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Sample records for cell sheet engineering

  1. Cell sheet engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Yamato

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available We have developed ‘cell sheet engineering’ in order to avoid the limitations of tissue reconstruction using biodegradable scaffolds or single cell suspension injection. Our concept is tissue reconstruction, not from single cells, but from cell sheets. Cell sheets are prepared using temperature-responsive culture dishes. Temperature-responsive polymers are covalently grafted onto the dishes, allowing various types of cells to adhere and proliferate at 37°C. The cells spontaneously detach when the temperature is reduced below 32°C without the need for proteolytic enzymes. The confluent cells are noninvasively harvested as single, contiguous cell sheets with intact cell-cell junctions and deposited extracellular matrix (ECM. We have used these harvested cell sheets for various tissue reconstructions, including ocular surfaces, periodontal ligaments, cardiac patches, and bladder augmentation.

  2. Cell sheet approach for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Utoh, Rie; Nagase, Kenichi; Okano, Teruo

    2014-09-28

    After the biotech medicine era, regenerative medicine is expected to be an advanced medicine that is capable of curing patients with difficult-to-treat diseases and physically impaired function. Our original scaffold-free cell sheet-based tissue engineering technology enables transplanted cells to be engrafted for a long time, while fully maintaining their viability. This technology has already been applied to various diseases in the clinical setting, including the cornea, esophagus, heart, periodontal ligament, and cartilage using autologous cells. Transplanted cell sheets not only replace the injured tissue and compensate for impaired function, but also deliver growth factors and cytokines in a spatiotemporal manner over a prolonged period, which leads to promotion of tissue repair. Moreover, the integration of stem cell biology and cell sheet technology with sufficient vascularization opens possibilities for fabrication of human three-dimensional vascularized dense and intact tissue grafts for regenerative medicine to parenchymal organs. PMID:24858800

  3. Temperature-Responsive Polymer Modified Surface for Cell Sheet Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruo Okano

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades, as a novel approach for tissue engineering, cell sheet engineering has been proposed by our laboratory. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PIPAAm, which is a well-known temperature-responsive polymer, has been grafted on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS surfaces through an electron beam irradiated polymerization. At 37 °C, where the PIPAAm modified surface is hydrophobic, cells can adhere, spread on the surface and grow to confluence. By decreasing temperature to 20 °C, since the surface turns to hydrophilic, cells can detach themselves from the surface spontaneously and form an intact cell sheet with extracellular matrix. For obtaining a temperature-induced cell attachment and detachment, it is necessary to immobilize an ultra thin PIPAAm layer on the TCPS surfaces. This review focuses on the characteristics of PIAPAm modified surfaces exhibiting these intelligent properties. In addition, PIPAAm modified surfaces giving a rapid cell-sheet recovery has been further developed on the basis of the characteristic of the PIPAAm surface. The designs of temperature-responsive polymer layer have provided an enormous potential to fabricate clinically applicable regenerative medicine.

  4. Fabrication of a thermoresponsive cell culture dish: a key technology for cell sheet tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Kobayashi and Teruo Okano

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the properties and characterization of an intelligent thermoresponsive surface, which is a key technology for cell sheet-based tissue engineering. Intelligent thermoresponsive surfaces grafted with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) exhibit hydrophilic/hydrophobic alteration in response to temperature change. Cultured cells are harvested on thermoresponsive cell culture dishes by decreasing the temperature without the use of digestive enzymes or chelating agents. Our group has d...

  5. Engineering tubular bone using mesenchymal stem cell sheets and coral particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Wenxin [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China); Ma, Dongyang [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Lanzhou General Hospital, Lanzhou Command of PLA, BinHe 333 South Road, Lanzhou 730052 (China); Yan, Xingrong; Liu, Liangqi; Cui, Jihong; Xie, Xin; Li, Hongmin [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China); Chen, Fulin, E-mail: chenfl@nwu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, No.229 North Taibai Road, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: • We developed a novel engineering strategy to solve the limitations of bone grafts. • We fabricated tubular constructs using cell sheets and coral particles. • The composite constructs showed high radiological density and compressive strength. • These characteristics were similar to those of native bone. -- Abstract: The development of bone tissue engineering has provided new solutions for bone defects. However, the cell-scaffold-based approaches currently in use have several limitations, including low cell seeding rates and poor bone formation capacity. In the present study, we developed a novel strategy to engineer bone grafts using mesenchymal stem cell sheets and coral particles. Rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were continuously cultured to form a cell sheet with osteogenic potential and coral particles were integrated into the sheet. The composite sheet was then wrapped around a cylindrical mandrel to fabricate a tubular construct. The resultant tubular construct was cultured in a spinner-flask bioreactor and subsequently implanted into a subcutaneous pocket in a nude mouse for assessment of its histological characteristics, radiological density and mechanical property. A similar construct assembled from a cell sheet alone acted as a control. In vitro observations demonstrated that the composite construct maintained its tubular shape, and exhibited higher radiological density, compressive strength and greater extracellular matrix deposition than did the control construct. In vivo experiments further revealed that new bone formed ectopically on the composite constructs, so that the 8-week explants of the composite sheets displayed radiological density similar to that of native bone. These results indicate that the strategy of using a combination of a cell sheet and coral particles has great potential for bone tissue engineering and repairing bone defects.

  6. Engineering tubular bone using mesenchymal stem cell sheets and coral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We developed a novel engineering strategy to solve the limitations of bone grafts. • We fabricated tubular constructs using cell sheets and coral particles. • The composite constructs showed high radiological density and compressive strength. • These characteristics were similar to those of native bone. -- Abstract: The development of bone tissue engineering has provided new solutions for bone defects. However, the cell-scaffold-based approaches currently in use have several limitations, including low cell seeding rates and poor bone formation capacity. In the present study, we developed a novel strategy to engineer bone grafts using mesenchymal stem cell sheets and coral particles. Rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were continuously cultured to form a cell sheet with osteogenic potential and coral particles were integrated into the sheet. The composite sheet was then wrapped around a cylindrical mandrel to fabricate a tubular construct. The resultant tubular construct was cultured in a spinner-flask bioreactor and subsequently implanted into a subcutaneous pocket in a nude mouse for assessment of its histological characteristics, radiological density and mechanical property. A similar construct assembled from a cell sheet alone acted as a control. In vitro observations demonstrated that the composite construct maintained its tubular shape, and exhibited higher radiological density, compressive strength and greater extracellular matrix deposition than did the control construct. In vivo experiments further revealed that new bone formed ectopically on the composite constructs, so that the 8-week explants of the composite sheets displayed radiological density similar to that of native bone. These results indicate that the strategy of using a combination of a cell sheet and coral particles has great potential for bone tissue engineering and repairing bone defects

  7. In-depth analysis of switchable glycerol based polymeric coatings for cell sheet engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherer, Tobias; Heinen, Silke; Wei, Qiang; Haag, Rainer; Weinhart, Marie

    2015-10-01

    Scaffold-free cell sheet engineering using thermoresponsive substrates provides a promising alternative to conventional tissue engineering which in general employs biodegradable scaffold materials. We have previously developed a thermoresponsive coating with glycerol based linear copolymers that enables gentle harvesting of entire cell sheets. In this article we present an in-depth analysis of these thermoresponsive linear polyglycidyl ethers and their performance as coating for substrates in cell culture in comparison with commercially available poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) coated culture dishes. A series of copolymers of glycidyl methyl ether (GME) and glycidyl ethyl ether (EGE) was prepared in order to study their thermoresponsive properties in solution and on the surface with respect to the comonomer ratio. In both cases, when grafted to planar surfaces or spherical nanoparticles, the applied thermoresponsive polyglycerol coatings render the respective surfaces switchable. Protein adsorption experiments on copolymer coated planar surfaces with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy reveal the ability of the tested thermoresponsive coatings to be switched between highly protein resistant and adsorptive states. Cell culture experiments demonstrate that these thermoresponsive coatings allow for adhesion and proliferation of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts comparable to TCPS and faster than on PNIPAM substrates. Temperature triggered detachment of complete cell sheets from copolymer coated substrates was accomplished within minutes while maintaining high viability of the harvested cells. Thus such glycerol based copolymers present a promising alternative to PNIPAM as a thermoresponsive coating of cell culture substrates. PMID:26143602

  8. Monosaccharide-responsive phenylboronate-polyol cell scaffolds for cell sheet and tissue engineering applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachamalla Maheedhar Reddy

    Full Text Available Analyte-responsive smart polymeric materials are of great interest and have been actively investigated in the field of regenerative medicine. Phenylboronate containing copolymers form gels with polyols under alkaline conditions. Monosaccharides, by virtue of their higher affinity towards boronate, can displace polyols and solubilize such gels. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of utilizing phenylboronate-polyol interactions at physiological pH in order to develop monosaccharide-responsive degradable scaffold materials for systems dealing with cells and tissues. Amine assisted phenylboronate-polyol interactions were employed to develop novel hydrogel and cryogel scaffolds at neutral pH. The scaffolds displayed monosaccharide inducible gel-sol phase transformability. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated the ability of scaffolds to support cell adhesion, viability and proliferation. Fructose induced gel degradation is used to recover cells cultured on the hydrogels. The cryogels displayed open macroporous structure and superior mechanical properties. These novel phase transformable phenylboronate-polyol based scaffolds displayed a great potential for various cell sheet and tissue engineering applications. Their monosaccharide responsiveness at physiological pH is very useful and can be utilized in the fields of cell immobilization, spheroid culture, saccharide recognition and analyte-responsive drug delivery.

  9. Temperature-responsive intelligent interfaces for biomolecular separation and cell sheet engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Jun; Okano, Teruo

    2009-06-01

    Temperature-responsive intelligent surfaces, prepared by the modification of an interface with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its derivatives, have been used for biomedical applications. Such surfaces exhibit temperature-responsive hydrophilic/hydrophobic alterations with external temperature changes, which, in turn, result in thermally modulated interactions with biomolecules and cells. In this review, we focus on the application of these intelligent surfaces to chromatographic separation and cell cultures. Chromatographic separations using several types of intelligent surfaces are mentioned briefly, and various effects related to the separation of bioactive compounds are discussed, including wettability, copolymer composition and graft polymer architecture. Similarly, we also summarize temperature-responsive cell culture substrates that allow the recovery of confluent cell monolayers as contiguous living cell sheets for tissue-engineering applications. The key factors in temperature-dependent cell adhesion/detachment control are discussed from the viewpoint of grafting temperature-responsive polymers, and new methodologies for effective cell sheet culturing and the construction of thick tissues are summarized. PMID:19324682

  10. Sympathetic Innervation Induced in Engrafted Engineered Cardiomyocyte Sheets by Glial Cell Line Derived Neurotrophic Factor In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-ming Fu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of myocardial tissue engineering is to repair or regenerate damaged myocardium with engineered cardiac tissue. However, this strategy has been hampered by lack of functional integration of grafts with native myocardium. Autonomic innervation may be crucial for grafts to function properly with host myocardium. In this study, we explored the feasibility of in vivo induction of autonomic innervation to engineered myocardial tissue using genetic modulation by adenovirus encoding glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF. GFP-transgene (control group or GDNF overexpressing (GDNF group engineered cardiomyocyte sheets were transplanted on cryoinjured hearts in rats. Nerve fibers in the grafts were examined by immunohistochemistry at 1, 2, and 4 weeks postoperatively. Growth associated protein-43 positive growing nerves and tyrosine hydroxylase positive sympathetic nerves were first detected in the grafts at 2 weeks postoperatively in control group and 1 week in GDNF group. The densities of growing nerve and sympathetic nerve in grafts were significantly increased in GDNF group. No choline acetyltransferase immunopositive parasympathetic nerves were observed in grafts. In conclusion, sympathetic innervation could be effectively induced into engrafted engineered cardiomyocyte sheets using GDNF.

  11. Infused polymers for cell sheet release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juthani, Nidhi; Howell, Caitlin; Ledoux, Haylea; Sotiri, Irini; Kelso, Susan; Kovalenko, Yevgen; Tajik, Amanda; Vu, Thy L.; Lin, Jennifer J.; Sutton, Amy; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    Tissue engineering using whole, intact cell sheets has shown promise in many cell-based therapies. However, current systems for the growth and release of these sheets can be expensive to purchase or difficult to fabricate, hindering their widespread use. Here, we describe a new approach to cell sheet release surfaces based on silicone oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane. By coating the surfaces with a layer of fibronectin (FN), we were able to grow mesenchymal stem cells to densities comparable to those of tissue culture polystyrene controls (TCPS). Simple introduction of oil underneath an edge of the sheet caused it to separate from the substrate. Characterization of sheets post-transfer showed that they retain their FN layer and morphology, remain highly viable, and are able to grow and proliferate normally after transfer. We expect that this method of cell sheet growth and detachment may be useful for low-cost, flexible, and customizable production of cellular layers for tissue engineering.

  12. Scaffold Sheet Design Strategy for Soft Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Liping Tang; Dipendra Gyawali; Yi Zhang; Paul Thevenot; Tran, Richard T.; Jian Yang

    2010-01-01

    Creating heterogeneous tissue constructs with an even cell distribution and robust mechanical strength remain important challenges to the success of in vivo tissue engineering. To address these issues, we are developing a scaffold sheet tissue engineering strategy consisting of thin (~200 μm), strong, elastic, and porous crosslinked urethane- doped polyester (CUPE) scaffold sheets that are bonded together chemically or through cell culture. Suture retention of the tissue constructs (four shee...

  13. Poly(N-Isopropylacrylamide) surface-grafted ghitosan membranes as a new substrate for cell sheet engineering and manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Ricardo M. P. da; López Pérez, Paula M.; Elvira, C.; Mano, J.F; San Román, J.; Reis, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    The immobilization of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) on chitosanmembranes was performed in order to render membranes with thermo-responsive surface properties. The aim was to create membranes suitable for cell culture and in which confluent cell sheets can be recovered by simply lowering the temperature. The chitosan membranes were immersed in a solution of the monomer that was polymerized via radical initiation. The composition of the polymerization reaction so...

  14. Surface Engineering in Sheet Metal Forming

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsson, Per

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, surface engineering techniques have been developed in order to improve the tribological performance in many industrial applications. In sheet metal forming processes, the usage of liquid lubricants can be decreased by using self lubricated tribo surfaces which will result in more environmentally friendly workshops. In the present work two different concepts, i.e. the deposition of thin organic coatings on the steel sheet and PVD coatings on the tool, have been evaluated. The ...

  15. Cell sheet technology for regeneration of esophageal mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryo Takagi; Teruo Okano; Masayuki Yamato; Nobuo Kanai; Daisuke Murakami; Makoto Kondo; Takaaki Ishii; Takeshi Ohki; Hideo Namiki; Masakazu Yamamoto

    2012-01-01

    The progress of tissue-engineering technology has realized development of new therapies to treat various disorders by using cultured cells.Cell-and tissue-based therapies have been successfully applied to human patients,and several tissue-engineered products have been approved by the regulatory agencies and are commercially available.In the review article,we describe our experience of development and clinical application of cell sheet-based regenerative medicine.Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) have been shown to be useful for removal of gastrointestinal neoplasms with less invasiveness compared with open surgery,especially in esophageal surgery.However,postoperative inflammation and stenosis are major complications observed after intensive mucosal resection.Therefore,we have developed novel regenerative medicine to prevent such complications and promote wound healing of esophageal mucosa after EMR or ESD.Transplantable oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets were fabricated from patients' own oral mucosa.Immediately after EMR or ESD,fabricated autologous cell sheets were endoscopically transplanted to the ulcer sites.We performed a preclinical study with a canine model.In human clinical settings,cell culture and cell sheet fabrication were performed in clean rooms according to good manufacturing practice guidelines,and pharmaceutical drugs were used as supplements to culture medium in place of research regents used in animal study.We believe that cell-based regenerative medicine would be useful to improve quality of life of patients after EMR or ESD.

  16. FORMING FREEFORM SURFACE SHEET METAL USINGINTEGRATED REVERSE ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢渊

    2001-01-01

    This paper presented a model of integrated reverse engineering system and set up its various data output flowchart, which is easy to be associated with other systems. The idea of integrated reverse engineer is introduced to the system of forming sheet metal with complex surface and using IDEF0 method sets up the function model of the system. The freeform surface reconstruction and CAD modeling of the system are described and decomposed. This paper discussed some problems, such as the feature expression, feature modeling and feature translation of the sheet parts and dies.

  17. Real-time, noninvasive optical coherence tomography of cross-sectional living cell-sheets in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Mari; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Mizuuchi, Kiminori; Iseki, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Cell sheet technology has a history of application in regenerating various tissues, having successfully completed several clinical trials using autologous cell sheets. Tomographic analysis of living cell sheets is an important tool in the field of cell sheet-based regenerative medicine and tissue engineering to analyze the inner structure of layered living cells. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used in ophthalmology to noninvasively analyze cross-sections of target tissues at high resolution. This study used OCT to conduct real-time, noninvasive analysis of living cell sheet cross sections. OCT showed the internal structure of cell sheets in tomographic images synthesized with backscatter signals from inside the living cell sheet without invasion or damage. OCT observations were used to analyze the static and dynamic behaviors of living cell sheets in vitro and in vivo including (1) the harvesting process of a C2C12 mouse skeletal myoblast sheet from a temperature-responsive culture surface; (2) cell-sheet adhesion onto various surfaces including a culture surface, a synthetic rubber glove, and the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of rats; and (3) the real-time propagation of beating rat cardiac cells within cardiac cell sheets. This study showed that OCT technology is a powerful tool in the field of cell sheet-based regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. PMID:25350859

  18. Muscle-derived Stem Cell Sheets Support Pump Function and Prevent Cardiac Arrhythmias in a Model of Chronic Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Sekiya, Naosumi; Tobita, Kimimasa; Beckman, Sarah; Okada, Masaho; Gharaibeh, Burhan; Sawa, Yoshiki; Kormos, Robert L.; Huard, Johnny

    2013-01-01

    Direct intracardiac cell injection for heart repair is hindered by numerous limitations including: cell death, poor spreading of the injected cells, arrhythmia, needle injury, etc. Tissue-engineered cell sheet implantation has the potential to overcome some of these limitations. We evaluated whether the transplantation of a muscle-derived stem cell (MDSC) sheet could improve the regenerative capacity of MDSCs in a chronic model of myocardial infarction. MDSC sheet-implanted mice displayed a r...

  19. Cell sheet technology and its applications in corneal tissue engineering%细胞层片技术及其在角膜组织工程研究的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦巧玲; 徐建江

    2011-01-01

    Cell sheet technology (CST) is based on the use of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide,PNIPAAm) ,which can be exhibit reversible hydration and dehydration of its polymer chains in response to temperature changes across the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of 32 ℃. By reducing the incubation temperature to 20 ℃, all cultured cells are harvested as intact sheets along with their deposited extracellular matrix (ECM) due to the conversion of the grafted PIPAAm from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, as ECM remains present on the basal surface of the cell sheets,they can maintain cell viability and function as well as directly transplanted to tissue beds or even layered to create three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like structures without any scaffolds or sutures. The temperature-sensitive surfaces' preparation approaches,density, thickness, membrane additive ingredients and so on, all affect cell adhesion and proliferation. It can maintain cell viability and improve function by accelerating cell sheet detachment through changing the membrane compositions, density as well as types of graft substrate. With CST, cultured autologous/allogeneic corneal seed cells in vitro used as transplant sources can overcome the problems of immunorejection of transplanted tissues as well as donor organ shortages. So far, the cell sheet of limbal epithelium and autologous oral mucosal epithelium obtained by the CST have been successfully used in clinical graft for ocular surface reconstruction. Finally, There is an overview of preparations of temperatureresponsive surfaces, impacts of various factors that influenced cultured cells in vitro and clinical applications or clinically relevant animal experimentations of CST in corneal tissue engineering.%细胞层片技术(CST)以异内基丙烯酰胺(PNIPAAm)在低临界溶解温度(LCST)快速转变亲水相/疏水相为基础,通过调节细胞的培养温度获取连接紧密的活细胞片与细胞外基质.这种无创性方法获取的活细

  20. Cell and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Cell and Tissue Engineering” introduces the principles and new approaches in cell and tissue engineering. It includes both the fundamentals and the current trends in cell and tissue engineering, in a way useful both to a novice and an expert in the field. The book is composed of 13 chapters all of which are written by the leading experts. It is organized to gradually assemble an insight in cell and tissue function starting form a molecular nano-level, extending to a cellular micro-level and finishing at the tissue macro-level. In specific, biological, physiological, biophysical, biochemical, medical, and engineering aspects are covered from the standpoint of the development of functional substitutes of biological tissues for potential clinical use. Topics in the area of cell engineering include cell membrane biophysics, structure and function of the cytoskeleton, cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and mechanotransduction. In the area of tissue engineering the focus is on the in vitro cultivation of ...

  1. Editorial: Stem Cell Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Joaquim M S; Palecek, Sean P

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, the promise of stem cells as tools for basic research, in vitro diagnostics, and in vivo therapeutics is increasingly being realized. This Special issue of Biotechnology Journal explores recent advances in the emerging field of stem cell engineering, with a focus on applying engineering approaches to understanding stem cell biology and enabling translation of stem cells to commercial and clinical products. PMID:26447639

  2. A noninvasive transfer system for polarized renal tubule epithelial cell sheets using temperature-responsive culture dishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushida A.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available We used temperature-responsive culture dishes onto which the temperature-responsive polymer, poly(Nisopropylacrylamide, was covalently grafted for tissue engineering. Confluent cells harvested as intact sheets from these surfaces by simple temperature reduction can be transferred to various surfaces including additional culture dishes, other cell sheets, and tissues. In order to examine the maintenance of cell polarity, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and human primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells which had developed apical-basal cell polarity in culture, were subjected to cell sheet transfer. This functional and structural cell polarity, which is susceptible to treatment with trypsin, was examined by immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Using our cell-sheet method, the noninvasive transfer of these cell sheets retaining typical distributions of Na+/K+-ATPase, GLUT-1, SGLT-1, aquaporin-1, neutral endopeptidase and dipeptidylendopeptidase IV, could be achieved. The transferred cell sheets also developed numerous microvilli and tight junctions at the apical and lateral membranes, respectively. For biochemical analysis, immunoblotting of occludin, a transmembrane protein that composes tight junctions, was conducted and results confirmed that occludin remained intact after cell sheet transfer. This two-dimensional cell sheet manipulation method promises to be useful for tissue engineering as well as in the investigation of epithelial cell polarity.

  3. The Integration of Nanotechnology and Biology for Cell Engineering: Promises and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Maheswari Krishnan

    2013-10-01

    their variants, self-assembly, cell-printing techniques and cell sheet engineering, have all been elaborated in detail. These novel techniques may serve to overcome the challenges currently faced in tissue engineering.

  4. Rapid fabricating technique for multi-layered human hepatic cell sheets by forceful contraction of the fibroblast monolayer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Sakai

    Full Text Available Cell sheet engineering is attracting attention from investigators in various fields, from basic research scientists to clinicians focused on regenerative medicine. However, hepatocytes have a limited proliferation potential in vitro, and it generally takes a several days to form a sheet morphology and multi-layered sheets. We herein report our rapid and efficient technique for generating multi-layered human hepatic cell (HepaRG® cell sheets using pre-cultured fibroblast monolayers derived from human skin (TIG-118 cells as a feeder layer on a temperature-responsive culture dish. Multi-layered TIG-118/HepaRG cell sheets with a thick morphology were harvested on day 4 of culturing HepaRG cells by forceful contraction of the TIG-118 cells, and the resulting sheet could be easily handled. In addition, the human albumin and alpha 1-antitrypsin synthesis activities of TIG-118/HepaRG cells were approximately 1.2 and 1.3 times higher than those of HepaRG cells, respectively. Therefore, this technique is considered to be a promising modality for rapidly fabricating multi-layered human hepatocyte sheets from cells with limited proliferation potential, and the engineered cell sheet could be used for cell transplantation with highly specific functions.

  5. Cell Control Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1996-01-01

    The engineering process of creating cell control systems is described, and a Cell Control Engineering (CCE) concept is defined. The purpose is to assist people, representing different disciplines in the organisation, to implement cell controllers by addressing the complexity of having many systems...... in physically and logically different and changing manufacturing environments. The defined CCE concept combines state-of-the-art of commercially available enabling technologies for automation system software development, generic cell control models and guidelines for the complete engineering process....... It facilitates the understanding of the task and structure of cell controllers and uses this knowledge directly in the implementation of the system. By applying generic models CCE facilitates reuse of software components and maintenance of applications. In many enterprises, software makes up an...

  6. Fuel cell engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sundmacher

    2012-01-01

    Fuel cells are attractive electrochemical energy converters featuring potentially very high thermodynamic efficiency factors. The focus of this volume of Advances in Chemical Engineering is on quantitative approaches, particularly based on chemical engineering principles, to analyze, control and optimize the steady state and dynamic behavior of low and high temperature fuel cells (PEMFC, DMFC, SOFC) to be applied in mobile and stationary systems. * Updates and informs the reader on the latest research findings using original reviews * Written by leading industry experts and scholars * Review

  7. Spatial coordination of cell orientation directed by nanoribbon sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujie, Toshinori; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Liang, Xiaobin; Nakajima, Ken; Chen, Yin; Wu, Hongkai; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Spatial coordination of cell orientation is of central importance in tissue/organ construction. In this study, we developed microfabricated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoribbon sheets with unique structures, using spin-coating and micropatterning techniques, in order to generate a hierarchically assembled cellular structure consisting of murine skeletal myoblasts (C2C12). The nanoribbon sheets were composed of aligned PLGA nanoribbons in the center, and strips on four sides which take a role as bridges to connect and immobilize the aligned nanoribbons. Such unique structures facilitated the alignment of C2C12 cells into bilayer cell sheets, and cellular alignment was directed by the aligned direction of nanoribbons. The nanoribbon sheets also facilitated the construction of multilayer cell sheets with anisotropic (orthogonal) and isotropic (parallel) orientations. The enhanced expression of myogenic genes of C2C12 cells on the bilayer cell sheets demonstrated that the nanoribbons induced C2C12 cell differentiation into mature myoblasts. The micropatterned nanoribbon sheets may be a useful tool for directing cellular organization with defined alignment for regenerative medicine and drug screening applications. PMID:25890709

  8. Addition of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheets Improves Bone Formation at an Ectopic Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifa Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effect of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs added to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC sheets on bone formation at an ectopic site. We isolated MSCs and ADSCs from the same rabbits. We then prepared MSC sheets for implantation with or without ADSCs subcutaneously in the backs of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice. We assessed bone formation at eight weeks after implantation by micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. In osteogenic medium, MSCs grew to form multilayer sheets containing many calcium nodules. MSC sheets without ADSCs formed bone-like tissue; although neo-bone and cartilage-like tissues were sparse and unevenly distributed by eight weeks after implantation. In comparison, MSC sheets with ADSCs promoted better bone regeneration as evidenced by the greater density of bone, increased mineral deposition, obvious formation of blood vessels, large number of interconnected ossified trabeculae and woven bone structures, and greater bone volume/total volume within the composite constructs. Our results indicate that although sheets of only MSCs have the potential to form tissue engineered bone at an ectopic site, the addition of ADSCs can significantly increase the osteogenic potential of MSC sheets. Thus, the combination of MSC sheets with ADSCs may be regarded as a promising therapeutic strategy to stimulate bone regeneration.

