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Sample records for cell signaling transcriptional

  1. Control of microRNA biogenesis and transcription by cell signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    A limited set of cell-cell signaling pathways presides over the vast majority of animal developmental events. The typical raison d'etre for signal transduction is to control the transcription of protein-coding genes. However, with the recent appreciation of microRNAs, growing attention has been paid towards understanding how signaling pathways intertwine with microRNA-mediated regulation. This review highlights recent studies that uncover unexpected modes of microRNA regulation by cell signal...

  2. Dissecting the interface between signaling and transcriptional regulation in human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kai; Alvarez, Mariano J; Bisikirska, Brygida C

    2009-01-01

    A key role of signal transduction pathways is to control transcriptional programs in the nucleus as a function of signals received by the cell via complex post-translational modification cascades. This determines cell-context specific responses to environmental stimuli. Given the difficulty...... of quantitating protein concentration and post-translational modifications, signaling pathway studies are still for the most part conducted one interaction at the time. Thus, genome-wide, cell-context specific dissection of signaling pathways is still an open challenge in molecular systems biology....... In this manuscript we extend the MINDy algorithm for the identification of posttranslational modulators of transcription factor activity, to produce a first genome-wide map of the interface between signaling and transcriptional regulatory programs in human B cells. We show that the serine-threonine kinase STK38...

  3. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pérez-Vera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates.

  4. Pavement cells: a model system for non-transcriptional auxin signalling and crosstalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jisheng; Wang, Fei; Zheng, Shiqin; Xu, Tongda; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2015-08-01

    Auxin (indole acetic acid) is a multifunctional phytohormone controlling various developmental patterns, morphogenetic processes, and growth behaviours in plants. The transcription-based pathway activated by the nuclear TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESISTANT 1/auxin-related F-box auxin receptors is well established, but the long-sought molecular mechanisms of non-transcriptional auxin signalling remained enigmatic until very recently. Along with the establishment of the Arabidopsis leaf epidermal pavement cell (PC) as an exciting and amenable model system in the past decade, we began to gain insight into non-transcriptional auxin signalling. The puzzle-piece shape of PCs forms from intercalated or interdigitated cell growth, requiring local intra- and inter-cellular coordination of lobe and indent formation. Precise coordination of this interdigitated pattern requires auxin and an extracellular auxin sensing system that activates plasma membrane-associated Rho GTPases from plants and subsequent downstream events regulating cytoskeletal reorganization and PIN polarization. Apart from auxin, mechanical stress and cytokinin have been shown to affect PC interdigitation, possibly by interacting with auxin signals. This review focuses upon signalling mechanisms for cell polarity formation in PCs, with an emphasis on non-transcriptional auxin signalling in polarized cell expansion and pattern formation and how different auxin pathways interplay with each other and with other signals.

  5. BMP signaling orchestrates a transcriptional network to control the fate of mesenchymal stem cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jifan; Jing, Junjun; Li, Jingyuan; Zhao, Hu; Punj, Vasu; Zhang, Tingwei; Xu, Jian; Chai, Yang

    2017-07-15

    Signaling pathways are used reiteratively in different developmental processes yet produce distinct cell fates through specific downstream transcription factors. In this study, we used tooth root development as a model with which to investigate how the BMP signaling pathway regulates transcriptional complexes to direct the fate determination of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We first identified the MSC population supporting mouse molar root growth as Gli1(+) cells. Using a Gli1-driven Cre-mediated recombination system, our results provide the first in vivo evidence that BMP signaling activity is required for the odontogenic differentiation of MSCs. Specifically, we identified the transcription factors Pax9, Klf4, Satb2 and Lhx8 as being downstream of BMP signaling and expressed in a spatially restricted pattern that is potentially involved in determining distinct cellular identities within the dental mesenchyme. Finally, we found that overactivation of one key transcription factor, Klf4, which is associated with the odontogenic region, promotes odontogenic differentiation of MSCs. Collectively, our results demonstrate the functional significance of BMP signaling in regulating MSC fate during root development and shed light on how BMP signaling can achieve functional specificity in regulating diverse organ development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou, E-mail: xinzhou_yang@hotmail.com

    2014-12-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals.

  7. Mammalian Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition as transcriptional mediators of Hippo signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Mitsunori; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Regulation of organ size is important for development and tissue homeostasis. In Drosophila, Hippo signaling controls organ size by regulating the activity of a TEAD transcription factor, Scalloped, through modulation of its co-activator protein Yki. Here, we show that mouse Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation by mediating Hippo signaling. In NIH3T3 cells, cell density and Hippo signaling regulated the activity of endogenous Tead proteins by modulating nuclear localization of a Yki homolog, Yap1, and the resulting change in Tead activity altered cell proliferation. Tead2-VP16 mimicked Yap1 overexpression, including increased cell proliferation, reduced cell death, promotion of EMT, lack of cell contact inhibition and promotion of tumor formation. Growth-promoting activities of various Yap1 mutants correlated with their Tead-co-activator activities. Tead2-VP16 and Yap1 regulated largely overlapping sets of genes. However, only a few of the Tead/Yap1-regulated genes in NIH3T3 cells were affected in Tead1(-/-);Tead2(-/-) or Yap1(-/-) embryos. Most of the previously identified Yap1-regulated genes were not affected in NIH3T3 cells or mutant mice. In embryos, levels of nuclear Yap1 and Tead1 varied depending on cell type. Strong nuclear accumulation of Yap1 and Tead1 were seen in myocardium, correlating with requirements of Tead1 for proliferation. However, their distribution did not always correlate with proliferation. Taken together, mammalian Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition as a transcriptional mediator of Hippo signaling, but the mechanisms by which Tead/Yap1 regulate cell proliferation differ depending on the cell type, and Tead, Yap1 and Hippo signaling may play multiple roles in mouse embryos.

  8. Lipoic acid: energy metabolism and redox regulation of transcription and cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Lester; Cadenas, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The role of R-α-lipoic acid as a cofactor (lipoyllysine) in mitochondrial energy metabolism is well established. Lipoic acid non-covalently bound and exogenously administered to cells or supplemented in the diet is a potent modulator of the cell's redox status. The diversity of beneficial effects of lipoic acid in a variety of tissues can be mechanistically viewed in terms of thiol/disulfide exchange reactions that modulate the environment's redox and energy status. Lipoic acid-driven thiol/disulfide exchange reactions appear critical for the modulation of proteins involved in cell signaling and transcription factors. This review emphasizes the effects of lipoic acid on PI3K and AMPK signaling and related transcriptional pathways that are integrated by PGC-1α, a critical regulator of energy homoestasis. The effects of lipoic acid on the neuronal energy-redox axis are largely reviewed in terms of their outcomes for aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Partial promoter substitutions generating transcriptional sentinels of diverse signaling pathways in embryonic stem cells and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serup, Palle; Gustavsen, Carsten; Klein, Tino; Potter, Leah A.; Lin, Robert; Mullapudi, Nandita; Wandzioch, Ewa; Hines, Angela; Davis, Ashley; Bruun, Christine; Engberg, Nina; Petersen, Dorthe R.; Peterslund, Janny M. L.; MacDonald, Raymond J.; Grapin-Botton, Anne; Magnuson, Mark A.; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Extracellular signals in development, physiology, homeostasis and disease often act by regulating transcription. Herein we describe a general method and specific resources for determining where and when such signaling occurs in live animals and for systematically comparing the timing and extent of different signals in different cellular contexts. We used recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) to test the effect of successively deleting conserved genomic regions of the ubiquitously active Rosa26 promoter and substituting the deleted regions for regulatory sequences that respond to diverse extracellular signals. We thereby created an allelic series of embryonic stem cells and mice, each containing a signal-responsive sentinel with different fluorescent reporters that respond with sensitivity and specificity to retinoic acids, bone morphogenic proteins, activin A, Wnts or Notch, and that can be adapted to any pathway that acts via DNA elements. PMID:22888097

  10. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Rajesh K.; Murray, Thomas V. A.; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R.; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2016-01-01

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production. PMID:26620565

  11. A regulatory framework for shoot stem cell control integrating metabolic, transcriptional, and phytohormone signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Christoph; Gaillochet, Christophe; Medzihradszky, Anna; Busch, Wolfgang; Daum, Gabor; Krebs, Melanie; Kehle, Andreas; Lohmann, Jan U

    2014-02-24

    Plants continuously maintain pluripotent stem cells embedded in specialized tissues called meristems, which drive long-term growth and organogenesis. Stem cell fate in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) is controlled by the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) expressed in the niche adjacent to the stem cells. Here, we demonstrate that the bHLH transcription factor HECATE1 (HEC1) is a target of WUS and that it contributes to SAM function by promoting stem cell proliferation, while antagonizing niche cell activity. HEC1 represses the stem cell regulators WUS and CLAVATA3 (CLV3) and, like WUS, controls genes with functions in metabolism and hormone signaling. Among the targets shared by HEC1 and WUS are phytohormone response regulators, which we show to act as mobile signals in a universal feedback system. Thus, our work sheds light on the mechanisms guiding meristem function and suggests that the underlying regulatory system is far more complex than previously anticipated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SOX9: a stem cell transcriptional regulator of secreted niche signaling factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadaja, Meelis; Keyes, Brice E; Lin, Mingyan; Pasolli, H Amalia; Genander, Maria; Polak, Lisa; Stokes, Nicole; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-02-15

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cyclical periods of growth, which are fueled by stem cells (SCs) at the base of the resting follicle. HF-SC formation occurs during HF development and requires transcription factor SOX9. Whether and how SOX9 functions in HF-SC maintenance remain unknown. By conditionally targeting Sox9 in adult HF-SCs, we show that SOX9 is essential for maintaining them. SOX9-deficient HF-SCs still transition from quiescence to proliferation and launch the subsequent hair cycle. However, once activated, bulge HF-SCs begin to differentiate into epidermal cells, which naturally lack SOX9. In addition, as HF-SC numbers dwindle, outer root sheath production is not sustained, and HF downgrowth arrests prematurely. Probing the mechanism, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify SOX9-dependent transcriptional changes and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify SOX9-bound genes in HF-SCs. Intriguingly, a large cohort of SOX9-sensitive targets encode extracellular factors, most notably enhancers of Activin/pSMAD2 signaling. Moreover, compromising Activin signaling recapitulates SOX9-dependent defects, and Activin partially rescues them. Overall, our findings reveal roles for SOX9 in regulating adult HF-SC maintenance and suppressing epidermal differentiation in the niche. In addition, our studies expose a role for SCs in coordinating their own behavior in part through non-cell-autonomous signaling within the niche.

  13. Regulation of Arabidopsis Early Anther Development by Putative Cell-Cell Signaling Molecules and Transcriptional Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jin Sun; Carey LH Hord; Chang-Bin Chen; Hong Ma

    2007-01-01

    Anther development in flowering plants involves the formation of several cell types, including the tapetal and pollen mother cells. The use of genetic and molecular tools has led to the identification and characterization of genes that are critical for normal cell division and differentiation in Arabidopsis early anther development. We review here several recent studies on these genes, including the demonstration that the putative receptor protein kinases BAM1 and BAM2 together play essential roles in the control of early cell division and differentiation. In addition, we discuss the hypothesis that BAM1/2 may form a positive-negative feedback regulatory loop with a previously identified key regulator, SPOROCYTELESS (also called NOZZLE),to control the balance between sporogenous and somatic cell types in the anther. Furthermore, we summarize the isolation and functional analysis of the DYSFUNCTIONAL TAPETUM1 (DYT1) gene in promoting proper tapetal cell differentiation. Our finding that DYT1 encodes a putative transcription factor of the bHLH family, as well as relevant expression analyses, strongly supports a model that DYT1 serves as a critical link between upstream factors and downstream target genes that are critical for normal tapetum development and function. These studies, together with other recently published works, indicate that cell-cell communication and transcriptional control are key processes essential for cell fate specification in anther development.

  14. Epigenetic Alterations Affecting Transcription Factors and Signaling Pathways in Stromal Cells of Endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotova, Iveta; Hsu, Emily; Do, Catherine; Gaba, Aulona; Sczabolcs, Matthias; Dekan, Sabine; Kenner, Lukas; Wenzl, Rene; Tycko, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by growth of endometrial-like tissue outside the uterine cavity. Since its pathogenesis may involve epigenetic changes, we used Illumina 450K Methylation Beadchips to profile CpG methylation in endometriosis stromal cells compared to stromal cells from normal endometrium. We validated and extended the Beadchip data using bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq), and analyzed differential methylation (DM) at the CpG-level and by an element-level classification for groups of CpGs in chromatin domains. Genes found to have DM included examples encoding transporters (SLC22A23), signaling components (BDNF, DAPK1, ROR1, and WNT5A) and transcription factors (GATA family, HAND2, HOXA cluster, NR5A1, OSR2, TBX3). Intriguingly, among the TF genes with DM we also found JAZF1, a proto-oncogene affected by chromosomal translocations in endometrial stromal tumors. Using RNA-Seq we identified a subset of the DM genes showing differential expression (DE), with the likelihood of DE increasing with the extent of the DM and its location in enhancer elements. Supporting functional relevance, treatment of stromal cells with the hypomethylating drug 5aza-dC led to activation of DAPK1 and SLC22A23 and repression of HAND2, JAZF1, OSR2, and ROR1 mRNA expression. We found that global 5hmC is decreased in endometriotic versus normal epithelial but not stroma cells, and for JAZF1 and BDNF examined by oxidative bis-seq, found that when 5hmC is detected, patterns of 5hmC paralleled those of 5mC. Together with prior studies, these results define a consistent epigenetic signature in endometriosis stromal cells and nominate specific transcriptional and signaling pathways as therapeutic targets. PMID:28125717

  15. Simvastatin impairs growth hormone-activated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT signaling pathway in UMR-106 osteosarcoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Claudia Sandoval-Usme

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that statins reduce cell viability and induce apoptosis in various types of cancer cells. The molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood. The JAK/STAT pathway plays an important role in the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis in many tissues, and its deregulation is believed to be involved in tumorigenesis and cancer. The physiological activation of STAT proteins by GH is rapid but transient in nature and its inactivation is regulated mainly by the expression of SOCS proteins. UMR-106 osteosarcoma cells express a GH-responsive JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway, providing an experimental model to study the influence of statins on this system. In this study we investigated the actions of simvastatin on cell proliferation, migration, and invasion on UMR-106 cells and examined whether alterations in GH-stimulated JAK/STAT/SOCS signaling may be observed. Results showed that treatment of osteosarcoma cells with simvastatin at 3 to 10 µM doses decreases cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in a time- and dose-dependent manner. At the molecular level, although the mechanisms used by simvastatin are not entirely clear, the effect of the statin on the reduction of JAK2 and STAT5 phosphorylation levels may partially explain the decrease in the GH-stimulated STAT5 transcriptional activity. This effect correlated with a time- and dose-dependent increase of SOCS-3 expression levels in cells treated with simvastatin, a regulatory role that has not been previously described. Furthermore, the finding that simvastatin is capable of inducing SOCS-3 and CIS genes expression shows the potential of the JAK/STAT pathway as a therapeutic target, reinforcing the efficacy of simvastatin as chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of osteosarcoma.

  16. Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Activated by PI3K and ERK Transduced Growth Signals in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter M. Haverty; Zhi-Ping Weng; Ulla Hansen

    2005-01-01

    Determining how cells regulate their transcriptional response to extracellular signals is key to the understanding of complex eukaryotic systems. This study was initiated with the goals of furthering the study of mammalian transcriptional regulation and analyzing the relative benefits of related computational methodologies. One dataset available for such an analysis involved gene expression profiling of the early growth factor response to platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)in a human glioblastoma cell line; this study differentiated genes whose expression was regulated by signaling through the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) versus the extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathways. We have compared the inferred transcription factors from this previous study with additional predictions of regulatory transcription factors using two alternative promoter sequence analysis techniques. This comparative analysis, in which the algorithms predict overlapping,although not identical, sets of factors, argues for meticulous benchmarking of promoter sequence analysis methods to determine the positive and negative attributes that contribute to their varying results. Finally, we inferred transcriptional regulatory networks deriving from various signaling pathways using the CARRIE program suite. These networks not only included previously described transcriptional features of the response to growth signals, but also predicted new regulatory features for the propagation and modulation of the growth signal.

  17. Activin/Nodal signaling controls divergent transcriptional networks in human embryonic stem cells and in endoderm progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephanie; Teo, Adrian; Pauklin, Siim; Hannan, Nicholas; Cho, Candy H-H; Lim, Bing; Vardy, Leah; Dunn, N Ray; Trotter, Matthew; Pedersen, Roger; Vallier, Ludovic

    2011-08-01

    Activin/Nodal signaling is necessary to maintain pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and to induce their differentiation toward endoderm. However, the mechanisms by which Activin/Nodal signaling achieves these opposite functions remain unclear. To unravel these mechanisms, we examined the transcriptional network controlled in hESCs by Smad2 and Smad3, which represent the direct effectors of Activin/Nodal signaling. These analyses reveal that Smad2/3 participate in the control of the core transcriptional network characterizing pluripotency, which includes Oct-4, Nanog, FoxD3, Dppa4, Tert, Myc, and UTF1. In addition, similar experiments performed on endoderm cells confirm that a broad part of the transcriptional network directing differentiation is downstream of Smad2/3. Therefore, Activin/Nodal signaling appears to control divergent transcriptional networks in hESCs and in endoderm. Importantly, we observed an overlap between the transcriptional network downstream of Nanog and Smad2/3 in hESCs; whereas, functional studies showed that both factors cooperate to control the expression of pluripotency genes. Therefore, the effect of Activin/Nodal signaling on pluripotency and differentiation could be dictated by tissue specific Smad2/3 partners such as Nanog, explaining the mechanisms by which signaling pathways can orchestrate divergent cell fate decisions.

  18. Cross-Talk between CLL Cells and Bone Marrow Endothelial Cells: Role of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badoux, Xavier; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Harris, David; Li, Ping; Liu, Zhiming; Burger, Jan; O’Brien, Susan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J.; Estrov, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) bone marrow is characterized by increased angiogenesis. However, the molecular mediators of neovascularization and the biological significance of increased endothelial cell proliferation in CLL require further investigation. Because signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 is constitutively activated in CLL we studied the role of STAT3 in modulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and the effect of vascular endothelial cells on CLL cells. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) we found that anti-STAT3 antibodies immunoprecipitated DNA of STAT3, VEGF and other STAT3-regulated genes. In addition, STAT3-short interfering RNA significantly reduced mRNA levels of VEGF in CLL cells suggesting that STAT3 induces VEGF expression in CLL. Remarkably, bone marrow CLL cells expressed high levels of VEGF and high VEGF levels were detected in the plasma of patients with untreated CLL and correlated with white blood cell count. CLL bone marrow biopsies revealed increased microvascular density and attachment of CLL cells to endothelial cells. Co-culture of CLL and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cells showed a similar attachment. Furthermore, co-culture studies with HUVEC showed that HUVEC protected CLL cells from spontaneous apoptosis by direct cell-to-cell contact as assessed by flow cytometry using Annexin V. Our data suggest that constitutively activated STAT3 induces VEGF production by CLL cells and CLL cells derive a survival advantage from endothelial cells via cell-to cell contact. PMID:21733558

  19. Three WRKY transcription factors additively repress abscisic acid and gibberellin signaling in aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gu, Lingkun; Ringler, Patricia; Smith, Stanley; Rushton, Paul J; Shen, Qingxi J

    2015-07-01

    Members of the WRKY transcription factor superfamily are essential for the regulation of many plant pathways. Functional redundancy due to duplications of WRKY transcription factors, however, complicates genetic analysis by allowing single-mutant plants to maintain wild-type phenotypes. Our analyses indicate that three group I WRKY genes, OsWRKY24, -53, and -70, act in a partially redundant manner. All three showed characteristics of typical WRKY transcription factors: each localized to nuclei and yeast one-hybrid assays indicated that they all bind to W-boxes, including those present in their own promoters. Quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicated that the expression levels of the three WRKY genes varied in the different tissues tested. Particle bombardment-mediated transient expression analyses indicated that all three genes repress the GA and ABA signaling in a dosage-dependent manner. Combination of all three WRKY genes showed additive antagonism of ABA and GA signaling. These results suggest that these WRKY proteins function as negative transcriptional regulators of GA and ABA signaling. However, different combinations of these WRKY genes can lead to varied strengths in suppression of their targets.

  20. UVB-induced cell death signaling is associated with G1-S progression and transcription inhibition in primary human fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Grohmann Ortolan

    Full Text Available DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV radiation can be removed by nucleotide excision repair through two sub-pathways, one general (GGR and the other specific for transcribed DNA (TCR, and the processing of unrepaired lesions trigger signals that may lead to cell death. These signals involve the tumor suppressor p53 protein, a central regulator of cell responses to DNA damage, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, that forms a feedback regulatory loop with p53. The involvement of cell cycle and transcription on the signaling to apoptosis was investigated in UVB-irradiated synchronized, DNA repair proficient, CS-B (TCR-deficient and XP-C (GGR-deficient primary human fibroblasts. Cells were irradiated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with two doses with equivalent levels of apoptosis (low and high, defined for each cell line. In the three cell lines, the low doses of UVB caused only a transient delay in progression to the S phase, whereas the high doses induced permanent cell cycle arrest. However, while accumulation of Mdm2 correlated well with the recovery from transcription inhibition at the low doses for normal and CS-B fibroblasts, for XP-C cells this protein was shown to be accumulated even at UVB doses that induced high levels of apoptosis. Thus, UVB-induced accumulation of Mdm2 is critical for counteracting p53 activation and apoptosis avoidance, but its effect is limited due to transcription inhibition. However, in the case of XP-C cells, an excess of unrepaired DNA damage would be sufficient to block S phase progression, which would signal to apoptosis, independent of Mdm2 accumulation. The data clearly discriminate DNA damage signals that lead to cell death, depending on the presence of UVB-induced DNA damage in replicating or transcribing regions.

  1. Resolving Early Signaling Events in T-Cell Activation Leading to IL-2 and FOXP3 Transcription

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    Jeffrey P. Perley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Signal intensity and feedback regulation are known to be major factors in the signaling events stemming from the T-cell receptor (TCR and its various coreceptors, but the exact nature of these relationships remains in question. We present a mathematical model of the complex signaling network involved in T-cell activation with cross-talk between the Erk, calcium, PKC and mTOR signaling pathways. The model parameters are adjusted to fit new and published data on TCR trafficking, Zap70, calcium, Erk and Isignaling. The regulation of the early signaling events by phosphatases, CD45 and SHP1, and the TCR dynamics are critical to determining the behavior of the model. Additional model corroboration is provided through quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data collected under different stimulating and knockout conditions. The resulting model is analyzed to investigate how signal intensity and feedback regulation affect TCR- and coreceptor-mediated signal transduction and their downstream transcriptional profiles to predict the outcome for a variety of stimulatory and knockdown experiments. Analysis of the model shows that: (1 SHP1 negative feedback is necessary for preventing hyperactivity in TCR signaling; (2 CD45 is required for TCR signaling, but also partially suppresses it at high expression levels; and (3 elevated FOXP3 and reduced IL-2 signaling, an expression profile often associated with T regulatory cells (Tregs, is observed when the system is subjected to weak TCR and CD28 costimulation or a severe reduction in CD45 activity.

  2. Partial promoter substitutions generating transcriptional sentinels of diverse signaling pathways in embryonic stem cells and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Palle; Gustavsen, Carsten; Klein, Tino

    2012-01-01

    extracellular signals. We thereby created an allelic series of embryonic stem cells and mice, each containing a signal-responsive sentinel with different fluorescent reporters that respond with sensitivity and specificity to retinoic acids, bone morphogenic proteins, activin A, Wnts or Notch, and that can...

  3. Partial promoter substitutions generating transcriptional sentinels of diverse signaling pathways in embryonic stem cells and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Palle; Gustavsen, Carsten; Klein, Tino;

    2012-01-01

    extracellular signals. We thereby created an allelic series of embryonic stem cells and mice, each containing a signal-responsive sentinel with different fluorescent reporters that respond with sensitivity and specificity to retinoic acids, bone morphogenic proteins, activin A, Wnts or Notch, and that can...

  4. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation is associated with bladder cancer cell growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fu-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 signaling pathway plays an important role in several human cancers. Activation of Stat3 is dependent on the phosphorylation at the tyrosine residue 705 by upstream kinases and subsequent nuclear translocation after dimerization. It remains unclear whether oncogenic Stat3 signaling pathway is involved in the oncogenesis of bladder cancer. Results We found that elevated Stat3 phosphorylation in 19 of 100 (19% bladder cancer tissues as well as bladder cancer cell lines, WH, UMUC-3 and 253J. To explore whether Stat3 activation is associated with cell growth and survival of bladder cancer, we targeted the Stat3 signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells using an adenovirus-mediated dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F and a small molecule compound, STA-21. Both prohibited cell growth and induction of apoptosis in these bladder cancer cell lines but not in normal bladder smooth muscle cell (BdSMC. The survival inhibition might be mediated through apoptotic caspase 3, 8 and 9 pathways. Moreover, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin and a cell cycle regulating gene (cyclin D1 was associated with the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Conclusion These results indicated that activation of Stat3 is crucial for bladder cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, interference of Stat3 signaling pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic approach for bladder cancer.

  5. PLK1 Signaling in Breast Cancer Cells Cooperates with Estrogen Receptor-Dependent Gene Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wierer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1 is a key regulator of cell division and is overexpressed in many types of human cancers. Compared to its well-characterized role in mitosis, little is known about PLK1 functions in interphase. Here, we report that PLK1 mediates estrogen receptor (ER-regulated gene transcription in human breast cancer cells. PLK1 interacts with ER and is recruited to ER cis-elements on chromatin. PLK1-coactivated genes included classical ER target genes such as Ps2, Wisp2, and Serpina3 and were enriched in developmental and tumor-suppressive functions. Performing large-scale phosphoproteomics of estradiol-treated MCF7 cells in the presence or absence of the specific PLK1 inhibitor BI2536, we identified several PLK1 end targets involved in transcription, including the histone H3K4 trimethylase MLL2, the function of which on ER target genes was impaired by PLK1 inhibition. Our results propose a mechanism for the tumor-suppressive role of PLK1 in mammals as an interphase transcriptional regulator.

  6. PlexinD1 Is a Novel Transcriptional Target and Effector of Notch Signaling in Cancer Cells

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    Rehman, Michael; Capparuccia, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The secreted semaphorin Sema3E controls cell migration and invasiveness in cancer cells. Sema3E-receptor, PlexinD1, is frequently upregulated in melanoma, breast, colon, ovarian and prostate cancers; however, the mechanisms underlying PlexinD1 upregulation and the downstream events elicited in tumor cells are still unclear. Here we show that the canonical RBPjk-dependent Notch signaling cascade controls PlexinD1 expression in primary endothelial and cancer cells. Transcriptional activation was studied by quantitative PCR and promoter activity reporter assays. We found that Notch ligands and constitutively activated intracellular forms of Notch receptors upregulated PlexinD1 expression; conversely RNAi-based knock-down, or pharmacological inhibition of Notch signaling by gamma-secretase inhibitors, downregulated PlexinD1 levels. Notably, both Notch1 and Notch3 expression positively correlates with PlexinD1 levels in prostate cancer, as well as in other tumor types. In prostate cancer cells, Sema3E-PlexinD1 axis was previously reported to regulate migration; however, implicated mechanisms were not elucidated. Here we show that in these cells PlexinD1 activity induces the expression of the transcription factor Slug, downregulates E-cadherin levels and enhances cell migration. Moreover, our mechanistic data identify PlexinD1 as a pivotal mediator of this signaling axis downstream of Notch in prostate cancer cells. In fact, on one hand, PlexinD1 is required to mediate cell migration and E-cadherin regulation elicited by Notch. On the other hand, PlexinD1 upregulation is sufficient to induce prostate cancer cell migration and metastatic potential in mice, leading to functional rescue in the absence of Notch. In sum, our work identifies PlexinD1 as a novel transcriptional target induced by Notch signaling, and reveals its role promoting prostate cancer cell migration and downregulating E-cadherin levels in Slug-dependent manner. Collectively, these findings suggest that

  7. In tobacco BY-2 cells xyloglucan oligosaccharides alter the expression of genes involved in cell wall metabolism, signalling, stress responses, cell division and transcriptional control.

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    González-Pérez, Lien; Perrotta, Lara; Acosta, Alexis; Orellana, Esteban; Spadafora, Natasha; Bruno, Leonardo; Bitonti, Beatrice M; Albani, Diego; Cabrera, Juan Carlos; Francis, Dennis; Rogers, Hilary J

    2014-10-01

    Xyloglucan oligosaccharides (XGOs) are breakdown products of XGs, the most abundant hemicelluloses of the primary cell walls of non-Poalean species. Treatment of cell cultures or whole plants with XGOs results in accelerated cell elongation and cell division, changes in primary root growth, and a stimulation of defence responses. They may therefore act as signalling molecules regulating plant growth and development. Previous work suggests an interaction with auxins and effects on cell wall loosening, however their mode of action is not fully understood. The effect of an XGO extract from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) on global gene expression was therefore investigated in tobacco BY-2 cells using microarrays. Over 500 genes were differentially regulated with similar numbers and functional classes of genes up- and down-regulated, indicating a complex interaction with the cellular machinery. Up-regulation of a putative XG endotransglycosylase/hydrolase-related (XTH) gene supports the mechanism of XGO action through cell wall loosening. Differential expression of defence-related genes supports a role for XGOs as elicitors. Changes in the expression of genes related to mitotic control and differentiation also support previous work showing that XGOs are mitotic inducers. XGOs also affected expression of several receptor-like kinase genes and transcription factors. Hence, XGOs have significant effects on expression of genes related to cell wall metabolism, signalling, stress responses, cell division and transcriptional control.

  8. Altered LKB1/CREB-regulated transcription co-activator (CRTC) signaling axis promotes esophageal cancer cell migration and invasion.

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    Gu, Y; Lin, S; Li, J-L; Nakagawa, H; Chen, Z; Jin, B; Tian, L; Ucar, D A; Shen, H; Lu, J; Hochwald, S N; Kaye, F J; Wu, L

    2012-01-26

    LKB1 is a tumor susceptibility gene for the Peutz-Jeghers cancer syndrome and is a target for mutational inactivation in sporadic human malignancies. LKB1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase that has critical roles in cell growth, polarity and metabolism. A novel and important function of LKB1 is its ability to regulate the phosphorylation of CREB-regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) whose aberrant activation is linked with oncogenic activities. However, the roles and mechanisms of LKB1 and CRTC in the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer have not been previously investigated. In this study, we observed altered LKB1-CRTC signaling in a subset of human esophageal cancer cell lines and patient samples. LKB1 negatively regulates esophageal cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro. Mechanistically, we determined that CRTC signaling becomes activated because of LKB1 loss, which results in the transcriptional activation of specific downstream targets including LYPD3, a critical mediator for LKB1 loss-of-function. Our data indicate that de-regulated LKB1-CRTC signaling might represent a crucial mechanism for esophageal cancer progression.

  9. The Drosophila Forkhead transcription factor FOXO mediates the reduction in cell number associated with reduced insulin signaling

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    Végh Mátyás

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Forkhead transcription factors belonging to the FOXO subfamily are negatively regulated by protein kinase B (PKB in response to signaling by insulin and insulin-like growth factor in Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals. In Drosophila, the insulin-signaling pathway regulates the size of cells, organs, and the entire body in response to nutrient availability, by controlling both cell size and cell number. In this study, we present a genetic characterization of dFOXO, the only Drosophila FOXO ortholog. Results Ectopic expression of dFOXO and human FOXO3a induced organ-size reduction and cell death in a manner dependent on phosphoinositide (PI 3-kinase and nutrient levels. Surprisingly, flies homozygous for dFOXO null alleles are viable and of normal size. They are, however, more sensitive to oxidative stress. Furthermore, dFOXO function is required for growth inhibition associated with reduced insulin signaling. Loss of dFOXO suppresses the reduction in cell number but not the cell-size reduction elicited by mutations in the insulin-signaling pathway. By microarray analysis and subsequent genetic validation, we have identified d4E-BP, which encodes a translation inhibitor, as a relevant dFOXO target gene. Conclusion Our results show that dFOXO is a crucial mediator of insulin signaling in Drosophila, mediating the reduction in cell number in insulin-signaling mutants. We propose that in response to cellular stresses, such as nutrient deprivation or increased levels of reactive oxygen species, dFOXO is activated and inhibits growth through the action of target genes such as d4E-BP.

  10. Directed pancreatic acinar differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells via embryonic signalling molecules and exocrine transcription factors.

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    Fabien Delaspre

    Full Text Available Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESC are a promising cellular system for generating an unlimited source of tissue for the treatment of chronic diseases and valuable in vitro differentiation models for drug testing. Our aim was to direct differentiation of mouse ESC into pancreatic acinar cells, which play key roles in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. To that end, ESC were first differentiated as embryoid bodies and sequentially incubated with activin A, inhibitors of Sonic hedgehog (Shh and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP pathways, fibroblast growth factors (FGF and retinoic acid (RA in order to achieve a stepwise increase in the expression of mRNA transcripts encoding for endodermal and pancreatic progenitor markers. Subsequent plating in Matrigel® and concomitant modulation of FGF, glucocorticoid, and folllistatin signalling pathways involved in exocrine differentiation resulted in a significant increase of mRNAs encoding secretory enzymes and in the number of cells co-expressing their protein products. Also, pancreatic endocrine marker expression was down-regulated and accompanied by a significant reduction in the number of hormone-expressing cells with a limited presence of hepatic marker expressing-cells. These findings suggest a selective activation of the acinar differentiation program. The newly differentiated cells were able to release α-amylase and this feature was greatly improved by lentiviral-mediated expression of Rbpjl and Ptf1a, two transcription factors involved in the maximal production of digestive enzymes. This study provides a novel method to produce functional pancreatic exocrine cells from ESC.

  11. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and 5 regulate system Xc- and redox balance in human breast cancer cells.

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    Linher-Melville, Katja; Haftchenary, Sina; Gunning, Patrick; Singh, Gurmit

    2015-07-01

    System Xc- is a cystine/glutamate antiporter that contributes to the maintenance of cellular redox balance. The human xCT (SLC7A11) gene encodes the functional subunit of system Xc-. Transcription factors regulating antioxidant defense mechanisms including system Xc- are of therapeutic interest, especially given that aggressive breast cancer cells exhibit increased system Xc- function. This investigation provides evidence that xCT expression is regulated by STAT3 and/or STAT5A, functionally affecting the antiporter in human breast cancer cells. Computationally analyzing two kilobase pairs of the xCT promoter/5' flanking region identified a distal gamma-activated site (GAS) motif, with truncations significantly increasing luciferase reporter activity. Similar transcriptional increases were obtained after treating cells transiently transfected with the full-length xCT promoter construct with STAT3/5 pharmacological inhibitors. Knock-down of STAT3 or STAT5A with siRNAs produced similar results. However, GAS site mutation significantly reduced xCT transcriptional activity, suggesting that STATs may interact with other transcription factors at more proximal promoter sites. STAT3 and STAT5A were bound to the xCT promoter in MDA-MB-231 cells, and binding was disrupted by pre-treatment with STAT inhibitors. Pharmacologically suppressing STAT3/5 activation significantly increased xCT mRNA and protein levels, as well as cystine uptake, glutamate release, and total levels of intracellular glutathione. Our data suggest that STAT proteins negatively regulate basal xCT expression. Blocking STAT3/5-mediated signaling induces an adaptive, compensatory mechanism to protect breast cancer cells from stress, including reactive oxygen species, by up-regulating xCT expression and the function of system Xc-. We propose that targeting system Xc- together with STAT3/5 inhibitors may heighten therapeutic anti-cancer effects.

  12. Transforming growth factor-beta inhibits aromatase gene transcription in human trophoblast cells via the Smad2 signaling pathway

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    Fu Guodong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta is known to exert multiple regulatory functions in the human placenta, including inhibition of estrodial production. We have previously reported that TGF-beta1 decreased aromatase mRNA levels in human trophoblast cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulatory effect of TGF-beta1 on aromatase expression. Methods To determine if TGF-beta regulates aromatase gene transcription, several reporter constructs containing different lengths of the placental specific promoter of the human aromatase gene were generated. JEG-3 cells were transiently transfected with a promoter construct and treated with or without TGF-beta1. The promoter activity was measured by luciferase assays. To examine the downstream signaling molecule mediating the effect of TGF-beta on aromatase transcription, cells were transiently transfected with dominant negative mutants of TGF-beta type II (TbetaRII and type I receptor (ALK5 receptors before TGF-beta treatment. Smad2 activation was assessed by measuring phophorylated Smad2 protein levels in cytosolic and nuclear fractions. Smad2 expression was silenced using a siRNA expression construct. Finally, aromatase mRNA half-life was determined by treating cells with actinomycin D together with TGF-beta1 and measuring aromatase mRNA levels at various time points after treatment. Results and Discussion TGF-beta1 inhibited the aromatase promoter activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Deletion analysis suggests that the TGF-β1 response element resides between -422 and -117 nucleotides upstream from the transcription start site where a Smad binding element was found. The inhibitory effect of TGF-beta1 was blocked by dominant negative mutants of TbetaRII and ALK5. TGF-beta1 treatment induced Smad2 phosphorylation and translocation into the nucleus. On the other hand, knockdown of Smad2 expression reversed the

  13. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

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    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  14. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

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    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  15. Dact2 represses PITX2 transcriptional activation and cell proliferation through Wnt/beta-catenin signaling during odontogenesis.

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    Xiao Li

    Full Text Available Dact proteins belong to the Dapper/Frodo protein family and function as cytoplasmic attenuators in Wnt and TGFβ signaling. Previous studies show that Dact1 is a potent Wnt signaling inhibitor by promoting degradation of β-catenin. We report a new mechanism for Dact2 function as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by interacting with PITX2. PITX2 is a downstream transcription factor in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and PITX2 synergizes with Lef-1 to activate downstream genes. Immunohistochemistry verified the expression of Dact2 in the tooth epithelium, which correlated with Pitx2 epithelial expression. Dact2 loss of function and PITX2 gain of function studies reveal a feedback mechanism for controlling Dact2 expression. Pitx2 endogenously activates Dact2 expression and Dact2 feeds back to repress Pitx2 transcriptional activity. A Topflash reporter system was employed showing PITX2 activation of Wnt signaling, which is attenuated by Dact2. Transient transfections demonstrate the inhibitory effect of Dact2 on critical dental epithelial differentiation factors during tooth development. Dact2 significantly inhibits PITX2 activation of the Dlx2 and amelogenin promoters. Multiple lines of evidence conclude the inhibition is achieved by the physical interaction between Dact2 and Pitx2 proteins. The loss of function of Dact2 also reveals increased cell proliferation due to up-regulated Wnt downstream genes, cyclinD1 and cyclinD2. In summary, we have identified a novel role for Dact2 as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt pathway in embryonic tooth development through its regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation.

  16. Dact2 represses PITX2 transcriptional activation and cell proliferation through Wnt/beta-catenin signaling during odontogenesis.

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    Li, Xiao; Florez, Sergio; Wang, Jianbo; Cao, Huojun; Amendt, Brad A

    2013-01-01

    Dact proteins belong to the Dapper/Frodo protein family and function as cytoplasmic attenuators in Wnt and TGFβ signaling. Previous studies show that Dact1 is a potent Wnt signaling inhibitor by promoting degradation of β-catenin. We report a new mechanism for Dact2 function as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by interacting with PITX2. PITX2 is a downstream transcription factor in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and PITX2 synergizes with Lef-1 to activate downstream genes. Immunohistochemistry verified the expression of Dact2 in the tooth epithelium, which correlated with Pitx2 epithelial expression. Dact2 loss of function and PITX2 gain of function studies reveal a feedback mechanism for controlling Dact2 expression. Pitx2 endogenously activates Dact2 expression and Dact2 feeds back to repress Pitx2 transcriptional activity. A Topflash reporter system was employed showing PITX2 activation of Wnt signaling, which is attenuated by Dact2. Transient transfections demonstrate the inhibitory effect of Dact2 on critical dental epithelial differentiation factors during tooth development. Dact2 significantly inhibits PITX2 activation of the Dlx2 and amelogenin promoters. Multiple lines of evidence conclude the inhibition is achieved by the physical interaction between Dact2 and Pitx2 proteins. The loss of function of Dact2 also reveals increased cell proliferation due to up-regulated Wnt downstream genes, cyclinD1 and cyclinD2. In summary, we have identified a novel role for Dact2 as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt pathway in embryonic tooth development through its regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation.

  17. SIRT1 Represses Estrogen-signaling, Ligand-Independent ERα-mediated Transcription, and Cell Proliferation in Estrogen-Responsive Breast Cells

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    Moore, Robert L.; Faller, Douglas V.

    2013-01-01

    In prostate and breast cancer, the androgen and estrogen receptors mediate induction of androgen- and estrogen-responsive genes respectively, and stimulate cell proliferation in response to the binding of their cognate steroid hormones. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent class III histone deacetylase (HDAC) that has been linked to gene silencing, control of the cell cycle, apoptosis and energy homeostasis. In prostate cancer, SIRT1 is required for androgen-antagonist-mediated transcriptional repression and growth suppression of prostate cancer cells. Whether SIRT1 plays a similar role in the actions of estrogen or antagonists had not been determined. We report here that SIRT1 represses the transcriptional and proliferative response of breast cancer cells to estrogens, and this repression is estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα)-dependent. Inhibition of SIRT1 activity results in the phosphorylation of ERα in an AKT-dependent manner, and this activation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity. Phosphorylated ERα subsequently accumulates in the nucleus, where ERα binds DNA ER-response elements and activates transcription of estrogen-responsive genes. This ER-dependent transcriptional activation augments estrogen-induced signaling, but also activates ER-signaling in the absence of estrogen, thus defining a novel and unexpected mechanism of ligand-independent ERα-mediated activation and target gene transcription. Like ligand-dependent activation of ERα, SIRT1 inhibition-mediated ERα activation in the absence of estrogen also results in breast cancer cell proliferation. Together, these data demonstrate that SIRT1 regulates the most important cell signaling pathway for the growth of breast cancer cells, both in the presence and the absence of estrogen. PMID:23169992

  18. Quercetin induces caspase-dependent extrinsic apoptosis through inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling in HER2-overexpressing BT-474 breast cancer cells.

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    Seo, Hye-Sook; Ku, Jin Mo; Choi, Han-Seok; Choi, Youn Kyung; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Kim, Minsoo; Kim, Ilhwan; Na, Chang Hyeok; Hur, Hansol; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-07-01

    Flavonoids are assumed to exert beneficial effects in different types of cancers at high concentrations. Yet, their molecular mechanisms of action remain unknown. The present study aimed to examine the effect of quercetin on proliferation and apoptosis in HER2-expressing breast cancer cells. The anti-proliferative effects of quercetin were examined by proliferation, MTT and clonogenic survival assays. The effect of quercetin on expression of apoptotic molecules was determined by western blotting. Luciferase reporter assay was performed to measure signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcriptional activity. ELISA assay was performed to measure intracellular MMP-9 levels. Immunocytochemistry was performed to evaluate the nuclear STAT3 level. The results revealed that quercetin inhibited the proliferation of BT-474 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Quercetin also inhibited clonogenic survival (anchorage-dependent and -independent) of BT-474 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These growth inhibitions were accompanied with an increase in sub-G0/G1 apoptotic populations. Quercetin induced caspase-dependent extrinsic apoptosis upregulating the levels of cleaved caspase-8 and cleaved caspase-3, and inducing the cleavage of poly(ADP‑ribose) polymerase (PARP). In contrast, quercetin did not induce apoptosis via intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathway since this compound did not decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential and did not affect the levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX). Quercetin reduced the expression of phospho-JAK1 and phospho-STAT3 and decreased STAT3-dependent luciferase reporter gene activity in the BT-474 cells. Quercetin inhibited MMP-9 secretion and decreased the nuclear translocation of STAT3. Our study indicates that quercetin induces apoptosis at concentrations >20 µM through inhibition of STAT3 signaling and could serve as a useful compound to prevent or treat HER2

  19. Apigenin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis by inhibiting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling in HER2-overexpressing SKBR3 breast cancer cells.

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    Seo, Hye-Sook; Ku, Jin Mo; Choi, Han-Seok; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Go, Hoyeon; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2015-08-01

    Phytoestrogens have been demonstrated to inhibit tumor induction; however, their molecular mechanisms of action have remained elusive. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a phytoestrogen, apigenin, on proliferation and apoptosis of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-expressing breast cancer cell line SKBR3. Proliferation assay, MTT assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and ELISA assay were used in the present study. The results of the present study indicated that apigenin inhibited the proliferation of SKBR3 cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner. This inhibition of growth was accompanied by an increase in the sub-G0/G1 apoptotic population. Furthermore, apigenin enhanced the expression levels of cleaved caspase-8 and -3, and induced the cleavage of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase in SKBR3 cells, confirming that apigenin promotes apoptosis via a caspase-dependent pathway. Apigenin additionally reduced the expression of phosphorylated (p)-janus kinase 2 and p-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), inhibited CoCl2-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion and decreased the nuclear localization of STAT3. The STAT3 inhibitor S31-201 decreased the cellular proliferation rate and reduced the expression of p-STAT3 and VEGF. Therefore, these results suggested that apigenin induced apoptosis via the inhibition of STAT3 signaling in SKBR3 cells. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that apigenin may be a potentially useful compound for the prevention or treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer.

  20. Laricitrin ameliorates lung cancer-mediated dendritic cell suppression by inhibiting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3.

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    Chang, Wei-An; Hung, Jen-Yu; Jian, Shu-Fang; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Wu, Cheng-Ying; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2016-12-20

    Natural polyphenolic compounds of grapes and their seeds are thought to be therapeutic adjuvants in a variety of diseases, including cancer prevention. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of grape phenolic compounds on the regulation of cancer-mediated immune suppression. Laricitrin exhibits the greatest potential to ameliorate the suppressive effects of lung cancer on dendritic cells' (DCs') differentiation, maturation and function. Human lung cancer A549 and CL1-5 cells change the phenotype of DCs that express to high levels of IL-10 and prime T cells towards an immune suppression type-2 response (Th2). Laricitrin treatment stimulated DC differentiation and maturation in the condition media of cancer cells, a finding supported by monocyte marker CD14's disappearance and DC marker CD1a's upregulation. Laricitrin decreases expression of IL-10 in cancer-conditioned DCs, and subsequently switches CD4+ T cell response from Th2 to Th1 in vitro and in vivo. Reversal of laricitrin on lung cancer-induced DCs' paralysis was via inhibiting the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Laricitrin also potentiated the anticancer activity of cisplatin in mouse models. Thus, laricitrin could be an efficacious immunoadjuvant and have a synergistic effect when combined with chemotherapy.

  1. Interleukin-10 attenuates tumour growth by inhibiting interleukin-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signalling in myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

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    Lee, Bo-Ra; Kwon, Bo-Eun; Hong, Eun-Hye; Shim, Aeri; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Kim, Hong-Min; Chang, Sun-Young; Kim, Yeon-Jeong; Kweon, Mi-Na; Youn, Je-In; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-10-10

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a well-characterized anti-inflammatory cytokine, but its role in anti-cancer immunity is controversial. After injection with TC-1 cancer cells, we observed more rapid tumour growth and significantly higher interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in IL-10 knockout (IL-10(-/-)) mice than wild-type (WT) mice. Blocking IL-6 with an anti-IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) monoclonal antibody (mAb) inhibited tumour growth and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) generation, which were significantly increased in IL-10-deficient mice. MDSCs and tumour cells from IL-10(-/-) mice had increased phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3) levels. Treatment with a STAT3 inhibitor, S3I, reduced tumour growth, inhibited MDSC expansion, reduced IL-6 in tumours, and relieved T cell suppression. The combination of anti-IL-6R mAb and S3I further inhibited tumour growth compared to S3I treatment alone. These results suggested that the inhibition of the IL-6/STAT3 signalling axis is a candidate anti-cancer strategy, especially under systemic inflammatory conditions with high IL-6. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 is involved in cell growth and survival of human rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma cells

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    Qualman Stephen J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stat3 has been classified as a proto-oncogene and constitutive Stat3 signaling appears to be involved in oncogenesis of human cancers. However, whether constitutive Stat3 signaling plays a role in the survival and growth of osteosarcomas, rhabdomyosarcomas, and soft-tissue sarcomas is still unclear. Methods To examine whether Stat3 is activated in osteosarcomas, rhabdomyosarcomas and other soft-tissue sarcomas we analyzed sarcoma tissue microarray slides and sarcoma cell lines using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, respectively, with a phospho-specific Stat3 antibody. To examine whether the activated Stat3 pathway is important for sarcoma cell growth and survival, adenovirus-mediated expression of a dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F and a small molecule inhibitor (termed STA-21 were used to inhibit constitutive Stat3 signaling in human sarcoma cell lines expressing elevated levels of Stat3 phosphorylation. Cell viability was determined by MTT assays and induction of apoptosis was analyzed by western blotting using antibodies that specifically recognize cleaved caspases-3, 8, and 9. Results Stat3 phosphorylation is elevated in 19% (21/113 of osteosarcoma, 27% (17/64 of rhabdomyosarcoma, and 15% (22/151 of other soft-tissue sarcoma tissues as well as in sarcoma cell lines. Expression of the dominant-negative Stat3 and treatment of STA-21 inhibited cell viability and growth and induced apoptosis through caspases 3, 8 and 9 pathways in human sarcoma cell lines expressing elevated levels of phosphorylated Stat3. Conclusion This study demonstrates that Stat3 phosphorylation is elevated in human rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcomas and soft-tissue sarcomas. Furthermore, the activated Stat3 pathway is important for cell growth and survival of human sarcoma cells.

  3. Hyperosmolarity invokes distinct anti-inflammatory mechanisms in pulmonary epithelial cells: evidence from signaling and transcription layers.

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    Franklin L Wright

    Full Text Available Hypertonic saline (HTS has been used intravenously to reduce organ dysfunction following injury and as an inhaled therapy for cystic fibrosis lung disease. The role and mechanism of HTS inhibition was explored in the TNFα and IL-1β stimulation of pulmonary epithelial cells. Hyperosmolar (HOsm media (400 mOsm inhibited the production of select cytokines stimulated by TNFα and IL-1β at the level of mRNA translation, synthesis and release. In TNFα stimulated A549 cells, HOsm media inhibited I-κBα phosphorylation, NF-κB translocation into the nucleus and NF-κB nuclear binding. In IL-1β stimulated cells HOsm inhibited I-κBα phosphorylation without affecting NF-κB translocation or nuclear binding. Incubation in HOsm conditions inhibited both TNFα and IL-1β stimulated nuclear localization of interferon response factor 1 (IRF-1. Additional transcription factors such as AP-1, Erk-1/2, JNK and STAT-1 were unaffected by HOsm. HTS and sorbitol supplemented media produced comparable outcomes in all experiments, indicating that the effects of HTS were mediated by osmolarity, not by sodium. While not affecting MAPK modules discernibly in A549 cells, both HOsm conditions inhibit IRF-1 against TNFα or IL-1β, but inhibit p65 NF-kB translocation only against TNFα but not IL-1β. Thus, anti-inflammatory mechanisms of HTS/HOsm appear to disrupt cytokine signals at distinct intracellular steps.

  4. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)-3 Activates Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

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    Liu, Zhiming; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Harris, David M.; Li, Ping; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J.; Estrov, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB plays a major role in the pathogenesis of B-cell neoplasms. A broad array of mostly extracellular stimuli has been reported to activate NF-κB, to various degrees, in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Because CLL cells harbor high levels of unphosphorylated (U) signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 protein and U-STAT3 was reported to activate NF-κB, we sought to determine whether U-STAT3 activates NF-κB in CLL. Using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) we studied peripheral blood low-density cells from 15 patients with CLL and found that CLL cell nuclear extracts from all the samples bound to an NF-κB DNA probe, suggesting that NF-κB is constitutively activated in CLL. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that STAT3 bound NF-κB p65, and confocal microscopy studies detected U-STAT3/NF-κB complexes in the nuclei of CLL cells, thereby confirming these findings. Furthermore, infection of CLL cells with retroviral STAT3-shRNA attenuated the binding of NF-κB to DNA, as assessed by EMSA, and downregulated mRNA levels of NF-κB-regulated genes, as assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Taken together, our data suggest that U-STAT3 binds to the NF-κB p50/p65 dimers and that the U-STAT3/NF-κB complexes bind to DNA and activate NF-κB-regulated genes in CLL cells. PMID:21364020

  5. T Cell Receptor and Cytokine Signaling Can Function at Different Stages to Establish and Maintain Transcriptional Memory and Enable T Helper Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, Sarah L; Cauchy, Pierre; Withers, David R; Lane, Peter J L; Cockerill, Peter N

    2017-01-01

    Experienced T cells exhibit immunological memory via a rapid recall response, responding to restimulation much faster than naïve T cells. The formation of immunological memory starts during an initial slow response, when naïve T cells become transformed to proliferating T blast cells, and inducible immune response genes are reprogrammed as active chromatin domains. We demonstrated that these active domains are supported by thousands of priming elements which cooperate with inducible transcriptional enhancers to enable efficient responses to stimuli. At the conclusion of this response, a small proportion of these cells return to the quiescent state as long-term memory T cells. We proposed that priming elements can be established in a hit-and-run process dependent on the inducible factor AP-1, but then maintained by the constitutive factors RUNX1 and ETS-1. This priming mechanism may also function to render genes receptive to additional differentiation-inducing factors such as GATA3 and TBX21 that are encountered under polarizing conditions. The proliferation of recently activated T cells and the maintenance of immunological memory in quiescent memory T cells are also dependent on various cytokine signaling pathways upstream of AP-1. We suggest that immunological memory is established by T cell receptor signaling, but maintained by cytokine signaling.

  6. T Cell Receptor and Cytokine Signaling Can Function at Different Stages to Establish and Maintain Transcriptional Memory and Enable T Helper Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, Sarah L.; Cauchy, Pierre; Withers, David R.; Lane, Peter J. L.; Cockerill, Peter N.

    2017-01-01

    Experienced T cells exhibit immunological memory via a rapid recall response, responding to restimulation much faster than naïve T cells. The formation of immunological memory starts during an initial slow response, when naïve T cells become transformed to proliferating T blast cells, and inducible immune response genes are reprogrammed as active chromatin domains. We demonstrated that these active domains are supported by thousands of priming elements which cooperate with inducible transcriptional enhancers to enable efficient responses to stimuli. At the conclusion of this response, a small proportion of these cells return to the quiescent state as long-term memory T cells. We proposed that priming elements can be established in a hit-and-run process dependent on the inducible factor AP-1, but then maintained by the constitutive factors RUNX1 and ETS-1. This priming mechanism may also function to render genes receptive to additional differentiation-inducing factors such as GATA3 and TBX21 that are encountered under polarizing conditions. The proliferation of recently activated T cells and the maintenance of immunological memory in quiescent memory T cells are also dependent on various cytokine signaling pathways upstream of AP-1. We suggest that immunological memory is established by T cell receptor signaling, but maintained by cytokine signaling.

  7. An Ehrlichia chaffeensis tandem repeat protein interacts with multiple host targets involved in cell signaling, transcriptional regulation, and vesicle trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeel, Abdul; Kuriakose, Jeeba A; McBride, Jere W

    2009-05-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular bacterium that exhibits tropism for mononuclear phagocytes forming cytoplasmic membrane-bound microcolonies called morulae. To survive and replicate within phagocytes, E. chaffeensis exploits the host cell by modulating a number of host cell processes, but the ehrlichial effector proteins involved are unknown. In this study, we determined that p47, a secreted, differentially expressed, tandem repeat (TR) protein, interacts with multiple host proteins associated with cell signaling, transcriptional regulation, and vesicle trafficking. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that p47 interacts with polycomb group ring finger 5 (PCGF5) protein, Src protein tyrosine kinase FYN (FYN), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 2 (PTPN2), and adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1). p47 interaction with these proteins was further confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation assays and colocalization in HeLa cells transfected with p47-green fluorescent fusion protein (AcGFP1-p47). Moreover, confocal microscopy demonstrated p47-expressing dense-cored (DC) ehrlichiae colocalized with PCGF5, FYN, PTPN2, and CAP1. An amino-terminally truncated form of p47 containing TRs interacted only with PCGF5 and not with FYN, PTPN2, and CAP1, indicating differences in p47 domains that are involved in these interactions. These results demonstrate that p47 is involved in a complex network of interactions involving numerous host cell proteins. Furthermore, this study provides a new insight into the molecular and functional distinction of DC ehrlichiae, as well as the effector proteins involved in facilitating ehrlichial survival in mononuclear phagocytes.

  8. EGF receptor signaling blocks aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated transcription and cell differentiation in human epidermal keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Sutter, Carrie Hayes; Yin, Hong; Li, Yunbo; Mammen, Jennifer S.; Bodreddigari, Sridevi; Stevens, Gaylene; Cole, Judith A; Sutter, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    Dioxin is an extremely potent carcinogen. In highly exposed people, the most commonly observed toxicity is chloracne, a pathological response of the skin. Most of the effects of dioxin are attributed to its activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a transcription factor that binds to the Ah receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) to regulate the transcription of numerous genes, including CYP1A1 and CYP1B1. In cultures of normal human epidermal keratinocytes dioxin accelerates cell diff...

  9. The bHLH transcription factor Ascl1a is essential for the specification of the intestinal secretory cells and mediates Notch signaling in the zebrafish intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasse, Lydie C; Stern, David G; Pirson, Justine L; Manfroid, Isabelle; Peers, Bernard; Voz, Marianne L

    2013-04-15

    Notch signaling has a fundamental role in stem cell maintenance and in cell fate choice in the intestine of different species. Canonically, Notch signaling represses the expression of transcription factors of the achaete-scute like (ASCL) or atonal related protein (ARP) families. Identifying the ARP/ASCL genes expressed in the gastrointestinal tract is essential to build the regulatory cascade controlling the differentiation of gastrointestinal progenitors into the different intestinal cell types. The expression of the ARP/ASCL factors was analyzed in zebrafish to identify, among all the ARP/ASCL factors found in the zebrafish genome, those expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. ascl1a was found to be the earliest factor detected in the intestine. Loss-of-function analyses using the pia/ascl1a mutant, revealed that ascl1a is crucial for the differentiation of all secretory cells. Furthermore, we identify a battery of transcription factors expressed during secretory cell differentiation and downstream of ascl1a. Finally, we show that the repression of secretory cell fate by Notch signaling is mediated by the inhibition of ascl1a expression. In conclusion, this work identifies Ascl1a as a key regulator of the secretory cell lineage in the zebrafish intestine, playing the same role as Atoh1 in the mouse intestine. This highlights the diversity in the ARP/ASCL family members acting as cell fate determinants downstream from Notch signaling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of BMP4 and BMP7 signaling in breast cancer cells unveils time-dependent transcription patterns and highlights a common synexpression group of genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Martinez Alejandra

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs are members of the TGF-beta superfamily of growth factors. They are known for their roles in regulation of osteogenesis and developmental processes and, in recent years, evidence has accumulated of their crucial functions in tumor biology. BMP4 and BMP7, in particular, have been implicated in breast cancer. However, little is known about BMP target genes in the context of tumor. We explored the effects of BMP4 and BMP7 treatment on global gene transcription in seven breast cancer cell lines during a 6-point time series, using a whole-genome oligo microarray. Data analysis included hierarchical clustering of differentially expressed genes, gene ontology enrichment analyses and model based clustering of temporal data. Results Both ligands had a strong effect on gene expression, although the response to BMP4 treatment was more pronounced. The cellular functions most strongly affected by BMP signaling were regulation of transcription and development. The observed transcriptional response, as well as its functional outcome, followed a temporal sequence, with regulation of gene expression and signal transduction leading to changes in metabolism and cell proliferation. Hierarchical clustering revealed distinct differences in the response of individual cell lines to BMPs, but also highlighted a synexpression group of genes for both ligands. Interestingly, the majority of the genes within these synexpression groups were shared by the two ligands, probably representing the core molecular responses common to BMP4 and BMP7 signaling pathways. Conclusions All in all, we show that BMP signaling has a remarkable effect on gene transcription in breast cancer cells and that the functions affected follow a logical temporal pattern. Our results also uncover components of the common cellular transcriptional response to BMP4 and BMP7. Most importantly, this study provides a list of potential novel BMP target

  11. Identification of bovine leukemia virus tax function associated with host cell transcription, signaling, stress response and immune response pathway by microarray-based gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arainga Mariluz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T-cell leukemia virus type I. The Tax protein of BLV is a transcriptional activator of viral replication and a key contributor to oncogenic potential. We previously identified interesting mutant forms of Tax with elevated (TaxD247G or reduced (TaxS240P transactivation effects on BLV replication and propagation. However, the effects of these mutations on functions other than transcriptional activation are unknown. In this study, to identify genes that play a role in the cascade of signal events regulated by wild-type and mutant Tax proteins, we used a large-scale host cell gene-profiling approach. Results Using a microarray containing approximately 18,400 human mRNA transcripts, we found several alterations after the expression of Tax proteins in genes involved in many cellular functions such as transcription, signal transduction, cell growth, apoptosis, stress response, and immune response, indicating that Tax protein has multiple biological effects on various cellular environments. We also found that TaxD247G strongly regulated more genes involved in transcription, signal transduction, and cell growth functions, contrary to TaxS240P, which regulated fewer genes. In addition, the expression of genes related to stress response significantly increased in the presence of TaxS240P as compared to wild-type Tax and TaxD247G. By contrast, the largest group of downregulated genes was related to immune response, and the majority of these genes belonged to the interferon family. However, no significant difference in the expression level of downregulated genes was observed among the Tax proteins. Finally, the expression of important cellular factors obtained from the human microarray results were validated at the RNA and protein levels by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting

  12. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Inhibit Growth Hormone and Prolactin Gene Transcription via cAMP/PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Dairy Cow Anterior Pituitary Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Fa Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs play a key role in altering carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, influence endocrine pancreas activity, and as a precursor of ruminant milk fat. However, the effect and detailed mechanisms by which SCFAs mediate bovine growth hormone (GH and prolactin (PRL gene transcription remain unclear. In this study, we detected the effects of SCFAs (acetate, propionate, and butyrate on the activity of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway, GH, PRL, and Pit-1 gene transcription in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells (DCAPCs. The results showed that SCFAs decreased intracellular cAMP levels and a subsequent reduction in PKA activity. Inhibition of PKA activity decreased CREB phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. Furthermore, PTX blocked SCFAs- inhibited cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. These data showed that the inhibition of GH and PRL gene transcription induced by SCFAs is mediated by Gi activation and that propionate is more potent than acetate and butyrate in inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. In conclusion, this study identifies a biochemical mechanism for the regulation of SCFAs on bovine GH and PRL gene transcription in DCAPCs, which may serve as one of the factors that regulate pituitary function in accordance with dietary intake.