  9. A Computer Algorithm For Engineering Off-Shell Multiplets With Four Supercharges On The World Sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Burghardt, K

    2012-01-01

    We present an adinkra-based computer algorithm implemented in a Mathematica code and use it in a limited demonstration of how to engineer off-shell, arbitrary N-extended world-sheet supermultiplets. Using one of the outputs from this algorithm, we present evidence for the unexpected discovery of a previously unknown 8 - 8 representation of N = 2 world sheet supersymmetry. As well, we uncover a menagerie of (p, q) = (3, 1) world sheet supermultiplets.

  10. Flow sheeting software as a tool when teaching Chemical Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Asad

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to design different chemical processes by using flow sheeting software and to show the usefulness of flow sheeting software as an educational tool. The industries studied are hydrogen, sulfur, nitric acid and ethylene glycol production and a model of drying technique is also included. Firstly, there is an introduction of chemcad as a tool when teaching chemical processes and explanation of each industry which is selected to design. Various production methods for each...

  11. Microscale technologies for cell engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh

    2016-01-01

    This book offers readers cutting-edge research at the interface of polymer science and engineering, biomedical engineering, materials science, and biology. State-of-the-art developments in microscale technologies for cell engineering applications are covered, including technologies relevant to both pluripotent and adult stem cells, the immune system, and somatic cells of the animal and human origin. This book bridges the gap in the understanding of engineering biology at multiple length scale, including microenvironmental control, bioprocessing, and tissue engineering in the areas of cardiac, cartilage, skeletal, and vascular tissues, among others. This book also discusses unique, emerging areas of micropatterning and three-dimensional printing models of cellular engineering, and contributes to the better understanding of the role of biophysical factors in determining the cell fate. Microscale Technologies for Cell Engineering is valuable for bioengineers, biomaterial scientists, tissue engineers, clinicians,...

  12. 细胞膜片技术在组织工程中的应用与研究进展%Application of cell sheet technology in tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周术奎; 张楷乐; 王营; 傅强

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The cel sheet technology that is applied with the absence of scaffolds and enzymatic digestion can effectively repair tissue defects and improve organ function, by stimulating the secretion of extracelular matrix to form a dense membrane tissue. OBJECTIVE: To review the recent progress in cel sheet technology used in tissue engineering, thereby providing a new idea for relevant basic and clinical research. METHODS:The first author retrieved CNKI database, Wanfang database and PubMed with the keywords of “cel sheet, tissue engineering” in Chinese and English, respectively. Literature retrieval period was from January 2010 to July 2015. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Cel sheet technology combined with scaffold materials can be used for reconstruction and repair of tissues and organs. With the emerging of new technologies, multi-layer cel sheets are stratified to form a three-dimensional tissue for repair of soft tissues and organs. Compared with the monolayer cel sheet, the three-dimensional cel sheet that is laminated by same or different cel sheets has stronger regenerative ability and can be used to construct the ideal target tissue modelin vitro. Cel sheet technology combined with scaffolds can improve the mechanical strength of the composite and reduce cel loss, which has made great progress in the repair of tooth, bone and cartilage tissue. Currently, the cel sheet technology is at the laboratory stage, and little is reported on its clinical applications. We look forward to more innovative technologies that can be integrated into the cel sheet technology.%背景:细胞膜片技术无须支架材料和酶消化,通过刺激细胞外基质分泌形成致密膜片组织,能有效地修复组织缺损和改善器官功能。  目的:回顾近年来国内外细胞膜片技术应用于组织工程领域的新技术和新进展,为相关基础和临床研究提供新的思路。  方法:由第一作者检索CNKI全文数据库、

  13. 骨髓间充质干细胞膜片复合磷酸三钙陶瓷构建工程化骨组织的体内成骨研究%Engineering bone tissue using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell sheet and β-tricalcium phosphate ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马东洋; 马敬; 姜东红; 王剑锋

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of constructing bone tissue using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheet and β-tricalcium phosphate ceramic (TCP).Methods We first harvested a cell sheet from rabbit BMSCs using a continuous culture method and a scraping technique.The cell sheet was then wraped around a cylinder of β-TCP.Finally,the constructs were implanted into the subcutaneous pockets of nude mice for in vivo experiments.Gross view and histological examinations were performed to evaluate the harvested specimens.Results The cell sheet,with an average thickness of 158 mm, was composed of multi-layered cells separated in the extracellular matrix.Six weeks after implantation, the new bone tissue was present both on the edge and at the center of the TCP in sheet-TCP group.A layer of woven bone formed in the cell-sheet group.In contrast, the TCP was filled only with fibrous tissue in the TCP group,without evidence of bone formation.Conclusion The study indicates that the combination of osteogenic BMSC sheet and β-TCP ceramic can engineer bone tissue and the engineered construct might be considered as a promising substitute for bone repair.%目的:探讨骨髓间充质千细胞膜片复合磷酸三钙支架材料构建组织工程骨的可行性.方法:将兔骨髓间充质干细胞高密度接种于普通培养皿,在成骨诱导条件下连续培养2周,获得细胞膜片,修剪成长方形,并由一端卷起包裹圆柱状的磷酸三钙材料.静置孵育24h后将构建物移植到裸鼠背部皮下.术后6周取材,进行大体观察、组织学检查、组织定量学分析.结果:所获骨髓间充质干细胞膜片有多层细胞组成,保留了细胞外基质.实验组在材料表面及其孔隙内有较多的骨质形成;单一材料组空隙内为纤维组织,未见骨或软骨样组织;单一膜片组见片状编织骨形成.结论:骨髓间充质干细胞膜片在体内具有良好的成骨能力,可作为细胞释放载体与磷酸三

  14. Designing 3D Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheets Merging Magnetic and Fluorescent Features: When Cell Sheet Technology Meets Image-Guided Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmi, Gabriel; Pidial, Laetitia; Silva, Amanda K. A.; Blondiaux, Eléonore; Meresse, Bertrand; Gazeau, Florence; Autret, Gwennhael; Balvay, Daniel; Cuenod, Charles André; Perretta, Silvana; Tavitian, Bertrand; Wilhelm, Claire; Cellier, Christophe; Clément, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cell sheet technology opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration therapy by providing readily implantable, scaffold-free 3D tissue constructs. Many studies have focused on the therapeutic effects of cell sheet implantation while relatively little attention has concerned the fate of the implanted cells in vivo. The aim of the present study was to track longitudinally the cells implanted in the cell sheets in vivo in target tissues. To this end we (i) endowed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) with imaging properties by double labeling with fluorescent and magnetic tracers, (ii) applied BMMSC cell sheets to a digestive fistula model in mice, (iii) tracked the BMMSC fate in vivo by MRI and probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), and (iv) quantified healing of the fistula. We show that image-guided longitudinal follow-up can document both the fate of the cell sheet-derived BMMSCs and their healing capacity. Moreover, our theranostic approach informs on the mechanism of action, either directly by integration of cell sheet-derived BMMSCs into the host tissue or indirectly through the release of signaling molecules in the host tissue. Multimodal imaging and clinical evaluation converged to attest that cell sheet grafting resulted in minimal clinical inflammation, improved fistula healing, reduced tissue fibrosis and enhanced microvasculature density. At the molecular level, cell sheet transplantation induced an increase in the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (TGF-ß2 and IL-10) and host intestinal growth factors involved in tissue repair (EGF and VEGF). Multimodal imaging is useful for tracking cell sheets and for noninvasive follow-up of their regenerative properties. PMID:27022420

  15. Avidin-biotin-based approach to forming heterotypic cell clusters and cell sheets on a gas-permeable membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implantation of sheet-like liver tissues is a promising method in hepatocyte-based therapies, because angiogenesis is expected to occur upon implantation from the surrounding tissues. In this context, we introduce here a new methodology for the formation of a functional thick hepatic tissue usable for cell sheet technology. First, we report the formation of composite tissue elements in suspension culture. Composite elements were composed of human hepatoma Hep G2 cells and mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts which are important modulators for thick-tissue formation. To overcome the very low attachment and organization capability between different cells in suspension, we synthesized a new cell-to-cell binding molecule based on the avidin-biotin binding system that we previously applied to attach hepatocytes on artificial substrata. This newly synthesized biotin-conjugated biocompatible anchoring molecule was inserted in the plasma membrane of both cell types. NIH/3T3 cells were further conjugated with avidin and incubated with biotin-presenting Hep G2 cells to form highly composite tissue elements. Then, we seeded those elements on highly gas-permeable membranes at their closest packing density to induce the formation of a thick, composite, functional hepatic tissue without any perfusion. This methodology could open a new way to engineer implantable thick liver tissue sheets where different cell types are spatially organized and well supplied with oxygen.

  16. FORMING FREEFORM SURFACE SHEET METAL USINGINTEGRATED REVERSE ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING; Yuan(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Puntambekar N V, Jablokow A G, Sommer H J. Unified review of 3D model generation for reverse engineering[J]. Computer Integrated Manufacturing System,1994,7(4):259~268.[2]Chikofsky E J. Reverse engineering and design recovery: a taxonomy[J]. IEEE Software,1990,6(3):13~17.[3]Chou Hon-yue. Application of reverse engineering in die and mold manufacturing[A]. 3rd Int Conf on Mould & Die Technique in Asia[C]. Taibei, China,1995.753~764.[4]Dipl-Ing Thomas Haller. Rapid mould and die making using reverse engineering and rapid prototyping[A]. 3rd Int Conf on Mould & Die Technique in Asia[C]. Taibei, China,1995.739~752.[5]Abella R J, Daschbach J M. Reverse engineering industrial applications[J]. Computers Ind Engng,1994,26(2):381~385.[6]Chen Y D, Tang X J. Automatic digitization of freeform curves by coordinate measuring machines[J]. ASME PED,1992,62:113~125.[7]Antonie van Rensburg. Implementing IDEF techniques as simulation modeling specifications[J]. Computers Ind Engng,1994,29(1-4):467~571.[8]Eastma C M, Fereshetian N. Informaiton models for use in product design: a comparison[J]. Computer-Aided Design.1994,26(7):551~572.

  17. Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    In an effort to reduce the cost of biofuels, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has merged biochemistry with modern computing and mathematics. The result is a model of carbon metabolism that will help researchers understand and engineer the process of photosynthesis for optimal biofuel production.

  18. Surface modification of uniaxial cyclic strain cell culture platform with temperature-responsive polymer for cell sheet detachment†

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, E L; Bendre, H. H.; Kalmykov, A.; Wong, J Y

    2015-01-01

    Current cell sheet-based blood vessels lack biomimetic structure and require excessively long culture times that may compromise smooth muscle cell phenotype. We modified a commercially available product for uniaxial cell sheet conditioning with thermoresponsive copolymers. Thus, culture of detachable conditioned cell sheets is shortened while retaining structural integrity and contractility.

  19. Osteogenic Matrix Cell Sheets Facilitate Osteogenesis in Irradiated Rat Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Uchihara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of large bone defects after resection of malignant musculoskeletal tumors is a significant challenge in orthopedic surgery. Extracorporeal autogenous irradiated bone grafting is a treatment option for bone reconstruction. However, nonunion often occurs because the osteogenic capacity is lost by irradiation. In the present study, we established an autogenous irradiated bone graft model in the rat femur to assess whether osteogenic matrix cell sheets improve osteogenesis of the irradiated bone. Osteogenic matrix cell sheets were prepared from bone marrow-derived stromal cells and co-transplanted with irradiated bone. X-ray images at 4 weeks after transplantation showed bridging callus formation around the irradiated bone. Micro-computed tomography images at 12 weeks postoperatively showed abundant callus formation in the whole circumference of the irradiated bone. Histology showed bone union between the irradiated bone and host femur. Mechanical testing showed that the failure force at the irradiated bone site was significantly higher than in the control group. Our study indicates that osteogenic matrix cell sheet transplantation might be a powerful method to facilitate osteogenesis in irradiated bones, which may become a treatment option for reconstruction of bone defects after resection of malignant musculoskeletal tumors.

  20. The effect of the coumarin-like derivative osthole on the osteogenic properties of human periodontal ligament and jaw bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-Na; An, Ying; Lei, Ming; Li, Bei; Yang, Hao; Lu, Hong; Chen, Fa-Ming; Jin, Yan

    2013-12-01

    Cell sheet engineering is a scaffold-free delivery concept that has been shown to improve mesenchymal stem cell-mediated regeneration of injured or pathologically damaged periodontal tissues in preclinical studies and several clinical trials. However, the best strategy for cell sheet production remains to be identified. The aim of this study was to investigate the biological effects of osthole, a coumarin-like derivative extracted from Chinese herbs, on the cell sheet formation and osteogenic properties of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and jaw bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (JBMMSCs). Patient-matched PDLSCs and JBMMSCs were isolated, and an appropriate concentration of osthole for cell culture was screened for both cell types in terms of cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Next, the best mode of osthole stimulation for inducing the formation of sheets by each cell type was selected by evaluating the amount of their extracellular matrix (ECM) protein production as well as osteogenic-related gene expression. Furthermore, both PDLSC and JBMMSC sheets obtained from each optimized technique were transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice to evaluate their capacity for ectopic bone regeneration. The results revealed that 10(-5) m/L osthole significantly enhanced the proliferation of both PDLSCs and JBMMSCs (P osthole groups (P > 0.05). In addition, 10(-5) m/L osthole was the best concentration to promote the ALP activities of both cells (P osthole throughout the entire culture stage (10 days) for PDLSCs or at the early stage (first 3 days) for JBMMSCs was the most effective osthole administration mode for cell sheet formation (P osthole-mediated PDLSC and JBMMSC sheets formed more new bone than those obtained without osthole intervention (P osthole stimulation may enhance ECM production and positively affect cell behavior in cell sheet engineering. PMID:24095254

  1. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Schwann Cell Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering of Schwann cells (SCs) can serve a number of purposes, such as in vitro SC-related disease modeling, treatment of peripheral nerve diseases or peripheral nerve injury, and, potentially, treatment of CNS diseases. SCs can be generated from autologous stem cells in vitro by recapitu

  2. Osteogenesis of human adipose-derived stem cells on hydroxyapatite-mineralized poly(lactic acid) nanofiber sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrospun fiber sheets with various orientations (random, partially aligned, and aligned) and smooth and roughened casted membranes were prepared. Hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals were in situ formed on these material surfaces via immersion in 10 × simulated body fluid solution. The size and morphology of the resulting fibers were examined using scanning electron microscopy. The average diameter of the fibers ranged from 225 ± 25 to 1050 ± 150 nm depending on the electrospinning parameters. Biological experiment results show that human adipose-derived stem cells exhibit different adhesion and osteogenic differentiation on the three types of fiber. The cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were best on the aligned fibers. Similar results were found for phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase expression. Electrospun poly(lactic acid) aligned fibers mineralized with HA crystals provide a good environment for cell growth and osteogenic differentiation and thus have great potential in the tissue engineering field. - Highlights: • hADSCs show higher adhesion and proliferation on HA-precipitate electrospun fiber sheets than those of the control membranes. • HA-mineralized fiber groups greatly improve cell growth and increase FAK and p-FAK expressions. • HA-precipitate electrospun fiber sheets present higher ALP and OC activity through the study periods. • Electrospun PLA fiber mineralized with HA provides a good environment for cell growth and osteogenic differentiation. • A simple immersion of electrospun fibers in 10 × SBF are a potential matrix for bone tissue engineering

  3. Osteogenesis of human adipose-derived stem cells on hydroxyapatite-mineralized poly(lactic acid) nanofiber sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Fu-Chen [Department of Health Developing and Health Marketing, Kainan University, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang, E-mail: chichang31@thu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taiwan (China); Lai, Wen-Fu T., E-mail: Laitw@tmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-01

    Electrospun fiber sheets with various orientations (random, partially aligned, and aligned) and smooth and roughened casted membranes were prepared. Hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals were in situ formed on these material surfaces via immersion in 10 × simulated body fluid solution. The size and morphology of the resulting fibers were examined using scanning electron microscopy. The average diameter of the fibers ranged from 225 ± 25 to 1050 ± 150 nm depending on the electrospinning parameters. Biological experiment results show that human adipose-derived stem cells exhibit different adhesion and osteogenic differentiation on the three types of fiber. The cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were best on the aligned fibers. Similar results were found for phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase expression. Electrospun poly(lactic acid) aligned fibers mineralized with HA crystals provide a good environment for cell growth and osteogenic differentiation and thus have great potential in the tissue engineering field. - Highlights: • hADSCs show higher adhesion and proliferation on HA-precipitate electrospun fiber sheets than those of the control membranes. • HA-mineralized fiber groups greatly improve cell growth and increase FAK and p-FAK expressions. • HA-precipitate electrospun fiber sheets present higher ALP and OC activity through the study periods. • Electrospun PLA fiber mineralized with HA provides a good environment for cell growth and osteogenic differentiation. • A simple immersion of electrospun fibers in 10 × SBF are a potential matrix for bone tissue engineering.

  4. Potential of Newborn and Adult Stem Cells for the Production of Vascular Constructs Using the Living Tissue Sheet Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourget, Jean-Michel; Gauvin, Robert; Duchesneau, David; Remy, Murielle; Auger, François A.; Germain, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Bypass surgeries using native vessels rely on the availability of autologous veins and arteries. An alternative to those vessels could be tissue-engineered vascular constructs made by self-organized tissue sheets. This paper intends to evaluate the potential use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from two different sources: (1) bone marrow-derived MSCs and (2) umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs. When cultured in vitro, a proportion of those cells differentiated into smooth muscle cell- (SMC-) like cells and expressed contraction associated proteins. Moreover, these cells assembled into manipulable tissue sheets when cultured in presence of ascorbic acid. Tubular vessels were then produced by rolling those tissue sheets on a mandrel. The architecture, contractility, and mechanical resistance of reconstructed vessels were compared with tissue-engineered media and adventitia produced from SMCs and dermal fibroblasts, respectively. Histology revealed a collagenous extracellular matrix and the contractile responses measured for these vessels were stronger than dermal fibroblasts derived constructs although weaker than SMCs-derived constructs. The burst pressure of bone marrow-derived vessels was higher than SMCs-derived ones. These results reinforce the versatility of the self-organization approach since they demonstrate that it is possible to recapitulate a contractile media layer from MSCs without the need of exogenous scaffolding material. PMID:26504783

  5. Organic fuel cells and fuel cell conducting sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I.; Ha, Su; Adams, Brian

    2007-10-16

    A passive direct organic fuel cell includes an organic fuel solution and is operative to produce at least 15 mW/cm.sup.2 when operating at room temperature. In additional aspects of the invention, fuel cells can include a gas remover configured to promote circulation of an organic fuel solution when gas passes through the solution, a modified carbon cloth, one or more sealants, and a replaceable fuel cartridge.

  6. Engineering stem cell niches in bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and amniotic fluid stem cells have the potential to be expanded and differentiated into various cell types in the body. Efficient differentiation of stem cells with the desired tissue-specific function is critical for stem cell-based cell therapy, tissue engineering, drug discovery and disease modeling. Bioreactors provide a great platform to regulate the stem cell microenvironment, known as “ni...

  7. NREL Showcases Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Bus, Helps DOE Set Standards for Outreach (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) accomplishments in showcasing a Ford hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H2ICE) bus at The Taste of Colorado festival in Denver. NREL started using its U.S. Department of Energy-funded H2ICE bus in May 2010 as the primary shuttle vehicle for VIP visitors, members of the media, and new employees. In September 2010, NREL featured the bus at The Taste of Colorado. This was the first major outreach event for the bus. NREL's educational brochure, vehicle wrap designs, and outreach efforts serve as a model for other organizations with DOE-funded H2ICE buses. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Education Group and Market Transformation Group in the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  8. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrefai MT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad T Alrefai,1–3 Divya Murali,4 Arghya Paul,4 Khalid M Ridwan,1,2 John M Connell,1,2 Dominique Shum-Tim1,2 1Division of Cardiac Surgery, 2Division of Surgical Research, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Abstract: Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. Keywords: stem cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac surgery, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, heart, scaffolds, organoids, cell sheet and tissue engineering

  9. Membrane-based electrolyte sheets for facile fabrication of flexible dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A new electrolyte sheet was developed for flexible dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). → It is composed of a porous polyethylene membranes and ionic liquid electrolytes. → The electrochemical properties of the electrolyte sheets were evaluated. → High-performance flexible DSCs with the electrolyte sheets were facilely fabricated. - Abstract: New electrolyte sheets based on porous polyethylene membranes for flexible dye-sensitized solar cells have been developed. Ionic liquid electrolytes are accommodated in commercial polyethylene membranes to form the electrolyte sheets. The morphology of membranes and iodine concentrations in ionic liquid are varied. The electrochemical measurement results show that the morphology, pore structure, and iodine concentration affect mass transport in electrolyte sheet, as well as charge transfer between platinum electrode and electrolyte sheet greatly. Based on these electrolyte sheets, lamination method instead of conventional vacuum injection of electrolyte is used to fabricate flexible dye-sensitized solar cells. Optimal device with an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.63 V, a fill factor of 0.58, and a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 6.17 mA cm-2 at an incident light intensity of 100 mW cm-2 is obtained, which yields a light-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 2.25%.

  10. In vivo vascularization of cell sheets provided better long-term tissue survival than injection of cell suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ryohei; Kuruma, Yosuke; Sekine, Hidekazu; Dobashi, Izumi; Yamato, Masayuki; Umezu, Mitsuo; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    Cell sheets have shown a remarkable ability for repairing damaged myocardium in clinical and preclinical studies. Although they demonstrate a high degree of viability as engrafted cells in vivo, the reason behind their survivability is unclear. In this study, the survival and vascularization of rat cardiac cell sheets transplanted in the subcutaneous tissue of athymic rats were investigated temporally. The cell sheets showed significantly higher survival than cell suspensions for up to 12 months, using an in vivo bioluminescence imaging system to detect luciferase-positive transplanted cells. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay also showed a smaller number of apoptotic cells in the cell sheets than in the cell suspensions at 1 day. Rapid vascular formation and maturation were observed inside the cell sheets using an in vivo imaging system. Leaky vessels appeared at 6 h, red blood cells flowing through functional vessels appeared at 12 h, and morphologically matured vessels appeared at 7 days. In addition, immunostaining of cell sheets with nerve/glial antigen-2 (NG2) showed that vessel maturity increased over time. Interestingly, these results correlated with the dynamics of cell sheet mRNA expression. Genes related to endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation, migration and vessel sprouting were highly expressed within 1 day, and genes related to pericyte recruitment and vessel maturation were highly expressed at 3 days or later. This suggested that the cell sheets could secrete appropriate angiogenic factors in a timely way after transplantation, and this ability might be a key reason for their high survival. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24470393

  11. Polycrystalline Silicon Sheets for Solar Cells by the Improved Spinning Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Hide, I.

    1984-01-01

    Cost reduction of silicon materials in the photovoltaic program of materials was examined. The current process of producing silicon sheets is based entirely on the conventional Czochralski ingot growth and wafering used in the semiconductor industry. The current technology cannot meet the cost reduction demands for producing low cost silicon sheets. Alternative sheet production processes such as unconventional crystallization are needed. The production of polycrystalline silicon sheets by unconventional ingot technology is the casting technique. Though large grain sheets were obtained by this technique, silicon ribbon growth overcomes deficiencies of the casting process by obtaining the sheet directly from the melt. The need to solve difficulties of growth stability and impurity effects are examined. The direct formation process of polycrystalline silicon sheets with large grain size, smooth surface, and sharp edges from the melt with a high growth rate which will yield low cost silicon sheets for solar cells and the photovoltaic characteristics associated with this type of sheet to include an EBIC study of the grain boundaries are described.

  12. Cryopreservation of Cell Sheets of Adipose Stem Cells: Limitations and Successes

    OpenAIRE

    Prata, F. P.; M.T. Cerqueira; Moreira-Silva, J.; Pirraco, Rogério P.; Reis, R. L.; Marques, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Cell Sheets of hASCs (hASCs-CS) have been previously proposed for wound healing applications(1, 2) and despite the concern for production time reduction, the possibility of having these hASCs-CS off-the-shelf is appealing. The goal of this work was to define a cryopreservation methodology allowing to preserve cells viability and the properties CS matrix. hASCs-CS obtained from three different donors were created in UP-cell thermoresponsive dishes(Nunc, Germany) as previously reported(1,...

  13. Treatment of refractory cutaneous ulcers with mixed sheets consisting of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Koji Ueno; Yuriko Takeuchi; Makoto Samura; Yuya Tanaka; Tamami Nakamura; Arata Nishimoto; Tomoaki Murata; Tohru Hosoyama; Kimikazu Hamano

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the therapeutic effects of mixed sheets consisting of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) and fibroblasts on cutaneous skin ulcers. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion in mixed cell sheets was much higher than in PBMNCs and fibroblasts. Concerning the mechanism, transforming growth factor beta 1 and platelet-derived growth factor BB secreted from PBMNCs enhanced VEGF production in fibroblasts. In wounds created on the backs of d...

  14. Bioengineered periosteal progenitor cell sheets to enhance tendon-bone healing in a bone tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsiang Chang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tendon-bone tunnel healing is crucial for long term success in anterior cruciate liga­ment (ACL reconstruction. The periosteum contains osteochondral progenitor cells that can differenti­ate into osteoblasts and chondroblasts during tendon-bone healing. We developed a scaf­fold-free method using polymerized fibrin-coated dishes to make functional periosteal progenitor cell (PPC sheets. Bioengineered PPC sheets for enhancing tendon-bone healing were evaluated in an extra-articular bone tunnel model in rabbit. Methods: PPC derived from rabbit tibia periosteum, cultivated on polymerized fi­brin-coated dishes and harvested as PPC sheet. A confocal microscopy assay was used to evaluate the morphology of PPC sheets. PPC sheets as a periosteum to wrap around hamstring tendon grafts were pulled into a 3-mm diameter bone tunnel of tibia, and compared with a tendon graft without PPC sheets treatment. Rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biochemical as­say and histological assay to demonstrate the enhancement of PPC sheets in tendon-bone healing. Results: PPC spread deposit on fibrin on the dish surface with continuous monolayer PPC was ob­served. Histological staining revealed that PPC sheets enhance collagen and glycosaminoglycans deposi­tion with fibrocartilage formation in the tendon-bone junction at 4 weeks. Collagen fiber with fibrocartilage formation at tendon-bone junction was also found at 8 weeks. Matured fibrocartilage and dense collagen fiber were formed at the tendon-bone interface at 8 weeks by Masson trichrome and Safranin-O staining Conclusions: Periosteal progenitor cell monolayer maintains the differentiated capacity and osteochon­dral potential in order to promote fibrocartilage formation in tendon-bone junction. Bioengi­neered PPC sheets can offer a new feasible therapeutic strategy of a novel approach to en­hance tendon-bone junction healing.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Tooth Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peng; Ling Ye; Xue-dong Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Tooth loss compromises human oral health. Although several prosthetic methods, such as artificial denture and dental implants, are clinical therapies to tooth loss problems, they are thought to have safety and usage time issues. Recently, tooth tissue engineering has attracted more and more attention. Stem cell based tissue engineering is thought to be a promising way to replace the missing tooth. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells which can differentiate into a variety of cell types. The potential MSCs for tooth regeneration mainly include stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from the apical part of the papilla (SCAPs), stem cells from the dental follicle (DFSCs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). This review outlines the recent progress in the mesenchymal stem cells used in tooth regeneration.

  16. Stem cells in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jeong Min [Department of Preventive and Social Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Hwang, Yu-Shik [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Mantalaris, Anathathios, E-mail: yshwang@khu.ac.k [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Bone tissue engineering has been one of the most promising areas of research, providing a potential clinical application to cure bone defects. Recently, various stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have received extensive attention in the field of bone tissue engineering due to their distinct biological capability to differentiate into osteogenic lineages. The application of these stem cells to bone tissue engineering requires inducing in vitro differentiation of these cells into bone forming cells, osteoblasts. For this purpose, efficient in vitro differentiation towards osteogenic lineage requires the development of well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source for application to bone tissue engineering therapies. This review provides a critical examination of the various experimental strategies that could be used to direct the differentiation of ESC, BM-MSC, UCB-MSC, ADSC, MDSC and DPSC towards osteogenic lineages and their potential applications in tissue engineering, particularly in the regeneration of bone. (topical review)

  17. Stem cells in bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone tissue engineering has been one of the most promising areas of research, providing a potential clinical application to cure bone defects. Recently, various stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have received extensive attention in the field of bone tissue engineering due to their distinct biological capability to differentiate into osteogenic lineages. The application of these stem cells to bone tissue engineering requires inducing in vitro differentiation of these cells into bone forming cells, osteoblasts. For this purpose, efficient in vitro differentiation towards osteogenic lineage requires the development of well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source for application to bone tissue engineering therapies. This review provides a critical examination of the various experimental strategies that could be used to direct the differentiation of ESC, BM-MSC, UCB-MSC, ADSC, MDSC and DPSC towards osteogenic lineages and their potential applications in tissue engineering, particularly in the regeneration of bone. (topical review)

  18. Stem cell engineering a WTEC global assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, Jeanne; McDevitt, Todd; Palecek, Sean; Schaffer, David; Zandstra, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This book describes a global assessment of stem cell engineering research, achieved through site visits by a panel of experts to leading institutes, followed by dedicated workshops. The assessment made clear that engineers and the engineering approach with its quantitative, system-based thinking can contribute much to the progress of stem cell research and development. The increased need for complex computational models and new, innovative technologies, such as high-throughput screening techniques, organ-on-a-chip models and in vitro tumor models require an increasing involvement of engineers and physical scientists. Additionally, this book will show that although the US is still in a leadership position in stem cell engineering, Asian countries such as Japan, China and Korea, as well as European countries like the UK, Germany, Sweden and the Netherlands are rapidly expanding their investments in the field. Strategic partnerships between countries could lead to major advances of the field and scalable expansi...

  19. Bay Area Transit Agencies Propel Fuel Cell Buses Toward Commercialization (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration of the next generation of fuel cells buses. Several transit agencies in the San Francisco Bay Area are participating in demonstrating the largest single fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States.

  20. Development of 3D in vitro platform technology to engineer mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseinkhani H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hossein Hosseinkhani,1 Po-Da Hong,1 Dah-Shyong Yu,2 Yi-Ru Chen,3 Diana Ickowicz,4 Ira-Yudovin Farber,4 Abraham J Domb41Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (TAIWANTECH, 2Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, 4Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy-Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, IsraelAbstract: This study aims to develop a three-dimensional in vitro culture system to genetically engineer mesenchymal stem cells (MSC to express bone morphogenic protein-2. We employed nanofabrication technologies borrowed from the spinning industry, such as electrospinning, to mass-produce identical building blocks in a variety of shapes and sizes to fabricate electrospun nanofiber sheets comprised of composites of poly (glycolic acid and collagen. Homogenous nanoparticles of cationic biodegradable natural polymer were formed by simple mixing of an aqueous solution of plasmid DNA encoded bone morphogenic protein-2 with the same volume of cationic polysaccharide, dextran-spermine. Rat bone marrow MSC were cultured on electrospun nanofiber sheets comprised of composites of poly (glycolic acid and collagen prior to the incorporation of the nanoparticles into the nanofiber sheets. Bone morphogenic protein-2 was significantly detected in MSC cultured on nanofiber sheets incorporated with nanoparticles after 2 days compared with MSC cultured on nanofiber sheets incorporated with naked plasmid DNA. We conclude that the incorporation of nanoparticles into nanofiber sheets is a very promising strategy to genetically engineer MSC and can be used for further applications in regenerative medicine therapy.Keywords: 3D culture, nanoparticles, nanofibers, polycations, tissue engineering

  1. Calculated and Experimental Research of Sheet Resistances of Laser-Doped Silicon Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Wang, Wen-Jing

    2015-02-01

    The calculated and experimental research of sheet resistances of crystalline silicon solar cells by dry laser doping is investigated. The nonlinear numerical model on laser melting of crystalline silicon and liquid-phase diffusion of phosphorus atoms by dry laser doping is analyzed by the finite difference method implemented in MATLAB. The melting period and melting depth of crystalline silicon as a function of laser energy density is achieved. The effective liquid-phase diffusion of phosphorus atoms in melting silicon by dry laser doping is confirmed by the rapid decrease of sheet resistances in experimental measurement. The plateau of sheet resistances is reached at around 15Ω/□. The calculated sheet resistances as a function of laser energy density is obtained and the calculated results are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental measurement. Due to the successful verification by comparison between experimental measurement and calculated results, the simulation results could be used to optimize the virtual laser doping parameters.

  2. Simulation Model Driven Engineering for Manufacturing Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Hibino, Hironori; Inukai, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Yukishige

    2010-01-01

    In our research, the simulation model driven engineering for manufacturing cell (SMDE-MC) is proposed. The purposes of SMDE-MC are to support the manufacturing engineering processes based on the simulation model and to extend the range of control applications and simulation applications using the PC based control. SMDE-MC provides the simulation model which controls and monitors the manufacturing cell directly using PC based control in the manufacturing system execution phase. Then when the s...

  3. Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are the building blocks for all other cells in an organism. The human body has about 200 different types of cells and any of those cells can be produced by a stem cell. This fact emphasizes the significance of stem cells in transplantational medicine, regenerative therapy and bioengineering. Whether embryonic or adult, these cells can be used for the successful treatment of a wide range of diseases that were not treatable before, such as osteogenesis imperfecta in children, different forms of leukemias, acute myocardial infarction, some neural damages and diseases, etc. Bioengineering, e.g. successful manipulation of these cells with multipotential capacity of differentiation toward appropriate patterns and precise quantity, are the prerequisites for successful outcome and treatment. By combining in vivo and in vitro techniques, it is now possible to manage the wide spectrum of tissue damages and organ diseases. Although the stem-cell therapy is not a response to all the questions, it provides more...

  4. Application of Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Stem cells have become an important source of seed cells for tissue engineering because they are relatively easy to expand in vitro and can be induced to differentiate into various cell types in vitro or in vivo. In the current stage, most stem cell researches focus on in vitro studies, including in vitro induction and phenotype characterization. Our center has made a great deal of effort in the in vivo study by using stem cells as seed cells for tissue construction. We have used bone marrow stem cells (BMS...

  5. Cancer Immunotherapy Using Engineered Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gschweng, Eric Hans

    2015-01-01

    Engineering the immune system against cancer ideally provides surgical precision against the antigen bearing target cell while avoiding the systemic, off-target toxicity of chemotherapy. Successful treatment of patients in the clinic has been achieved by the expression of anti-cancer T-cell receptors (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) in T cells followed by infusion of these cells into cancer patients. Unfortunately, while many patients initially respond showing anti-tumor efficacy, t...

  6. Nano-scaled hydroxyapatite/silk fibroin sheets support osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel biomaterial that was composed of nano-scaled sintered hydroxyapatite (HAp) and silk fibroin (SF) was fabricated. We cultured rat marrow mesenchymal cells (MMCs) on this biomaterial (nano-HAp/SF sheet), on bare SF sheets, and on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) dishes as controls, then evaluated cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of the MMCs. After 1 h of culture, a large number of viable cells were observed on the nano-HAp/SF sheets in comparison to the controls. In addition, after 3 h of culture, the morphology of the cells on the nano-HAp/SF sheets was quite different from that on the SF sheets. MMCs extrude their cytoplasmic processes to nano-HAp particles and are well attached to the sheets. After 14 days of culture, under osteogenic conditions, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and bone-specific osteocalcin secretion of the cells on nano-HAp/SF sheets were higher than were those on the controls. These results indicated that the surface of the nano-HAp/SF sheets is covered with appropriate HAp crystal for MMC adhesion/proliferation and that the sheets effectively support the osteogenic differentiation of MMCs. Therefore, the nano-HAp/SF sheet is an effective biomaterial that is applicable in bone reconstruction surgery

  7. Energy efficient sheet working by an optimized production engineering; Energieeffiziente Blechbearbeitung durch optimierte Fertigungstechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettner-Reich, Andreas [Trumpf Werkzeugmaschinen Gmbh + Co.KG, Ditzingen (Germany)

    2011-06-20

    Energy efficiency must be considered comprehensively as resource efficiency. So a carbon dioxide laser convinces by best sheet cutting, also during stamping energy saving is to be realized. Laser processing saves energy in comparision to cutting. (GL)

  8. Glycan Engineering for Cell and Developmental Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Matthew E.; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-surface glycans are a diverse class of macromolecules that participate in many key biological processes, including cell-cell communication, development, and disease progression. Thus, the ability to modulate the structures of glycans on cell surfaces provides a powerful means not only to understand fundamental processes but also to direct activity and elicit desired cellular responses. Here, we describe methods to sculpt glycans on cell surfaces and highlight recent successes in which artificially engineered glycans have been employed to control biological outcomes such as the immune response and stem cell fate. PMID:26933739

  9. Engineering the Polyketide Cell Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Louise

    Natural products constitute one of the largest sources of therapeutics known to mankind. Among the natural products polyketides such as erythromycin (antibiotic) and lovastatin (cholesterol lowering) have long proven their immense value to patients around the world. Polyketides are naturally...... through the use of adaptive evolution, random mutagenesis and screening as well as metabolic engineering. Firstly, in silico guided metabolic engineering was used as a tool to direct metabolism towards higher levels of 6-MSA production in A. nidulans. 6-MSA was stably expressed in the A. nidulans genome...... platform can be used for both process optimization as well as screening libraries of mutants generated through random mutagenesis. The experiments validated the CDD-flatbed scanning platform as a tool for quantifying microbial biomass from both bacteria and yeasts. Furthermore, the platform can be used to...

  10. Theories, Methods and Numerical Technology of Sheet Metal Cold and Hot Forming Analysis, Simulation and Engineering Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Ping; Liu, Li-zhong; Zhu, Yi-guo

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, the application of innovative steel concepts in the automotive industry has increased steadily. Numerical simulation technology of hot forming of high-strength steel allows engineers to modify the formability of hot forming steel metals and to optimize die design schemes. Theories, Methods and Numerical Technology of Sheet Metal Cold and Hot Forming focuses on hot and cold forming theories, numerical methods, relative simulation and experiment techniques for high-strength steel forming and die design in the automobile industry. Theories, Methods and Numerical Technology of Sheet Metal Cold and Hot Forming introduces the general theories of cold forming, then expands upon advanced hot forming theories and simulation methods, including: • the forming process, • constitutive equations, • hot boundary constraint treatment, and • hot forming equipment and experiments. Various calculation methods of cold and hot forming, based on the authors’ experience in commercial CAE software f...

  11. Engineered cell-cell communication via DNA messaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortiz Monica E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution has selected for organisms that benefit from genetically encoded cell-cell communication. Engineers have begun to repurpose elements of natural communication systems to realize programmed pattern formation and coordinate other population-level behaviors. However, existing engineered systems rely on system-specific small molecules to send molecular messages among cells. Thus, the information transmission capacity of current engineered biological communication systems is physically limited by specific biomolecules that are capable of sending only a single message, typically “regulate transcription.” Results We have engineered a cell-cell communication platform using bacteriophage M13 gene products to autonomously package and deliver heterologous DNA messages of varying lengths and encoded functions. We demonstrate the decoupling of messages from a common communication channel via the autonomous transmission of various arbitrary genetic messages. Further, we increase the range of engineered DNA messaging across semisolid media by linking message transmission or receipt to active cellular chemotaxis. Conclusions We demonstrate decoupling of a communication channel from message transmission within engineered biological systems via the autonomous targeted transduction of user-specified heterologous DNA messages. We also demonstrate that bacteriophage M13 particle production and message transduction occurs among chemotactic bacteria. We use chemotaxis to improve the range of DNA messaging, increasing both transmission distance and communication bit rates relative to existing small molecule-based communication systems. We postulate that integration of different engineered cell-cell communication platforms will allow for more complex spatial programming of dynamic cellular consortia.

  12. Improving the osteogenesis of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell sheets by microRNA-21-loaded chitosan/hyaluronic acid nanoparticles via reverse transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Z

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhongshan Wang,1 Guangsheng Wu,2,3 Mengying Wei,4 Qian Liu,1 Jian Zhou,1 Tian Qin,1 Xiaoke Feng,1 Huan Liu,1 Zhihong Feng,1 Yimin Zhao1 1State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Department of Prosthodontics, 2State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Engineering Research Center for Dental Materials and Advanced Manufacture, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, 3Qingdao First Sanatorium, Jinan Military Region, Qingdao, Shandong Province, 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cell sheet engineering has emerged as a novel approach to effectively deliver seeding cells for tissue regeneration, and developing human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hBMMSC sheets with high osteogenic ability is a constant requirement from clinics for faster and higher-quality bone formation. In this work, we fabricated biocompatible and safe chitosan (CS/hyaluronic acid (HA nanoparticles (NPs to deliver microRNA-21 (miR-21, which has been proved to accelerate osteogenesis in hBMMSCs; then, the CS/HA/miR-21 NPs were cross-linked onto the surfaces of culture plates with 0.2% gel solution to fabricate miR-21-functionalized culture plates for reverse transfection. hBMMSC sheets were induced continuously for 14 days using a vitamin C-rich method on the miR-21-functionalized culture plates. For the characterization of CS/HA/miR-21 NPs, the particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology, and gel retardation were sequentially investigated. Then, the biological effects of hBMMSC sheets on the miR-21-functionalized culture plates were evaluated. The assay results demonstrated that the hBMMSC sheets could be successfully induced via the novel

  13. The PLUTO reactor at Harwell, U.K. and ancillary hot cell facilities. Information sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical information is given on the PLUTO reactor and associated hot cell facilities, with the main emphasis on experimental irradiation facilities and specialized irradiation devices (loops and capsules). The information is presented in the form of five information sheets under the headings; main characteristics of the reactor; utilization and specialization of the reactor; experimental facilities; neutron spectra; main characteristics of specialized irradiation devices

  14. Engineering Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Lessons from Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, R Grant; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Zon, Leonard I; Daley, George Q

    2016-06-01

    Cell engineering has brought us tantalizingly close to the goal of deriving patient-specific hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). While directed differentiation and transcription factor-mediated conversion strategies have generated progenitor cells with multilineage potential, to date, therapy-grade engineered HSCs remain elusive due to insufficient long-term self-renewal and inadequate differentiated progeny functionality. A cross-species approach involving zebrafish and mammalian systems offers complementary methodologies to improve understanding of native HSCs. Here, we discuss the role of conserved developmental timing processes in vertebrate hematopoiesis, highlighting how identification and manipulation of stage-specific factors that specify HSC developmental state must be harnessed to engineer HSCs for therapy. PMID:27257760

  15. Nanotechnology, Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Haraguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have fabricated new types of polymer hydrogels and polymer nanocomposites, i.e., nanocomposite gels (NC gels and soft, polymer nanocomposites (M-NCs: solid, with novel organic/inorganic network structures. Both NC gels and M-NCs were synthesized by in-situ free-radical polymerization in the presence of exfoliated clay platelets in aqueous systems and were obtained in various forms such as film, sheet, tube, coating, etc. and sizes with a wide range of clay contents. Here, disk-like inorganic clay nanoparticles act as multi-functional crosslinkers to form new types of network systems. Both NC gels and M-NCs have extraordinary optical and mechanical properties including ultra-high reversible extensibility, as well as a number of new characteristics relating to optical anisotropy, polymer/clay morphology, biocompatibility, stimuli-sensitive surfaces, micro-patterning, etc. For examples, the biological testing of medical devices, comprised of a sensitization test, an irritation test, an intracutaneous test and an in vitro cytotoxicity test,was carried out for NC gels and M-NCs. The safety of NC gels and M-NCs was confirmed in all tests. Also, the interaction of living tissue with NC gel was investigated in vivo by implantation in live goats; neither inflammation nor concrescence occurred around the NC gels. Furthermore, it was found that both N-NC gels consisting of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide(PNIPA/clay network and M-NCs consisting of poly(2-methoxyethyacrylate(PMEA/clay network show characteristic cell culture and subsequent cell detachment on their surfaces, although it was almost impossible to culture cells on conventional, chemically-crosslinked PNIPA hydrogels and chemically crossslinked PMEA, regardless of their crosslinker concentration. Various kinds of cells, such ashumanhepatoma cells (HepG2, normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, could be cultured to be confluent on the surfaces of N

  16. Fuel-cell engine stream conditioning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBose, Ronald Arthur

    2002-01-01

    A stream conditioning system for a fuel cell gas management system or fuel cell engine. The stream conditioning system manages species potential in at least one fuel cell reactant stream. A species transfer device is located in the path of at least one reactant stream of a fuel cell's inlet or outlet, which transfer device conditions that stream to improve the efficiency of the fuel cell. The species transfer device incorporates an exchange media and a sorbent. The fuel cell gas management system can include a cathode loop with the stream conditioning system transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell related to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

  17. NREL Spurred the Success of Multijunction Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-08-01

    Many scientists once believed that high-quality gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) alloys could not be grown for use as semiconductors because the alloys would separate. However, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) thought differently, and they employed GaInP in a material combination that allowed the multijunction cell to flourish. The multijunction cell is now the workhorse that powers satellites and the catalyst for renewed interest in concentrator photovoltaic products.

  18. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Colin D; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-07-11

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell-substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  19. Allogeneic Transplantation of Periodontal Ligament-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Sheets in Canine Critical-Size Supra-Alveolar Periodontal Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumanuma, Yuka; Iwata, Takanori; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Washio, Kaoru; Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that induces the destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, followed by tooth loss. Although several approaches have been applied to periodontal regeneration, complete periodontal regeneration has not been accomplished. Tissue engineering using a combination of cells and scaffolds is considered to be a viable alternative strategy. We have shown that autologous transplantation of periodontal ligament-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (PDL-MSC) sheets regenerates periodontal tissue in canine models. However, the indications for autologous cell transplantation in clinical situations are limited. Therefore, this study evaluated the safety and efficacy of allogeneic transplantation of PDL-MSC sheets using a canine horizontal periodontal defect model. Canine PDL-MSCs were labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and were cultured on temperature-responsive dishes. Three-layered cell sheets were transplanted around denuded root surfaces either autologously or allogeneically. A mixture of β-tricalcium phosphate and collagen gel was placed on the bone defects. Eight weeks after transplantation, dogs were euthanized and subjected to microcomputed tomography and histological analyses. RNA and DNA were extracted from the paraffin sections to verify the presence of EGFP at the transplantation site. Inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Periodontal regeneration was observed in both the autologous and the allogeneic transplantation groups. The allogeneic transplantation group showed particularly significant regeneration of newly formed cementum, which is critical for the periodontal regeneration. Serum levels of inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera showed little difference between the autologous and allogeneic groups. EGFP amplicons were detectable in the paraffin sections of the allogeneic group. These results suggest that

  20. Cell-Free Metabolic Engineering: Biomanufacturing beyond the cell

    OpenAIRE

    Dudley, Quentin M.; Karim, Ashty S.; Jewett, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology and microbial metabolic engineering are poised to help meet the growing demand for sustainable, low-cost commodity chemicals and natural products, yet the fraction of biochemicals amenable to commercial production remains limited. Common problems afflicting the current state-of-the-art include low volumetric productivities, build-up of toxic intermediates or products, and byproduct losses via competing pathways. To overcome these limitations, cell-free metabolic engin...

  1. New technique for investigation of solar cell sheet resistance distribution by laser beam scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, Vadym O.; Ilchenko, Leonid M.; Kilchitskaya, S.; Litvinenko, Sergiy V.; Smirnov, Eugene M.

    1998-04-01

    Laser beam scanning was applied for evaluating the distribution of sheet resistance of solar cell emitter. It was shown that the voltage drop around the illuminated spot has an information about the local sheet resistance since the most part of the voltage drop occurs near the illuminated area. The current under local illumination in reverse direction depends on the local quantum efficiency while in forward direction it depends on the same local properties and on the local sheet resistance. The processing of laser beam induced current images at different bias voltage gives a map of local sheet resistance complementing other techniques for investigation the electron devices. We investigated one and dual-beam technique for amplitude and phase LBIC measurement by means of universal laser scanning microscope worked in amplitude and differential-phase regimes. Acousto-optical scanning results in 2D distribution of amplitude or phase LBIC. For convenience of image processing and visualization, TV type scanning is applied to laser beams.

  2. Cell sheets image validation of phase-diversity homodyne OCT and effect of the light irradiation on cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Naoko; Osawa, Kentaro

    2016-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is one of powerful 3D tissue imaging tools with no fluorescence staining. We have reported that Phase-Diversity Homodyne OCT developed in Hitachi could be useful for non-invasive regeneration tissue evaluation test. The OCT enables cell imaging because of high resolution (axial resolution; ~2.6 μm, lateral resolution; ~1 μm, in the air), whereas conventional OCT was not used for cell imaging because of low resolution (10~20 μm). Furthermore, the OCT has advantage over other 3D imaging devices in cost because the light source and the objective were originally used as an optical pickup of compact disc. In this report, we aimed to assess effectiveness and safety of Phase-Diversity Homodyne OCT cell imaging. Effectiveness of OCT was evaluated by imaging a living cell sheet of human oral mucosal epithelial cells. OCT images were compared with reflection confocal microscopy (RCM) images, because confocal optical system is the highest resolution (cell sheet. Degree of differentiation could be estimated using OCT images, which becomes possible because the size of cells depends on distribution of differentiation. Effect of the OCT light irradiation on cells was studied using NIH/3T3 cells. Light irradiation, the exposure amount of which is equivalent to OCT, had no impact on cell shape, cell viability, and proliferation rate. It suggested that the light irradiation has no cell damage under the condition.

  3. THE ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OF THE SIDMOUTH DISTRICT 1:50000 GEOLOGICAL SHEET 326/340

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, A

    1998-01-01

    This description ofthe engineering geology ofthe district around Sidmouth (Fig. 1) was based on the lithostratigraphical units shown in Table 1. They may be subject to amendment as the remapping proceeds. The account also includes information from a geotechnical database compiled by the Coastal and Engineering Geology Group of the BGS.

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cells engineering for cell-based therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Stem cells carry the promise to cure a broad range of diseases and injuries, from diabetes, heart and muscular diseases, to neurological diseases, disorders and injuries. Significant progresses have been made in stem cell research over the past decade; the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from human tissues, the development of cloning technology by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and the confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain and that neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS), including that of humans. Despite these advances, there may be decades before stem cell research will translate into therapy. Stem cell research is also subject to ethical and political debates, controversies and legislation, which slow its progress. Cell engineering has proven successful in bringing genetic research to therapy. In this review, I will review, in two examples, how investigators are applying cell engineering to stem cell biology to circumvent stem cells' ethical and political constraints and bolster stem cell research and therapy.