  13. Regulation of granulosa cell cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) binding and effect of CART signaling inhibitor on granulosa cell estradiol production during dominant follicle selection in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, Joseph K; Jimenez-Krassel, Fermin; Ireland, James J; Lv, Lihua; Smith, George W

    2013-12-01

    We previously established a potential role for cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CARTPT) in dominant follicle selection in cattle. CARTPT expression is elevated in subordinate versus dominant follicles, and treatment with the mature form of the CARTPT peptide (CART) decreases follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-stimulated granulosa cell estradiol production in vitro and follicular fluid estradiol and granulosa cell CYP19A1 mRNA in vivo. However, mechanisms that regulate granulosa cell CART responsiveness are not understood. In this study, we investigated hormonal regulation of granulosa cell CART-binding sites in vitro and temporal regulation of granulosa cell CART-binding sites in bovine follicles collected at specific stages of a follicular wave. We also determined the effect of inhibition of CART receptor signaling in vivo on estradiol production in future subordinate follicles. Granulosa cell CART binding in vitro was increased by FSH, and this induction was blocked by estrogen receptor antagonist treatment. In follicles collected in vivo at specific stages of a follicular wave, granulosa cell CART binding in the F2 (second largest), future subordinate follicle increased during dominant follicle selection. Injection into the F2 follicle (at onset of diameter deviation) of an inhibitor of the o/i subclass of G proteins (previously shown to block CART actions in vitro) resulted in increased follicular fluid estradiol concentrations in vivo. Collectively, results demonstrate hormonal regulation of granulosa cell CART binding in vitro and temporal regulation of CART binding in subordinate follicles during dominant follicle selection. Results also suggest that CART signaling may help suppress estradiol-producing capacity of the F2 (subordinate) follicle during this time period.

  14. Transcriptional analysis of rat photoreceptor cells reveals daily regulation of genes important for visual signaling and light damage susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, Stefanie; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Hölter, Philip; Wengert, Alexander; Grether, Markus; Sticht, Carsten; Weyer, Veronika; Wolfrum, Uwe; Spessert, Rainer

    2013-03-01

    Photoreceptor cells face the challenge of adjusting their function and, possibly, their susceptibility to light damage to the marked daily changes in ambient light intensity. To achieve a better understanding of photoreceptor adaptation at the transcriptional level, this study aimed to identify genes which are under daily regulation in photoreceptor cells using microarray analysis and quantitative PCR. Included in the gene set obtained were a number of genes which up until now have not been shown to be expressed in photoreceptor cells, such as Atf3 (activating transcription factor 3) and Pde8a (phosphodiesterase 8A), and others with a known impact on phototransduction and/or photoreceptor survival, such as Grk1 (G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1) and Pgc-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, coactivator 1alpha). According to their daily dynamics, the genes identified could be clustered in two groups: those with peak expression during the second part of the day which are uniformly promoted to cycle by light/dark transitions and those with peak expression during the second part of the night which are predominantly driven by a clock. Since Grk1 and Pgc-1α belong in the first group, the present results support a concept in which transcriptional regulation of genes by ambient light contributes to the functional adjustment of photoreceptor cells over the 24-h period.

  15. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears ...

  16. A novel transcription factor, ERD15 (Early Responsive to Dehydration 15), connects endoplasmic reticulum stress with an osmotic stress-induced cell death signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Murilo S; Reis, Pedro A B; Dadalto, Silvana P; Faria, Jerusa A Q A; Fontes, Elizabeth P B; Fietto, Luciano G

    2011-06-03

    As in all other eukaryotic organisms, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers the evolutionarily conserved unfolded protein response in soybean, but it also communicates with other adaptive signaling responses, such as osmotic stress-induced and ER stress-induced programmed cell death. These two signaling pathways converge at the level of gene transcription to activate an integrated cascade that is mediated by N-rich proteins (NRPs). Here, we describe a novel transcription factor, GmERD15 (Glycine max Early Responsive to Dehydration 15), which is induced by ER stress and osmotic stress to activate the expression of NRP genes. GmERD15 was isolated because of its capacity to stably associate with the NRP-B promoter in yeast. It specifically binds to a 187-bp fragment of the NRP-B promoter in vitro and activates the transcription of a reporter gene in yeast. Furthermore, GmERD15 was found in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, and a ChIP assay revealed that it binds to the NRP-B promoter in vivo. Expression of GmERD15 in soybean protoplasts activated the NRP-B promoter and induced expression of the NRP-B gene. Collectively, these results support the interpretation that GmERD15 functions as an upstream component of stress-induced NRP-B-mediated signaling to connect stress in the ER to an osmotic stress-induced cell death signal.

  17. Cooperative antiproliferative signaling by aspirin and indole-3-carbinol targets microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene expression and promoter activity in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Kevin M; Matthew, Susanne; Aronchik, Ida; Firestone, Gary L

    2016-04-01

    Antiproliferative signaling of combinations of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural indolecarbinol compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, was investigated in human melanoma cells. Melanoma cell lines with distinct mutational profiles were sensitive to different extents to the antiproliferative response of aspirin, with oncogenic BRAF-expressing G361 cells and wild-type BRAF-expressing SK-MEL-30 cells being the most responsive. I3C triggered a strong proliferative arrest of G361 melanoma cells and caused only a modest decrease in the proliferation of SK-MEL-30 cells. In both cell lines, combinations of aspirin and I3C cooperatively arrested cell proliferation and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, and nearly ablated protein and transcript levels of the melanocyte master regulator microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoform M (MITF-M). In melanoma cells transfected with a -333/+120-bp MITF-M promoter-luciferase reporter plasmid, treatment with aspirin and I3C cooperatively disrupted MITF-M promoter activity, which accounted for the loss of MITF-M gene products. Mutational analysis revealed that the aspirin required the LEF1 binding site, whereas I3C required the BRN2 binding site to mediate their combined and individual effects on MITF-M promoter activity. Consistent with LEF1 being a downstream effector of Wnt signaling, aspirin, but not I3C, downregulated protein levels of the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor-related protein-6 and β-catenin and upregulated the β-catenin destruction complex component Axin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that aspirin-regulated Wnt signaling and I3C-targeted signaling pathways converge at distinct DNA elements in the MITF-M promoter to cooperatively disrupt MITF-M expression and melanoma cell proliferation.

  18. Npas4 Transcription Factor Expression Is Regulated by Calcium Signaling Pathways and Prevents Tacrolimus-induced Cytotoxicity in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckmann, Thilo; Sabatini, Paul V; Nian, Cuilan; Smith, Riley G; Lynn, Francis C

    2016-02-01

    Cytosolic calcium influx activates signaling pathways known to support pancreatic beta cell function and survival by modulating gene expression. Impaired calcium signaling leads to decreased beta cell mass and diabetes. To appreciate the causes of these cytotoxic perturbations, a more detailed understanding of the relevant signaling pathways and their respective gene targets is required. In this study, we examined the calcium-induced expression of the cytoprotective beta cell transcription factor Npas4. Pharmacological inhibition implicated the calcineurin, Akt/protein kinase B, and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase signaling pathways in the regulation of Npas4 transcription and translation. Both Npas4 mRNA and protein had high turnover rates, and, at the protein level, degradation was mediated via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Finally, beta cell cytotoxicity of the calcineurin inhibitor and immunosuppressant tacrolimus (FK-506) was prevented by Npas4 overexpression. These results delineate the pathways regulating Npas4 expression and stability and demonstrate its importance in clinical settings such as islet transplantation.

  19. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 activation is sufficient to drive transcriptional induction of cyclin D2 gene and proliferation of rat pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, Birgitte N; Richter, Henrijette E; Hansen, Johnny A

    2003-01-01

    in a time-dependent manner by hGH in INS-1 cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis by coincubation with cycloheximide did not affect the hGH-induced increase of cyclin D2 mRNA levels at 4 h. Expression of a dominant negative STAT5 mutant, STAT5aDelta749, partially inhibited cyclin D2 protein levels. INS-1...... cells and hGH-induced increase of mRNA-levels of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D2. In this study we have further characterized the role of STAT5 in the regulation of cyclin D expression and beta-cell proliferation by hGH. Cyclin D2 mRNA and protein levels (but not cyclin D1 and D3) were induced......-STAT5b stimulated transcriptional activation of the cyclin D2 promoter and induced hGH-independent proliferation in these cells. In primary beta-cells, adenovirus-mediated expression of CA-STAT5b profoundly stimulated DNA-synthesis (5.3-fold over control) in the absence of hGH. Our studies indicate...

  20. Fluctuation sensitivity of a transcriptional signaling cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkiewicz, Kevin R.; Mayo, Michael L.

    2016-09-01

    The internal biochemical state of a cell is regulated by a vast transcriptional network that kinetically correlates the concentrations of numerous proteins. Fluctuations in protein concentration that encode crucial information about this changing state must compete with fluctuations caused by the noisy cellular environment in order to successfully transmit information across the network. Oftentimes, one protein must regulate another through a sequence of intermediaries, and conventional wisdom, derived from the data processing inequality of information theory, leads us to expect that longer sequences should lose more information to noise. Using the metric of mutual information to characterize the fluctuation sensitivity of transcriptional signaling cascades, we find, counter to this expectation, that longer chains of regulatory interactions can instead lead to enhanced informational efficiency. We derive an analytic expression for the mutual information from a generalized chemical kinetics model that we reduce to simple, mass-action kinetics by linearizing for small fluctuations about the basal biological steady state, and we find that at long times this expression depends only on a simple ratio of protein production to destruction rates and the length of the cascade. We place bounds on the values of these parameters by requiring that the mutual information be at least one bit—otherwise, any received signal would be indistinguishable from noise—and we find not only that nature has devised a way to circumvent the data processing inequality, but that it must be circumvented to attain this one-bit threshold. We demonstrate how this result places informational and biochemical efficiency at odds with one another by correlating high transcription factor binding affinities with low informational output, and we conclude with an analysis of the validity of our assumptions and propose how they might be tested experimentally.

  1. Transcriptional Profiling of Hypoxic Neural Stem Cells Identifies Calcineurin-NFATc4 Signaling as a Major Regulator of Neural Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Marta; Fernández, Virginia; Monllau, Josep M; Borrell, Víctor; Lerin, Carles; de la Iglesia, Núria

    2015-08-11

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in a hypoxic microenvironment within the brain. However, the crucial transcription factors (TFs) that regulate NSC biology under physiologic hypoxia are poorly understood. Here we have performed gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray datasets from hypoxic versus normoxic NSCs with the aim of identifying pathways and TFs that are activated under oxygen concentrations mimicking normal brain tissue microenvironment. Integration of TF target (TFT) and pathway enrichment analysis identified the calcium-regulated TF NFATc4 as a major candidate to regulate hypoxic NSC functions. Nfatc4 expression was coordinately upregulated by top hypoxia-activated TFs, while NFATc4 target genes were enriched in hypoxic NSCs. Loss-of-function analyses further revealed that the calcineurin-NFATc4 signaling axis acts as a major regulator of NSC self-renewal and proliferation in vitro and in vivo by promoting the expression of TFs, including Id2, that contribute to the maintenance of the NSC state.

  2. NF-κB-dependent signals control BOB.1/OBF.1 and Oct2 transcriptional activity in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilzheimer, Melanie; Quandt, Jasmin; Langhans, Julia; Weihrich, Petra; Wirth, Thomas; Brunner, Cornelia

    2015-12-01

    The transcriptional co-activator BOB.1/OBF.1 is crucial for Octamer-driven transcription in B cells. BOB.1/OBF.1-deficiency leads to tremendous defects in B-cell development and function. Therefore, in the past research focused on the identification of BOB.1/OBF.1 target genes. However, the regulation of BOB.1/OBF.1 expression itself is poorly understood. Here we show that in B cells NF-κB as well as to some extent NFAT proteins are involved in the activation of basal as well as inducible BOB.1/OBF.1 expression by direct binding to the BOB.1/OBF.1 promoter. Moreover, the analysis of different inducers of NF-κB, like several TLR ligands, TNF-α, BAFF, or LTα1β2, revealed that both the canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways are involved in the induction of BOB.1/OBF.1 gene. The identification of so far unknown inducers that regulate BOB.1/OBF.1 expression in B cells provides novel insights in the potential function of BOB.1/OBF.1 during different aspects of B-cell development and function.

  3. Sesamin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signalling in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Pengyi; Wang, Chen; Chen, Liulin; Wang, Cheng; Du, Yuhan; Yan, Xu; Chen, Mingjie; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2013-01-01

    Sesamin, one of the most abundant lignans in sesame seeds, has been shown to exhibit various pharmacological effects. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether sesamin promotes cell cycle arrest and induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells and further to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here, we found that sesamin inhibited HepG2 cell growth by inducing G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Furthermore, sesamin suppressed the constitutive and interleukin (IL)-6-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling pathway in HepG2 cells, leading to regulate the downstream genes, including p53, p21, cyclin proteins and the Bcl-2 protein family. Our studies showed that STAT3 signalling played a key role in sesamin-induced G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These findings provided a molecular basis for understanding of the effects of sesamin in hepatocellular carcinoma tumour cell proliferation. Therefore, sesamin may thus be a potential chemotherapy drug for liver cancer.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of tenascin-W by TGF-beta signaling in the bone metastatic niche of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiovaro, Francesca; Martina, Enrico; Bottos, Alessia; Scherberich, Arnaud; Hynes, Nancy E; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2015-10-15

    Tenascin-W is a matricellular protein with a dynamically changing expression pattern in development and disease. In adults, tenascin-W is mostly restricted to stem cell niches, and is also expressed in the stroma of solid cancers. Here, we analyzed its expression in the bone microenvironment of breast cancer metastasis. Osteoblasts were isolated from tumor-free or tumor-bearing bones of mice injected with MDA-MB231-1833 breast cancer cells. We found a fourfold upregulation of tenascin-W in the osteoblast population of tumor-bearing mice compared to healthy mice, indicating that tenascin-W is supplied by the bone metastatic niche. Transwell and co-culture studies showed that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) express tenascin-W protein after exposure to factors secreted by MDA-MB231-1833 breast cancer cells. To study tenascin-W gene regulation, we identified and analyzed the tenascin-W promoter as well as three evolutionary conserved regions in the first intron. 5'RACE analysis of mRNA from human breast cancer, glioblastoma and bone tissue showed a single tenascin-W transcript with a transcription start site at a noncoding first exon followed by exon 2 containing the ATG translation start. Site-directed mutagenesis of a SMAD4-binding element in proximity of the TATA box strongly impaired promoter activity. TGFβ1 induced tenascin-W expression in human BMSCs through activation of the TGFβ1 receptor ALK5, while glucocorticoids were inhibitory. Our experiments show that tenascin-W acts as a niche component for breast cancer metastasis to bone by supporting cell migration and cell proliferation of the cancer cells.

  5. Transcription Dynamics in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenstra, Tineke L; Rodriguez, Joseph; Chen, Huimin; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-07-01

    The transcription cycle can be roughly divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Understanding the molecular events that regulate all these stages requires a dynamic view of the underlying processes. The development of techniques to visualize and quantify transcription in single living cells has been essential in revealing the transcription kinetics. They have revealed that (a) transcription is heterogeneous between cells and (b) transcription can be discontinuous within a cell. In this review, we discuss the progress in our quantitative understanding of transcription dynamics in living cells, focusing on all parts of the transcription cycle. We present the techniques allowing for single-cell transcription measurements, review evidence from different organisms, and discuss how these experiments have broadened our mechanistic understanding of transcription regulation.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of ErbB signalling in mammary luminal epithelial cells - interplay of ErbB and IGF1 signalling through IGFBP3 regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worthington Jenny

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the ErbB family of growth factor receptors are intricately linked with epithelial cell biology, development and tumourigenesis; however, the mechanisms involved in their downstream signalling are poorly understood. Indeed, it is unclear how signal specificity is achieved and the relative contribution each receptor has to specific gene expression. Methods Gene expression profiling of a human mammary luminal epithelial cell model of ErbB2-overexpression was carried out using cDNA microarrays with a common RNA reference approach to examine long-term overlapping and differential responses to EGF and heregulin beta1 treatment in the context of ErbB2 overexpression. Altered gene expression was validated using quantitative real time PCR and/or immunoblotting. One gene of interest was targeted for further characterisation, where the effects of siRNA-mediated silencing on IGF1-dependent signalling and cellular phenotype were examined and compared to the effects of loss of ErbB2 expression. Results 775 genes were differentially expressed and clustered in terms of their growth factor responsiveness. As well as identifying uncharacterized genes as novel targets of ErbB2-dependent signalling, ErbB2 overexpression augmented the induction of multiple genes involved in proliferation (e.g. MYC, MAP2K1, MAP2K3, autocrine growth factor signalling (VEGF, PDGF and adhesion/cytoskeletal regulation (ZYX, THBS1, VCL, CNN3, ITGA2, ITGA3, NEDD9, TAGLN, linking them to the hyper-poliferative and altered adhesive phenotype of the ErbB2-overexpressing cells. We also report ErbB2-dependent down-regulation of multiple interferon-stimulated genes that may permit ErbB2-overexpressing cells to resist the anti-proliferative action of interferons. Finally, IGFBP3 was unique in its pattern of regulation and we further investigated a possible role for IGFBP3 down-regulation in ErbB2-dependent transformation through suppressed IGF1 signalling. We show

  7. Quantitative analysis of interferon alpha receptor subunit 1 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 gene transcription in blood cells of patients with chronic hepatitis C

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    Sedeño-Monge Virginia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon (IFN-α receptor 1 (ifnar1 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (socs1 transcription levels were quantified in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of 59 patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV and 17 non-infected individuals. Samples were obtained from patients infected with HCV that were either untreated or treated with IFN-α2 plus ribavirin for 1 year and divided into responders and non-responders based on viral load reduction 6 months after treatment. Ifnar1 and socs1 transcription was quantified by real-time RT-PCR, and the fold difference (2-ΔΔCT with respect to hprt housekeeping gene was calculated. Results Ifnar1 transcription increased significantly in HCV-infected patients either untreated (3.26 ± 0.31, responders (3.1 ± 0.23 and non-responders (2.18 ± 0.23 with respect to non-infected individuals (1 ± 0.34; P = 0.005. Ifnar1 transcription increased significantly (P = 0.003 in patients infected with HCV genotypes 1a (4.74 ± 0.25 and 1b (2.81 ± 0.25 but not in 1a1b (1.58 ± 0.21. No association was found of Ifnar1 transcription with disease progress, initial viral load or other clinical factors. With respect to socs1 transcription, values were similar for non-infected individuals (1 ± 0.28 and untreated patients (0.99 ± 0.41 but increased in responders (2.81 ± 0.17 and non-responder patients (1.67 ± 0.41. Difference between responder and non-responder patients was not statistically significant. Socs1 transcription increased in patients infected with HCV genotypes 1a and 1b (2.87 ± 0.45 and 2.22 ± 0.17, respectively but not in 1a1b (1.28 ± 0.40. Socs1 transcript was absent in three patients infected with HCV genotype 1b. A weak correlation between ifnar1 and socs1 transcription was found, when Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated. Conclusion Our results suggest that HCV infection may up-regulate ifnar1 transcription. HCV genotypes differ in their capacity to affect

  8. Mitochondrial translocation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) in leukemic T cells and cytokine-stimulated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chueh, Fu-Yu; Leong, King-Fu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, H. M. Bligh Cancer Research Laboratories, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States); Yu, Chao-Lan, E-mail: chaolan.yu@rosalindfranklin.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, H. M. Bligh Cancer Research Laboratories, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States)

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} STAT5 interacts with a mitochondrial protein PDC-E2 in a leukemic T cell line LSTRA. {yields} Tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT5, but not STAT3, is present in LSTRA mitochondria. {yields} Cytokines induce mitochondrial translocation of STAT5, but not STAT1 or STAT3. {yields} Cytokine-induced mitochondrial translocation of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT5 is transient. {yields} Mitochondrial STAT5 binds to a putative STAT5 site in the mitochondrial DNA in vitro. -- Abstract: Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) were first identified as key signaling molecules in response to cytokines. Constitutive STAT activation also has been widely implicated in oncogenesis. We analyzed STAT5-associated proteins in a leukemic T cell line LSTRA, which exhibits constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of STAT5. A cellular protein was found to specifically interact with STAT5 in LSTRA cells by co-immunoprecipitation. Sequencing analysis and subsequent immunoblotting confirmed the identity of this STAT5-associated protein as the E2 component of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2). Consistent with this interaction, both subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy revealed mitochondrial localization of STAT5 in LSTRA cells. Mitochondrial localization of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT5 also occurred in cytokine-stimulated cells. A time course experiment further demonstrated the transient kinetics of STAT5 mitochondrial translocation after cytokine stimulation. In contrast, cytokine-induced STAT1 and STAT3 activation did not result in their translocation into mitochondria. Furthermore, we showed that mitochondrial STAT5 bound to the D-loop regulatory region of mitochondrial DNA in vitro. It suggests a potential role of STAT5 in regulating the mitochondrial genome. Proliferative metabolism toward aerobic glycolysis is well known in cancer cells as the Warburg effect and is also observed in cytokine

  9. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase 22 inhibits colon cancer cell invasion by suppressing the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/matrix metalloproteinase 9 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Ning; Liu, Yanyan; Bian, Xiaocui; Feng, Hailiang; Liu, Yuqin

    2015-08-01

    Colon cancer is associated with increased cell migration and invasion. In the present study, the role of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 22 (USP22) in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-mediated colon cancer cell invasion was investigated. The messenger RNA levels of STAT3 target genes were measured by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, following USP22 knockdown by RNA interference in SW480 colon cancer cells. The matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) proteolytic activity and invasion potential of SW480 cells were measured by zymography and Transwell assay, respectively, following combined USP22 and STAT3 short interfering (si)RNA treatment or STAT3 siRNA treatment alone. Similarly, a cell counting kit-8 assay was used to detect the proliferation potential of SW480 cells. The protein expression levels of USP22, STAT3 and MMP9 were detected by immunohistochemistry in colon cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs) and the correlation between USP22, STAT3 and MMP9 was analyzed. USP22/STAT3 co-depletion partly rescued the MMP9 proteolytic activity and invasion of SW480 cells, compared with that of STAT3 depletion alone. However, the proliferation of USP22/STAT3si-SW480 cells was decreased compared with that of STAT3si-SW480 cells. USP22 expression was positively correlated with STAT3 and MMP9 expression in colon cancer TMAs. In conclusion, USP22 attenuated the invasion capacity of colon cancer cells by inhibiting the STAT3/MMP9 signaling pathway.

  10. Passive sensitization increases histamine-stimulated calcium signaling and NF-кB transcription activity in bronchial epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si JIN; Dan TIAN; Jian-guo CHEN; Li-ping ZHU; Sheng-yuan LIU; Di-xun WANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To find out if the two aspects of asthma (chronic airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness) are related to hypersensitivity of calcium signaling in bronchial epithelial cells. Methods: Porcine bronchial epithelial cells (PBEC) were divided into sensitized (S) and nonsesitized (N) groups. In group S, the cells were preincubated with serum from ovalbumin sensitized guinea pigs. In group N, the cells were preincubated with serum from nonsensitized guinea pigs. Single cell calcium imaging and ELISA-based NF-κB activity were used to evaluate the histamine-stimulated intracellular free calcium level and NF-κB activity, respectively. Results: First, 0.1 umol/L histamine could induce [Ca2+]i oscillations in PBEC of group S, but not in group N. Second, 1 umol/L histamine could induce [Ca2+]i oscillations of PBEC in both group S and group N. The [Ca2+]i oscillation frequency of PBEC was significantly higher in group S than in group N, though the [Ca2+]i oscillation amplitude showed no difference between the two groups. Finally, when 10 umol/L histamine was used to stimulate PBEC, a transient initial increase followed by a sustained elevation (FSE) of [Ca2+]i was observed in PBEC in both groups. The amplitude of the FSE of [Ca2+]i in PBEC was significantly higher in group S than in group N. The subsequent NF-KB activity was in accordance to the calcium oscillation frequency evoked by histamine, but not to the amplitude. Conclusion: It was suggested that the increased sensitivity of calcium signaling in bronchial epithelial cells might contribute to the exorbitant inflammation or increased susceptibility in asthmatic airway epithelial cells.

  11. A Pathway Switch Directs BAFF Signaling to Distinct NFκB Transcription Factors in Maturing and Proliferating B Cells

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    Jonathan V. Almaden

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BAFF, an activator of the noncanonical NFκB pathway, provides critical survival signals during B cell maturation and contributes to B cell proliferation. We found that the NFκB family member RelB is required ex vivo for B cell maturation, but cRel is required for proliferation. Combined molecular network modeling and experimentation revealed Nfkb2 p100 as a pathway switch; at moderate p100 synthesis rates in maturing B cells, BAFF fully utilizes p100 to generate the RelB:p52 dimer, whereas at high synthesis rates, p100 assembles into multimeric IκBsome complexes, which BAFF neutralizes in order to potentiate cRel activity and B cell expansion. Indeed, moderation of p100 expression or disruption of IκBsome assembly circumvented the BAFF requirement for full B cell expansion. Our studies emphasize the importance of p100 in determining distinct NFκB network states during B cell biology, which causes BAFF to have context-dependent functional consequences.

  12. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; Ungricht, Rosemarie; Kelemen, János Z; Shetty, Chetak; Ratna, Prasuna; Becskei, Attila

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears the hallmarks of competitive inhibition, whereas a downstream activator inhibits gene expression non-competitively. When gene expression is induced weakly, the antagonistic activator can have a positive effect and can even trigger paradoxical activation. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium models of transcription shed light on the mechanism by which interference converts signals, and reveals that self-antagonism of activators imitates the behavior of feed-forward loops. Indeed, a synthetic circuit generates a bell-shaped response, so that the induction of expression is limited to a narrow range of the input signal. The identification of conserved regulatory principles of interference will help to predict the transcriptional response of genes in their genomic context. PMID:19690569

  13. Dedicator of cytokinesis 8 regulates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation and promotes TH17 cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Sevgi; Charbonnier, Louis Marie; Kabaleeswaran, Venkataraman; Reisli, Ismail; Genel, Ferah; Gulez, Nesrin; Al-Herz, Waleed; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Perez-Atayde, Antonio; Karaca, Neslihan E; Kutukculer, Necil; Wu, Hao; Geha, Raif S; Chatila, Talal A

    2016-11-01

    The autosomal recessive hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) caused by dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) deficiency shares clinical features with autosomal dominant HIES because of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mutations, including recurrent infections and mucocutaneous candidiasis, which are suggestive of TH17 cell dysfunction. The mechanisms underlying this phenotypic overlap are unclear. We sought to elucidate common mechanisms operating in the different forms of HIES. We analyzed the differentiation of CD4(+) TH cell subsets in control and DOCK8-deficient subjects. We also examined the role of DOCK8 in regulating STAT3 activation in T cells. TH cell differentiation was analyzed by ELISA, flow cytometry, and real-time PCR measurements of cytokines and TH cell transcription factors. The interaction of DOCK8 and STAT3 signaling pathways was examined by using flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, coimmunoprecipitation, and gene expression analysis. There was a profound block in the differentiation of DOCK8-deficient naive CD4(+) T cells into TH17 cells. A missense mutation that disrupts DOCK8 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity while sparing protein expression also impaired TH17 cell differentiation. DOCK8 constitutively associated with STAT3 independent of GEF activity, whereas it regulated STAT3 phosphorylation in a GEF activity-dependent manner. DOCK8 also promoted STAT3 translocation to the nucleus and induction of STAT3-dependent gene expression. DOCK8 interacts with STAT3 and regulates its activation and the outcome of STAT3-dependent TH17 differentiation. These findings might explain the phenotypic overlap between DOCK8 deficiency and autosomal dominant HIES. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Divergent transcriptional and translational signals in Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torarinsson, E; Klenk, H. P.; Garrett, Roger A.

    2005-01-01

    Many Archaea, in contrast to bacteria, produce a high proportion of leaderless transcripts, show a wide variation in their consensus Shine-Dalgarno (S-D) sequences and frequently use GUG and UUG start codons. In order to understand the basis for these differences, 18 complete archaeal genomes were...... examined for sequence signals that are positionally conserved upstream from genes. These functional motifs include box A promoter sequences for leaderless transcripts and S-D sequences for transcripts with leaders. Most of the box A sequences were preceded by a BRE-like motif and followed by a previously...... for the 18 Archaea, reveal that usage of high levels of both S-D motifs, and GUG and UUG start codons occurs exclusively in the shorter branched Archaea. High levels of leaderless transcripts are found in the longer branched Archaea....

  15. Inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 expression by RNA interference suppresses invasion through inducing anoikis in human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Fan; You-Li Zhang; Ying Wu; Wei Zhang; Yin-Huan Wang; Zhao-Ming Cheng; Hua Li

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the roles and mechanism of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in invasion of human colon cancer cells by RNA interference. METHODS: Small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was transfected into HT29 colon cancer cells. STAT3 protein level and DNA-binding activity of STAT3 was evaluated by western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), respectively. We studied the anchorage-independent growth using colony formation in soft agar, and invasion using the boyden chamber model, anoikis using DNA fragmentation assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL), respectively. Western blot assay was used to observe the protein expression of Bcl-xL and survivin in colon cancer HT29 cells. RESULTS: RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by siRNA leads to suppression of STAT3 expression in colon cancer cell lines. Suppression of STAT3 expression by siRNA could inhibit anchorage-independent growth, and invasion ability, and induces anoikis in the colon cancer cell line HT29. It has been shown that knockdown of STAT3 expression by siRNA results in a reduction in expression of Bcl-xL and survivin in HT29 cells. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that STAT3 siRNA can inhibit the invasion ability of colon cancer cells through inducing anoikis, which antiapoptotic genes survivin and Bcl-xL contribute to regulation of anoikis. These studies indicate STAT3 siRNA could be a useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of colon cancer.

  16. Transcriptional Profiling of Hypoxic Neural Stem Cells Identifies Calcineurin-NFATc4 Signaling as a Major Regulator of Neural Stem Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Marta; Fernández, Virginia; Monllau, Josep M.; Borrell, Víctor; Lerin, Carles; de la Iglesia, Núria

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in a hypoxic microenvironment within the brain. However, the crucial transcription factors (TFs) that regulate NSC biology under physiologic hypoxia are poorly understood. Here we have performed gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray datasets from hypoxic versus normoxic NSCs with the aim of identifying pathways and TFs that are activated under oxygen concentrations mimicking normal brain tissue microenvironment. Integration of TF target (TFT) and pathway enrichment analysis identified the calcium-regulated TF NFATc4 as a major candidate to regulate hypoxic NSC functions. Nfatc4 expression was coordinately upregulated by top hypoxia-activated TFs, while NFATc4 target genes were enriched in hypoxic NSCs. Loss-of-function analyses further revealed that the calcineurin-NFATc4 signaling axis acts as a major regulator of NSC self-renewal and proliferation in vitro and in vivo by promoting the expression of TFs, including Id2, that contribute to the maintenance of the NSC state. PMID:26235896

  17. Transcriptional Profiling of Hypoxic Neural Stem Cells Identifies Calcineurin-NFATc4 Signaling as a Major Regulator of Neural Stem Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Moreno

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs reside in a hypoxic microenvironment within the brain. However, the crucial transcription factors (TFs that regulate NSC biology under physiologic hypoxia are poorly understood. Here we have performed gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA of microarray datasets from hypoxic versus normoxic NSCs with the aim of identifying pathways and TFs that are activated under oxygen concentrations mimicking normal brain tissue microenvironment. Integration of TF target (TFT and pathway enrichment analysis identified the calcium-regulated TF NFATc4 as a major candidate to regulate hypoxic NSC functions. Nfatc4 expression was coordinately upregulated by top hypoxia-activated TFs, while NFATc4 target genes were enriched in hypoxic NSCs. Loss-of-function analyses further revealed that the calcineurin-NFATc4 signaling axis acts as a major regulator of NSC self-renewal and proliferation in vitro and in vivo by promoting the expression of TFs, including Id2, that contribute to the maintenance of the NSC state.

  18. Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and nuclear factor κB signaling in glioblastoma cancer stem cells regulates the Notch pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Jo Meagan; Fan, Meiyun; Yang, Chuan He; Du, Ziyun; Sims, Michelle; Davidoff, Andrew M; Pfeffer, Lawrence M

    2013-09-06

    Malignant gliomas are locally aggressive, highly vascular tumors that have a dismal prognosis, and present therapies provide little improvement in the disease course and outcome. Many types of malignancies, including glioblastoma, originate from a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are able to initiate and maintain tumors. Although CSCs only represent a small fraction of cells within a tumor, their high tumor-initiating capacity and therapeutic resistance drives tumorigenesis. Therefore, it is imperative to identify pathways associated with CSCs to devise strategies to selectively target them. In this study, we describe a novel relationship between glioblastoma CSCs and the Notch pathway, which involves the constitutive activation of STAT3 and NF-κB signaling. Glioma CSCs were isolated and maintained in vitro using an adherent culture system, and the biological properties were compared with the traditional cultures of CSCs grown as multicellular spheres under nonadherent culture conditions. Interestingly, both adherent and spheroid glioma CSCs show constitutive activation of the STAT3/NF-κB signaling pathway and up-regulation of STAT3- and NF-κB-dependent genes. Gene expression profiling also identified components of the Notch pathway as being deregulated in glioma CSCs, and the deregulated expression of these genes was sensitive to treatment with STAT3 and NF-κB inhibitors. This finding is particularly important because Notch signaling appears to play a key role in CSCs in a variety of cancers and controls cell fate determination, survival, proliferation, and the maintenance of stem cells. The constitutive activation of STAT3 and NF-κB signaling pathways that leads to the regulation of Notch pathway genes in glioma CSCs identifies novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of glioma.

  19. Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 promotes the proliferation of chondro­sarcoma cell via activating Notch-1 signaling pathway

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    Xu FQ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fengqin Xu,1,* Zhi-qiang Zhang,2,* Yong-chao Fang,2 Xiao-lei Li,2 Yu Sun,2 Chuan-zhi Xiong,2 Lian-qi Yan,2 Qiang Wang2 1Department of Orthopaedics, Hongquan Hospital, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Subei People’s Hospital, Yangzhou, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1 is identified to be overexpressed in several cancers. However, the role of MALAT-1 in chondrosarcoma is poorly understood.Methods: The expression of MALAT-1 and Notch-1 signaling pathway was detected in chondrosarcoma tissues and chondrosarcoma cells by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and Western blot. 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay was performed to examine the cell viability of chondrosarcoma cells transfected with si-MALAT-1 or pcDNA-MALAT-1. Then the expression of Notch-1 signaling pathway was detected when MALAT-1 was upregulated or downregulated in chondrosarcoma cells. A subcutaneous chondrosarcoma cells xenograft model was used to confirm the effect of MALAT-1 on tumor growth in vivo.Results: We found the increased expression of MALAT-1 and Notch-1 signaling pathway in chondrosarcoma tissue and cells. MALAT-1 promoted the proliferation of chondrosarcoma cells. In addition, MALAT-1 activated the Notch-1 signaling pathway at posttranscriptional level in chondrosarcoma cells. Meanwhile, overexpression of Notch-1 reversed the effect of si-MALAT-1 on the proliferation of chondrosarcoma cells. Finally, we found that MALAT-1 promoted the tumor growth in a subcutaneous chondrosarcoma cells xenograft model, which confirmed the promoted effect of MALAT-1 on the tumor growth in vivo.Conclusion: Taken together, our study demonstrated that MALAT-1 promoted the proliferation of chondrosarcoma cell via activating Notch-1 signaling pathway. Keywords: MALAT-1, cell proliferation

  20. Constitutively active RAS signaling reduces 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D-mediated gene transcription in intestinal epithelial cells by reducing vitamin D receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmet, Marsha L; Fleet, James C

    2017-10-01

    High vitamin D status is associated with reduced colon cancer risk but these studies ignore the diversity in the molecular etiology of colon cancer. RAS activating mutations are common in colon cancer and they activate pro-proliferative signaling pathways. We examined the impact of RAS activating mutations on 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D)-mediated gene expression in cultured colon and intestinal cell lines. Transient transfection of Caco-2 cells with a constitutively active mutant K-RAS (G12 V) significantly reduced 1,25(OH)2D-induced activity of both a human 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 24 hydroxyase (CYP24A1) promoter-luciferase and an artificial 3X vitamin D response element (VDRE) promoter-luciferase reporter gene. Young Adult Mouse Colon (YAMC) and Rat Intestinal Epithelial (RIE) cell lines with stable expression of mutant H-RAS had suppressed 1,25(OH)2D-mediated induction of CYP24A1 mRNA. The RAS effects were associated with lower Vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA and protein levels in YAMC and RIE cells and they could be partially reversed by VDR overexpression. RAS-mediated suppression of VDR levels was not due to either reduced VDR mRNA stability or increased VDR gene methylation. However, chromatin accessibility to the VDR gene at the proximal promoter (-300bp), an enhancer region at -6kb, and an enhancer region located in exon 3 was significantly reduced in RAS transformed YAMC cells (YAMC-RAS). These data show that constitutively active RAS signaling suppresses 1,25(OH)2D-mediated gene transcription in colon epithelial cells by reducing VDR gene transcription but the mechanism for this suppression is not yet known. These data suggest that cancers with RAS-activating mutations may be less responsive to vitamin D mediated treatment or chemoprevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Manassantin A and B from Saururus chinensis inhibit interleukin-6-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation in Hep3B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jong Sun; Lee, Seung Woong; Kim, Myo Sun; Yun, Bo Ra; Park, Mi Hye; Lee, Seok-Geun; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Woo Song; Rho, Mun-Chual

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been postulated to be an effective therapy in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. The current study was performed to examine potential effects of manassantin A and B isolated from Saururus chinensis on the IL-6-induced response to human hepatoma cells. We found that manassantin A and B inhibit signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) activity stimulated by IL-6. We also found that both compounds decreased IL-6-induced Stat3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Both compounds blocked suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS-3)-mRNA expression induced by IL-6. In addition, we found that Stat3 inhibitory effects of these compounds could be related to protein tyrosine phosphatase. These findings suggest that manassantin A and B could be useful remedies for treatment of inflammatory diseases by inhibiting IL-6 action.

  2. Dietary agent, benzyl isothiocyanate inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation and collaborates with sulforaphane in the growth suppression of PANC-1 cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deangelis Stephanie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT proteins comprise a family of latent transcription factors with diverse functions. STAT3 has well established roles in cell proliferation, growth and survival, and its persistent activation has been detected with high frequency in many human cancers. As constitutive activation of STAT3 appears to be vital for the continued survival of these cancerous cells, it has emerged as an attractive target for chemotherapeutics. We examined whether the inhibitory activities of bioactive compounds from cruciferous vegetables, such as Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC and sulforaphane, extended to STAT3 activation in PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells. BITC and sulforaphane were both capable of inhibiting cell viability and inducing apoptosis in PANC-1. Sulforaphane had minimal effect on the direct inhibition of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation, however, suggesting its inhibitory activities are most likely STAT3-independent. Conversely, BITC was shown to inhibit the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3, but not the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, MAPK and p70S6 kinase. These results suggest that STAT3 may be one of the targets of BITC-mediated inhibition of cell viability in PANC-1 cancer cells. In addition, we show that BITC can prevent the induction of STAT3 activation by Interleukin-6 in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, combinations of BITC and sulforaphane inhibited cell viability and STAT3 phosphorylation more dramatically than either agent alone. These findings suggest that the combination of the dietary agents BITC and sulforaphane has potent inhibitory activity in pancreatic cancer cells and that they may have translational potential as chemopreventative or therapeutic agents.

  3. Signaling through P2X7 receptor in human T cells involves p56lck, MAP kinases, and transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kappa B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budagian, Vadim; Bulanova, Elena; Brovko, Luba; Orinska, Zane; Fayad, Raja; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-01-17

    ATP-gated ion channel P2X receptors are expressed on the surface of most immune cells and can trigger multiple cellular responses, such as membrane permeabilization, cytokine production, and cell proliferation or apoptosis. Despite broad distribution and pleiotropic activities, signaling pathways downstream of these ionotropic receptors are still poorly understood. Here, we describe intracellular signaling events in Jurkat cells treated with millimolar concentrations of extracellular ATP. Within minutes, ATP treatment resulted in the phosphorylation and activation of p56(lck) kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase but not p38 kinase. These effects were wholly dependent upon the presence of extracellular Ca(2+) ions in the culture medium. Nevertheless, calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium and CaM kinase inhibitor KN-93 both had no effect on the activation of p56(lck) and ERK, whereas a pretreatment of Jurkat cells with MAP kinase kinase inhibitor P098059 was able to abrogate phosphorylation of ERK. Further, expression of c-Jun and c-Fos proteins and activator protein (AP-1) DNA binding activity were enhanced in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, DNA binding activity of NF-kappa B was reduced. ATP failed to stimulate the phosphorylation of ERK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase and activation of AP-1 in the p56(lck)-deficient isogenic T cell line JCaM1, suggesting a critical role for p56(lck) kinase in downstream signaling. Regarding the biological significance of the ATP-induced signaling events we show that although extracellular ATP was able to stimulate proliferation of both Jurkat and JCaM1 cells, an increase in interleukin-2 transcription was observed only in Jurkat cells. The nucleotide selectivity and pharmacological profile data supported the evidence that the ATP-induced effects in Jurkat cells were mediated through the P2X7 receptor. Taken together, these results demonstrate the ability of extracellular ATP to activate

  4. Graft union formation in grapevine induces transcriptional changes related to cell wall modification, wounding, hormone signalling, and secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Sarah Jane; Clemente Moreno, Maria José; Hevin, Cyril; Nyamba Mendome, Larissa Zita; Delrot, Serge; Trossat-Magnin, Claudine; Ollat, Nathalie

    2013-07-01

    Grafting is particularly important to the cultivation of perennial crops such as grapevine (Vitis vinifera) because rootstocks can provide resistance to soil-borne pests and diseases as well as improve tolerance to some abiotic stresses. Successful grafting is a complex biochemical and structural process beginning with the adhesion of the two grafted partners, followed by callus formation and the establishment of a functional vascular system. At the molecular level, the sequence of events underlying graft union formation remains largely uncharacterized. The present study investigates the transcriptome of grapevine rootstock and graft interface tissues sampled 3 d and 28 d after grafting of over-wintering stems in the spring. Many genes were differentially expressed over time, from 3 d to 28 d after grafting, which could be related to the activation of stem growth and metabolic activity in the spring. This hypothesis is supported by the up-regulation of many genes associated with cell wall synthesis, and phloem and xylem development. Generally, there was an up-regulation of gene expression in the graft interface tissue compared with the rootstock, particularly genes involved in cell wall synthesis, secondary metabolism, and signalling. Although there was overlap between the genes differentially expressed over time (from 3 d to 28 d after grafting) with the gene differentially expressed between the rootstock and the graft interface, numerous graft interface-specific genes were identified.

  5. Hsp90 orchestrates transcriptional regulation by Hsf1 and cell wall remodelling by MAPK signalling during thermal adaptation in a pathogenic yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle D Leach

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal adaptation is essential in all organisms. In yeasts, the heat shock response is commanded by the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1. Here we have integrated unbiased genetic screens with directed molecular dissection to demonstrate that multiple signalling cascades contribute to thermal adaptation in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. We show that the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 interacts with and down-regulates Hsf1 thereby modulating short term thermal adaptation. In the longer term, thermal adaptation depends on key MAP kinase signalling pathways that are associated with cell wall remodelling: the Hog1, Mkc1 and Cek1 pathways. We demonstrate that these pathways are differentially activated and display cross talk during heat shock. As a result ambient temperature significantly affects the resistance of C. albicans cells to cell wall stresses (Calcofluor White and Congo Red, but not osmotic stress (NaCl. We also show that the inactivation of MAP kinase signalling disrupts this cross talk between thermal and cell wall adaptation. Critically, Hsp90 coordinates this cross talk. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 disrupts the Hsf1-Hsp90 regulatory circuit thereby disturbing HSP gene regulation and reducing the resistance of C. albicans to proteotoxic stresses. Hsp90 depletion also affects cell wall biogenesis by impairing the activation of its client proteins Mkc1 and Hog1, as well as Cek1, which we implicate as a new Hsp90 client in this study. Therefore Hsp90 modulates the short term Hsf1-mediated activation of the classic heat shock response, coordinating this response with long term thermal adaptation via Mkc1- Hog1- and Cek1-mediated cell wall remodelling.

  6. Hsp90 orchestrates transcriptional regulation by Hsf1 and cell wall remodelling by MAPK signalling during thermal adaptation in a pathogenic yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle D Leach

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal adaptation is essential in all organisms. In yeasts, the heat shock response is commanded by the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1. Here we have integrated unbiased genetic screens with directed molecular dissection to demonstrate that multiple signalling cascades contribute to thermal adaptation in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. We show that the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 interacts with and down-regulates Hsf1 thereby modulating short term thermal adaptation. In the longer term, thermal adaptation depends on key MAP kinase signalling pathways that are associated with cell wall remodelling: the Hog1, Mkc1 and Cek1 pathways. We demonstrate that these pathways are differentially activated and display cross talk during heat shock. As a result ambient temperature significantly affects the resistance of C. albicans cells to cell wall stresses (Calcofluor White and Congo Red, but not osmotic stress (NaCl. We also show that the inactivation of MAP kinase signalling disrupts this cross talk between thermal and cell wall adaptation. Critically, Hsp90 coordinates this cross talk. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 disrupts the Hsf1-Hsp90 regulatory circuit thereby disturbing HSP gene regulation and reducing the resistance of C. albicans to proteotoxic stresses. Hsp90 depletion also affects cell wall biogenesis by impairing the activation of its client proteins Mkc1 and Hog1, as well as Cek1, which we implicate as a new Hsp90 client in this study. Therefore Hsp90 modulates the short term Hsf1-mediated activation of the classic heat shock response, coordinating this response with long term thermal adaptation via Mkc1- Hog1- and Cek1-mediated cell wall remodelling.

  7. Genome wide transcriptional analysis of resting and IL2 activated human natural killer cells: gene expression signatures indicative of novel molecular signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz Alexander

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human natural killer (NK cells are the key contributors of innate immune response and the effector functions of these cells are enhanced by cytokines such as interleukine 2 (IL2. We utilized genome-wide transcriptional profiling to identify gene expression signatures and pathways in resting and IL2 activated NK cell isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors. Results Gene expression profiling of resting NK cells showed high expression of a number of cytotoxic factors, cytokines, chemokines and inhibitory and activating surface NK receptors. Resting NK cells expressed many genes associated with cellular quiescence and also appeared to have an active TGFβ (TGFB1 signaling pathway. IL2 stimulation induced rapid downregulation of quiescence associated genes and upregulation of genes associated with cell cycle progression and proliferation. Numerous genes that may enhance immune function and responsiveness including activating receptors (DNAM1, KLRC1 and KLRC3, death receptor ligand (TNFSF6 (FASL and TRAIL, chemokine receptors (CX3CR1, CCR5 and CCR7, interleukin receptors (IL2RG, IL18RAB and IL27RA and members of secretory pathways (DEGS1, FKBP11, SSR3, SEC61G and SLC3A2 were upregulated. The expression profile suggested PI3K/AKT activation and NF-κB activation through multiple pathways (TLR/IL1R, TNF receptor induced and TCR-like possibly involving BCL10. Activation of NFAT signaling was supported by increased expression of many pathway members and downstream target genes. The transcription factor GATA3 was expressed in resting cells while T-BET was upregulated on activation concurrent with the change in cytokine expression profile. The importance of NK cells in innate immune response was also reflected by late increased expression of inflammatory chemotactic factors and receptors and molecules involved in adhesion and lymphocyte trafficking or migration. Conclusion This analysis allowed us to identify genes implicated in

  8. Gomisin A enhances tumor necrosis factor-α-induced G1 cell cycle arrest via signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-mediated phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiwut, Pornthip; Shin, Myoung-Sook; Yokoyama, Satoru; Saiki, Ikuo; Sakurai, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Gomisin A, a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan isolated from the fruit of Schisandra chinensis, has been reported as an anti-cancer substance. In this study, we investigated the effects of gomisin A on cancer cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. Gomisin A significantly inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner after 72 h treatment, especially in the presence of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), due to cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase with the downregulation of cyclin D1 expression and Retinoblastoma (RB) phosphorylation. In addition, gomisin A in combination with TNF-α strongly suppressed the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Inhibition of STAT1 pathways by a small-interfering RNA against STAT1 and AG490 Janus kinase (JAK) kinase inhibitor AG490 reduced the cyclin D1 expression and RB phosphorylation, indicating that JAK-mediated STAT1 activation is involved in gomisin A-induced G1 cell cycle arrest.

  9. Transcriptional coordination of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratsios, Paschalis; Pinan-Lucarré, Bérangère; Kerk, Sze Yen; Weinreb, Alexis; Bessereau, Jean-Louis; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-05-18

    During nervous system development, postmitotic neurons face the challenge of generating and structurally organizing specific synapses with appropriate synaptic partners. An important unexplored question is whether the process of synaptogenesis is coordinated with the adoption of specific signaling properties of a neuron. Such signaling properties are defined by the neurotransmitter system that a neuron uses to communicate with postsynaptic partners, the neurotransmitter receptor type used to receive input from presynaptic neurons, and, potentially, other sensory receptors that activate a neuron. Elucidating the mechanisms that coordinate synaptogenesis, neuronal activation, and neurotransmitter signaling in a postmitotic neuron represents one key approach to understanding how neurons develop as functional units. Using the SAB class of Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons as a model system, we show here that the phylogenetically conserved COE-type transcription factor UNC-3 is required for synaptogenesis. UNC-3 directly controls the expression of the ADAMTS-like protein MADD-4/Punctin, a presynaptically secreted synapse-organizing molecule that clusters postsynaptic receptors. UNC-3 also controls the assembly of presynaptic specializations and ensures the coordinated expression of enzymes and transporters that define the cholinergic neurotransmitter identity of the SAB neurons. Furthermore, synaptic output properties of the SAB neurons are coordinated with neuronal activation and synaptic input, as evidenced by UNC-3 also regulating the expression of ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors and putative stretch receptors. Our study shows how synaptogenesis and distinct, function-defining signaling features of a postmitotic neuron are hardwired together through coordinated transcriptional control.

  10. Transcriptional mechanisms and protein kinase signaling mediate organic dust induction of IL-8 expression in lung epithelial and THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottipati, Koteswara R; Bandari, Shiva Kumar; Nonnenmann, Matthew W; Levin, Jeffrey L; Dooley, Gregory P; Reynolds, Stephen J; Boggaram, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the agricultural work environment is a risk factor for the development of respiratory symptoms and chronic lung diseases. Inflammation is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of tissue injury and disease. Cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating lung inflammatory responses to agricultural dust are not yet fully understood. We studied the effects of poultry dust extract on molecular regulation of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a proinflammatory cytokine, in A549 and Beas2B lung epithelial and THP-1 monocytic cells. Our findings indicate that poultry dust extract potently induces IL-8 levels by increasing IL-8 gene transcription without altering IL-8 mRNA stability. Increase in IL-8 promoter activity was due to enhanced binding of activator protein 1 and NF-κB. IL-8 induction was associated with protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and inhibited by PKC and MAPK inhibitors. IL-8 increase was not inhibited by polymyxin B or l-nitroarginine methyl ester, indicating lack of involvement of lipopolysaccharide and nitric oxide in the induction. Lung epithelial and THP-1 cells share common mechanisms for induction of IL-8 levels. Our findings identify key roles for transcriptional mechanisms and protein kinase signaling pathways for IL-8 induction and provide insights into the mechanisms regulating lung inflammatory responses to organic dust exposure.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signals inversely regulate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity to control human dental pulp stem cell quiescence, propagation, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandomme, Jerome; Touil, Yasmine; Ostyn, Pauline; Olejnik, Cecile; Flamenco, Pilar; El Machhour, Raja; Segard, Pascaline; Masselot, Bernadette; Bailliez, Yves; Formstecher, Pierre; Polakowska, Renata

    2014-04-15

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remain quiescent until activated in response to severe dental pulp damage. Once activated, they exit quiescence and enter regenerative odontogenesis, producing reparative dentin. The factors and signaling molecules that control the quiescence/activation and commitment to differentiation of human DPSCs are not known. In this study, we determined that the inhibition of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling commonly activates DPSCs and promotes their exit from the G0 phase of the cell cycle as well as from the pyronin Y(low) stem cell compartment. The inhibition of these two pathways, however, inversely determines DPSC fate. In contrast to p38 MAPK inhibitors, IGF-1R inhibitors enhance dental pulp cell sphere-forming capacity and reduce the cells' colony-forming capacity without inducing cell death. The inverse cellular changes initiated by IGF-1R and p38 MAPK inhibitors were accompanied by inverse changes in the levels of active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) factor, inactive glycogen synthase kinase 3, and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein, a marker of early odontoblast differentiation. Our data suggest that there is cross talk between the IGF-1R and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in DPSCs and that the signals provided by these pathways converge at STAT3 and inversely regulate its activity to maintain quiescence or to promote self-renewal and differentiation of the cells. We propose a working model that explains the possible interactions between IGF-1R and p38 MAPK at the molecular level and describes the cellular consequences of these interactions. This model may inspire further fundamental study and stimulate research on the clinical applications of DPSC in cellular therapy and tissue regeneration.

  12. Genomic and chromatin signals underlying transcription start-site selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind; Sandelin, Albin Gustav

    2011-01-01

    A central question in cellular biology is how the cell regulates transcription and discerns when and where to initiate it. Locating transcription start sites (TSSs), the signals that specify them, and ultimately elucidating the mechanisms of regulated initiation has therefore been a recurrent theme......; the field is now faced with the daunting challenge of translating these descriptive maps into quantitative and predictive models describing the underlying biology. We review here the genomic and chromatin features that underlie TSS selection and usage, focusing on the differences between the major classes...

  13. Differential repression by the transcription factor REST/NRSF of the various Ca2+ signalling mechanisms in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariano, P; Zamburlin, P; D'Alessandro, R; Meldolesi, J; Lovisolo, D

    2010-04-01

    Expression of the nerve cell phenotype is orchestrated by the REST/NRSF transcription repressor, working on hundreds of genes recognized at a specific regulatory binding sequence. Most PC12 clones, the most frequently employed neuronal model, maintain low levels of REST; however a few, defective of neurosecretion, express high levels. To investigate the role of REST in Ca2+ signalling we studied the [Ca2+](i) changes in single cells of four clones, two wild-type and two defective, pre-treated for 5 days with NGF. We focused on Ca2+ influxes induced by depolarization and ATP. Only a subpopulation ( approximately 15%) of the defective, high REST cells responded to depolarization (Ca(V) expression approximately 10%). The ATP-induced intracellular Ca2+ release was little changed, whereas influx via ionotropic P2X receptors was decreased, in agreement with the decreased expression of P2X2 receptors. The percentage of defective cells expressing store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) following ATP stimulation was also lower. The responses of the defective clones were little affected by their differentiated state. In conclusion, our results revealed important new aspects of REST control of Ca2+ homeostasis, of potential physiological importance. The mechanisms of this control remain to be investigated. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Selenate Enhances STAT3 Transcriptional Activity in Endothelial Cells: Differential Actions of Selenate and Selenite on LIF Cytokine Signaling and Cell Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Alturkmani, Hani J; Zgheib, Carlos; Zouein, Fouad A.; Alshaaer, Nour Eddin F.; Kurdi, Mazen; Booz, George W.

    2012-01-01

    Sodium selenate may have utility in treating Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes; however, its impact on the associated proinflammatory cytokine signaling of endothelial cells has not been investigated. We report that treatment of human microvascular endothelial cells with sodium selenate at a pharmacological dose (100 μM) enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of nuclear STAT3 on Y705 in response to IL-6-type cytokine, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), indicative of enhanced STAT3 activity. Accordin...

  15. Transcriptional and signaling regulation in neural crest stem cell-derived melanocyte development:do all roads lead to Mitf?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Hou; William J Pavan

    2008-01-01

    Human neurocristopathies include a number of syndromes,tumors,and dysmorphologies of neural crest (NC) stem cell derivatives.In recent years,many white spotting genes have been associated with hypopigmentary disorders and deafness in neurocristopathies resulting from NC stem cell-derived melanocyte deficiency during development.These include PAX3,SOX10,MITF,SNAI2,EDNRB,EDN3,KIT,and KITL.Recent studies have revealed surprising new insights into a central role of MITF in the complex network of interacting genes in melanocyte development.In this perspective,we provide an overview of some of the current findings and explore complex functional roles of these genes during NC stem cell-derived melanocyte development.

  16. The other side of cardiac Ca2+ signaling: transcriptional control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro eDomínguez-Rodríquez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+ is probably the most versatile signal transduction element used by all cell types. In the heart, it is essential to activate cellular contraction in each heartbeat. Nevertheless Ca2+ is not only a key element in excitation-contraction coupling (EC coupling, but it is also a pivotal second messenger in cardiac signal transduction, being able to control processes such as excitability, metabolism, and transcriptional regulation. Regarding the latter, Ca2+ activates Ca2+-dependent transcription factors by a process called excitation-transcription coupling (ET coupling. ET coupling is an integrated process by which the common signaling pathways that regulate EC coupling activate transcription factors. Although ET coupling has been extensively studied in neurons and other cell types, less is known in cardiac muscle. Some hints have been found in studies on the development of cardiac hypertrophy, where two Ca2+-dependent enzymes are key actors: Ca2+/Calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII and phosphatase calcineurin, both of which are activated by the complex Ca2+/ /Calmodulin. The question now is how ET coupling occurs in cardiomyocytes, where intracellular Ca2+ is continuously oscillating. In this focused review, we will draw attention to location of Ca2+ signaling: intranuclear ([Ca2+]n or cytoplasmic ([Ca2+]c, and the specific ionic channels involved in the activation of cardiac ET coupling. Specifically, we will highlight the role of the 1,4,5 inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs in the elevation of [Ca2+]n levels, which are important to locally activate CaMKII, and the role of transient receptor potential channels canonical (TRPCs in [Ca2+]c, needed to activate calcineurin.

  17. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a inhibited by pimozide may regulate survival of goat mammary gland epithelial cells by regulating parathyroid hormone-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zheng, Huiling; Sun, Yongsen; Yu, Qian; Li, Lihui

    2014-11-10

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a (Stat5a) modulates genes involved in proliferation and survival and plays pivotal roles in regulating the function of the mammary gland during pregnancy, lactation, and involution. However, there is little information about the effects of Stat5a on apoptosis of goat mammary gland epithelial cells (GMECs). In addition, parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a key regulator in cellular calcium transport, mammary gland development and breast tumor biology. This study aimed to explore the interaction of Stat5a and PTHrP in GMEC apoptosis. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that Stat5a was predominantly expressed in the mammary gland, lung, liver and spleen of goats. Treating the GMECs with pimozide, an inhibitor of Stat5a that decreases Stat5a tyrosine phosphorylation, increased PTHrP levels in GMECs in a dose-dependent manner and simultaneously promoted apoptosis of the GMECs. We also demonstrated that PTHrP inhibition induced GMEC apoptosis and restrained cell proliferation. In contrast, PTHrP overexpression protected GMECs from pimozide- and calcium-induced apoptosis, and promoted cell proliferation. Furthermore, pimozide and CaCl2 downregulated the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 mRNA expression, respectively, and these effects were protected by PTHrP overexpression. Interestingly, we also found that Stat5a suppressed the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) which can induce goat mammary epithelial cell migration, but PTHrP increased MMP-9 mRNA level. Thus, Stat5a may regulate GMEC survival by regulating the expression of PTHrP. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Cell signaling review series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiming Lin; Zhenggang Liu

    2008-01-01

    @@ Signal transduction is pivotal for many, if not all, fundamental cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, transformation and programmed cell death. Deregulation of cell signaling may result in certain types of cancers and other human diseases.

  19. Resveratrol inhibits phosphorylation within the signal transduction and activator of transcription 3 signaling pathway by activating sirtuin 1 in SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haidong; Chen, Hui; Yu, Kehe; Zhang, Jingdong; Li, Bin; Cai, Ningyu; Pan, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The present study assessed the mechanism by which resveratrol (Res) inhibits the growth of SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells and examined whether sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) activation affects phosphorylation within the signal transduction and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. The present study used SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells in the logarithmic phase of growth (control and treatment groups). The latter group was treated with Res at 25 and 50 µmol/l for 24 h, and cell viability, proliferation and apoptosis were analyzed using the cell counting kit‑8 assay, colony counting and Hoechst staining, respectively. The expression levels of caspase‑3, cleaved caspase‑3, B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (BCL‑2), BCL-2 associated X protein (Bax), STAT3 and phosphorylated (p‑)STAT3) were measured by Western blotting. SW1353 cells were transfected with small interfering (si)RNA targeting Sirt1 and the expression levels of Sirt1, STAT3 and p-STAT3 were assessed. Exposure of SW1353 cells to Res reduced cell viability in a dose‑dependent manner (P<0.01). Additionally, cell proliferation was significantly inhibited and the cell nuclei exhibited apoptotic characteristics. Cleaved caspase‑3, Sirt1 and Bax levels were upregulated. The expression levels of BCL‑2 and p‑STAT3 were downregulated. Additionally, the BCL‑2/Bax ratio was reduced compared with the control group. The total STAT3 level was unaffected. Res treatment activated Sirt1, however, in cells transfected with Sirt1‑siRNA, the ability of resveratrol to suppress p‑STAT3 expression was compromised. Overall, it was revealed that Res treatment induced apoptosis, inhibited proliferation and affected phosphorylation within the STAT3 signaling pathway by activating Sirt1 in SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells.

  20. Stimulation of pancreatic beta-cell replication by incretins involves transcriptional induction of cyclin D1 via multiple signalling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, Birgitte N; Neubauer, Nicole; Lee, Ying C;

    2006-01-01

    pathways leading to mitosis by incretins and cytokines, respectively. The response to both GLP-1 and GIP was completely blocked by the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89. In addition, the phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor...... PD98059, both inhibited GLP-1- and GIP-stimulated proliferation. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, SB203580, had no inhibitory effect on either GLP-1 or GIP stimulated proliferation. Cyclin Ds act as molecular switches for the G0/G1-S phase transition in many cell types...

  1. Two serine residues of non-metastasis protein 23-H1 are critical in inhibiting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity in human lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhihao; Guo, Lili; Ge, Jiangnan; Zhang, Zhijian; Wei, Huijun; Zhou, Qinghua

    2017-01-01

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in numerous cancers, including lung cancer, is one of the major mechanisms of tumor progression and metastasis. The authors previously reported that the metastasis suppressor non-metastasis protein 23-H1 (Nm23-H1) negatively regulates STAT3 activity by inhibiting its phosphorylation on Tyr705. Nm23-H1 is a multifunction protein that has three different kinase activities. By transfecting the five mutants that inactivated three different kinase activities respectively into Nm23-H1 deficient lung cancer cell lines, it was identified that Nm23-H1S44A (Ser44 to Ala) and Nm23-H1S120G (Ser120 to Gly) mutant forms were unable to suppress STAT3 phosphorylation on Tyr705, resulting in increased expression of fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Notably, protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 was also involved in Nm23-H1S44A- and Nm23-H1S120G-mediated suppression of STAT3 phosphorylation. The present results indicated that Ser44 and Ser120 sites of Nm23-H1 may be responsible for its biological suppressive effects of STAT3 and tumor metastasis, which may contribute to illuminate the metastasis suppression function of Nm23-H1 in lung cancer. PMID:28781685

  2. A crucial role for the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in nicotinic cholinergic signaling to secretory protein transcription in pheochromocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, K; Wu, H; Mahata, S K; O'Connor, D T

    1998-07-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway plays a pivotal role in intracellular signaling, and this cascade may impinge on cAMP response elements (CREs) of target genes. Both the MAPK pathway and chromogranin A expression may be activated by cytosolic calcium influx, and calcium-dependent signals map onto the chromogranin A promoter proximal CRE. We therefore probed the role of the MAPK pathway in chromogranin A biosynthesis after secretory stimulation of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells by the nicotinic cholinergic pathway, the physiological secretory trigger. Chemical inhibition of either MAPK or MAPK kinase blocked the response of a transfected chromogranin A promoter to nicotine or protein kinase C activation [by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)], although nicotine-evoked catecholamine secretion was unaffected. Activation of the MAP kinase cascade (Ras, Raf, MAPK, or CREB kinase) by cotransfection of pathway components stimulated the chromogranin A promoter. Cotransfection of MAPK pathway dominant negative mutants (for Raf, MAPK, or CREB kinase) blocked nicotinic or PMA activation of chromogranin A, although a dominant negative Ras mutant was without effect. MAPK pathway enzymatic activity was stimulated by both nicotine and PMA. Point mutations of the chromogranin A CRE suggested that this element was necessary in cis for stimulation by nicotine, PMA, or chemical activation of the MAPK pathway. Transfer of the CRE to a heterologous promoter conferred inducibility by not only nicotine or cAMP but also MAPK activation. Expression of the CREB antagonist KCREB blocked the response of the chromogranin A promoter to nicotine, cAMP, or MAPK pathway activation by either chemical stimulation or cotransfection of active cascade components. Chromogranin A mRNA responded to MAPK pathway manipulation in a fashion similar to the transfected chromogranin A promoter, in both direction and magnitude. We conclude that the MAPK pathway is a necessary intermediate in

  3. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Susana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR, lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4 and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1 are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1 synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for

  4. Induction of caspase-dependent extrinsic apoptosis by apigenin through inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling in HER2-overexpressing BT-474 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hye-Sook; Jo, Jae Kyung; Ku, Jin Mo; Choi, Han-Seok; Choi, Youn Kyung; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Kim, Hyo In; Kang, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Kang Min; Nam, Koong Won; Park, Namkyu; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2015-10-23

    Phytoestrogen intake is known to be beneficial to decrease breast cancer incidence and progression. But its molecular mechanisms of action are still unknown. The present study aimed to examine the effect of apigenin on proliferation and apoptosis in HER2-expressing breast cancer cells. In our experiments, apigenin inhibited the proliferation of BT-474 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apigenin also inhibited clonogenic survival (anchorage-dependent and -independent) of BT-474 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These growth inhibitions were accompanied with an increase in sub-G0/G1 apoptotic populations. Apigenin-induced extrinsic a caspase-dependent apoptosis up-regulating the levels of cleaved caspase-8 and cleaved caspase-3, and inducing the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Whereas, apigenin did not induce apoptosis via intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathway since this compound did not decrease mitochondrial membrane potential without affecting the levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX). Apigenin reduced the expression of phospho-JAK1, phospho-JAK2 and phospho-STAT3 and decreased signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) dependent luciferase reporter gene activity in BT-474 cells. Apigenin inhibited CoCl2-induced VEGF secretion and decreased the nuclear translocation of STAT3. Our study indicates that apigenin induces apoptosis through inhibition of STAT3 signalling and could serve as a useful compound to prevent or treat HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. © 2015 Authors.

  5. Engineering cell-cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagovic, Katarina; Gong, Emily S; Milano, Daniel F; Natividad, Robert J; Asthagiri, Anand R

    2013-10-01

    Juxtacrine cell-cell signaling mediated by the direct interaction of adjoining mammalian cells is arguably the mode of cell communication that is most recalcitrant to engineering. Overcoming this challenge is crucial for progress in biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune system engineering and therapeutic design. Here, we describe the significant advances that have been made in developing synthetic platforms (materials and devices) and synthetic cells (cell surface engineering and synthetic gene circuits) to modulate juxtacrine cell-cell signaling. In addition, significant progress has been made in elucidating design rules and strategies to modulate juxtacrine signaling on the basis of quantitative, engineering analysis of the mechanical and regulatory role of juxtacrine signals in the context of other cues and physical constraints in the microenvironment. These advances in engineering juxtacrine signaling lay a strong foundation for an integrative approach to utilize synthetic cells, advanced 'chassis' and predictive modeling to engineer the form and function of living tissues.

  6. Engineering Cell-Cell Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Daniel F.; Natividad, Robert J.; Asthagiri, Anand R.

    2014-01-01

    Juxtacrine cell-cell signaling mediated by the direct interaction of adjoining mammalian cells is arguably the mode of cell communication that is most recalcitrant to engineering. Overcoming this challenge is crucial for progress in biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune system engineering and therapeutic design. Here, we describe the significant advances that have been made in developing synthetic platforms (materials and devices) and synthetic cells (cell surface engineering and synthetic gene circuits) to modulate juxtacrine cell-cell signaling. In addition, significant progress has been made in elucidating design rules and strategies to modulate juxtacrine signaling based on quantitative, engineering analysis of the mechanical and regulatory role of juxtacrine signals in the context of other cues and physical constraints in the microenvironment. These advances in engineering juxtacrine signaling lay a strong foundation for an integrative approach to utilizing synthetic cells, advanced ‘chassis’ and predictive modeling to engineer the form and function of living tissues. PMID:23856592

  7. Selenate enhances STAT3 transcriptional activity in endothelial cells: differential actions of selenate and selenite on LIF cytokine signaling and cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturkmani, Hani J; Zgheib, Carlos; Zouein, Fouad A; Alshaaer, Nour Eddin F; Kurdi, Mazen; Booz, George W

    2012-04-01

    Sodium selenate may have utility in treating Alzheimer's disease and diabetes; however, its impact on the associated proinflammatory cytokine signaling of endothelial cells has not been investigated. We report that treatment of human microvascular endothelial cells with sodium selenate at a pharmacological dose (100 μM) enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of nuclear STAT3 on Y705 in response to IL-6-type cytokine, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), indicative of enhanced STAT3 activity. Accordingly, STAT3 nuclear binding to DNA was increased, as well as LIF-induced gene expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2). CCL2 plays a key role in inflammatory processes associated with neuronal degenerative and vascular diseases. The enhancing action of selenate on LIF-induced STAT3 Y705 phosphorylation was replicated by vanadate and a specific inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 1 (PTP1B). Moreover, we observed that selenite, the cellular reduction bioproduct of selenate but not selenate itself, inhibited enzymatic activity of human recombinant PTP1B. Our findings support the conclusion that in human microvascular endothelial cells selenate has a vanadate-like effect in inhibiting PTP1B and enhancing proinflammatory STAT3 activation. These findings raise the possibility that beneficial actions of supranutritional levels of selenate for treating Alzheimer's and diabetes may be offset by a proinflammatory action on endothelial cells.

  8. Genomic and chromatin signals underlying transcription start-site selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valen, Eivind; Sandelin, Albin

    2011-11-01

    A central question in cellular biology is how the cell regulates transcription and discerns when and where to initiate it. Locating transcription start sites (TSSs), the signals that specify them, and ultimately elucidating the mechanisms of regulated initiation has therefore been a recurrent theme. In recent years substantial progress has been made towards this goal, spurred by the possibility of applying genome-wide, sequencing-based analysis. We now have a large collection of high-resolution datasets identifying locations of TSSs, protein-DNA interactions, and chromatin features over whole genomes; the field is now faced with the daunting challenge of translating these descriptive maps into quantitative and predictive models describing the underlying biology. We review here the genomic and chromatin features that underlie TSS selection and usage, focusing on the differences between the major classes of core promoters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Infection-stimulated Anemia Results Primarily from Interferon Gamma-dependent, Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1-independent Red Cell Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wang; Dong-Xia Zhang; Qi Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Background:Although the onset of anemia during infectious disease is commonly correlated with production of inflammatory cytokines,the mechanisms by which cytokines induce anemia are poorly defined.This study focused on the mechanism research.Methods:Different types of mice were infected perorally with Toxoplasma gondii strain ME49.At the indicated times,samples from each mouse were harvested,processed,and analyzed individually.Blood samples were analyzed using a Coulter Counter and red blood cell (RBC) survival was measured by biotinylation.Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α),inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS),and inducible protein 10 (IP-10) mRNA in liver tissue were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results:T.gondii-infected mice exhibited anemia due to a decrease in both erythropoiesis and survival time of RBC in the circulation (P < 0.02).In addition,infection-stimulated anemia was associated with fecal occult,supporting previous literature that hemorrhage is a consequence of T.gondii infection in mice.Infection-induced anemia was abolished in interferon gamma (IFNγ) and IFNγ receptor deficient mice (P < 0.05) but was still evident in mice lacking TNF-α,iNOS,phagocyte NADPH oxidase or IP-10 (P < 0.02).Neither signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) deficient mice nor 129S6 controls exhibited decreased erythropoiesis,but rather suffered from an anemia resulting solely from increased loss of circulating RBC.Conclusions:Infection-stimulated decrease in erythropoiesis and losses of RBC have distinct mechanistic bases.These results show that during T.gondii infection,IFNγ is responsible for an anemia that results from both a decrease in erythropoiesis and a STAT1 independent loss of circulating RBC.

  10. Gene transcriptional networks integrate microenvironmental signals in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2011-04-01

    A significant amount of evidence shows that microenvironmental signals generated from extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, soluble factors, and cell-cell adhesion complexes cooperate at the extra- and intracellular level. This synergetic action of microenvironmental cues is crucial for normal mammary gland development and breast malignancy. To explore how the microenvironmental genes coordinate in human breast cancer at the genome level, we have performed gene co-expression network analysis in three independent microarray datasets and identified two microenvironment networks in human breast cancer tissues. Network I represents crosstalk and cooperation of ECM microenvironment and soluble factors during breast malignancy. The correlated expression of cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion proteins in Network II implicates the coordinated action of these molecules in modulating the immune response in breast cancer tissues. These results suggest that microenvironmental cues are integrated with gene transcriptional networks to promote breast cancer development.

  11. The Hinge-Helix 1 Region of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ1 (PPARγ1) Mediates Interaction with Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 5 and PPARγ1 Transcriptional Activation: Involvement in Flow-Induced PPARγ Activation in Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Akaike, Masashi; Che, Wenyi; Marmarosh, Nicole-Lerner; Ohta, Shinsuke; Osawa, Masaki; Ding,Bo; Berk, Bradford C.; Yan, Chen; Abe, Jun-ichi

    2004-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are ligand-activated transcription factors that form a subfamily of the nuclear receptor gene family. Since both flow and PPARγ have atheroprotective effects and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) kinase activity is significantly increased by flow, we investigated whether ERK5 kinase regulates PPARγ activity. We found that activation of ERK5 induced PPARγ1 activation in endothelial cells (ECs). However, we could not detect PPARγ p...

  12. Control of MicroRNA-21 expression in colorectal cancer cells by oncogenic epidermal growth factor/Ras signaling and Ets transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Hanna B; Niemeyer, Brian F; Parrish, Janet K; Kerr, Carol A; Yaghi, Nasser K; Prescott, Jason D; Gutierrez-Hartmann, Arthur; Jedlicka, Paul

    2012-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are important regulators of gene expression in normal physiology and disease, and are widely misexpressed in cancer. A number of studies have identified miR-21 as an important promoter of oncogenesis. However, as is true of most miRs, the mechanisms behind the aberrant expression of miR-21 in cancer are poorly understood. Herein, we examine the regulation of miR-21 expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells by the oncogenic epidermal growth factor (EGF)/Ras pathway and by Ets transcription factors, modulators of epithelial oncogenesis that are frequently misexpressed in CRC. We show that EGF/Ras efficiently induces the miR-21 primary transcript, but this does not rapidly and simply translate into higher mature miR-21 levels. Rather, induction of mature miR-21 by constitutive activation of this pathway is slow, is associated with only minimal activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase, and may involve stimulation of post-transcriptional processing by mechanisms other than Dicer stabilization. We further identify Ets transcription factors as modifiers of miR-21 expression in CRC. The effects of Ets factors on miR-21 expression are cell context-dependent, and appear to involve both direct and indirect mechanisms. The Ets factor Pea3 emerges from our studies as a consistent repressor of miR-21 transcription. Overall, our studies identify a complex relationship between oncogenic pathways and steady-state miR-21 levels in CRC, and highlight the need for greater understanding of the control of miR expression in cancer and other disease states.

  13. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte eCaarls

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA are the major players. Extensive cross-communication between the hormone signaling pathways allows for fine tuning of transcriptional programs, determining resistance to invaders and trade-offs with plant development. Here, we give an overview of how SA can control transcriptional reprogramming of JA-induced genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. SA can influence activity and/or localization of transcriptional regulators by post-translational modifications of transcription factors and co-regulators. SA-induced redox changes, mediated by thioredoxins and glutaredoxins, modify transcriptional regulators that are involved in suppression of JA-dependent genes, such as NPR1 and TGA transcription factors, which affects their localization or DNA binding activity. Furthermore, SA can mediate sequestering of JA-responsive transcription factors away from their target genes by stalling them in the cytosol or in complexes with repressor proteins in the nucleus. SA also affects JA-induced transcription by inducing degradation of transcription factors with an activating role in JA signaling, as was shown for the ERF transcription factor ORA59. Additionally, SA can induce negative regulators, among which WRKY transcription factors, that can directly or indirectly inhibit JA-responsive gene expression. Finally, at the DNA level, modification of histones by SA-dependent factors can result in repression of JA-responsive genes. These diverse and complex regulatory mechanisms affect important signaling hubs in the integration of hormone signaling networks. Some pathogens have evolved effectors that highjack hormone crosstalk mechanisms for their own good, which are described in this review as well.

  14. Comparison of the gene expression profiles of human fetal cortical astrocytes with pluripotent stem cell derived neural stem cells identifies human astrocyte markers and signaling pathways and transcription factors active in human astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nasir; Wang, Xiantao; Shah, Sonia; Efthymiou, Anastasia G; Yan, Bin; Heman-Ackah, Sabrina; Zhan, Ming; Rao, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system (CNS) and have a multitude of functions that include maintenance of CNS homeostasis, trophic support of neurons, detoxification, and immune surveillance. It has only recently been appreciated that astrocyte dysfunction is a primary cause of many neurological disorders. Despite their importance in disease very little is known about global gene expression for human astrocytes. We have performed a microarray expression analysis of human fetal astrocytes to identify genes and signaling pathways that are important for astrocyte development and maintenance. Our analysis confirmed that the fetal astrocytes express high levels of the core astrocyte marker GFAP and the transcription factors from the NFI family which have been shown to play important roles in astrocyte development. A group of novel markers were identified that distinguish fetal astrocytes from pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and NSC-derived neurons. As in murine astrocytes, the Notch signaling pathway appears to be particularly important for cell fate decisions between the astrocyte and neuronal lineages in human astrocytes. These findings unveil the repertoire of genes expressed in human astrocytes and serve as a basis for further studies to better understand astrocyte biology, especially as it relates to disease.

  15. Mechanical control of cyclic AMP signalling and gene transcription through integrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C. J.; Alenghat, F. J.; Rim, P.; Fong, J. H.; Fabry, B.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This study was carried out to discriminate between two alternative hypotheses as to how cells sense mechanical forces and transduce them into changes in gene transcription. Do cells sense mechanical signals through generalized membrane distortion or through specific transmembrane receptors, such as integrins? Here we show that mechanical stresses applied to the cell surface alter the cyclic AMP signalling cascade and downstream gene transcription by modulating local release of signals generated by activated integrin receptors in a G-protein-dependent manner, whereas distortion of integrins in the absence of receptor occupancy has no effect.

  16. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Cytokine Signaling by AU-Rich and GU-Rich Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are necessary for cell communication to enable responses to external stimuli that are imperative for the survival and maintenance of homeostasis. Dysfunction of the cytokine network has detrimental effects on intra- and extracellular environments. Thus, it is critical that the expression of cytokines and the signals transmitted by cytokines to target cells are tightly regulated at numerous levels, including transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Here, we briefly summarize the role of AU-rich elements (AREs) in the regulation of cytokine gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and describe a role for GU-rich elements (GREs) in coordinating the regulation of cytokine signaling. GREs function as post-transcriptional regulators of proteins that control cellular activation, growth, and apoptosis. GREs and AREs work in concert to coordinate cytokine signal transduction pathways. The precise regulation of cytokine signaling is particularly important, because its dysregulation can lead to human diseases. PMID:24697201

  17. Structure and cell-specific expression of a cloned human retinol binding protein gene: the 5'-flanking region contains hepatoma specific transcriptional signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, C; Colantuoni, V; Cortese, R

    1985-08-01

    Human plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is coded by a single gene and is specifically synthesized in the liver. We have characterized a lambda clone, from a human DNA library, carrying the gene coding for plasma RBP. Southern blot analysis and DNA sequencing show that the gene is composed of six exons and five introns. Primer elongation and S1 mapping experiments allowed the definition of the initiation of transcription and the identification of the putative promoter. The 5'-flanking region of the RBP gene was fused upstream to the coding sequence of the bacterial enzyme chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT): the chimeric gene was introduced, by calcium phosphate precipitation, into the human hepatoma cell line Hep G2 and into HeLa cells. Efficient expression of CAT was obtained only in Hep G2. Primer elongation analysis of the RNA extracted from transfected Hep G2 showed that initiation of transcription of the transfected chimeric gene occurs at a position identical to that of the natural gene. Transcriptional analysis of Bal31 deletions from the 3' end of the RBP 5'-flanking DNA allowed the identification of the RBP gene promoter.

  18. Engineering Cell-Cell Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Blagovic, Katarina; Gong, Emily S.; Milano, Daniel F.; Natividad, Robert J.; Asthagiri, Anand R

    2013-01-01

    Juxtacrine cell-cell signaling mediated by the direct interaction of adjoining mammalian cells is arguably the mode of cell communication that is most recalcitrant to engineering. Overcoming this challenge is crucial for progress in biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune system engineering and therapeutic design. Here, we describe the significant advances that have been made in developing synthetic platforms (materials and devices) and synthetic cel...

  19. Regulation of the BMP Signaling-Responsive Transcriptional Network in the Drosophila Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deignan, Lisa; Pinheiro, Marco T; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Saunders, Abbie; Wilcockson, Scott G; Zeef, Leo A H; Donaldson, Ian J; Ashe, Hilary L

    2016-07-01

    The BMP signaling pathway has a conserved role in dorsal-ventral axis patterning during embryonic development. In Drosophila, graded BMP signaling is transduced by the Mad transcription factor and opposed by the Brinker repressor. In this study, using the Drosophila embryo as a model, we combine RNA-seq with Mad and Brinker ChIP-seq to decipher the BMP-responsive transcriptional network underpinning differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm during dorsal-ventral axis patterning. We identify multiple new BMP target genes, including positive and negative regulators of EGF signaling. Manipulation of EGF signaling levels by loss- and gain-of-function studies reveals that EGF signaling negatively regulates embryonic BMP-responsive transcription. Therefore, the BMP gene network has a self-regulating property in that it establishes a balance between its activity and that of the antagonistic EGF signaling pathway to facilitate correct patterning. In terms of BMP-dependent transcription, we identify key roles for the Zelda and Zerknüllt transcription factors in establishing the resulting expression domain, and find widespread binding of insulator proteins to the Mad and Brinker-bound genomic regions. Analysis of embryos lacking the BEAF-32 insulator protein shows reduced transcription of a peak BMP target gene and a reduction in the number of amnioserosa cells, the fate specified by peak BMP signaling. We incorporate our findings into a model for Mad-dependent activation, and discuss its relevance to BMP signal interpretation in vertebrates.

  20. Transcription factors and target genes of pre-TCR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose; Berga-Bolaños, Rosa

    2015-06-01

    Almost 30 years ago pioneering work by the laboratories of Harald von Boehmer and Susumo Tonegawa provided the first indications that developing thymocytes could assemble a functional TCRβ chain-containing receptor complex, the pre-TCR, before TCRα expression. The discovery and study of the pre-TCR complex revealed paradigms of signaling pathways in control of cell survival and proliferation, and culminated in the recognition of the multifunctional nature of this receptor. As a receptor integrated in a dynamic developmental process, the pre-TCR must be viewed not only in the light of the biological outcomes it promotes, but also in context with those molecular processes that drive its expression in thymocytes. This review article focuses on transcription factors and target genes activated by the pre-TCR to drive its different outcomes.

  1. Camel milk triggers apoptotic signaling pathways in human hepatoma HepG2 and breast cancer MCF7 cell lines through transcriptional mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korashy, Hesham M; Maayah, Zaid H; Abd-Allah, Adel R; El-Kadi, Ayman O S; Alhaider, Abdulqader A

    2012-01-01

    Few published studies have reported the use of crude camel milk in the treatment of stomach infections, tuberculosis and cancer. Yet, little research was conducted on the effect of camel milk on the apoptosis and oxidative stress associated with human cancer. The present study investigated the effect and the underlying mechanisms of camel milk on the proliferation of human cancer cells using an in vitro model of human hepatoma (HepG2) and human breast (MCF7) cancer cells. Our results showed that camel milk, but not bovine milk, significantly inhibited HepG2 and MCF7 cells proliferation through the activation of caspase-3 mRNA and activity levels, and the induction of death receptors in both cell lines. In addition, Camel milk enhanced the expression of oxidative stress markers, heme oxygenase-1 and reactive oxygen species production in both cells. Mechanistically, the increase in caspase-3 mRNA levels by camel milk was completely blocked by the transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D; implying that camel milk increased de novo RNA synthesis. Furthermore, Inhibition of the mitogen activated protein kinases differentially modulated the camel milk-induced caspase-3 mRNA levels. Taken together, camel milk inhibited HepG2 and MCF7 cells survival and proliferation through the activation of both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways.

  2. Camel Milk Triggers Apoptotic Signaling Pathways in Human Hepatoma HepG2 and Breast Cancer MCF7 Cell Lines through Transcriptional Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham M. Korashy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Few published studies have reported the use of crude camel milk in the treatment of stomach infections, tuberculosis and cancer. Yet, little research was conducted on the effect of camel milk on the apoptosis and oxidative stress associated with human cancer. The present study investigated the effect and the underlying mechanisms of camel milk on the proliferation of human cancer cells using an in vitro model of human hepatoma (HepG2 and human breast (MCF7 cancer cells. Our results showed that camel milk, but not bovine milk, significantly inhibited HepG2 and MCF7 cells proliferation through the activation of caspase-3 mRNA and activity levels, and the induction of death receptors in both cell lines. In addition, Camel milk enhanced the expression of oxidative stress markers, heme oxygenase-1 and reactive oxygen species production in both cells. Mechanistically, the increase in caspase-3 mRNA levels by camel milk was completely blocked by the transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D; implying that camel milk increased de novo RNA synthesis. Furthermore, Inhibition of the mitogen activated protein kinases differentially modulated the camel milk-induced caspase-3 mRNA levels. Taken together, camel milk inhibited HepG2 and MCF7 cells survival and proliferation through the activation of both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways.

  3. Mitochondrial function in ageing: coordination with signalling and transcriptional pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Liu, Zhigang; Cadenas, Enrique

    2016-04-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction entailing decreased energy-transducing capacity and perturbed redox homeostasis is an early and sometimes initiating event in ageing and age-related disorders involving tissues with high metabolic rate such as brain, liver and heart. In the central nervous system (CNS), recent findings from our and other groups suggest that the mitochondrion-centred hypometabolism is a key feature of ageing brains and Alzheimer's disease. This hypometabolic state is manifested by lowered neuronal glucose uptake, metabolic shift in the astrocytes, and alternations in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle function. Similarly, in liver and adipose tissue, mitochondrial capacity around glucose and fatty acid metabolism and thermogenesis is found to decline with age and is implicated in age-related metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. These mitochondrion-related disorders in peripheral tissues can impact on brain functions through metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory signals. At the cellular level, studies in CNS and non-CNS tissues support the notion that instead of being viewed as autonomous organelles, mitochondria are part of a dynamic network with close interactions with other cellular components through energy- or redox-sensitive cytosolic kinase signalling and transcriptional pathways. Hence, it would be critical to further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the communication between mitochondria and the rest of the cell. Therapeutic strategies that effectively preserves or improve mitochondrial function by targeting key component of these signalling cascades could represent a novel direction for numerous mitochondrion-implicated, age-related disorders.

  4. Cisplatin-induced regulation of signal transduction pathways and transcription factors in p53-mutated subclone variants of hepatoma cells: Potential application for therapeutic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Shang, Hung-Sheng; Ho, Chun-Te; Lai, Kun-Goung; Liu, Tsan-Zon; Chen, Yin-Ju; Chiou, Jeng-Fong

    2016-11-01

    Cisplatin is commonly recognized as a DNA-damaging drug; however, its versatile antitumor effects have been demonstrated to extend beyond this narrow functional attribute. The present study determined how cisplatin regulates alternative pathways and transcription factors to exert its additional antitumor actions. Cisplatin was observed to be able to trigger an endoplasmic reticulum stress response through aggravated nitrosative stress coupled to perturbed mitochondrial calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis, which substantially downregulated glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 78 expression by suppressing the cleavage of activating transcription factor (ATF) 6α (90 kDa) to its active 50 kDa subunit. Concomitantly, the ATF4-ATF3-C/emopamil binding protein homologous protein axis was activated by cisplatin, which triggered cellular glutathione (GSH) depletion by strongly inhibiting γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase heavy chain (γ-GCSh), a key enzyme in GSH biosynthesis. The present study also demonstrated that cisplatin substantially inhibited β-catenin, causing a marked downregulation of survivin and B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2. Taken together, the present results uncovered a novel mechanism of cisplatin that could simultaneously trigger the inhibition of three prominent antiapoptotic effector molecules (Bcl-2, survivin and GRP78) and effectively promote GSH depletion by inhibiting γ-GCSh. These newly discovered functional attributes of cisplatin can provide an avenue for novel combined therapeutic strategies to kill hepatocellular carcinoma cells effectively.

  5. HSPA6 augments garlic extract-induced inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion of bladder cancer EJ cells; Implication for cell cycle dysregulation, signaling pathway alteration, and transcription factor-associated MMP-9 regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Byungdoo; Noh, Dae-Hwa; Park, Sung Lyea; Kim, Won Tae; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Although recent studies have demonstrated the anti-tumor effects of garlic extract (GE), the exact molecular mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism associated with the inhibitory action of GE against bladder cancer EJ cell responses. Treatment with GE significantly inhibited proliferation of EJ cells dose-dependently through G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest. This G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest by GE was due to the activation of ATM and CHK2, which appears to inhibit phosphorylation of Cdc25C (Ser216) and Cdc2 (Thr14/Tyr15), this in turn was accompanied by down-regulation of cyclin B1 and up-regulation of p21WAF1. Furthermore, GE treatment was also found to induce phosphorylation of MAPK (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and JNK) and AKT. In addition, GE impeded the migration and invasion of EJ cells via inhibition of MMP-9 expression followed by decreased binding activities of AP-1, Sp-1, and NF-κB motifs. Based on microarray datasets, we selected Heat shock protein A6 (HSPA6) as the most up-regulated gene responsible for the inhibitory effects of GE. Interestingly, overexpression of HSPA6 gene resulted in an augmentation effect with GE inhibiting proliferation, migration, and invasion of EJ cells. The augmentation effect of HSPA6 was verified by enhancing the induction of G2/M-phase-mediated ATM-CHK2-Cdc25C-p21WAF1-Cdc2 cascade, phosphorylation of MAPK and AKT signaling, and suppression of transcription factor-associated MMP-9 regulation in response to GE in EJ cells. Overall, our novel results indicate that HSPA6 reinforces the GE-mediated inhibitory effects of proliferation, migration, and invasion of EJ cells and may provide a new approach for therapeutic treatment of malignancies. PMID:28187175

  6. Tumor-suppressive p53 Signaling Empowers Metastatic Inhibitor KLF17-dependent Transcription to Overcome Tumorigenesis in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amjad; Bhatti, Muhammad Zeeshan; Shah, Abdus Saboor; Duong, Hong-Quan; Alkreathy, Huda Mohammad; Mohammad, Shah Faisal; Khan, Rahmat Ali; Ahmad, Ayaz

    2015-08-28

    Metastasis, which is controlled by concerted action of multiple genes, is a complex process and is an important cause of cancer death. Krüppel-like factor 17 (KLF17) is a negative regulator of metastasis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during cancer progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanism and biological relevance of KLF17 in cancer cells are poorly understood. Here, we show that tumor suppressor protein p53 plays an integral role to induce KLF17 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). p53 is recruited to the KLF17 promoter and results in the formation of p53-DNA complex. p53 enhances binding of p300 and favors histone acetylation on the KLF17 promoter. Mechanistically, p53 physically interacts with KLF17 and thereby enhances the anti-metastatic function of KLF17. p53 empowers KLF17-mediated EMT genes transcription via enhancing physical association of KLF17 with target gene promoters. Nutlin-3 recruits KLF17 to EMT target gene promoters and results in the formation of KLF17-DNA complex via a p53-dependent pathway. p53 depletion abrogates DNA binding affinity of KLF17 to EMT target gene promoters. KLF17 is critical for p53 cellular activities in NSCLC. Importantly, KLF17 enhances p53 transcription to generate a novel positive feedback loop. KLF17 depletion accelerates lung cancer cell growth in response to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, we found that KLF17 increases the expression of tumor suppressor genes p53, p21, and pRB. Functionally, KLF17 required p53 to suppress cancer cell invasion and migration in NSCLC. In conclusion, our study highlights a novel insight into the anti-EMT effect of KLF17 via a p53-dependent pathway in NSCLC, and KLF17 may be a new therapeutic target in NSCLC with p53 status.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin activates NRF2-ARE-mediated transcriptional response via the ROS-EGFR-PI3K-AKT/MEK-ERK MAP kinase signaling in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Duan, Chaohui; Kuang, Zhizhou; Hao, Yonghua; Jeffries, Jayme L; Lau, Gee W

    2013-01-01

    The redox-active pyocyanin (PCN) secreted by the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes oxidative stress to pulmonary epithelial cells. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) confers protection against ROS-mediated cell death by inducing the expression of detoxifying enzymes and proteins via its binding to the cis-acting antioxidant response element (ARE). However, a clear relationship between NRF2 and PCN-mediated oxidative stress has not been established experimentally. In this study, we investigated the induction of NRF2-ARE response by PCN in the pulmonary epithelial cells. We analyzed the effect of PCN on NRF2 expression and nuclear translocation in cultured human airway epithelial cells, and in a mouse model of chronic PCN exposure. NRF2-dependent transcription of antioxidative enzymes was also assessed. Furthermore, we used inhibitors to examine the involvement of EGFR and its downstream signaling components that mediate NRF2-ARE-activation in response to PCN. PCN enhances the nuclear NRF2 accumulation and activates the transcription of ARE-mediated antioxidant genes. Furthermore, PCN activates NRF2 by inducing the EGFR-phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway and its main downstream effectors, AKT and MEK1/2-ERK1/2 MAP kinases. Inhibition of the EGFR-PI3K signaling markedly attenuates PCN-stimulated NRF2 accumulation in the nucleus. We demonstrate for the first time that PCN-mediated oxidative stress activates the EGFR-PI3K-AKT/MEK1/2-ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling pathway, leading to nuclear NRF2 translocation and ARE responsiveness in pulmonary epithelial cells.

  8. Tunable signal processing through modular control of transcription factor translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Budnik, Bogdan A.; Gunawardena, Jeremy; O’Shea, Erin K.

    2013-01-01

    Signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation. We explored how TFs process signaling inputs to generate diverse dynamic responses. The budding yeast general stress responsive TF Msn2 acted as a tunable signal processor that could track, filter, or integrate signals in an input dependent manner. This tunable signal processing appears to originate from dual regulation of both nuclear import and export by phosphorylation, as mutants with one form of regulation sustained only one signal processing function. Versatile signal processing by Msn2 is crucial for generating distinct dynamic responses to different natural stresses. Our findings reveal how complex signal processing functions are integrated into a single molecule and provide a guide for the design of TFs with “programmable” signal processing functions. PMID:23349292

  9. Tunable signal processing through modular control of transcription factor translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Budnik, Bogdan A; Gunawardena, Jeremy; O'Shea, Erin K

    2013-01-25

    Signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation. We explored how TFs process signaling inputs to generate diverse dynamic responses. The budding yeast general stress-responsive TF Msn2 acted as a tunable signal processor that could track, filter, or integrate signals in an input-dependent manner. This tunable signal processing appears to originate from dual regulation of both nuclear import and export by phosphorylation, as mutants with one form of regulation sustained only one signal-processing function. Versatile signal processing by Msn2 is crucial for generating distinct dynamic responses to different natural stresses. Our findings reveal how complex signal-processing functions are integrated into a single molecule and provide a guide for the design of TFs with "programmable" signal-processing functions.

  10. PEA3/ETV4-related transcription factors coupled with active ERK signalling are associated with poor prognosis in gastric adenocarcinoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keld, R

    2011-06-28

    Background: Transcription factors often play important roles in tumourigenesis. Members of the PEA3 subfamily of ETS-domain transcription factors fulfil such a role and have been associated with tumour metastasis in several different cancers. Moreover, the activity of the PEA3 subfamily transcription factors is potentiated by Ras-ERK pathway signalling, which is itself often deregulated in tumour cells.\\r\

  11. The Neurospora Transcription Factor ADV-1 Transduces Light Signals and Temporal Information to Control Rhythmic Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigzin Dekhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Light and the circadian clock have a profound effect on the biology of organisms through the regulation of large sets of genes. Toward understanding how light and the circadian clock regulate gene expression, we used genome-wide approaches to identify the direct and indirect targets of the light-responsive and clock-controlled transcription factor ADV-1 in Neurospora crassa. A large proportion of ADV-1 targets were found to be light- and/or clock-controlled, and enriched for genes involved in development, metabolism, cell growth, and cell fusion. We show that ADV-1 is necessary for transducing light and/or temporal information to its immediate downstream targets, including controlling rhythms in genes critical to somatic cell fusion. However, while ADV-1 targets are altered in predictable ways in Δadv-1 cells in response to light, this is not always the case for rhythmic target gene expression. These data suggest that a complex regulatory network downstream of ADV-1 functions to generate distinct temporal dynamics of target gene expression relative to the central clock mechanism.

  12. Hedgehog signaling pathway and gastrointestinal stem cell signaling network (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-12-01

    Hedgehog, BMP/TGFbeta, FGF, WNT and Notch signaling pathways constitute the stem cell signaling network, which plays a key role in a variety of processes, such as embryogenesis, maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis, tissue repair during chronic persistent inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Sonic hedgehog (SHH), Indian hedgehog (IHH) and Desert hedgehog (DHH) bind to PTCH1/PTCH or PTCH2 receptor to release Smoothened (SMO) signal transducer from Patched-dependent suppression. SMO then activates STK36 serine/threonine kinase to stabilize GLI family members and to phosphorylate SUFU for nuclear accumulation of GLI. Hedgehog signaling activation leads to GLI-dependent transcriptional activation of target genes, such as GLI1, PTCH1, CCND2, FOXL1, JAG2 and SFRP1. GLI1-dependent positive feedback loop combined with PTCH1-dependent negative feedback loop gives rise to transient proliferation of Hedgehog target cells. Iguana homologs (DZIP1 and DZIP1L) and Costal-2 homologs (KIF7 and KIF27) are identified by comparative integromics. SHH-dependent parietal cell proliferation is implicated in gastric mucosal repair during chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. BMP-RUNX3 signaling induces IHH expression in surface differentiated epithelial cells of stomach and intestine. Hedgehog signals from epithelial cells then induces FOXL1-mediated BMP4 upregulation in mesenchymal cells. Hedgehog signaling is frequently activated in esophageal cancer, gastric cancer and pancreatic cancer due to transcriptional upregulation of Hedgehog ligands and epigenetic silencing of HHIP1/HHIP gene, encoding the Hedgehog inhibitor. However, Hedgehog signaling is rarely activated in colorectal cancer due to negative regulation by the canonical WNT signaling pathway. Hedgehog signaling molecules or targets, such as SHH, IHH, HHIP1, PTCH1 and GLI1, are applied as biomarkers for cancer diagnostics, prognostics and therapeutics. Small-molecule inhibitors for SMO or STK36 are suitable to be used for

  13. T Cell Receptor-induced Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling and Transcriptional Activation Are Regulated by STIM1- and Orai1-mediated Calcium Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Berry, Corbett T; Ruthel, Gordon; Madara, Jonathan J; MacGillivray, Katelyn; Gray, Carolyn M; Madge, Lisa A; McCorkell, Kelly A; Beiting, Daniel P; Hershberg, Uri; May, Michael J; Freedman, Bruce D

    2016-04-15

    T cell activation following antigen binding to the T cell receptor (TCR) involves the mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) to activate the key transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T lymphocytes (NFAT) and NF-κB. The mechanism of NFAT activation by Ca(2+) has been determined. However, the role of Ca(2+) in controlling NF-κB signaling is poorly understood, and the source of Ca(2+) required for NF-κB activation is unknown. We demonstrate that TCR- but not TNF-induced NF-κB signaling upstream of IκB kinase activation absolutely requires the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) via STIM1-dependent Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+)/Orai channels. We further show that Ca(2+) influx controls phosphorylation of the NF-κB protein p65 on Ser-536 and that this posttranslational modification controls its nuclear localization and transcriptional activation. Notably, our data reveal that this role for Ca(2+) is entirely separate from its upstream control of IκBα degradation, thereby identifying a novel Ca(2+)-dependent distal step in TCR-induced NF-κB activation. Finally, we demonstrate that this control of distal signaling occurs via Ca(2+)-dependent PKCα-mediated phosphorylation of p65. Thus, we establish the source of Ca(2+) required for TCR-induced NF-κB activation and define a new distal Ca(2+)-dependent checkpoint in TCR-induced NF-κB signaling that has broad implications for the control of immune cell development and T cell functional specificity.

  14. Autotaxin-mediated lipid signaling intersects with LIF and BMP signaling to promote the naive pluripotency transcription factor program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kime, Cody; Sakaki-Yumoto, Masayo; Goodrich, Leeanne; Hayashi, Yohei; Sami, Salma; Derynck, Rik; Asahi, Michio; Panning, Barbara; Yamanaka, Shinya; Tomoda, Kiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Developmental signaling molecules are used for cell fate determination, and understanding how their combinatorial effects produce the variety of cell types in multicellular organisms is a key problem in biology. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and ascorbic acid (AA) efficiently converts mouse primed pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) into naive PSCs. Signaling by the lipid LPA through its receptor LPAR1 and downstream effector Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) cooperated with LIF signaling to promote this conversion. BMP4, which also stimulates conversion to naive pluripotency, bypassed the need for exogenous LPA by increasing the activity of the extracellular LPA-producing enzyme autotaxin (ATX). We found that LIF and LPA-LPAR1 signaling affect the abundance of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which induces a previously unappreciated Kruppel-like factor (KLF)2-KLF4-PR domain 14 (PRDM14) transcription factor circuit key to establish naive pluripotency. AA also affects this transcription factor circuit by controlling PRDM14 expression. Thus, our study reveals that ATX-mediated autocrine lipid signaling promotes naive pluripotency by intersecting with LIF and BMP4 signaling. PMID:27738243

  15. DMPD: The interferon signaling network and transcription factor C/EBP-beta. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18163952 The interferon signaling network and transcription factor C/EBP-beta. Li H..., Gade P, Xiao W, Kalvakolanu DV. Cell Mol Immunol. 2007 Dec;4(6):407-18. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The... interferon signaling network and transcription factor C/EBP-beta. PubmedID 18163952 Title The interfero

  16. The TEAD/TEF family of transcription factor Scalloped mediates Hippo signaling in organ size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Ren, Fangfang; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Yongbin; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) signaling pathway governs cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis by controlling key regulatory genes that execute these processes; however, the transcription factor of the pathway has remained elusive. Here we provide evidence that the TEAD/TEF family transcription factor Scalloped (Sd) acts together with the coactivator Yorkie (Yki) to regulate Hpo pathway-responsive genes. Sd and Yki form a transcriptional complex whose activity is inhibited by Hpo signaling. Sd overexpression enhances, whereas its inactivation suppresses, tissue overgrowth caused by Yki overexpression or tumor suppressor mutations in the Hpo pathway. Inactivation of Sd diminishes Hpo target gene expression and reduces organ size, whereas a constitutively active Sd promotes tissue overgrowth. Sd promotes Yki nuclear localization, whereas Hpo signaling retains Yki in the cytoplasm by phosphorylating Yki at S168. Finally, Sd recruits Yki to the enhancer of the pathway-responsive gene diap1, suggesting that diap1 is a direct transcriptional target of the Hpo pathway.

  17. Neurotrophin/Trk receptor signaling mediates C/EBPα, -β and NeuroD recruitment to immediate-early gene promoters in neuronal cells and requires C/EBPs to induce immediate-early gene transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Bohlen und Halbach Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular signaling through receptors for neurotrophins mediates diverse neuronal functions, including survival, migration and differentiation in the central nervous system, but the transcriptional targets and regulators that mediate these diverse neurotrophin functions are not well understood. Results We have identified the immediate-early (IE genes Fos, Egr1 and Egr2 as transcriptional targets of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF/TrkB signaling in primary cortical neurons, and show that the Fos serum response element area responds to BDNF/TrkB in a manner dependent on a combined C/EBP-Ebox element. The Egr1 and Egr2 promoters contain homologous regulatory elements. We found that C/EBPα/β and NeuroD formed complexes in vitro and in vivo, and were recruited to all three homologous promoter regions. C/EBPα and NeuroD co-operatively activated the Fos promoter in transfection assays. Genetic depletion of Trk receptors led to impaired recruitment of C/EBPs and NeuroD in vivo, and elimination of Cebpa and Cebpb alleles reduced BDNF induction of Fos, Egr1 and Egr2 in primary neurons. Finally, defective differentiation of cortical dendrites, as measured by MAP2 staining, was observed in both compound Cebp and Ntrk knockout mice. Conclusion We here identify three IE genes as targets for BDNF/TrkB signaling, show that C/EBPα and -β are recruited along with NeuroD to target promoters, and that C/EBPs are essential mediators of Trk signaling in cortical neurons. We show also that C/EBPs and Trks are required for cortical dendrite differentiation, consistent with Trks regulating dendritic differentiation via a C/EBP-dependent mechanism. Finally, this study indicates that BDNF induction of IE genes important for neuronal function depends on transcription factors (C/EBP, NeuroD up-regulated during neuronal development, thereby coupling the functional competence of the neuronal cells to their differentiation.

  18. Effects of monocrotophos pesticide on steroidogenesis and transcription of steroidogenic enzymes in rainbow trout RTG-2 cells involving the protein kinase A signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Xiaona; Tian, Hua; Wang, Wei; Ru, Shaoguo

    2015-02-01

    Monocrotophos (MCP) pesticide, listed as a UNEP Prior Informed Consent chemical, has been proved to exert toxic effects on the reproductive system of teleost fishes by changing the balance of sex steroid hormones. To investigate the effects of MCP on steroidogenesis in vitro, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gonadal cell line RTG-2 was exposed to different MCP concentrations for 48 h. The levels of 17 β-estradiol (E(2)) and testosterone in the medium were measured by radioimmunoassay and the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP11A1, CYP17, and CYP19A was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that 1.0 and 10.0 μg/L MCP pesticide induced E(2) levels and promoted steroidogenic enzyme expression. The possible mechanisms of MCP steroidogenic activity were investigated using inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C. The PKA inhibitor H-89 abrogated the 10.0 μg/L MCP-induced transcriptional up-regulation of steroidogenic enzymes, suggesting an involvement of PKA-dependent mechanism in the disruption of steroidogenesis by the MCP pesticide in rainbow trout RTG-2 cells.

  19. Cellular Levels of Signaling Factors Are Sensed by β-actin Alleles to Modulate Transcriptional Pulse Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Kalo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional response of β-actin to extra-cellular stimuli is a paradigm for transcription factor complex assembly and regulation. Serum induction leads to a precisely timed pulse of β-actin transcription in the cell population. Actin protein is proposed to be involved in this response, but it is not known whether cellular actin levels affect nuclear β-actin transcription. We perturbed the levels of key signaling factors and examined the effect on the induced transcriptional pulse by following endogenous β-actin alleles in single living cells. Lowering serum response factor (SRF protein levels leads to loss of pulse integrity, whereas reducing actin protein levels reveals positive feedback regulation, resulting in elevated gene activation and a prolonged transcriptional response. Thus, transcriptional pulse fidelity requires regulated amounts of signaling proteins, and perturbations in factor levels eliminate the physiological response, resulting in either tuning down or exaggeration of the transcriptional pulse.

  20. The oncoprotein NPM-ALK of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma induces JUNB transcription via ERK1/2 and JunB translation via mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staber, Philipp B; Vesely, Paul; Haq, Naznin; Ott, Rene G; Funato, Kotaro; Bambach, Isabella; Fuchs, Claudia; Schauer, Silvia; Linkesch, Werner; Hrzenjak, Andelko; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Sexl, Veronika; Bergler, Helmut; Kadin, Marshall E; Sternberg, David W; Kenner, Lukas; Hoefler, Gerald

    2007-11-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs) are highly proliferating tumors that commonly express the AP-1 transcription factor JunB. ALK fusions occur in approximately 50% of ALCLs, and among these, 80% have the t(2;5) translocation with NPM-ALK expression. We report greater activity of JunB in NPM-ALK-positive than in NPM-ALK-negative ALCLs. Specific knockdown of JUNB mRNA using small interfering RNA and small hairpin RNA in NPM-ALK-expressing cells decreases cellular proliferation as evidenced by a reduced cell count in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Expression of NPM-ALK results in ERK1/2 activation and transcriptional up-regulation of JUNB. Both NPM-ALK-positive and -negative ALCL tumors demonstrate active ERK1/2 signaling. In contrast to NPM-ALK-negative ALCL, the mTOR pathway is active in NPM-ALK-positive lymphomas. Pharmacological inhibition of mTOR in NPM-ALK-positive cells down-regulates JunB protein levels by shifting JUNB mRNA translation from large polysomes to monosomes and ribonucleic particles (RNPs), and decreases cellular proliferation. Thus, JunB is a critical target of mTOR and is translationally regulated in NPM-ALK-positive lymphomas. This is the first study demonstrating translational control of AP-1 transcription factors in human neoplasia. In conjunction with NPM-ALK, JunB enhances cell cycle progression and may therefore represent a therapeutic target.

  1. Advances in NF-κB Signaling Transduction and Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription have been the most attractive subjects for both basic research and pharmaceutical industries due to its important roles in both physiological and pathogenesis, particularly the close association of dysregulated NF-κB with tumorgenesis and inflammation. Several novel intracellular molecular events that regulate NF-κB activity have been described recently, including the discovery of an alternative signaling pathway that appears inducing a specific subset genes involved in adoptive immune response. Multi-level and multi-dimensional regulation of NF-κB activity by phosphorylation and acetylation modifications have unveiled and became the hottest targets for potentially tissue specific molecular interventions. Another emerging mechanism for NF-κB-responsive gene's regulation where NF-κB participates the transcriptional regulation independent of its cognate regulatory binding site within the target gene's promoter but facilitating the transaction activity of other involved transcription factors,that implicated an novel transcriptional activities for NF-κB. Thus, the current review will focus on these recent progresses that have been made on NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004; 1(6):425-435.

  2. Advances in NF-κB Signaling Transduction and Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Xiao

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription have been the most attractive subjects for both basic research and pharmaceutical industries due to its important roles in both physiological and pathogenesis, particularly the close association of dysregulated NF-κB with tumorgenesis and inflammation. Several novel intracellular molecular events that regulate NF-κB activity have been described recently, including the discovery of an alternative signaling pathway that appears inducing a specific subset genes involved in adoptive immune response. Multi-level and multi-dimensional regulation of NF-κB activity by phosphorylation and acetylation modifications have unveiled and became the hottest targets for potentially tissue specific molecular interventions. Another emerging mechanism for NF-κB-responsive gene's regulation where NF-κB participates the transcriptional regulation independent of its cognate regulatory binding site within the target gene's promoter but facilitating the transaction activity of other involved transcription factors,that implicated an novel transcriptional activities for NF-κB. Thus, the current review will focus on these recent progresses that have been made on NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):425-435.

  3. Control of transcription by cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yung Wu

    Full Text Available Cell size increases significantly with increasing ploidy. Differences in cell size and ploidy are associated with alterations in gene expression, although no direct connection has been made between cell size and transcription. Here we show that ploidy-associated changes in gene expression reflect transcriptional adjustment to a larger cell size, implicating cellular geometry as a key parameter in gene regulation. Using RNA-seq, we identified genes whose expression was altered in a tetraploid as compared with the isogenic haploid. A significant fraction of these genes encode cell surface proteins, suggesting an effect of the enlarged cell size on the differential regulation of these genes. To test this hypothesis, we examined expression of these genes in haploid mutants that also produce enlarged size. Surprisingly, many genes differentially regulated in the tetraploid are identically regulated in the enlarged haploids, and the magnitude of change in gene expression correlates with the degree of size enlargement. These results indicate a causal relationship between cell size and transcription, with a size-sensing mechanism that alters transcription in response to size. The genes responding to cell size are enriched for those regulated by two mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and components in those pathways were found to mediate size-dependent gene regulation. Transcriptional adjustment to enlarged cell size could underlie other cellular changes associated with polyploidy. The causal relationship between cell size and transcription suggests that cell size homeostasis serves a regulatory role in transcriptome maintenance.

  4. Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) acts as an activator of estrogen receptor signaling in breast cancer cells and the effect can be abrogated by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Johan; Kirkegaard, Tove; Laenkholm, Anne Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    -regulates the expression of the CYP19A1 gene, encoding the aromatase enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of estradiol. Furthermore, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 has also been reported to down-regulate the expression of estrogen receptor α (ERα), the main mediator of ER signaling.This study reports a novel transcription...... factor critical to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-mediated regulation of estrogenic signaling in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We have investigated the molecular mechanisms for the 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-mediated down-regulation of CYP19A1 and ERα gene expression in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and found...... that Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) plays a key role by binding to the promoters of CYP19A1 and ERα. Although sometimes reported as an inhibitor of gene expression, we found that WSTF acts as an activator of the promoter activity of both CYP19A1 and ERα. Silencing of WSTF by siRNA transfection...

  5. Reanalysis of microarray data reveals insights into altered transcriptional activity of T helper 17 and regulatory T cell signaling in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotb I

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Iman Kotb,1 Caroline Meharg,2 Robert N Barker,1 Anthony Ormerod11Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK; 2Institute for Global Food Security, Queen's University, Belfast, Northern IrelandAbstract: Identifying differential expression of genes in psoriatic and healthy skin by microarray data analysis is a key approach to understand the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Analysis of more than one dataset to identify genes commonly upregulated reduces the likelihood of false positives and narrows down the possible signature genes. Genes controlling the critical balance between T helper 17 and regulatory T cells are of special interest in psoriasis. Our objectives were to identify genes that are consistently upregulated in lesional skin from three published microarray datasets. We carried out a reanalysis of gene expression data extracted from three experiments on samples from psoriatic and nonlesional skin using the same stringency threshold and software and further compared the expression levels of 92 genes related to the T helper 17 and regulatory T cell signaling pathways. We found 73 probe sets representing 57 genes commonly upregulated in lesional skin from all datasets. These included 26 probe sets representing 20 genes that have no previous link to the etiopathogenesis of psoriasis. These genes may represent novel therapeutic targets and surely need more rigorous experimental testing to be validated. Our analysis also identified 12 of 92 genes known to be related to the T helper 17 and regulatory T cell signaling pathways, and these were found to be differentially expressed in the lesional skin samples.Keywords: psoriasis, gene array analysis, gene expression profiling

  6. Dataset of transcriptional landscape of B cell early activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Garruss

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Signaling via B cell receptors (BCR and Toll-like receptors (TLRs result in activation of B cells with distinct physiological outcomes, but transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that drive activation and distinguish these pathways remain unknown. At early time points after BCR and TLR ligand exposure, 0.5 and 2 h, RNA-seq was performed allowing observations on rapid transcriptional changes. At 2 h, ChIP-seq was performed to allow observations on important regulatory mechanisms potentially driving transcriptional change. The dataset includes RNA-seq, ChIP-seq of control (Input, RNA Pol II, H3K4me3, H3K27me3, and a separate RNA-seq for miRNA expression, which can be found at Gene Expression Omnibus Dataset GSE61608. Here, we provide details on the experimental and analysis methods used to obtain and analyze this dataset and to examine the transcriptional landscape of B cell early activation.

  7. Berberine modulates AP-1 activity to suppress HPV transcription and downstream signaling to induce growth arrest and apoptosis in cervical cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Syed A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Specific types of high risk Human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs particularly, HPV types 16 and 18 cause cervical cancer and while the two recently developed vaccines against these HPV types are prophylactic in nature, therapeutic options for treatment and management of already existing HPV infection are not available as yet. Because transcription factor, Activator Protein-1 (AP-1 plays a central role in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis, we explored the possibility of its therapeutic targeting by berberine, a natural alkaloid derived from a medicinal plant species, Berberis which has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties with no known toxicity; however, the effect of berberine against HPV has not been elucidated. Results- We studied the effect of berberine on HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell line, SiHa and HPV18-positive cervical cancer cell line, HeLa using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays, western and northern blotting which showed that berberine could selectively inhibit constitutively activated AP-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner and downregulates HPV oncogenes expression. Inhibition of AP-1 was also accompanied by changes in the composition of their DNA-binding complex. Berberine specifically downregulated expression of oncogenic c-Fos which was also absent in the AP-1 binding complex. Treatment with berberine resulted in repression of E6 and E7 levels and concomitant increase in p53 and Rb expression in both cell types. Berberine also suppressed expression of telomerase protein, hTERT, which translated into growth inhibition of cervical cancer cells. Interestingly, a higher concentration of berberine was found to reduce the cell viability through mitochondria-mediated pathway and induce apoptosis by activating caspase-3. Conclusion- These results indicate that berberine can effectively target both the host and viral factors responsible for development of cervical cancer

  8. Wnt signaling and stem cell control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roel Nusse

    2008-01-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in the control over various types of stem cells and may act as a niche factor to maintain stem cells in a self-renewing state.As currently understood,Wnt proteins bind to receptors of the Frizzled and LRP families on the cell surface.Through several cytoplasmic relay components,the signal is transduced to B-catenin,which then enters the nucleus and forms a complex with TCF to activate transcription of Wnt target genes.Wnts can also signal through tyrosine kinase receptors,in particular the ROR and RYK receptors,leading to alternative modes of Wnt signaling.During the growth of tissues,these ligands and receptors are dynamically expressed,often transcriptionally controlled by Wnt signals themselves,to ensure the right balance between proliferation and differentiation.Isolated Wnt proteins are active on a variety of stem cells,including neural,mammary and embryonic stem cells.In general,Wnt proteins act to maintain the undifferentiated state of stem cells,while other growth factors instruct the cells to proliferate.These other factors include FGF and EGF,signaling through tyrosine kinase pathways.

  9. Macula densa cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, P Darwin; Lapointe, Jean Yves; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2003-01-01

    Macula densa cells are renal sensor elements that detect changes in distal tubular fluid composition and transmit signals to the glomerular vascular elements. This tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism plays an important role in regulating glomerular filtration rate and blood flow. Macula densa cells detect changes in luminal sodium chloride concentration through a complex series of ion transport-related intracellular events. NaCl entry via a Na:K:2Cl cotransporter and Cl exit through a basolateral channel lead to cell depolarization and increases in cytosolic calcium. Na/H exchange (NHE2) results in cell alkalization, whereas intracellular [Na] is regulated by an apically located H(Na)-K ATPase and not by the traditional basolateral Na:K ATPase. Communication from macula densa cells to the glomerular vascular elements involves ATP release across the macula densa basolateral membrane through a maxi-anion channel. The adaptation of multi-photon microscopy is providing new insights into macula densa-glomerular signaling.