  5. Atomic step-and-terrace surface of polyimide sheet for advanced polymer substrate engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, G; Shimada, K; Nozawa, Y; Kaneko, S; Urakami, T; Koyama, K; Komura, M; Matsuda, A; Yoshimoto, M

    2016-07-22

    Typical thermostable and flexible polyimide polymers exhibit many excellent properties such as strong mechanical and chemical resistance. However, in contrast to single-crystal substrates like silicon or sapphire, polymers mostly display disordered and rough surfaces, which may result in instability and degradation of the interfaces between thin films and polymer substrates. As a step toward the development of next-generation polymer substrates, we here report single-atom-layer imprinting onto the polyimide sheets, resulting in an ultrasmooth 0.3 nm high atomic step-and-terrace surface on the polyimides. The ultrasmooth polymer substrates are expected to be applied to the fabrication of nanostructures such as superlattices, nanowires, or quantum dots in nanoscale-controlled electronic devices. We fabricate smooth and atomically stepped indium tin oxide transparent conducting oxide thin films on the imprinted polyimide sheets for future use in organic-based optoelectronic devices processed with nanoscale precision. Furthermore, toward 2D polymer substrate nanoengineering, we demonstrate nanoscale letter writing on the atomic step-and-terrace polyimide surface via atomic force microscopy probe scratching. PMID:27284690

  6. Atomic step-and-terrace surface of polyimide sheet for advanced polymer substrate engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, G.; Shimada, K.; Nozawa, Y.; Kaneko, S.; Urakami, T.; Koyama, K.; Komura, M.; Matsuda, A.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2016-07-01

    Typical thermostable and flexible polyimide polymers exhibit many excellent properties such as strong mechanical and chemical resistance. However, in contrast to single-crystal substrates like silicon or sapphire, polymers mostly display disordered and rough surfaces, which may result in instability and degradation of the interfaces between thin films and polymer substrates. As a step toward the development of next-generation polymer substrates, we here report single-atom-layer imprinting onto the polyimide sheets, resulting in an ultrasmooth 0.3 nm high atomic step-and-terrace surface on the polyimides. The ultrasmooth polymer substrates are expected to be applied to the fabrication of nanostructures such as superlattices, nanowires, or quantum dots in nanoscale-controlled electronic devices. We fabricate smooth and atomically stepped indium tin oxide transparent conducting oxide thin films on the imprinted polyimide sheets for future use in organic-based optoelectronic devices processed with nanoscale precision. Furthermore, toward 2D polymer substrate nanoengineering, we demonstrate nanoscale letter writing on the atomic step-and-terrace polyimide surface via atomic force microscopy probe scratching.

  7. Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrix: Basic Characteristics and Current Applications in Orthopedic Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixiang; Zhu, Yun; Li, Jia; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Liu, Shichen; Yang, Jianhua; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and intricate microenvironment with excellent biophysical, biomechanical, and biochemical properties, which can directly or indirectly regulate cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and differentiation, as well as plays key roles in homeostasis and regeneration of tissues and organs. The ECM has attracted a great deal of attention with the rapid development of tissue engineering in the field of regenerative medicine. Tissue-derived ECM scaffolds (also referred to as decellularized tissues and whole organs) are considered a promising therapy for the repair of musculoskeletal defects, including those that are widely used in orthopedics, although there are a few shortcomings. Similar to tissue-derived ECM scaffolds, cell-derived ECM scaffolds also have highly advantageous biophysical and biochemical properties, in particular their ability to be produced in vitro from a number of different cell types. Furthermore, cell-derived ECM scaffolds more closely resemble native ECM microenvironments. The products of cell-derived ECM have a wide range of biomedical applications; these include reagents for cell culture substrates and biomaterials for scaffolds, hybrid scaffolds, and living cell sheet coculture systems. Although cell-derived ECM has only just begun to be investigated, it has great potential as a novel approach for cell-based tissue repair in orthopedic tissue engineering. This review summarizes and analyzes the various types of cell-derived ECM products applied in cartilage, bone, and nerve tissue engineering in vitro or in vivo and discusses future directions for investigation of cell-derived ECM. PMID:26671674

  8. Lumped series resistance of solar cells as a result of distributed sheet resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolić, Saša; Križaj, Dejan; Amon, Slavko

    1993-04-01

    An analysis of solar cell distributed sheet resistance is performed by solving the nonlinear Poisson equation for the surface potential. Two different approaches to lumped series resistance are discussed: equivalent series resistance RSeq obtained from the cell's equivalent circuit that satisfies the actual current of the cell (all other parameters in the equivalent circuit except the series resistance are kept constant) and Joule series resistance RSJ obtained from the Joule losses in the emitter of the cell. It is observed that the I( U) characteristic obtained from the equivalent circuit that includes RSJ generally disagrees with the actual I( U) characteristic of the solar cell. An additional series resistance RSadd should be introduced in series with RSJ. Series resistances RSJ, Sadd and RSeq are analyzed numerically in one and two dimensions for different conditions of terminal voltage, illumination and weighted sheet resistance Rshb2, where b is related to the geometry of the analyzed cell. Following the derivations and the results of the numerical analysis it can be concluded that wherever RSJ varies as a function of terminal voltage, RSadd should be taken into consideration.

  9. Electron-Beam Induced Grafting of Isopropylacrylamide to a Poly(Ethylene-Terephthalate) Membrane for Cell Sheet Detachment, and Fuel Cell Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using high-energy irradiation initiation, isopropylacrylamide (IPAA) was grafted to a porous membrane dish composed of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). IPPA demonstrates a transition from a hydrophobic to a hydrophilic structure with a simple change in temperature. The dishes were used for cell grow. Cells generally grow in an environment set at 37 deg. C, at which the IPAA polymer exhibits its hydrophobic structure. IPAA was attached uniformly to a cell culture surface, and cells were able to grow on top of the IPAA while it was in its hydrophobic state. Cells were easily removed from the surface of the dishes after changing the temperature below the LCST of IPAA. By changing the temperature polymer altered its structure to a hydrophilic state and no longer provided a suitable surface for the cells to adhere to. This caused the cells to lift off the culture surface without the use of a destructive enzyme such as trypsin or dispase. These cell sheets are useful to cell sheet engineering because the cells will retain both their extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell-to-cell junctions, which are normally lost in the harvest of cells. Poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-hexefluoropropylene) (FEP) is a material under investigation as a polymer electrolyte membrane for fuel cells. In order to make it ionically conductive, styrene was grafted to it and then subsequently sulfonated. Grafting of styrene to FEP was performed by simultaneous irradiation of the monomer and substrate to initiate the reaction, followed by a heat treatment to allow the reaction to undergo propagation. The effects of dose rate and heat treatment time on the weight percent yield of grafting and uniformity as a function of depth in the substrate was investigated. A 38.5 wt% graft was obtained after a 50 kGy dose of electron irradiation at a dose rate of 2,8 Gy/pulse and post-irradiation heat treatment of 60 deg. C for three hours. FTIR analysis of 10 μm sections of material grafted under these conditions

  10. High-efficiency cell concepts on low-cost silicon sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R. O.; Ravi, K. V.

    1985-01-01

    The limitations on sheet growth material in terms of the defect structure and minority carrier lifetime are discussed. The effect of various defects on performance are estimated. Given these limitations designs for a sheet growth cell that will make the best of the material characteristics are proposed. Achievement of optimum synergy between base material quality and device processing variables is proposed. A strong coupling exists between material quality and the variables during crystal growth, and device processing variables. Two objectives are outlined: (1) optimization of the coupling for maximum performance at minimal cost; and (2) decoupling of materials from processing by improvement in base material quality to make it less sensitive to processing variables.

  11. Pupil engineering to create sheets, lines, and multiple spots at the focal region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present several algorithms to find pupil functions which give focal fields with different desirable properties, such as a laterally elongated spot, a focal sheet, a spot with increased axial resolution, a lateral array of closely packed spots, and a lateral array of widely spaced diffraction-limited spots. All the algorithms work by writing the pupil function as a linear combination of appropriate basis functions, for which the coefficients are optimized. The focal field can be calculated repeatedly efficiently, since focal fields of each of the basis functions are precalculated. For each of the desired focal fields, the specific details of the algorithm are explained, simulation results are presented, and the results are compared to those in other publications. (paper)

  12. Single objective light-sheet microscopy for high-speed whole-cell 3D super-resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddens, Marjolein B M; Liu, Sheng; Finnegan, Patrick S; Edwards, Thayne L; James, Conrad D; Lidke, Keith A

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a method for performing light-sheet microscopy with a single high numerical aperture lens by integrating reflective side walls into a microfluidic chip. These 45° side walls generate light-sheet illumination by reflecting a vertical light-sheet into the focal plane of the objective. Light-sheet illumination of cells loaded in the channels increases image quality in diffraction limited imaging via reduction of out-of-focus background light. Single molecule super-resolution is also improved by the decreased background resulting in better localization precision and decreased photo-bleaching, leading to more accepted localizations overall and higher quality images. Moreover, 2D and 3D single molecule super-resolution data can be acquired faster by taking advantage of the increased illumination intensities as compared to wide field, in the focused light-sheet. PMID:27375939

  13. "Direct" measurement of sheet resistance in inter-subcell layers of multi-junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, Valery D.; Larionov, Valery R.; Pokrovskiy, Pavel V.

    2015-09-01

    The multi-junction cells are sensitive to chromatic aberrations inherent to the lens-type concentrators. At spectrally and spatially inhomogeneous distribution of incident light, considerable lateral currents flow along the inter-subcell layers causing a voltage drop across corresponding sheet resistance and, consequently, a decrease in the cell conversion efficiency. The sheet resistance unit is Ohm-per-square that corresponds to the resistance between two bar-type electrodes on the opposite sides of a thin conductive square. A method of "direct" measurement of this parameter is proposed using lasers for local illumination of the strip-in-shape parts of a rectangular-in-form tested cell. These illuminated parts play a role of electrodes for a lateral current induced by photoexitation. Wavelengths of the lasers have to be chosen to generate photocurrents independently in the neighboring subcells, as well as locally in the upper and lower ones. SPICE model of the method is analyzed and experimental results on the InGaP/InGaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells are presented.

  14. Light sheet microscopy for tracking single molecules on the apical surface of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Hu, Ying; Cang, Hu

    2013-12-12

    Single particle tracking is a powerful tool to study single molecule dynamics in living biological samples. However, current tracking techniques, which are based mainly on epifluorescence, confocal, or TIRF microscopy, have difficulties in tracking single molecules on the apical surface of a cell. We present here a three-dimensional (3D) single particle tracking technique that is based on prism coupled light-sheet microscopy (PCLSM). This novel design provides a signal-to-noise ratio comparable to confocal microscopy while it has the capability of illuminating at arbitrary depth. We demonstrate tracking of single EGF molcules on the apical surface of live cell membranes from their binding to EGF receptors until they are internalized or photobleached. We found that EGF exhibits multiple diffusion behaviors on live A549 cell membranes. At room temperature, the average diffusion coefficient of EGF on A549 cells was measured to be 0.13 μm(2)/s. Depletion of cellular cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin leads to a broader distribution of diffusion coefficients and an increase of the average diffusion coefficient at room temperature. This light-sheet based 3D single particle tracking technique solves the technique difficulty of tracking single particles on apical membranes and is able to document the whole "lifetime" of a particle from binding till photobleaching or internalization. PMID:23895420

  15. ''Cloud in Cell'' technique applied to the roll up of vortex sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of the roll up of a two dimensional vortex sheet generated by a wing in an ideal fluid is phrased in terms of the streamfunction and the vortex sheet strength. A numerical method is used to calculate the time evolution of the vortex sheet by adapting the ''Cloud In Cell'' technique introduced in solving many particle simulations in plasma physics (see J. P. Christiansen, J. Computational Physics 13 (1973)). Two cases are considered for the initial distribution of circulation, one corresponding to an elliptically loaded wing and the other simulating the wing with a flap deployed. Results indicate that small scale behaviour plays an important part in the roll up. Typically, small scale perturbations result in small structures which evolve into ever increasing larger structures by vortex amalgamation. Conclusions are given from a number of tests exploring the validity of the method. Briefly, small scale perturbations are introduced artificially by the grid; but once the process of vortex amalgamation is well underway, the emerging large scale behaviour is relatively insensitive to the precise details of the initial perturbations. Since clearly defined structures result from the application of this method, it promises to aid considerably in understanding the behaviour of vortex wakes

  16. Cell-free metabolic engineering: Biomanufacturing beyond the cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudley, QM; Karim, AS; Jewett, MC

    2014-10-15

    Industrial biotechnology and microbial metabolic engineering are poised to help meet the growing demand for sustainable, low-cost commodity chemicals and natural products, yet the fraction of biochemicals amenable to commercial production remains limited. Common problems afflicting the current state-of-the-art include low volumetric productivities, build-up of toxic intermediates or products, and byproduct losses via competing pathways. To overcome these limitations, cell-free metabolic engineering (CFME) is expanding the scope of the traditional bioengineering model by using in vitro ensembles of catalytic proteins prepared from purified enzymes or crude lysates of cells for the production of target products. In recent years, the unprecedented level of control and freedom of design, relative to in vivo systems, has inspired the development of engineering foundations for cell-free systems. These efforts have led to activation of long enzymatic pathways (>8 enzymes), near theoretical conversion yields, productivities greater than 100 mg L-1 h(-1), reaction scales of >100 L, and new directions in protein purification, spatial organization, and enzyme stability. In the coming years, CFME will offer exciting opportunities to: (i) debug and optimize biosynthetic pathways; (ii) carry out design-build-test iterations without re-engineering organisms; and (iii) perform molecular transformations when bioconversion yields, productivities, or cellular toxicity limit commercial feasibility.

  17. Engineering CAR-T Cells: Design Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shivani; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being empirically designed based on a simple understanding of TCR signaling, T cells engineered with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have been remarkably successful in treating patients with advanced refractory B cell malignancies. However, many challenges remain in improving the safety and efficacy of this therapy and extending it toward the treatment of epithelial cancers. Other aspects TCR signaling beyond those directly provided by CD3ζ and CD28 phosphorylation strongly influence a T cell’s ability to differentiate and acquire full effector functions. Here, we discuss how the principles of TCR recognition, including spatial constraints, Kon/Koff rates, and synapse formation, along with in-depth analysis of CAR signaling might be applied to develop safer and more effective synthetic tumor targeting receptors. PMID:26169254

  18. Deformable Graph Model for Tracking Epithelial Cell Sheets in Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Roger S; Tomasi, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    We propose a novel method for tracking cells that are connected through a visible network of membrane junctions. Tissues of this form are common in epithelial cell sheets and resemble planar graphs where each face corresponds to a cell. We leverage this structure and develop a method to track the entire tissue as a deformable graph. This coupled model in which vertices inform the optimal placement of edges and vice versa captures global relationships between tissue components and leads to accurate and robust cell tracking. We compare the performance of our method with that of four reference tracking algorithms on four data sets that present unique tracking challenges. Our method exhibits consistently superior performance in tracking all cells accurately over all image frames, and is robust over a wide range of image intensity and cell shape profiles. This may be an important tool for characterizing tissues of this type especially in the field of developmental biology where automated cell analysis can help elucidate the mechanisms behind controlled cell-shape changes. PMID:26829784

  19. Nano scaffolds and stem cell therapy in liver tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2015-08-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been constantly developing of late due to the major progress in cell and organ transplantation, as well as advances in materials science and engineering. Although stem cells hold great potential for the treatment of many injuries and degenerative diseases, several obstacles must be overcome before their therapeutic application can be realized. These include the development of advanced techniques to understand and control functions of micro environmental signals and novel methods to track and guide transplanted stem cells. A major complication encountered with stem cell therapies has been the failure of injected cells to engraft to target tissues. The application of nanotechnology to stem cell biology would be able to address those challenges. Combinations of stem cell therapy and nanotechnology in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have achieved significant advances. These combinations allow nanotechnology to engineer scaffolds with various features to control stem cell fate decisions. Fabrication of Nano fiber cell scaffolds onto which stem cells can adhere and spread, forming a niche-like microenvironment which can guide stem cells to proceed to heal damaged tissues. In this paper, current and emergent approach based on stem cells in the field of liver tissue engineering is presented for specific application. The combination of stem cells and tissue engineering opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration for stem cell therapy because of the potential to control stem cell behavior with the physical and chemical characteristics of the engineered scaffold environment.

  20. Transfer of fibroblast sheets cultured on thermoresponsive dishes with membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawecki, Marek; Kraut, Małgorzata; Klama-Baryła, Agnieszka; Łabuś, Wojciech; Kitala, Diana; Nowak, Mariusz; Glik, Justyna; Sieroń, Aleksander L; Utrata-Wesołek, Alicja; Trzebicka, Barbara; Dworak, Andrzej; Szweda, Dawid

    2016-06-01

    In cell or tissue engineering, it is essential to develop a support for cell-to-cell adhesion, which leads to the generation of cell sheets connected by extracellular matrix. Such supports must be hydrophobic and should result in a detachable cell sheet. A thermoresponsive support that enables the cultured cell sheet to detach using only a change in temperature could be an interesting alternative in regenerative medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate plates covered with thermoresponsive polymers as supports for the formation of fibroblast sheets and to develop a damage-free procedure for cell sheet transfer with the use of membranes as transfer tools. Human skin fibroblasts were seeded on supports coated with a thermoresponsive polymer: commercial UpCell™ dishes (NUNC™) coated with thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and dishes coated with thermoresponsive poly(tri(ethylene glycol) monoethyl ether methacrylate) (P(TEGMA-EE)). Confluent fibroblast sheets were effectively cultured and harvested from both commercial PNIPAM-coated dishes and laboratory P(TEGMA-EE)-coated dishes. To transfer a detached cell sheet, two membranes, Immobilon-P(®) and SUPRATHEL(®), were examined. The use of SUPRATHEL for relocating the cell sheets opens a new possibility for the clinical treatment of wounds. This study established the background for implementing thermoresponsive supports for transplanting in vitro cultured fibroblasts. PMID:27153827

  1. Better Solar Cells and Manufacturing Processes Using NREL's Ultrafast Quantum Efficiency Method (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-08-01

    Fact sheet on the FlashQE system, a 2011 R&D 100 Award winner. A solid-state optical system by NREL and Tau Science measures solar cell quantum efficiency in less than a second, enabling a suite of new capabilities for solar cell manufacturers.

  2. Endochondral bone tissue engineering using embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jukes, Jojanneke M.; Both, Sanne Karijn; Leusink, Anouk; Sterk, Lotus M. Th.; Blitterswijk, van, W.J.; Boer, de, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells can provide an unlimited supply of pluripotent cells for tissue engineering applications. Bone tissue engineering by directly differentiating ES cells (ESCs) into osteoblasts has been unsuccessful so far. Therefore, we investigated an alternative approach, based on the process of endochondral ossification. A cartilage matrix was formed in vitro by mouse ESCs seeded on a scaffold. When these cartilage tissue-engineered constructs (CTECs) were implanted s.c., the cartilage ...

  3. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neural Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Aijun; Tang, Zhenyu; Park, In-Hyun; Zhu, Yiqian; Patel, Shyam; Daley, George Q.; Song, Li

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapies and tissue engineering. Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) are multipotent and represent a valuable system to investigate iPSC differentiation and therapeutic potential. Here we derived NCSCs from human iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and investigated the potential of NCSCs for neural tissue engineering. The differentiation of iPSCs and the expansion of derived NCSCs varied in different cell lines, but all NCSC l...

  4. Cell Microenvironment Engineering and Monitoring for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine: The Recent Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, Julien; Özçelik, Hayriye; Hindié, Mathilde; Ndreu-Halili, Albana; Hasan, Anwarul

    2014-01-01

    In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, the conditions in the immediate vicinity of the cells have a direct effect on cells' behaviour and subsequently on clinical outcomes. Physical, chemical, and biological control of cell microenvironment are of crucial importance for the ability to direct and control cell behaviour in 3-dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds spatially and temporally. In this review, we will focus on the different aspects of cell microenvironment such as surface micro-, nanotopography, extracellular matrix composition and distribution, controlled release of soluble factors, and mechanical stress/strain conditions and how these aspects and their interactions can be used to achieve a higher degree of control over cellular activities. The effect of these parameters on the cellular behaviour within tissue engineering context is discussed and how these parameters are used to develop engineered tissues is elaborated. Also, recent techniques developed for the monitoring of the cell microenvironment in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, together with recent tissue engineering applications where the control of cell microenvironment has been exploited. Cell microenvironment engineering and monitoring are crucial parts of tissue engineering efforts and systems which utilize different components of the cell microenvironment simultaneously can provide more functional engineered tissues in the near future. PMID:25143954

  5. Cell Microenvironment Engineering and Monitoring for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine: The Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Barthes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, the conditions in the immediate vicinity of the cells have a direct effect on cells’ behaviour and subsequently on clinical outcomes. Physical, chemical, and biological control of cell microenvironment are of crucial importance for the ability to direct and control cell behaviour in 3-dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds spatially and temporally. In this review, we will focus on the different aspects of cell microenvironment such as surface micro-, nanotopography, extracellular matrix composition and distribution, controlled release of soluble factors, and mechanical stress/strain conditions and how these aspects and their interactions can be used to achieve a higher degree of control over cellular activities. The effect of these parameters on the cellular behaviour within tissue engineering context is discussed and how these parameters are used to develop engineered tissues is elaborated. Also, recent techniques developed for the monitoring of the cell microenvironment in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, together with recent tissue engineering applications where the control of cell microenvironment has been exploited. Cell microenvironment engineering and monitoring are crucial parts of tissue engineering efforts and systems which utilize different components of the cell microenvironment simultaneously can provide more functional engineered tissues in the near future.

  6. Engineering models and methods for industrial cell control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1997-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the engineering, i.e. the designing and making, of industrial cell control systems. The focus is on automated robot welding cells in the shipbuilding industry. The industrial research project defines models and methods for design and implemen-tation of computer based....... Further, an engineering methodology is defined. The three elements enablers, architecture and methodology constitutes the Cell Control Engineering concept which has been defined and evaluated through the implementation of two cell control systems for robot welding cells in production at ODENSE STEEL...... SHIPYARD.It is concluded that cell control technology provides for increased performance in production systems, and that the Cell Control Engineering concept reduces the effort for providing and operating high quality and high functionality cell control solutions for the industry....

  7. Construction of Tissue Engineering Artificial Cornea with Skin Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan LIU; Yan JIN

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction The clinical need for an alternative to donor corneal tissue has encouraged much interests in recent years. An artificial cornea must fulfill the functions of the cornea it replaces. More recently, the idea of a bio-engineered cornea has risen. Corneal equivalents have been reconstructed by tissue engineering method. Aim of this study is to construct an artificial rabbit cornea by employing tissue engineering method and to determine if skin stem cells have a role in tissue engineered cornea construction.

  8. Quantitative neuroanatomy of all Purkinje cells with light sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico eSilvestri

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the cytoarchitecture of mammalian central nervous system on a brain-wide scale is becoming a compelling need in neuroscience. For example, realistic modeling of brain activity requires the definition of quantitative features of large neuronal populations in the whole brain. Quantitative anatomical maps will also be crucial to classify the cytoarchtitectonic abnormalities associated with neuronal pathologies in a high reproducible and reliable manner. In this paper, we apply recent advances in optical microscopy and image analysis to characterize the spatial distribution of Purkinje cells across the whole cerebellum. Light sheet microscopy was used to image with micron-scale resolution a fixed and cleared cerebellum of an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all Purkinje cells are fluorescently labeled. A fast and scalable algorithm for fully automated cell identification was applied on the image to extract the position of all the fluorescent Purkinje cells. This vectorized representation of the cell population allows a thorough characterization of the complex three-dimensional distribution of the neurons, highlighting the presence of gaps inside the lamellar organization of Purkinje cells, whose density is believed to play a significant role in autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, clustering analysis of the localized somata permits dividing the whole cerebellum in groups of Purkinje cells with high spatial correlation, suggesting new possibilities of anatomical partition. The quantitative approach presented here can be extended to study the distribution of different types of cell in many brain regions and across the whole encephalon, providing a robust base for building realistic computational models of the brain, and for unbiased morphological tissue screening in presence of pathologies and/or drug treatments.

  9. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Niu; Weimin Guo; Shufeng Han; Yun Zhu; Shuyun Liu; Quanyi Guo

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a ...

  10. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy. PMID:10811469

  11. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wei; Guo, Weimin; Han, Shufeng; Zhu, Yun; Liu, Shuyun; Guo, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a fundamental role in meniscal regeneration. According to current studies, the main cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering are single cell type strategies; cell coculture strategies also were applied to meniscus tissue engineering. Likewise, on the one side, the zonal recapitulation strategies based on mimicking meniscal differing cells and internal architectures have received wide attentions. On the other side, cell self-assembling strategies without any scaffolds may be a better way to build a bionic meniscus. In this review, we primarily discuss cell seeds for meniscus tissue engineering and their application strategies. We also discuss recent advances and achievements in meniscus repair experiments that further improve our understanding of meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:27274735

  12. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a fundamental role in meniscal regeneration. According to current studies, the main cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering are single cell type strategies; cell coculture strategies also were applied to meniscus tissue engineering. Likewise, on the one side, the zonal recapitulation strategies based on mimicking meniscal differing cells and internal architectures have received wide attentions. On the other side, cell self-assembling strategies without any scaffolds may be a better way to build a bionic meniscus. In this review, we primarily discuss cell seeds for meniscus tissue engineering and their application strategies. We also discuss recent advances and achievements in meniscus repair experiments that further improve our understanding of meniscus tissue engineering.