  10. Making a tooth: growth factors, transcription factors, and stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yah Ding ZHANG; Zhi CHEN; Yi Qiang SONG; Chao LIU; Yi Ping CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian tooth development is largely dependent on sequential and reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions.These processes involve a series of inductive and permissive interactions that result in the determination, differentiation,and organization of odontogenic tissues. Multiple signaling molecules, including BMPs, FGFs, Shh, and Wnt proteins,have been implicated in mediating these tissue interactions. Transcription factors participate in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions via linking the signaling loops between tissue layers by responding to inductive signals and regulating the expression of other signaling molecules. Adult stem cells are highly plastic and multipotent. These cells including dental pulp stem cells and bone marrow stromal cells could be reprogrammed into odontogenic fate and participated in tooth formation. Recent progress in the studies of molecular basis of tooth development, adult stem cell biology, and regeneration will provide fundamental knowledge for the realization of human tooth regeneration in the near future.

  11. Spatial organization of transcription in bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiaoli; Xiao, Jie

    2014-07-01

    Prokaryotic transcription has been extensively studied over the past half a century. However, there often exists a gap between the structural, mechanistic description of transcription obtained from in vitro biochemical studies, and the cellular, phenomenological observations from in vivo genetic studies. It is now accepted that a living bacterial cell is a complex entity; the heterogeneous cellular environment is drastically different from the homogenous, well-mixed situation in vitro. Where molecules are inside a cell may be important for their function; hence, the spatial organization of different molecular components may provide a new means of transcription regulation in vivo, possibly bridging this gap. In this review, we survey current evidence for the spatial organization of four major components of transcription [genes, transcription factors, RNA polymerase (RNAP) and RNAs] and critically analyze their biological significance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biophysical models of transcription in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sandeep

    Cells constantly face environmental challenges and deal with them by changing their gene expression patterns. They make decisions regarding which genes to express and which genes not to express based on intra-cellular and environmental cues. These decisions are often made by regulating the process of transcription. While the identities of the different molecules that take part in regulating transcription have been determined for a number of different genes, their dynamics inside the cell are still poorly understood. One key feature of these regulatory dynamics is that the numbers of the bio-molecules involved is typically small, resulting in large temporal fluctuations in transcriptional outputs (mRNA and protein). In this thesis I show that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability of the distribution of transcribing RNA polymerases along a gene provide a previously unexplored method for deciphering the mechanism of its transcription in vivo. First, I propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which I calculate transcribing RNA polymerase copy-number fluctuations. I test my theory against published data obtained for yeast genes and propose a novel mechanism of transcription. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate-limiting step, as was previously proposed, my single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Second, I compute the distribution of inter-polymerase distance distribution along a gene and propose a method for analyzing inter-polymerase distance distributions acquired in experiments. By applying this method to images of polymerases transcribing ribosomal genes in E.coli I show that one model of regulation of these genes is consistent with inter-polymerase distance data while a number of other models are not. The analytical framework described in this thesis can be used to extract quantitative information about the dynamics of transcription from single-cell

  13. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schreck, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Panozzo, J. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  14. Wnt signalling pathway parameters for mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Wee Tan

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin signalling regulates cell fate, survival, proliferation and differentiation at many stages of mammalian development and pathology. Mutations of two key proteins in the pathway, APC and β-catenin, have been implicated in a range of cancers, including colorectal cancer. Activation of Wnt signalling has been associated with the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and consequential up-regulation of β-catenin/TCF gene transcription. In 2003, Lee et al. constructed a computational model of Wnt signalling supported by experimental data from analysis of time-dependent concentration of Wnt signalling proteins in Xenopus egg extracts. Subsequent studies have used the Xenopus quantitative data to infer Wnt pathway dynamics in other systems. As a basis for understanding Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, a confocal live cell imaging measurement technique is developed to measure the cell and nuclear volumes of MDCK, HEK293T cells and 3 human colorectal cancer cell lines and the concentrations of Wnt signalling proteins β-catenin, Axin, APC, GSK3β and E-cadherin. These parameters provide the basis for formulating Wnt signalling models for kidney/intestinal epithelial mammalian cells. There are significant differences in concentrations of key proteins between Xenopus extracts and mammalian whole cell lysates. Higher concentrations of Axin and lower concentrations of APC are present in mammalian cells. Axin concentrations are greater than APC in kidney epithelial cells, whereas in intestinal epithelial cells the APC concentration is higher than Axin. Computational simulations based on Lee's model, with this new data, suggest a need for a recalibration of the model.A quantitative understanding of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, in particular human colorectal cancers requires a detailed understanding of the concentrations of key protein complexes over time. Simulations of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells can be initiated

  15. LIF signaling in stem cells and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Kento; Zandstra, Peter W

    2015-07-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a member of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine family. All members of this family activate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a transcription factor that influences stem and progenitor cell identity, proliferation and cytoprotection. The role of LIF in development was first identified when LIF was demonstrated to support the propagation of mouse embryonic stem cells. Subsequent studies of mice deficient for components of the LIF pathway have revealed important roles for LIF signaling during development and homeostasis. Here and in the accompanying poster, we provide a broad overview of JAK-STAT signaling during development, with a specific focus on LIF-mediated JAK-STAT3 activation.

  16. Activation of rapid signaling pathways and the subsequent transcriptional regulation for the proliferation of breast cancer MCF-7 cells by the treatment with an extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Sijun; Inoue, Akio; Zhu, Yun; Tanji, Masao; Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2007-12-01

    Glycyrrhiza glabra root is one of the common traditional Chinese medicines and used as flavoring and sweetening agents for tobaccos, chewing gums, candies, toothpaste and beverages. While glycyrrhizin is one of the main components in the extract of G. glabra root and has been characterized, the other components have not been well characterized. The mechanism of growth activation of breast cancer MCF-7 cells, including the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt, and the transcriptional regulation of estrogen-responsive genes, was examined by means of sulforhodamine B, luciferase reporter gene, real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting assays after the induction of the cells with the extract of G. glabra root. The extract has similar activity to that induced by 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), although glycyrrhizin did not show such an activity. Moreover, the estrogen receptor alpha-dependent neurite outgrowth induced by the extract was similar to that by E(2), whereas glycyrrhizin had no effect. Furthermore, the expression profile examined by cDNA microarray assay using a set of 120 estrogen-responsive genes, which were related to proliferation, transcription, transport, enzymes and signaling, showed a statistically significant correlation (R=0.47, Pglabra root. Furthermore, the extract had estrogenic activity and a distinguishable profile of gene expression, suggesting the presence of potentially useful components other than glycyrrhizin in G. glabra root for hormone and anti-cancer therapies.

  17. ETS transcription factors in hematopoietic stem cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Wang, Lu; Patient, Roger; Liu, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are essential for the maintenance of the hematopoietic system. However, these cells cannot be maintained or created in vitro, and very little is known about their generation during embryogenesis. Many transcription factors and signaling pathways play essential roles at various stages of HSC development. Members of the ETS ('E twenty-six') family of transcription factors are recognized as key regulators within the gene regulatory networks governing hematopoiesis, including the ontogeny of HSCs. Remarkably, although all ETS transcription factors bind the same DNA consensus sequence and overlapping tissue expression is observed, individual ETS transcription factors play unique roles in the development of HSCs. Also, these transcription factors are recurrently used throughout development and their functions are context-dependent, increasing the challenge of studying their mechanism of action. Critically, ETS factors also play roles under pathological conditions, such as leukemia and, therefore, deciphering their mechanism of action will not only enhance our knowledge of normal hematopoiesis, but also inform protocols for their creation in vitro from pluripotent stem cells and the design of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of malignant blood cell diseases. In this review, we summarize the key findings on the roles of ETS transcription factors in HSC development and discuss novel mechanisms by which they could control hematopoiesis. © 2013.

  18. Transcriptional Regulation and Signaling in Phosphorus Starvation: What About Legumes?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oswaldo Valdés-Lóppez; Georgina Hernández

    2008-01-01

    The availability of soil phosphorus (P), an essential element, is one of the most important requirements for plant growth and crop production. The morphological and physiological adaptations evolved by plants to cope with P starvation have been well characterized. Several P deficiency plant responses are regulated at the transcriptional level. Microarray analysis has generated valuable information on global gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana grown under P-stress. Despite the identification of P responsive genes, little is known about the regulation of gene expression changes. Four transcription factors, PHR1, WRKY75, ZAT6 and BHLH32, involved in P starvation signaling have been characterized in Arabidopsis, and signaling pathways are deciphered. This review analyzes the current knowledge of transcriptional regulation of P starvation responses in Arabidopsis vis-a-vis legumes such as lupine, common bean and Medicago truncatula. The knowledge on regulatory and signaling mechanisms involved in P acquisition and use in legumes will be useful for improvement of these crops, which account for a large proportion of the world's crop production, providing good nutritional quality feed and food.

  19. Transcriptional networks that regulate muscle stem cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punch, Vincent G; Jones, Andrew E; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Muscle stem cells comprise different populations of stem and progenitor cells found in embryonic and adult tissues. A number of signaling and transcriptional networks are responsible for specification and survival of these cell populations and regulation of their behavior during growth and regeneration. Muscle progenitor cells are mostly derived from the somites of developing embryos, while satellite cells are the progenitor cells responsible for the majority of postnatal growth and adult muscle regeneration. In resting muscle, these stem cells are quiescent, but reenter the cell cycle during their activation, whereby they undergo decisions to self-renew, proliferate, or differentiate and fuse into multinucleated myofibers to repair damaged muscle. Regulation of muscle stem cell activity is under the precise control of a number of extrinsic signaling pathways and active transcriptional networks that dictate their behavior, fate, and regenerative potential. Here, we review the networks responsible for these different aspects of muscle stem cell biology and discuss prevalent parallels between mechanisms regulating the activity of embryonic muscle progenitor cells and adult satellite cells.

  20. Hepatitis C virus core protein increases Snail expression and induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition through the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway in hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia-Jia; Meng, Zhe; He, Xiao-Yu; Cheng, Di; Ye, Hui-Lin; Deng, Xiao-Geng; Chen, Ru-Fu

    2017-05-01

    Aberrant expression of Snail, a mediator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), is crucial for cancer invasiveness and metastasis. Although hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein has been implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis, the relationship between HCV core and Snail expression has not been clarified. HepG2 and Huh7 stable cell lines were established by transfection with pcDNA-HCVc. HepG2-HCVc and Huh7-HCVc cells were co-administered with AG490. Cell migration and invasiveness were tested. STAT3 and Snail expression was analyzed by Real-time PCR and Western blot. We found that HCV core is capable of increasing Snail expression and inducing EMT in hepatoma cells. HCV core-induced Snail expression was accompanied by activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), inhibition of STAT3 abrogated HCV core-induced Snail expression and EMT. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that phosphorylated STAT3 directly binds to the Snail promoter. Collectively, these results suggest that HCV core would play a role in hepatocellular carcinoma invasiveness and metastasis by activating the STAT3 pathway, increasing Snail expression and subsequently triggering EMT. These findings would advance the understanding of HCV-mediated invasiveness and metastasis, and might provide a new potential therapeutic target for HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. © 2016 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  1. Matrine suppresses cell growth of human chronic myeloid leukemia cells via its inhibition of the interleukin-6/Janus activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lingdi; Zhu, Zhichao; Jiang, Lijia; Sun, Xiao; Lu, Xuzhang; Zhou, Min; Qian, Sixuan; Jianyong, Li

    2015-01-01

    Matrine, alkaloid isolated from Sophora flavescens, is known to be pleiotropic by exerting anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidation, as well as anti-cancer effects. However, the precise molecular targets or pathways responsible for its activities still remain unclear. The present study aimed to determine the underlying mechanisms of matrine in inhibiting the chronic myeloid leukemia cells (CML). It was observed that matrine treatment significantly suppressed CML cells proliferation, induced apoptosis and resulted in the accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase, accompanied by a significant decrease in Bcl-xL, Cyclin D1, and c-Myc expression. Western blot analyses revealed that matrine treatment resulted in the down-regulation in phospho-STAT3 and phospho-JAK2 without significantly effects on STAT3 and JAK2 protein levels. Matrine significantly reduced the expression of IL-6, a potent upstream activating factor of STAT3. These results strongly suggested the IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway play an important role in matrine's anti-leukemia effects in K562 cells.

  2. Intricate Transcriptional Networks of Classical Brown and Beige Fat Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Hong; Hur, Wonhee; Lee, Sean Bong

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipocytes are a specialized cell type that is critical for adaptive thermogenesis, energy homeostasis, and metabolism. In response to cold, both classical brown fat and the newly identified "beige" or "brite" cells are activated by β-adrenergic signaling and catabolize stored lipids and carbohydrates to produce heat via UCP1. Once thought to be non-existent in adults, recent studies have discovered active classical brown and beige fat cells in humans, thus reinvigorating interest in brown and beige adipocytes. This review will focus on the newly discovered transcription factors and microRNAs that specify and orchestrate the classical brown and beige fat cell development.

  3. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3 and Trophoblast Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitzgerald JS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Human trophoblast cells have the fascinating property of physiological invasiveness into allogenic tissue. The underlying mechanisms, such as extra- and intracellular signalling, are very similar to those abused by a variety of tumours. The main contrasting feature to cancerous cells is the very fundamental ability of trophoblasts to auto-regulate invasion with respect to time and space. Trophoblast cells start invasion into the decidua very shortly after implantation, which approaches a maximum during the first trimester of gestation period. During this period of time, several cytokines from cells of different maternal origin, including NK cells, dendritic cells, stroma cells and endothelial cells, are present which, analogous to the situation in tumours, have the potential to trigger and enhance invasion, migration and proliferation of trophoblast cells. These mainly include interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-11, Leukaemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF, Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF and Insulin-like Growth Factors (IGF. Cytokines, upon binding to their specific receptors present on the trophoblast cells, trigger several intracellular signalling cascades. One of these signalling pathways is the Janus Kinase (Jak/Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT pathway. As recent studies have shown, the tyrosine phosphorylated form of STAT3 is a major inducer of invasiveness which mainly takes place upon binding of LIF to its receptor. For autoregulation of signals, STAT3 induces the transcription of Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 3 (SOCS3. The balance between STAT3 and SOCS3 may be argued as one of the main tuners of trophoblast invasion for successful implantation. Disturbances in this balance may lead to serious complications like cancer and implantation failure.

  4. Transcriptional control of Shh/Ptc1 signaling in embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Lung; Chang, Shin-Ju E; Ying, Shao-Yao

    2006-02-15

    In vivo profiling of signal-directed gene expression patterns is a major bottleneck in studying developmental biology. A signal molecule initiates its specific gene expression pattern through the activation of certain transcription factor (TF); however, tissue heterogeneity often masks this pattern due to intercellular complexity of other signal transduction pathways. To decipher the synergistic regulation of signal-directed gene expression in the tissue level, we report here a unique transcriptional responsive element (TRE) existing in the 5'-upstream promoter regions (5'-UPR) of the genes responding to the Shh/Ptc1 signal transduction pathway during feather placode development in chicken embryos. By locating the TRE homologue and its interactive TF, we were able to reveal the gene expression pattern of the Shh/Ptc1 signaling. We firstly demonstrated that homology profiling of the 5'-UPR of the genes, Gli1, TGF-beta2 and Msx2, responding to the Shh/Ptc1 signaling showed a more than 70% conserved region. Computer alignment of the consensus sequences in the conserved region revealed a 37-nucleotide TRE sequence, containing two regulatory elements homologous to human and mouse Gli-binding sites. Activation of this newly identified Shh/Ptc1-responsive TRE by active Smo signaling in chicken hepatoepithelial carcinoma cells elicited a strong synergistic expression of the Shh/Ptc1-downstream genes. Based on previous bioinformatics and the present experimental findings, we successfully established an in vivo signaling model for the Shh/Ptc1-directed embryonic feather morphogenesis.

  5. The Interferon Signaling Network and Transcription Factor C/EBP-β

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Li; Padmaja Gade; Weihua Xiao; Dhan V.Kalvakolanu

    2007-01-01

    Cytoines like interferons (IFNs) play a central role in regulating innate and specific immunities against the pathogens and neoplastic cells. A number of signaling pathways are induced in response to IFN in various cells.One classic mechanism employed by IFNs is the JAK-STAT signaling pathway for inducing cellular responses.Here we describe the non-STAT pathways that participate in IFN-induced responses. In particular, we will focus on the role played by transcription factor C/EBP-β in mediating these responses.

  6. N-Acetylglucosamine Functions in Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B. Konopka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The amino sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc is well known for the important structural roles that it plays at the cell surface. It is a key component of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan, fungal cell wall chitin, and the extracellular matrix of animal cells. Interestingly, recent studies have also identified new roles for GlcNAc in cell signaling. For example, GlcNAc stimulates the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans to undergo changes in morphogenesis and expression of virulence genes. Pathogenic E. coli responds to GlcNAc by altering the expression of fimbriae and CURLI fibers that promote biofilm formation and GlcNAc stimulates soil bacteria to undergo changes in morphogenesis and production of antibiotics. Studies with animal cells have revealed that GlcNAc influences cell signaling through the posttranslational modification of proteins by glycosylation. O-linked attachment of GlcNAc to Ser and Thr residues regulates a variety of intracellular proteins, including transcription factors such as NFκB, c-myc, and p53. In addition, the specificity of Notch family receptors for different ligands is altered by GlcNAc attachment to fucose residues in the extracellular domain. GlcNAc also impacts signal transduction by altering the degree of branching of N-linked glycans, which influences cell surface signaling proteins. These emerging roles of GlcNAc as an activator and mediator of cellular signaling in fungi, animals, and bacteria will be the focus of this paper.

  7. Comparative integromics on non-canonical WNT or planar cell polarity signaling molecules: transcriptional mechanism of PTK7 in colorectal cancer and that of SEMA6A in undifferentiated ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-09-01

    Non-canonical WNT and planar cell polarity (PCP) are overlapping but distinct signaling pathways, which control convergent extension, neural tube closure, orientation of cilia and sensory hair cells, axon guidance, and cell motility. Non-canonical WNT signals, regulated by the interaction of WNT, WNT antagonist, Frizzled and ROR2, are transduced to JNK, ROCK, PKC, MAP3K7, and NFAT signaling cascades. PCP signals, regulated by the interaction of VANGL-PRICKLE complex, CELSR and Frizzled-DVL complex, are transduced to JNK, ROCK, and other uncharacterized signaling cascades. PTK7 signaling, regulated by SEMA6 and Plexin-A family members, affects PCP pathway through VANGL. Here, integrative genomic analyses on WNT5A, WNT5B, WNT11, FZD3, FZD6, ROR1, ROR2, RYK, CELSR1, CELSR2, CELSR3, VANGL1, VANGL2, PRICKLE1, PRICKLE2, PTK7, SEMA6A, SEMA6B, SEMA6C and SEMA6D were carried out. PTK7 and SEMA6A were expressed in undifferentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells, SEMA6A in endodermal progenitors, CELSR1, VANGL1 and PTK7 in gastrointestinal tumors. CELSR2, PRICKLE2 and SEMA6C were expressed in fetal brain, CELSR2, PRICKLE1 and SEMA6A in adult brain, WNT5A and CELSR3 in adult brain tumors. These facts indicate class switches of non-canonical WNT or PCP signaling molecules during embryogenesis and carcinogenesis. TCF/LEF-, SP1-, and 5 bHLH-binding sites within human PTK7 promoter were conserved in chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, mouse, and rat PTK7 orthologs, which explained the mechanism of PTK7 upregulation in colorectal cancer. NANOG-, SOX2-, and POU5F1 (OCT3/OCT4)-binding sites within intron 1 of the human SEMA6A gene were conserved in chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, mouse, and rat SEMA6A orthologs, which explained the mechanism of SEMA6A upregulation in undifferentiated ES cells. Most of non-canonical WNT or PCP signaling molecules, except PTK7 and SEMA6A, were not frequently expressed in undifferentiated human ES cells. Non-canonical WNT or PCP signaling pathway, activated to orchestrate

  8. Transcriptional targeting of sphingosine-1- phosphate receptor S1P2 by epigallocatechin- 3-gallate prevents sphingosine-1-phosphate- mediated signaling in macrophage-differentiated HL-60 promyelomonocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chokor R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rima Chokor, Sylvie Lamy, Borhane AnnabiLaboratoire d'Oncologie Moléculaire, Centre de recherche BIOMED, Département de Chimie, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, QC, CanadaBackground: Macrophage chemotaxis followed by blood–brain barrier transendothelial migration is believed to be associated with inflammation in the central nervous system. Antineuroinflammatory strategies have identified the dietary-derived epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG as an efficient agent to prevent neuroinflammation-associated neurodegenerative diseases by targeting proinflammatory mediator signaling.Methods: Given that high levels of sphingosine kinase and its product, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, are present in brain tumors, we used quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and immunoblotting to test whether EGCG may impact on S1P receptor gene expression and prevent S1P response in undifferentiated and in terminally differentiated macrophages.Results: Promyelomonocytic human leukemia (HL-60 cells were differentiated into macrophages, and S1P triggered phosphorylation in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK intracellular signaling, as shown by Western blot analysis. Pretreatment of cells with EGCG prior to differentiation inhibited the response to S1P in all three pathways, while EGCG abrogated P38 MAPK phosphorylation when present only during differentiation. Terminally-differentiated macrophages were, however, insensitive to EGCG treatment. Using qRT-PCR, gene expression of the S1P receptors S1P1, S1P2, and S1P5 was predominantly induced in terminally-differentiated macrophages, while the S1P2 was decreased by EGCG treatment.Conclusion: Our data suggest that diet-derived EGCG achieves efficient effects as a preventive agent, targeting signaling pathways prior to cell terminal differentiation. Such properties could impact on cell chemotaxis

  9. Role of Calcium Signaling in the Transcriptional Regulation of the Apicoplast Genome of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabna Cheemadan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is a universal second messenger that plays an important role in regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. To understand calcium-dependent signaling in malaria parasites, we analyzed transcriptional responses of Plasmodium falciparum to two calcium ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin that cause redistribution of intracellular calcium within the cytoplasm. While ionomycin induced a specific transcriptional response defined by up- or downregulation of a narrow set of genes, A23187 caused a developmental arrest in the schizont stage. In addition, we observed a dramatic decrease of mRNA levels of the transcripts encoded by the apicoplast genome during the exposure of P. falciparum to both calcium ionophores. Neither of the ionophores caused any disruptions to the DNA replication or the overall apicoplast morphology. This suggests that the mRNA downregulation reflects direct inhibition of the apicoplast gene transcription. Next, we identify a nuclear encoded protein with a calcium binding domain (EF-hand that is localized to the apicoplast. Overexpression of this protein (termed PfACBP1 in P. falciparum cells mediates an increased resistance to the ionophores which suggests its role in calcium-dependent signaling within the apicoplast. Our data indicate that the P. falciparum apicoplast requires calcium-dependent signaling that involves a novel protein PfACBP1.

  10. The LIN-15A and LIN-56 transcriptional regulators interact to negatively regulate EGF/Ras signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans vulval cell-fate determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Ewa M; Saffer, Adam M; Huang, Linda S; DeModena, John; Sternberg, Paul W; Horvitz, H Robert

    2011-03-01

    The restricted expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) family ligands is important for proper development and for preventing cancerous growth in mammals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the class A and B synthetic multivulva (synMuv) genes redundantly repress expression of lin-3 EGF to negatively regulate Ras-mediated vulval development. The class B synMuv genes encode proteins homologous to components of the NuRD and Myb-MuvB/dREAM transcriptional repressor complexes, indicating that they likely silence lin-3 EGF through chromatin remodeling. The two class A synMuv genes cloned thus far, lin-8 and lin-15A, both encode novel proteins. The LIN-8 protein is nuclear. We have characterized the class A synMuv gene lin-56 and found it to encode a novel protein that shares a THAP-like C(2)CH motif with LIN-15A. Both the LIN-56 and LIN-15A proteins localize to nuclei. Wild-type levels of LIN-56 require LIN-15A, and wild-type levels and/or localization of LIN-15A requires LIN-56. Furthermore, LIN-56 and LIN-15A interact in the yeast two-hybrid system. We propose that LIN-56 and LIN-15A associate in a nuclear complex that inhibits vulval specification by repressing lin-3 EGF expression.

  11. Dual effects of acetylsalicylic acid on ERK signaling and Mitf transcription lead to inhibition of melanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Takashi; Usami, Mai; Awaji, Mizuki; Shinohara, Sumire; Sato, Kazuomi

    2016-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely used as an analgesic/antipyretic drug. It exhibits a wide range of biological effects, including preventative effects against heart attack and stroke, and the induction of apoptosis in various cancer cells. We previously found that ASA inhibits melanogenesis in B16 melanoma cells. However, the mechanisms of how ASA down-regulates melanin synthesis remain unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of ASA on melanogenic pathways, such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) transcription. ASA significantly inhibited melanin synthesis in a dose-dependent manner without oxidative stress and cell death. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the inhibitory effect of ASA might be due to the inhibition of Mitf gene transcription. Interestingly, ASA also induced ERK phosphorylation. Additionally, treatment with PD98059, a specific ERK phosphorylation inhibitor, abolished the anti-melanogenic effect of ASA. These results suggest that the depigmenting effect of ASA results from down-regulation of Mitf, which is induced by both the induction of ERK phosphorylation and the inhibition of Mitf transcription.

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor induces multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 overexpression through phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling pathway and transcription factor specificity protein 1 in BGC823 cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Li; Xiaojun Wu; Jinling Gong; Jing Yang; Jiayan Leng; Qiaoyun Chen; Wenlin Xu

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the most important causes of chemotherapy failure and carcinoma recurrence.But the roles of the MDR-associated protein MRP1 in MDR remain poorly understood.Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF),one of the most active and specific vascular growth factors,plays a significant role in proliferation,differentiation,and metastasis of cancers.To explore the effect of VEGF on the expression of MRP1,we used recombinant human VEGF to stimulate K562 and BGC-823 cell lines.Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis showed that the expression of MRP1 at both mRNA and protein levels was increased.3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide results also showed that VEGF significantly enhanced the ICs0 of the cells treated with adriamycin.To explore the underlying regulatory mechanisms,we constructed MRP1 promoter and the luciferase reporter gene recombinant vector.The luciferase reporter gene assay showed that the activity of the MRP1 promoter was markedly increased by VEGF stimulation,while LY294002,an inhibitor of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway,reduced this effect.Transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1) binding site mutation partially blocked the up-regulation of MRP1 promoter activity by VEGF.In summary,our results demonstrated that VEGF enhanced the expression of MRP1,and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and SP1 may be involved in this modulation.

  13. CRHR1 mediates p53 transcription induced by high altitude hypoxia through ERK 1/2 signaling in rat hepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Ming-Yang; Hao, Ke; Chen, Xue-Qun; Du, Ji-Zeng

    2013-06-01

    We have previously reported that hypoxia activates corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and the expression of its type-1 receptor (CRHR1) and induces disorders of the brain-endocrine-immune network. p53 is activated by hypoxia and involved in tumorigenesis and apoptosis. Whether CRHR1 regulates p53 transactivation to further influence apoptotic genes remains unclear. Here, we showed that hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 5km or 7km for 8 and 24h increased p53 protein and mRNA, and reduced apoptotic bax and IGFBP3 gene expression while upregulating the cell-arrest gene p21 for 8h in rat liver cells. The upregulation of p53 mRNA and downregulation of bax mRNA induced by hypoxia were blocked by pretreatment with the specific CRHR1 antagonist CP-154,526, but the downregulation of IGFBP3 and upregulation of p21 mRNA were not. Furthermore, CRH stimulated p53 mRNA via the ERK 1/2 pathway in the BRL-3A cell line and this was blocked by the ERK 1/2 antagonist U0126. These data provide novel evidence that the CRHR1-triggered ERK 1/2 pathway is involved in the activation of p53 and suppression of the apoptotic bax gene by hypoxia in rat liver.

  14. ATF-2 regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription in macrophage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Noriyuki; Maekawa, Toshio; Shinagawa, Toshie; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2009-07-17

    The transcription factor ATF-2, a member of the ATF/CREB family, is a target of p38 that are involved in stress-induced apoptosis and in Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated signaling. Phosphorylation of ATF-2 at Thr-71 was enhanced by treating of RAW264.7 macrophage cells with either LPS, MALP-2, or CpG-ODN. LPS treatment enhanced the trans-activation capacity of ATF-2. Among multiple LPS-induced genes, the LPS-induced expression of Socs-3 was significantly reduced by the treatment of RAW264.7 cells with an Atf-2 siRNA. Transcription from the Socs-3 promoter was synergistically stimulated by ATF-2 and LPS, whereas it was suppressed by Atf-2 siRNA. Histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) interacted with ATF-2 after LPS treatment, but not before treatment. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with trichostatin A, an inhibitor of HDAC, suppressed the LPS-induced Socs-3 expression, suggesting that HDAC1 positively regulates the LPS-induced transcription of Socs-3. Thus, ATF-2 plays an important role in TLR-mediated transcriptional control in macrophage cells.

  15. Deciphering the Innate Lymphoid Cell Transcriptional Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Seillet

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are enriched at mucosal surfaces, where they provide immune surveillance. All ILC subsets develop from a common progenitor that gives rise to pre-committed progenitors for each of the ILC lineages. Currently, the temporal control of gene expression that guides the emergence of these progenitors is poorly understood. We used global transcriptional mapping to analyze gene expression in different ILC progenitors. We identified PD-1 to be specifically expressed in PLZF+ ILCp and revealed that the timing and order of expression of the transcription factors NFIL3, ID2, and TCF-1 was critical. Importantly, induction of ILC lineage commitment required only transient expression of NFIL3 prior to ID2 and TCF-1 expression. These findings highlight the importance of the temporal program that permits commitment of progenitors to the ILC lineage, and they expand our understanding of the core transcriptional program by identifying potential regulators of ILC development.

  16. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schreck, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-06-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Dissecting the Transcriptional Response to Elicitors in Vitis vinifera Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Bru, Roque; Martínez-Zapater, José M.; Lijavetzky, Diego; Pedreño, María A.

    2014-01-01

    The high effectiveness of cyclic oligosaccharides like cyclodextrins in the production of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera cell cultures is enhanced in the presence of methyl jasmonate. In order to dissect the basis of the interactions among the elicitation responses triggered by these two compounds, a transcriptional analysis of grapevine cell cultures treated with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate separately or in combination was carried out. The results showed that the activation of genes encoding enzymes from phenylpropanoid and stilbene biosynthesis induced by cyclodextrins alone was partially enhanced in the presence of methyl jasmonate, which correlated with their effects on trans-resveratrol production. In addition, protein translation and cell cycle regulation were more highly repressed in cells treated with cyclodextrins than in those treated with methyl jasmonate, and this response was enhanced in the combined treatment. Ethylene signalling was activated by all treatments, while jasmonate signalling and salicylic acid conjugation were activated only in the presence of methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins, respectively. Moreover, the combined treatment resulted in a crosstalk between the signalling cascades activated by cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate, which, in turn, provoked the activation of additional regulatory pathways involving the up-regulation of MYB15, NAC and WRKY transcription factors, protein kinases and calcium signal transducers. All these results suggest that both elicitors cause an activation of the secondary metabolism in detriment of basic cell processes like the primary metabolism or cell division. Crosstalk between cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate-induced signalling provokes an intensification of these responses resulting in a greater trans-resveratrol production. PMID:25314001

  18. Distinct transcriptional networks in quiescent myoblasts: a role for Wnt signaling in reversible vs. irreversible arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sindhu; Sreenivas, Prethish; Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Reddy, Vatrapu Rami; Shashidhara, Lingadahalli Subrahmanya; Chilukoti, Ravi Kumar; Mylavarapu, Madhavi; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2014-01-01

    Most cells in adult mammals are non-dividing: differentiated cells exit the cell cycle permanently, but stem cells exist in a state of reversible arrest called quiescence. In damaged skeletal muscle, quiescent satellite stem cells re-enter the cell cycle, proliferate and subsequently execute divergent programs to regenerate both post-mitotic myofibers and quiescent stem cells. The molecular basis for these alternative programs of arrest is poorly understood. In this study, we used an established myogenic culture model (C2C12 myoblasts) to generate cells in alternative states of arrest and investigate their global transcriptional profiles. Using cDNA microarrays, we compared G0 myoblasts with post-mitotic myotubes. Our findings define the transcriptional program of quiescent myoblasts in culture and establish that distinct gene expression profiles, especially of tumour suppressor genes and inhibitors of differentiation characterize reversible arrest, distinguishing this state from irreversibly arrested myotubes. We also reveal the existence of a tissue-specific quiescence program by comparing G0 C2C12 myoblasts to isogenic G0 fibroblasts (10T1/2). Intriguingly, in myoblasts but not fibroblasts, quiescence is associated with a signature of Wnt pathway genes. We provide evidence that different levels of signaling via the canonical Wnt pathway characterize distinct cellular states (proliferation vs. quiescence vs. differentiation). Moderate induction of Wnt signaling in quiescence is associated with critical properties such as clonogenic self-renewal. Exogenous Wnt treatment subverts the quiescence program and negatively affects clonogenicity. Finally, we identify two new quiescence-induced regulators of canonical Wnt signaling, Rgs2 and Dkk3, whose induction in G0 is required for clonogenic self-renewal. These results support the concept that active signal-mediated regulation of quiescence contributes to stem cell properties, and have implications for pathological

  19. Regulation and function of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-Rong; Qi; Zeng-Ming; Yang

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3(STAT3), a member of the STAT family, is a key regulator of many physiological and pathological processes. Significant progress has been made in understanding the transcriptional control, posttranslational modification, cellular localization and functional regulation of STAT3. STAT3 can translocate into the nucleus and bind to specific promoter sequences, thereby exerting transcriptional regulation. Recent studies have shown that STAT3 can also translocate into mitochondria, participating in aerobic respiration and apoptosis. In addition, STAT3 plays an important role in inflammation and tumorigenesis by regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. Conditional knockout mouse models make it possible to study the physiological function of STAT3 in specific tissues and organs. This review summarizes the latest advances in the understanding of the expression, regulation and function of STAT3 in physiological and tumorigenic processes.

  20. Signaling with homeoprotein transcription factors in development and throughout adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochiantz, A

    2013-09-01

    The concept of homeoprotein transduction as a novel signaling pathway has dramatically evolved since it was first proposed in 1991. It is now well established in several biological systems from plants to mammals. In this review, the different steps that have led to this unexpected observation are recalled and the developmental and physiological models that have allowed us (and a few others) to consolidate the original hypothesis are described. Because homeoprotein signaling is active in plants and animals it is proposed that it has predated the separation between animals and plants and is thus very ancient. This may explain why the basic phenomenon of homeoprotein transduction is so minimalist, requiring no specific receptors or transduction pathways beside those offered by mitochondria, organelles present in all eukaryotic cells. Indeed complexity has been added in the course of evolution and the conservation of homeoprotein transduction is discussed in the context of its synergy with bona fide signaling mechanism that may have added robustness to this primitive cell communication device. The same synergy possibly explains why homeoprotein signaling is important both in embryonic development and in adult functions fulfilled by signaling entities (e.g. growth factors) themselves active throughout development and in the adult. The cell biological mechanism of homeoprotein transfer is also discussed. Although it is clear that many questions are still in want of precise answers, it appears that the sequences responsible both for secretion and internalization are in the DNA-binding domain and very highly conserved among most homeoproteins. On this basis, it is proposed that this signaling pathway is likely to imply as many as 200 proteins that participate in a myriad of developmental and physiological pathways.

  1. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as a therapeutic target for cancer and the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Hak; Yi, Eun Hee; Ye, Sang-Kyu

    2016-08-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a cytoplasmic transcription factor that modulates the transcription of a variety of genes to regulate important biological functions, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, angiogenesis, and immune response. Constitutive activation of STAT3 is important in oncogenic signaling and occurs at high frequency in human cancers, including diverse solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Moreover, it is associated with a poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment has recently been recognized as a key condition for cancer progression, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance by activation of STAT3 signaling. Therefore, understanding the biology associated with STAT3-mediated signaling cascades in the tumor microenvironment may offer the therapeutic potential to treat human cancers. This review presents an overview of the critical roles of STAT3 in the tumor microenvironment related to cancer biology and discusses recent advancements in the development of anticancer drugs that therapeutically inhibit STAT3 signaling cascades.

  2. Tracking Hypoxic Signaling in Encapsulated Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Suchit; McFarland, Rachel; Skiles, Mathew L.; Sullivan, Denise; Williams, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen is not only a nutrient but also an important signaling molecule whose concentration can influence the fate of stem cells. This study details the development of a marker of hypoxic signaling for use with encapsulated cells. Testing of the marker was performed with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D culture conditions in varied oxygen environments. The cells were genetically modified with our hypoxia marker, which produces a red fluorescent protein (DsRed-DR), under the control of a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) trimer. For 3D culture, ADSCs were encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol)–based hydrogels. The hypoxia marker (termed HRE DsRed-DR) is built on a recombinant adenovirus and ADSCs infected with the marker will display red fluorescence when hypoxic signaling is active. This marker was not designed to measure local oxygen concentration but rather to show how a cell perceives its local oxygen concentration. ADSCs cultured in both 2D and 3D were exposed to 20% or 1% oxygen environments for 96 h. In 2D at 20% O2, the marker signal was not observed during the study period. In 1% O2, the fluorescent signal was first observed at 24 h, with maximum prevalence observed at 96 h as 59%±3% cells expressed the marker. In 3D, the signal was observed in both 1% and 20% O2. The onset of signal in 1% O2 was observed at 4 h, reaching maximum prevalence at 96 h with 76%±4% cells expressing the marker. Interestingly, hypoxic signal was also observed in 20% O2, with 13%±3% cells showing positive marker signal after 96 h. The transcription factor subunit hypoxia inducible factor-1α was tracked in these cells over the same time period by immunostaining and western blot analysis. Immunostaining results in 2D correlated well with our marker at 72 h and 96 h, but 3D results did not correlate well. The western blotting results in 2D and 3D correlated well with the fluorescent marker. The HRE DsRed-DR virus can be used to track

  3. Receptor Signaling Directs Global Recruitment of Pre-existing Transcription Factors to Inducible Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockerill, Peter N.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression programs are largely regulated by the tissue-specific expression of lineage-defining transcription factors or by the inducible expression of transcription factors in response to specific stimuli. Here I will review our own work over the last 20 years to show how specific activation signals also lead to the wide-spread re-distribution of pre-existing constitutive transcription factors to sites undergoing chromatin reorganization. I will summarize studies showing that activation of kinase signaling pathways creates open chromatin regions that recruit pre-existing factors which were previously unable to bind to closed chromatin. As models I will draw upon genes activated or primed by receptor signaling in memory T cells, and genes activated by cytokine receptor mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. I also summarize a hit-and-run model of stable epigenetic reprograming in memory T cells, mediated by transient Activator Protein 1 (AP-1) binding, which enables the accelerated activation of inducible enhancers. PMID:28018147

  4. Resveratrol Ameliorates Dysregulation of Th1, Th2, Th17, and T Regulatory Cell-Related Transcription Factor Signaling in a BTBR T + tf/J Mouse Model of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheet, Saleh A; Alzahrani, Mohammad Zeed; Ansari, Mushtaq Ahmad; Nadeem, Ahmed; Zoheir, Khairy M A; Attia, Sabry M; Al-Ayadhi, Laila Yousef; Ahmad, Sheikh Fayaz

    2017-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder. It is characterized by impaired social communication, abnormal social interactions, and repetitive behaviors and/or restricted interests. BTBR T + tf/J (BTBR) inbred mice are commonly used as a model for ASD. Resveratrol is used widely as a beneficial therapeutic in the treatment of an extensive array of pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, the effect of resveratrol administration (20 and 40 mg/kg) was evaluated in both BTBR and C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Behavioral (self-grooming), Foxp3, T-bet, GATA-3, RORγt, and IL-17A in CD4(+) T cells were assessed. Our study showed that BTBR control mice exhibited a distinct immune profile from that of the B6 control mice. BTBR mice were characterized by lower levels of Foxp3(+) and higher levels of RORγt(+), T-bet(+), and GATA-3(+) production in CD4(+) T cells when compared with B6 control. Resveratrol (20 and 40 mg/kg) treatment to B6 and BTBR mice showed substantial induction of Foxp3(+) and reduction of T-bet(+), GATA-3(+), and IL-17A(+) expression in CD4(+) cells when compared with the respective control groups. Moreover, resveratrol treatment resulted in upregulated expression of Foxp3 mRNA and decreased expression levels of T-bet, GATA-3, RORγt, and IL-17A in the spleen and brain tissues. Western blot analysis confirmed that resveratrol treatment decreased the protein expression of T-bet, GATA-3, RORγ, and IL-17 and that it increased Foxp3 in B6 and BTBR mice. Our results suggest that autism is associated with dysregulation of transcription factor signaling that can be corrected by resveratrol treatment.

  5. Rhomboids, signalling and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Matthew

    2016-06-15

    Here, I take a somewhat personal perspective on signalling control, focusing on the rhomboid-like superfamily of proteins that my group has worked on for almost 20 years. As well as describing some of the key and recent advances, I attempt to draw out signalling themes that emerge. One important message is that the genetic and biochemical perspective on signalling has tended to underplay the importance of cell biology. There is clear evidence that signalling pathways exploit the control of intracellular trafficking, protein quality control and degradation and other cell biological phenomena, as important regulatory opportunities.

  6. Oncogene-initiated aberrant signaling engenders the metastatic phenotype: synergistic transcription factor interactions are targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denhardt, D T

    1996-01-01

    Certain p21GTPases (notably Ras) and some of their guanine nucleotide exchange factors (e.g., Ost, Dbl, Tiam) and downstream mediators (e.g., Raf, Myc) have the potential to promote the development of malignancies because they can enhance the transcription of genes that foster the tumorigenic and metastatic phenotype. Among these are genes that stimulate cell proliferation, confer immortality, and facilitate the invasion of normal tissues. Oncogenes upstream of Ras-cell surface receptors such as ErbB2/Neu, Met, or Trk (and their ligands), and nonreceptor cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinases such as Src and Abl-not only can act through Ras but also contribute additional signals. This review presents a synopsis of our understanding of signaling pathways controlled by the p21GTPases, with a focus on transcription factors regulated by the pathways. Mutations in one or more of the elements in these signaling pathways are invariably found in cancer cells. Crosstalk among the pathways may explain how some forms of stress can contribute to the development of a malignancy. Abnormal signaling leads to modified cytoskeletal structures and permanently altered (i.e., self-sustaining or epigenetic) transcription of target genes. A common therne is that genes whose transcription is elevated to the greatest extent by Ras often have in their promoters juxtaposed binding sites for two different transcription factors (particularly those in the Fos/Jun, CREB/ATF, NFkB, and Ets families) each of which is activated and such that together they synergize to augment transcription substantially. Some of these transcription factors can also act as oncogenes in certain cell types when appropriately modified and expressed. This unifying theme among many different cancers suggests that strategies to restore the balance among the signaling pathways or to suppress synergistic interactions between transcription factors may prove broadly useful in reversing the malignant phenotype.

  7. Signaling mechanisms in alcoholic liver injury: Role of transcription factors,kinases and heat shock proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Alcoholic liver injury comprises of interactions of various intracellular signaling events in the liver. Innate immune responses in the resident Kupffer cells of the liver, oxidative stress-induced activation of hepatocytes,fibrotic events in liver stellate cells and activation of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells all contribute to alcoholic liver injury. The signaling mechanisms associated with alcoholic liver injury vary based on the cell type involved and the extent of alcohol consumption. In this review we will elucidate the oxidative stress and signaling pathways affected by alcohol in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells in the liver by alcohol. The toll-like receptors and their down-stream signaling events that play an important role in alcohol-induced inflammation will be discussed. Alcohol-induced alterations of various intracellular transcription factors such as NFκB, PPARs and AP-1, as well as MAPK kinases in hepatocytes and macrophages leading to induction of target genes that contribute to liver injury will be reviewed. Finally, we will discuss the significance of heat shock proteins as chaperones and their functional regulation in the liver that could provide new mechanistic insights into the contributions of stress-induced signaling mechanisms in alcoholic liver injury.

  8. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling affects IL-21/IL-22 cytokines and GATA3/T-bet transcription factor expression in CD4(+) T cells from a BTBR T(+) Itpr3tf/J mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sheikh F; Ansari, Mushtaq A; Nadeem, Ahmed; Bakheet, Saleh A; Almutairi, Mashal M; Attia, Sabry M

    2017-10-15

    Autism is a complex heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder; previous studies have identified altered immune responses among individuals diagnosed with autism. An imbalance in the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and transcription factors plays a role in neurodevelopmental behavioral and autism disorders. BTBR T(+) Itpr3tf/J (BTBR) mice are used as a model for autism, as they exhibit social deficits, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors compared with C57BL/6J (B6) mice. The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) appears to be a potential target for the improvement of behavioral, inflammatory, immune, and neurological disorders. We investigated the effects of the A2AR antagonist SCH 5826 (SCH) and agonist CGS 21680 (CGS) on IL-21, IL-22, T-bet, T-box transcription factor (T-bet), GATA3 (GATA Binding Protein 3), and CD152 (CTLA-4) expression in BTBR mice. Our results showed that BTBR mice treated with SCH had increased CD4(+)IL-21(+), CD4(+)IL-22(+), CD4(+)GATA3(+), and CD4(+)T-bet(+) and decreased CD4(+)CTLA-4(+) expression in spleen cells compared with BTBR control mice. Moreover, CGS efficiently decreased CD4(+)IL-21(+), CD4(+)IL-22(+), CD4(+)GATA3(+), and CD4(+)T-bet(+) and increased CD4(+)CTLA-4 production in spleen cells compared with SCH-treated and BTBR control mice. Additionally, SCH treatment significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-21, IL-22, GATA3, and T-bet in brain tissue compared with CGS-treated and BTBR control mice. The augmented levels of IL-21/IL-22 and GATA3/T-bet could be due to altered A2AR signaling. Our results indicate that A2AR agonists may represent a new class of compounds that can be developed for use in the treatment of autistic and neuroimmune dysfunctions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. WRKY Transcription Factors: Key Components in Abscisic Acid Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    2008). In cereals, upon imbibing, the embryos of nondormant seeds produce GA. This GA is transported to the aleurone, a thin layer of cells surround- ing...sensing, signaling and transport . Plant Cell Physiol. 51, 1821–1839. Urano, K., Kurihara, Y., Seki, M. and Shinozaki, K. (2010) ‘Omics’ analyses of...galactinol synthase (BhGolS1) promoter. Planta , 230, 1155–1166. Wu, F.-Q., Xin, Q., Cao, Z., Liu, Z.-Q., Du, S.-Y., Mei, C., Zhao, C.-X., Wang, X.-F

  10. Molecular cell biology of androgen receptor signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Nigel C; Gardiner, Robert A; Hooper, John D; Johnson, David W; Gobe, Glenda C

    2010-06-01

    The classical action of androgen receptor (AR) is to regulate gene transcriptional processes via AR nuclear translocation, response element binding and recruitment of, or crosstalk with, transcription factors. AR also utilises non-classical, non-genomic mechanisms of signal transduction. These precede gene transcription or protein synthesis, and involve steroid-induced modulation of cytoplasmic or cell membrane-bound regulatory proteins. Despite many decades of investigation, the role of AR in gene regulation of cells and tissues remains only partially characterised. AR exerts most of its effects in sex hormone-dependent tissues of the body, but the receptor is also expressed in many tissues not previously thought to be androgen sensitive. Thus it is likely that a complex, more over-arching, role for AR exists. Each AR domain co-ordinates a multitude of individual and vital roles via a diverse array of interacting partner molecules that are necessary for cellular and tissue development and maintenance. Aberrant AR activity, promoted by mutations or binding partner misregulation, can present as many clinical manifestations including androgen insensitivity syndrome and prostate cancer. In the case of malignant prostate cancer, treatment generally revolves around androgen deprivation therapies designed to interfere with AR action and the androgen signalling axis. Androgen therapies for prostate cancer often fail, highlighting a real need for increased research into AR function.

  11. Transcriptional analysis of phloem-associated cells of potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tian; Lashbrook, Coralie C; Cho, Sung Ki; Butler, Nathaniel M; Sharma, Pooja; Muppirala, Usha; Severin, Andrew J; Hannapel, David J

    2015-09-03

    Numerous signal molecules, including proteins and mRNAs, are transported through the architecture of plants via the vascular system. As the connection between leaves and other organs, the petiole and stem are especially important in their transport function, which is carried out by the phloem and xylem, especially by the sieve elements in the phloem system. The phloem is an important conduit for transporting photosynthate and signal molecules like metabolites, proteins, small RNAs, and full-length mRNAs. Phloem sap has been used as an unadulterated source to profile phloem proteins and RNAs, but unfortunately, pure phloem sap cannot be obtained in most plant species. Here we make use of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and RNA-seq for an in-depth transcriptional profile of phloem-associated cells of both petioles and stems of potato. To expedite our analysis, we have taken advantage of the potato genome that has recently been fully sequenced and annotated. Out of the 27 k transcripts assembled that we identified, approximately 15 k were present in phloem-associated cells of petiole and stem with greater than ten reads. Among these genes, roughly 10 k are affected by photoperiod. Several RNAs from this day length-regulated group are also abundant in phloem cells of petioles and encode for proteins involved in signaling or transcriptional control. Approximately 22 % of the transcripts in phloem cells contained at least one binding motif for Pumilio, Nova, or polypyrimidine tract-binding proteins in their downstream sequences. Highlighting the predominance of binding processes identified in the gene ontology analysis of active genes from phloem cells, 78 % of the 464 RNA-binding proteins present in the potato genome were detected in our phloem transcriptome. As a reasonable alternative when phloem sap collection is not possible, LCM can be used to isolate RNA from specific cell types, and along with RNA-seq, provides practical access to expression profiles of

  12. Palmitoylation of TEAD Transcription Factors Is Required for Their Stability and Function in Hippo Pathway Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Cameron L; Gierke, Sarah; Schnier, Paul D; Murray, Jeremy; Sandoval, Wendy N; Sagolla, Meredith; Dey, Anwesha; Hannoush, Rami N; Fairbrother, Wayne J; Cunningham, Christian N

    2016-01-05

    The Hippo signaling pathway is responsible for regulating the function of TEAD family transcription factors in metazoans. TEADs, with their co-activators YAP/TAZ, are critical for controlling cell differentiation and organ size through their transcriptional activation of genes involved in cell growth and proliferation. Dysregulation of the Hippo pathway has been implicated in multiple forms of cancer. Here, we identify a novel form of regulation of TEAD family proteins. We show that human TEADs are palmitoylated at a universally conserved cysteine, and report the crystal structures of the human TEAD2 and TEAD3 YAP-binding domains in their palmitoylated forms. These structures show a palmitate bound within a highly conserved hydrophobic cavity at each protein's core. Our findings also demonstrate that this modification is required for proper TEAD folding and stability, indicating a potential new avenue for pharmacologically regulating the Hippo pathway through the modulation of TEAD palmitoylation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell Polarity Signaling in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhenbiao

    2008-01-01

    Cell polarization is intimately linked to plant development, growth, and responses to the environment. Major advances have been made in our understanding of the signaling pathways and networks that regulate cell polarity in plants owing to recent studies on several model systems, e.g., tip growth in pollen tubes, cell morphogenesis in the leaf epidermis, and polar localization of PINs. From these studies we have learned that plant cells use conserved mechanisms such as Rho family GTPases to i...

  14. Synchronization of developmental processes and defense signaling by growth regulating transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyi Liu

    Full Text Available Growth regulating factors (GRFs are a conserved class of transcription factor in seed plants. GRFs are involved in various aspects of tissue differentiation and organ development. The implication of GRFs in biotic stress response has also been recently reported, suggesting a role of these transcription factors in coordinating the interaction between developmental processes and defense dynamics. However, the molecular mechanisms by which GRFs mediate the overlaps between defense signaling and developmental pathways are elusive. Here, we report large scale identification of putative target candidates of Arabidopsis GRF1 and GRF3 by comparing mRNA profiles of the grf1/grf2/grf3 triple mutant and those of the transgenic plants overexpressing miR396-resistant version of GRF1 or GRF3. We identified 1,098 and 600 genes as putative targets of GRF1 and GRF3, respectively. Functional classification of the potential target candidates revealed that GRF1 and GRF3 contribute to the regulation of various biological processes associated with defense response and disease resistance. GRF1 and GRF3 participate specifically in the regulation of defense-related transcription factors, cell-wall modifications, cytokinin biosynthesis and signaling, and secondary metabolites accumulation. GRF1 and GRF3 seem to fine-tune the crosstalk between miRNA signaling networks by regulating the expression of several miRNA target genes. In addition, our data suggest that GRF1 and GRF3 may function as negative regulators of gene expression through their association with other transcription factors. Collectively, our data provide new insights into how GRF1 and GRF3 might coordinate the interactions between defense signaling and plant growth and developmental pathways.

  15. Parathyroid hormone inhibition of Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 3 transcription: Intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factor expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, Elida Adalgisa; Bezerra, Camila Nogueira Alves, E-mail: camilab@icb.usp.br; Queiroz-Leite, Gabriella Duarte; Polidoro, Juliano Zequini; Rebouças, Nancy Amaral

    2015-06-12

    The main transport mechanism of reabsorption of sodium bicarbonate and fluid in the renal proximal tubules involves Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 3 (NHE3), which is acutely and chronically downregulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH). Although PTH is known to exert an inhibitory effect on NHE3 expression and transcription, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that, in opossum kidney proximal tubule (OKP) cells, PTH-induced inhibition of Nhe3 gene promoter occurs even in the core promoter that controls expression of the reporter gene. We found that inhibition of the protein kinase A (PKA) and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathways transformed PTH from an inhibitor of promoter activity into an activator of that same activity, as did point mutations in the EGR1, Sp1, and Sp3 binding consensus elements in the promoter. In nuclear extracts of PTH-treated OKP cells, we also observed increased expression of EGR1 mRNA and of some Sp3 isoforms. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed a supershift of the −61 to −42-bp probe with an anti-EGR1 antibody in PTH-treated cells, suggesting that EGR1 binding is relevant for the inhibitory activity of PTH. We conclude that PTH-induced inhibition of NHE3 transcription is related to higher EGR1 expression; to EGR1 binding to the proximal and core promoters; and to PKA and JAK/STAT pathway activation. This mechanism might be responsible, at least in part, for lower NHE3 expression and sodium reabsorption in renal proximal tubules in the presence of high PTH levels. - Highlights: • PTH regulation of Nhe3 promoter depends on EGR1 binding. • EGR1, PKA and JAK/STAT are involved in PTH inhibition of the Nhe3 promoter. • PTH alters expression of EGR1 and Sp3. • PTH inhibits the Nhe3 promoter by regulating PKA and JAK/STAT signaling.

  16. NF-κB Mediated Transcription in Human Monocytic Cells and Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, G C; Mackman, N

    1998-04-01

    Monocytes and endothelial cells become activated at sites of inflammation and contribute to the pathology of many diseases, including septic shock and atherosclerosis. In these cells, induction of genes expressing various inflammatory mediators, such as adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors, is regulated by NF-κB/Rel transcription factors. Recent studies have identified components of the signal transduction pathways leading to the activation of NF-κB/Rel proteins. Inhibition of these signaling pathways provides a novel therapeutic approach to prevent inducible gene expression in both monocytes and endothelial cells. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1998;8:138-142). © 1998, Elsevier Science Inc.

  17. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  18. The transcriptional corepressor SMRTER influences both Notch and ecdysone signaling during Drosophila development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan W. Heck

    2011-12-01

    SMRTER (SMRT-related and ecdysone receptor interacting factor is the Drosophila homologue of the vertebrate proteins SMRT and N-CoR, and forms with them a well-conserved family of transcriptional corepressors. Molecular characterization of SMRT-family proteins in cultured cells has implicated them in a wide range of transcriptional regulatory pathways. However, little is currently known about how this conserved class of transcriptional corepressors regulates the development of particular tissues via specific pathways. In this study, through our characterization of multiple Smrter (Smr mutant lines, mosaic analysis of a loss-of-function Smr allele, and studies of two independent Smr RNAi fly lines, we report that SMRTER is required for the development of both ovarian follicle cells and the wing. In these two tissues, SMRTER inhibits not only the ecdysone pathway, but also the Notch pathway. We differentiate SMRTER's influence on these two signaling pathways by showing that SMRTER inhibits the Notch pathway, but not the ecdysone pathway, in a spatiotemporally restricted manner. We further confirm the likely involvement of SMRTER in the Notch pathway by demonstrating a direct interaction between SMRTER and Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H], a DNA-binding transcription factor pivotal in the Notch pathway, and the colocalization of both proteins at many chromosomal regions in salivary glands. Based on our results, we propose that SMRTER regulates the Notch pathway through its association with Su(H, and that overcoming a SMRTER-mediated transcriptional repression barrier may represent a key mechanism used by the Notch pathway to control the precise timing of events and the formation of sharp boundaries between cells in multiple tissues during development.

  19. SoxB1-driven transcriptional network underlies neural-specific interpretation of morphogen signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterveen, Tony; Kurdija, Sanja; Ensterö, Mats; Uhde, Christopher W; Bergsland, Maria; Sandberg, Magnus; Sandberg, Rickard; Muhr, Jonas; Ericson, Johan

    2013-04-30

    The reiterative deployment of a small cadre of morphogen signals underlies patterning and growth of most tissues during embyogenesis, but how such inductive events result in tissue-specific responses remains poorly understood. By characterizing cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) associated with genes regulated by Sonic hedgehog (Shh), retinoids, or bone morphogenetic proteins in the CNS, we provide evidence that the neural-specific interpretation of morphogen signaling reflects a direct integration of these pathways with SoxB1 proteins at the CRM level. Moreover, expression of SoxB1 proteins in the limb bud confers on mesodermal cells the potential to activate neural-specific target genes upon Shh, retinoid, or bone morphogenetic protein signaling, and the collocation of binding sites for SoxB1 and morphogen-mediatory transcription factors in CRMs faithfully predicts neural-specific gene activity. Thus, an unexpectedly simple transcriptional paradigm appears to conceptually explain the neural-specific interpretation of pleiotropic signaling during vertebrate development. Importantly, genes induced in a SoxB1-dependent manner appear to constitute repressive gene regulatory networks that are directly interlinked at the CRM level to constrain the regional expression of patterning genes. Accordingly, not only does the topology of SoxB1-driven gene regulatory networks provide a tissue-specific mode of gene activation, but it also determines the spatial expression pattern of target genes within the developing neural tube.

  20. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  1. Sizn1 is a novel protein that functions as a transcriptional coactivator of bone morphogenic protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ginam; Lim, Youngshin; Zand, Dina; Golden, Jeffrey A

    2008-03-01

    Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) play pleotrophic roles in nervous system development, and their signaling is highly regulated at virtually every step in the pathway. We have cloned a novel gene, Sizn1 (Smad-interacting zinc finger protein), which functions as a transcriptional coactivator of BMP signaling. It positively modulates BMP signaling by interacting with Smad family members and associating with CBP in the transcription complex. Sizn1 is expressed in the ventral embryonic forebrain, where, as we will show, it contributes to BMP-dependent, cholinergic-neuron-specific gene expression. These data indicate that Sizn1 is a positive modulator of BMP signaling and provide further insight into how BMP signaling can be modulated in neuronal progenitor subsets to influence cell-type-specific gene expression and development.

  2. Yap1, transcription regulator in the Hippo signaling pathway, is required for Xenopus limb bud regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Tamura, Koji; Yokoyama, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is conserved from insects to mammals and is important for multiple processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and tissue homeostasis. Hippo signaling is also crucial for regeneration, including intercalary regeneration, of the whole body in the flatworm and of the leg in the cricket. However, its role in vertebrate epimorphic regeneration is unknown. Therefore, to identify principles of regeneration that are conserved among bilaterians, we investigated the role of Hippo signaling in the limb bud regeneration of an anuran amphibian, Xenopus laevis. We found that a transcription factor, Yap1, an important downstream effector of Hippo signaling, is upregulated in the regenerating limb bud. To evaluate Yap1׳s function in limb bud regeneration, we made transgenic animals that expressed a dominant-negative form of Yap under a heat-shock promoter. Overexpression of a dominant-negative form of Yap in tadpoles reduced cell proliferation, induced ectopic apoptosis, perturbed the expression domains of limb-patterning genes including hoxa13, hoxa11, and shh in the regenerating limb bud. Transient expression of a dominant-negative Yap in transgenic tadpoles also caused limb bud regeneration defects, and reduced intercalary regeneration. These results indicate that Yap1 has a crucial role in controlling the limb regenerative capacity in Xenopus, and suggest that the involvement of Hippo signaling in regeneration is conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates. This finding provides molecular evidence that common principles underlie regeneration across phyla, and may contribute to the development of new therapies in regenerative medicine.