  13. Characterization of Tensile Mechanical Behavior of MSCs/PLCL Hybrid Layered Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangesty, Azizah Intan; Arahira, Takaaki; Todo, Mitsugu

    2016-01-01

    A layered construct was developed by combining a porous polymer sheet and a cell sheet as a tissue engineered vascular patch. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the influence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) sheet on the tensile mechanical properties of porous poly-(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) sheet. The porous PLCL sheet was fabricated by the solid-liquid phase separation method and the following freeze-drying method. The MSCs sheet, prepared by the temperature-responsive dish, was then layered on the top of the PLCL sheet and cultured for 2 weeks. During the in vitro study, cellular properties such as cell infiltration, spreading and proliferation were evaluated. Tensile test of the layered construct was performed periodically to characterize the tensile mechanical behavior. The tensile properties were then correlated with the cellular properties to understand the effect of MSCs sheet on the variation of the mechanical behavior during the in vitro study. It was found that MSCs from the cell sheet were able to migrate into the PLCL sheet and actively proliferated into the porous structure then formed a new layer of MSCs on the opposite surface of the PLCL sheet. Mechanical evaluation revealed that the PLCL sheet with MSCs showed enhancement of tensile strength and strain energy density at the first week of culture which is characterized as the effect of MSCs proliferation and its infiltration into the porous structure of the PLCL sheet. New technique was presented to develop tissue engineered patch by combining MSCs sheet and porous PLCL sheet, and it is expected that the layered patch may prolong biomechanical stability when implanted in vivo. PMID:27271675

  14. Characterization of Tensile Mechanical Behavior of MSCs/PLCL Hybrid Layered Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangesty, Azizah Intan; Arahira, Takaaki; Todo, Mitsugu

    2016-01-01

    A layered construct was developed by combining a porous polymer sheet and a cell sheet as a tissue engineered vascular patch. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the influence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) sheet on the tensile mechanical properties of porous poly-(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) sheet. The porous PLCL sheet was fabricated by the solid-liquid phase separation method and the following freeze-drying method. The MSCs sheet, prepared by the temperature-responsive dish, was then layered on the top of the PLCL sheet and cultured for 2 weeks. During the in vitro study, cellular properties such as cell infiltration, spreading and proliferation were evaluated. Tensile test of the layered construct was performed periodically to characterize the tensile mechanical behavior. The tensile properties were then correlated with the cellular properties to understand the effect of MSCs sheet on the variation of the mechanical behavior during the in vitro study. It was found that MSCs from the cell sheet were able to migrate into the PLCL sheet and actively proliferated into the porous structure then formed a new layer of MSCs on the opposite surface of the PLCL sheet. Mechanical evaluation revealed that the PLCL sheet with MSCs showed enhancement of tensile strength and strain energy density at the first week of culture which is characterized as the effect of MSCs proliferation and its infiltration into the porous structure of the PLCL sheet. New technique was presented to develop tissue engineered patch by combining MSCs sheet and porous PLCL sheet, and it is expected that the layered patch may prolong biomechanical stability when implanted in vivo. PMID:27271675

  15. Characterization of Tensile Mechanical Behavior of MSCs/PLCL Hybrid Layered Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizah Intan Pangesty

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A layered construct was developed by combining a porous polymer sheet and a cell sheet as a tissue engineered vascular patch. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the influence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs sheet on the tensile mechanical properties of porous poly-(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone (PLCL sheet. The porous PLCL sheet was fabricated by the solid-liquid phase separation method and the following freeze-drying method. The MSCs sheet, prepared by the temperature-responsive dish, was then layered on the top of the PLCL sheet and cultured for 2 weeks. During the in vitro study, cellular properties such as cell infiltration, spreading and proliferation were evaluated. Tensile test of the layered construct was performed periodically to characterize the tensile mechanical behavior. The tensile properties were then correlated with the cellular properties to understand the effect of MSCs sheet on the variation of the mechanical behavior during the in vitro study. It was found that MSCs from the cell sheet were able to migrate into the PLCL sheet and actively proliferated into the porous structure then formed a new layer of MSCs on the opposite surface of the PLCL sheet. Mechanical evaluation revealed that the PLCL sheet with MSCs showed enhancement of tensile strength and strain energy density at the first week of culture which is characterized as the effect of MSCs proliferation and its infiltration into the porous structure of the PLCL sheet. New technique was presented to develop tissue engineered patch by combining MSCs sheet and porous PLCL sheet, and it is expected that the layered patch may prolong biomechanical stability when implanted in vivo.

  16. Cell-scaffold interactions in the bone tissue engineering triad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CM Murphy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering has emerged as one of the leading fields in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The success of bone tissue engineering relies on understanding the interplay between progenitor cells, regulatory signals, and the biomaterials/scaffolds used to deliver them – otherwise known as the tissue engineering triad. This review will discuss the roles of these fundamental components with a specific focus on the interaction between cell behaviour and scaffold structural properties. In terms of scaffold architecture, recent work has shown that pore size can affect both cell attachment and cellular invasion. Moreover, different materials can exert different biomechanical forces, which can profoundly affect cellular differentiation and migration in a cell type specific manner. Understanding these interactions will be critical for enhancing the progress of bone tissue engineering towards clinical applications.

  17. Autologous transplantation of oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets cultured on an amniotic membrane substrate for intraoral mucosal defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Amemiya

    Full Text Available The human amniotic membrane (AM is a thin intrauterine placental membrane that is highly biocompatible and possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-scarring properties. Using AM, we developed a novel method for cultivating oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets. We investigated the autologous transplantation of oral mucosal epithelial cells cultured on AM in patients undergoing oral surgeries. We obtained specimens of AM from women undergoing cesarean sections. This study included five patients without any history of a medical disorder who underwent autologous cultured oral epithelial transplantation following oral surgical procedures. Using oral mucosal biopsy specimens obtained from these patients, we cultured oral epithelial cells on an AM carrier. We transplanted the resultant cell sheets onto the oral mucosal defects. Patients were followed-up for at least 12 months after transplantation. After 2-3 weeks of being cultured on AM, epithelial cells were well differentiated and had stratified into five to seven layers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cultured cells expressed highly specific mucosal epithelial cell markers and basement membrane proteins. After the surgical procedures, no infection, bleeding, rejection, or sheet detachment occurred at the reconstructed sites, at which new oral mucous membranes were evident. No recurrence was observed in the long-term follow-up, and the postoperative course was excellent. Our results suggest that AM-cultured oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets represent a useful biomaterial and feasible method for oral mucosal reconstruction. However, our primary clinical study only evaluated their effects on a limited number of small oral mucosal defects.

  18. Genetically engineered immune privileged Sertoli cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Gurvinder; Long, Charles R.; Dufour, Jannette M.

    2012-01-01

    Sertoli cells are immune privileged cells, important for controlling the immune response to male germ cells as well as maintaining the tolerogenic environment in the testis. Additionally, ectopic Sertoli cells have been shown to survive and protect co-grafted cells when transplanted across immunological barriers. The survival of ectopic Sertoli cells has led to the idea that they could be used in cell based gene therapy. In this review, we provide a brief overview of testis immune privilege a...

  19. Engineering spinal fusion: evaluating ceramic materials for cell based tissue engineered approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis was to advance the development of tissue engineered posterolateral spinal fusion by investigating the potential of calcium phosphate ceramic materials to support cell based tissue engineered bone formation. This was accomplished by developing several novel model syst

  20. Quantitative neuroanatomy of all Purkinje cells with light sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Paciscopi, Marco; Soda, Paolo; Biamonte, Filippo; Iannello, Giulio; Frasconi, Paolo; Pavone, Francesco S

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the cytoarchitecture of mammalian central nervous system on a brain-wide scale is becoming a compelling need in neuroscience. For example, realistic modeling of brain activity requires the definition of quantitative features of large neuronal populations in the whole brain. Quantitative anatomical maps will also be crucial to classify the cytoarchtitectonic abnormalities associated with neuronal pathologies in a high reproducible and reliable manner. In this paper, we apply recent advances in optical microscopy and image analysis to characterize the spatial distribution of Purkinje cells (PCs) across the whole cerebellum. Light sheet microscopy was used to image with micron-scale resolution a fixed and cleared cerebellum of an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all PCs are fluorescently labeled. A fast and scalable algorithm for fully automated cell identification was applied on the image to extract the position of all the fluorescent PCs. This vectorized representation of the cell population allows a thorough characterization of the complex three-dimensional distribution of the neurons, highlighting the presence of gaps inside the lamellar organization of PCs, whose density is believed to play a significant role in autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, clustering analysis of the localized somata permits dividing the whole cerebellum in groups of PCs with high spatial correlation, suggesting new possibilities of anatomical partition. The quantitative approach presented here can be extended to study the distribution of different types of cell in many brain regions and across the whole encephalon, providing a robust base for building realistic computational models of the brain, and for unbiased morphological tissue screening in presence of pathologies and/or drug treatments. PMID:26074783

  1. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Nurlina Wan Yahya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration.

  2. Stem cell technology and engineering for cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sinh Truong Nguyen; Phuc Van Pham

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are not only widely used for regenerative medicine, but are also considered as a useful tool for cancer treatment. For a long time, stem cells have been utilized to renew the immune system for radiation or chemotherapy treated patients. Recently, stem cells are being engineered to carry therapeutic reagents to target tumor sites. Cancer vaccines based on the knowledge of cancer stem cells have been studied and applied for cancer treatment. Induced pluripotent stem cells have been u...

  3. Fuel Cell Car Design Project for Freshman Engineering Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Steve R.; Davis, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    In the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering at Auburn University, we have integrated a semester long design project based on a toy fuel cell car into our freshman "Introduction to Chemical Engineering Class." The project provides the students a basic foundation in chemical reactions, energy, and dimensional analysis that facilitates…

  4. Energizing Engineering Students with Hydrogen Fuel Cell Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, Nori; Zavaleta, Dan

    2010-01-01

    At Desert Vista High School, near Phoenix, Arizona, Perkins Innovation Grant funding is being used to fund a program that is helping to prepare students for careers in engineering by giving them hands-on experience in areas like hydrogen generation and fuel cell utilization. As one enters Dan Zavaleta's automotive and engineering classroom and lab…

  5. Implementation of Scientific Computing Applications on the Cell Broadband Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guochun Shi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cell Broadband Engine architecture is a revolutionary processor architecture well suited for many scientific codes. This paper reports on an effort to implement several traditional high-performance scientific computing applications on the Cell Broadband Engine processor, including molecular dynamics, quantum chromodynamics and quantum chemistry codes. The paper discusses data and code restructuring strategies necessary to adapt the applications to the intrinsic properties of the Cell processor and demonstrates performance improvements achieved on the Cell architecture. It concludes with the lessons learned and provides practical recommendations on optimization techniques that are believed to be most appropriate.

  6. Cell Processing Engineering for Regenerative Medicine : Noninvasive Cell Quality Estimation and Automatic Cell Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Mutsumi

    2016-01-01

    The cell processing engineering including automatic cell processing and noninvasive cell quality estimation of adherent mammalian cells for regenerative medicine was reviewed. Automatic cell processing necessary for the industrialization of regenerative medicine was introduced. The cell quality such as cell heterogeneity should be noninvasively estimated before transplantation to patient, because cultured cells are usually not homogeneous but heterogeneous and most protocols of regenerative medicine are autologous system. The differentiation level could be estimated by two-dimensional cell morphology analysis using a conventional phase-contrast microscope. The phase-shifting laser microscope (PLM) could determine laser phase shift at all pixel in a view, which is caused by the transmitted laser through cell, and might be more noninvasive and more useful than the atomic force microscope and digital holographic microscope. The noninvasive determination of the laser phase shift of a cell using a PLM was carried out to determine the three-dimensional cell morphology and estimate the cell cycle phase of each adhesive cell and the mean proliferation activity of a cell population. The noninvasive discrimination of cancer cells from normal cells by measuring the phase shift was performed based on the difference in cytoskeleton density. Chemical analysis of the culture supernatant was also useful to estimate the differentiation level of a cell population. A probe beam, an infrared beam, and Raman spectroscopy are useful for diagnosing the viability, apoptosis, and differentiation of each adhesive cell. PMID:25373455

  7. Comparison of Osteogenesis between Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Sheets on Poly-ε-Caprolactone/β-Tricalcium Phosphate Composite Scaffolds in Canine Bone Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Seung Hoon; Kang, Byung-Jae; Kim, Wan Hee; Yun, Hui-Suk; Kweon, Oh-Kyeong

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and MSC sheets have effective potentials of bone regeneration. Composite polymer/ceramic scaffolds such as poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) are widely used to repair large bone defects. The present study investigated the in vitro osteogenic potential of canine adipose-derived MSCs (Ad-MSCs) and Ad-MSC sheets. Composite PCL/β-TCP scaffolds seeded with Ad-MSCs or wrapped with osteogenic Ad-MSC sheets (OCS) were also fabricated and their osteogenic potential was assessed following transplantation into critical-sized bone defects in dogs. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of osteogenic Ad-MSCs (O-MSCs) and OCS was significantly higher than that of undifferentiated Ad-MSCs (U-MSCs). The ALP, runt-related transcription factor 2, osteopontin, and bone morphogenetic protein 7 mRNA levels were upregulated in O-MSCs and OCS as compared to U-MSCs. In a segmental bone defect, the amount of newly formed bone was greater in PCL/β-TCP/OCS and PCL/β-TCP/O-MSCs/OCS than in the other groups. The OCS exhibit strong osteogenic capacity, and OCS combined with a PCL/β-TCP composite scaffold stimulated new bone formation in a critical-sized bone defect. These results suggest that the PCL/β-TCP/OCS composite has potential clinical applications in bone regeneration and can be used as an alternative treatment modality in bone tissue engineering. PMID:27610141

  8. Can engineered "designer" T cells outsmart chronic hepatitis B?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protzer, U; Abken, H

    2010-01-01

    More than 350 million people worldwide are persistently infected with human heptatitis B virus (HBV) and at risk to develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma making long-term treatment necessary. While a vaccine is available and new antiviral drugs are being developed, elimination of persistently infected cells is still a major issue. Recent efforts in adoptive cell therapy are experimentally exploring immunotherapeutic elimination of HBV-infected cells by means of a biological attack with genetically engineered "designer" T cells. PMID:21188203

  9. Neural tissue engineering using embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Willerth, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    With the recent start of the first clinical trial evaluating a human embryonic stem cell-derived therapy for the treatment of acute spinal cord injury, it is important to review the current literature examining the use of embryonic stem cells for neural tissue engineering applications with a focus on diseases and disorders that affect the central nervous system. Embryonic stem cells exhibit pluripotency and thus can differentiate into any cell type found in the body, including those found in ...

  10. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration. (topical review)

  11. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsushi Taguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration.

  12. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi, E-mail: taguchi.tetsushi@nims.go.jp [Biofunctional Materials Unit, Nano-Bio Field, Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration. (topical review)

  13. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2011-12-01

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration.

  14. Cell engineering: spearheading the next generation in healthcare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayasinghe, Suwan N [BioPhysics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.jayasinghe@ucl.ac.uk

    2008-09-01

    Manipulating living mammalian cells present fascinating possibilities for a plethora of applications within our healthcare. These imply several possibilities in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, to those of a therapeutic nature. The physical sciences are increasingly playing a pivotal role in this endeavour by both advancing existing cell engineering technology and pioneering new protocols for the creation of biologically viable structures. In this paper, the author introduces several direct needle/channel/orifice-based cell engineering protocols, currently undergoing intense investigation for a whole host of bio-applications. Hence, each protocol's advantages and disadvantages are clearly identified, whilst recognizing their future biological and engineering challenges. In conclusion, a few selected biotechnological applications present possibilities where these protocols could undergo focused exploration. Successful development of these bio-protocols sees the emergence of unique future strategies within a clinical environment having far-reaching consequences for our healthcare.

  15. Reconstruction of Multiple Facial Nerve Branches Using Skeletal Muscle-Derived Multipotent Stem Cell Sheet-Pellet Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Kosuke; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Hirata, Maki; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kenei; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Kazuno, Akihito; Sakai, Akihiro; IIDA, MASAHIRO; Okami, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages, and surgical resection with wide margins is generally indicated, despite this treatment being associated with poor postoperative quality of life (QOL). We have previously reported on the therapeutic effects of skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs), which exert reconstitution capacity for muscle-nerve-blood vessel units. Recently, we further developed a 3D patch-transplantation system using Sk-MSC sheet-pellets. The...

  16. Glycosylation Helps Cellulase Enzymes Bind to Plant Cell Walls (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    Computer simulations suggest a new strategy to design enhanced enzymes for biofuels production. Large-scale computer simulations predict that the addition of glycosylation on carbohydrate-binding modules can dramatically improve the binding affinity of these protein domains over amino acid mutations alone. These simulations suggest that glycosylation can be used as a protein engineering tool to enhance the activity of cellulase enzymes, which are a key component in the conversion of cellulose to soluble sugars in the production of biofuels. Glycosylation is the covalent attachment of carbohydrate molecules to protein side chains, and is present in many proteins across all kingdoms of life. Moreover, glycosylation is known to serve a wide variety of functions in biological recognition, cell signaling, and metabolism. Cellulase enzymes, which are responsible for deconstructing cellulose found in plant cell walls to glucose, contain glycosylation that when modified can affect enzymatic activity-often in an unpredictable manner. To gain insight into the role of glycosylation on cellulase activity, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used computer simulation to predict that adding glycosylation on the carbohydrate-binding module of a cellulase enzyme dramatically boosts the binding affinity to cellulose-more than standard protein engineering approaches in which amino acids are mutated. Because it is known that higher binding affinity in cellulases leads to higher activity, this work suggests a new route to designing enhanced enzymes for biofuels production. More generally, this work suggests that tuning glycosylation in cellulase enzymes is a key factor to consider when engineering biochemical conversion processes, and that more work is needed to understand how glycosylation affects cellulase activity at the molecular level.

  17. Air intake and exhaust systems in fuel cell engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuesser, R.; Weber, O. [Mann and Hummel (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the design and development of the air intake and exhaust system of a fuel cell powered road vehicle. In this instance the automotive supplier designed both the air intake and the exhaust system. The fuel cell engine gives a cold combustion effect making it possible to manufacture the exhaust from plastic materials. (UK)

  18. Development of Cell-Responsive Nanophase Hydroxyapatite for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Murugan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Scaffold plays a critical role in engineering bone tissues by providing necessary structural support for the cells to accommodate and guiding their growth in the three dimensional (3D space. Therefore, designing scaffold that mimic composition and structural aspects of the bone is of great importance to promote cell adhesion, cell-matrix interactions, osteointegration, tissue formation and continued function. Nanophase hydroxyapatite (HA is a class of bioceramic material that mimics the bone mineral in composition and structure and possesses unique capabilities for surface interactions with biological entities than conventional HA; therefore, it can be used as a scaffolding system in engineering bone tissues. This article reports synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of nanophase HA for use in bone tissue engineering and how the nanophase characteristics help the HA to promote cells/tissue growth with suitable experimental examples.

  19. Cell interactions in bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Pirraco, Rogério; Marques, A. P.; Reis, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    Bone fractures, where the innate regenerative bone response is compromised, represent between 4 and 8 hundred thousands of the total fracture cases, just in the United States. Bone tissue engineering (TE) brought the notion that, in cases such as those, it was preferable to boost the healing process of bone tissue instead of just adding artificial parts that could never properly replace the native tissue. However, despite the hype, bone TE so far could not live up to its promises and...

  20. Cell interactions in bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Pirraco, R. P.; Marques, A. P.; Reis, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Bone fractures, where the innate regenerative bone response is compromised, represent between 4 and 8 hundred thousands of the total fracture cases, just in the United States. Bone tissue engineering (TE) brought the notion that, in cases such as those, it was preferable to boost the healing process of bone tissue instead of just adding artificial parts that could never properly replace the native tissue. However, despite the hype, bone TE so far could not live up to its promises and...

  1. Micro & nano-engineering of fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, Dennis YC

    2015-01-01

    Fuel cells are clean and efficient energy conversion devices expected to be the next generation power source. During more than 17 decades of research and development, various types of fuel cells have been developed with a view to meet the different energy demands and application requirements. Scientists have devoted a great deal of time and effort to the development and commercialization of fuel cells important for our daily lives. However, abundant issues, ranging from mechanistic study to system integration, still need to be figured out before massive applications can be used. Miniaturizatio

  2. Biodiesel Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-06-01

    This fact sheet provides a brief introduction to biodiesel, including a discussion of biodiesel blends, which blends are best for which vehicles, where to buy biodiesel, how biodiesel compares to diesel fuel in terms of performance, how biodiesel performs in cold weather, whether biodiesel use will plug vehicle filters, how long-term biodiesel use may affect engines, biodiesel fuel standards, and whether biodiesel burns cleaner than diesel fuel. The fact sheet also dismisses the use of vegetable oil as a motor fuel.

  3. Cryopreservation of Cell/Scaffold Tissue-Engineered Constructs

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Pedro F.; Dias, Ana F.; Reis, Rui L.; Gomes, Manuela E.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of cryopreservation over the functionality of tissue-engineered constructs, analyzing the survival and viability of cells seeded, cultured, and cryopreserved onto 3D scaffolds. Further, it also evaluated the effect of cryopreservation over the properties of the scaffold material itself since these are critical for the engineering of most tissues and in particular, tissues such as bone. For this purpose, porous scaffolds, namely fiber meshes based o...

  4. Utilizing stem cells for three-dimensional neural tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Cho, Yongku; Li, Xue-Jun; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-05-26

    Three-dimensional neural tissue engineering has made great strides in developing neural disease models and replacement tissues for patients. However, the need for biomimetic tissue models and effective patient therapies remains unmet. The recent push to expand 2D neural tissue engineering into the third dimension shows great potential to advance the field. Another area which has much to offer to neural tissue engineering is stem cell research. Stem cells are well known for their self-renewal and differentiation potential and have been shown to give rise to tissues with structural and functional properties mimicking natural organs. Application of these capabilities to 3D neural tissue engineering may be highly useful for basic research on neural tissue structure and function, engineering disease models, designing tissues for drug development, and generating replacement tissues with a patient's genetic makeup. Here, we discuss the vast potential, as well as the current challenges, unique to integration of 3D fabrication strategies and stem cells into neural tissue engineering. We also present some of the most significant recent achievements, including nerve guidance conduits to facilitate better healing of nerve injuries, functional 3D biomimetic neural tissue models, physiologically relevant disease models for research purposes, and rapid and effective screening of potential drugs. PMID:26890524

  5. Reconstruction of Multiple Facial Nerve Branches Using Skeletal Muscle-Derived Multipotent Stem Cell Sheet-Pellet Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kosuke; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Hirata, Maki; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kenei; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Kazuno, Akihito; Sakai, Akihiro; Iida, Masahiro; Okami, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages, and surgical resection with wide margins is generally indicated, despite this treatment being associated with poor postoperative quality of life (QOL). We have previously reported on the therapeutic effects of skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs), which exert reconstitution capacity for muscle-nerve-blood vessel units. Recently, we further developed a 3D patch-transplantation system using Sk-MSC sheet-pellets. The aim of this study is the application of the 3D Sk-MSC transplantation system to the reconstitution of facial complex nerve-vascular networks after severe damage. Mouse experiments were performed for histological analysis and rats were used for functional examinations. The Sk-MSC sheet-pellets were prepared from GFP-Tg mice and SD rats, and were transplanted into the facial resection model (ST). Culture medium was transplanted as a control (NT). In the mouse experiment, facial-nerve-palsy (FNP) scoring was performed weekly during the recovery period, and immunohistochemistry was used for the evaluation of histological recovery after 8 weeks. In rats, contractility of facial muscles was measured via electrical stimulation of facial nerves root, as the marker of total functional recovery at 8 weeks after transplantation. The ST-group showed significantly higher FNP (about three fold) scores when compared to the NT-group after 2-8 weeks. Similarly, significant functional recovery of whisker movement muscles was confirmed in the ST-group at 8 weeks after transplantation. In addition, engrafted GFP+ cells formed complex branches of nerve-vascular networks, with differentiation into Schwann cells and perineurial/endoneurial cells, as well as vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, Sk-MSC sheet-pellet transplantation is potentially useful for functional reconstitution therapy of large defects in facial nerve-vascular networks. PMID:26372044

  6. Application of adult stem cells in neural tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihong Piao; Wei Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTTIVE:To investigate the progress in finding,isolation and culture.proliferation and differentiation,and application in neural tissue engineering of adult stem cells(ASCs).DATA SOURCES:Using the terms"adult stem cells,nerve,tissue engineering".we searched the PubMed for adult stem ceils-related studies published in English from January 2001 to August 2006.Meanwhile,we also performed a China National Knowledge Infrastructure(CNKI)search for homochronous correlative literatures on the computer by inputting the terms"adult stem cells,nerve,tissue engineering"in Chinese.texts were searched for.Inclusive criteria:①Literatures about the sources,distribution,culture.proliferation and differentiation.and application in the repair of neural ASCs by tissue engineering.②Articles recommended either by randomized.blind or by other methods were not excluded.Exclusive criteria:①Embryonic stem cells.②Review,repetitive study,case report,Meta analysis. DATA EXTRACTION:Totally 1 278 articles related to ASCs were collected,32 were involved and the other 1 246 were excluded. DATA SYNTHESIS:Adult stem cell has the ability of self-renewal.unceasing proliferation and transdifferentiation.It has wide source,which does not involved in ethical problems.It has advantages over embryonic stem cell.Studies on the isolation and culture,induction and differentiation and application in neural ASCs by tissue engineering contribute to obtaining considerable ASCs,so as to provide experimental and theoretical bases for CONCLUSION:ASCs play a very important role in neural tissue engineering.

  7. Solar cell as a self-oscillating heat engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar cells are engines converting energy supplied by the photon flux into work. All known types of macroscopic engines and turbines are also self-oscillating systems which yield a periodic motion at the expense of a usually non-periodic source of energy. The very definition of work in the formalism of quantum open systems suggests the hypothesis that the oscillating ‘piston’ is a necessary ingredient of the work extraction process. This aspect of solar cell operation is absent in the existing descriptions and the main goal of this paper is to show that plasma oscillations provide the physical implementation of a piston. (paper)

  8. Prospect of Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizeh-Mitra Yousefi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been the subject of many studies in recent years, ranging from basic science that looks into MSCs properties to studies that aim for developing bioengineered tissues and organs. Adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs have been the focus of most studies due to the inherent potential of these cells to differentiate into various cell types. Although, the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of cellular differentiation. These cells are another attractive stem cell source because of their ability to be reprogramed, allowing the generation of multiple cell types from a single cell. This paper briefly covers various types of stem cell sources that have been used for tissue engineering applications, with a focus on bone regeneration. Then, an overview of some recent studies making use of MSC-seeded 3D scaffold systems for bone tissue engineering has been presented. The emphasis has been placed on the reported scaffold properties that tend to improve MSCs adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation outcomes.

  9. Engineered Biomaterials to Enhance Stem Cell-Based Cardiac Tissue Engineering and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Waters, Renae; Roula, Boustany; Dana, Rahbani; Yara, Seif; Alexandre, Toubia; Paul, Arghya

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Since adult cardiac cells are limited in their proliferation, cardiac tissue with dead or damaged cardiac cells downstream of the occluded vessel does not regenerate after myocardial infarction. The cardiac tissue is then replaced with nonfunctional fibrotic scar tissue rather than new cardiac cells, which leaves the heart weak. The limited proliferation ability of host cardiac cells has motivated investigators to research the potential cardiac regenerative ability of stem cells. Considerable progress has been made in this endeavor. However, the optimum type of stem cells along with the most suitable matrix-material and cellular microenvironmental cues are yet to be identified or agreed upon. This review presents an overview of various types of biofunctional materials and biomaterial matrices, which in combination with stem cells, have shown promises for cardiac tissue replacement and reinforcement. Engineered biomaterials also have applications in cardiac tissue engineering, in which tissue constructs are developed in vitro by combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for drug screening or eventual implantation. This review highlights the benefits of using biomaterials in conjunction with stem cells to repair damaged myocardium and give a brief description of the properties of these biomaterials that make them such valuable tools to the field. PMID:26953627

  10. Continuous synthesis of graphene sheets by spray pyrolysis and their use as catalysts for fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Biao; Wang, Xiao Xia; Huang, Xin Xin; Wang, Jian Nong

    2015-01-14

    Graphene sheets (GNS) were synthesized continuously by spray pyrolysis of iron carbonyl and pyridine. The Pt catalyst supported on GNS exhibited excellent durability for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The GNS, when used as a metal-free catalyst for ORR, showed performance even better than the commercial Pt/C catalyst. PMID:25421428

  11. Distributed Shared Memory for the Cell Broadband Engine (DSMCBE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Nørgaard; Skovhede, Kenneth; Vinter, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The CELL-BE processor provides high performance and has been shown to reach a performance close to the theoretical peak, however, the high performance comes at the price of a quite complex programming model. Central to the complexity of the CELL-BE programming model is the need to move data in and...... out of non-coherent local storage blocks for each special processor element. In this paper we present a software library, namely the Distributed Shared Memory for the Cell Broadband Engine (DSMCBE). By using techniques known from distributed shared memory DSMCBE allows programmers to program the CELL...

  12. New model for cardiomyocyte sheet transplantation using avirus-cell fusion technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    AIM To facilitate close contacts between transplantedcardiomyocytes and host skeletal muscle using cellfusion mediated by hemagglutinating virus of Japanenvelope (HVJ-E) and tissue maceration.METHODS: Cardiomyocytes (1.5 × 106) from fetalrats were first cultured. After proliferation, some cellswere used for fusion with adult muscle fibers usingHVJ-E. Other cells were used to create cardiomyocytesheets (area: about 3.5 cm2 including 2.1 × 106cells), which were then treated with Nile blue, separated,and transplanted between the latissimusdorsi and intercostal muscles of adult rats with fourcombinations of HVJ-E and/or NaOH maceration:G1: HVJ-E(+), NaOH(+), Cardiomyocytes(+); G2:HVJ-E(-), NaOH(+), Cardiomyocytes(+); G3: HVJ-E(+),NaOH(-), Cardiomyocytes(+); G4: HVJ-E(-), NaOH(-),Cardiomyocytes(-). At 1 and 2 wk after transplantation,the four groups were compared by detection of beatingdomains, motion images using moving target analysissoftware, action potentials, gene expression of MLC-2v and Mesp1 by reverse transcription-polymerasechain reaction, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and immunostainingfor cardiac troponin and skeletal myosin.RESULTS: In vitro cardiomyocytes were fused withskeletal muscle fibers using HVJ-E. Cardiomyocytesheets remained in the primary transplanted sites for2 wk. Although beating domains were detected inG1, G2, and G3 rats, G1 rats prevailed in the number,size, motion image amplitudes, and action potentialcompared with G2 and G3 rats. Close contacts wereonly found in G1 rats. At 1 wk after transplantation,the cardiomyocyte sheets showed adhesion at variouspoints to the myoblast layer in the latissimus dorsimuscle. At 2 wk after transplantation, close contactswere seen over a broad area. Part of the skeletalmuscle sarcoplasma seemed to project into themyocardiocyte plasma and some nuclei appeared toshare both sarcoplasmas.CONCLUSION: The present results

  13. Tissue engineering a surrogate niche for metastatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seib, F Philipp; Berry, Janice E; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Taichman, Russell S; Kaplan, David L

    2015-05-01

    In breast and prostate cancer patients, the bone marrow is a preferred site of metastasis. We hypothesized that we could use tissue-engineering strategies to lure metastasizing cancer cells to tissue-engineered bone marrow. First, we generated highly porous 3D silk scaffolds that were biocompatible and amenable to bone morphogenetic protein 2 functionalization. Control and functionalized silk scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in mice and bone marrow development was followed. Only functionalized scaffolds developed cancellous bone and red bone marrow, which appeared as early as two weeks post-implantation and further developed over the 16-week study period. This tissue-engineered bone marrow microenvironment could be readily manipulated in situ to understand the biology of bone metastasis. To test the ability of functionalized scaffolds to serve as a surrogate niche for metastasis, human breast cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of mice. The treatment of animals with scaffolds had no significant effect on primary tumor growth. However, extensive metastasis was observed in functionalized scaffolds, and the highest levels for scaffolds that were in situ manipulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). We also applied this tissue-engineered bone marrow model in a prostate cancer and experimental metastasis setting. In summary, we were able to use tissue-engineered bone marrow to serve as a target or "trap" for metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:25771021

  14. Engineered T Cells for the Adoptive Therapy of B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Koehler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL remains an incurable disease due to the high risk of relapse, even after complete remission, raising the need to control and eliminate residual tumor cells in long term. Adoptive T cell therapy with genetically engineered specificity is thought to fulfil expectations, and clinical trials for the treatment of CLL are initiated. Cytolytic T cells from patients are redirected towards CLL cells by ex vivo engineering with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which binds to CD19 on CLL cells through an antibody-derived domain and triggers T cell activation through CD3ζ upon tumor cell engagement. Redirected T cells thereby target CLL cells in an MHC-unrestricted fashion, secret proinflammatory cytokines, and eliminate CD19+ leukaemia cells with high efficiency. Cytolysis of autologous CLL cells by patient's engineered T cells is effective, however, accompanied by lasting elimination of healthy CD19+ B-cells. In this paper we discuss the potential of the strategy in the treatment of CLL, the currently ongoing trials, and the future challenges in the adoptive therapy with CAR-engineered T cells.

  15. Engineering Cell and Tissue Mechanical Microenvironments for Regenerative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Tsou, Danielle An-Chi

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of tissue engineering is to create technologies that will improve or replace biological function of diseased or damaged cells and tissues. The purpose of my thesis work is to determine how the mechanical properties of the murine microenvironment, specifically matrix stiffness, can affect the function and behavior of cells and tissues. Previous research has shown that stiffness is a powerful mechanical property; it is associated with breast and liver cancer, and can also be ...

  16. Tissue Engineering Bone Using Autologous Progenitor Cells in the Peritoneum

    OpenAIRE

    Jinhui Shen; Ashwin Nair; Ramesh Saxena; Cheng Cheng Zhang; Joseph Borrelli; Liping Tang

    2014-01-01

    Despite intensive research efforts, there remains a need for novel methods to improve the ossification of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Based on a common phenomenon and known pathological conditions of peritoneal membrane ossification following peritoneal dialysis, we have explored the possibility of regenerating ossified tissue in the peritoneum. Interestingly, in addition to inflammatory cells, we discovered a large number of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the periton...

  17. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeldon, Ian; Farhadi, Arash; Bick, Alexander G; Khademhosseini, Ali [Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Jabbari, Esmaiel, E-mail: alik@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2011-05-27

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness these interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behavior. Here, we review two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3D) nanoscale tissue engineering technologies, and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffold technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D. However, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and that can control the temporal changes in the cellular microenvironment. (topical review)

  18. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness these interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behavior. Here, we review two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3D) nanoscale tissue engineering technologies, and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffold technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D. However, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and that can control the temporal changes in the cellular microenvironment. (topical review)

  19. Engineered CHO cells for production of diverse, homogeneous glycoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhang; Wang, Shengjun; Halim, Adnan; Schulz, Morten Alder; Frodin, Morten; Rahman, Shamim H.; Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Behrens, Carsten; Kristensen, Claus; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Bennett, Eric Paul; Wandall, Hans H.; Clausen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    genes controlling N-glycosylation in CHO cells and constructed a design matrix that facilitates the generation of desired glycosylation, such as human-like alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid capping. This engineering approach will aid the production of glycoproteins with improved properties and therapeutic...

  20. Mammalian designer cells: Engineering principles and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingqi; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Biotechnology is a widely interdisciplinary field focusing on the use of living cells or organisms to solve established problems in medicine, food production and agriculture. Synthetic biology, the science of engineering complex biological systems that do not exist in nature, continues to provide the biotechnology industry with tools, technologies and intellectual property leading to improved cellular performance. One key aspect of synthetic biology is the engineering of deliberately reprogrammed designer cells whose behavior can be controlled over time and space. This review discusses the most commonly used techniques to engineer mammalian designer cells; while control elements acting on the transcriptional and translational levels of target gene expression determine the kinetic and dynamic profiles, coupling them to a variety of extracellular stimuli permits their remote control with user-defined trigger signals. Designer mammalian cells with novel or improved biological functions not only directly improve the production efficiency during biopharmaceutical manufacturing but also open the door for cell-based treatment strategies in molecular and translational medicine. In the future, the rational combination of multiple sets of designer cells could permit the construction and regulation of higher-order systems with increased complexity, thereby enabling the molecular reprogramming of tissues, organisms or even populations with highest precision. PMID:26010998

  1. Upgrades of Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory hot cell facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory operates the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PITL) and the 324 Shielded Materials Facility (SMF). These hot cell facilities provide diverse capabilities for the postirradiation examination and testing of irradiated reactor fuels and materials. The primary function of these facilities is to determine failure mechanisms and effects of irradiation on physical and mechanical properties of reactor components. The purpose of this paper is to review major equipment and facility upgrades that enhance customer satisfaction and broaden the engineering capabilities for more diversified programs. These facility and system upgrades are providing higher quality remote nondestructive and destructive examination services with increased productivity, operator comfort, and customer satisfaction

  2. Engineering a clinically-useful matrix for cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Glenn D

    2008-01-01

    The design criteria for matrices for encapsulation of cells for cell therapy include chemical, biological, engineering, marketing, regulatory, and financial constraints. What is required is a biocompatible material for culture of cells in three-dimensions (3-D) that offers ease of use, experimental flexibility to alter composition and compliance, and a composition that would permit a seamless transition from in vitro to in vivo use. The challenge is to replicate the complexity of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) environment with the minimum number of components necessary to allow cells to rebuild a given tissue. Our approach is to deconstruct the ECM to a few modular components that can be reassembled into biomimetic materials that meet these criteria. These semi-synthetic ECMs (sECMs) employ thiol-modified derivatives of hyaluronic acid (HA) that can form covalently crosslinked, biodegradable hydrogels. These sECMs are "living" biopolymers, meaning that they can be crosslinked in the presence of cells or tissues to enable cell therapy and tissue engineering. Moreover, the sECMs allow inclusion of the appropriate biological cues needed to simulate the complexity of the ECM of a given tissue. Taken together, the sECM technology offers a manufacturable, highly reproducible, flexible, FDA-approvable, and affordable vehicle for cell expansion and differentiation in 3-D. PMID:19279714

  3. Defect engineering in solar cell manufacturing and thin film solar cell development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01

    During the last few years many defect engineering concepts were successfully applied to fabricate high efficiency silicon solar cells on low-cost substrates. Some of the research advances are described.

  4. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, C.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  5. Genetic Engineering of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Adam; Walczak, Piotr; Janowski, Miroslaw; Lukomska, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which can be obtained from various organs and easily propagated in vitro, are one of the most extensively used types of stem cells and have been shown to be efficacious in a broad set of diseases. The unique and highly desirable properties of MSCs include high migratory capacities toward injured areas, immunomodulatory features, and the natural ability to differentiate into connective tissue phenotypes. These phenotypes include bone and cartilage, and these properties predispose MSCs to be therapeutically useful. In addition, MSCs elicit their therapeutic effects by paracrine actions, in which the metabolism of target tissues is modulated. Genetic engineering methods can greatly amplify these properties and broaden the therapeutic capabilities of MSCs, including transdifferentiation toward diverse cell lineages. However, cell engineering can also affect safety and increase the cost of therapy based on MSCs; thus, the advantages and disadvantages of these procedures should be discussed. In this review, the latest applications of genetic engineering methods for MSCs with regenerative medicine purposes are presented. PMID:26140302

  6. TEOS-assisted synthesis of porous MoS2 with ultra-small exfoliated sheets and applications in dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: We developed a TEOS-assisted strategy for synthesis of porous MoS2 with ultra-small exfoliated sheets. The prepared porous MoS2 sheets were employed as counter electrodes (CEs) materials for dye-sensitized solar cells. The photo to electron conversion efficiency is higher than that of Pt coated CEs. - Highlights: • The porous MoS2 sheets were synthesized using tetraethylorthosilicate assisted way. • The porous MoS2 sheets possess a high specific surface area (101.6 m2/g). • The porous MoS2 sheets were employed as counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells. • The DSSCs based on the porous MoS2 sheets CEs achieve a high power conversion efficiency of 6.35% which is higher than that of Pt CEs (6.19%) - Abstract: Exfoliated MoS2 of ultra-small sheets were for the first time synthesized by embedding the precursors ((NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O and thiourea) inside the hydrogel of the activated silicic acid (calculated as SiO2) which was obtained from hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). It was found that the added molar ratio of SiO2/MoS2 = 10.0 can effectively be used as templates to prohibit the growth of MoS2. Analysis of TEM, Raman spectra, XRD and BET reveals that the added TEOS plays a vital role in forming of exfoliated sheets and obtaining high specific surface area (101.6 m2/g) in the resultant products. The prepared exfoliated sheets of MoS2 were employed as counter electrodes (CEs) materials for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The electrochemical analysis (cyclic voltammograms, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) indicates that the porous MoS2 sheets CEs possess lower charge transfer resistance and a higher electro-catalytic activity in reducing I3− to I− compared to the flower-shaped MoS2 synthesized with less amount of the added TEOS. The DSSCs based on the porous MoS2 sheets CEs was demonstrated to achieve a high power conversion efficiency of 6.35% which is comparable to that of Pt CEs (6.19%)

  7. Monitoring cell profile in tissue engineered constructs by OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Wood, Mairead A.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Guyot, Elvire; Dubois, Arnaud; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2005-04-01

    Despite significant progress in tissue engineering over the last decade, the development of real-time, non-destructive tools for monitoring the development of engineered tissues remains a great challenge. To date, the evaluation of cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production in response to various culture conditions depends upon traditional DNA, RNA and protein analysis which requires extraction of cell components from constructs resulting in loss of tissue morphology and integrity. In this study, we report how optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be exploited to monitor cell profiles in real-time and in a non-destructive manner. Scaffolds made from poly(lactic acid) (PLLA) with various porosities were scanned by OCT. A local porosity analysis method has been developed to quantify the porosity change. The hypothesis is whether the local porosity analysis can correlate with the tissue growth within the scaffold following seeding of the cells within it. Bone cells have been grown in the PLLA scaffolds under different culture conditions. The OCT images of these scaffolds have been collected. It has been found that the porosity of the cultured scaffold-cell constructs reduced under different culture conditions compared to blank scaffolds. A decrease in light penetration depth in OCT images has also been observed. There existed a good relationship between the local porosity and tissue growth. It has been demonstrated that the mean local porosity based on OCT images can become a unique method to correlate and monitor tissue growth.

  8. Influence of engineered surface on cell directionality and motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control of cell migration is important in numerous key biological processes, and is implicated in pathological conditions such as cancer metastasis and inflammatory diseases. Many previous studies indicated that cell migration could be guided by micropatterns fabricated on cell culture surfaces. In this study, we designed a polydimethylsiloxane cell culture substrate with gratings punctuated by corners and ends, and studied its effects on the behavior of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. MC3T3-E1 cells elongated and aligned with the gratings, and the migration paths of the cells appeared to be guided by the grating pattern. Interestingly, more than 88% of the cells cultured on these patterns were observed to reverse their migration directions at least once during the 16 h examination period. Most of the reversal events occurred at the corners and the ends of the pattern, suggesting these localized topographical features induce an abrupt loss in directional persistence. Moreover, the cell speed was observed to increase temporarily right after each directional reversal. Focal adhesion complexes were more well-established in cells on the angular gratings than on flat surfaces, but the formation of filipodia appeared to be imbalanced at the corners and the ends, possibly leading to the loss of directional persistence. This study describes the first engineered cell culture surface that consistently induces changes in the directional persistence of adherent cells. This will provide an experimental model for the study of this phenomenon and a valuable platform to control the cell motility and directionality, which can be used for cell screening and selection. (paper)

  9. Automatic design system for a steel sheet pile cellular cofferdam and its evaluation; Koya ita cell shiki kozobutsu no kihon sekkei no jidoka oyobi system no hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Y.; Ito, A.; Yokota, H. [Port and Harbour Research Inst., Kanagawa (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    A new design scheme has recently been introduced to a sheet pile cellular cofferdam, which takes the effect of the embedded part of a sheet pile on the structural stability into account. On the basis of the modification of the design way, the automatic design system for this type of structure has been established. Port engineers are able to conduct basic design of a breakwater and a seaward made of the sheet pile cellular cofferdam. Parametric studies have been conducted using this automatic design system. It has been confirmed based on the study that this system provides the reasonable structural sections, embedded length, and so on. Some particular characteristics of this type of structures have also been provided in this present report. 5 refs., 59 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Tissue engineered heart valves based on human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, D.; Hoerstrup, S P

    2006-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is still a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Clinically used valve replacements including mechanical valves as well as fixed biological xeno- or homografts are associated with several major disadvantages. Alternatively, tissue engineering aims at the fabrication of autologous living cardiovascular replacements with the potential to grow and to repair, particularly for paediatric applications. Therefore, autologous cells are harvested and seeded ont...

  11. Tissue engineered heart valves based on human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, D.; Hoerstrup, S P

    2007-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is still a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Clinically used valve replacements including mechanical valves as well as fixed biological xeno- or homografts are associated with several major disadvantages. Alternatively, tissue engineering aims at the fabrication of autologous living cardiovascular replacements with the potential to grow and to repair, particularly for paediatric applications. Therefore, autologous cells are harvested and seeded ont...

  12. Engineering the Interface Between Inorganic Materials and Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, David

    2014-05-31

    To further optimize cell function in hybrid “living materials”, it would be advantageous to render mammalian cells responsive to novel “orthogonal” cues, i.e. signals they would not ordinarily respond to but that can be engineered to feed into defined intracellular signaling pathways. We recently developed an optogenetic method, based on A. thaliana Cry2, for rapid and reversible protein oligomerization in response to blue light. We also demonstrated the ability to use this method to channel the light input into several defined signaling pathways, work that will enhance communication between inorganic devices and living systems.

  13. Cell broadband engine architecture as a DSP platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumski, Karol; Malanowski, Mateusz

    2009-06-01

    The slowing pace of performance improvement in the commonly available processors is a cause of concern amongst many computational scientists. This combined with the ever increasing need for computational power has caused us to turn to alternative architectures in search of performance gains. Two main candidates were the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) and the Cell Broadband Engine (CELL BE) architecture. This paper focuses on the latter, outlining the architecture and basic programming paradigms, and also contains performance comparison of algorithms currently developed by our team.

  14. Engineered microtopographies and surface chemistries direct cell attachment and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Chelsea Marie

    Harrison, in 1914, first recognized that cells respond to physicochemical cues such as substratum topography when he observed that fibroblasts elongated while cultured on spider silk. Recently, techniques developed in the micro-electronics industry have been used to create molds for producing microscaled topographies with various shapes and spatial arrangements. Although these patterning techniques are well-established, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying cell sensing and response to microtopographies. In this work cellular micro-environments with varying surface topographies and chemistries were evaluated with marine organisms and mammalian cells to investigate cellular sensing and response. Biofouling---the accumulation of micro-organisms, plants, and animals on submerged surfaces---is an environmental and economic concern. Engineered topographies, replicated in polydimethylsiloxane elastomer (PDMSe) and functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) hydrogels, were evaluated for inhibition of marine fouling organism attachment. Microtopographies replicated in PDMSe inhibited attachment of the marine bacterium, Cobetia marina up to 99% versus smooth. The average normalized attachment densities of cells of C. marina and zoospores of the green algae Ulva on PDMSe topographies scaled inversely with the Engineered Roughness Index (ERIII), a representation of surface energy. Attachment densities of Ulva from four assays and C. marina from two growth phases to PDMSe surfaces scaled inversely with one equation: ERI II multiplied by the Reynolds number of the organism (Re) (R 2 = 0.77). The same microtopographies created in PDMSe reduced the initial attachment density and attachment strength of cells of the diatoms Navicula incerta and Seminavis robusta compared to smooth PDMSe. The average normalized attachment density of Navicula after exposure to shear stress (48 Pa) was correlated with the contact area between the diatom and a

  15. Establishment of cell surface engineering and its development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Cell surface display of proteins/peptides has been established based on mechanisms of localizing proteins to the cell surface. In contrast to conventional intracellular and extracellular (secretion) expression systems, this method, generally called an arming technology, is particularly effective when using yeasts as a host, because the control of protein folding that is often required for the preparation of proteins can be natural. This technology can be employed for basic and applied research purposes. In this review, I describe various strategies for the construction of engineered yeasts and provide an outline of the diverse applications of this technology to industrial processes such as the production of biofuels and chemicals, as well as bioremediation and health-related processes. Furthermore, this technology is suitable for novel protein engineering and directed evolution through high-throughput screening, because proteins/peptides displayed on the cell surface can be directly analyzed using intact cells without concentration and purification. Functional proteins/peptides with improved or novel functions can be created using this beneficial, powerful, and promising technique. PMID:27305282

  16. Dendritic cell and macrophage staining by monoclonal antibodies in tissue sections and epidermal sheets.

    OpenAIRE

    Flotte, T. J.; Springer, T A; Thorbecke, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Mouse tissue sections were stained by monoclonal antibodies to macrophage antigens (Mac-1 (M1/70), Mac-2 (M3/38), Mac-3 (M3/84) with the use of immunoperoxidase. Mac-1 was located diffusely in the cytoplasm of round cells in a high percentage of alveolar macrophages, resident peritoneal and bone marrow cells, in splenic red pulp, and in rare perivascular cells in the thymus. Mac-1 was absent in epithelial cells and Langerhans cells. Mac-2 was strongly positive in many dendritic cells in the t...

  17. Toward Synthetic Spatial Patterns in Engineered Cell Populations with Chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Solé, Ricard V

    2016-07-15

    A major force shaping form and patterns in biology is based in the presence of amplification mechanisms able to generate ordered, large-scale spatial structures out of local interactions and random initial conditions. Turing patterns are one of the best known candidates for such ordering dynamics, and their existence has been proven in both chemical and physical systems. Their relevance in biology, although strongly supported by indirect evidence, is still under discussion. Extensive modeling approaches have stemmed from Turing's pioneering ideas, but further confirmation from experimental biology is required. An alternative possibility is to engineer cells so that self-organized patterns emerge from local communication. Here we propose a potential synthetic design based on the interaction between population density and a diffusing signal, including also directed motion in the form of chemotaxis. The feasibility of engineering such a system and its implications for developmental biology are also assessed. PMID:27009520

  18. Epidermal stem cells and skin tissue engineering in hairfollicle regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of a fully organized and functionalhair follicle from dissociated cells propagated underdefined tissue culture conditions is a challenge stillpending in tissue engineering. The loss of hair folliclescaused by injuries or pathologies such as alopecia notonly affects the patients' psychological well-being, butalso endangers certain inherent functions of the skin. Itis then of great interest to find different strategies aimingto regenerate or neogenerate the hair follicle underconditions proper of an adult individual. Based uponcurrent knowledge on the epithelial and dermal cells andtheir interactions during the embryonic hair generationand adult hair cycling, many researchers have tried toobtain mature hair follicles using different strategies andapproaches depending on the causes of hair loss. Thisreview summarizes current advances in the differentexperimental strategies to regenerate or neogenerate hairfollicles, with emphasis on those involving neogenesisof hair follicles in adult individuals using isolated cellsand tissue engineering. Most of these experiments wereperformed using rodent cells, particularly from embryonicor newborn origin. However, no successful strategy togenerate human hair follicles from adult cells has yetbeen reported. This review identifies several issues thatshould be considered to achieve this objective. Perhapsthe most important challenge is to provide threedimensionalculture conditionsmimicking the structure ofliving tissue. Improving culture conditions that allow theexpansion of specific cells while protecting their inductiveproperties, as well as methods for selecting populationsof epithelial stem cells, should give us the necessary toolsto overcome the difficulties that constrain human hairfollicle neogenesis. An analysis of patent trends showsthat the number of patent applications aimed at hairfollicle regeneration and neogenesis has been increasingduring the last decade. This field is attractive not only

  19. Speech recognition systems on the Cell Broadband Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y; Jones, H; Vaidya, S; Perrone, M; Tydlitat, B; Nanda, A

    2007-04-20

    In this paper we describe our design, implementation, and first results of a prototype connected-phoneme-based speech recognition system on the Cell Broadband Engine{trademark} (Cell/B.E.). Automatic speech recognition decodes speech samples into plain text (other representations are possible) and must process samples at real-time rates. Fortunately, the computational tasks involved in this pipeline are highly data-parallel and can receive significant hardware acceleration from vector-streaming architectures such as the Cell/B.E. Identifying and exploiting these parallelism opportunities is challenging, but also critical to improving system performance. We observed, from our initial performance timings, that a single Cell/B.E. processor can recognize speech from thousands of simultaneous voice channels in real time--a channel density that is orders-of-magnitude greater than the capacity of existing software speech recognizers based on CPUs (central processing units). This result emphasizes the potential for Cell/B.E.-based speech recognition and will likely lead to the future development of production speech systems using Cell/B.E. clusters.