  3. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-04-20

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene\\'s function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins\\' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/FullSignalRanker/ © 2015 IEEE.

  4. Adipocyte activation of cancer stem cell signaling in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin; Wolfson; Gabriel; Eades; Qun; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Signaling within the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in cancer initiation and progression. Adipocytes, one of the major components of the breast microenvironment,have been shown to provide pro-tumorigenic signals that promote cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Adipocyte secreted factors such as leptin and interleukin-6(IL-6) have a paracrine effect on breast cancer cells. In adipocyte-adjacent breast cancer cells, the leptin and IL-6 signaling pathways activate janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activatorof transcription 5, promoting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and upregulating stemness regulators such as Notch, Wnt and the Sex determining region Y-box 2/octamer binding transcription factor 4/Nanog signaling axis. In this review we will summarize the major signaling pathways that regulate cancer stem cells in breast cancer and describe the effects that adipocyte secreted IL-6 and leptin have on breast cancer stem cell signaling. Finally we will introduce a new potential treatment paradigm of inhibiting the adipocyte-breast cancer cell signaling via targeting the IL-6 or leptin pathways.

  5. Transcriptional regulators in the Hippo signaling pathway control organ growth in Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Ochi, Haruki; Ogino, Hajime; Kawasumi, Aiko; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Koji; Yokoyama, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    The size and shape of tissues are tightly controlled by synchronized processes among cells and tissues to produce an integrated organ. The Hippo signaling pathway controls both cell proliferation and apoptosis by dual signal-transduction states regulated through a repressive kinase cascade. Yap1 and Tead, transcriptional regulators that act downstream of the Hippo signaling kinase cascade, have essential roles in regulating cell proliferation. In amphibian limb or tail regeneration, the local tissue outgrowth terminates when the correct size is reached, suggesting that organ size is strictly controlled during epimorphic organ-level regeneration. We recently demonstrated that Yap1 is required for the regeneration of Xenopus tadpole limb buds (Hayashi et al., 2014, Dev. Biol. 388, 57-67), but the molecular link between the Hippo pathway and organ size control in vertebrate epimorphic regeneration is not fully understood. To examine the requirement of Hippo pathway transcriptional regulators in epimorphic regeneration, including organ size control, we inhibited these regulators during Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration by overexpressing a dominant-negative form of Yap (dnYap) or Tead4 (dnTead4) under a heat-shock promoter in transgenic animal lines. Each inhibition resulted in regeneration defects accompanied by reduced cell mitosis and increased apoptosis. Single-cell gene manipulation experiments indicated that Tead4 cell-autonomously regulates the survival of neural progenitor cells in the regenerating tail. In amphibians, amputation at the proximal level of the tail (deep amputation) results in faster regeneration than that at the distal level (shallow amputation), to restore the original-sized tail with similar timing. However, dnTead4 overexpression abolished the position-dependent differential growth rate of tail regeneration. These results suggest that the transcriptional regulators in the Hippo pathway, Tead4 and Yap1, are required for general vertebrate

  6. Nuclear localization signal in a cancer-related transcriptional regulator protein NAC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Kosuke; Nakayama, Naomi; Nariai, Yuko; Nakayama, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Kohji; Maruyama, Riruke; Kato, Hiroaki; Kosugi, Shunichi; Urano, Takeshi; Sakashita, Gyosuke

    2012-10-01

    Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1) might have potential oncogenic properties and participate in regulatory networks for pluripotency. Although NAC1 is described as a transcriptional regulator, the nuclear import machinery of NAC1 remains unclear. We found, using a point mutant, that dimer formation was not committed to the nuclear localization of NAC1 and, using deletion mutants, that the amino-terminal half of NAC1 harbored a potential nuclear localization signal (NLS). Wild type, but not mutants of this region, alone was sufficient to drive the importation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the nucleus. Bimax1, a synthetic peptide that blocks the importin α/β pathway, impaired nuclear localization of NAC1 in cells. We also used the binding properties of importin to demonstrate that this region is an NLS. Furthermore, the transcriptional regulator function of NAC1 was dependent on its nuclear localization activity in cells. Taken together, these results show that the region with a bipartite motif constitutes a functional nuclear import sequence in NAC1 that is independent of NAC1 dimer formation. The identification of an NAC1 NLS thus clarifies the mechanism through which NAC1 translocates to the nucleus to regulate the transcription of genes involved in oncogenicity and pluripotency.

  7. Transcription factor TLX1 controls retinoic acid signaling to ensure spleen development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenti, Elisa; Farinello, Diego; Penkov, Dmitry; Castagnaro, Laura; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Wuputra, Kenly; Tjaden, Naomi E. Butler; Bernassola, Francesca; Caridi, Nicoletta; Wagner, Michael; Kozinc, Katja; Niederreither, Karen; Blasi, Francesco; Pasini, Diego; Trainor, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie spleen development and congenital asplenia, a condition linked to increased risk of overwhelming infections, remain largely unknown. The transcription factor TLX1 controls cell fate specification and organ expansion during spleen development, and Tlx1 deletion causes asplenia in mice. Deregulation of TLX1 expression has recently been proposed in the pathogenesis of congenital asplenia in patients carrying mutations of the gene-encoding transcription factor SF-1. Herein, we have shown that TLX1-dependent regulation of retinoic acid (RA) metabolism is critical for spleen organogenesis. In a murine model, loss of Tlx1 during formation of the splenic anlage increased RA signaling by regulating several genes involved in RA metabolism. Uncontrolled RA activity resulted in premature differentiation of mesenchymal cells and reduced vasculogenesis of the splenic primordium. Pharmacological inhibition of RA signaling in Tlx1-deficient animals partially rescued the spleen defect. Finally, spleen growth was impaired in mice lacking either cytochrome P450 26B1 (Cyp26b1), which results in excess RA, or retinol dehydrogenase 10 (Rdh10), which results in RA deficiency. Together, these findings establish TLX1 as a critical regulator of RA metabolism and provide mechanistic insights into the molecular determinants of human congenital asplenia. PMID:27214556

  8. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  9. Diverse ETS transcription factors mediate FGF signaling in the Ciona anterior neural plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainous, T Blair; Wagner, Eileen; Levine, Michael

    2015-03-15

    The ascidian Ciona intestinalis is a marine invertebrate belonging to the sister group of the vertebrates, the tunicates. Its compact genome and simple, experimentally tractable embryos make Ciona well-suited for the study of cell-fate specification in chordates. Tunicate larvae possess a characteristic chordate body plan, and many developmental pathways are conserved between tunicates and vertebrates. Previous studies have shown that FGF signals are essential for neural induction and patterning at sequential steps of Ciona embryogenesis. Here we show that two different ETS family transcription factors, Ets1/2 and Elk1/3/4, have partially redundant activities in the anterior neural plate of gastrulating embryos. Whereas Ets1/2 promotes pigment cell formation in lateral lineages, both Ets1/2 and Elk1/3/4 are involved in the activation of Myt1L in medial lineages and the restriction of Six3/6 expression to the anterior-most regions of the neural tube. We also provide evidence that photoreceptor cells arise from posterior regions of the presumptive sensory vesicle, and do not depend on FGF signaling. Cells previously identified as photoreceptor progenitors instead form ependymal cells and neurons of the larval brain. Our results extend recent findings on FGF-dependent patterning of anterior-posterior compartments in the Ciona central nervous system. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Wnt-3A/beta-catenin signaling induces transcription from the LEF-1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filali, Mohammed; Cheng, Ningli; Abbott, Duane; Leontiev, Vladimir; Engelhardt, John F

    2002-09-06

    Members of the Wnt family of secreted molecules have been established as key factors in determining cell fate and morphogenic signaling. It has long been recognized that Wnt induces morphogenic signaling through the Tcf/LEF-1 cascade by regulating free intracellular levels of beta-catenin, a co-factor for Tcf/LEF-1 transcription factors. In the present study, we have demonstrated that Wnt-3A can also directly induce transcription from the LEF-1 promoter. This induction was dependent on glycogen synthase kinase 3beta inactivation, a rise in free intracellular beta-catenin, and a short 110-bp Wnt-responsive element (WRE) in the LEF-1 promoter. Linear and internal deletion of this WRE led to a dramatic increase in constitutive LEF-1 promoter activity and loss of Wnt-3A responsiveness. In isolation, the 110-bp WRE conferred context-independent Wnt-3A or beta-catenin(S37A) responsiveness to a heterologous SV40 promoter. Studies expressing dominant active and negative forms of LEF-1, beta-catenin, GSK-3beta, and beta-catenin/LEF-1 fusions suggest that Wnt-3A activates the LEF-1 promoter through a beta-catenin-dependent and LEF-1-independent process. Wnt-3A expression also induced multiple changes in the binding of factors to the WRE and suggests that regulatory mechanisms may involve modulation of a multiprotein complex. In summary, these results provide evidence for transcriptional regulation of the LEF-1 promoter by Wnt and enhance the mechanistic understanding of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in the regulation of LEF-1-dependent developmental processes.

  11. Targeting signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) in human cancer by dietary polyphenolic antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amani, Hamed; Ajami, Marjan; Maleki, Solmaz Nasseri; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza; Daglia, Maria; Tsetegho Sokeng, Arold Jorel; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Devi, Kasi Pandima; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-08-11

    Over the course of the last three decades, a large body of evidence has shown that polyphenols, the secondary metabolites occurring in plant foods and beverages, exert protective effects due to their antioxidant activity mediated through different mechanisms ranging from direct radical scavenging and metal chelating activities, to the capacity to inhibit pro-oxidant enzymes and to target specific cell-signalling pathways. In the last decade, dietary components, and polyphenols in particular have gained considerable attention as chemopreventive agents against different types of cancer. The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family is a group of cytoplasmic transcription factors which interact with specific sequences of DNA, inducing the expression of specific genes which in turn give rise to adaptive and highly specific biological responses. Growing evidence suggests that, of the seven STAT members identified, STAT3 is over-expressed in many human tumors (i.e. solid tumors and hematological malignancies) promoting the onset and development of cancer in humans by inhibiting apoptosis or by inducing cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. This review article aims to assess the most recent studies on the role of STATs, with focus on STAT3, in oncogenesis, and the promising effects of some polyphenols on STAT expression. Moreover, the mechanisms behind the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of polyphenols which have an influence on STAT expression are discussed, with a focus on their ability to target specific cell-signalling pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Societe Francaise de Biochimie et Biologie Moleculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  12. ERK-dependent phosphorylation of the transcription initiation factor TIF-IA is required for RNA polymerase I transcription and cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jian; Yuan, Xuejun; Frödin, Morten;

    2003-01-01

    Phosphorylation of transcription factors by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades links cell signaling with the control of gene expression. Here we show that growth factors induce rRNA synthesis by activating MAPK-dependent signaling cascades that target the RNA polymerase I-specific t...

  13. Transcription Factors Downstream of IL-4 and TGF-β Signals: Analysis by Quantitative PCR, Western Blot, and Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Atsushi; Kawakami, Ryoji; Mikami, Norihisa

    2017-01-01

    IL-9-producing Th9 cell is a novel Th cell subset involved in type II allergic inflammations such as asthma. Th9 cells can be induced from naïve Th cells in the presence of IL-4 and TGF-β. It is also well established that downstream signals of IL-4 and TGF-β, including STAT6, IRF4, Smad, and PU.1, directly mediate IL-9 production in Th9 cells. In this chapter we describe the methods of flow cytometry, qPCR and western blot analysis to determine the expression or activation of these transcription factors downstream of IL-4 and TGF-β.

  14. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Carrie D.; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Silvio Gutkind, J.; Hales, Tim G.; Lee, Norman H.

    2015-06-01

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of dendritic cell diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Michaël; Allan, Rhys S; Belz, Gabrielle T

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration, and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These findings open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle - identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man - now sets the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  16. Ligand-specific sequential regulation of transcription factors for differentiation of MCF-7 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyoda Tetsuro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing a common ErbB/HER receptor signaling pathway, heregulin (HRG induces differentiation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells while epidermal growth factor (EGF elicits proliferation. Although cell fates resulting from action of the aforementioned ligands completely different, the respective gene expression profiles in early transcription are qualitatively similar, suggesting that gene expression during late transcription, but not early transcription, may reflect ligand specificity. In this study, based on both the data from time-course quantitative real-time PCR on over 2,000 human transcription factors and microarray of all human genes, we identified a series of transcription factors which may control HRG-specific late transcription in MCF-7 cells. Results We predicted that four transcription factors including EGR4, FRA-1, FHL2, and DIPA should have responsibility of regulation in MCF-7 cell differentiation. Validation analysis suggested that one member of the activator protein 1 (AP-1 family, FOSL-1 (FRA-1 gene, appeared immediately following c-FOS expression, might be responsible for expression of transcription factor FHL2 through activation of the AP-1 complex. Furthermore, RNAi gene silencing of FOSL-1 and FHL2 resulted in increase of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation of which duration was sustained by HRG stimulation. Conclusion Our analysis indicated that a time-dependent transcriptional regulatory network including c-FOS, FRA-1, and FHL2 is vital in controlling the ERK signaling pathway through a negative feedback loop for MCF-7 cell differentiation.

  17. The chemical structure of DNA sequence signals for RNA transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. G.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed recognition sites for RNA transcription for E. coli NRA polymerase, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, and eukaryotic RNA polymerase Pol II are evaluated in the light of the requirements for efficient recognition. It is shown that although there is good experimental evidence that specific nucleic acid sequence patterns are involved in transcriptional regulation in bacteria and bacterial viruses, among the sequences now available, only in the case of the promoters recognized by bacteriophage T7 polymerase does it seem likely that the pattern is sufficient. It is concluded that the eukaryotic pattern that is investigated is not restrictive enough to serve as a recognition site.

  18. Wnt signaling through T-cell factor phosphorylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergei Y Sokol

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic signaling pathways often lead to a switch from default repression to transcriptional activation of target genes. A major consequence of Wnt signaling is stabilization of p-catenin, which associates with T-cell factors (TCFs) and 'converts' them from repressors into transcriptional activators. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this conversion remain poorly understood. Several studies have reported on the regulation of TCF by phosphorylation,yet its physiological significance has been unclear: in some cases it appears to promote target gene activation, in oth-ers Wnt-dependent transcription is inhibited. This review focuses on recent progress in the understanding of context-dependent post-translational regulation of TCF function by Wnt signaling.

  19. An inside job: hacking into Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling cascades by the intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkers, Eric Y; Bzik, David J; Fox, Barbara A; Butcher, Barbara A

    2012-02-01

    The intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is well known for its skill at invading and living within host cells. New discoveries are now also revealing the astounding ability of the parasite to inject effector proteins into the cytoplasm to seize control of the host cell. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of one such secretory protein called ROP16. This molecule is released from rhoptries into the host cell during invasion. The ROP16 molecule acts as a kinase, directly activating both signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and STAT6 signaling pathways. In macrophages, an important and preferential target cell of parasite infection, the injection of ROP16 has multiple consequences, including downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine signaling and macrophage deviation to an alternatively activated phenotype.

  20. An Inside Job: Hacking into Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription Signaling Cascades by the Intracellular Protozoan Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzik, David J.; Fox, Barbara A.; Butcher, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is well known for its skill at invading and living within host cells. New discoveries are now also revealing the astounding ability of the parasite to inject effector proteins into the cytoplasm to seize control of the host cell. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of one such secretory protein called ROP16. This molecule is released from rhoptries into the host cell during invasion. The ROP16 molecule acts as a kinase, directly activating both signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and STAT6 signaling pathways. In macrophages, an important and preferential target cell of parasite infection, the injection of ROP16 has multiple consequences, including downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine signaling and macrophage deviation to an alternatively activated phenotype. PMID:22104110

  1. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 gene G2964A polymorphism and inflammatory bowel disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, B; Crusius, J.B.A.; Wu, J; Zwiers, A.; Bodegraven, van A.A.; Pena, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) is a key transcription factor involved in interleukin 4 (IL-4) and IL-13-mediated Th2 response. The STAT6 gene is located on chromosome 12q13.3-14.1 (IBD2 region) and is therefore a positional and functional candidate gene for study in infla

  2. Bcl6 Sets a Threshold for Antiviral Signaling by Restraining IRF7 Transcriptional Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Kang, Yanhua; Zhuang, Ningtong; Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Hang; Xu, Dakang; Ding, Yina; Yin, Hongping; Shi, Liyun

    2016-01-05

    The coordination of restraining and priming of antiviral signaling constitute a fundamental aspect of immunological functions. However, we currently know little about the molecular events that can translate the pathogenic cues into the appropriate code for antiviral defense. Our present study reports a specific role of B cell lymphoma (Bcl)6 as a checkpoint in the initiation of the host response to cytosolic RNA viruses. Remarkably, Bcl6 specifically binds to the interferon-regulatory factor (IRF)7 loci and restrains its transcription, thereby functioning as a negative regulator for interferon (IFN)-β production and antiviral responses. The signal-controlled turnover of the Bcl6, most likely mediated by microRNA-127, coordinates the antiviral response and inflammatory sequelae. Accordingly, de-repression of Bcl6 resulted in a phenotypic conversion of macrophages into highly potent IFN-producing cells and rendered mice more resistant to pathogenic RNA virus infection. The failure to remove the Bcl6 regulator, however, impedes the antiviral signaling and exaggerates viral pneumonia in mice. We thus reveal a novel key molecular checkpoint to orchestrate antiviral innate immunity.

  3. Coupled transcription and translation within nuclei of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iborra, F J; Jackson, D A; Cook, P R

    2001-08-10

    It is widely assumed that the vital processes of transcription and translation are spatially separated in eukaryotes and that no translation occurs in nuclei. We localized translation sites by incubating permeabilized mammalian cells with [3H]lysine or lysyl-transfer RNA tagged with biotin or BODIPY; although most nascent polypeptides were cytoplasmic, some were found in discrete nuclear sites known as transcription "factories." Some of this nuclear translation also depends on concurrent transcription by RNA polymerase II. This coupling is simply explained if nuclear ribosomes translate nascent transcripts as those transcripts emerge from still-engaged RNA polymerases, much as they do in bacteria.

  4. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT 1 protein expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E L Stone

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs through pattern recognition receptors (PRR. PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV.

  5. Rapid transcriptional pulsing dynamics of high expressing retroviral transgenes in embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Y M Lo

    Full Text Available Single cell imaging studies suggest that transcription is not continuous and occurs as discrete pulses of gene activity. To study mechanisms by which retroviral transgenes can transcribe to high levels, we used the MS2 system to visualize transcriptional dynamics of high expressing proviral integration sites in embryonic stem (ES cells. We established two ES cell lines each bearing a single copy, self-inactivating retroviral vector with a strong ubiquitous human EF1α gene promoter directing expression of mRFP fused to an MS2-stem-loop array. Transfection of MS2-EGFP generated EGFP focal dots bound to the mRFP-MS2 stem loop mRNA. These transcription foci colocalized with the transgene integration site detected by immunoFISH. Live tracking of single cells for 20 minutes detected EGFP focal dots that displayed frequent and rapid fluctuations in transcription over periods as short as 25 seconds. Similarly rapid fluctuations were detected from focal doublet signals that colocalized with replicated proviral integration sites by immunoFISH, consistent with transcriptional pulses from sister chromatids. We concluded that retroviral transgenes experience rapid transcriptional pulses in clonal ES cell lines that exhibit high level expression. These events are directed by a constitutive housekeeping gene promoter and may provide precedence for rapid transcriptional pulsing at endogenous genes in mammalian stem cells.

  6. Molecular cloning, transcriptional profiling, and subcellular localization of signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2) ortholog from rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathige, S D N K; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Priyathilaka, Thanthrige Thiunuwan; Thulasitha, William Shanthakumar; Jayasinghe, J D H E; Wan, Qiang; Nam, Bo-Hye; Lee, Jehee

    2017-08-30

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2) is a key element that transduces signals from the cell membrane to the nucleus via the type I interferon-signaling pathway. Although the structural and functional aspects of STAT proteins are well studied in mammals, information on teleostean STATs is very limited. In this study, a STAT paralog, which is highly homologous to the STAT2 members, was identified from a commercially important fish species called rock bream and designated as RbSTAT2. The RbSTAT2 gene was characterized at complementary DNA (cDNA) and genomic sequence levels, and was found to possess structural features common with its mammalian counterparts. The complete cDNA sequence was distributed into 24 exons in the genomic sequence. The promoter proximal region was analyzed and found to contain potential transcription factor binding sites to regulate the transcription of RbSTAT2. Phylogenetic studies and comparative genomic structure organization revealed the distinguishable evolution for fish and other vertebrate STAT2 orthologs. Transcriptional quantification was performed by SYBR Green quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and the ubiquitous expression of RbSTAT2 transcripts was observed in all tissues analyzed from healthy fish, with a remarkably high expression in blood cells. Significantly (Prock bream irido virus; RBIV), bacterial (Edwardsiella tarda and Streptococcus iniae), and immune stimulants (poly I:C and LPS). Antiviral potential was further confirmed by WST-1 assay, by measuring the viability of rock bream heart cells treated with RBIV. In addition, results of an in vitro challenge experiment signified the influence of rock bream interleukin-10 (RbIL-10) on transcription of RbSTAT2. Subcellular localization studies by transfection of pEGFP-N1/RbSTAT2 into rock bream heart cells revealed that the RbSTAT2 was usually located in the cytoplasm and translocated near to the nucleus upon poly I:C administration. Altogether, these

  7. Stochastic models of transcription: from single molecules to single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Choubey, Sandeep; Kondev, Jane

    2013-07-15

    Genes in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are typically regulated by complex promoters containing multiple binding sites for a variety of transcription factors leading to a specific functional dependence between regulatory inputs and transcriptional outputs. With increasing regularity, the transcriptional outputs from different promoters are being measured in quantitative detail in single-cell experiments thus providing the impetus for the development of quantitative models of transcription. We describe recent progress in developing models of transcriptional regulation that incorporate, to different degrees, the complexity of multi-state promoter dynamics, and its effect on the transcriptional outputs of single cells. The goal of these models is to predict the statistical properties of transcriptional outputs and characterize their variability in time and across a population of cells, as a function of the input concentrations of transcription factors. The interplay between mathematical models of different regulatory mechanisms and quantitative biophysical experiments holds the promise of elucidating the molecular-scale mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in cells, from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 on GH signaling in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, Sif G; Hansen, Johnny A; Lindberg, Karen

    2002-01-01

    GH is an important regulator of cell growth and metabolism. In the pancreas, GH stimulates mitogenesis as well as insulin production in beta-cells. The cellular effects of GH are exerted mainly through activation of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway....... Furthermore, using Northern blot analysis it was shown that SOCS-3 can completely inhibit GH-induced insulin production in these cells. Finally, 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis showed that SOCS-3 inhibits GH-induced proliferation of INS-1 cells...

  9. Complexes between nuclear factor-κB p65 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 are key actors in inducing activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and immunoglobulin A production in CD40L plus interleukin-10-treated human blood B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarge, S; Hamzeh-Cognasse, H; Richard, Y; Pozzetto, B; Cogné, M; Cognasse, F; Garraud, O

    2011-11-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor pathway plays an important role in many biological phenomena. STAT3 transcription is triggered by cytokine-associated signals. Here, we use isolated human B cells to analyse the role of STAT3 in interleukin (IL)-10 induced terminal B cell differentiation and in immunoglobulin (Ig)A production as a characteristic readout of IL-10 signalling. We identified optimal conditions for inducing in-vitro IgA production by purified blood naive B cells using IL-10 and soluble CD40L. We show that soluble CD40L consistently induces the phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 but not of STAT3, while IL-10 induces the phosphorylation of STAT3 but not of NF-κB p65. Interestingly, while soluble CD40L and IL-10 were synergistic in driving the terminal maturation of B cells into IgA-producing plasma cells, they did not co-operate earlier in the pathway with regard to the transcription factors NF-κB p65 or STAT3. Blocking either NF-κB p65 or STAT3 profoundly altered the production of IgA and mRNA for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme strictly necessary for Ig heavy chain recombination. Finally, the STAT3 pathway was directly activated by IL-10, while IL-6, the main cytokine otherwise known for activating the STAT3 pathway, did not appear to be involved in IL-10-induced-STAT3 activation. Our results suggest that STAT3 and NF-κB pathways co-operate in IgA production, with soluble CD40L rapidly activating the NF-κB pathway, probably rendering STAT3 probably more reactive to IL-10 signalling. This novel role for STAT3 in B cell development reveals a potential therapeutic or vaccine target for eliciting IgA humoral responses at mucosal interfaces.

  10. Optogenetic Control of Nodal Signaling Reveals a Temporal Pattern of Nodal Signaling Regulating Cell Fate Specification during Gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Keisuke; Pradhan, Saurabh J; Barone, Vanessa; Inglés-Prieto, Álvaro; Müller, Patrick; Ruprecht, Verena; Čapek, Daniel; Galande, Sanjeev; Janovjak, Harald; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-07-19

    During metazoan development, the temporal pattern of morphogen signaling is critical for organizing cell fates in space and time. Yet, tools for temporally controlling morphogen signaling within the embryo are still scarce. Here, we developed a photoactivatable Nodal receptor to determine how the temporal pattern of Nodal signaling affects cell fate specification during zebrafish gastrulation. By using this receptor to manipulate the duration of Nodal signaling in vivo by light, we show that extended Nodal signaling within the organizer promotes prechordal plate specification and suppresses endoderm differentiation. Endoderm differentiation is suppressed by extended Nodal signaling inducing expression of the transcriptional repressor goosecoid (gsc) in prechordal plate progenitors, which in turn restrains Nodal signaling from upregulating the endoderm differentiation gene sox17 within these cells. Thus, optogenetic manipulation of Nodal signaling identifies a critical role of Nodal signaling duration for organizer cell fate specification during gastrulation.

  11. Optogenetic Control of Nodal Signaling Reveals a Temporal Pattern of Nodal Signaling Regulating Cell Fate Specification during Gastrulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Sako

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During metazoan development, the temporal pattern of morphogen signaling is critical for organizing cell fates in space and time. Yet, tools for temporally controlling morphogen signaling within the embryo are still scarce. Here, we developed a photoactivatable Nodal receptor to determine how the temporal pattern of Nodal signaling affects cell fate specification during zebrafish gastrulation. By using this receptor to manipulate the duration of Nodal signaling in vivo by light, we show that extended Nodal signaling within the organizer promotes prechordal plate specification and suppresses endoderm differentiation. Endoderm differentiation is suppressed by extended Nodal signaling inducing expression of the transcriptional repressor goosecoid (gsc in prechordal plate progenitors, which in turn restrains Nodal signaling from upregulating the endoderm differentiation gene sox17 within these cells. Thus, optogenetic manipulation of Nodal signaling identifies a critical role of Nodal signaling duration for organizer cell fate specification during gastrulation.

  12. Transcriptional gene expression profiles of HGF/SF-met signaling pathway in colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Nong Li; Yan-Qing Ding; Guo-Bing Liu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the transcriptional gene expression profiles of HGF/SF-met signaling pathway in colorectal carcinoma to understand mechanisms of the signaling pathway at so gene level.METHODS: Total RNA was isolated from human colorectal carcinoma cell line LoVo treated with HGF/SF (80 ng/L)for 48 h. Fluorescent probes were prepared from RNA labeled with cy3-dUTP for the control groups and with cy5-dUTP for the HGF/SF-treated groups through reversetranscription. The probes were mixed and hybridized on the microarray at 60 ℃ for 15-20 h, then the microarray was scanned by laser scanner (GenePix 4000B). The intensity of each spot and ratios of Cy5/Cy3 were analyzed and finally the differentially expressed genes were selected by GenePix Pro 3.0 software. 6 differential expression genes (3 up-regulated genes and 3 down-regulated genes) were selected randomly and analyzed by β-actin semiquantitative RT-PCR.RESULTS: The fluorescent intensities of built-in negative control spots were less than 200, and the fluorescent intensities of positive control spots were more than 5000.Of the 4004 human genes analyzed by microarray, 129 genes (holding 3.22 % of the investigated genes) revealed differential expression in HGF/SF-treated groups compared with the control groups, of which 61 genes were up-regulated (holding 1.52 % of the investigated genes) and 68 genes were down-regulated (holding 1.70 % of the investigated genes), which supplied abundant information about target genes of HGF/SF-met signaling.CONCLUSION: HGF/SF-met signaling may up-regulate oncogenes, signal transduction genes, apoptosis-related genes, metastasis related genes, and down-regulate a number of genes. The complexity of HGF/SF-met signaling to control the gene expression is revealed as a whole by the gene chip technology.

  13. Transcriptional Amplification in Tumor Cells with Elevated c-Myc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles Y.; Lovén, Jakob; Rahl, Peter B.; Paranal, Ronald M.; Burge, Christopher B.; Bradner, James E.; Lee, Tong Ihn; Young, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Elevated expression of the c-Myc transcription factor occurs frequently in human cancers and is associated with tumor aggression and poor clinical outcome. The effect of high levels of c-Myc on global gene regulation is poorly understood, but is widely thought to involve newly activated or repressed “Myc target genes”. We report here that in tumor cells expressing high levels of c-Myc, the transcription factor accumulates in the promoter regions of active genes and causes transcriptional amplification, producing increased levels of transcripts within the cell's gene expression program. Thus, rather than binding and regulating a new set of genes, c-Myc amplifies the output of the existing gene expression program. These results provide an explanation for the diverse effects of oncogenic c-Myc on gene expression in different tumor cells and suggest that transcriptional amplification reduces rate-limiting constraints for tumor cell growth and proliferation. PMID:23021215

  14. Transcriptional networks in developing and mature B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Patrick; Rolink, Antonius G

    2005-06-01

    The development of B cells from haematopoietic stem cells proceeds along a highly ordered, yet flexible, pathway. At multiple steps along this pathway, cells are instructed by transcription factors on how to further differentiate, and several check-points have been identified. These check-points are initial commitment to lymphocytic progenitors, specification of pre-B cells, entry to the peripheral B-cell pool, maturation of B cells and differentiation into plasma cells. At each of these regulatory nodes, there are transcriptional networks that control the outcome, and much progress has recently been made in dissecting these networks. This article reviews our current understanding of this exciting field.

  15. Noisy transcription factor NF-¿B oscillations stabilize and sensitize cytokine signaling in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gangstad, S.W.; Feldager, C.W.; Juul, Jeppe Søgaard;

    2013-01-01

    NF-¿B is a major transcription factor mediating inflammatory response. In response to a pro-inflammatory stimulus, it exhibits a characteristic response - a pulse followed by noisy oscillations in concentrations of considerably smaller amplitude. NF-¿B is an important mediator of cellular...... amplitude has not been addressed. We use a cellular automaton model to address these issues in the context of spatially distributed communicating cells. We find that noisy secondary oscillations stabilize concentric wave patterns, thus improving signal quality. Furthermore, both lower secondary amplitude...... as well as noise in the oscillation period might be working against chronic inflammation, the state of self-sustained and stimulus-independent excitations. Our findings suggest that the characteristic irregular secondary oscillations of lower amplitude are not accidental. On the contrary, they might have...

  16. Roles of signaling and transcriptional networks in pathological lymphangiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimatsu, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Hideki; Watabe, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    Lymphangiogenesis, the generation of new lymphatic vessels, plays important roles in cancer metastasis. Outstanding progress during the past decade has dramatically increased the novel knowledge and insights of the mechanisms underlying the generation of new lymphatic vessels, the roles of transcription factors and lymphangiogenic growth factors during physiological development and pathological processes such as cancer and inflammation. Furthermore, an understanding of the molecular consequences during tumor lymphangiogenesis has provided chances to develop better diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that aim to limit the progression of cancer. In this article, we will explain the current knowledge of how lymphatic function is altered in various pathological conditions including cancer progression.

  17. Jeb/Alk signalling regulates the Lame duck GLI family transcription factor in the Drosophila visceral mesoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popichenko, Dmitry; Hugosson, Fredrik; Sjögren, Camilla; Dogru, Murat; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Wolfstetter, Georg; Schönherr, Christina; Fallah, Mahsa; Hallberg, Bengt; Nguyen, Hanh; Palmer, Ruth H

    2013-08-01

    The Jelly belly (Jeb)/Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (Alk) signalling pathway regulates myoblast fusion in the circular visceral mesoderm (VM) of Drosophila embryos via specification of founder cells. However, only a limited number of target molecules for this pathway are described. We have investigated the role of the Lame Duck (Lmd) transcription factor in VM development in relationship to Jeb/Alk signal transduction. We show that Alk signalling negatively regulates Lmd activity post-transcriptionally through the MEK/MAPK (ERK) cascade resulting in a relocalisation of Lmd protein from the nucleus to cytoplasm. It has previously been shown that downregulation of Lmd protein is necessary for the correct specification of founder cells. In the visceral mesoderm of lmd mutant embryos, fusion-competent myoblasts seem to be converted to 'founder-like' cells that are still able to build a gut musculature even in the absence of fusion. The ability of Alk signalling to downregulate Lmd protein requires the N-terminal 140 amino acids, as a Lmd(141-866) mutant remains nuclear in the presence of active ALK and is able to drive robust expression of the Lmd downstream target Vrp1 in the developing VM. Our results suggest that Lmd is a target of Jeb/Alk signalling in the VM of Drosophila embryos.

  18. The cell cycle rallies the transcription cycle: Cdc28/Cdk1 is a cell cycle-regulated transcriptional CDK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chymkowitch, Pierre; Enserink, Jorrit M

    2013-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) Kin28, Bur1 and Ctk1 regulate basal transcription by phosphorylating the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II. However, very little is known about the involvement of the cell cycle CDK Cdc28 in the transcription process. We have recently shown that, upon cell cycle entry, Cdc28 kinase activity boosts transcription of a subset of genes by directly stimulating the basal transcription machinery. Here, we discuss the biological significance of this finding and give our view of the kinase-dependent role of Cdc28 in regulation of RNA polymerase II.

  19. RBPJ, the major transcriptional effector of Notch signaling, remains associated with chromatin throughout mitosis, suggesting a role in mitotic bookmarking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Lake

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms that maintain transcriptional memory through cell division are important to maintain cell identity, and sequence-specific transcription factors that remain associated with mitotic chromatin are emerging as key players in transcriptional memory propagation. Here, we show that the major transcriptional effector of Notch signaling, RBPJ, is retained on mitotic chromatin, and that this mitotic chromatin association is mediated through the direct association of RBPJ with DNA. We further demonstrate that RBPJ binds directly to nucleosomal DNA in vitro, with a preference for sites close to the entry/exit position of the nucleosomal DNA. Genome-wide analysis in the murine embryonal-carcinoma cell line F9 revealed that roughly 60% of the sites occupied by RBPJ in asynchronous cells were also occupied in mitotic cells. Among them, we found that a fraction of RBPJ occupancy sites shifted between interphase and mitosis, suggesting that RBPJ can be retained on mitotic chromatin by sliding on DNA rather than disengaging from chromatin during mitotic chromatin condensation. We propose that RBPJ can function as a mitotic bookmark, marking genes for efficient transcriptional activation or repression upon mitotic exit. Strikingly, we found that sites of RBPJ occupancy were enriched for CTCF-binding motifs in addition to RBPJ-binding motifs, and that RBPJ and CTCF interact. Given that CTCF regulates transcription and bridges long-range chromatin interactions, our results raise the intriguing hypothesis that by collaborating with CTCF, RBPJ may participate in establishing chromatin domains and/or long-range chromatin interactions that could be propagated through cell division to maintain gene expression programs.

  20. Melanoma cells revive an embryonic transcriptional network to dictate phenotypic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Niels; Berx, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Compared to the overwhelming amount of literature describing how epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-inducing transcription factors orchestrate cellular plasticity in embryogenesis and epithelial cells, the functions of these factors in non-epithelial contexts, such as melanoma, are less clear. Melanoma is an aggressive tumor arising from melanocytes, endowed with unique features of cellular plasticity. The reversible phenotype-switching between differentiated and invasive phenotypes is increasingly appreciated as a mechanism accounting for heterogeneity in melanoma and is driven by oncogenic signaling and environmental cues. This phenotypic switch is coupled with an intriguing and somewhat counterintuitive signaling switch of EMT-inducing transcription factors. In contrast to carcinomas, different EMT-inducing transcription factors have antagonizing effects in melanoma. Balancing between these different EMT transcription factors is likely the key to successful metastatic spread of melanoma.

  1. LIN28 phosphorylation by MAPK/ERK couples signalling to the post-transcriptional control of pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsanov, Kaloyan M; Pearson, Daniel S; Wu, Zhaoting; Han, Areum; Triboulet, Robinson; Seligson, Marc T; Powers, John T; Osborne, Jihan K; Kane, Susan; Gygi, Steven P; Gregory, Richard I; Daley, George Q

    2017-01-01

    Signalling and post-transcriptional gene control are both critical for the regulation of pluripotency, yet how they are integrated to influence cell identity remains poorly understood. LIN28 (also known as LIN28A), a highly conserved RNA-binding protein, has emerged as a central post-transcriptional regulator of cell fate through blockade of let-7 microRNA biogenesis and direct modulation of mRNA translation. Here we show that LIN28 is phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK in pluripotent stem cells, which increases its levels via post-translational stabilization. LIN28 phosphorylation had little impact on let-7 but enhanced the effect of LIN28 on its direct mRNA targets, revealing a mechanism that uncouples LIN28's let-7-dependent and -independent activities. We have linked this mechanism to the induction of pluripotency by somatic cell reprogramming and the transition from naive to primed pluripotency. Collectively, our findings indicate that MAPK/ERK directly impacts LIN28, defining an axis that connects signalling, post-transcriptional gene control, and cell fate regulation.

  2. 24. The transcription factors and the relevant signaling pathways activated by low concentration MNNG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Aims: To explore the transcription factors and related signal transduction pathways activated in the alkylating agents N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanindine (MNNG) exposed cells which may involved in the mechanism of MNNG induced changes of gene expression, especially the elevation of DNA polymerase β expression and also the consequence of JNK kinase activation which were reported previously in this lab. Methods: Clontech Mercury pathway profiling system containing 8 different vectors in which a specific response element is located upstream from the SEAP-reporter gene were employed to detect the transcription factor activation in Vero cells treated with 0.2 μmol/L MNNG for 2 hours. Thoroughly, CREB phosphorylation, protein kinase A (PKA) and the cellular cAMP content were also assayed with PhosphoPlus CREB (ser-133) antibody kit, protein kinase assay kit and cAMP RIA kit respectively. Results: Among 8 different response elements, the expression of the reporter gene governed by the transcription factors CREB (cAMP response element binding protein), AP1 (activator protein 1), NF-κB (nuclear factor κ B) were elevated by 1.3, 1.4 and 1.3 times higber than control respectively. The level of activated CREB by Ser-133 phosphorylation was 2.08 times higher than control in cells treated with MNNG for 60 min, as measured by immunoblotting. The activity of CREB upstream kinase protein kinase A (PKA), which can phosphorylate CREB on ser-133 was also activated, and the activation peaked at 60 min (11.03±2.80 arbitrary units vs 0.86±0.43 of control). Also, cAMP levels were significantly raised after 60-minute-treatment, 1.52 times higher vs those in solvent control. Conclusion: In addition of previously reported JNK activation, we show here that low concentration alkylating agent MNNG can also activate the cAMP-PKA and NF-κB pathway. These in consequence induce the activation of transcription factors APl, CREB and NF-κB, which may related to the MNNG induced changes in

  3. Noisy transcription factor NF-κB oscillations stabilize and sensitize cytokine signaling in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangstad, Sirin W.; Feldager, Cilie W.; Juul, Jeppe; Trusina, Ala

    2013-02-01

    NF-κB is a major transcription factor mediating inflammatory response. In response to a pro-inflammatory stimulus, it exhibits a characteristic response—a pulse followed by noisy oscillations in concentrations of considerably smaller amplitude. NF-κB is an important mediator of cellular communication, as it is both activated by and upregulates production of cytokines, signals used by white blood cells to find the source of inflammation. While the oscillatory dynamics of NF-κB has been extensively investigated both experimentally and theoretically, the role of the noise and the lower secondary amplitude has not been addressed. We use a cellular automaton model to address these issues in the context of spatially distributed communicating cells. We find that noisy secondary oscillations stabilize concentric wave patterns, thus improving signal quality. Furthermore, both lower secondary amplitude as well as noise in the oscillation period might be working against chronic inflammation, the state of self-sustained and stimulus-independent excitations. Our findings suggest that the characteristic irregular secondary oscillations of lower amplitude are not accidental. On the contrary, they might have evolved to increase robustness of the inflammatory response and the system's ability to return to a pre-stimulated state.

  4. Transcription factor ABF-1 suppresses plasma cell differentiation but facilitates memory B cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yi-Kai; Lin, I-Ying; Su, Shin-Tang; Wang, Kuan-Hsiung; Yang, Shii-Yi; Tsai, Dong-Yan; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Lin, Kuo-I

    2014-09-01

    Ag-primed B cells that result from an immune response can form either memory B cells or Ab-secreting plasma cells; however, the molecular machinery that controls this cellular fate is poorly understood. In this study, we show that activated B cell factor-1 (ABF-1), which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor, participates in this regulation. ABF-1 was prevalently expressed in purified memory B cells and induced by T follicular helper cell-mediated signals. ABF-1 expression declined by the direct repression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 during differentiation. Ectopic expression of ABF-1 reduced the formation of Ab-secreting cells in an in vitro differentiation system of human memory B cells. Accordingly, knockdown of ABF-1 potentiates the formation of Ab-secreting cells. A transgenic mouse that expresses inducible ABF-1 in a B cell-specific manner was generated to demonstrate that the formation of germinal center and memory B cells was augmented by induced ABF-1 in an immune response, whereas the Ag-specific plasma cell response was dampened. This effect was associated with the ability of ABF-1 to limit cell proliferation. Together, our results demonstrate that ABF-1 facilitates formation of memory B cells but prevents plasma cell differentiation.

  5. The role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in Rift Valley fever virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkham, Chelsea; An, Soyeon; Lundberg, Lindsay; Bansal, Neha; Benedict, Ashwini; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene, E-mail: kkehnhal@gmu.edu

    2016-09-15

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a zoonotic disease that can cause severe illness in humans and livestock, triggering spontaneous abortion in almost 100% of pregnant ruminants. In this study, we demonstrate that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is phosphorylated on its conserved tyrosine residue (Y705) following RVFV infection. This phosphorylation was dependent on a major virulence factor, the viral nonstructural protein NSs. Loss of STAT3 had little effect on viral replication, but rather resulted in cells being more susceptible to RVFV-induced cell death. Phosphorylated STAT3 translocated to the nucleus, coinciding with inhibition of fos, jun, and nr4a2 gene expression, and the presence of STAT3 and NSs at the nr4a2 promoter. NSs was found predominantly in the cytoplasm of STAT3 null cells, indicating that STAT3 influences NSs nuclear localization. Collectively, these data demonstrate that STAT3 functions in a pro-survival capacity through modulation of NSs localization. - Highlights: • STAT3 is phosphorylated on tyrosine residue 705 following RVFV infection. • Phosphorylation of STAT3 was dependent on the viral protein NSs. • STAT3 -/- MEFs were more susceptible to RVFV-induced cell death. • Loss of STAT3 led to an increase in pro-apoptotic gene expression. • STAT3 functions in a pro-survival capacity by modulation of NSs localization.

  6. STAT3 is a key transcriptional regulator of cancer stem cell marker CD133 in HCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Sarani; Fuchs, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) marker CD133 was found to be upregulated in many cancers including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the molecular mechanism of CD133 regulation in the liver tumor microenvironment has remained elusive. In this study Won and colleagues report that interleukin-6 (IL-6) mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) signaling and hypoxia enhance the expression of CD133 and promote the progression of HCC. PMID:27275460

  7. Transcriptional regulation induced by cAMP elevation in mouse Schwann cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Schmid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In peripheral nerves, Schwann cell development is regulated by a variety of signals. Some of the aspects of Schwann cell differentiation can be reproduced in vitro in response to forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator elevating intracellular cAMP levels. Herein, the effect of forskolin treatment was investigated by a comprehensive genome-wide expression study on primary mouse Schwann cell cultures. Additional to myelin-related genes, many so far unconsidered genes were ascertained to be modulated by forskolin. One of the strongest differentially regulated gene transcripts was the transcription factor Olig1 (oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1, whose mRNA expression levels were reduced in treated Schwann cells. Olig1 protein was localized in myelinating and nonmyelinating Schwann cells within the sciatic nerve as well as in primary Schwann cells, proposing it as a novel transcription factor of the Schwann cell lineage. Data analysis further revealed that a number of differentially expressed genes in forskolin-treated Schwann cells were associated with the ECM (extracellular matrix, underlining its importance during Schwann cell differentiation in vitro. Comparison of samples derived from postnatal sciatic nerves and from both treated and untreated Schwann cell cultures showed considerable differences in gene expression between in vivo and in vitro, allowing us to separate Schwann cell autonomous from tissue-related changes. The whole data set of the cell culture microarray study is provided to offer an interactive search tool for genes of interest.

  8. Transcriptional Regulation Induced by cAMP Elevation in Mouse Schwann Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Schmid

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In peripheral nerves, Schwann cell development is regulated by a variety of signals. Some of the aspects of Schwann cell differentiation can be reproduced in vitro in response to forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator elevating intracellular cAMP levels. Herein, the effect of forskolin treatment was investigated by a comprehensive genome-wide expression study on primary mouse Schwann cell cultures. Additional to myelin-related genes, many so far unconsidered genes were ascertained to be modulated by forskolin. One of the strongest differentially regulated gene transcripts was the transcription factor Olig1 (oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1, whose mRNA expression levels were reduced in treated Schwann cells. Olig1 protein was localized in myelinating and nonmyelinating Schwann cells within the sciatic nerve as well as in primary Schwann cells, proposing it as a novel transcription factor of the Schwann cell lineage. Data analysis further revealed that a number of differentially expressed genes in forskolin-treated Schwann cells were associated with the ECM (extracellular matrix, underlining its importance during Schwann cell differentiation in vitro. Comparison of samples derived from postnatal sciatic nerves and from both treated and untreated Schwann cell cultures showed considerable differences in gene expression between in vivo and in vitro, allowing us to separate Schwann cell autonomous from tissue-related changes. The whole data set of the cell culture microarray study is provided to offer an interactive search tool for genes of interest.

  9. Reactive oxygen species in signalling the transcriptional activation of WIPK expression in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Yoo, Seung Jin; Liu, Yidong; Ren, Dongtao; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-07-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinases represented by tobacco WIPK (wounding-induced protein kinase) and its orthologs in other species are unique in their regulation at transcriptional level in response to stress and pathogen infection. We previously demonstrated that transcriptional activation of WIPK is essential for induced WIPK activity, and activation of salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) by the constitutively active NtMEK2(DD) is sufficient to induce WIPK gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of SIPK on WIPK gene expression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using a combination of pharmacological and gain-of-function transgenic approaches, we studied the relationship among SIPK activation, WIPK gene activation in response to fungal cryptogein, light-dependent ROS generation in chloroplasts, and ROS generated via NADPH oxidase. In the conditional gain-of-function GVG-NtMEK2(DD) transgenic tobacco, induction of WIPK expression is dependent on the ROS generation in chloroplasts. Consistently, methyl viologen, an inducer of ROS generation in chloroplasts, highly activated WIPK expression. In addition to chloroplast-originated ROS, H(2)O(2) generated from the cell-surface NADPH oxidase could also activate WIPK gene expression, and inhibition of cryptogein-induced ROS generation also abolished WIPK gene activation. Our data demonstrate that WIPK gene activation is mediated by ROS, which provides a mechanism by which ROS influence cellular signalling processes in plant stress/defence response.

  10. Ets-1 is a transcriptional mediator of oncogenic nitric oxide signaling in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The Ets-1 transcription factor is a candidate breast cancer oncogene that regulates the expression of genes involved in tumor progression and metastasis. Ets-1 signaling has also been linked to the development of a basal-like breast cancer phenotype. We recently described a nitric oxide (NO)-induced gene signature that is associated with poor disease outcome in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer and contains both stem cell-like and basal-like components. Thus, we examined the role of Ets-1 in NO signaling and NO-induced phenotypes in ER- human breast cancer cells. Methods Promoter region analyses were performed on genes upregulated in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) high expressing tumors for Ets-binding sites. In vitro mechanisms were examined in human basal-like breast cancer cells lines. NO signaling effects were studied using either forced NOS2 expression or the use of a chemical NO-donor, diethlylenetriamine NONOate (DETANO). Results Promoter region analysis of genes that are up-regulated in human ER-negative breast tumors with high NOS2 expression revealed that the Ets-binding sequence is the only common promoter element present in all of these genes, indicating that Ets-1 is the key transcriptional factor down-stream of oncogenic NOS2-signaling. Accordingly, both forced NOS2 over-expression and exposure to NO-donors resulted in significant Ets-1 transcriptional activation in ER- breast cancer cells. Functional studies showed that NO activated Ets-1 transcriptional activity via a Ras/MEK/ERK signaling pathway by a mechanism that involved Ras S-nitrosylation. RNA knock-down of Ets-1 suppressed NO-induced expression of selected basal-like breast cancer markers such as P-cadherin, S100A8, IL-8 and αβ-crystallin. Additionally, Ets-1 knock-down reduced NO-mediated cellular proliferation, matrix metalloproteinase and cathepsin B activities, as well as matrigel invasion. Conclusions These data show that Ets-1 is a key

  11. Notch signaling and EMT in non-small cell lung cancer: biological significance and therapeutic application

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xun; Wu, Hua; Han, Na; Xu, Hanxiao; Chu, Qian; Yu, Shiying; Chen, Yuan; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cancer cells acquire enhanced ability of migration and invasion, stem cell like characteristics and therapeutic resistance. Notch signaling regulates cell-cell connection, cell polarity and motility during organ development. Recent studies demonstrate that Notch signaling plays an important role in lung cancer initiation and cross-talks with several transcriptional factors to enhance EMT, contributing to the progression of non-small cell lung c...

  12. Regulation of spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal and spermatocyte meiosis by Sertoli cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-Ren; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2015-04-01

    Spermatogenesis is a continuous and productive process supported by the self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which arise from undifferentiated precursors known as gonocytes and are strictly controlled in a special 'niche' microenvironment in the seminiferous tubules. Sertoli cells, the only somatic cell type in the tubules, directly interact with SSCs to control their proliferation and differentiation through the secretion of specific factors. Spermatocyte meiosis is another key step of spermatogenesis, which is regulated by Sertoli cells on the luminal side of the blood-testis barrier through paracrine signaling. In this review, we mainly focus on the role of Sertoli cells in the regulation of SSC self-renewal and spermatocyte meiosis, with particular emphasis on paracrine and endocrine-mediated signaling pathways. Sertoli cell growth factors, such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), as well as Sertoli cell transcription factors, such as ETS variant 5 (ERM; also known as ETV5), nociceptin, neuregulin 1 (NRG1), and androgen receptor (AR), have been identified as the most important upstream factors that regulate SSC self-renewal and spermatocyte meiosis. Other transcription factors and signaling pathways (GDNF-RET-GFRA1 signaling, FGF2-MAP2K1 signaling, CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling, CCL9-CCR1 signaling, FSH-nociceptin/OPRL1, retinoic acid/FSH-NRG/ERBB4, and AR/RB-ARID4A/ARID4B) are also addressed.

  13. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  14. Apoptosis transcriptional mechanism of feline infectious peritonitis virus infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuid, Ahmad Naqib; Safi, Nikoo; Haghani, Amin; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Haron, Mohd Syamsul Reza; Tan, Sheau Wei; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2015-11-01

    Apoptosis has been postulated to play an important role during feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection; however, its mechanism is not well characterized. This study is focused on apoptosis and transcriptional profiling of FIPV-infected cells following in vitro infection of CRFK cells with FIPV 79-1146 WSU. Flow cytometry was used to determine mode of cell death in first 42 h post infection (hpi). FIPV infected cells underwent early apoptosis at 9 hpi (p < 0.05) followed by late apoptosis at 12 hpi (p < 0.05) and necrosis from 24 hpi (p < 0.05). Then, next generation sequencing was performed on 9 hpi and control uninfected cells by Illumina analyzer. An aggregate of 4546 genes (2229 down-regulated and 2317 up-regulated) from 17 cellular process, 11 molecular functions and 130 possible biological pathways were affected by FIPV. 131 genes from apoptosis cluster (80 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated) along with increase of apoptosis, p53, p38 MAPK, VEGF and chemokines/cytokines signaling pathways were probably involved in apoptosis process. Six of the de-regulated genes expression (RASSF1, BATF2, MAGEB16, PDCD5, TNFα and TRAF2) and TNFα protein concentration were analyzed by RT-qPCR and ELISA, respectively, at different time-points. Up-regulations of both pro-apoptotic (i.e. PDCD5) and anti-apoptotic (i.e. TRAF2) were detected from first hpi and continuing to deregulate during apoptosis process in the infected cells.

  15. A model for how signal duration can determine distinct outcomes of gene transcription programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D Fowler

    Full Text Available The reason why IL-6 induces a pro-inflammatory response, while IL-10 induces an anti-inflammatory response, despite both cytokines activating the same transcription factor, STAT3, is not well understood. It is known that IL-6 induces a transient STAT3 signal and that IL-10 induces a sustained STAT3 signal due to the STAT3-induced inhibitor SOCS3's ability to bind to the IL-6R and not the IL-10R. We sought to develop a general transcriptional network that is capable of translating sustained signals into one response, while translating transient signals into a second response. The general structure of such a network is that the transcription factor STAT3 can induce both an inflammatory response and an anti-inflammatory response by inducing two different genes. The anti-inflammatory gene can bind to and inhibit the inflammatory gene's production and the inflammatory gene can bind to its own promoter and induce its own transcription in the absence of the signal. One prediction that can be made from such a network is that in SOCS3-/- mice, where IL-6 induces a sustained STAT3 signal, that IL-6 would act as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, which has indeed been observed experimentally in the literature.

  16. Signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT5 is recruited to c-Myc super-enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinz, Sophia; Unser, Samy; Rascle, Anne

    2016-04-14

    c-Myc has been proposed as a putative target gene of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5). No functional STAT5 binding site has been identified so far within the c-Myc gene locus, therefore a direct transcriptional regulation by STAT5 remains uncertain. c-Myc super-enhancer, located 1.7 Mb downstream of the c-Myc gene locus, was recently reported as essential for the regulation of c-Myc gene expression by hematopoietic transcription factors and bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins and for leukemia maintenance. c-Myc super-enhancer is composed of five regulatory regions (E1-E5) which recruit transcription and chromatin-associated factors, mediating chromatin looping and interaction with the c-Myc promoter. We now show that STAT5 strongly binds to c-Myc super-enhancer regions E3 and E4, both in normal and transformed Ba/F3 cells. We also found that the BET protein bromodomain-containing protein 2 (BRD2), a co-factor of STAT5, co-localizes with STAT5 at E3/E4 in Ba/F3 cells transformed by the constitutively active STAT5-1*6 mutant, but not in non-transformed Ba/F3 cells. BRD2 binding at E3/E4 coincides with c-Myc transcriptional activation and is lost upon treatment with deacetylase and BET inhibitors, both of which inhibit STAT5 transcriptional activity and c-Myc gene expression. Our data suggest that constitutive STAT5 binding to c-Myc super-enhancer might contribute to BRD2 maintenance and thus allow sustained expression of c-Myc in Ba/F3 cells transformed by STAT5-1*6.

  17. Transcriptional Crosstalk between Nuclear Receptors and Cytokine Signal Transduction Pathways in Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihua Wang; Xiaohu Zhang; William L. Farrar; Xiaoyi Yang

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear receptor superfamily and the transcriptional factors associated with cytokines are inherently different families of signaling molecules and activate gene transcription by binding to their respective responsive element. However, it has become increasingly clear from our works and others that nuclear receptors are important regulators of cytokine production and function through complex and varied interactions between these distinct transcriptional factors. This review provides a general overview of the mechanism of action of nuclear receptors and their transcriptional crosstalk with transcriptional factors associated with cytokine transduction pathways. One of the most important mechanistic aspects is protein to protein interaction through a direct or co-regulator-mediated indirect manner. Such crosstalk is crucially involved in physiological and therapeutic roles of nuclear receptors and their ligands in immunity,inflammation and cytokine-related tumors. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):416-424.

  18. Coupling planar cell polarity signaling to morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Jeffrey D; McNeill, Helen

    2002-02-15

    Epithelial cells and other groups of cells acquire a polarity orthogonal to their apical-basal axes, referred to as Planar Cell Polarity (PCP). The process by which these cells become polarized requires a signaling pathway using Frizzled as a receptor. Responding cells sense cues from their environment that provide directional information, and they translate this information into cellular asymmetry. Most of what is known about PCP derives from studies in the fruit fly, Drosophila. We review what is known about how cells translate an unknown signal into asymmetric cytoskeletal reorganization. We then discuss how the vertebrate processes of convergent extension and cochlear hair-cell development may relate to Drosophila PCP signaling.

  19. PPARα Promotes Cancer Cell Glut1 Transcription Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Mengli; Jin, Jianhua; Liu, Qian; Xu, QingGang; Shi, Juanjuan; Hou, Yongzhong

    2017-06-01

    Abundant nutrient availability including glucose and amino acids plays an important role in maintaining cancer cell energetic and biosynthetic pathways. As a nuclear receptor, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) regulates inflammation and cancer progression, however, it is still unclear the interaction of PPARα with the cancer cell glucose metabolism. Here we found that PPARα reduced Glut1 (Glucose transporter 1) protein and gene levels in HCT-116, SW480, HeLa, and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. In contrast, silenced PPARα reversed this event. Further analysis shows that PPARα directly targeted the consensus PPRE motif of Glut1 promoter region resulting in Glut1 transcription repression. PPARα-mediated Glut1 transcription repression led to decreased influx of glucose in cancer cells. These findings revealed a novel mechanism of PPARα-mediated cancer cell Glut1 transcription repression. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1556-1562, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Interrogating a cell signalling network sensitively monitors cell fate transition during early differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Yi-Hsin; HO; Chih-ming

    2010-01-01

    The different cell types in an animal are often considered to be specified by combinations of transcription factors,and defined by marker gene expression.This paradigm is challenged,however,in stem cell research and application.Using a mouse embryonic stem cell(mESC) culture system,here we show that the expression level of many key stem cell marker genes/transcription factors such as Oct4,Sox2 and Nanog failed to monitor cell status transition during mESC differentiation.On the other hand,the response patterns of cell signalling network to external stimuli,as monitored by the dynamics of protein phosphorylation,changed dramatically.Our results also suggest that an irreversible alternation in the cell signalling network precedes the adjustment of transcription factor levels.This is consistent with the notion that signal transduction events regulate cell fate specification.We propose that interrogating a cell signalling network can assess the cell property more precisely,and provide a sensitive measurement for the early events in cell fate transition.We wish to bring attention to the potential problem of cell identification using a few marker genes,and suggest a novel methodology to address this issue.

  1. The role of NANOG transcriptional factor in the development of malignant phenotype of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik-Rzemieniewska, Natalia; Bednarek, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    NANOG is a transcription factor that is involved in the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells (ES) and is a critical factor for the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of pluripotent cells. Extensive data in the literature show that the NANOG gene is aberrantly expressed during the development of malignancy in cancer cells. ES and cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells within the tumor, are thought to share common phenotypic properties. This review describes the role of NANOG in cancer cell proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), apoptosis and metastasis. In addition, this paper illustrates a correlation between NANOG and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in the maintenance of cancer stem cell properties and multidrug resistance. Together, the available data demonstrate that NANOG is strictly involved in the process of carcinogenesis and is a potential prognostic marker of malignant tumors.

  2. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development.

  3. DMPD: Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15733829 Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. Sen GC, Sa... signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. PubmedID 15733829 Title Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role

  4. A transcription elongation factor that links signals from the reproductive system to lifespan extension in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjumand Ghazi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, the aging of the soma is influenced by the germline. When germline-stem cells are removed, aging slows and lifespan is increased. The mechanism by which somatic tissues respond to loss of the germline is not well-understood. Surprisingly, we have found that a predicted transcription elongation factor, TCER-1, plays a key role in this process. TCER-1 is required for loss of the germ cells to increase C. elegans' lifespan, and it acts as a regulatory switch in the pathway. When the germ cells are removed, the levels of TCER-1 rise in somatic tissues. This increase is sufficient to trigger key downstream events, as overexpression of tcer-1 extends the lifespan of normal animals that have an intact reproductive system. Our findings suggest that TCER-1 extends lifespan by promoting the expression of a set of genes regulated by the conserved, life-extending transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO. Interestingly, TCER-1 is not required for DAF-16/FOXO to extend lifespan in animals with reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Thus, TCER-1 specifically links the activity of a broadly deployed transcription factor, DAF-16/FOXO, to longevity signals from reproductive tissues.