  20. Reverse engineering human neurodegenerative disease using pluripotent stem cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    With the technology of reprogramming somatic cells by introducing defined transcription factors that enables the generation of "induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)" with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), it has become possible to use this technology to produce various cells and tissues that have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is bringing forth rapid progress in iPSC-based disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. More and more studies have demonstrated that phenotypes of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders could be rather faithfully recapitulated in iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. Moreover, despite the adult-onset nature of the diseases, pathogenic phenotypes and cellular abnormalities often exist in early developmental stages, providing new "windows of opportunity" for understanding mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and for discovering new medicines. The cell reprogramming technology enables a reverse engineering approach for modeling the cellular degenerative phenotypes of a wide range of human disorders. An excellent example is the study of the human neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using iPSCs. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs), culminating in muscle wasting and death from respiratory failure. The iPSC approach provides innovative cell culture platforms to serve as ALS patient-derived model systems. Researchers have converted iPSCs derived from ALS patients into MNs and various types of glial cells, all of which are involved in ALS, to study the disease. The iPSC technology could be used to determine the role of specific genetic factors to track down what׳s wrong in the neurodegenerative disease process in the "disease-in-a-dish" model. Meanwhile, parallel experiments of targeting the same specific genes in human ESCs could also be performed to

  1. Direct fired reciprocating engine and bottoming high temperature fuel cell hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Holcombe, Norman T.

    2006-02-07

    A system of a fuel cell bottoming an internal combustion engine. The engine exhaust gas may be combined in varying degrees with air and fed as input to a fuel cell. Reformer and oxidizers may be combined with heat exchangers to accommodate rich and lean burn conditions in the engine in peaking and base load conditions without producing high concentrations of harmful emissions.

  2. Electron beam induced grafting of N-isopropylacrylamide to a poly(ethylene-terephthalate) membrane for rapid cell sheet detachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intact sheets of human prostate epithelium cells were successfully detached from a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) membrane radiolytically grafted to poly(ethlylene-terephthalate (PET) culture dishes. The detachment process took less than 20 min without damaging the sheet structure. The grafting was performed using a high-energy electron beam to covalently bond NIPAM to the surface of PET culture dishes. This work demonstrates that the optimal conditions for uniform grafting can be achieved by adding argon-saturated solutions of NIPAM monomer onto pre-irradiated, surface-activated PET membranes. The solutions and the membranes were then irradiated under anaerobic conditions to a total absorbed dose of 25 kGy. This grafting method involves producing carbon-centered free radicals NIPAM· and PET· from both NIPAM and PET, respectively. An investigation of the kinetics of the early stages of polymerization of NIPAM was performed through electron beam pulse radiolysis with optical detection. The pulse radiolysis experiments of anaerobic NIPAM methanol solutions show that the esol·- reacts very rapidly with NIPAM producing NIPAM·- anions with a reaction rate constant of 1.4x109±10% L mol-1 s-1. The NIPAM·- anions then undergo a protonation reaction producing the initiation free radical (NIPAM·) with a reaction rate constant of 9x102 L mol-1 s-1. Along with pulse radiolysis, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements show that the radiolytically produced carbon-centered free radicals of the PET, PET·, decay following an overall observed pseudo-first-order reaction with rate constants of k=2.0x10-4 and 7.0x10-4 s-1 produced in argon and in air, respectively. The overall observed decay reaction involve PET·+PET· cross-linking, PET·+O2, PET+HO2·, and PET+H-atoms, since these EPR measurements were conducted under aerobic conditions.

  3. Human dental pulp stem cell is a promising autologous seed cell for bone tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-hui; LIU Da-yong; ZHANG Fang-ming; WANG Fan; ZHANG Wen-kui; ZHANG Zhen-ting

    2011-01-01

    Background The seed cell is a core problem in bone tissue engineering research.Recent research indicates that human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) can differentiate into osteoblasts in vitro,which suggests that they may become a new kind of seed cells for bone tissue engineering.The aim of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs in vitro and bone-like tissue formation when transplanted with three-dimensional gelatin scaffolds in vivo,and hDPSCs may become appropriate seed cells for bone tissue engineering.Methods We have utilized enzymatic digestion to obtain hDPSCs from dental pulp tissue extracted during orthodontic treatment.After culturing and expansion to three passages,the cells were seeded in 6-well plates or on three-dimensional gelatin scaffolds and cultured in osteogenic medium.After 14 days in culture,the three-dimensional gelatin scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice for 4 weeks.In 6-well plate culture,osteogenesis was assessed by alkaline phosphatase staining,Von Kossa staining,and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of the osteogenesis-specific genes type I collagen (COL l),bone sialoprotein (BSP),osteocalcin (OCN),RUNX2,and osterix (OSX).In three-dimensional gelatin scaffold culture,X-rays,hematoxylin/eosin staining,and immunohistochemical staining were used to examine bone formation.Results In vitro studies revealed that hDPSCs do possess osteogenic differentiation potential.In vivo studies revealed that hDPSCs seeded on gelatin scaffolds can form bone structures in heterotopic sites of nude mice.Conclusions These findings suggested that hDPSCs may be valuable as seed cells for bone tissue engineering.As a special stem cell source,hDPSCs may blaze a new path for bone tissue engineering.

  4. Multifunctional Fullerene Derivative for Interface Engineering in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaowen; Zhao, Yue; Chen, Qi; Yang, Yang Michael; Liu, Yongsheng; Hong, Ziruo; Liu, Zonghao; Hsieh, Yao-Tsung; Meng, Lei; Li, Yongfang; Yang, Yang

    2015-12-16

    In perovskite based planar heterojunction solar cells, the interface between the TiO2 compact layer and the perovskite film is critical for high photovoltaic performance. The deep trap states on the TiO2 surface induce several challenging issues, such as charge recombination loss and poor stability etc. To solve the problems, we synthesized a triblock fullerene derivative (PCBB-2CN-2C8) via rational molecular design for interface engineering in the perovskite solar cells. Modifying the TiO2 surface with the compound significantly improves charge extraction from the perovskite layer. Together with its uplifted surface work function, open circuit voltage and fill factor are dramatically increased from 0.99 to 1.06 V, and from 72.2% to 79.1%, respectively, resulting in 20.7% improvement in power conversion efficiency for the best performing devices. Scrutinizing the electrical properties of this modified interfacial layer strongly suggests that PCBB-2CN-2C8 passivates the TiO2 surface and thus reduces charge recombination loss caused by the deep trap states of TiO2. The passivation effect is further proven by stability testing of the perovskite solar cells with shelf lifetime under ambient conditions improved by a factor of more than 4, from ∼40 h to ∼200 h, using PCBB-2CN-2C8 as the TiO2 modification layer. This work offers not only a promising material for cathode interface engineering, but also provides a viable approach to address the challenges of deep trap states on TiO2 surface in planar perovskite solar cells. PMID:26592525

  5. Metabolically Engineered Fungal Cells With Increased Content Of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates to the production of fatty acids and particularly to the production of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) arachidonic acid (ARA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in genetically engineered fungal cells, in particular, to metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  6. Engineering Cell Instructive Materials To Control Cell Fate and Functions through Material Cues and Surface Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventre, Maurizio; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-06-22

    Mastering the interaction between cells and extracellular environment is a fundamental prerequisite in order to engineer functional biomaterial interfaces able to instruct cells with specific commands. Such advanced biomaterials might find relevant application in prosthesis design, tissue engineering, diagnostics and stem cell biology. Because of the highly complex, dynamic, and multifaceted context, a thorough understanding of the cell-material crosstalk has not been achieved yet; however, a variety of material features including biological cues, topography, and mechanical properties have been proved to impact the strength and the nature of the cell-material interaction, eventually affecting cell fate and functions. Although the nature of these three signals may appear very different, they are equated by their participation in the same material-cytoskeleton crosstalk pathway as they regulate cell adhesion events. In this work we present recent and relevant findings on the material-induced cell responses, with a particular emphasis on how the presentation of biochemical/biophysical signals modulates cell behavior. Finally, we summarize and discuss the literature data to draw out unifying elements concerning cell recognition of and reaction to signals displayed by material surfaces. PMID:26693600

  7. High Efficiency CdTe Ink-Based Solar Cells Using Nanocrystals (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    This NREL Highlight is being developed for the 2015 February Alliance S&T Board meeting and describes a solution-processable ink to produce high-efficiency solar cells using low temperature and simple processing.

  8. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  9. Forces generated by cell intercalation tow epidermal sheets in mammalian tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Evan; Kumar, K Vijay; Grill, Stephan W; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-03-31

    While gastrulation movements offer mechanistic paradigms for how collective cellular movements shape developing embryos, far less is known about coordinated cellular movements that occur later in development. Studying eyelid closure, we explore a case where an epithelium locally reshapes, expands, and moves over another epithelium. Live imaging, gene targeting, and cell-cycle inhibitors reveal that closure does not require overlying periderm, proliferation, or supracellular actin cable assembly. Laser ablation and quantitative analyses of tissue deformations further distinguish the mechanism from wound repair and dorsal closure. Rather, cell intercalations parallel to the tissue front locally compress it perpendicularly, pulling the surrounding epidermis along the closure axis. Functional analyses in vivo show that the mechanism requires localized myosin-IIA- and α5β1 integrin/fibronectin-mediated migration and E-cadherin downregulation likely stimulated by Wnt signaling. These studies uncover a mode of epithelial closure in which forces generated by cell intercalation are leveraged to tow the surrounding tissue. PMID:24697897

  10. Photobiology Research Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Photobiology Research Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL. The photobiology group's research is in four main areas: (1) Comprehensive studies of fuel-producing photosynthetic, fermentative, and chemolithotrophic model microorganisms; (2) Characterization and engineering of redox enzymes and proteins for fuel production; (3) Genetic and pathway engineering of model organisms to improve production of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels; and (4) Studies of nanosystems using biological and non-biological materials in hybrid generation. NREL's photobiology research capabilities include: (1) Controlled and automated photobioreactors and fermenters for growing microorganisms under a variety of environmental conditions; (2) High-and medium-throughput screening of H{sub 2}-producing organisms; (3) Homologous and heterologous expression, purification, and biochemical/biophysical characterization of redox enzymes and proteins; (4) Qualitative and quantitative analyses of gases, metabolites, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins; (5) Genetic and pathway engineering and development of novel genetic toolboxes; and (6) Design and spectroscopic characterization of enzyme-based biofuel cells and energy conversion nanodevices.

  11. Van der Waals epitaxy of ultrathin α-MoO3 sheets on mica substrate with single-unit-cell thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Li, Jing-Ning; Zhou, Yu; Xu, Di-Hu; Xiong, Xiang; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2016-02-01

    We report on van der Waals epitaxy of single-crystalline α-MoO3 sheets with single-unit-cell thickness on the mica substrate. The crystalline lattice structure, growth habits, and Raman spectra of the grown α-MoO3 sheets are analyzed. The anisotropic growth of α-MoO3 sheets can be understood by period bond chains theory. Unlike monolayer MoS2 or graphene, Raman spectra of α-MoO3 do not possess frequency shift from bulk crystal to single-unit-cell layer. The relative intensities of two Raman modes (Ag) at 159 and 818 cm-1 are sensitive to the polarization of incident light. This scenario provides a quick approach to determine the lattice orientation of α-MoO3 crystals. Our studies indicate that van der Waals epitaxial growth is a simple and effective way to fabricate high-quality ultrathin α-MoO3 sheets for physical property investigations and potential applications.

  12. Stem cell bioprocess engineering towards cGMP production and clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sart, Sébastien; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Li, Yan; Agathos, Spiros N.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells, including mesenchymal stem cells and pluripotent stem cells, are becoming an indispensable tool for various biomedical applications including drug discovery, disease modeling, and tissue engineering. Bioprocess engineering, targeting large scale production, provides a platform to generate a controlled microenvironment that could potentially recreate the stem cell niche to promote stem cell proliferation or lineage-specific differentiation. This survey aims at defining the characte...

  13. New Fabrication Method Improves the Efficiency and Economics of Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-01

    Synthetic fabrication strategy optimizes the illumination geometry and transport properties of dye-sensitized solar cells. Using oriented titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotube (NT) arrays has shown promise for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). High solar conversion efficiency requires that the incident light enters the cell from the photoelectrode side. However, for NT-based DSSCs, the light normally enters the cell through the counter electrode because a nontransparent titanium foil is typically used as the substrate for forming the aligned NTs and for making electrical contact with them. It has been synthetically challenging to prepare transparent TiO{sub 2} NT electrodes by directly anodizing Ti metal films on transparent conducting oxide (TCO) substrates because it is difficult to control the synthetic conditions. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers have developed a general synthetic strategy for fabricating transparent TiO{sub 2} NT films on TCO substrates. With the aid of a conducting Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} (NTO) layer between the Ti film and TCO substrate, the Ti film can be anodized completely without degrading the TCO. The NTO layer protects the TCO from degradation through a self-terminating mechanism by arresting the electric field-assisted dissolution process at the NT-NTO interface. NREL researchers found that the illumination direction and wavelength of the light incident on the DSSCs strongly influenced the incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency, light-harvesting, and charge-collection properties, which, in turn, affect the photocurrent density, photovoltage, and solar energy conversion efficiency. Researchers also examined the effects of NT film thickness on the properties and performance of DSSCs and found that illuminating the cell from the photoelectrode side substantially increased the conversion efficiency compared with illuminating it from the counter-electrode side. This method solves a key challenge in fabricating

  14. Genetic engineering of platelets to neutralize circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahe; Sharkey, Charles C; Wun, Brittany; Liesveld, Jane L; King, Michael R

    2016-04-28

    Mounting experimental evidence demonstrates that platelets support cancer metastasis. Within the circulatory system, platelets guard circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from immune elimination and promote their arrest at the endothelium, supporting CTC extravasation into secondary sites. Neutralization of CTCs in blood circulation can potentially attenuate metastases to distant organs. Therefore, extensive studies have explored the blockade of platelet-CTC interactions as an anti-metastatic strategy. Such an intervention approach, however, may cause bleeding disorders since the platelet-CTC interactions inherently rely on the blood coagulation cascade including platelet activation. On the other hand, platelets have been genetically engineered to correct inherited bleeding disorders in both animal models and human clinical trials. In this study, inspired by the physical association between platelets and CTCs, platelets were genetically modified to express surface-bound tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a cytokine known to induce apoptosis specifically in tumor cells. The TRAIL-expressing platelets were demonstrated to kill cancer cells in vitro and significantly reduce metastases in a mouse model of prostate cancer metastasis. Our results suggest that using platelets to produce and deliver cancer-specific therapeutics can provide a Trojan-horse strategy of neutralizing CTCs to attenuate metastasis. PMID:26921521

  15. A blueprint for engineering cell fate: current technologies to reprogram cell identity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samantha A Morris; George Q Daley

    2013-01-01

    Human diseases such as heart failure,diabetes,neurodegenerative disorders,and many others result from the deficiency or dysfunction of critical cell types.Strategies for therapeutic tissue repair or regeneration require the in vitro manufacture of clinically relevant quantities of defined cell types.In addition to transplantation therapy,the generation of otherwise inaccessible cells also permits disease modeling,toxicology testing and drug discovery in vitro.In this review,we discuss current strategies to manipulate the identity of abundant and accessible cells by differentiation from an induced pluripotent state or direct conversion between differentiated states.We contrast these approaches with recent advances employing partial reprogramming to facilitate lineage switching,and discuss the mechanisms underlying the engineering of cell fate.Finally,we address the current limitations of the field and how the resulting cell types can be assessed to ensure the production of medically relevant populations.

  16. Forces Generated by Cell Intercalation Tow Epidermal Sheets in Mammalian Tissue Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Heller, Evan; Kumar, K. Vijay; Grill, Stephan W.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    While gastrulation movements offer mechanistic paradigms for how collective cellular movements shape developing embryos, far less is known about coordinated cellular movements that occur later in development. Studying eyelid closure, we explore a case where an epithelium locally reshapes, expands, and moves over another epithelium. Live imaging, gene targeting and cell cycle inhibitors reveal that closure does not require overlying periderm, proliferation or supracellular actin cable assembly...

  17. Process engineering of ceramic composite coatings for fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G.; Kim, H.; Chen, M.; Yang, Q.; Troczynski, T. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Researchers at UBCeram at the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering at the University of British Columbia have developed a technology to chemically bond composite sol-gel (CB-CSG) coating onto metallic surfaces of complex or concave shapes. The process has been optimized for electrically resistive coatings and corrosion-resistant coatings. The CSG is sprayed onto metallic surfaces and is heat-treated at 300 degrees C to partially dehydrate the hydroxides. The CSG film is then chemically bonded through reaction of active alumina with metal phosphates, such as aluminium phosphate. A new chromate-free process is being developed to address the issue of coatings porosity. The electrodeposition technique involves polymer particles mixed with suspended fine alumina particles which are co-deposited by electrophoretic means or by electrocoagulation. The composite e-coatings have excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as a protective coating for various components of fuel cell systems. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Semaphorin 3A-modified adipose-derived stem cell sheet may improve osseointegration in a type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kaixiu; Song, Wen; Wang, Lifeng; Xu, Xiaoru; Tan, Naiwen; Zhang, Sijia; Wei, Hongbo; Song, Yingliang

    2016-01-01

    Although titanium (Ti) implants are considered to be an optimal choice for the replacement of missing teeth, it remains difficult to obtain sufficient osseointegration in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study aimed to investigate whether adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) may be used to improve Ti implant osseointegration in T2DM conditions with the addition of semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), a recently identified osteoprotective protein. Cell morphology was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Cell proliferation was determined using Cell Counting Kit-8. Osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the staining of alkaline phosphatase, collagen secretion and calcium deposition. An in vivo evaluation was performed in the T2DM rat model, which was induced by a high-fat diet and a low-dose streptozotocin intraperitoneal injection. A Sema3A-modified ASC sheet was wrapped around the Ti implant, which was subsequently inserted into the tibia. The rats were then exposed to Sema3A stimulation. The morphology and proliferation ability of ASCs remained unchanged; however, their osteogenic differentiation ability was increased. Micro-computed tomography scanning and histological observations confirmed that formation of new bone was improved with the use of the Sema3A-modified ASCs sheet. The present study indicated that the Sema3A-modified ASCs sheet may be used to improve osseointegration under T2DM conditions. PMID:27484405

  19. Semaphorin 3A-modified adipose-derived stem cell sheet may improve osseointegration in a type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kaixiu; Song, Wen; Wang, Lifeng; Xu, Xiaoru; Tan, Naiwen; Zhang, Sijia; Wei, Hongbo; Song, Yingliang

    2016-09-01

    Although titanium (Ti) implants are considered to be an optimal choice for the replacement of missing teeth, it remains difficult to obtain sufficient osseointegration in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study aimed to investigate whether adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) may be used to improve Ti implant osseointegration in T2DM conditions with the addition of semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), a recently identified osteoprotective protein. Cell morphology was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Cell proliferation was determined using Cell Counting Kit‑8. Osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the staining of alkaline phosphatase, collagen secretion and calcium deposition. An in vivo evaluation was performed in the T2DM rat model, which was induced by a high‑fat diet and a low‑dose streptozotocin intraperitoneal injection. A Sema3A‑modified ASC sheet was wrapped around the Ti implant, which was subsequently inserted into the tibia. The rats were then exposed to Sema3A stimulation. The morphology and proliferation ability of ASCs remained unchanged; however, their osteogenic differentiation ability was increased. Micro‑computed tomography scanning and histological observations confirmed that formation of new bone was improved with the use of the Sema3A-modified ASCs sheet. The present study indicated that the Sema3A‑modified ASCs sheet may be used to improve osseointegration under T2DM conditions. PMID:27484405

  20. Internalisation of engineered nanoparticles into mammalian cells in vitro: influence of cell type and particle properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular internalisation of industrial engineered nanoparticles is undesired and a reason for concern. Here we investigated and compared the ability of seven different mammalian cell cultures in vitro to incorporate six kinds of engineered nanoparticles, focussing on the role of cell type and particle properties in particle uptake. Uptake was examined using light and electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) for particle element identification. Flow cytometry was applied for semi-quantitative analyses of particle uptake and for exploring the influence on uptake by the phagocytosis inhibitor Cytochalasin D (CytoD). All particles studied were found to enter each kind of cultured cells. Yet, particles were never found within cell nuclei. The presence of the respective particles within the cells was confirmed by EDX. Live-cell imaging revealed the time-dependent process of internalisation of technical nanoparticles, which was exemplified by tungsten carbide particle uptake into the human skin cells, HaCaT. Particles were found to co-localise with lysosomal structures within the cells. The incorporated nanoparticles changed the cellular granularity, as measured by flow cytometry, already after 3 h of exposure in a particle specific manner. By correlating particle properties with flow cytometry data, only the primary particle size was found to be a weakly influential property for particle uptake. CytoD, an inhibitor of actin filaments and therewith of phagocytosis, significantly inhibited the internalisation of particle uptake in only two of the seven investigated cell cultures. Our study, therefore, supports the notion that nanoparticles can enter mammalian cells quickly and easily, irrespective of the phagocytic ability of the cells.

  1. Measurements and Characterization (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Measurements and Characterization that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Analytical Microscopy, Electro-Optical Characterization, Surface Analysis, and Cell and Module Performance.

  2. Self-Organizing Maps on the Cell Broadband Engine Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present and evaluate novel parallel implementations of Self-Organizing Maps for the Cell Broadband Engine Architecture. Motivated by the interactive nature of the data-mining process, we evaluate the scalability of the implementations on two clusters using different network characteristics and incarnations (PS3TMconsole and PowerXCell 8i) of the architecture. Our implementations use varying combinations of the Power Processing Elements (PPEs) and Synergistic Processing Elements (SPEs) found in the Cell architecture. For a single processor, our implementation scaled well with the number of SPEs regardless of the incarnation. When combining multiple PS3TMconsoles, the synchronization over the slower network resulted in poor speedups and demonstrated that the use of such a low-cost cluster may be severely restricted, even without the use of SPEs. When using multiple SPEs for the PowerXCell 8i cluster, the speedup grew linearly with increasing number of SPEs for a given number of processors, and linear up to a maximum with the number of processors for a given number of SPEs. Our implementation achieved a worst-case efficiency of 67% for the maximum number of processing elements involved in the computation, but consistently higher values for smaller numbers of processing elements with speedups of up to 70.

  3. Engineered antifouling microtopographies: surface pattern effects on cell distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Joseph T; Sheats, Julian T; Brennan, Anthony B

    2014-12-23

    Microtopography has been observed to lead to altered attachment behavior for marine fouling organisms; however, quantification of this phenomenon is lacking in the scientific literature. Here, we present quantitative measurement of the disruption of normal attachment behavior of the fouling algae Ulva linza by antifouling microtopographies. The distribution of the diatom Navicula incerta was shown to be unaffected by the presence of topography. The radial distribution function was calculated for both individual zoospores and cells as well as aggregates of zoospores from attachment data for a variety topographic configurations and at a number of different attachment densities. Additionally, the screening distance and maximum values were mapped according to the location of zoospore aggregates within a single unit cell. We found that engineered topographies decreased the distance between spore aggregates compared to that for a smooth control surface; however, the distributions for individual spores were unchanged. We also found that the local attachment site geometry affected the screening distance for aggregates of zoospores, with certain geometries decreasing screening distance and others having no measurable effect. The distribution mapping techniques developed and explored in this article have yielded important insight into the design parameters for antifouling microtopographies that can be implemented in the next generation of antifouling surfaces. PMID:25420235

  4. Polyacylurethanes as Novel Degradable Cell Carrier Materials for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend Jan Schouten

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Polycaprolactone (PCL polyester and segmented aliphatic polyester urethanes based on PCL soft segment have been thoroughly investigated as biodegradable scaffolds for tissue engineering. Although proven beneficial as long term implants, these materials degrade very slowly and are therefore not suitable in applications in which scaffold support is needed for a shorter time. A recently developed class of polyacylurethanes (PAUs is expected to fulfill such requirements. Our aim was to assess in vitro the degradation of PAUs and evaluate their suitability as temporary scaffold materials to support soft tissue repair. With both a mass loss of 2.5–3.0% and a decrease in molar mass of approx. 35% over a period of 80 days, PAUs were shown to degrade via both bulk and surface erosion mechanisms. Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR spectroscopy was successfully applied to study the extent of PAUs microphase separation during in vitro degradation. The microphase separated morphology of PAU1000 (molar mass of the oligocaprolactone soft segment = 1000 g/mol provided this polymer with mechano-physical characteristics that would render it a suitable material for constructs and devices. PAU1000 exhibited excellent haemocompatibility in vitro. In addition, PAU1000 supported both adhesion and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells and this could be further enhanced by pre-coating of PAU1000 with fibronectin (Fn. The contact angle of PAU1000 decreased both with in vitro degradation and by incubation in biological fluids. In endothelial cell culture medium the contact angle reached 60°, which is optimal for cell adhesion. Taken together, these results support the application of PAU1000 in the field of soft tissue repair as a temporary degradable scaffold.

  5. Stem Cells and Progenitor Cells for Tissue-Engineered Solutions to Congenital Heart Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Gao; Jacot, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic patches and fixed grafts currently used in the repair of congenital heart defects are nonliving, noncontractile, and not electrically responsive, leading to increased risk of complication, reoperation, and sudden cardiac death. Studies suggest that tissue-engineered patches made from living, functional cells could grow with the patient, facilitate healing, and help recover cardiac function. In this paper, we review the research into possible sources of cardiomyocytes and other cardi...

  6. Isoproterenol directs hair follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells to differentiate in vitro to cardiac muscle cells which can be induced to form beating heart-muscle tissue sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Aiko; Yashiro, Masateru; Mii, Sumiyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Nestin-expressing hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells are located in the bulge area of the follicle. Previous studies have shown that HAP stem cells can differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. HAP stem cells effected nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. Recently, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. The differentiation potential to cardiac muscle cells was greatest in the upper part of the follicle. The beat rate of the cardiac muscle cells was stimulated by isoproterenol. In the present study, we observed that isoproterenol directs HAP stem cells to differentiate to cardiac muscle cells in large numbers in culture compared to HAP stem cells not supplemented with isoproterenol. The addition of activin A, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor, along with isoproternal, induced the cardiac muscle cells to form tissue sheets of beating heart muscle cells. These results demonstrate that HAP stem cells have great potential to form beating cardiac muscle cells in tissue sheets. PMID:27104748

  7. The Effects of Environmental Factors on Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells and Esophagus Tissues Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are increasingly being used for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) can be differentiated from ASCs. Oxygen is a key factor influencing the stem cell differentiation. Tissue engineered esophagus has been a preferred solution for diseased esophagus replacement. The first part involved the effect of hypoxia on differentiation. The results showed 5% hypoxia to be the optimal condition for differentiation of ASCs into contract...