  5. Small molecule selectively suppresses MYC transcription in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvard, Claire; Lim, Sang Min; Ludka, John; Yazdani, Nahid; Woods, Ashley K; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Schultz, Peter G; Zhu, Shoutian

    2017-03-28

    Stauprimide is a staurosporine analog that promotes embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation by inhibiting nuclear localization of the MYC transcription factor NME2, which in turn results in down-regulation of MYC transcription. Given the critical role the oncogene MYC plays in tumor initiation and maintenance, we explored the potential of stauprimide as an anticancer agent. Here we report that stauprimide suppresses MYC transcription in cancer cell lines derived from distinct tissues. Using renal cancer cells, we confirmed that stauprimide inhibits NME2 nuclear localization. Gene expression analysis also confirmed the selective down-regulation of MYC target genes by stauprimide. Consistent with this activity, administration of stauprimide inhibited tumor growth in rodent xenograft models. Our study provides a unique strategy for selectively targeting MYC transcription by pharmacological means as a potential treatment for MYC-dependent tumors.

  6. Both mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 and phosphatidylinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways regulate activation of E-twenty-six (ETS)-like transcription factor 1 (Elk-1) in U138 glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mut, Melike; Lule, Sevda; Demir, Ozlem; Kurnaz, Isil Aksan; Vural, Imran

    2012-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor (EGFR) have been shown to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma. In our study, the EGFR was stimulated with EGF in human U138 glioblastoma cells. We show that the activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 pathway phosphorylated the E twenty-six (ETS)-like transcription factor 1 (Elk-1) mainly at serine 383 residue. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, UO126 and ERK inhibitor II, FR180204 blocked the Elk-1 phosphorylation and activation. The phosphatidylinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway was also involved in the Elk-1 activation. Activation of the Elk-1 led to an increased survival and a proliferative response with the EGF stimulation in the U138 glioblastoma cells. Knocking-down the Elk-1 using an RNA interference technique caused a decrease in survival of the unstimulated U138 glioblastoma cells and also decreased the proliferative response to the EGF stimulation. The Elk-1 transcription factor was important for the survival and proliferation of U138 glioblastoma cells upon the stimulation of EGFR with EGF. The MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways regulated this response via activation of the Elk-1 transcription factor. The Elk-1 may be one of the convergence points for pathways located downstream of EGFR in glioblastoma cells. Utilization of the Elk-1 as a therapeutic target may lead to a novel strategy in treatment of glioblastoma.

  7. FGF signalling regulates chromatin organisation during neural differentiation via mechanisms that can be uncoupled from transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishal S Patel

    Full Text Available Changes in higher order chromatin organisation have been linked to transcriptional regulation; however, little is known about how such organisation alters during embryonic development or how it is regulated by extrinsic signals. Here we analyse changes in chromatin organisation as neural differentiation progresses, exploiting the clear spatial separation of the temporal events of differentiation along the elongating body axis of the mouse embryo. Combining fluorescence in situ hybridisation with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we show that chromatin around key differentiation gene loci Pax6 and Irx3 undergoes both decompaction and displacement towards the nuclear centre coincident with transcriptional onset. Conversely, down-regulation of Fgf8 as neural differentiation commences correlates with a more peripheral nuclear position of this locus. During normal neural differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling is repressed by retinoic acid, and this vitamin A derivative is further required for transcription of neural genes. We show here that exposure to retinoic acid or inhibition of FGF signalling promotes precocious decompaction and central nuclear positioning of differentiation gene loci. Using the Raldh2 mutant as a model for retinoid deficiency, we further find that such changes in higher order chromatin organisation are dependent on retinoid signalling. In this retinoid deficient condition, FGF signalling persists ectopically in the elongating body, and importantly, we find that inhibiting FGF receptor (FGFR signalling in Raldh2-/- embryos does not rescue differentiation gene transcription, but does elicit both chromatin decompaction and nuclear position change. These findings demonstrate that regulation of higher order chromatin organisation during differentiation in the embryo can be uncoupled from the machinery that promotes transcription and, for the first time, identify FGF as an extrinsic signal that

  8. Legionella pneumophila type IV effectors hijack the transcription and translation machinery of the host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, Monica; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens modulate the host response to persist and replicate inside a eukaryotic cell and cause disease. Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is present in freshwater environments and represents one of these pathogens. During coevolution with protozoan cells, L. pneumophila has acquired highly sophisticated and diverse strategies to hijack host cell processes. It secretes hundreds of effectors into the host cell, and these manipulate host signaling pathways and key cellular processes. Recently it has been shown that L. pneumophila is also able to alter the transcription and translation machinery of the host and to exploit epigenetic mechanisms in the cells it resides in to counteract host responses.

  9. BPTF transduces MITF-driven prosurvival signals in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Altaf A; Majid, Shahana; Bezrookove, Vladimir; Phan, Binh; Ursu, Sarah; Nosrati, Mehdi; De Semir, David; Sagebiel, Richard W; Miller, James R; Debs, Robert; Cleaver, James E; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2016-05-31

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) plays a critical and complex role in melanocyte transformation. Although several downstream targets of MITF action have been identified, the precise mechanisms by which MITF promotes melanocytic tumor progression are incompletely understood. Recent studies identified an oncogenic role for the bromodomain plant homeodomain finger transcription factor (BPTF) gene in melanoma progression, in part through activation of BCL2, a canonical target of MITF signaling. Analysis of the BPTF promoter identified a putative MITF-binding site, suggesting that MITF may regulate BPTF expression. Overexpression of MITF resulted in up-regulation of BPTF in a panel of melanoma and melanocyte cell lines. shRNA-mediated down-regulation of MITF in melanoma cells was accompanied by down-regulation of BPTF and BPTF-regulated genes (including BCL2) and resulted in reduced proliferative capacity of melanoma cells. The suppression of cell growth mediated by MITF silencing was rescued by overexpression of BPTF cDNA. Binding of MITF to the BPTF promoter was demonstrated using ChIP analysis. MITF overexpression resulted in direct transcriptional activation of BPTF, as evidenced by increased luciferase activity driven by the BPTF promoter. These results indicate that BPTF transduces key prosurvival signals driven by MITF, further supporting its important role in promoting melanoma cell survival and progression.

  10. TEAD transcription factors mediate the function of TAZ in cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Liu, Chen-Ying; Zha, Zheng-Yu; Zhao, Bin; Yao, Jun; Zhao, Shimin; Xiong, Yue; Lei, Qun-Ying; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2009-05-15

    The TAZ transcription co-activator has been shown to promote cell proliferation and to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Recently we have demonstrated that TAZ is phosphorylated and inhibited by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, which is altered in human cancer. The mechanism of TAZ-mediated transcription is unclear. We demonstrate here that TEAD is a key downstream transcription factor mediating the function of TAZ. Disruption of TEAD-TAZ binding or silencing of TEAD expression blocked the function of TAZ to promote cell proliferation and to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition, demonstrating TEAD as a key downstream effector of TAZ. We also identified CTGF, a gene that regulates cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration, as a direct target of TAZ and TEAD. Our study establishes a functional partnership between TAZ and TEAD under negative regulation by the Hippo signaling pathway.

  11. Alkaline-stress response in Glycine soja leaf identifies specific transcription factors and ABA-mediated signaling factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ying; Li, Yong; Lv, De-Kang; Bai, Xi; Ji, Wei; Cai, Hua; Wang, Ao-Xue; Zhu, Yan-Ming

    2011-06-01

    Transcriptome of Glycine soja leaf tissue during a detailed time course formed a foundation for examining transcriptional processes during NaHCO(3) stress treatment. Of a total of 2,310 detected differentially expressed genes, 1,664 genes were upregulated and 1,704 genes were downregulated at various time points. The number of stress-regulated genes increased dramatically after a 6-h stress treatment. GO category gene enrichment analysis revealed that most of the differentially expressed genes were involved in cell structure, protein synthesis, energy, and secondary metabolism. Another enrichment test revealed that the response of G. soja to NaHCO(3) highlights specific transcription factors, such as the C2C2-CO-like, MYB-related, WRKY, GARP-G2-like, and ZIM families. Co-expressed genes were clustered into ten classes (P < 0.001). Intriguingly, one cluster of 188 genes displayed a unique expression pattern that increases at an early stage (0.5 and 3 h), followed by a decrease from 6 to 12 h. This group was enriched in regulation of transcription components, including AP2-EREBP, bHLH, MYB/MYB-related, C2C2-CO-like, C2C2-DOF, C2C2, C3H, and GARP-G2-like transcription factors. Analysis of the 1-kb upstream regions of transcripts displaying similar changes in abundance identified 19 conserved motifs, potential binding sites for transcription factors. The appearance of ABA-responsive elements in the upstream of co-expression genes reveals that ABA-mediated signaling participates in the signal transduction in alkaline response.

  12. Amplification of the E2F1 transcription factor gene in the HEL erythroleukemia cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saito, M; Helin, K; Valentine, M B;

    1995-01-01

    and overexpressed in HEL erythroleukemia cells and translocated to other chromosomes in several established human leukemia cell lines. This study provides the first evidence of gene amplification involving a member of the E2F family of transcription factors. We propose that E2F1 overexpression in erythroid......The E2F transcription factor plays an important regulatory role in cell proliferation, mediating the expression of genes whose products are essential for inducing resting cells to enter the cell cycle and synthesize DNA. To investigate the possible involvement of E2F in hematopoietic malignancies...... progenitors may stimulate abnormal cell proliferation by overriding negative regulatory signals mediated by tumor suppressor proteins such as pRb....

  13. STAT4-mediated transcriptional repression of the IL5 gene in human memory Th2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-van Horn, Sarah R; Estrada, Leonardo D; van Oers, Nicolai S C; Farrar, J David

    2016-06-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β) plays a critical role in suppressing viral replication by driving the transcription of hundreds of interferon-sensitive genes (ISGs). While many ISGs are transcriptionally activated by the ISGF3 complex, the significance of other signaling intermediates in IFN-α/β-mediated gene regulation remains elusive, particularly in rare cases of gene silencing. In human Th2 cells, IFN-α/β signaling suppressed IL5 and IL13 mRNA expression during recall responses to T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. This suppression occurred through a rapid reduction in the rate of nascent transcription, independent of de novo expression of ISGs. Further, IFN-α/β-mediated STAT4 activation was required for repressing the human IL5 gene, and disrupting STAT4 dimerization reversed this effect. This is the first demonstration of STAT4 acting as a transcriptional repressor in response to IFN-α/β signaling and highlights the unique activity of this cytokine to acutely block the expression of an inflammatory cytokine in human T cells.

  14. OsWRKY03, a rice transcriptional activator that functions in defense signaling pathway upstream of OsNPR1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Qiang LIU; Xian Quan BAI; Qian QIAN; Xiu Jie WANG; Ming Sheng CHEN; Cheng Cai CHU

    2005-01-01

    WRKY family proteins are a class of plant specific transcription factors that involve in many stress response pathways.It has been shown that one Arabidopsis WRKY protein, AtWRKY29/22, is activated by MAP kinase signaling cascade and confers resistance to both bacterial and fungal pathogens. However, little is known about the biological roles of WRKY proteins in rice. In this study, we investigated the expression patterns of rice AtWRKY29/22 homolog, OsWRKY03,under different conditions, and also its possible role involved in plant defense. Our results showed that OsWRKY03 was up-regulated by several defense signaling molecules or different treatments. Further analysis revealed that the expression of OsWRKY03 was light dependent. Transcriptional activation activity of OsWRKY03 was also demonstrated by yeast functional assay. Transient expression of OsWRKY03-GFP fusion protein in onion epidermis cells showed that OsWRKY03 was a nuclear localized protein. OsNPR1 as well as several other pathogenesis-related genes, such as OsPR1b, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (ZB8) and peroxidase (POX22.3), were induced in OsWRKY03-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results indicated that OsWRKY03 is located upstream of OsNPR1 as a transcriptional activator in salicylic acid (SA)-dependent or jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent defense signaling cascades.

  15. Research resource: the dynamic transcriptional profile of sertoli cells during the progression of spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Céline; Stévant, Isabelle; Borel, Christelle; Conne, Béatrice; Pitetti, Jean-Luc; Calvel, Pierre; Kaessmann, Henrik; Jégou, Bernard; Chalmel, Frédéric; Nef, Serge

    2015-04-01

    Sertoli cells (SCs), the only somatic cells within seminiferous tubules, associate intimately with developing germ cells. They not only provide physical and nutritional support but also secrete factors essential to the complex developmental processes of germ cell proliferation and differentiation. The SC transcriptome must therefore adapt rapidly during the different stages of spermatogenesis. We report comprehensive genome-wide expression profiles of pure populations of SCs isolated at 5 distinct stages of the first wave of mouse spermatogenesis, using RNA sequencing technology. We were able to reconstruct about 13 901 high-confidence, nonredundant coding and noncoding transcripts, characterized by complex alternative splicing patterns with more than 45% comprising novel isoforms of known genes. Interestingly, roughly one-fifth (2939) of these genes exhibited a dynamic expression profile reflecting the evolving role of SCs during the progression of spermatogenesis, with stage-specific expression of genes involved in biological processes such as cell cycle regulation, metabolism and energy production, retinoic acid synthesis, and blood-testis barrier biogenesis. Finally, regulatory network analysis identified the transcription factors endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1 (EPAS1/Hif2α), aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT/Hif1β), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) as potential master regulators driving the SC transcriptional program. Our results highlight the plastic transcriptional landscape of SCs during the progression of spermatogenesis and provide valuable resources to better understand SC function and spermatogenesis and its related disorders, such as male infertility.

  16. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M; Quail, Peter H; Monte, Elena

    2016-05-06

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis and signaling in plant cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The increases of H2O2 concentrations in plant cells often occur under biotic and abiotic stress conditions (e.g. light, environmental stresses and plant hormone abscisic acid).Atmospheric H2O2 as an ancient signal molecule not only plays the key role in inducing evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, but also modulates many physiological events, such as stomatal movement, hypersensitive responses, programmed cell death and gene expressions. H2O2 levels in cells must sustain a fine equilibrium between production and scavenging. H2O2 enters cells from the apoplast or generated sources, and in turn is distributed in sub-cellular compartments.H2O2 can modulate the activities of many components in signaling, such as protein phosphatases,protein kinases, transcription factors (TFs), and calcium channels. Elevated cytosolic calcium concentrations will initiate further downstream responses, via the action of calcium-binding proteins. On the other hand, the research of H2O2 as a signal molecule is still in a comparatively juvenile stage, for example, little is known about how the cells sense H2O2, what the rate-limiting steps and most important cellular events are in cell signaling and what kind of genes is specific or necessary to H2O2 signaling. The answers to all the questions depend on the functional genomic and molecular genetics analysis.

  18. Proteome adaptation in cell reprogramming proceeds via distinct transcriptional networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benevento, Marco; Tonge, Peter D; Puri, Mira C; Hussein, Samer M I; Cloonan, Nicole; Wood, David L; Grimmond, Sean M; Nagy, Andras; Munoz, Javier; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-01-01

    The ectopic expression of Oct4, Klf4, c-Myc and Sox2 (OKMS) transcription factors allows reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The reprogramming process, which involves a complex network of molecular events, is not yet fully characterized. Here we perform a quan

  19. Proteome adaptation in cell reprogramming proceeds via distinct transcriptional networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benevento, Marco|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328200859; Tonge, Peter D; Puri, Mira C; Hussein, Samer M I; Cloonan, Nicole; Wood, David L; Grimmond, Sean M; Nagy, Andras; Munoz, Javier; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332

    2014-01-01

    The ectopic expression of Oct4, Klf4, c-Myc and Sox2 (OKMS) transcription factors allows reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The reprogramming process, which involves a complex network of molecular events, is not yet fully characterized. Here we perform a quan

  20. HIV transcription is induced with some forms of cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schreck, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)][South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Panozzo, J. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Chang-Liu, C.-M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct`, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {Gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires function p53, which is missing in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  1. High-density transcriptional initiation signals underline genomic islands in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianli Huang

    Full Text Available Genomic islands (GIs, frequently associated with the pathogenicity of bacteria and having a substantial influence on bacterial evolution, are groups of "alien" elements which probably undergo special temporal-spatial regulation in the host genome. Are there particular hallmark transcriptional signals for these "exotic" regions? We here explore the potential transcriptional signals that underline the GIs beyond the conventional views on basic sequence composition, such as codon usage and GC property bias. It showed that there is a significant enrichment of the transcription start positions (TSPs in the GI regions compared to the whole genome of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. There was up to a four-fold increase for the 70% GIs, implying high-density TSPs profile can potentially differentiate the GI regions. Based on this feature, we developed a new sliding window method GIST, Genomic-island Identification by Signals of Transcription, to identify these regions. Subsequently, we compared the known GI-associated features of the GIs detected by GIST and by the existing method Islandviewer to those of the whole genome. Our method demonstrates high sensitivity in detecting GIs harboring genes with biased GI-like function, preferred subcellular localization, skewed GC property, shorter gene length and biased "non-optimal" codon usage. The special transcriptional signals discovered here may contribute to the coordinate expression regulation of foreign genes. Finally, by using GIST, we detected many interesting GIs in the 2011 German E. coli O104:H4 outbreak strain TY-2482, including the microcin H47 system and gene cluster ycgXEFZ-ymgABC that activates the production of biofilm matrix. The aforesaid findings highlight the power of GIST to predict GIs with distinct intrinsic features to the genome. The heterogeneity of cumulative TSPs profiles may not only be a better identity for "alien" regions, but also provide hints to the special

  2. Regulation of transcription of cell division genes in the Escherichia coli dcw cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, M; Gomez, M J; Ayala, J A

    1998-04-01

    The Escherichia coli dcw cluster contains cell division genes, such as the phylogenetically ubiquitous ftsZ, and genes involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. Transcription in the cluster proceeds in the same direction as the progress of the replication fork along the chromosome. Regulation is exerted at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The absence of transcriptional termination signals may, in principle, allow extension of the transcripts initiated at the up-stream promoter (mraZ1p) even to the furthest down-stream gene (envA). Complementation tests suggest that they extend into ftsW in the central part of the cluster. In addition, the cluster contains other promoters individually regulated by cis- and trans-acting signals. Dissociation of the expression of the ftsZ gene, located after ftsQ and A near the 3' end of the cluster, from its natural regulatory signals leads to an alteration in the physiology of cell division. The complexities observed in the regulation of gene expression in the cluster may then have an important biological role. Among them, LexA-binding SOS boxes have been found at the 5' end of the cluster, preceding promoters which direct the expression of ftsI (coding for PBP3, the penicillin-binding protein involved in septum formation). A gearbox promoter, ftsQ1p, forms part of the signals regulating the transcription of ftsQ, A and Z. It is an inversely growth-dependent mechanism driven by RNA polymerase containing sigma s, the factor involved in the expression of stationary phase-specific genes. Although the dcw cluster is conserved to a different extent in a variety of bacteria, the regulation of gene expression, the presence or absence of individual genes, and even the essentiality of some of them, show variations in the phylogenetic scale which may reflect adaptation to specific life cycles.

  3. Estrogen receptors regulate innate immune cells and signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovats, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Humans show strong sex differences in immunity to infection and autoimmunity, suggesting sex hormones modulate immune responses. Indeed, receptors for estrogens (ERs) regulate cells and pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, as well as immune cell development. ERs are ligand-dependent transcription factors that mediate long-range chromatin interactions and form complexes at gene regulatory elements, thus promoting epigenetic changes and transcription. ERs also participate in membrane-initiated steroid signaling to generate rapid responses. Estradiol and ER activity show profound dose- and context-dependent effects on innate immune signaling pathways and myeloid cell development. While estradiol most often promotes the production of type I interferon, innate pathways leading to pro-inflammatory cytokine production may be enhanced or dampened by ER activity. Regulation of innate immune cells and signaling by ERs may contribute to the reported sex differences in innate immune pathways. Here we review the recent literature and highlight several molecular mechanisms by which ERs regulate the development or functional responses of innate immune cells.

  4. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 regulation by novel binding partners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadashi; Matsuda; Ryuta; Muromoto; Yuichi; Sekine; Sumihito; Togi; Yuichi; Kitai; Shigeyuki; Kon; Kenji; Oritani

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription(STATs) mediate essential signals for various biological processes,including immune responses,hematopoiesis,and neurogenesis. STAT3,for example,is involved in the pathogenesis of various human diseases,including cancers,autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. STAT3 activation is therefore tightly regulated at multiple levels to prevent these pathological conditions. A number of proteins have been reported to associate with STAT3 and regulate its activity. These STAT3-interacting proteins function to modulate STAT3-mediated signaling at various steps and mediate the crosstalk of STAT3 with other cellular signaling pathways. This article reviews the roles of novel STAT3 binding partners such as DAXX,zipperinteracting protein kinase,Krüppel-associated box-associated protein 1,Y14,PDZ and LIM domain 2 and signal transducing adaptor protein-2,in the regulation of STAT3-mediated signaling.

  5. Distinct and shared transcriptomes are regulated by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoforms in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahlaee, Amir H; Brandal, Stephanie; Lee, Youl-Nam; Jie, Chunfa; Takemoto, Clifford M

    2007-01-01

    The Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) is an essential basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor for mast cell development. Mice deficient in Mitf harbor a severe mast cell deficiency, and Mitf-mutant mast cells cultured ex vivo display a number of functional defects. Therefore, an understanding of the genetic program regulated by Mitf may provide important insights into mast cell differentiation. Multiple, distinct isoforms of Mitf have been identified in a variety of cell types; we found that Mitf-a, Mitf-e, and Mitf-mc were the major isoforms expressed in mast cells. To determine the physiologic function of Mitf in mast cells, we restored expression of these isoforms in primary mast cells from Mitf(-/-) mice. We found that these isoforms restored granular morphology and integrin-mediated migration. By microarray analysis, proteases, signaling molecules, cell surface receptor, and transporters comprised the largest groups of genes up-regulated by all isoforms. Furthermore, we found that isoforms also regulated distinct genes sets, suggesting separable biological activities. This work defines the transcriptome regulated by Mitf in mast cells and supports its role as master regulator of mast cell differentiation. Expression of multiple isoforms of this transcription factor may provide for redundancy of biological activities while also allowing diversity of function.

  6. Estrogen receptor-mediated transcription involves the activation of multiple kinase pathways in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sara; Rainville, Jennifer; Zhao, Xing; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Pfaff, Donald; Vasudevan, Nandini

    2014-01-01

    While many physiological effects of estrogens (E) are due to regulation of gene transcription by liganded estrogen receptors (ERs), several effects are also mediated, at least in part, by rapid non-genomic actions of E. Though the relative importance of rapid versus genomic effects in the central nervous system is controversial, we showed previously that membrane-limited effects of E, initiated by an estradiol bovine serum albumin conjugate (E2-BSA), could potentiate transcriptional effects of 17β-estradiol from an estrogen response element (ERE)-reporter in neuroblastoma cells. Here, using specific inhibitors and activators in a pharmacological approach, we show that activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase (PI3K) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, dependent on a Gαq coupled receptor signaling are important in this transcriptional potentiation. We further demonstrate, using ERα phospho-deficient mutants, that E2-BSA mediated phosphorylation of ERα is one mechanism to potentiate transcription from an ERE reporter construct. This study provides a possible mechanism by which signaling from the membrane is coupled to transcription in the nucleus, providing an integrated view of hormone signaling in the brain.

  7. Calcium signaling in pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apáti, Ágota; Pászty, Katalin; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Szebényi, Kornélia; Homolya, László; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2012-04-28

    Pluripotent stem cells represent a new source of biological material allowing the exploration of signaling phenomena during normal cell development and differentiation. Still, the calcium signaling pathways and intracellular calcium responses to various ligands or stress conditions have not been sufficiently explored as yet in embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells and in their differentiated offspring. This is partly due to the special culturing conditions of these cell types, the rapid morphological and functional changes in heterogeneous cell populations during early differentiation, and methodological problems in cellular calcium measurements. In this paper, we review the currently available data in the literature on calcium signaling in pluripotent stem cells and discuss the potential shortcomings of these studies. Various assay methods are surveyed for obtaining reliable data both in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells and in specific, stem cell-derived human tissues. In this paper, we present the modulation of calcium signaling in human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and in their derivates; mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells and cardiac tissues using the fluorescent calcium indicator Fluo-4 and confocal microscopy. LPA, trypsin and angiotensin II were effective in inducing calcium signals both in HUES9 and MSCl cells. Histamine and thrombin induced calcium signal exclusively in the MSCl cells, while ATP was effective only in HUES9 cells. There was no calcium signal evoked by GABA, even at relatively high concentrations. In stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes a rapid increase in the beating rate and an increase of the calcium signal peaks could be observed after the addition of adrenaline, while verapamil led to a strong decrease in cellular calcium and stopped spontaneous contractions in a relaxed state.

  8. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and increases cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathanoori, Ramasri; Olde, Björn; Erlinge, David; Göransson, Olga; Wierup, Nils

    2013-02-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is an islet peptide that promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in beta cells via cAMP/PKA-dependent pathways. In addition, CART is a regulator of neuronal survival. In this study, we examined the effect of exogenous CART 55-102 on beta cell viability and dissected its signaling mechanisms. Evaluation of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation revealed that CART 55-102 reduced glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis in both INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets. Glucotoxicity in INS-1 (832/13) cells also caused a 50% reduction of endogenous CART protein. We show that CART increased proliferation in INS-1 (832/13) cells, an effect that was blocked by PKA, PKB, and MEK1 inhibitors. In addition, CART induced phosphorylation of CREB, IRS, PKB, FoxO1, p44/42 MAPK, and p90RSK in INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets, all key mediators of cell survival and proliferation. Thus, we demonstrate that CART 55-102 protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and promotes proliferation. Taken together our data point to the potential use of CART in therapeutic interventions targeted at enhancing functional beta cell mass and long-term insulin secretion in T2D.

  9. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  10. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C; Côté, Maxime C; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-14

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  11. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors. PMID:27739523

  12. Boolean Modeling Reveals the Necessity of Transcriptional Regulation for Bistability in PC12 Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offermann, Barbara; Knauer, Steffen; Singh, Amit; Fernández-Cachón, María L; Klose, Martin; Kowar, Silke; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    The nerve growth factor NGF has been shown to cause cell fate decisions toward either differentiation or proliferation depending on the relative activity of downstream pERK, pAKT, or pJNK signaling. However, how these protein signals are translated into and fed back from transcriptional activity to complete cellular differentiation over a time span of hours to days is still an open question. Comparing the time-resolved transcriptome response of NGF- or EGF-stimulated PC12 cells over 24 h in combination with protein and phenotype data we inferred a dynamic Boolean model capturing the temporal sequence of protein signaling, transcriptional response and subsequent autocrine feedback. Network topology was optimized by fitting the model to time-resolved transcriptome data under MEK, PI3K, or JNK inhibition. The integrated model confirmed the parallel use of MAPK/ERK, PI3K/AKT, and JNK/JUN for PC12 cell differentiation. Redundancy of cell signaling is demonstrated from the inhibition of the different MAPK pathways. As suggested in silico and confirmed in vitro, differentiation was substantially suppressed under JNK inhibition, yet delayed only under MEK/ERK inhibition. Most importantly, we found that positive transcriptional feedback induces bistability in the cell fate switch. De novo gene expression was necessary to activate autocrine feedback that caused Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator (uPA) Receptor signaling to perpetuate the MAPK activity, finally resulting in the expression of late, differentiation related genes. Thus, the cellular decision toward differentiation depends on the establishment of a transcriptome-induced positive feedback between protein signaling and gene expression thereby constituting a robust control between proliferation and differentiation.

  13. An Efficient Method to Identify Conditionally Activated Transcription Factors and their Corresponding Signal Transduction Pathway Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Hu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A signal transduction pathway (STP is a cascade composed of a series of signal transferring steps, which often activate one or more transcription factors (TFs to control the transcription of target genes. Understanding signaling pathways is important to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of disease. Many condition-annotated pathways have been deposited in public databases. However, condition-annotated pathways are far from complete, considering the large number of possible conditions. Computational methods to assist in the identification of conditionally activated pathways are greatly needed. In this paper, we propose an efficient method to identify conditionally activated pathway segments starting from the identification of conditionally activated TFs, by incorporating protein-DNA binding data, gene expression data and protein interaction data. Applying our methods on several microarray datasets, we have discovered many significantly activated TFs and their corresponding pathway segments, which are supported by evidence in the literature.

  14. Post-transcriptional modifications in development and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Michaela; Blanco, Sandra

    2016-11-01

    Cells adapt to their environment by linking external stimuli to an intricate network of transcriptional, post-transcriptional and translational processes. Among these, mechanisms that couple environmental cues to the regulation of protein translation are not well understood. Chemical modifications of RNA allow rapid cellular responses to external stimuli by modulating a wide range of fundamental biochemical properties and processes, including the stability, splicing and translation of messenger RNA. In this Review, we focus on the occurrence of N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A), 5-methylcytosine (m(5)C) and pseudouridine (Ψ) in RNA, and describe how these RNA modifications are implicated in regulating pluripotency, stem cell self-renewal and fate specification. Both post-transcriptional modifications and the enzymes that catalyse them modulate stem cell differentiation pathways and are essential for normal development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Proteome adaptation in cell reprogramming proceeds via distinct transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevento, Marco; Tonge, Peter D; Puri, Mira C; Hussein, Samer M I; Cloonan, Nicole; Wood, David L; Grimmond, Sean M; Nagy, Andras; Munoz, Javier; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-12-10

    The ectopic expression of Oct4, Klf4, c-Myc and Sox2 (OKMS) transcription factors allows reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The reprogramming process, which involves a complex network of molecular events, is not yet fully characterized. Here we perform a quantitative mass spectrometry-based analysis to probe in-depth dynamic proteome changes during somatic cell reprogramming. Our data reveal defined waves of proteome resetting, with the first wave occurring 48 h after the activation of the reprogramming transgenes and involving specific biological processes linked to the c-Myc transcriptional network. A second wave of proteome reorganization occurs in a later stage of reprogramming, where we characterize the proteome of two distinct pluripotent cellular populations. In addition, the overlay of our proteome resource with parallel generated -omics data is explored to identify post-transcriptionally regulated proteins involved in key steps during reprogramming.

  16. Transcriptional Wiring of Cell Wall-Related Genes in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Mutwil; Colin Ruprecht; Federico M. Giorgi; Martin Bringmann; Bj(o)rn Usadel; Staffan Persson

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional coordination, or co-expression, of genes may signify functional relatedness of the correspond-ing proteins. For example, several genes involved in secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis are co-expressed with genes engaged in the synthesis of xylan, which is a major component of the secondary cell wall. To extend these types of anal-yses, we investigated the co-expression relationships of all Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZy)-related genes for Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, the intention was to transcriptionally link different cell wall-related processes to each other, and also to other biological functions. To facilitate easy manual inspection, we have displayed these interactions as networks and matrices, and created a web-based interface (http://aranet.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/corecarb) containing downloadable files for all the transcriptional associations.

  17. Arsenic inhibits hedgehog signaling during P19 cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jui Tung [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Bain, Lisa J., E-mail: lbain@clemson.edu [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Arsenic is a toxicant found in ground water around the world, and human exposure mainly comes from drinking water or from crops grown in areas containing arsenic in soils or water. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure during development decreased intellectual function, reduced birth weight, and altered locomotor activity, while in vitro studies have shown that arsenite decreased muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays an important role during the differentiation of both neurons and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether arsenic can disrupt Shh signaling in P19 mouse embryonic stem cells, leading to changes muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. P19 embryonic stem cells were exposed to 0, 0.25, or 0.5 μM of sodium arsenite for up to 9 days during cell differentiation. We found that arsenite exposure significantly reduced transcript levels of genes in the Shh pathway in both a time and dose-dependent manner. This included the Shh ligand, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, the Gli2 transcription factor, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, and its downstream target gene Ascl1, which was decreased 5-fold. GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity were also reduced. However, arsenic did not alter GLI2 primary cilium accumulation or nuclear translocation. Moreover, additional extracellular SHH rescued the inhibitory effects of arsenic on cellular differentiation due to an increase in GLI binding activity. Taken together, we conclude that arsenic exposure affected Shh signaling, ultimately decreasing the expression of the Gli2 transcription factor. These results suggest a mechanism by which arsenic disrupts cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Arsenic exposure decreases sonic hedgehog pathway-related gene expression. • Arsenic decreases GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity in P19 cells. • Arsenic exposure does not alter the levels of SHH

  18. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Van Duyne, Rachel [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Romerio, Fabio [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah, E-mail: fkashanc@gmu.edu [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  19. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-06-27

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer.

  20. Enhanced osteoclastogenesis by mitochondrial retrograde signaling through transcriptional activation of the cathepsin K gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Koenigstein, Alexander; Zaidi, Mone; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has emerged as an important factor in wide ranging human pathologies. We have previously defined a retrograde signaling pathway that originates from dysfunctional mitochondria (Mt-RS) and causes a global nuclear transcriptional reprograming as its end point. Mitochondrial dysfunction causing disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and consequent increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca(2) ](c) activates calcineurin and the transcription factors NF-κB, NFAT, CREB, and C/EBPδ. In macrophages, this signaling complements receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastic differentiation. Here, we show that the Mt-RS activated transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNP A2) is induced by hypoxia in murine macrophages. We demonstrate that the cathepsin K gene (Ctsk), one of the key genes upregulated during osteoclast differentiation, is transcriptionally activated by Mt-RS factors. HnRNP A2 acts as a coactivator with nuclear transcription factors, cRel, and C/EBPδ for Ctsk promoter activation under hypoxic conditions. Notably, our study shows that hypoxia-induced activation of the stress target factors mediates effects similar to that of RANKL with regard to Ctsk activation. We therefore suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of Mt-RS, induced by various pathophysiologic conditions, is a potential risk factor for osteoclastogenesis and bone loss.

  1. Enhanced osteoclastogenesis by mitochondrial retrograde signaling through transcriptional activation of the cathepsin K gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Koenigstein, Alexander; Zaidi, Mone; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has emerged as an important factor in wide ranging human pathologies. We have previously defined a retrograde signaling pathway that originates from dysfunctional mitochondria (Mt-RS) and causes a global nuclear transcriptional reprograming as its endpoint. Mitochondrial dysfunction causing disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and consequent increase in cytosolic calcium [Ca2](c) activates calcineurin and the transcription factors NF-κB, NFAT, CREB, and C/EBPδ. In macrophages this signaling complements receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)–induced osteoclastic differentiation. Here, we show that the Mt-RS activated transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNP A2) is induced by hypoxia in murine macrophages. We demonstrate that the cathepsin K gene (Cstk), one of the key genes upregulated during osteoclast differentiation, is transcriptionally activated by Mt-RS factors. HnRNP A2 acts as a coactivator with nuclear transcription factors, cRel, and C/EBPδ for Cstk promoter activation under hypoxic conditions. Notably, our study shows that hypoxia-induced activation of the stress target factors mediates effects similar to that of RANKL with regard to Cstk activation. We therefore suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of Mt-RS, induced by various pathophysiologic conditions, is a potential risk factor for osteoclastogenesis and bone loss. PMID:25800988

  2. A membrane-bound NAC transcription factor as an integrator of biotic and abiotic stress signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2010-05-01

    Transcription factors are central components of gene regulatory networks that mediate virtually all aspects of growth and developmental processes in biological systems. The activity of transcription factors is regulated at multiple steps, such as gene transcription, posttranscriptional RNA processing, posttranslational modification, protein-protein interactions, and controlled protein turnover. Controlled activation of dormant, membrane-bound transcription factor (MTF) is an intriguing regulatory mechanism that ensures quick transcriptional responses to environmental fluctuations in plants, in which various stress hormones serve as signaling mediators. NTL6 is proteolytically activated upon exposure to cold and induces expression of the Pathogenesis-Related (PR) genes. The membrane-mediated cold signaling in inducing pathogen resistance is considered to be an adaptive strategy that protects plants against infection by hydrophilic pathogens frequently occurring during cold season. We found that NTL6 also mediates abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of abiotic stress responses in Arabidopsis. NTL6 is proteolytically activated by ABA. Transgenic plants overexpressing a nuclear NTL6 form (35S:6ΔC) exhibited a hypersensitive response to ABA and high salinity in seed germination. Taken together, these observations indicate that NTL6 plays an integrative role in plant responses to both biotic and abiotic stress conditions.

  3. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) modulates adipocyte differentiation via MOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Zhang, Yuchao; Liu, Yuantao; Chen, Jicui; Zong, Chen; Yu, Cong; Cui, Shang; Gao, Weina; Qin, Dandan; Sun, Wenchuan; Li, Xia; Wang, Xiangdong

    2015-12-01

    The role and mechanism of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) in adipogenesis remain unclear. In this study, our data showed that Males absent on the first (MOF) protein expression was increased during 3 T3-L1 preadipocytes differentiation accompanied with STAT5B expression increasing. Over-expression STAT5B enhanced MOF promoter trans-activation in HeLa cells. Mutagenesis assay and ChIP analysis exhibited that STAT5B was able to bind MOF promoter. Knocking-down STAT5B in 3 T3-L1 preadipocytes led to decreased expression of MOF, but resulted in increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (Fabp4), which were important factors or enzymes for adipogenesis. We also found that knocking-down MOF in 3 T3-L1 preadipocytes resulted in increased expression of PPARγ, C/EBPα and Fabp4, which was in the same trend as STAT5B knocking-down. Over-expression MOF resulted in reduced promoter trans-activation activity of C/EBPα. These results suggest that STAT5B and MOF work as negative regulators in adipogenesis, and STAT5B modulates preadipocytes differentiation partially by regulating MOF expression.

  4. The role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 in the inhibitory effects of GH on adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, H E; Albrektsen, T; Billestrup, Nils

    2003-01-01

    of transcription (STAT)-5 signalling pathway. Within minutes of treatment, GH induced the tyrosine phosphorylation, nuclear localization and DNA binding of STAT5. Importantly, there was no evidence that STAT5 acted via an interaction with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. To further understand...... the mechanism of STAT5 action, we reconstituted the inhibition of aP2 in a non-adipogenic cell line. Using this system, we showed that the ability of GH to inhibit a 520 bp aP2 reporter was largely dependent upon the presence of either STAT5A or STAT5B. Mutant analysis confirmed that the tyrosine...

  5. Preparation of cell lines for single-cell analysis of transcriptional activation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U; Janicki, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Imaging molecularly defined regions of chromatin in single living cells during transcriptional activation has the potential to provide new insight into gene regulatory mechanisms. Here, we describe a method for isolating cell lines with multi-copy arrays of reporter transgenes, which can be used for real-time high-resolution imaging of transcriptional activation dynamics in single cells.

  6. Universal signal generator for dynamic cell stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piehler, Andreas; Ghorashian, Navid; Zhang, Ce; Tay, Savaş

    2017-06-27

    Dynamic cell stimulation is a powerful technique for probing gene networks and for applications in stem cell differentiation, immunomodulation and signaling. We developed a robust and flexible method and associated microfluidic devices to generate a wide-range of precisely formulated dynamic chemical signals to stimulate live cells and measure their dynamic response. This signal generator is capable of digital to analog conversion (DAC) through combinatoric selection of discrete input concentrations, and outperforms existing methods by both achievable resolution, dynamic range and simplicity in design. It requires no calibration, has minimal space requirements and can be easily integrated into microfluidic cell culture devices. The signal generator hardware and software we developed allows to choose the waveform, period and amplitude of chemical input signals and features addition of well-defined chemical noise to study the role of stochasticity in cellular information processing.

  7. Tracking Hypoxic Signaling within Encapsulated Cell Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, Matthew L.; Sahai, Suchit; Blanchette, James O.

    2011-01-01

    nutrients, notably oxygen, is therefore reduced and limited by diffusion. This reduced oxygen availability may especially impact β-cells whose insulin secretory function is highly dependent on oxygen11-13. Capsule composition and geometry will also impact diffusion rates and lengths for oxygen. Therefore, we also describe a technique for identifying hypoxic cells within our PEG capsules. Infection of the cells with a recombinant adenovirus allows for a fluorescent signal to be produced when intracellular hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways are activated14. As HIFs are the primary regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia, they represent an ideal target marker for detection of hypoxic signaling15. This approach allows for easy and rapid detection of hypoxic cells. Briefly, the adenovirus has the sequence for a red fluorescent protein (Ds Red DR from Clontech) under the control of a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) trimer. Stabilization of HIF-1 by low oxygen conditions will drive transcription of the fluorescent protein (Figure 1). Additional details on the construction of this virus have been published previously15. The virus is stored in 10% glycerol at -80° C as many 150 μL aliquots in 1.5 mL centrifuge tubes at a concentration of 3.4 x 1010 pfu/mL. Previous studies in our lab have shown that MIN6 cells encapsulated as aggregates maintain their viability throughout 4 weeks of culture in 20% oxygen. MIN6 aggregates cultured at 2 or 1% oxygen showed both signs of necrotic cells (still about 85-90% viable) by staining with ethidium bromide as well as morphological changes relative to cells in 20% oxygen. The smooth spherical shape of the aggregates displayed at 20% was lost and aggregates appeared more like disorganized groups of cells. While the low oxygen stress does not cause a pronounced drop in viability, it is clearly impacting MIN6 aggregation and function as measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion15. Western blot analysis of encapsulated

  8. Tracking hypoxic signaling within encapsulated cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, Matthew L; Sahai, Suchit; Blanchette, James O

    2011-12-16

    , is therefore reduced and limited by diffusion. This reduced oxygen availability may especially impact β-cells whose insulin secretory function is highly dependent on oxygen. Capsule composition and geometry will also impact diffusion rates and lengths for oxygen. Therefore, we also describe a technique for identifying hypoxic cells within our PEG capsules. Infection of the cells with a recombinant adenovirus allows for a fluorescent signal to be produced when intracellular hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways are activated. As HIFs are the primary regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia, they represent an ideal target marker for detection of hypoxic signaling. This approach allows for easy and rapid detection of hypoxic cells. Briefly, the adenovirus has the sequence for a red fluorescent protein (Ds Red DR from Clontech) under the control of a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) trimer. Stabilization of HIF-1 by low oxygen conditions will drive transcription of the fluorescent protein (Figure 1). Additional details on the construction of this virus have been published previously. The virus is stored in 10% glycerol at -80° C as many 150 μL aliquots in 1.5 mL centrifuge tubes at a concentration of 3.4 x 10(10) pfu/mL. Previous studies in our lab have shown that MIN6 cells encapsulated as aggregates maintain their viability throughout 4 weeks of culture in 20% oxygen. MIN6 aggregates cultured at 2 or 1% oxygen showed both signs of necrotic cells (still about 85-90% viable) by staining with ethidium bromide as well as morphological changes relative to cells in 20% oxygen. The smooth spherical shape of the aggregates displayed at 20% was lost and aggregates appeared more like disorganized groups of cells. While the low oxygen stress does not cause a pronounced drop in viability, it is clearly impacting MIN6 aggregation and function as measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Western blot analysis of encapsulated cells in 20% and 1% oxygen also

  9. Signal transduction and HIV transcriptional activation after exposure to ultraviolet light and other DNA-damaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerie, K.; Laster, W.S.; Luhua Cheng; Kirkham, J.C.; Reavey, Peter; Kuemmerle, N.B. [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1996-08-01

    Short wavelength (254 nm) ultraviolet light (UVC) radiation was much more potent in activating transcription of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV) reporter genes stably integrated into the genomes of human and monkey cells than ionizing radiation (IR) from a {sup 137}Cs source at similarly cytotoxic doses. A similar differential was also observed when c-jun transcription levels were examined. However, these transcription levels do not correlate with activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kB and AP-1 measured by band-shift assays, i.e. both types of radiation produce similar increases in NF-kB and AP-1 activity, suggesting existence of additional levels of regulation during these responses. Because of the well-established involvement of cytoplasmic signaling pathways in the cellular response to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), UVC, and IR using other types of assays, the role of TNF-{alpha} in the UVC response of HIV and c-jun was investigated in our cell system. We demonstrate that UVC and TNF-{alpha} activate HIV gene expression in a synergistic fashion, suggesting that it is unlikely that TNF-{alpha} is involved in UVC activation of HIV transcription in stably transfected HeLa cells. Moreover, maximum TNF-{alpha} stimulation resulted in one order of magnitude lower levels of HIV expression than that observed after UVC exposure. We also observed an additive effect of UVC and TNF-{alpha} on c-jun steady-state mRNA levels, suggestive of a partial overlap in activation mechanism of c-jun by UVC and TNF-{alpha}; yet these responses are distinct to some extent. Our results indicate that the HIV, and to some extent also the c-jun, transcriptional responses to UVC are not the result of TNF-{alpha} stimulation and subsequent downstream cytoplasmic signaling events in HeLa cells. In addition to the new data, this report also summarizes our current views regarding UVC-induced activations of HIV gene expression in stably transfected cells. (Author).

  10. PARP1 orchestrates variant histone exchange in signal-mediated transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Amanda; Yang, Shen-Hsi; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2013-12-01

    Transcriptional activation is accompanied by multiple molecular events that remodel the local chromatin environment in promoter regions. These molecular events are often orchestrated in response to the activation of signalling pathways, as exemplified by the response of immediate early genes such as FOS to ERK MAP kinase signalling. Here, we demonstrate that inducible NFI recruitment permits PARP1 binding to the FOS promoter by a mutually reinforcing loop. PARP1 and its poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation activity are required for maintaining FOS activation kinetics. We also show that the histone variant H2A.Z associates with the FOS promoter and acts in a transcription-suppressive manner. However, in response to ERK pathway signalling, H2A.Z is replaced by H2A; PARP1 activity is required to promote this exchange. Thus, our work has revealed an additional facet of PARP1 function in promoting dynamic remodelling of promoter-associated nucleosomes to allow transcriptional activation in response to cellular signalling.

  11. Transcription factor interplay in T helper cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Catherine M; Jenner, Richard G

    2013-11-01

    The differentiation of CD4 helper T cells into specialized effector lineages has provided a powerful model for understanding immune cell differentiation. Distinct lineages have been defined by differential expression of signature cytokines and the lineage-specifying transcription factors necessary and sufficient for their production. The traditional paradigm of differentiation towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes driven by T-bet and GATA3, respectively, has been extended to incorporate additional T cell lineages and transcriptional regulators. Technological advances have expanded our view of these lineage-specifying transcription factors to the whole genome and revealed unexpected interplay between them. From these data, it is becoming clear that lineage specification is more complex and plastic than previous models might have suggested. Here, we present an overview of the different forms of transcription factor interplay that have been identified and how T cell phenotypes arise as a product of this interplay within complex regulatory networks. We also suggest experimental strategies that will provide further insight into the mechanisms that underlie T cell lineage specification and plasticity.

  12. Intracellular Peptides as Natural Regulators of Cell Signaling*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Fernanda M.; Berti, Denise A.; Ferreira, Zulma S.; Klitzke, Clécio F.; Markus, Regina P.; Ferro, Emer S.

    2008-01-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system releases large amounts of oligopeptides within cells. To investigate possible functions for these intracellularly generated oligopeptides, we fused them to a cationic transactivator peptide sequence using reversible disulfide bonds, introduced them into cells, and analyzed their effect on G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signal transduction. A mixture containing four of these peptides (20–80 μm) significantly inhibited the increase in the extracellular acidification response triggered by angiotensin II (ang II) in CHO-S cells transfected with the ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R-CHO-S). Subsequently, either alone or in a mixture, these peptides increased luciferase gene transcription in AT1R CHO-S cells stimulated with ang II and in HEK293 cells treated with isoproterenol. These peptides without transactivator failed to affect GPCR cellular responses. All four functional peptides were shown in vitro to competitively inhibit the degradation of a synthetic substrate by thimet oligopeptidase. Overexpression of thimet oligopeptidase in both CHO-S and HEK293 cells was sufficient to reduce luciferase activation triggered by a specific GPCR agonist. Moreover, using individual peptides as baits in affinity columns, several proteins involved in GPCR signaling were identified, including α-adaptin A and dynamin 1. These results suggest that before their complete degradation, intracellular peptides similar to those generated by proteasomes can actively affect cell signaling, probably representing additional bioactive molecules within cells. PMID:18617518

  13. Intracellular peptides as natural regulators of cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Fernanda M; Berti, Denise A; Ferreira, Zulma S; Klitzke, Clécio F; Markus, Regina P; Ferro, Emer S

    2008-09-05

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system releases large amounts of oligopeptides within cells. To investigate possible functions for these intracellularly generated oligopeptides, we fused them to a cationic transactivator peptide sequence using reversible disulfide bonds, introduced them into cells, and analyzed their effect on G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signal transduction. A mixture containing four of these peptides (20-80 microm) significantly inhibited the increase in the extracellular acidification response triggered by angiotensin II (ang II) in CHO-S cells transfected with the ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R-CHO-S). Subsequently, either alone or in a mixture, these peptides increased luciferase gene transcription in AT1R CHO-S cells stimulated with ang II and in HEK293 cells treated with isoproterenol. These peptides without transactivator failed to affect GPCR cellular responses. All four functional peptides were shown in vitro to competitively inhibit the degradation of a synthetic substrate by thimet oligopeptidase. Overexpression of thimet oligopeptidase in both CHO-S and HEK293 cells was sufficient to reduce luciferase activation triggered by a specific GPCR agonist. Moreover, using individual peptides as baits in affinity columns, several proteins involved in GPCR signaling were identified, including alpha-adaptin A and dynamin 1. These results suggest that before their complete degradation, intracellular peptides similar to those generated by proteasomes can actively affect cell signaling, probably representing additional bioactive molecules within cells.

  14. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 protects rat pancreatic islets from cytokine-induced apoptosis through Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Qi; XIANG Ruo-lan; YANG Yan-li; FENG Kai; ZHANG Kui; DING Wen-yi

    2013-01-01

    Background Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are inhibitors of cytokine signaling pathway involved in negative feedback loops.Although SOCS1 is an important intracellular suppressor of apoptosis in a variety of cell types,its role in cytokine-induced pancreatic β-cell apoptosis remains unclear.The present study investigated potential effects of SOCS1 on the cytokine-induced pancreatic β-cell apoptosis.Methods After successfully transfected with SOCS1/pEGFP-C1 or pEGFP-C1 plasmids to overexpress SOCS1,RINm5F (rat insulinoma cell line) cells were exposed to cytokines,interferon (IFN)-γ alone,IFN-γ+interleukin (IL)-1β,IFN-y+IL-1β+tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α respectively.Pancreatic β-cell apoptosis was assessed by using MTT,FACS,and caspase-3 activity assays.Protein phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) were verified by Western blotting and mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS),NF-κB and Fas were analyzed by RT-PCR.Results Overexpression of SOCS1 in RINm5F cells was shown to attenuate IFN-γ alone,IFN-γ+IL-1β and IFN-γ+TNF-α+IL-1β mediated apoptosis.Phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT1 significantly decreased in RINm5F cells which overexpressed SOCS1 protein.Overexpression of SOCS1 significantly suppressed cytokine-induced iNOS mRNA levels.Conclusion Overexpression of SOCS1 protects pancreatic islets from cytokine-induced cell apoptosis via the JAK2/STAT1 pathway.

  15. Function-based discovery of significant transcriptional temporal patterns in insulin stimulated muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Camillo, Barbara; Irving, Brian A; Schimke, Jill; Sanavia, Tiziana; Toffolo, Gianna; Cobelli, Claudio; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2012-01-01

    Insulin action on protein synthesis (translation of transcripts) and post-translational modifications, especially of those involving the reversible modifications such as phosphorylation of various signaling proteins, are extensively studied but insulin effect on transcription of genes, especially of transcriptional temporal patterns remains to be fully defined. To identify significant transcriptional temporal patterns we utilized primary differentiated rat skeletal muscle myotubes which were treated with insulin and samples were collected every 20 min for 8 hours. Pooled samples at every hour were analyzed by gene array approach to measure transcript levels. The patterns of transcript levels were analyzed based on a novel method that integrates selection, clustering, and functional annotation to find the main temporal patterns associated to functional groups of differentially expressed genes. 326 genes were found to be differentially expressed in response to in vitro insulin administration in skeletal muscle myotubes. Approximately 20% of the genes that were differentially expressed were identified as belonging to the insulin signaling pathway. Characteristic transcriptional temporal patterns include: (a) a slow and gradual decrease in gene expression, (b) a gradual increase in gene expression reaching a peak at about 5 hours and then reaching a plateau or an initial decrease and other different variable pattern of increase in gene expression over time. The new method allows identifying characteristic dynamic responses to insulin stimulus, common to a number of genes and associated to the same functional group. The results demonstrate that insulin treatment elicited different clusters of gene transcript profile supporting a temporal regulation of gene expression by insulin in skeletal muscle cells.

  16. Function-based discovery of significant transcriptional temporal patterns in insulin stimulated muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Di Camillo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin action on protein synthesis (translation of transcripts and post-translational modifications, especially of those involving the reversible modifications such as phosphorylation of various signaling proteins, are extensively studied but insulin effect on transcription of genes, especially of transcriptional temporal patterns remains to be fully defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify significant transcriptional temporal patterns we utilized primary differentiated rat skeletal muscle myotubes which were treated with insulin and samples were collected every 20 min for 8 hours. Pooled samples at every hour were analyzed by gene array approach to measure transcript levels. The patterns of transcript levels were analyzed based on a novel method that integrates selection, clustering, and functional annotation to find the main temporal patterns associated to functional groups of differentially expressed genes. 326 genes were found to be differentially expressed in response to in vitro insulin administration in skeletal muscle myotubes. Approximately 20% of the genes that were differentially expressed were identified as belonging to the insulin signaling pathway. Characteristic transcriptional temporal patterns include: (a a slow and gradual decrease in gene expression, (b a gradual increase in gene expression reaching a peak at about 5 hours and then reaching a plateau or an initial decrease and other different variable pattern of increase in gene expression over time. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The new method allows identifying characteristic dynamic responses to insulin stimulus, common to a number of genes and associated to the same functional group. The results demonstrate that insulin treatment elicited different clusters of gene transcript profile supporting a temporal regulation of gene expression by insulin in skeletal muscle cells.

  17. Endocytosis and signaling: cell logistics shape the eukaryotic cell plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sigismund, Sara; Confalonieri, Stefano; Ciliberto, Andrea; Polo, Simona; Scita, Giorgio; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    ... with almost all aspects of cellular signaling. This led to the notion that endocytosis is actually the master organizer of cellular signaling, providing the cell with understandable messages that have been resolved...

  18. Coupling Planar Cell Polarity Signaling to Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D. Axelrod

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cells and other groups of cells acquire a polarity orthogonal to their apical–basal axes, referred to as Planar Cell Polarity (PCP. The process by which these cells become polarized requires a signaling pathway using Frizzled as a receptor. Responding cells sense cues from their environment that provide directional information, and they translate this information into cellular asymmetry. Most of what is known about PCP derives from studies in the fruit fly, Drosophila. We review what is known about how cells translate an unknown signal into asymmetric cytoskeletal reorganization. We then discuss how the vertebrate processes of convergent extension and cochlear hair-cell development may relate to Drosophila PCP signaling.

  19. Rph1 mediates the nutrient-limitation signaling pathway leading to transcriptional activation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Amélie; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2015-04-01

    To maintain proper cellular homeostasis, the magnitude of autophagy activity has to be finely tuned in response to environmental changes. Many aspects of autophagy regulation have been extensively studied: pathways integrating signals through the master regulators TORC1 and PKA lead to multiple post-translational modifications affecting the functions, protein-protein interactions, and localization of Atg proteins. The expression of several ATG genes increases sharply upon autophagy induction conditions, and defects in ATG gene expression are associated with various diseases, pointing to the importance of transcriptional regulation of autophagy. Yet, how changes in ATG gene expression affect the rate of autophagy is not well characterized, and transcriptional regulators of the autophagy pathway remain largely unknown. To identify such regulators, we analyzed the expression of several ATG genes in a library of DNA-binding protein mutants. This led to the identification of Rph1 as a master transcriptional regulator of autophagy.

  20. A comparative study of Pointed and Yan expression reveals new complexity to the transcriptional networks downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisclair Lachance, Jean-François; Peláez, Nicolás; Cassidy, Justin J; Webber, Jemma L; Rebay, Ilaria; Carthew, Richard W

    2014-01-15

    The biochemical regulatory network downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling is controlled by two opposing ETS family members: the transcriptional activator Pointed (Pnt) and the transcriptional repressor Yan. A bistable switch model has been invoked to explain how pathway activation can drive differentiation by shifting the system from a high-Yan/low-Pnt activity state to a low-Yan/high-Pnt activity state. Although the model explains yan and pnt loss-of-function phenotypes in several different cell types, how Yan and Pointed protein expression dynamics contribute to these and other developmental transitions remains poorly understood. Toward this goal we have used a functional GFP-tagged Pnt transgene (Pnt-GFP) to perform a comparative study of Yan and Pnt protein expression throughout Drosophila development. Consistent with the prevailing model of the Pnt-Yan network, we found numerous instances where Pnt-GFP and Yan adopt a mutually exclusive pattern of expression. However we also observed many examples of co-expression. While some co-expression occurred in cells where RTK signaling is presumed low, other co-expression occurred in cells with high RTK signaling. The instances of co-expressed Yan and Pnt-GFP in tissues with high RTK signaling cannot be explained by the current model, and thus they provide important contexts for future investigation of how context-specific differences in RTK signaling, network topology, or responsiveness to other signaling inputs, affect the transcriptional response.

  1. Epidermal growth-factor-induced transcript isoform variation drives mammary cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang J Köstler

    Full Text Available Signal-induced transcript isoform variation (TIV includes alternative promoter usage as well as alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation of mRNA. To assess the phenotypic relevance of signal-induced TIV, we employed exon arrays and breast epithelial cells, which migrate in response to the epidermal growth factor (EGF. We show that EGF rapidly--within one hour--induces widespread TIV in a significant fraction of the transcriptome. Importantly, TIV characterizes many genes that display no differential expression upon stimulus. In addition, similar EGF-dependent changes are shared by a panel of mammary cell lines. A functional screen, which utilized isoform-specific siRNA oligonucleotides, indicated that several isoforms play essential, non-redundant roles in EGF-induced mammary cell migration. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of TIV in the rapid evolvement of a phenotypic response to extracellular signals.

  2. PGE2 modulates the transcriptional activity of ERRa in prostate stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Zhaochen; Du, Xiaoling; Zhang, Ju; Yang, Kuo; Miao, Lin; Zhu, Yan; Yuan, Hui; Wang, Linlin; Klocker, Helmut; Shi, Jiandang

    2014-12-01

    The regulation of the transcriptional activity of the estrogen receptor-related receptor a (ERRa) has not yet been clearly documented. Aromatase is a direct target gene of ERRa, and we previously reported that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increased the expression of ERRa in the prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1, which ultimately promoted estradiol production by enhancing aromatase gene transcription. Here, we show that PGE2 also affects aromatase expression by regulating ERRa transcriptional activity in prostate stromal cells. When the cells were cultured in serum-free medium, the expression of aromatase was not proportional to the ERRa protein level, if no other stimulation occurred, indicating the absence of a factor that activates ERRa. PGE2 could upregulate aromatase and ERRa response element (ERRE)-reporter expression and also enhance ERRa phosphorylation and nuclear localization. PGE2 functions through the PGE2 receptors (EP) 2 and EP4, which couple to adenylate cyclase. The activation of adenylate cyclase with Forskolin mimicked the PGE2-mediated enhancement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and ERRa target gene expression. Experiments using specific signaling pathway inhibitors showed that both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK are involved in ERRa activation, and the PI3K inhibitor was shown to abolish ERK activation. Our results suggest that PGE2 is a modulator of ERRa transcriptional activity. Furthermore, PGE2 activates the EP2/EP4-cAMP-PI3K-ERK signaling pathway, which enhanced ERRa transcriptional potentiality by increasing ERRa phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, subsequently promoting the expression of its target genes, such as aromatase.

  3. The transcriptional diversity of 25 Drosophila cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherbas, Lucy [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Willingham, Aarron [Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Zhang, Dayu [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Yang, Li [University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Zou, Yi [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Eads, Brian D. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Carlson, Joseph W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Landolin, Jane M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kapranov, Philipp [Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Dumais, Jacqueline [Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Samsonova, Anastasia [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Choi, Jeong-Hyeon [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Roberts, Johnny [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Davis, Carrie A. [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (United States); Tang, Haixu [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); van Baren, Marijke J. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Ghosh, Srinka [Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Dobin, Alexander [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (United States); Bell, Kim [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (United States); Lin, Wei [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (United States); Langton, Laura [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Duff, Michael O. [University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Tenney, Aaron E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Zaleski, Chris [Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (United States); Brent, Michael R. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Hoskins, Roger A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kaufman, Thomas C. [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Andrews, Justen [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Graveley, Brenton R. [University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Perrimon, Norbert [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Celniker, Susan E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gingeras, Thomas R. [Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York (United States); Cherbas, Peter [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2010-12-22

    Drosophila melanogaster cell lines are important resources for cell biologists. In this article, we catalog the expression of exons, genes, and unannotated transcriptional signals for 25 lines. Unannotated transcription is substantial (typically 19% of euchromatic signal). Conservatively, we identify 1405 novel transcribed regions; 684 of these appear to be new exons of neighboring, often distant, genes. Sixty-four percent of genes are expressed detectably in at least one line, but only 21% are detected in all lines. Each cell line expresses, on average, 5885 genes, including a common set of 3109. Expression levels vary over several orders of magnitude. Major signaling pathways are well represented: most differentiation pathways are ‘‘off’’ and survival/growth pathways ‘‘on.’’ Roughly 50% of the genes expressed by each line are not part of the common set, and these show considerable individuality. Thirty-one percent are expressed at a higher level in at least one cell line than in any single developmental stage, suggesting that each line is enriched for genes characteristic of small sets of cells. Most remarkable is that imaginal disc-derived lines can generally be assigned, on the basis of expression, to small territories within developing discs. These mappings reveal unexpected stability of even fine-grained spatial determination. No two cell lines show identical transcription factor expression. We conclude that each line has retained features of an individual founder cell superimposed on a common ‘‘cell line‘‘ gene expression pattern. We report the transcriptional profiles of 25 Drosophila melanogaster cell lines, principally by whole-genome tiling microarray analysis of total RNA, carried out as part of the modENCODE project. The data produced in this study add to our knowledge of the cell lines and of the Drosophila transcriptome in several ways. We summarize the expression of previously annotated genes in each of the 25

  4. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, J. Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals propagating through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programs in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. In many cases, the dynamical performance of transcriptional re...

  5. Insulin-FOXO3 signaling modulates circadian rhythms via regulation of clock transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Inês; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Schellevis, Raymond; Nijman, Romana M; Koerkamp, Marian Groot; Holstege, Frank C P; Smidt, Marten P; Hoekman, Marco F M

    2014-06-02

    Circadian rhythms are responsive to external and internal cues, light and metabolism being among the most important. In mammals, the light signal is sensed by the retina and transmitted to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) master clock [1], where it is integrated into the molecular oscillator via regulation of clock gene transcription. The SCN synchronizes peripheral oscillators, an effect that can be overruled by incoming metabolic signals [2]. As a consequence, peripheral oscillators can be uncoupled from the master clock when light and metabolic signals are not in phase. The signaling pathways responsible for coupling metabolic cues to the molecular clock are being rapidly uncovered [3-5]. Here we show that insulin-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Forkhead box class O3 (FOXO3) signaling is required for circadian rhythmicity in the liver via regulation of Clock. Knockdown of FoxO3 dampens circadian amplitude, an effect that is rescued by overexpression of Clock. Subsequently, we show binding of FOXO3 to two Daf-binding elements (DBEs) located in the Clock promoter area, implicating Clock as a transcriptional target of FOXO3. Transcriptional oscillation of both core clock and output genes in the liver of FOXO3-deficient mice is affected, indicating a disrupted hepatic circadian rhythmicity. Finally, we show that insulin, a major regulator of FOXO activity [6-9], regulates Clock levels in a PI3K- and FOXO3-dependent manner. Our data point to a key role of the insulin-FOXO3-Clock signaling pathway in the modulation of circadian rhythms.

  6. Association of signaling transducers and activators of transcription 1 and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan; Xu, Wang-Dong; Yang, Xiao-Ke; Fang, Xin-Yu; Liu, Yan-Yan; Ni, Jing; Qiu, Li-Juan; Hui, Peng; Cen, Han; Leng, Rui-Xue; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is complex autoimmune disease which involves various facets of the immune system. Signaling transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) belongs to the family of STAT transcription factors that mediate various biological responses. Recently, studies in both experimental animal models of lupus and patients with SLE have revealed expression and activation of STAT1 is closely associated with the pathogenesis of SLE. Moreover, increased production of interferons (IFNs) and aberrant activation of IFNs signaling, which is mechanistically linked to increased level of STAT1, are crucial for the development of SLE. Therefore, we will focus on the association of STAT1 and SLE based on recent understandings to render more information about the mechanisms of STAT1 might perform in. Hopefully, the information obtained will lead to a better understanding of the development and pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases, as well as its clinical implications and therapeutic potential.

  7. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong, E-mail: jungkim@cau.ac.kr; Choi, Kyung-Hee, E-mail: khchoi@cau.ac.kr

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  8. Transcription factors regulating B cell fate in the germinal centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recaldin, T; Fear, D J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification of the antibody repertoire is essential for the normal operation of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Following antigen encounter, B cells are activated, proliferate rapidly and undergo two diversification events; somatic hypermutation (followed by selection), which enhances the affinity of the antibody for its cognate antigen, and class-switch recombination, which alters the effector functions of the antibody to adapt the response to the challenge faced. B cells must then differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. These activities take place in specialized immunological environments called germinal centres, usually located in the secondary lymphoid organs. To complete the germinal centre activities successfully, a B cell adopts a transcriptional programme that allows it to migrate to specific sites within the germinal centre, proliferate, modify its DNA recombination and repair pathways, alter its apoptotic potential and finally undergo terminal differentiation. To co-ordinate these processes, B cells employ a number of 'master regulator' transcription factors which mediate wholesale transcriptomic changes. These master transcription factors are mutually antagonistic and form a complex regulatory network to maintain distinct gene expression programs. Within this network, multiple points of positive and negative feedback ensure the expression of the 'master regulators', augmented by a number of 'secondary' factors that reinforce these networks and sense the progress of the immune response. In this review we will discuss the different activities B cells must undertake to mount a successful T cell-dependent immune response and describe how a regulatory network of transcription factors controls these processes.

  9. Fine temporal analysis of DHT transcriptional modulation of the ATM/Gadd45g signaling pathways in the mouse uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanga, Mahinè; Labrie, Yvan; Calvo, Ezequiel; Belleau, Pascal; Martel, Céline; Pelletier, Georges; Morissette, Jean; Labrie, Fernand; Durocher, Francine

    2009-03-01

    In rodents, the uterus of a mature female undergoes changes during the uterine cycle, under the control of steroid hormones. 5alpha-Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is recognized to play an important role in the regulation of androgen action in normal endometrium. Using microarray technology, a screening analysis of genes responding to DHT in the uterus of ovariectomized mice, has allowed us to highlight multiple genes of the ATM/Gadd45g pathway that are modulated following exposure to DHT. Two phases of regulation were identified. In the early phase, the expression of genes involved in the G2/M arrest is rapidly increased, followed by the repression of genes of the G1/S checkpoint, and by the induction of transcriptional regulators. Later, i.e. from 12 to 24 hr, genes involved in G2/M transition, cytoarchitectural and lipid-related genes are stimulated by DHT while immunity-related genes appear to be differentially regulated by the hormone. These results show that a physiological dose of DHT induces the transcription of genes promoting the cell cycle progression in mice. Profile determination of temporal uterine gene expression at the transcriptional level enables us to suggest that the DHT modulation of genes involved in ATM/Gadd45g signaling in an ATM- or p53-independent manner, could play an important role in the cyclical changes of uterine cells in the mouse uterus.

  10. Integration of Transcriptional and Posttranslational Regulation in a Glucose Signal Transduction Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong-Ho; Brachet, Valérie; Moriya, Hisao; Johnston, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Expression of the HXT genes encoding glucose transporters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by two interconnected glucose-signaling pathways: the Snf3/Rgt2-Rgt1 glucose induction pathway and the Snf1-Mig1 glucose repression pathway. The Snf3 and Rgt2 glucose sensors in the membrane generate a signal in the presence of glucose that inhibits the functions of Std1 and Mth1, paralogous proteins that regulate the function of the Rgt1 transcription factor, which binds to th...

  11. Thousands of novel transcripts identified in mouse cerebrum, testis, and ES cells by ribo-minus RNA sequencing method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanfei eLiu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies provide an excellent opportunity for the detection of less-abundance transcripts that may not be identifiable by previously-available techniques. Here, we report a discovery of thousands of novel transcripts (mostly non-coding RNAs that are expressed in mouse cerebrum, testis, and embryonic stem (ES cells, through in-depth analysis of rmRNA-seq data. These transcripts show significant associations with transcriptional start and elongation signals. At the upstream of these transcripts we observe significant enrichment of histone marks (histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, H3K4me3, RNAPII binding, and CAGE tags that marks transcriptional start sites. Along the length of these transcripts, we also observe enrichment of histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3. Moreover, these transcripts show strong purifying selection in their genomic loci, exonic sequences, and promoter regions, implying functional constraints on the evolution of these transcripts. These results define a collection of novel transcripts in the mouse genome and indicate the potential function in the mouse tissues or cells.

  12. Thousands of Novel Transcripts Identified in Mouse Cerebrum, Testis, and ES Cells Based on ribo-minus RNA Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanfei; Zhao, Yuhui; Cui, Peng; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Xin, Chengqi; Tan, Xinyu; Song, Shuhui; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian

    2011-01-01

    The high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies provide an excellent opportunity for the detection of less-abundance transcripts that may not be identifiable by previously available techniques. Here, we report a discovery of thousands of novel transcripts (mostly non-coding RNAs) that are expressed in mouse cerebrum, testis, and embryonic stem (ES) cells, through an in-depth analysis of rmRNA-seq data. These transcripts show significant associations with transcriptional start and elongation signals. At the upstream of these transcripts we observed significant enrichment of histone marks (histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, H3K4me3), RNAPII binding sites, and cap analysis of gene expression tags that mark transcriptional start sites. Along the length of these transcripts, we also observed enrichment of histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3). Moreover, these transcripts show strong purifying selection in their genomic loci, exonic sequences, and promoter regions, implying functional constraints on the evolution of these transcripts. These results define a collection of novel transcripts in the mouse genome and indicate their potential functions in the mouse tissues and cells. PMID:22303387

  13. Cell signaling underlying epileptic behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri eBozzi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a complex disease, characterized by the repeated occurrence of bursts of electrical activity (seizures in specific brain areas. The behavioral outcome of seizure events strongly depends on the brain regions that are affected by overactivity. Here we review the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the generation of seizures in epileptogenic areas. Pathways activated by modulatory neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin, involving the activation of extracellular-regulated kinases (ERKs and the induction of immediate early genes (IEGs will be first discussed in relation to the occurrence of acute seizure events. Activation of immediate early genes has been proposed to lead to long-term molecular and behavioral responses induced by acute seizures. We also review deleterious consequences of seizure activity, focusing on the contribution of apoptosis-associated signaling pathways to the progression of the disease. A deep understanding of signaling pathways involved in both acute and long-term responses to seizures continues to be crucial to unravel the origins of epileptic behaviors and ultimately identify novel therapeutic targets for the cure of epilepsy.

  14. The planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Diversin translocates to the nucleus to interact with the transcription factor AF9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haribaskar, Ramachandran; Puetz, Michael; Schupp, Birte; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Bietenbeck, Andreas; Walz, Gerd [Renal Division, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany); Schaefer, Tobias, E-mail: tobias.schaefer@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Renal Division, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    2009-09-11

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, a {beta}-catenin-independent branch of the Wnt signaling pathway, orients cells and their appendages with respect to the body axes. Diversin, the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila PCP protein Diego, acts as a molecular switch that blocks {beta}-catenin-dependent and promotes {beta}-catenin-independent Wnt signaling. We report now that Diversin, containing several nuclear localization signals, translocates to the nucleus, where it interacts with the transcription factor AF9. Both Diversin and AF9 block canonical Wnt signaling; however, this occurs independently of each other, and does not require nuclear Diversin. In contrast, AF9 strongly augments the Diversin-driven activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent gene expression in the nucleus, and this augmentation largely depends on the presence of nuclear Diversin. Thus, our findings reveal that components of the PCP cascade translocate to the nucleus to participate in transcriptional regulation and PCP signaling.

  15. Electronic control of gene expression and cell behaviour in Escherichia coli through redox signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirhart, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; McKay, Ryan; Ueda, Hana; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Pottash, Alex Eli; Zargar, Amin; Negrete, Alejandro; Shiloach, Joseph; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to interconvert information between electronic and ionic modalities has transformed our ability to record and actuate biological function. Synthetic biology offers the potential to expand communication `bandwidth' by using biomolecules and providing electrochemical access to redox-based cell signals and behaviours. While engineered cells have transmitted molecular information to electronic devices, the potential for bidirectional communication stands largely untapped. Here we present a simple electrogenetic device that uses redox biomolecules to carry electronic information to engineered bacterial cells in order to control transcription from a simple synthetic gene circuit. Electronic actuation of the native transcriptional regulator SoxR and transcription from the PsoxS promoter allows cell response that is quick, reversible and dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the imposed electronic signals. Further, induction of bacterial motility and population based cell-to-cell communication demonstrates the versatility of our approach and potential to drive intricate biological behaviours.

  16. [Suppression of WIFI transcript and protein in non-small cell lung carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobko, E V; Kalinichenko, S V; Shepelev, M V; Zborovskaia, I B; Allakhverdiev, A K; Zinov'eva, M V; Vinogradova, T V; Sverdlov, E D; Korobko, I V

    2007-01-01

    Changes in WIFI expression, an extracellular inhibitor of Wnt pathway, in non-small cell lung carcinomas were analyzed. Frequent (67% cases) suppression of WIFI transcript in non-small cell lung carcinomas were found. Our results, together with previously published data, suggest that inhibition of WIFI expression often occurs in squamous cell carcinomas and is less typical of adenocarcinomas. It was also found that a decrease in the WIFI transcript in tumors is parallel to concomitant suppression of the WIFI protein level. Our results provide further evidence that the WIFI suppression is a frequent event in the lung carcinogenesis, which might lead to disregulation of Wnt signaling pathway and contribute to tumor progression.

  17. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans which can participate in diverse cell surface interactions, involving extracellular matrix macromolecules, growth factors, protease inhibitors, and even viral entry. Currently, all extracellular interactions are believed to be mediated by distinct...... structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...

  18. Ecdysone Receptor (EcR Is Involved in the Transcription of Cell Cycle Genes in the Silkworm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenliang Qian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available EcR (ecdysone receptor-mediated ecdysone signaling pathway contributes to regulate the transcription of genes involved in various processes during insect development. In this work, we detected the expression of EcR gene in silkworm ovary-derived BmN4 cells and found that EcR RNAi result in an alteration of cell shape, indicating that EcR may orchestrate cell cycle progression. EcR RNAi and EcR overexpression analysis revealed that in the cultured BmN4 cells, EcR respectively promoted and suppressed the transcription of E2F-1 and CycE, two genes controlling cell cycle progression. Further examination demonstrated that ecdysone application in BmN4 cells not only changed the transcription of these two cell cycle genes like that under EcR overexpression, but also induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. In vivo analysis confirmed that E2F-1 expression was elevated in silk gland of silkworm larvae after ecdysone application, which is same as its response to ecdysone in BmN4 cells. However, ecdysone also promotes CycE transcription in silk gland, and this is converse with the observation in BmN4 cells. These results provide new insights into understanding the roles of EcR-mediated ecdysone signaling in the regulation of cell cycle.

  19. Navigating the transcriptional roadmap regulating plant secondary cell wall deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Grant Hussey

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The current status of lignocellulosic biomass as an invaluable resource in industry, agriculture and health has spurred increased interest in understanding the transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall (SCW biosynthesis. The last decade of research has revealed an extensive network of NAC, MYB and other families of transcription factors regulating Arabidopsis SCW biosynthesis, and numerous studies have explored SCW-related transcription factors in other dicots and monocots. Whilst the general structure of the Arabidopsis network has been a topic of several reviews, they have not comprehensively represented the detailed protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions described in the literature, and an understanding of network dynamics and functionality has not yet been achieved for SCW formation. Furthermore the methodologies employed in studies of SCW transcriptional regulation have not received much attention, especially in the case of non-model organisms. In this review, we have reconstructed the most exhaustive literature-based network representations to date of SCW transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis. We include a manipulable Cytoscape representation of the Arabidopsis SCW transcriptional network to aid in future studies, along with a list of supporting literature for each documented interaction. Amongst other topics, we discuss the various components of the network, its evolutionary conservation in plants, putative modules and dynamic mechanisms that may influence network function, and the approaches that have been employed in network inference. Future research should aim to better understand network function and its response to dynamic perturbations, whilst the development and application of genome-wide approaches such as ChIP-seq and systems genetics are in progress for the study of SCW transcriptional regulation in non-model organisms.

  20. The transcriptional targets of mutant FOXL2 in granulosa cell tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseanne Rosario

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite their distinct biology, granulosa cell tumours (GCTs are treated the same as other ovarian tumours. Intriguingly, a recurring somatic mutation in the transcription factor Forkhead Box L2 (FOXL2 402C>G has been found in nearly all GCTs examined. This investigation aims to identify the pathogenicity of mutant FOXL2 by studying its altered transcriptional targets. METHODS: The expression of mutant FOXL2 was reduced in the GCT cell line KGN, and wildtype and mutant FOXL2 were overexpressed in the GCT cell line COV434. Total RNA was hybridised to Affymetrix U133 Plus 2 microarrays. Comparisons were made between the transcriptomes of control cells and cells altered by FOXL2 knockdown and overexpression, to detect potential transcriptional targets of mutant FOXL2. RESULTS: The overexpression of wildtype and mutant FOXL2 in COV434, and the silencing of mutant FOXL2 expression in KGN, has shown that mutant FOXL2 is able to differentially regulate the expression of many genes, including two well known FOXL2 targets, StAR and CYP19A. We have shown that many of the genes regulated by mutant FOXL2 are clustered into functional annotations of cell death, proliferation, and tumourigenesis. Furthermore, TGF-β signalling was found to be enriched when using the gene annotation tools GATHER and GeneSetDB. This enrichment was still significant after performing a robust permutation analysis. CONCLUSION: Given that many of the transcriptional targets of mutant FOXL2 are known TGF-β signalling genes, we suggest that deregulation of this key antiproliferative pathway is one way mutant FOXL2 contributes to the pathogenesis of adult-type GCTs. We believe this pathway should be a target for future therapeutic interventions, if outcomes for women with GCTs are to improve.

  1. Altered calcium signaling in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Yapa, Kunsala T D S; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-10-01

    It is the nature of the calcium signal, as determined by the coordinated activity of a suite of calcium channels, pumps, exchangers and binding proteins that ultimately guides a cell's fate. Deregulation of the calcium signal is often deleterious and has been linked to each of the 'cancer hallmarks'. Despite this, we do not yet have a full understanding of the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with cancer. Such an understanding could aid in guiding the development of therapies specifically targeting altered calcium signaling in cancer cells during tumorigenic progression. Findings from some of the studies that have assessed the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with tumorigenesis and/or processes important in invasion and metastasis are presented in this review. The potential of new methodologies is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  2. Fidelity in planar cell polarity signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dali; Yang, Chung-hui; McNeill, Helen; Simon, Michael A; Axelrod, Jeffrey D

    2003-01-30

    The polarity of Drosophila wing hairs displays remarkable fidelity. Each of the approximately 30,000 wing epithelial cells constructs an actin-rich prehair that protrudes from its distal vertex and points distally. The distal location and orientation of the hairs is virtually error free, thus forming a nearly perfect parallel array. This process is controlled by the planar cell polarity signalling pathway. Here we show that interaction between two tiers of the planar cell polarity signalling mechanism results in the observed high fidelity. The first tier, mediated by the cadherin Fat, dictates global orientation by transducing a directional signal to individual cells. The second tier, orchestrated by the 7-pass transmembrane receptor Frizzled, aligns each cell's polarity with that of its neighbours through the action of an intercellular feedback loop, enabling polarity to propagate from cell to cell. We show that all cells need not respond correctly to the presumably subtle signal transmitted by Fat. Subsequent action of the Frizzled feedback loop is sufficient to align all the cells cooperatively. This economical system is therefore highly robust, and produces virtually error-free arrays.

  3. Maternal Wnt/β-catenin signaling coactivates transcription through NF-κB binding sites during Xenopus axis formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Armstrong

    Full Text Available Maternal Wnt/β-Catenin signaling establishes a program of dorsal-specific gene expression required for axial patterning in Xenopus. We previously reported that a subset of dorsally expressed genes depends not only on Wnt/β-Catenin stimulation, but also on a MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor/IL1-receptor (TLR/IL1-R signaling pathway. Here we show that these two signal transduction cascades converge in the nucleus to coactivate gene transcription in blastulae through a direct interaction between β-Catenin and NF-κB proteins. A transdominant inhibitor of NF-κB, ΔNIκBα, phenocopies loss of MyD88 protein function, implicating Rel/NF-κB proteins as selective activators of dorsal-specific gene expression. Sensitive axis formation assays in the embryo demonstrate that dorsalization by Wnt/β-Catenin requires NF-κB protein activity, and vice versa. Xenopus nodal-related 3 (Xnr3 is one of the genes with dual β-Catenin/NF-κB input, and a proximal NF-κB consensus site contributes to the regional activity of its promoter. We demonstrate in vitro binding of Xenopus β-Catenin to several XRel proteins. This interaction is observed in vivo upon Wnt-stimulation. Finally, we show that a synthetic luciferase reporter gene responds to both endogenous and exogenous β-Catenin levels in an NF-κB motif dependent manner. These results suggest that β-Catenin acts as a transcriptional co-activator of NF-κB-dependent transcription in frog primary embryonic cells.

  4. Integration of G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling Pathways for Activation of a Transcription Factor (EGR-3)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehai Tan; Pam Sanders; Jack Bolado Jr.; Mike Whitney

    2003-01-01

    We recently reported the use of a gene-trapping approach to isolate cell clones in which a reporter gene had integrated into genes modulated by T-cell activation. We have now tested a panel of clones from that report and identified the one that responds to a variety of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The βlactamase tagged EGR-3 Jurkat cell was used to dissect specific GPCR signaling in vivo. Three GPCRs were studied, including the chemokine receptor CXCR4 (Gicoupled) that was endogenously expressed, the platelet activation factor (PAF) receptor (Gq-coupled), andβ2 adrenergic receptor (Gs-coupled) that was both stably transfected. Agonists for each receptor activated transcription of theβ-lactamase tagged EGR-3 gene. Induction of EGR-3 through CXCR4 was blocked by pertussis toxin and PD58059, a specific inhibitor of MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase). Neither of these inhibitors blocked isoproterenol or PAF-mediated activation of EGR-3. Conversely, β2- and PAF-mediated EGR-3 activation was blocked by the p38, specific inhibitor SB580. In addition, bothβ2- and PAF-mediated EGR-3 activation could be synergistically activated by CXCR4 activation. This combined result indicates that EGR-3 can be activated through distinct signal transduction pathways by different GPCRs and that signals can be integrated and amplified to efficiently tune the level of activation.

  5. B Cell Autonomous TLR Signaling and Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut; Rawlings, David J

    2009-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune diseases and the recognition of importance of B cells in these disorders has grown dramatically in association with the remarkable success of B-cell depletion as a treatment for autoimmunity. The precise mechanisms that promote alterations in B cell tolerance remain incompletely defined. There is increasing evidence, however, that TLRs play a major role in these events. Stimulation of B cells via the TLR pathway not only leads to an increase in antibody production but also promotes additional changes including cytokine production and upregulation of activation markers increasing the effectiveness of B cells as APCs. Understanding the role of TLRs in systemic autoimmunity will not only provide insight into the disease pathogenesis but may also lead to the development of novel therapies. This article gives an overview of TLR signaling in B cells and the possible involvement of such signals in autoimmune diseases. PMID:18295736

  6. Mechanistic differences in the transcriptional interpretation of local and long-range Shh morphogen signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterveen, Tony; Kurdija, Sanja; Alekseenko, Zhanna; Uhde, Christopher W; Bergsland, Maria; Sandberg, Magnus; Andersson, Elisabet; Dias, José M; Muhr, Jonas; Ericson, Johan

    2012-11-13

    Morphogens orchestrate tissue patterning in a concentration-dependent fashion during vertebrate embryogenesis, yet little is known of how positional information provided by such signals is translated into discrete transcriptional outputs. Here we have identified and characterized cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) of genes operating downstream of graded Shh signaling and bifunctional Gli proteins in neural patterning. Unexpectedly, we find that Gli activators have a noninstructive role in long-range patterning and cooperate with SoxB1 proteins to facilitate a largely concentration-independent mode of gene activation. Instead, the opposing Gli-repressor gradient is interpreted at transcriptional levels, and, together with CRM-specific repressive input of homeodomain proteins, comprises a repressive network that translates graded Shh signaling into regional gene expression patterns. Moreover, local and long-range interpretation of Shh signaling differs with respect to CRM context sensitivity and Gli-activator dependence, and we propose that these differences provide insight into how morphogen function may have mechanistically evolved from an initially binary inductive event.

  7. Cell cycle and cell signal transduction in marine phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingwen; JIAO Nianzhi; CAI Huinong

    2006-01-01

    As unicellular phytoplankton, the growth of a marine phytoplankton population results directly from the completion of a cell cycle, therefore, cell-environment communication is an important way which involves signal transduction pathways to regulate cell cycle progression and contribute to growth, metabolism and primary production and respond to their surrounding environment in marine phytoplankton. Cyclin-CDK and CaM/Ca2+ are essentially key regulators in control of cell cycle and signal transduction pathway, which has important values on both basic research and applied biotechnology. This paper reviews progress made in this research field, which involves the identification and characterization of cyclins and cell signal transduction system, cell cycle control mechanisms in marine phytoplankton cells, cell cycle proteins as a marker of a terminal event to estimate the growth rate of phytoplankton at the species level, cell cycle-dependent toxin production of toxic algae and cell cycle progression regulated by environmental factors.

  8. Transcription of ftsZ oscillates during the cell cycle of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, T; Sánchez, M; Palacios, P; Aldea, M; Vicente, M

    1993-10-01

    The FtsZ protein is a key element controlling cell division in Escherichia coli. A powerful transcription titration assay was used to quantify the ftsZ mRNA present in synchronously dividing cells. The ftsZ mRNA levels oscillate during the cell cycle reaching a maximum at about the time DNA replication initiates. This cell cycle dependency is specifically due to the two proximal ftsZ promoters. A strain was constructed in which expression of ftsZ could be modulated by an exogenous inducer. In this strain cell size and cell division frequency were sensitive to the cellular FtsZ contents, demonstrating the rate-limiting role of this protein in cell division. Transcriptional activity of the ftsZ promoters was found to be independent of DnaA, indicating that DNA replication and cell division may be independently controlled at the time when new rounds of DNA replication are initiated. This suggests a parallelism between the prokaryotic cell cycle signals and the START point of eukaryotic cell cycles.

  9. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  10. Making memories of stressful events: a journey along epigenetic, gene transcription and signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes M.H.M. eReul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong psychologically stressful events are known to have a long-lasting impact on behavior. The consolidation of such, largely adaptive, behavioral responses to stressful events involves changes in gene expression in limbic brain regions such as the hippocampus and amygdala. The underlying molecular mechanisms however were until recently unresolved. More than a decade ago we started to investigate the role of these hormones in signaling and epigenetic mechanisms participating in the effects of stress on gene transcription in hippocampal neurons. We discovered a novel, rapid non-genomic mechanism in which glucocorticoids via glucocorticoid receptors (GRs facilitate signaling of the ERK MAPK signaling pathway to the downstream nuclear kinases MSK1 and Elk-1 in dentate gyrus (DG granule neurons. Activation of this signaling pathway results in serine10 (S10 phosphorylation and lysine14 (K14 acetylation at histone H3 (H3S10p-K14ac, leading to the induction of the immediate early genes c-Fos and Egr-1. In addition, we found a role of the DNA methylation status of gene promoters. A series of studies showed that these molecular mechanisms play a critical role in the long-lasting consolidation of behavioral responses in the forced swim test and Morris water maze. Furthermore, an important role of GABA was found in controlling the epigenetic and gene transcriptional responses to psychological stress. Thus, psychologically stressful events evoke a long-term impact on behavior through changes in hippocampal function brought about by distinct glutamatergic and glucocorticoid-driven changes in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription which are modulated by (local GABAergic interneurons and limbic afferent inputs. These epigenetic processes may play an important role in the etiology of stress-related mental disorders such as major depressive and anxiety disorders like PTSD.

  11. Constrained transcription factor spacing is prevalent and important for transcriptional control of mouse blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Felicia S L; Schütte, Judith; Ruau, David; Diamanti, Evangelia; Hannah, Rebecca; Kinston, Sarah J; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-12-16

    Combinatorial transcription factor (TF) binding is essential for cell-type-specific gene regulation. However, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms of TF interactions, including to what extent constrained spacing and orientation of interacting TFs are critical for regulatory element activity. To examine the relative prevalence of the 'enhanceosome' versus the 'TF collective' model of combinatorial TF binding, a comprehensive analysis of TF binding site sequences in large scale datasets is necessary. We developed a motif-pair discovery pipeline to identify motif co-occurrences with preferential distance(s) between motifs in TF-bound regions. Utilizing a compendium of 289 mouse haematopoietic TF ChIP-seq datasets, we demonstrate that haematopoietic-related motif-pairs commonly occur with highly conserved constrained spacing and orientation between motifs. Furthermore, motif clustering revealed specific associations for both heterotypic and homotypic motif-pairs with particular haematopoietic cell types. We also showed that disrupting the spacing between motif-pairs significantly affects transcriptional activity in a well-known motif-pair-E-box and GATA, and in two previously unknown motif-pairs with constrained spacing-Ets and Homeobox as well as Ets and E-box. In this study, we provide evidence for widespread sequence-specific TF pair interaction with DNA that conforms to the 'enhanceosome' model, and furthermore identify associations between specific haematopoietic cell-types and motif-pairs. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Role of CSL-dependent and independent Notch signaling pathways in cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chong; Xing, Rui; Liu, Jing; Xing, Feiyue

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a normally biological phenomenon in various organisms, involving complexly molecular mechanisms with a series of signaling processes. Notch signaling is found evolutionarily conserved in many species, playing a critical role in embryonic development, normal tissue homeostasis, angiogenesis and immunoregulation. The focus of this review is on currently novel advances about roles of CSL-dependent and independent Notch signaling pathways in cell apoptosis. The CSL can bind Notch intracellular domain (NIC) to act as a switch in mediating transcriptional activation or inactivation of the Notch signaling pathway downstream genes in the nucleus. It shows that CSL-dependent signaling regulates the cell apoptosis through Hes-1-PTEN-AKT-mTOR signaling, but rather the CSL-independent signaling mediates the cell apoptosis possibly via NIC-mTORC2-AKT-mTOR signaling, providing a new insight into apoptotic mechanisms.

  13. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Is Critical for Human Endometrial Stromal Cell Decidualization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna Kommagani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone, via the progesterone receptor (PGR, is essential for endometrial stromal cell decidualization, a cellular transformation event in which stromal fibroblasts differentiate into decidual cells. Uterine decidualization supports embryo implantation and placentation as well as subsequent events, which together ensure a successful pregnancy. Accordingly, impaired decidualization results not only in implantation failure or early fetal miscarriage, but also may lead to potential adverse outcomes in all three pregnancy trimesters. Transcriptional reprogramming on a genome-wide scale underlies progesterone dependent decidualization of the human endometrial stromal cell (hESC. However, identification of the functionally essential signals encoded by these global transcriptional changes remains incomplete. Importantly, this knowledge-gap undercuts future efforts to improve diagnosis and treatment of implantation failure based on a dysfunctional endometrium. By integrating genome-wide datasets derived from decidualization of hESCs in culture, we reveal that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF transcription factor is rapidly induced by progesterone and that this induction is indispensable for progesterone-dependent decidualization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq identified at least ten progesterone response elements within the PLZF gene, indicating that PLZF may act as a direct target of PGR signaling. The spatiotemporal expression profile for PLZF in both the human and mouse endometrium offers further support for stromal PLZF as a mediator of the progesterone decidual signal. To identify functional targets of PLZF, integration of PLZF ChIP-Seq and RNA Pol II RNA-Seq datasets revealed that the early growth response 1 (EGR1 transcription factor is a PLZF target for which its level of expression must be reduced to enable progesterone dependent hESC decidualization. Apart from furnishing

  14. Discrete redox signaling pathways regulate photosynthetic light-harvesting and chloroplast gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Allen

    Full Text Available In photosynthesis in chloroplasts, two related regulatory processes balance the actions of photosystems I and II. These processes are short-term, post-translational redistribution of light-harvesting capacity, and long-term adjustment of photosystem stoichiometry initiated by control of chloroplast DNA transcription. Both responses are initiated by changes in the redox state of the electron carrier, plastoquinone, which connects the two photosystems. Chloroplast Sensor Kinase (CSK is a regulator of transcription of chloroplast genes for reaction centres of the two photosystems, and a sensor of plastoquinone redox state. We asked whether CSK is also involved in regulation of absorbed light energy distribution by phosphorylation of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II. Chloroplast thylakoid membranes isolated from a CSK T-DNA insertion mutant and from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit similar light- and redox-induced (32P-labelling of LHC II and changes in 77 K chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra, while room-temperature chlorophyll fluorescence emission transients from Arabidopsis leaves are perturbed by inactivation of CSK. The results indicate indirect, pleiotropic effects of reaction centre gene transcription on regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting in vivo. A single, direct redox signal is transmitted separately to discrete transcriptional and post-translational branches of an integrated cytoplasmic regulatory system.

  15. The transcription factor MEF2C mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Juan Pablo; Collao, Andres; Chiong, Mario; Maldonado, Carola; Adasme, Tatiana; Carrasco, Loreto; Ocaranza, Paula; Bravo, Roberto; Gonzalez, Leticia; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo [Centro FONDAP Estudios Moleculares de la Celula, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas y Farmaceuticas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile); Hidalgo, Cecilia [Centro FONDAP Estudios Moleculares de la Celula, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile); Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile); Lavandero, Sergio, E-mail: slavander@uchile.cl [Centro FONDAP Estudios Moleculares de la Celula, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas y Farmaceuticas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile); Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile)

    2009-10-09

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays an important role in cardiovascular development and is a key transcription factor for cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe MEF2C regulation by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its role in IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We found that IGF-1 addition to cultured rat cardiomyocytes activated MEF2C, as evidenced by its increased nuclear localization and DNA binding activity. IGF-1 stimulated MEF2 dependent-gene transcription in a time-dependent manner, as indicated by increased MEF2 promoter-driven reporter gene activity; IGF-1 also induced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, while an inhibitor of p38-MAPK decreased both effects. Additionally, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcineurin prevented IGF-1-induced MEF2 transcriptional activity. Via MEF2C-dependent signaling, IGF-1 also stimulated transcription of atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal {alpha}-actin but not of fos-lux reporter genes. These novel data suggest that MEF2C activation by IGF-1 mediates the pro-hypertrophic effects of IGF-1 on cardiac gene expression.

  16. Prediction and testing of novel transcriptional networks regulating embryonic stem cell self-renewal and commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Emily; Ohishi, Minako; Davey, Ryan E; Zhang, Wen; Cassar, Paul A; Tanaka, Tetsuya S; Der, Sandy D; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R; Zandstra, Peter W; Stanford, William L

    2007-06-07

    Stem cell fate is governed by the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic positive and negative signals upon inherent transcriptional networks. To identify novel embryonic stem cell (ESC) regulators and assemble transcriptional networks controlling ESC fate, we performed temporal expression microarray analyses of ESCs after the initiation of commitment and integrated these data with known genome-wide transcription factor binding. Effects of forced under- or overexpression of predicted novel regulators, defined as differentially expressed genes with potential binding sites for known regulators of pluripotency, demonstrated greater than 90% correspondence with predicted function, as assessed by functional and high-content assays of self-renewal. We next assembled 43 theoretical transcriptional networks in ESCs, 82% (23 out of 28 tested) of which were supported by analysis of genome-wide expression in Oct4 knockdown cells. By using this integrative approach, we have formulated novel networks describing gene repression of key developmental regulators in undifferentiated ESCs and successfully predicted the outcomes of genetic manipulation of these networks.

  17. ROS-mediated redox signaling during cell differentiation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Romy; Schippers, Jos H M

    2015-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have emerged in recent years as important regulators of cell division and differentiation. The cellular redox state has a major impact on cell fate and multicellular organism development. However, the exact molecular mechanisms through which ROS manifest their regulation over cellular development are only starting to be understood in plants. ROS levels are constantly monitored and any change in the redox pool is rapidly sensed and responded upon. Different types of ROS cause specific oxidative modifications, providing the basic characteristics of a signaling molecule. Here we provide an overview of ROS sensors and signaling cascades that regulate transcriptional responses in plants to guide cellular differentiation and organ development. Although several redox sensors and cascades have been identified, they represent only a first glimpse on the impact that redox signaling has on plant development and growth. We provide an initial evaluation of ROS signaling cascades involved in cell differentiation in plants and identify potential avenues for future studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Redox regulation of differentiation and de-differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ionic mechanisms in pancreatic β cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao-Nian; Shi, Yue; Yang, Guang; Li, Yuxin; Yu, Jia; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2014-11-01

    The function and survival of pancreatic β cells critically rely on complex electrical signaling systems composed of a series of ionic events, namely fluxes of K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-) across the β cell membranes. These electrical signaling systems not only sense events occurring in the extracellular space and intracellular milieu of pancreatic islet cells, but also control different β cell activities, most notably glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Three major ion fluxes including K(+) efflux through ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels, the voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx and K(+) efflux through voltage-gated K(+) (KV) channels operate in the β cell. These ion fluxes set the resting membrane potential and the shape, rate and pattern of firing of action potentials under different metabolic conditions. The KATP channel-mediated K(+) efflux determines the resting membrane potential and keeps the excitability of the β cell at low levels. Ca(2+) influx through CaV1 channels, a major type of β cell CaV channels, causes the upstroke or depolarization phase of the action potential and regulates a wide range of β cell functions including the most elementary β cell function, insulin secretion. K(+) efflux mediated by KV2.1 delayed rectifier K(+) channels, a predominant form of β cell KV channels, brings about the downstroke or repolarization phase of the action potential, which acts as a brake for insulin secretion owing to shutting down the CaV channel-mediated Ca(2+) entry. These three ion channel-mediated ion fluxes are the most important ionic events in β cell signaling. This review concisely discusses various ionic mechanisms in β cell signaling and highlights KATP channel-, CaV1 channel- and KV2.1 channel-mediated ion fluxes.

  19. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  20. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3' untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF-myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells.

  1. Function and regulation of transcription factors involved in root apical meristem and stem cell maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Corinna Drisch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant roots are essential for overall plant development, growth and performance by providing anchorage in the soil and uptake of nutrients and water. The primary root of higher plants derives from a group of pluripotent, mitotically active stem cells residing in the root apical meristem (RAM which provides the basis for growth, development and regeneration of the root. The stem cells in the Arabidopsis thaliana RAM are surrounding the quiescent center (QC, which consists of a group of rarely dividing cells. The QC maintains the stem cells in a non-cell-autonomous manner and prevents them from differentiation. The necessary dynamic but also tight regulation of the transition from stem cell fate to differentiation most likely requires complex regulatory mechanisms to integrate external and internal cues. Transcription factors play a central role in root development and are regulated by phytohormones, small signaling molecules and miRNAs. In this review we give a comprehensive overview about the function and regulation of specific transcription factors controlling stem cell fate and root apical meristem maintenance and discuss the possibility of TF complex formation, subcellular translocations and cell-to-cell movement functioning as another level of regulation.

  2. The cytoskeletal protein Zyxin inhibits Shh signaling during the CNS patterning in Xenopus laevis through interaction with the transcription factor Gli1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynova, Natalia Y; Ermolina, Ludmila V; Ermakova, Galina V; Eroshkin, Fedor M; Gyoeva, Fatima K; Baturina, Natalia S; Zaraisky, Andrey G

    2013-08-01

    Zyxin is a cytoskeletal protein that controls cell movements by regulating actin filaments assembly, but it can also modulate gene expression owing to its interactions with the proteins involved in signaling cascades. Therefore, identification of proteins that interact with Zyxin in embryonic cells is a promising way to unravel mechanisms responsible for coupling of two major components of embryogenesis: morphogenetic movements and cell differentiation. Now we show that in Xenopus laevis embryos Zyxin can bind to and suppress activity of the primary effector of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling cascade, the transcription factor Gli1. By using loss- and gain-of-function approaches, we demonstrate that Zyxin is essential for reduction of Shh signaling within the dorsal part of the neural tube of X. laevis embryo. Thus, our finding discloses a novel function of Zyxin in fine tuning of the central neural system patterning which is based on the ventral-to-dorsal gradient of Shh signaling.

  3. The Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling pathway contributes to the integrity of tight junctions in brain endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Wnt morphogens released by neural precursor cells were recently reported to control blood–brain barrier (BBB) formation during development. Indeed, in mouse brain endothelial cells, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, also known as the canonical Wnt pathway, was shown to stabilize endothelial tight junctions (TJs) through transcriptional regulation of the expression of TJ proteins. Because Wnt proteins activate several distinct β-catenin-dependent and independent signaling path...

  4. Genomic dissection of conserved transcriptional regulation in intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, J. Gray; Weiser, Matthew; Cocchiaro, Jordan L.; Kingsley, David M.; Furey, Terrence S.; Sheikh, Shehzad Z.; Rawls, John F.

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium serves critical physiologic functions that are shared among all vertebrates. However, it is unknown how the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms underlying these functions have changed over the course of vertebrate evolution. We generated genome-wide mRNA and accessible chromatin data from adult intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) in zebrafish, stickleback, mouse, and human species to determine if conserved IEC functions are achieved through common transcriptional regulation. We found evidence for substantial common regulation and conservation of gene expression regionally along the length of the intestine from fish to mammals and identified a core set of genes comprising a vertebrate IEC signature. We also identified transcriptional start sites and other putative regulatory regions that are differentially accessible in IECs in all 4 species. Although these sites rarely showed sequence conservation from fish to mammals, surprisingly, they drove highly conserved IEC expression in a zebrafish reporter assay. Common putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) found at these sites in multiple species indicate that sequence conservation alone is insufficient to identify much of the functionally conserved IEC regulatory information. Among the rare, highly sequence-conserved, IEC-specific regulatory regions, we discovered an ancient enhancer upstream from her6/HES1 that is active in a distinct population of Notch-positive cells in the intestinal epithelium. Together, these results show how combining accessible chromatin and mRNA datasets with TFBS prediction and in vivo reporter assays can reveal tissue-specific regulatory information conserved across 420 million years of vertebrate evolution. We define an IEC transcriptional regulatory network that is shared between fish and mammals and establish an experimental platform for studying how evolutionarily distilled regulatory information commonly controls IEC development and physiology. PMID

  5. E2F1 transcription factor and its impact on growth factor and cytokine signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertosun, Mustafa Gokhan; Hapil, Fatma Zehra; Osman Nidai, Ozes

    2016-10-01

    E2F1 is a transcription factor involved in cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. The transactivation capacity of E2F1 is regulated by pRb. In its hypophosphorylated form, pRb binds and inactivates DNA binding and transactivating functions of E2F1. The growth factor stimulation of cells leads to activation of CDKs (cyclin dependent kinases), which in turn phosphorylate Rb and hyperphosphorylated Rb is released from E2F1 or E2F1/DP complex, and free E2F1 can induce transcription of several genes involved in cell cycle entry, induction or inhibition of apoptosis. Thus, growth factors and cytokines generally utilize E2F1 to direct cells to either fate. Furthermore, E2F1 regulates expressions of various cytokines and growth factor receptors, establishing positive or negative feedback mechanisms. This review focuses on the relationship between E2F1 transcription factor and cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, IL-6, TGF-beta, G-CSF, LIF), growth factors (EGF, KGF, VEGF, IGF, FGF, PDGF, HGF, NGF), and interferons (IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-γ).

  6. [Immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells and regulation of their transcription].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchenko, A G; Urakov, D N; Luchina, N N; Deev, S M; Polianovskiĭ, O L

    1990-01-01

    The hybridoma genomes contain polyploid sets of immunoglobulin genes. We have shown, that the hybridoma PTF-02 genome contains three genes of heavy chains and two genes of light chains. The genes responsible for antibody synthesis were cloned and their structure were determined. Investigation of the kappa gene transcription and its fragments which contain regulatory sequences revealed a nuclear factor. The latter interacts with the octanucleotide localized at the promoter region of the kappa gene. The purified factor activates the transcription of the kappa gene in a heterologous cell-free system. Together with the tissue-specific factor there is also an universal factor interacting with the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interact with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interacting with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. As a result, there is a family of factors which interact with ATTTGCAT sequence. One major factor (m.w. 60 +/- 2 kDa) is an obligatory component for the initiation of immunoglobulin genes transcription.

  7. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4+ T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4+ T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4+ T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:26184775

  8. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer.

  9. Differential T Cell Cytokine Receptivity and Not Signal Quality Distinguishes IL-6 and IL-10 Signaling during Th17 Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lindsay L; Alli, Rajshekhar; Li, Bofeng; Geiger, Terrence L

    2016-04-01

    How a large number of cytokines differentially signal through a small number of signal transduction pathways is not well resolved. This is particularly true for IL-6 and IL-10, which act primarily through STAT3 yet induce dissimilar transcriptional programs leading alternatively to pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. Kinetic differences in signaling, sustained to IL-10 and transient to IL-6, are critical to this in macrophages. T cells are also key targets of IL-6 and IL-10, yet how differential signaling in these cells leads to divergent cellular fates is unclear. We show that, unlike for macrophages, signal duration cannot explain the distinct effects of these cytokines in T cells. Rather, naive, activated, activated-rested, and memory CD4(+) T cells differentially express IL-6 and IL-10 receptors in an activation state-dependent manner, and this impacts downstream cytokine effects. We show a dominant role for STAT3 in IL-6-mediated Th17 subset maturation. IL-10 cannot support Th17 differentiation because of insufficient cytokine receptivity rather than signal quality. Enforced expression of IL-10Rα on naive T cells permits an IL-10-generated STAT3 signal equivalent to that of IL-6 and equally capable of promoting Th17 formation. Similarly, naive T cell IL-10Rα expression also allows IL-10 to mimic the effects of IL-6 on both Th1/Th2 skewing and Tfh cell differentiation. Our results demonstrate a key role for the regulation of receptor expression rather than signal quality or duration in differentiating the functional outcomes of IL-6 and IL-10 signaling, and identify distinct signaling properties of these cytokines in T cells compared with myeloid cells.

  10. Loss of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling during elevated activity causes vulnerability in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Sachiko; Kim, Eunyoung; Lin, Lin; Hoffman, Dax A; McKay, Ronald D

    2012-10-31

    Chronically altered levels of network activity lead to changes in the morphology and functions of neurons. However, little is known of how changes in neuronal activity alter the intracellular signaling pathways mediating neuronal survival. Here, we use primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons to show that elevated neuronal activity impairs phosphorylation of the serine/threonine kinase, Erk1/2, and the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) by phosphorylation of serine 727. Chronically stimulated neurons go through apoptosis when they fail to activate another serine/threonine kinase, Akt. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments show that STAT3 plays the key role directly downstream from Erk1/2 as the alternative survival pathway. Elevated neuronal activity resulted in increased expression of a tumor suppressor, p53, and its target gene, Bax. These changes are observed in Kv4.2 knock-out mouse hippocampal neurons, which are also sensitive to the blockade of TrkB signaling, confirming that the alteration occurs in vivo. Thus, this study provides new insight into a mechanism by which chronic elevation of activity may cause neurodegeneration.

  11. Divergence and transcriptional analysis of the division cell wall (dcw) gene cluster in Neisseria spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Lori A S; Shafer, William M; Saunders, Nigel J

    2003-01-01

    Three of the 18 open reading frames in the division and cell wall synthesis cluster of the pathogenic Neisseria spp. are not present in the clusters of other bacterial species. The region containing two of these, dcaB and dcaC, displays interstrain and interspecies variability uncharacteristic of such clusters. 3' of dcaB is a Correia repeat enclosed element (CREE), which is only present in some strains. It has been suggested that this CREE is a transcriptional terminator, although we demonstrate otherwise. A gearbox-like promoter within this CREE is active in Escherichia coli but not in Neisseria meningitidis. There is an active promoter 5' of dcaC, although its sequence is not conserved. The presence of similarly located promoters has not been demonstrated in other species. In Neisseria lactamica, this promoter involves another dcw-associated CREE, the first demonstration of active promoter generation at the 5' end of this common intergenic, apparently mobile, element. Upstream of this promoter is an inverted pair of neisserial uptake signal sequences, which are commonly considered to be transcriptional terminators. It has been proposed to terminate transcription in this location, although we have demonstrated transcript extending through this uptake signal sequence. dcaC contains a 108 bp tandem repeat, which is present in different copy numbers in the neisserial strains examined. This investigation reveals extensive sequence variation, disputes the presence of transcriptional terminators and identifies active internal promoters in this normally highly conserved cluster of essential genes, and addresses the transcriptional activity of two common neisserial intergenic components.

  12. A transcriptional signaling pathway in the IFN system mediated by 2′-5′-oligoadenylate activation of RNase L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malathi, Krishnamurthy; Paranjape, Jayashree M.; Bulanova, Elena; Shim, Minsub; Guenther-Johnson, Jeanna M.; Faber, Pieter W.; Eling, Thomas E.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    Virus replication in higher vertebrates is restrained by IFNs that cause cells to transcribe genes encoding antiviral proteins, such as 2′-5′ oligoadenylate synthetases. 2′-5′ oligoadenylate synthetase is stimulated by dsRNA to produce 5′-phosphorylated, 2′-5′-linked oligoadenylates (2-5A), whose function is to activate RNase L. Although RNase L is required for a complete IFN antiviral response and mutations in the RNase L gene (RNASEL or HPC1) increase prostate cancer rates, it is unknown how 2-5A affects these biological endpoints through its receptor, RNase L. Presently, we show that 2-5A activation of RNase L produces a remarkable stimulation of transcription (≥20-fold) for genes that suppress virus replication and prostate cancer. Unexpectedly, exposure of DU145 prostate cancer cells to physiologic levels of 2-5A (0.1 μM) induced approximately twice as many RNA species as it down-regulated. Among the 2-5A-induced genes are several IFN-stimulated genes, including IFN-inducible transcript 1/P56, IFN-inducible transcript 2/P54, IL-8, and IFN-stimulated gene 15. 2-5A also potently elevated RNA for macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-activated gene-1, a TGF-β superfamily member implicated as an apoptotic suppressor of prostate cancer. Transcriptional signaling to the macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-activated gene-1 promoter by 2-5A was deficient in HeLa cells expressing a nuclease-dead mutant of RNase L and was dependent on the mitogen-activated protein kinases c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, both of which were activated in response to 2-5A treatments. Because 2-5A and RNase L participate in defenses against viral infections and prostate cancer, our findings have implications for basic cellular mechanisms that control major pathogenic processes. PMID:16203993

  13. A transcriptional signaling pathway in the IFN system mediated by 2'-5'-oligoadenylate activation of RNase L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malathi, Krishnamurthy; Paranjape, Jayashree M; Bulanova, Elena; Shim, Minsub; Guenther-Johnson, Jeanna M; Faber, Pieter W; Eling, Thomas E; Williams, Bryan R G; Silverman, Robert H

    2005-10-11

    Virus replication in higher vertebrates is restrained by IFNs that cause cells to transcribe genes encoding antiviral proteins, such as 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetases. 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase is stimulated by dsRNA to produce 5'-phosphorylated, 2'-5'-linked oligoadenylates (2-5A), whose function is to activate RNase L. Although RNase L is required for a complete IFN antiviral response and mutations in the RNase L gene (RNASEL or HPC1) increase prostate cancer rates, it is unknown how 2-5A affects these biological endpoints through its receptor, RNase L. Presently, we show that 2-5A activation of RNase L produces a remarkable stimulation of transcription (>/=20-fold) for genes that suppress virus replication and prostate cancer. Unexpectedly, exposure of DU145 prostate cancer cells to physiologic levels of 2-5A (0.1 muM) induced approximately twice as many RNA species as it down-regulated. Among the 2-5A-induced genes are several IFN-stimulated genes, including IFN-inducible transcript 1/P56, IFN-inducible transcript 2/P54, IL-8, and IFN-stimulated gene 15. 2-5A also potently elevated RNA for macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-activated gene-1, a TGF-beta superfamily member implicated as an apoptotic suppressor of prostate cancer. Transcriptional signaling to the macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-activated gene-1 promoter by 2-5A was deficient in HeLa cells expressing a nuclease-dead mutant of RNase L and was dependent on the mitogen-activated protein kinases c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, both of which were activated in response to 2-5A treatments. Because 2-5A and RNase L participate in defenses against viral infections and prostate cancer, our findings have implications for basic cellular mechanisms that control major pathogenic processes.

  14. The transcriptional regulators TAZ and YAP direct transforming growth factor β-induced tumorigenic phenotypes in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemer, Samantha E; Szymaniak, Aleksander D; Varelas, Xaralabos

    2014-05-09

    Uncontrolled transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signaling promotes aggressive metastatic properties in late-stage breast cancers. However, how TGFβ-mediated cues are directed to induce tumorigenic events is poorly understood, particularly given that TGFβ has clear tumor suppressing activity in other contexts. Here, we demonstrate that the transcriptional regulators TAZ and YAP (TAZ/YAP), key effectors of the Hippo pathway, are necessary to promote and maintain TGFβ-induced tumorigenic phenotypes in breast cancer cells. Interactions between TAZ/YAP, TGFβ-activated SMAD2/3, and TEAD transcription factors reveal convergent roles for these factors in the nucleus. Genome-wide expression analyses indicate that TAZ/YAP, TEADs, and TGFβ-induced signals coordinate a specific pro-tumorigenic transcriptional program. Importantly, genes cooperatively regulated by TAZ/YAP, TEAD, and TGFβ, such as the novel targets NEGR1 and UCA1, are necessary for maintaining tumorigenic activity in metastatic breast cancer cells. Nuclear TAZ/YAP also cooperate with TGFβ signaling to promote phenotypic and transcriptional changes in nontumorigenic cells to overcome TGFβ-repressive effects. Our work thus identifies cross-talk between nuclear TAZ/YAP and TGFβ signaling in breast cancer cells, revealing novel insight into late-stage disease-driving mechanisms.

  15. Derivation and transcriptional profiling analysis of pluripotent stem cell lines from rat blastocysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunliang Li; Ying Yang; Junjie Gu; Yu Ma; Ying Jin

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from blastocyst-stage embryos. Their unique properties of self-renewal and pluripotency make them an attractive tool for basic research and a potential cell resource for therapy. ES cells of mouse and human have been successfully generated and applied in a wide range of research. However, no genuine ES cell lines have been obtained from rat to date. In this study, we identified pluripotent cells in early rat embryos using specific antibodies against markers of pluripotent stem cells. Subsequently, by modifying the culture medium for rat blastocysts, we derived pluripotent rat ES-llke cell lines, which expressed pluripotency markers and formed embryoid bodies (EBs) in vitro. Importantly, these rat ES-like cells were able to produce teratomas. Both EBs and teratomas contained tissues from all three embryonic germ layers, in addition, from the rat ES-like cells, we derived a rat primitive endoderm (PrE) cell line. Furthermore, we conducted transcriptional profiling of the rat ES-like cells and identified the unique molecular signature of the rat pluripotent stem cells. Our analysis demonstrates that multiple signaling pathways, including the BMP, Activin and roTOR pathways, may be involved in keeping the rat ES-like cells in an undifferentiated state. The cell lines and information obtained in this study will accelerate our understanding of the molecular regulation underlying pluripotency and guide us in the appropriate manipulation of ES cells from a particular species.

  16. Activation of Akt is essential for the propagation of mitochondrial respiratory stress signaling and activation of the transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Manti; Fang, Ji-Kang; Monks, Robert; Birnbaum, Morris J; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2010-10-15

    Mitochondrial respiratory stress (also called mitochondrial retrograde signaling) activates a Ca(2+)/calcineurin-mediated signal that culminates in transcription activation/repression of a large number of nuclear genes. This signal is propagated through activation of the regulatory proteins NFκB c-Rel/p50, C/EBPδ, CREB, and NFAT. Additionally, the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNPA2) functions as a coactivator in up-regulating the transcription of Cathepsin L, RyR1, and Glut-4, the target genes of stress signaling. Activation of IGF1R, which causes a metabolic switch to glycolysis, cell invasiveness, and resistance to apoptosis, is a phenotypic hallmark of C2C12 myoblasts subjected to mitochondrial stress. In this study, we report that mitochondrial stress leads to increased expression, activation, and nuclear localization of Akt1. Mitochondrial respiratory stress also activates Akt1-gene expression, which involves hnRNPA2 as a coactivator, indicating a complex interdependency of these two factors. Using Akt1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts and Akt1 mRNA-silenced C2C12 cells, we show that Akt1-mediated phosphorylation is crucial for the activation and recruitment of hnRNPA2 to the enhanceosome complex. Akt1 mRNA silencing in mtDNA-depleted cells resulted in reversal of the invasive phenotype, accompanied by sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. These results show that Akt1 is an important regulator of the nuclear transcriptional response to mitochondrial stress.

  17. The transcription factor Gfi1 regulates G-CSF signaling and neutrophil development through the Ras activator RasGRP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Luz Sierra, Maria; Sakakibara, Shuhei; Gasperini, Paola; Salvucci, Ombretta; Jiang, Kan; McCormick, Peter J.; Segarra, Marta; Stone, Jim; Maric, Dragan; Zhu, Jinfang; Qian, Xiaolan; Lowy, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor growth factor independence 1 (Gfi1) and the growth factor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) are individually essential for neutrophil differentiation from myeloid progenitors. Here, we provide evidence that the functions of Gfi1 and G-CSF are linked in the regulation of granulopoiesis. We report that Gfi1 promotes the expression of Ras guanine nucleotide releasing protein 1 (RasGRP1), an exchange factor that activates Ras, and that RasGRP1 is required for G-CSF signaling through the Ras/mitogen–activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/Erk) pathway. Gfi1-null mice have reduced levels of RasGRP1 mRNA and protein in thymus, spleen, and bone marrow, and Gfi1 transduction in myeloid cells promotes RasGRP1 expression. When stimulated with G-CSF, Gfi1-null myeloid cells are selectively defective at activating Erk1/2, but not signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) or STAT3, and fail to differentiate into neutrophils. Expression of RasGRP1 in Gfi1-deficient cells rescues Erk1/2 activation by G-CSF and allows neutrophil maturation by G-CSF. These results uncover a previously unknown function of Gfi1 as a regulator of RasGRP1 and link Gfi1 transcriptional control to G-CSF signaling and regulation of granulopoiesis. PMID:20203268

  18. Whole genome transcription profiling of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in human and tick host cells by tiling array analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavez Adela

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Ap is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis, an emerging tick-borne disease. Ap alternately infects ticks and mammals and a variety of cell types within each. Understanding the biology behind such versatile cellular parasitism may be derived through the use of tiling microarrays to establish high resolution, genome-wide transcription profiles of the organism as it infects cell lines representative of its life cycle (tick; ISE6 and pathogenesis (human; HL-60 and HMEC-1. Results Detailed, host cell specific transcriptional behavior was revealed. There was extensive differential Ap gene transcription between the tick (ISE6 and the human (HL-60 and HMEC-1 cell lines, with far fewer differentially transcribed genes between the human cell lines, and all disproportionately represented by membrane or surface proteins. There were Ap genes exclusively transcribed in each cell line, apparent human- and tick-specific operons and paralogs, and anti-sense transcripts that suggest novel expression regulation processes. Seven virB2 paralogs (of the bacterial type IV secretion system showed human or tick cell dependent transcription. Previously unrecognized genes and coding sequences were identified, as were the expressed p44/msp2 (major surface proteins paralogs (of 114 total, through elevated signal produced to the unique hypervariable region of each – 2/114 in HL-60, 3/114 in HMEC-1, and none in ISE6. Conclusion Using these methods, whole genome transcription profiles can likely be generated for Ap, as well as other obligate intracellular organisms, in any host cells and for all stages of the cell infection process. Visual representation of comprehensive transcription data alongside an annotated map of the genome renders complex transcription into discernable patterns.

  19. Data integration for identification of important transcription factors of STAT6-mediated cell fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jargosch, M; Kröger, S; Gralinska, E; Klotz, U; Fang, Z; Chen, W; Leser, U; Selbig, J; Groth, D; Baumgrass, R

    2016-06-24

    Data integration has become a useful strategy for uncovering new insights into complex biological networks. We studied whether this approach can help to delineate the signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6)-mediated transcriptional network driving T helper (Th) 2 cell fate decisions. To this end, we performed an integrative analysis of publicly available RNA-seq data of Stat6-knockout mouse studies together with STAT6 ChIP-seq data and our own gene expression time series data during Th2 cell differentiation. We focused on transcription factors (TFs), cytokines, and cytokine receptors and delineated 59 positively and 41 negatively STAT6-regulated genes, which were used to construct a transcriptional network around STAT6. The network illustrates that important and well-known TFs for Th2 cell differentiation are positively regulated by STAT6 and act either as activators for Th2 cells (e.g., Gata3, Atf3, Satb1, Nfil3, Maf, and Pparg) or as suppressors for other Th cell subpopulations such as Th1 (e.g., Ar), Th17 (e.g., Etv6), or iTreg (e.g., Stat3 and Hif1a) cells. Moreover, our approach reveals 11 TFs (e.g., Atf5, Creb3l2, and Asb2) with unknown functions in Th cell differentiation. This fact together with the observed enrichment of asthma risk genes among those regulated by STAT6 underlines the potential value of the data integration strategy used here. Thus, our results clearly support the opinion that data integration is a useful tool to delineate complex physiological processes.

  20. Cytokine signalling in embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, David Møbjerg; Kalisz, Mark; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2006-01-01

    Cytokines play a central role in maintaining self-renewal in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells through a member of the interleukin-6 type cytokine family termed leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). LIF activates the JAK-STAT3 pathway through the class I cytokine receptor gp130, which forms a trimeric...... pathways seem to converge on c-myc as a common target to promote self-renewal. Whereas LIF does not seem to stimulate self-renewal in human embryonic stem cells it cannot be excluded that other cytokines are involved. The pleiotropic actions of the increasing number of cytokines and receptors signalling...... via JAKs, STATs and SOCS exhibit considerable redundancy, compensation and plasticity in stem cells in accordance with the view that stem cells are governed by quantitative variations in strength and duration of signalling events known from other cell types rather than qualitatively different stem...

  1. Primary Cilia, Signaling Networks and Cell Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veland, Iben Rønn

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based, sensory organelles that emerge from the centrosomal mother centriole to project from the surface of most quiescent cells in the human body. Ciliary entry is a tightly controlled process, involving diffusion barriers and gating complexes that maintain a unique...... this controls directional cell migration as a physiological response. The ciliary pocket is a membrane invagination with elevated activity of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE). In paper I, we show that the primary cilium regulates TGF-β signaling and the ciliary pocket is a compartment for CDE...... on formation of the primary cilium and CDE at the pocket region. The ciliary protein Inversin functions as a molecular switch between canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. In paper II, we show that Inversin and the primary cilium control Wnt signaling and are required for polarization and cell migration...

  2. Primary Cilia, Signaling Networks and Cell Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veland, Iben Rønn

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based, sensory organelles that emerge from the centrosomal mother centriole to project from the surface of most quiescent cells in the human body. Ciliary entry is a tightly controlled process, involving diffusion barriers and gating complexes that maintain a unique...... this controls directional cell migration as a physiological response. The ciliary pocket is a membrane invagination with elevated activity of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE). In paper I, we show that the primary cilium regulates TGF-β signaling and the ciliary pocket is a compartment for CDE...... on formation of the primary cilium and CDE at the pocket region. The ciliary protein Inversin functions as a molecular switch between canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. In paper II, we show that Inversin and the primary cilium control Wnt signaling and are required for polarization and cell migration...

  3. A special issue on cell signaling, disease, and stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dangsheng Li

    2012-01-01

    As the basic unit of life,cells utilize signaling pathways to receive inputs from the environment and translate such information into appropriate cellular behaviors and responses.Cell signaling is also pivotal for multicellular organisms such as mammals,as cells need to communicate extensively among each other and with the environment in order to orchestrate appropriate actions,which are in turn integrated at the system level for the proper functioning and well-being of the organism.Thus,understanding the molecular mechanisms of cell signaling constitutes a fundamental quest of today's life science research.Not surprisingly,dysregulation of cell signaling causes many diseases such as cancer,and in such cases,a thorough understanding of the nature of cell signaling under disease states would provide an important basis to the efforts of developing novel therapeutic strategies.In this context,we are pleased to present this 2012 Cell Research Special Issue focusing on "Cell signaling,disease,and stem cells".

  4. Expressions of effective molecules transcriptional coactivator with plasma dissociated zircon-binding motif of Hippo signaling pathway in human osteosarcomas and osteosarcoma stem cells%Hippo信号通路作用分子TAZ在人骨肉瘤及骨肉瘤干细胞中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱忠胜; 张春林; 汪泱

    2014-01-01

    目的:检测在人骨肉瘤组织、骨肉瘤MG63细胞及其干细胞中Hippo信号分子TAZ的表达情况,比较骨肉瘤细胞和骨肉瘤干细胞中 TAZ 的表达差异,并探讨其可能的临床意义。方法2010年1月至2012年1月在我院治疗的骨肉瘤患者中,选取原发骨肉瘤组织标本12例,复发的骨肉瘤标本6例,另选6例骨纤维结构不良组织作阴性对照,并贴壁培养骨肉瘤MG63细胞,采用免疫组化方法检测骨肉瘤组织和骨肉瘤MG63细胞中 TAZ 的表达情况;用无血清悬浮培养骨肉瘤 MG63细胞,分离并收集骨肉瘤细胞球,通过定量反转录-聚合酶链反应( RT-PCR )法检测骨肉瘤MG63细胞及骨肉瘤细胞球中胚胎干细胞标志基因( Nanog, Oct4)和 Hippo 信号分子 TAZ 的表达,Western 印记法检测 MG63细胞和细胞球中 TAZ 蛋白的表达情况。结果在12例人骨肉瘤原发组织标本中,3例骨肉瘤组织TAZ表达阳性,而6例骨肉瘤复发组织中TAZ表达全部阳性,在骨肉瘤细胞MG63中TAZ分子表达也呈阳性,而骨纤维结果不良中全部表达阴性。与骨肉瘤MG63细胞相比,RT-PCR显示培养的骨肉瘤细胞球中干细胞标志基因Nanog,Oct4和Hippo信号分子TAZ明显高表达。Western blot 提示细胞球中 TAZ 蛋白表达明显高于骨肉瘤 MG63细胞。结论骨肉瘤组织中存在TAZ分子的表达,在复发骨肉瘤组织中呈高表达;在骨肉瘤细胞株中也存在TAZ分子的表达,而在干细胞中TAZ分子表达更高;提示其与骨肉瘤干细胞的特征具有一定的相关性。%Objective To detect the expressions of transcriptional coactivator with plasma dissociated zircon ( PDZ )-binding motif ( TAZ ) molecules of Hippo signaling pathway in human osteosarcoma tissues, osteosarcoma MG63 cells and stem cells, to compare the expression differences of TAZ molecules in osteosarcoma cells and osteosarcoma stem cells, and to investigate possible clinical

  5. Integration of Signaling Pathways with the Epigenetic Machinery in the Maintenance of Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Fagnocchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells balance their self-renewal and differentiation potential by integrating environmental signals with the transcriptional regulatory network. The maintenance of cell identity and/or cell lineage commitment relies on the interplay of multiple factors including signaling pathways, transcription factors, and the epigenetic machinery. These regulatory modules are strongly interconnected and they influence the pattern of gene expression of stem cells, thus guiding their cellular fate. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs represent an invaluable tool to study this interplay, being able to indefinitely self-renew and to differentiate towards all three embryonic germ layers in response to developmental cues. In this review, we highlight those mechanisms of signaling to chromatin, which regulate chromatin modifying enzymes, histone modifications, and nucleosome occupancy. In addition, we report the molecular mechanisms through which signaling pathways affect both the epigenetic and the transcriptional state of ESCs, thereby influencing their cell identity. We propose that the dynamic nature of oscillating signaling and the different regulatory network topologies through which those signals are encoded determine specific gene expression programs, leading to the fluctuation of ESCs among multiple pluripotent states or to the establishment of the necessary conditions to exit pluripotency.

  6. Reshaping the transcriptional frontier: epigenetics and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Charles R; Westhusin, Mark E; Golding, Michael C

    2014-02-01

    Somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) experiments have paved the way to the field of cellular reprogramming. The demonstrated ability to clone over 20 different species to date has proven that the technology is robust but very inefficient, and is prone to developmental anomalies. Yet, the offspring from cloned animals exhibit none of the abnormalities of their parents, suggesting the low efficiency and high developmental mortality are epigenetic in origin. The epigenetic barriers to reprogramming somatic cells into a totipotent embryo capable of developing into a viable offspring are significant and varied. Despite their intimate relationship, chromatin structure and transcription are often not uniformly reprogramed after nuclear transfer, and many cloned embryos develop gene expression profiles that are hybrids between the donor cell and an embryonic blastomere. Recent advances in cellular reprogramming suggest that alteration of donor-cell chromatin structure towards that found in an normal embryo is actually the rate-limiting step in successful development of SCNT embryos. Here we review the literature relevant to the transformation of a somatic-cell nucleus into an embryo capable of full-term development. Interestingly, while resetting somatic transcription and associated epigenetic marks are absolutely required for development of SCNT embryos, life does not demand perfection.

  7. Inference of Transcriptional Network for Pluripotency in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburatani, S.

    2015-01-01

    In embryonic stem cells, various transcription factors (TFs) maintain pluripotency. To gain insights into the regulatory system controlling pluripotency, I inferred the regulatory relationships between the TFs expressed in ES cells. In this study, I applied a method based on structural equation modeling (SEM), combined with factor analysis, to 649 expression profiles of 19 TF genes measured in mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs). The factor analysis identified 19 TF genes that were regulated by several unmeasured factors. Since the known cell reprogramming TF genes (Pou5f1, Sox2 and Nanog) are regulated by different factors, each estimated factor is considered to be an input for signal transduction to control pluripotency in mouse ESCs. In the inferred network model, TF proteins were also arranged as unmeasured factors that control other TFs. The interpretation of the inferred network model revealed the regulatory mechanism for controlling pluripotency in ES cells.

  8. Light intensity regulation of cab gene transcription is signaled by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escoubas, J.M.; Lomas, M.; LaRoche, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-24

    The eukaryotic green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta acclimates to decreased growth irradiance by increasing cellular levels of light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex apoproteins associated with photosystem II (LHCIIs), whereas increased growth irradiance elicits the opposite response. Nuclear run-on transcription assays and measurements of cab mRNA stability established that light intensity-dependent changes in LHCII are controlled at the level of transcription. cab gene transcription in high-intensity light was partially enhanced by reducing plastoquinone with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea (DCMU), whereas it was repressed in low-intensity light by partially inhibiting the oxidation of plastoquinol with 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (DBMIB). Uncouplers of photosynthetic electron transport and inhibition of water splitting had no effect on LHCII levels. These results strongly implicate the redox state of the plastoquinone pool in the chloroplast as a photon-sensing system that is coupled to the light-intensity regulation of nuclear-encoded cab gene transcription. The accumulation of cellular chlorophyll at low-intensity light can be blocked by cytoplasmically directed phosphatase inhibitors, such as okadaic acid, microcystin L-R, and tautomycin. Gel mobility-shift assays revealed that cells grown in high-intensity light contained proteins that bind to the promoter region of a cab gene carrying sequences homologous to higher plant light-responsive elements. On the basis of these experimental results, we propose a model for a light intensity signaling system where cab gene expression is reversibly repressed by a phosphorylated factor coupled to the redox status of plastoquinone through a chloroplast protein kinase. 54 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Wnt signaling inhibits adrenal steroidogenesis by cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Elisabeth M; Kuick, Rork; Finco, Isabella; Bohin, Natacha; Hrycaj, Steven M; Wellik, Deneen M; Hammer, Gary D

    2014-09-01

    Wnt/β-catenin (βcat) signaling is critical for adrenal homeostasis. To elucidate how Wnt/βcat signaling elicits homeostatic maintenance of the adrenal cortex, we characterized the identity of the adrenocortical Wnt-responsive population. We find that Wnt-responsive cells consist of sonic hedgehog (Shh)-producing adrenocortical progenitors and differentiated, steroidogenic cells of the zona glomerulosa, but not the zona fasciculata and rarely cells that are actively proliferating. To determine potential direct inhibitory effects of βcat signaling on zona fasciculata-associated steroidogenesis, we used the mouse ATCL7 adrenocortical cell line that serves as a model system of glucocorticoid-producing fasciculata cells. Stimulation of βcat signaling caused decreased corticosterone release consistent with the observed reduced transcription of steroidogenic genes Cyp11a1, Cyp11b1, Star, and Mc2r. Decreased steroidogenic gene expression was correlated with diminished steroidogenic factor 1 (Sf1; Nr5a1) expression and occupancy on steroidogenic promoters. Additionally, βcat signaling suppressed the ability of Sf1 to transactivate steroidogenic promoters independent of changes in Sf1 expression level. To investigate Sf1-independent effects of βcat on steroidogenesis, we used Affymetrix gene expression profiling of Wnt-responsive cells in vivo and in vitro. One candidate gene identified, Ccdc80, encodes a secreted protein with unknown signaling mechanisms. We report that Ccdc80 is a novel βcat-regulated gene in adrenocortical cells. Treatment of adrenocortical cells with media containing secreted Ccdc80 partially phenocopies βcat-induced suppression of steroidogenesis, albeit through an Sf1-independent mechanism. This study reveals multiple mechanisms of βcat-mediated suppression of steroidogenesis and suggests that Wnt/βcat signaling may regulate adrenal homeostasis by inhibiting fasciculata differentiation and promoting the undifferentiated state of progenitor

  10. NO signaling in retinal bipolar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agurto, A; Vielma, A H; Cadiz, B; Couve, E; Schmachtenberg, O

    2017-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a neuromodulator involved in physiological and pathological processes in the retina. In the inner retina, a subgroup of amacrine cells have been shown to synthesize NO, but bipolar cells remain controversial as NO sources. This study correlates NO synthesis in dark-adapted retinas, through labeling with the NO marker DAF-FM, with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and inducible NOS expression, and presence of the NO receptor soluble guanylate cyclase in bipolar cells. NO containing bipolar cells were morphologically identified by dialysis of DAF fluorescent cells with intracellular dyes, or by DAF labeling followed by immunohistochemistry for nNOS and other cellular markers. DAF fluorescence was observed in all types of bipolar cells that could be identified, but the most intense DAF fluorescence was observed in bipolar cells with severed processes, supporting pathological NO signaling. Among nNOS expressing bipolar cells, type 9 was confirmed unequivocally, while types 2, 3a, 3b, 4, 5, 7, 8 and the rod bipolar cell were devoid of this enzyme. These results establish specific bipolar cell types as NO sources in the inner retina, and support the involvement of NO signaling in physiological and pathological processes in the inner retina. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Syndecans in tumor cell adhesion and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapraeger Alan C

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anchorage of cells to "heparin" – binding domains that are prevalent in extracellular matrix (ECM components is thought to occur primarily through the syndecans, a four-member family of transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans that communicate environmental cues from the ECM to the cytoskeleton and the signaling apparatus of the cell. Known activities of the syndecans trace to their highly conserved cytoplasmic domains and to their heparan sulfate chains, which can serve to regulate the signaling of growth factors and morphogens. However, several emerging studies point to critical roles for the syndecans' extracellular protein domains in tumor cell behavior to include cell adhesion and invasion. Although the mechanisms of these activities remain largely unknown, one possibility involves "co-receptor" interactions with integrins that may regulate integrin function and the cell adhesion-signaling phenotype. Thus, alterations in syndecan expression, leading to either overexpression or loss of expression, both of which take place in tumor cells, may have dramatic effects on tumor cell invasion.

  12. Ion channels, guidance molecules, intracellular signaling and transcription factors regulating nervous and vascular system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Tenpei; Kumada, Tatsuro; Yoshihara, Sei-ichi; Egea, Joaquim; Yamagishi, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Our sophisticated thoughts and behaviors are based on the miraculous development of our complex nervous network system, in which many different types of proteins and signaling cascades are regulated in a temporally and spatially ordered manner. Here we review our recent attempts to grasp the principles of nervous system development in terms of general cellular phenomena and molecules, such as volume-regulated anion channels, intracellular Ca(2+) and cyclic nucleotide signaling, the Npas4 transcription factor and the FLRT family of axon guidance molecules. We also present an example illustrating that the same FLRT family may regulate the development of vascular networks as well. The aim of this review is to open up new vistas for understanding the intricacy of nervous and vascular system development.

  13. Transcriptional landscape estimation from tiling array data using a model of signal shift and drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard; Nicolas, P

    2009-01-01

    . The statistical models currently used to handle these data remain however very simple, the most popular being the piecewise constant Gaussian model with a fixed number of breakpoints. RESULTS: This article describes a new methodology based on a hidden Markov model that embeds the segmentation of a continuous......-valued signal in a probabilistic setting. For a computationally affordable cost, this framework (i) alleviates the difficulty of choosing a fixed number of breakpoints, and (ii) permits retrieving more information than a unique segmentation by giving access to the whole probability distribution...... of the transcription profile. Importantly, the model is also enriched and accounts for subtle effects such as signal 'drift' and covariates. Relevance of this framework is demonstrated on a Bacillus subtilis dataset. AVAILABILITY: A software is distributed under the GPL....

  14. NPM-ALK oncogenic tyrosine kinase controls T-cell identity by transcriptional regulation and epigenetic silencing in lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrogio, Chiara; Martinengo, Cinzia; Voena, Claudia; Tondat, Fabrizio; Riera, Ludovica; di Celle, Paola Francia; Inghirami, Giorgio; Chiarle, Roberto

    2009-11-15

    Transformed cells in lymphomas usually maintain the phenotype of the postulated normal lymphocyte from which they arise. By contrast, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a T-cell lymphoma with aberrant phenotype because of the defective expression of the T-cell receptor and other T-cell-specific molecules for still undetermined mechanisms. The majority of ALCL carries the translocation t(2;5) that encodes for the oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK, fundamental for survival, proliferation, and migration of transformed T cells. Here, we show that loss of T-cell-specific molecules in ALCL cases is broader than reported previously and involves most T-cell receptor-related signaling molecules, including CD3epsilon, ZAP70, LAT, and SLP76. We further show that NPM-ALK, but not the kinase-dead NPM-ALK(K210R), downregulated the expression of these molecules by a STAT3-mediated gene transcription regulation and/or epigenetic silencing because this downregulation was reverted by treating ALCL cells with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine or by knocking down STAT3 through short hairpin RNA. Finally, NPM-ALK increased the methylation of ZAP70 intron 1-exon 2 boundary region, and both NPM-ALK and STAT3 regulated the expression levels of DNA methyltransferase 1 in transformed T cells. Thus, our data reveal that oncogene-deregulated tyrosine kinase activity controls the expression of molecules that determine T-cell identity and signaling.

  15. VEGF-A isoform-specific regulation of calcium ion flux, transcriptional activation and endothelial cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A regulates many aspects of vascular physiology such as cell migration, proliferation, tubulogenesis and cell-cell interactions. Numerous isoforms of VEGF-A exist but their physiological significance is unclear. Here we evaluated two different VEGF-A isoforms and discovered differential regulation of cytosolic calcium ion flux, transcription factor localisation and endothelial cell response. Analysis of VEGF-A isoform-specific stimulation of VEGFR2-dependent signal transduction revealed differential capabilities for isoform activation of multiple signal transduction pathways. VEGF-A165 treatment promoted increased phospholipase Cγ1 phosphorylation, which was proportional to the subsequent rise in cytosolic calcium ions, in comparison to cells treated with VEGF-A121. A major consequence of this VEGF-A isoform-specific calcium ion flux in endothelial cells is differential dephosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFATc2. Using reverse genetics, we discovered that NFATc2 is functionally required for VEGF-A-stimulated endothelial cell migration but not tubulogenesis. This work presents a new mechanism for understanding how VEGF-A isoforms program complex cellular outputs by converting signal transduction pathways into transcription factor redistribution to the nucleus, as well as defining a novel role for NFATc2 in regulating the endothelial cell response.

  16. Signals that drive T-bet expression in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, Arpita; Gearhart, Patricia J; Cancro, Michael P

    2017-09-11

    Transcription factors regulate various developmental and functional aspects of B cells. T-bet is a recently appreciated transcription factor associated with "Age-associated B cells" or ABCs, the development of autoimmunity, and viral infections. T-bet expression is favored by nucleic acid-containing antigens and immune complexes and is regulated by interplay between various cytokines, notably, the TFH cytokines IL-21, IL-4 and IFNγ. Adaptive signals by themselves cannot upregulate T-bet; however, they have a synergistic effect on induction of T-bet by innate receptors. The functional role of T-bet+ B cells is unclear, although it is known that T-bet promotes class switching to IgG2a/c. It is likely T-bet serves dichotomous roles in B cells, promoting pathogenic autoreactive antibodies on one hand but mediating microbial immunity on the other, making it a target of interest in both therapeutic and prophylactic settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Notch signalling inhibits CD4 expression during initiation and differentiation of human T cell lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Carlin

    Full Text Available The Delta/Notch signal transduction pathway is central to T cell differentiation from haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Although T cell development is well characterized using expression of cell surface markers, the detailed mechanisms driving differentiation have not been established. This issue becomes central with observations that adult HSCs exhibit poor differentiation towards the T cell lineage relative to neonatal or embryonic precursors. This study investigates the contribution of Notch signalling and stromal support cells to differentiation of adult and Cord Blood (CB human HSCs, using the Notch signalling OP9Delta co-culture system. Co-cultured cells were assayed at weekly intervals during development for phenotype markers using flow cytometry. Cells were also assayed for mRNA expression at critical developmental stages. Expression of the central thymocyte marker CD4 was initiated independently of Notch signalling, while cells grown with Notch signalling had reduced expression of CD4 mRNA and protein. Interruption of Notch signalling in partially differentiated cells increased CD4 mRNA and protein expression, and promoted differentiation to CD4(+ CD8(+ T cells. We identified a set of genes related to T cell development that were initiated by Notch signalling, and also a set of genes subsequently altered by Notch signal interruption. These results demonstrate that while Notch signalling is essential for establishment of the T cell lineage, at later stages of differentiation, its removal late in differentiation promotes more efficient DP cell generation. Notch signalling adds to signals provided by stromal cells to allow HSCs to differentiate to T cells via initiation of transcription factors such as HES1, GATA3 and TCF7. We also identify gene expression profile differences that may account for low generation of T cells from adult HSCs.

  18. Planar cell polarity signaling in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Chonnettia; Chen, Ping

    2007-02-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the polarization of a field of cells within the plane of a cell sheet. This form of polarization is required for diverse cellular processes in vertebrates, including convergent extension (CE), the establishment of PCP in epithelial tissues and ciliogenesis. Perhaps the most distinct example of vertebrate PCP is the uniform orientation of stereociliary bundles at the apices of sensory hair cells in the mammalian auditory sensory organ. The establishment of PCP in the mammalian cochlea occurs concurrently with CE in this ciliated epithelium, therefore linking three cellular processes regulated by the vertebrate PCP pathway in the same tissue and emerging as a model system for dissecting PCP signaling. This review summarizes the morphogenesis of this model system to assist the interpretation of the emerging data and proposes molecular mechanisms underlying PCP signaling in vertebrates.

  19. DNA-PK triggers histone ubiquitination and signaling in response to DNA double-strand breaks produced during the repair of transcription-blocking topoisomerase I lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristini, Agnese; Park, Joon-Hyung; Capranico, Giovanni; Legube, Gaëlle; Favre, Gilles; Sordet, Olivier

    2016-02-18

    Although defective repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leads to neurodegenerative diseases, the processes underlying their production and signaling in non-replicating cells are largely unknown. Stabilized topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (Top1cc) by natural compounds or common DNA alterations are transcription-blocking lesions whose repair depends primarily on Top1 proteolysis and excision by tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase-1 (TDP1). We previously reported that stabilized Top1cc produce transcription-dependent DSBs that activate ATM in neurons. Here, we use camptothecin (CPT)-treated serum-starved quiescent cells to induce transcription-blocking Top1cc and show that those DSBs are generated during Top1cc repair from Top1 peptide-linked DNA single-strand breaks generated after Top1 proteolysis and before excision by TDP1. Following DSB induction, ATM activates DNA-PK whose inhibition suppresses H2AX and H2A ubiquitination and the later assembly of activated ATM into nuclear foci. Inhibition of DNA-PK also reduces Top1 ubiquitination and proteolysis as well as resumption of RNA synthesis suggesting that DSB signaling further enhances Top1cc repair. Finally, we show that co-transcriptional DSBs kill quiescent cells. Together, these new findings reveal that DSB production and signaling by transcription-blocking Top1 lesions impact on non-replicating cell fate and provide insights on the molecular pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as SCAN1 and AT syndromes, which are caused by TDP1 and ATM deficiency, respectively.

  20. Notch Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, J T; Lilly, B

    2017-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a highly conserved pathway involved in cell fate determination in embryonic development and also functions in the regulation of physiological processes in several systems. It plays an especially important role in vascular development and physiology by influencing angiogenesis, vessel patterning, arterial/venous specification, and vascular smooth muscle biology. Aberrant or dysregulated Notch signaling is the cause of or a contributing factor to many vascular disorders, including inherited vascular diseases, such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, associated with degeneration of the smooth muscle layer in cerebral arteries. Like most signaling pathways, the Notch signaling axis is influenced by complex interactions with mediators of other signaling pathways. This complexity is also compounded by different members of the Notch family having both overlapping and unique functions. Thus, it is vital to fully understand the roles and interactions of each Notch family member in order to effectively and specifically target their exact contributions to vascular disease. In this chapter, we will review the Notch signaling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells as it relates to vascular development and human disease.

  1. Transcriptional analysis of sex pheromone biosynthesis signal genes in Bombyx mori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Heng An; Meng-Fang Du; Li-Juan Su; Xin-Ming Yin

    2012-01-01

    Six sex pheromone synthesis signal genes,including acyl coenzyme A (acylCoA) desaturase (desatl),fatty acyl reductase (FAR),pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR),fatty acid transport protein (FATP),acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) and store-operated channel protein (OrailA),were studied for their transcriptional regulations.The expression profiles of these transcripts at different developmental stages (from-96 to 48 h) revealed that the genes are expressed in an age-dependent manner.The transcripts of these genes continued to increase despite decapitation,and compared with normally developmental females,decapitation significantly inhibited their expression.Further experiments with a methoprene,a juvenile hormone (JH) analogue,challenge showed that JH was not a key inhibiting factor in the expression of these genes,and mating was found to significantly inhibit the expression of these marker genes.Altogether,the results provide a reference for understanding the mechanism of sex pheromone synthesis.

  2. Transcription-dependent nuclear localization of DAZAP1 requires an N-terminal signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Tzu; Wen, Wan-Ching [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Yen, Pauline H., E-mail: pyen@ibms.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when the nuclear transcription is inhibited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1's transcription-dependent nuclear localization requires N-terminal N42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SLIRP binds to N42 and may be involved in the process. -- Abstract: Deleted in Azoospermia Associated Protein 1 (DAZAP1) is a ubiquitous hnRNP protein required for normal development and spermatogenesis. It resides predominantly in the nucleus and moves between the nucleus and the cytoplasm via a ZNS shuttling signal at its C-terminus. DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when RNA polymerase II activity is inhibited by actinomycin D. Here we report the mapping of a 42-amino acid segment (N42) at the N-terminus of DAZAP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for its transcription-dependent nuclear localization. In addition, using a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified SLIRP as a N42-binding protein which may regulate DAZAP1 subcellular localization.

  3. YAP, TAZ, and Yorkie: a conserved family of signal-responsive transcriptional coregulators in animal development and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kainan; Degerny, Cindy; Xu, Minghong; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2009-02-01

    How extracellular cues are transduced to the nucleus is a fundamental issue in biology. The paralogous WW-domain proteins YAP (Yes-associated protein) and TAZ (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif; also known as WWTR1, for WW-domain containing transcription regulator 1) constitute a pair of transducers linking cytoplasmic signaling events to transcriptional regulation in the nucleus. A cascade composed of mammalian Ste20-like (MST) and large tumor suppressor (LATS) kinases directs multisite phosphorylation, promotes 14-3-3 binding, and hinders nuclear import of YAP and TAZ, thereby inhibiting their transcriptional coactivator and growth-promoting activities. A similar cascade regulates the trafficking and function of Yorkie, the fly orthologue of YAP. Mammalian YAP and TAZ are expressed in various tissues and serve as coregulators for transcriptional enhancer factors (TEFs; also referred to as TEADs, for TEA-domain proteins), runt-domain transcription factors (Runxs), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), T-box transcription factor 5 (Tbx5), and several others. YAP and TAZ play distinct roles during mouse development. Both, and their upstream regulators, are intimately linked to tumorigenesis and other pathogenic processes. Here, we review studies on this family of signal-responsive transcriptional coregulators and emphasize how relative sequence conservation predicates their function and regulation, to provide a conceptual framework for organizing available information and seeking new knowledge about these signal transducers.

  4. Designer cell signal processing circuits for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Robert W; Wang, Baojun

    2015-12-25

    Microorganisms are able to respond effectively to diverse signals from their environment and internal metabolism owing to their inherent sophisticated information processing capacity. A central aim of synthetic biology is to control and reprogramme the signal processing pathways within living cells so as to realise repurposed, beneficial applications ranging from disease diagnosis and environmental sensing to chemical bioproduction. To date most examples of synthetic biological signal processing have been built based on digital information flow, though analogue computing is being developed to cope with more complex operations and larger sets of variables. Great progress has been made in expanding the categories of characterised biological components that can be used for cellular signal manipulation, thereby allowing synthetic biologists to more rationally programme increasingly complex behaviours into living cells. Here we present a current overview of the components and strategies that exist for designer cell signal processing and decision making, discuss how these have been implemented in prototype systems for therapeutic, environmental, and industrial biotechnological applications, and examine emerging challenges in this promising field.

  5. A role for RNA post-transcriptional regulation in satellite cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina Nicholas H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Satellite cells are resident skeletal muscle stem cells responsible for muscle maintenance and repair. In resting muscle, satellite cells are maintained in a quiescent state. Satellite cell activation induces the myogenic commitment factor, MyoD, and cell cycle entry to facilitate transition to a population of proliferating myoblasts that eventually exit the cycle and regenerate muscle tissue. The molecular mechanism involved in the transition of a quiescent satellite cell to a transit-amplifying myoblast is poorly understood. Methods Satellite cells isolated by FACS from uninjured skeletal muscle and 12 h post-muscle injury from wild type and Syndecan-4 null mice were probed using Affymetrix 430v2 gene chips and analyzed by Spotfiretm and Ingenuity Pathway analysis to identify gene expression changes and networks associated with satellite cell activation, respectively. Additional analyses of target genes identify miRNAs exhibiting dynamic changes in expression during satellite cell activation. The function of the miRNAs was assessed using miRIDIAN hairpin inhibitors. Results An unbiased gene expression screen identified over 4,000 genes differentially expressed in satellite cells in vivo within 12 h following muscle damage and more than 50% of these decrease dramatically. RNA binding proteins and genes involved in post-transcriptional regulation were significantly over-represented whereas splicing factors were preferentially downregulated and mRNA stability genes preferentially upregulated. Furthermore, six computationally identified miRNAs demonstrated novel expression through muscle regeneration and in satellite cells. Three of the six miRNAs were found to regulate satellite cell fate. Conclusions The quiescent satellite cell is actively maintained in a state poised to activate in response to external signals. Satellite cell activation appears to be regulated by post-transcriptional gene regulation.

  6. Arsenic Attenuates GLI Signaling, Increasing or Decreasing its Transcriptional Program in a Context-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Giambelli, Camilla; Tang, Bo; Winterbottom, Emily; Long, Jun; Jin, Ke; Wang, Zhiqiang; Fei, Dennis Liang; Nguyen, Dao M; Athar, Mohammad; Wang, Baolin; Subbarayan, Pochi R; Wang, Lily; Rai, Priyamvada; Ardalan, Bach; Capobianco, Anthony J; Robbins, David J

    2016-02-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a worldwide environmental toxicant, exposure to which is associated with many adverse outcomes. Arsenic is also an effective therapeutic agent in certain disease settings. Arsenic was recently shown to regulate the activity of the Hedgehog (HH) signal transduction pathway, and this regulation of HH signaling was proposed to be responsible for a subset of arsenic's biologic effects. Surprisingly, these separate reports proposed contradictory activities for arsenic, as either an agonist or antagonist of HH signaling. Here we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that arsenic acts as a modulator of the activity of the HH effector protein glioma-associated oncogene family zinc finger (GLI), activating or inhibiting GLI activity in a context-dependent manner. This arsenic-induced modulation of HH signaling is observed in cultured cells, patients with colorectal cancer who have received arsenic-based therapy, and a mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model. Our results show that arsenic activates GLI signaling when the intrinsic GLI activity is low but inhibits signaling in the presence of high-level GLI activity. Furthermore, we show that this modulation occurs downstream of primary cilia, evidenced by experiments in suppressor of fused homolog (SUFU) deficient cells. Combining our findings with previous reports, we present an inclusive model in which arsenic plays dual roles in GLI signaling modulation: when GLIs are primarily in their repressor form, arsenic antagonizes their repression capacity, leading to low-level GLI activation, but when GLIs are primarily in their activator form, arsenic attenuates their activity.

  7. Distinctive characteristics of transcriptional profiles from two epithelial cell lines upon interaction with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, J J; Baker, H V; Oda, D; Lamont, R J; Handfield, M

    2006-08-01

    Transcriptional profiling and gene ontology analyses were performed to investigate the unique responses of two different epithelial cell lines to an Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans challenge. A total of 2867 genes were differentially regulated among all experimental conditions. The analysis of these 2867 genes revealed that the predominant specific response to infection in HeLa cells was associated with the regulation of enzyme activity, RNA metabolism, nucleoside and nucleic acid transport and protein modification. The predominant specific response in immortalized human gingival keratinocytes (IHGK) was associated with the regulation of angiogenesis, chemotaxis, transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine kinase signaling, cell differentiation, apoptosis and response to stress. Of particular interest, stress response genes were significantly - yet differently - affected in both cell lines. In HeLa cells, only three regulated genes impacted the response to stress, and the response to unfolded protein was the only term that passed the ontology filters. This strikingly contrasted with the profiles obtained for IHGK, in which 61 regulated genes impacted the response to stress and constituted an extensive network of cell responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans interaction (response to pathogens, oxidative stress, unfolded proteins, DNA damage, starvation and wounding). Hence, while extensive similarities were found in the transcriptional profiles of these two epithelial cell lines, significant differences were highlighted. These differences were predominantly found in pathways that are associated with host-pathogen interactions.

  8. Erythropoietin (EPO-receptor signaling induces cell death of primary myeloma cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea Kristin Våtsveen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple myeloma is an incurable complex disease characterized by clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells in a hypoxic bone marrow environment. Hypoxia-dependent erythropoietin (EPO-receptor (EPOR signaling is central in various cancers, but the relevance of EPOR signaling in multiple myeloma cells has not yet been thoroughly investigated. Methods Myeloma cell lines and malignant plasma cells isolated from bone marrow of myeloma patients were used in this study. Transcript levels were analysed by quantitative PCR and cell surface levels of EPOR in primary cells by flow cytometry. Knockdown of EPOR by short interfering RNA was used to show specific EPOR signaling in the myeloma cell line INA-6. Flow cytometry was used to assess viability in primary cells treated with EPO in the presence and absence of neutralizing anti-EPOR antibodies. Gene expression data for total therapy 2 (TT2, total therapy 3A (TT3A trials and APEX 039 and 040 were retrieved from NIH GEO omnibus and EBI ArrayExpress. Results We show that the EPOR is expressed in myeloma cell lines and in primary myeloma cells both at the mRNA and protein level. Exposure to recombinant human EPO (rhEPO reduced viability of INA-6 myeloma cell line and of primary myeloma cells. This effect could be partially reversed by neutralizing antibodies against EPOR. In INA-6 cells and primary myeloma cells, janus kinase 2 (JAK-2 and extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK-1/2 were phosphorylated by rhEPO treatment. Knockdown of EPOR expression in INA-6 cells reduced rhEPO-induced phospo-JAK-2 and phospho-ERK-1/2. Co-cultures of primary myeloma cells with bone marrow-derived stroma cells did not protect the myeloma cells from rhEPO-induced cell death. In four different clinical trials, survival data linked to gene expression analysis indicated that high levels of EPOR mRNA were associated with better survival. Conclusions Our results demonstrate for the first time

  9. Erythropoietin (EPO)-receptor signaling induces cell death of primary myeloma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Våtsveen, Thea Kristin; Sponaas, Anne-Marit; Tian, Erming; Zhang, Qing; Misund, Kristine; Sundan, Anders; Børset, Magne; Waage, Anders; Brede, Gaute

    2016-08-31

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable complex disease characterized by clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells in a hypoxic bone marrow environment. Hypoxia-dependent erythropoietin (EPO)-receptor (EPOR) signaling is central in various cancers, but the relevance of EPOR signaling in multiple myeloma cells has not yet been thoroughly investigated. Myeloma cell lines and malignant plasma cells isolated from bone marrow of myeloma patients were used in this study. Transcript levels were analysed by quantitative PCR and cell surface levels of EPOR in primary cells by flow cytometry. Knockdown of EPOR by short interfering RNA was used to show specific EPOR signaling in the myeloma cell line INA-6. Flow cytometry was used to assess viability in primary cells treated with EPO in the presence and absence of neutralizing anti-EPOR antibodies. Gene expression data for total therapy 2 (TT2), total therapy 3A (TT3A) trials and APEX 039 and 040 were retrieved from NIH GEO omnibus and EBI ArrayExpress. We show that the EPOR is expressed in myeloma cell lines and in primary myeloma cells both at the mRNA and protein level. Exposure to recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) reduced viability of INA-6 myeloma cell line and of primary myeloma cells. This effect could be partially reversed by neutralizing antibodies against EPOR. In INA-6 cells and primary myeloma cells, janus kinase 2 (JAK-2) and extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK-1/2) were phosphorylated by rhEPO treatment. Knockdown of EPOR expression in INA-6 cells reduced rhEPO-induced phospo-JAK-2 and phospho-ERK-1/2. Co-cultures of primary myeloma cells with bone marrow-derived stroma cells did not protect the myeloma cells from rhEPO-induced cell death. In four different clinical trials, survival data linked to gene expression analysis indicated that high levels of EPOR mRNA were associated with better survival. Our results demonstrate for the first time active EPOR signaling in malignant plasma cells. EPO

  10. MAPK Cascades in Guard Cell Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuree; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwak, June M.

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions. PMID:26904052

  11. MAPK cascades in guard cell signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuree eLee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions.

  12. Reinstate the Damaged VEGF Signaling Pathway with VEGF-activating Transcription Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao-guo Yang; Heng Guan; Chang-wei Liu; Yong-jun Li

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of vascular endothelial growth factor-activating transcriptional factor(VEGF-ATF)on the VEGF signaling pathway in diabetes mellitus.Methods Totally,20 C57BL/6 mice fed with high fat diet was induced into diabetes mellitus.Ten diabetes mellitus mice received a lower limb muscle injection with VEGF-ATF plasmid,and another ten were as control.VEGF-ATF is an engineered transcription factor designed to increase VEGF expression.Three days later,mice were sacrificed and the injected gastrocnemius was used for analysis.VEGF mRNA and protein expressions were examined by real-time PCR and ELISA respectively.VEGF receptor 2 mRNA expression was tested with RT-PCR.Phosphorylated Akt,Akt,endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS),and phosphorylated eNOS were assessed by western blot.Results At 3 days post-injection,in mice with diabetes mellitus,VEGF gene transfer increased VEGF mRNA copies and VEGF protein expression in injected muscles compared with control;and reinstated the impaired VEGF signaling pathway with increasing the ratios of phosphorylated Akt/Akt and phosphorylated eNOS/eNOS.However,it did not affect the expression of VEGF receptor 2 mRNA.Conclusion Gene transfer with VEGF-ATF is able to reinstate the impaired VEGF downstream pathway,and potentially promote therapeutic angiogenesis in mice with diabetes mcllitus.

  13. Activated α2-Macroglobulin Regulates Transcriptional Activation of c-MYC Target Genes through Cell Surface GRP78 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Udhayakumar; Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2016-05-13

    Activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*) signals predominantly through cell surface GRP78 (CS-GRP78) to promote proliferation and survival of cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanism remains obscure. c-MYC is an essential transcriptional regulator that controls cell proliferation. We hypothesize that α2M*/CS-GRP78-evoked key signaling events are required for transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes. Activation of CS-GRP78 by α2M* requires ligation of the GRP78 primary amino acid sequence (Leu(98)-Leu(115)). After stimulation with α2M*, CS-GRP78 signaling activates 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) to induce phosphorylation of PLK1, which in turn induces c-MYC transcription. We demonstrate that PLK1 binds directly to c-MYC and promotes its transcriptional activity by phosphorylating Ser(62) Moreover, activated c-MYC is recruited to the E-boxes of target genes FOSL1 and ID2 by phosphorylating histone H3 at Ser(10) In addition, targeting the carboxyl-terminal domain of CS-GRP78 with a mAb suppresses transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes and impairs cell proliferation. This work demonstrates that α2M*/CS-GRP78 acts as an upstream regulator of the PDK1/PLK1 signaling axis to modulate c-MYC transcription and its target genes, suggesting a therapeutic strategy for targeting c-MYC-associated malignant progression. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Activated α2-Macroglobulin Regulates Transcriptional Activation of c-MYC Target Genes through Cell Surface GRP78 Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Udhayakumar; Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*) signals predominantly through cell surface GRP78 (CS-GRP78) to promote proliferation and survival of cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanism remains obscure. c-MYC is an essential transcriptional regulator that controls cell proliferation. We hypothesize that α2M*/CS-GRP78-evoked key signaling events are required for transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes. Activation of CS-GRP78 by α2M* requires ligation of the GRP78 primary amino acid sequence (Leu98–Leu115). After stimulation with α2M*, CS-GRP78 signaling activates 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) to induce phosphorylation of PLK1, which in turn induces c-MYC transcription. We demonstrate that PLK1 binds directly to c-MYC and promotes its transcriptional activity by phosphorylating Ser62. Moreover, activated c-MYC is recruited to the E-boxes of target genes FOSL1 and ID2 by phosphorylating histone H3 at Ser10. In addition, targeting the carboxyl-terminal domain of CS-GRP78 with a mAb suppresses transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes and impairs cell proliferation. This work demonstrates that α2M*/CS-GRP78 acts as an upstream regulator of the PDK1/PLK1 signaling axis to modulate c-MYC transcription and its target genes, suggesting a therapeutic strategy for targeting c-MYC-associated malignant progression. PMID:27002159

  15. Churchill regulates cell movement and mesoderm specification by repressing Nodal signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mentzer Laura

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell movements are essential to the determination of cell fates during development. The zinc-finger transcription factor, Churchill (ChCh has been proposed to regulate cell fate by regulating cell movements during gastrulation in the chick. However, the mechanism of action of ChCh is not understood. Results We demonstrate that ChCh acts to repress the response to Nodal-related signals in zebrafish. When ChCh function is abrogated the expression of mesodermal markers is enhanced while ectodermal markers are expressed at decreased levels. In cell transplant assays, we observed that ChCh-deficient cells are more motile than wild-type cells. When placed in wild-type hosts, ChCh-deficient cells often leave the epiblast, migrate to the germ ring and are later found in mesodermal structures. We demonstrate that both movement of ChCh-compromised cells to the germ ring and acquisition of mesodermal character depend on the ability of the donor cells to respond to Nodal signals. Blocking Nodal signaling in the donor cells at the levels of Oep, Alk receptors or Fast1 inhibited migration to the germ ring and mesodermal fate change in the donor cells. We also detect additional unusual movements of transplanted ChCh-deficient cells which suggests that movement and acquisition of mesodermal character can be uncoupled. Finally, we demonstrate that ChCh is required to limit the transcriptional response to Nodal. Conclusion These data establish a broad role for ChCh in regulating both cell movement and Nodal signaling during early zebrafish development. We show that chch is required to limit mesodermal gene expression, inhibit Nodal-dependant movement of presumptive ectodermal cells and repress the transcriptional response to Nodal signaling. These findings reveal a dynamic role for chch in regulating cell movement and fate during early development.

  16. Signaling involved in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shihori; Tanabe

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation is regulated by multiple signaling events. Recent technical advances have reve-aled that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed into stem cells. The signals involved in stem cell pro-gramming are of major interest in stem cell research. The signaling mechanisms involved in regulating stem cell reprogramming and differentiation are the subject of intense study in the field of life sciences. In this review,the molecular interactions and signaling pathways related to stem cell differentiation are discussed.

  17. Topological peculiarities of mammalian networks with different functionalities: transcription, signal transduction and metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorn Goemann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have comparatively investigated three different mammalian networks - on transcription, signal transduction and metabolic processes - with respect to their common and individual topological traits. The networks have been constructed based on genome- wide data collected from human, mouse and rat. None of these three networks exhibits a pure power-law degree distribution and, therefore, could be considered scalefree. Rather, the degree distributions of all three networks were best fitted by mixed models of a power law with an exponential tail. The networks differ from one another in the quantitative parameters of the models. Moreover, the transcription network can also be very well approximated by an exponential law. The connectivity within each network is rather robust, as is seen when removing individual nodes and computing the values of their pairwise disconnectivity index (PDI, which characterizes the topological significance of each node v by the number of direct or indirect connections in the network that critically depend on the presence of v. The results evidence that the networks are not centralized: none of nodes globally controls the integrity of each network. Just a few vertices appeared to strongly affect the coherence of the networks. These nodes are characterized by a broad range of degrees, thereby indicating that the degree alone is not the decisive criteria of a node's importance. The networks reveal distinct architectures: The transcriptional network exhibits a hierarchical modularity, whereas the signaling network is mainly comprised of semi-autonomous modules. The metabolic network seems to be made by a more complex mixture of substructures. Thus, despite being encoded by the same genomes, the networks significantly differ from one another in their general architectural design. Altogether, our results indicate that the subsets of genes and relationships that constitute these networks have co-evolved very differently and

  18. Linkage of E2F1 transcriptional network and cell proliferation with respiratory chain activity in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kazunori; Uchida, Tetsu; Fukumura, Motonori; Tamiya, Shigetoshi; Higurashi, Masato; Sakai, Hirosato; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Shibanuma, Motoko

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are multifunctional organelles; they have been implicated in various aspects of tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated a novel role of the basal electron transport chain (ETC) activity in cell proliferation by inhibiting mitochondrial replication and transcription (mtR/T) using pharmacological and genetic interventions, which depleted mitochondrial DNA/RNA, thereby inducing ETC deficiency. Interestingly, mtR/T inhibition did not decrease ATP levels despite deficiency in ETC activity in different cell types, including MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, but it severely impeded cell cycle progression, specifically progression during G2 and/or M phases in the cancer cells. Under these conditions, the expression of a group of cell cycle regulators was downregulated without affecting the growth signaling pathway. Further analysis suggested that the transcriptional network organized by E2F1 was significantly affected because of the downregulation of E2F1 in response to ETC deficiency, which eventually resulted in the suppression of cell proliferation. Thus, in this study, the E2F1-mediated ETC-dependent mechanism has emerged as the regulatory mechanism of cell cycle progression. In addition to E2F1, FOXM1 and BMYB were also downregulated, which contributed specifically to the defects in G2 and/or M phase progression. Thus, ETC-deficient cancer cells lost their growing ability, including their tumorigenic potential in vivo. ETC deficiency abolished the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the mitochondria and a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mimicked the deficiency, thereby suggesting that ETC activity signaled through ROS production. In conclusion, this novel coupling between ETC activity and cell cycle progression may be an important mechanism for coordinating cell proliferation and metabolism.

  19. Chloroplast signaling within, between and beyond cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof eBobik

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The most conspicuous function of the plastid is oxygenic photosynthesis of chloroplasts, yet plastids are super-factories that produce a plethora of compounds that are indispensable for proper plant physiology and development. Given their origins as free-living prokaryotes, it is not surprising that the plastid possesses its own genome whose expression is essential to plastid function. This semi-autonomous character of plastids requires the existence of sophisticated regulatory mechanisms that provide reliable communication between them and other cellular compartments. Such intracellular signaling is necessary for coordinating whole-cell responses to constantly varying environmental cues and cellular metabolic needs. This is achieved by plastids acting as receivers and transmitters of specific signals that coordinate expression of the nuclear and plastid genomes according to particular needs. In this review we will consider the so-called retrograde signaling occurring between plastids and nucleus, and between plastids and other organelles. Another important role of the plastid we will discuss is the involvement of plastid signaling in biotic and abiotic stress that, in addition to influencing retrograde signaling has direct effects on several cellular compartments including the cell wall. We will also review recent evidence pointing to an intriguing function of chloroplasts in regulating intercellular symplasmic transport. Finally, we consider an intriguing yet neglected aspect of plant biology, chloroplast signaling from the perspective of the entire plant. Thus, accumulating evidence highlights that chloroplasts, with their complex signaling pathways, provide a mechanism for exquisite regulation of plant development, metabolism and responses to the environment. As chloroplast processes are targeted for engineering for improved productivity the effect of such modifications on chloroplast signaling will have to be carefully considered in order

  20. Fast Algorithm for In situ transcription of musical signals : Case of lute music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lhoussine Bahatti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a fast and accurate transcription method of a musical signal. It consists of extracting the musical information from the temporal evolution of the generated signal by the instrument. Each note (primary will mainly be represented by a finite set of basic attributes (pitch, partial, energy, duration,. To do so, we begin by extracting each note by selecting the beginning of its appearance (onset detection, then proceeding by segmenting the signal, in order to delimit each note, which is to be identified later by determining its remaining features. The proposed method is an extension of the well known spectral based method. It is specially designed for oriental music which is characterized by its richness in tone that can be extended to tone. It aims to detect and isolate notes from a real audio signal recorded from an Oriental lute in an ordinary environment, then exploits the constraints of the lutes sound to improve the performance of the proposed transcriber. This method also includes, preprocessing and post processing based mainly on the surrounding noise, and echo. Subsequently, we present an interpretation of the results and rigorous assessment of the method through modeling the lute string motion.

  1. A transcriptional repressive role for epithelial-specific ETS factor ELF3 on oestrogen receptor alpha in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajulapalli, Vijaya Narasihma Reddy; Samanthapudi, Venkata Subramanyam Kumar; Pulaganti, Madhusudana; Khumukcham, Saratchandra Singh; Malisetty, Vijaya Lakhsmi; Guruprasad, Lalitha; Chitta, Suresh Kumar; Manavathi, Bramanandam

    2016-04-15

    Oestrogen receptor-α (ERα) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that primarily mediates oestrogen (E2)-dependent gene transcription required for mammary gland development. Coregulators critically regulate ERα transcription functions by directly interacting with it. In the present study, we report that ELF3, an epithelial-specific ETS transcription factor, acts as a transcriptional repressor of ERα. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) analysis demonstrated that ELF3 strongly binds to ERα in the absence of E2, but ELF3 dissociation occurs upon E2 treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner suggesting that E2 negatively influences such interaction. Domain mapping studies further revealed that the ETS (E-twenty six) domain of ELF3 interacts with the DNA binding domain of ERα. Accordingly, ELF3 inhibited ERα's DNA binding activity by preventing receptor dimerization, partly explaining the mechanism by which ELF3 represses ERα transcriptional activity. Ectopic expression of ELF3 decreases ERα transcriptional activity as demonstrated by oestrogen response elements (ERE)-luciferase reporter assay or by endogenous ERα target genes. Conversely ELF3 knockdown increases ERα transcriptional activity. Consistent with these results, ELF3 ectopic expression decreases E2-dependent MCF7 cell proliferation whereas ELF3 knockdown increases it. We also found that E2 induces ELF3 expression in MCF7 cells suggesting a negative feedback regulation of ERα signalling in breast cancer cells. A small peptide sequence of ELF3 derived through functional interaction between ERα and ELF3 could inhibit DNA binding activity of ERα and breast cancer cell growth. These findings demonstrate that ELF3 is a novel transcriptional repressor of ERα in breast cancer cells. Peptide interaction studies further represent a novel therapeutic option in breast cancer therapy. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Transcriptional analysis of Rickettsia prowazekii invasion gene homolog (invA) during host cell infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaywee, Jariyanart; Radulovic, Suzana; Higgins, James A; Azad, Abdu F

    2002-11-01

    An invasion gene homolog, invA, of Rickettsia prowazekii has recently been identified to encode a member of the Nudix hydrolase subfamily which acts specifically on dinucleoside oligophosphates (Np(n)N; n >/= 5), a group of cellular signaling molecules known as alarmones. InvA is thought to enhance intracellular survival by regulating stress-induced toxic nucleotide levels during rickettsial infection. To further characterize the physiological function of InvA, the gene expression pattern during various stages of rickettsial intracellular growth was investigated. Using semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and real-time fluorescent probe-based quantitative RT-PCR, a differential expression profile of invA during rickettsial host cell infection was examined. The invA transcript temporarily increased during the early period of infection. Expression of rickettsial groEL, a molecular indicator of cellular stresses, was also shown to be upregulated during the early period of infection. Furthermore, invA was cotranscribed in a polycistronic message with rrp, a gene encoding the response regulator protein homolog, which is a part of a two-component signal transduction system. These results support our earlier findings that under such stress conditions dinucleoside oligophosphate pyrophosphatase may function as a buffer, enhancing rickettsial survival within the cytoplasm of a eukaryotic cell. The expression of rickettsial dinucleoside oligophosphate pyrophosphatase may be regulated by a part of the two-component signal transduction system similar to that described for response regulators in other bacterial systems.

  3. Regulation of embryonic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by TGF-β family signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are characterized by their ability to indefinitely self-renew and potential to differentiate into all the cell lineages of the body. ES cells are considered to have potential applications in regenerative medicine. In particular, the emergence of an ES cell analogue-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells via somatic cell reprogramming by co-expressing a limited number of critical stemness-related transcriptional factors has solved the problem of obtaining patient-specific pluripotent cells, encouraging researchers to develop more specific and functional cell lineages from ES or iPS cells for broad therapeutic applications. ES cell fate choice is delicately controlled by a core transcriptional network, epigenetic modification profiles and complex signaling cascades both intrinsically and extrinsically. Of these signals, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family members, including TGF-β, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Activin and Nodal, have been reported to influence cell self-renewal and a broad spectrum of lineage differentiation in ES cells, in accordance with the key roles of TGF-β family signaling in early embryo development. In this review, the roles of TGF-β family signals in coordinating ES cell fate determination are summarized.

  4. Fgf and Esrrb integrate epigenetic and transcriptional networks that regulate self-renewal of trophoblast stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latos, Paulina A; Goncalves, Angela; Oxley, David; Mohammed, Hisham; Turro, Ernest; Hemberger, Myriam

    2015-07-24

    Esrrb (oestrogen-related receptor beta) is a transcription factor implicated in embryonic stem (ES) cell self-renewal, yet its knockout causes intrauterine lethality due to defects in trophoblast development. Here we show that in trophoblast stem (TS) cells, Esrrb is a downstream target of fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signalling and is critical to drive TS cell self-renewal. In contrast to its occupancy of pluripotency-associated loci in ES cells, Esrrb sustains the stemness of TS cells by direct binding and regulation of TS cell-specific transcription factors including Elf5 and Eomes. To elucidate the mechanisms whereby Esrrb controls the expression of its targets, we characterized its TS cell-specific interactome using mass spectrometry. Unlike in ES cells, Esrrb interacts in TS cells with the histone demethylase Lsd1 and with the RNA Polymerase II-associated Integrator complex. Our findings provide new insights into both the general and context-dependent wiring of transcription factor networks in stem cells by master transcription factors.

  5. Balanced transcription of cell division genes in Bacillus subtilis as revealed by single cell analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, Erik Nico; Veening, Jan-Willem; Stewart, Eric J.; Errington, Jeff; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria is carried out by a set of conserved proteins that all have to function at the correct place and time. A cell cycle-dependent transcriptional programme drives cell division in bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus. Whether such a programme exists in the Gram-positive mode

  6. Balanced transcription of cell division genes in Bacillus subtilis as revealed by single cell analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, Erik Nico; Veening, Jan-Willem; Stewart, Eric J.; Errington, Jeff; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria is carried out by a set of conserved proteins that all have to function at the correct place and time. A cell cycle-dependent transcriptional programme drives cell division in bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus. Whether such a programme exists in the Gram-positive

  7. Fast transcription rates of RNA polymerase II in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Paolo; Knezevich, Anna; De Marco, Alex; Mazza, Davide; Kula, Anna; McNally, Jim G; Marcello, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Averaged estimates of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) elongation rates in mammalian cells have been shown to range between 1.3 and 4.3 kb min−1. In this work, nascent RNAs from an integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1-derived vector were detectable at the single living cell level by fluorescent RNA tagging. At steady state, a constant number of RNAs was measured corresponding to a minimal density of polymerases with negligible fluctuations over time. Recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching was complete within seconds, indicating a high rate of RNA biogenesis. The calculated transcription rate above 50 kb min−1 points towards a wide dynamic range of RNAPII velocities in living cells. PMID:22015688

  8. FoxO transcription factors and stem cell homeostasis: insights from the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tothova, Zuzana; Gilliland, D Gary

    2007-08-16

    The forkhead O (FoxO) family of transcription factors participates in diverse physiologic processes, including induction of cell-cycle arrest, stress resistance, differentiation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Several recent studies indicate that FoxO-dependent signaling is required for long-term regenerative potential of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment through regulation of HSC response to physiologic oxidative stress, quiescence, and survival. These observations link FoxO function in mammalian systems with the evolutionarily conserved role of FoxO in promotion of stress resistance and longevity in lower phylogenetic systems. Furthermore, these findings have implications for aging in higher organisms and in malignant stem cell biology, and suggest that FoxOs may play an important role in the maintenance and integrity of stem cell compartments in a broad spectrum of tissues.

  9. Sulforaphane attenuates EGFR signaling in NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Yuan; Yu, Zhu-Yun; Chuang, Yen-Shu; Huang, Rui-Mei; Wang, Tzu-Chien V

    2015-06-03

    EGFR, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is frequently overexpressed and mutated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been widely used in the treatment of many cancers, including NSCLC. However, intrinsic and acquired resistance to TKI remains a common obstacle. One strategy that may help overcome EGFR-TKI resistance is to target EGFR for degradation. As EGFR is a client protein of heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) and sulforaphane is known to functionally regulate HSP90, we hypothesized that sulforaphane could attenuate EGFR-related signaling and potentially be used to treat NSCLC. Our study revealed that sulforaphane displayed antitumor activity against NSCLC cells both in vitro and in vivo. The sensitivity of NSCLC cells to sulforaphane appeared to positively correlate with the inhibition of EGFR-related signaling, which was attributed to the increased proteasomal degradation of EGFR. Combined treatment of NSCLC cells with sulforaphane plus another HSP90 inhibitor (17-AAG) enhanced the inhibition of EGFR-related signaling both in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that sulforaphane is a novel inhibitory modulator of EGFR expression and is effective in inhibiting the tumor growth of EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cells. Our findings suggest that sulforaphane should be further explored for its potential clinical applications against NSCLC.

  10. A balance between B cell receptor and inhibitory receptor signaling controls plasma cell differentiation by maintaining optimal Ets1 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Mayeux, Jessica; Gutierrez, Toni; Russell, Lisa; Getahun, Andrew; Müller, Jennifer; Tedder, Thomas; Parnes, Jane; Rickert, Robert; Nitschke, Lars; Cambier, John; Satterthwaite, Anne B; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann

    2014-07-15

    Signaling through the BCR can drive B cell activation and contribute to B cell differentiation into Ab-secreting plasma cells. The positive BCR signal is counterbalanced by a number of membrane-localized inhibitory receptors that limit B cell activation and plasma cell differentiation. Deficiencies in these negative signaling pathways may cause autoantibody generation and autoimmune disease in both animal models and human patients. We have previously shown that the transcription factor Ets1 can restrain B cell differentiation into plasma cells. In this study, we tested the roles of the BCR and inhibitory receptors in controlling the expression of Ets1 in mouse B cells. We found that Ets1 is downregulated in B cells by BCR or TLR signaling through a pathway dependent on PI3K, Btk, IKK2, and JNK. Deficiencies in inhibitory pathways, such as a loss of the tyrosine kinase Lyn, the phosphatase Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP1) or membrane receptors CD22 and/or Siglec-G, result in enhanced BCR signaling and decreased Ets1 expression. Restoring Ets1 expression in Lyn- or SHP1-deficient B cells inhibits their enhanced plasma cell differentiation. Our findings indicate that downregulation of Ets1 occurs in response to B cell activation via either BCR or TLR signaling, thereby allowing B cell differentiation and that the maintenance of Ets1 expression is an important function of the inhibitory Lyn → CD22/SiglecG → SHP1 pathway in B cells.

  11. Transcriptional profiling of rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, James A; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M; Clepper, Lisa; Wolf, Don P

    2006-12-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) may be able to cure or alleviate the symptoms of various degenerative diseases. However, unresolved issues