  8. Steel Sheet Pile Walls in Soft Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    For almost a century, steel sheet pile walls are applied worldwide as earth retaining structures for excavations and quay walls. Within the framework of the development of European structural codes for Civil Engineering works, the Eurocodes, Eurocode 3 Part 5 for design of steel sheet pile walls was

  9. CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Owen W; Poddar, Snigdha; Cate, Jamie H D

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing that results in scarless and marker-free integrations of DNA into Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. DNA integration results from cotransforming (1) a single plasmid (pCAS) that coexpresses the Cas9 endonuclease and a uniquely engineered single guide RNA (sgRNA) expression cassette and (2) a linear DNA molecule that is used to repair the chromosomal DNA damage by homology-directed repair. For target specificity, the pCAS plasmid requires only a single cloning modification: replacing the 20-bp guide RNA sequence within the sgRNA cassette. This CRISPR-Cas9 protocol includes methods for (1) cloning the unique target sequence into pCAS, (2) assembly of the double-stranded DNA repair oligonucleotides, and (3) cotransformation of pCAS and linear repair DNA into yeast cells. The protocol is technically facile and requires no special equipment. It can be used in any S. cerevisiae strain, including industrial polyploid isolates. Therefore, this CRISPR-Cas9-based DNA integration protocol is achievable by virtually any yeast genetics and molecular biology laboratory. PMID:27250940

  10. Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Research (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance innovation in concentrating solar power (CSP). This fact sheet summarizes how NREL is advancing CSP research.

  11. CRISPR/Cas9 advances engineering of microbial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociunas, Tadas; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Keasling, Jay D.

    2016-01-01

    interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and its associated proteins (Cas) have become the method of choice for precision genome engineering in many organisms due to their orthogonality, versatility and efficacy. Here we review the strategies adopted for implementation of RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing...... be highlighted. Finally, this review will provide a perspective on the immediate challenges and opportunities foreseen by the use of CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering and regulation in the context of metabolic engineering....

  12. Extraction and Assembly of Tissue-Derived Gels for Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Uriel, Shiri; Labay, Edwardine; Francis-Sedlak, Megan; Moya, Monica L.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Ervin, Natalia; Cankova, Zdravka; Eric M Brey

    2008-01-01

    Interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) play an important role in regulating cell function. Cells cultured in, or on, three-dimensional ECM recapitulate similar features to those found in vivo that are not present in traditional two-dimensional culture. In addition, both natural and synthetic materials containing ECM components have shown promise in a number of tissue engineering applications. Current materials available for cell culture and tissue engineering do not adequately refle...

  13. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ru Dai; Zongjie Wang; Roya Samanipour; Kyo-in Koo; Keekyoung Kim

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a mesenchymal stem cell source with properties of self-renewal and multipotential differentiation. Compared to bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs), ASCs can be derived from more sources and are harvested more easily. Three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering scaffolds are better able to mimic the in vivo cellular microenvironment, which benefits the localization, attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of ASCs. Therefore, tissue-engineered ASCs ...

  14. Electrospun nanofibrous sheets of collagen/elastin/polycaprolactone improve cardiac repair after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Yachen; Wang, Zhenhua; Wen, Dezhong; Zhang, Wentian; Schmull, Sebastian; Li, Haiyan; Chen, Yao; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibrous sheets get increasing attention in myocardial infarction (MI) treatment due to their good cytocompatibility to deliver transplanted stem cells to infarcted areas and due to mechanical characteristics to support damaged tissue. Cardiac extracellular matrix is essential for implanted cells since it provides the cardiac microenvironment. In this study, we hypothesized high concentrations of cardiac nature protein (NP), namely elastin and collagen, in hybrid polycaprolactone (PCL) electrospun nanofibrous sheets could be effective as cardiac-mimicking patch. Optimal ratio of elastin and collagen with PCL in electrospun sheets (80% NP/PCL) was selected based on cytocompatibility and mechanical characteristics. Bone-marrow (BM) c-kit(+) cells anchoring onto NP/PCL sheets exhibited increased proliferative capacity compared with those seeded on PCL in vitro. Moreover, we examined the improvement of cardiac function in MI mice by cell-seeded cardiac patch. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-labeled BM c-kit(+) cells were loaded on 80% NP/PCL sheets which was transplanted into MI mice. Both 80% NP/PCL and c-kit(+)-seeded 80% NP/PCL effectively improved cardiac function after 4 weeks of transplantation, with reduced infarction area and restricted LV remodeling. C-kit(+)-seeded 80% NP/PCL was even superior to the 80% NP/PCL alone and both superior to PCL. GFP(+) cells were identified both in the sheets and local infarcted area where transplanted cells underwent cardiac differentiation after 4 weeks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that sheets with high concentrations of nature proteins loaded with BM c-kit(+) cells might be a novel promising candidate for tissue-engineered cardiac patch to improve cardiac repair after MI. PMID:27186292

  15. Computational model-informed design and bioprinting of cell-patterned constructs for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Aurélie; Skvortsov, Gözde Akdeniz; Hafezi, Forough; Ferraris, Eleonora; Patterson, Jennifer; Koç, Bahattin; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a rapidly advancing tissue engineering technology that holds great promise for the regeneration of several tissues, including bone. However, to generate a successful 3D bone tissue engineering construct, additional complexities should be taken into account such as nutrient and oxygen delivery, which is often insufficient after implantation in large bone defects. We propose that a well-designed tissue engineering construct, that is, an implant with a specific spatial pattern of cells in a matrix, will improve the healing outcome. By using a computational model of bone regeneration we show that particular cell patterns in tissue engineering constructs are able to enhance bone regeneration compared to uniform ones. We successfully bioprinted one of the most promising cell-gradient patterns by using cell-laden hydrogels with varying cell densities and observed a high cell viability for three days following the bioprinting process. In summary, we present a novel strategy for the biofabrication of bone tissue engineering constructs by designing cell-gradient patterns based on a computational model of bone regeneration, and successfully bioprinting the chosen design. This integrated approach may increase the success rate of implanted tissue engineering constructs for critical size bone defects and also can find a wider application in the biofabrication of other types of tissue engineering constructs. PMID:27187017

  16. Mature adipocytes may be a source of stem cells for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adipose tissue contains a large portion of stem cells. These cells appear morphologically like fibroblasts and are primarily derived from the stromal cell fraction. Mature (lipid-filled) adipocytes possess the ability to become proliferative cells and have been shown to produce progeny cells that possess the same morphological (fibroblast-like) appearance as the stem cells from the stromal fraction. A closer examination of mature adipocyte-derived progeny cells may prove to be an emerging area of growth/metabolic physiology that may modify present thinking about adipose tissue renewal capabilities. Knowledge of these cells may also prove beneficial in cell-based therapies for tissue repair, regeneration, or engineering

  17. Nano-Engineered Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Nosang; Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Wiberg, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Nano-engineered catalysts, and a method of fabricating them, have been developed in a continuing effort to improve the performances of direct methanol fuel cells as candidate power sources to supplant primary and secondary batteries in a variety of portable electronic products. In order to realize the potential for high energy densities (as much as 1.5 W h/g) of direct methanol fuel cells, it will be necessary to optimize the chemical compositions and geometric configurations of catalyst layers and electrode structures. High performance can be achieved when catalyst particles and electrode structures have the necessary small feature sizes (typically of the order of nanometers), large surface areas, optimal metal compositions, high porosity, and hydrophobicity. The present method involves electrodeposition of one or more catalytic metal(s) or a catalytic-metal/polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite on an alumina nanotemplate. The alumina nanotemplate is then dissolved, leaving the desired metal or metal/polytetrafluoroethylene-composite catalyst layer. Unlike some prior methods of making fine metal catalysts, this method does not involve processing at elevated temperature; all processing can be done at room temperature. In addition, this method involves fewer steps and is more amenable to scaling up for mass production. Alumina nanotemplates are porous alumina membranes that have been fabricated, variously, by anodizing either pure aluminum or aluminum that has been deposited on silicon by electronbeam evaporation. The diameters of the pores (7 to 300 nm), areal densities of pores (as much as 7 x 10(exp 10)sq cm), and lengths of pores (up to about 100 nm) can be tailored by selection of fabrication conditions. In a given case, the catalytic metal, catalytic metal alloy, or catalytic metal/ polytetrafluoroethylene composite is electrodeposited in the pores of the alumina nanotemplate. The dimensions of the pores, together with the electrodeposition conditions

  18. 1984: On monitoring cell fate in three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    OpenAIRE

    Leferink, Anne Marijke

    2014-01-01

    In cartilage and bone engineering there is a high need for methods to replace traditional tissue and organ transplantation approaches to overcome the currently faced problems of donor shortage and invasiveness of the transplantation procedure. Although many promising advances have been made in the past decades in in vitro tissue engineering, quality control remains a challenge. Most conventional methods to assess the quality of a tissue engineered construct, e.g. by studying cell fate and tis...

  19. Environmental parameters influence non-viral transfection of human mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering applications

    OpenAIRE

    King, William J.; Kouris, Nicholas A.; Choi, Siyoung; Ogle, Brenda M.; Murphy, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Non-viral transfection is a promising technique which could be used to increase the therapeutic potential of stem cells. The purpose of this study was to explore practical culture parameters of relevance in potential human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) clinical and tissue engineering applications, including type of polycationic transfection reagent, N/P ratio and dose of polycation/pDNA polyplexes, cell passage number, cell density, and cell proliferation. The non-viral transfection efficiency...

  20. PVC Plastic and Vinyl Sheet Flooring in the Practice of Construction Engineering%PVC塑胶卷材地面在工程中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄昳

    2011-01-01

    本文针对PVC塑胶卷材地面在施工中存在的难度,提出一系列措施,提高了施工质量,达到了工程施工的预期效果。%This article points to the problem in the construction of PVC sheet flooring,puts forward serial measures,enhances the construction quality,and achieves the desired results.

  1. Engineering PQS biosynthesis pathway for enhancement of bioelectricity production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa microbial fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Chua, Song-Lin; Cao, Bin;

    2013-01-01

    . aeruginosa strain that produces higher concentrations of phenazines under anaerobic conditions by over-expressing the PqsE effector in a PQS negative ΔpqsC mutant. The engineered strain exhibited an improved electrical performance in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and potentiostat-controlled electrochemical...... genetic engineering is a suitable technique to improve power output of bioelectrochemical systems....

  2. Prospects of microbial cell factories developed through systems metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Martin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-09-01

    While academic-level studies on metabolic engineering of microorganisms for production of chemicals and fuels are ever growing, a significantly lower number of such production processes have reached commercial-scale. In this work, we review the challenges associated with moving from laboratory-scale demonstration of microbial chemical or fuel production to actual commercialization, focusing on key requirements on the production organism that need to be considered during the metabolic engineering process. Metabolic engineering strategies should take into account techno-economic factors such as the choice of feedstock, the product yield, productivity and titre, and the cost effectiveness of midstream and downstream processes. Also, it is important to develop an industrial strain through metabolic engineering for pathway construction and flux optimization together with increasing tolerance to products and inhibitors present in the feedstock, and ensuring genetic stability and strain robustness under actual fermentation conditions. PMID:27435545

  3. Development of Synthetic and Natural Materials for Tissue Engineering Applications Using Adipose Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfan He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose stem cells have prominent implications in tissue regeneration due to their abundance and relative ease of harvest from adipose tissue and their abilities to differentiate into mature cells of various tissue lineages and secrete various growth cytokines. Development of tissue engineering techniques in combination with various carrier scaffolds and adipose stem cells offers great potential in overcoming the existing limitations constraining classical approaches used in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, as most tissue engineering techniques are new and highly experimental, there are still many practical challenges that must be overcome before laboratory research can lead to large-scale clinical applications. Tissue engineering is currently a growing field of medical research; in this review, we will discuss the progress in research on biomaterials and scaffolds for tissue engineering applications using adipose stem cells.

  4. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches. PMID:16989722

  5. Apparatus for measuring the finite load-deformation behavior of a sheet of epithelial cells cultured on a mesoscopic freestanding elastomer membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Details are given for the design, calibration, and operation of an apparatus for measuring the finite load-deformation behavior of a sheet of living epithelial cells cultured on a mesoscopic freestanding elastomer membrane, 10 μm thick and 5 mm in diameter. Although similar in concept to bulge tests used to investigate the mechanical properties of micromachined thin films, cell-elastomer composite diaphragm inflation tests pose a unique set of experimental challenges. Composite diaphragm (CD) specimens are extremely compliant (EMIN=0 μl, VMAX≤40 μl) while simultaneously recording the inflation pressure acting at the fixed boundary of the specimen, p(r=a). Using a carefully prescribed six-cycle inflation test protocol, the apparatus is shown to be capable of measuring the [V,p(r=a)] inflation response of a cell-elastomer CD with random uncertainties estimated at ±0.45 μl and ±2.5 Pa, respectively

  6. Prospect of Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Azizeh-Mitra Yousefi; James, Paul F.; Rosa Akbarzadeh; Aswati Subramanian; Conor Flavin; Hassane Oudadesse

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been the subject of many studies in recent years, ranging from basic science that looks into MSCs properties to studies that aim for developing bioengineered tissues and organs. Adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have been the focus of most studies due to the inherent potential of these cells to differentiate into various cell types. Although, the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represents a paradigm shift in our u...

  7. Genetic Engineering of Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Induce Their Migration and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Adam; Walczak, Piotr; Lukomska, Barbara; Janowski, Miroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are very attractive for regenerative medicine due to their relatively easy derivation and broad range of differentiation capabilities, either naturally or induced through cell engineering. However, efficient methods of delivery to diseased tissues and the long-term survival of grafted cells still need improvement. Here, we review genetic engineering approaches designed to enhance the migratory capacities of MSCs, as well as extend their survival after transplantation by the modulation of prosurvival approaches, including prevention of senescence and apoptosis. We highlight some of the latest examples that explore these pivotal points, which have great relevance in cell-based therapies.

  8. Induction of insulin secretion in engineered liver cells by nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan Sabire

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus results from an autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells, which produce insulin. The lack of insulin leads to chronic hyperglycemia and secondary complications, such as cardiovascular disease. The currently approved clinical treatments for diabetes mellitus often fail to achieve sustained and optimal glycemic control. Therefore, there is a great interest in the development of surrogate beta cells as a treatment for type 1 diabetes. Normally, pancreatic beta cells produce and secrete insulin only in response to increased blood glucose levels. However in many cases, insulin secretion from non-beta cells engineered to produce insulin occurs in a glucose-independent manner. In the present study we engineered liver cells to produce and secrete insulin and insulin secretion can be stimulated via the nitric oxide pathway. Results Expression of either human insulin or the beta cell specific transcription factors PDX-1, NeuroD1 and MafA in the Hepa1-6 cell line or primary liver cells via adenoviral gene transfer, results in production and secretion of insulin. Although, the secretion of insulin is not significantly increased in response to high glucose, treatment of these engineered liver cells with L-arginine stimulates insulin secretion up to three-fold. This L-arginine-mediated insulin release is dependent on the production of nitric oxide. Conclusion Liver cells can be engineered to produce insulin and insulin secretion can be induced by treatment with L-arginine via the production of nitric oxide.

  9. The potential of nanofibers in tissue engineering and stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh-Ghaleh Aziz, Shiva; Gholizadeh-Ghaleh Aziz, Sara; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-08-01

    Electrospinning is a technique in which materials in solution are shaped into continuous nano- and micro-sized fibers. Combining stem cells with biomaterial scaffolds and nanofibers affords a favorable approach for bone tissue engineering, stem cell growth and transfer, ocular surface reconstruction, and treatment of congenital corneal diseases. This review seeks to describe the current examples of the use of scaffolds in stem cell therapy. Stem cells are classified as adult or embryonic stem (ES) cells, and the advantages and drawbacks of each group are detailed. The nanofibers and scaffolds are further classified in Tables I and II , which describe specific examples from the literature. Finally, the current applications of biomaterial scaffolds containing stem cells for tissue engineering applications are presented. Overall, this review seeks to give an overview of the biomaterials available for use in combination with stem cells, and the application of nanofibers in stem cell therapy. PMID:26042482

  10. Engineering Escherichia coli Cell Factories for n-Butanol Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongjun; Zhao, Chunhua; Zhang, Tianrui; Lin, Zhao; Li, Yin; Zhang, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    The production of n-butanol, as a widely applied solvent and potential fuel, is attracting much attention. The fermentative production of butanol coupled with the production of acetone and ethanol by Clostridium (ABE fermentation) was once one of the oldest biotechnological processes, ranking second in scale behind ethanol fermentation. However, there remain problems with butanol production by Clostridium, especially the difficulty in genetically manipulating clostridial strains. In recent years, many efforts have been made to produce butanol using non-native strains. Until now, the most advanced effort was the engineering of the user-friendly and widely studied Escherichia coli for butanol production. This paper reviews the current progress and problems relating to butanol production by engineered E. coli in terms of prediction using mathematical models, pathway construction, novel enzyme replacement, butanol toxicity, and tolerance engineering strategies. PMID:25662903

  11. Remote Control of Tissue Interactions via Engineered Photo-switchable Cell Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Luo; Abigail Pulsipher; Debjit Dutta; Lamb, Brian M.; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2014-01-01

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture ...

  12. An Assessment of Cell Culture Plate Surface Chemistry for in Vitro Studies of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Röder; Elena García-Gareta; Christina Theodoropoulos; Nikola Ristovski; Keith A. Blackwood; Woodruff, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of biopolymers as a three dimensional (3D) support structure for cell growth is a leading tissue engineering approach in regenerative medicine. Achieving consistent cell seeding and uniform cell distribution throughout 3D scaffold culture in vitro is an ongoing challenge. Traditionally, 3D scaffolds are cultured within tissue culture plates to enable reproducible cell seeding and ease of culture media change. In this study, we compared two different well-plates with different surface ...

  13. Cancer cell-oriented migration of mesenchymal stem cells engineered with an anticancer gene (PTEN: an imaging demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang ZS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhuo-Shun Yang,1,* Xiang-Jun Tang,2,* Xing-Rong Guo,1 Dan-Dan Zou,1 Xu-Yong Sun,3 Jing-Bo Feng,1 Jie Luo,1 Long-Jun Dai,1,4 Garth L Warnock4 1Hubei Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Research, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China; 3Guangxi Key Laboratory for Transplant Medicine, 303 Hospital of PLA, Nanning, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been considered to hold great potential as ideal carriers for the delivery of anticancer agents since the discovery of their tumor tropism. This study was performed to demonstrate the effects of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN engineering on MSCs’ capacity for cancer cell-oriented migration. Methods: MSCs were engineered with a PTEN-bearing plasmid and the expression was confirmed with Western blotting. A human glioma cell line (DBTRG was used as the target cell; DBTRG cell-oriented migration of MSCs was monitored with a micro speed photographic system. Results: The expression of transfected PTEN in MSCs was identified by immunoblotting analysis and confirmed with cell viability assessment of target cells. The DBTRG cell-oriented migration of PTEN-engineered MSCs was demonstrated by a real-time dynamic monitoring system, and a phagocytosis-like action of MSCs was also observed. Conclusion: MSCs maintained their capacity for cancer cell-directed migration after they were engineered with anticancer genes. This study provides the first direct evidence of MSCs’ tropism post-anticancer gene engineering. Keywords: gene therapy, mesenchymal stem cells, phosphatase and tensin homolog, cancer

  14. Engineering of the Embryonic and Adult Stem Cell Niches

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseinkhani, Mohsen; Shirazi, Reza; Rajaei, Farzad; Mahmoudi, Masoud; Mohammadi, Navid; Abbasi, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Context Stem cells have the potential to generate a renewable source of cells for regenerative medicine due to their ability to self-renew and differentiate to various functional cell types of the adult organism. The extracellular microenvironment plays a pivotal role in controlling stem cell fate responses. Therefore, identification of appropriate environmental stimuli that supports cellular proliferation and lineage-specific differentiation is critical for the clinical application of the st...

  15. Characterisation of BHK-21 cells engineered to secrete human insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Gammell, Patrick; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Clynes, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune destruction of β cells in the pancreas leads to type I, or insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), through the loss of endogenous insulin production capacity. This paper describes an attempt to generate ‘artificial’β cells using the fibroblast cell line BHK21. Stable transfectants expressing the human preproinsulin (PPI) gene were isolated and characterised. The resulting clone selected for further analysis (BHK-PPI-C16) was capable of secreting 0.12 pmol proinsulin/hr/105 cell...

  16. Control of stem cell fate by engineering their micro andnanoenvironment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michelle F Griffin; Peter E Butler; Alexander M Seifalian; Deepak M Kalaskar

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are capable of long-term self-renewal anddifferentiation into specialised cell types, making theman ideal candidate for a cell source for regenerativemedicine. The control of stem cell fate has become amajor area of interest in the field of regenerative medicineand therapeutic intervention. Conventional methodsof chemically inducing stem cells into specific lineagesis being challenged by the advances in biomaterialtechnology, with evidence highlighting that materialproperties are capable of driving stem cell fate. Materialsare being designed to mimic the clues stem cells receivein their in vivo stem cell niche including topographicaland chemical instructions. Nanotopographical clues thatmimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) in vivo have shownto regulate stem cell differentiation. The delivery of ECMcomponents on biomaterials in the form of short peptidessequences has also proved successful in directing stem celllineage. Growth factors responsible for controlling stemcell fate in vivo have also been delivered via biomaterialsto provide clues to determine stem cell differentiation. Analternative approach to guide stem cells fate is to providegenetic clues including delivering DNA plasmids andsmall interfering RNAs via scaffolds. This review, aims toprovide an overview of the topographical, chemical andmolecular clues that biomaterials can provide to guidestem cell fate. The promising features and challenges ofsuch approaches will be highlighted, to provide directionsfor future advancements in this exciting area of stem celltranslation for regenerative medicine.

  17. GASN sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers around 50 detailed sheets which describe and present various aspects, data and information related to the nuclear sector or, more generally to energy. The following items are addressed: natural and artificial radioactive environment, evolution of energy needs in the world, radioactive wastes, which energy for France tomorrow, the consequences in France of the Chernobyl accident, ammunitions containing depleted uranium, processing and recycling of used nuclear fuel, transport of radioactive materials, seismic risk for the basic nuclear installations, radon, the precautionary principle, the issue of low doses, the EPR, the greenhouse effect, the Oklo nuclear reactors, ITER on the way towards fusion reactors, simulation and nuclear deterrence, crisis management in the nuclear field, does nuclear research put a break on the development of renewable energies by monopolizing funding, nuclear safety and security, the plutonium, generation IV reactors, comparison of different modes of electricity production, medical exposure to ionizing radiations, the control of nuclear activities, food preservation by ionization, photovoltaic solar collectors, the Polonium 210, the dismantling of nuclear installations, wind energy, desalination and nuclear reactors, from non-communication to transparency about nuclear safety, the Jules Horowitz reactor, CO2 capture and storage, hydrogen, solar energy, the radium, the subcontractors of maintenance of the nuclear fleet, biomass, internal radio-contamination, epidemiological studies, submarine nuclear propulsion, sea energy, the Three Mile Island accident, the Chernobyl accident, the Fukushima accident, the nuclear after Fukushima

  18. Engineered nanomaterial uptake and tissue distribution: from cell to organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kettiger H

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helene Kettiger,1,* Angela Schipanski,2,* Peter Wick,2 Jörg Huwyler1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 2Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Materials-Biology Interactions, St Gallen, Switzerland *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Improved understanding of interactions between nanoparticles and biological systems is needed to develop safety standards and to design new generations of nanomaterials. This article reviews the molecular mechanisms of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles, their intracellular fate, and their distribution within an organism. We have reviewed the available literature on the uptake and disposition of engineered nanoparticles. Special emphasis was placed on the analysis of experimental systems and their limitations with respect to their usefulness to predict the in vivo situation. The available literature confirms the need to study particle characteristics in an environment that simulates the situation encountered in biological systems. Phenomena such as protein binding and opsonization are of prime importance since they may have a strong impact on cellular internalization, biodistribution, and immunogenicity of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. Extrapolation from in vitro results to the in vivo situation in the whole organism remains a challenge. However, improved understanding of physicochemical properties of engineered nanoparticles and their influence on biological systems facilitates the design of nanomaterials that are safe, well tolerated, and suitable for diagnostic or therapeutic use in humans. Keywords: biodistribution, cellular transport, cellular uptake, endocytosis, engineered nanomaterials, nanosafety

  19. Tissue engineered periodontal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartold, P M; Gronthos, S; Ivanovski, S; Fisher, A; Hutmacher, D W

    2016-02-01

    Attainment of periodontal regeneration is a significant clinical goal in the management of advanced periodontal defects arising from periodontitis. Over the past 30 years numerous techniques and materials have been introduced and evaluated clinically and have included guided tissue regeneration, bone grafting materials, growth and other biological factors and gene therapy. With the exception of gene therapy, all have undergone evaluation in humans. All of the products have shown efficacy in promoting periodontal regeneration in animal models but the results in humans remain variable and equivocal concerning attaining complete biological regeneration of damaged periodontal structures. In the early 2000s, the concept of tissue engineering was proposed as a new paradigm for periodontal regeneration based on molecular and cell biology. At this time, tissue engineering was a new and emerging field. Now, 14 years later we revisit the concept of tissue engineering for the periodontium and assess how far we have come, where we are currently situated and what needs to be done in the future to make this concept a reality. In this review, we cover some of the precursor products, which led to our current position in periodontal tissue engineering. The basic concepts of tissue engineering with special emphasis on periodontal tissue engineering products is discussed including the use of mesenchymal stem cells in bioscaffolds and the emerging field of cell sheet technology. Finally, we look into the future to consider what CAD/CAM technology and nanotechnology will have to offer. PMID:25900048

  20. Engineering cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of sensitive biocompatible particle track detectors has so far limited parallel detection of physical energy deposition and biological response. Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3:C,Mg single crystals combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution limited by light diffraction. Here we report the development of next generation cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). The biocompatibility of FNTDs was tested using six different cell lines, i.e. human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549), glioblastoma (U87), androgen independent prostate cancer (PC3), epidermoid cancer (A431) and murine (VmDk) glioma SMA-560. To evaluate cell adherence, viability and conformal coverage of the crystals different seeding densities and alternative coating with extracellular matrix (fibronectin) was tested. Carbon irradiation was performed in Bragg peak (initial 270.55 MeV u−1). A series of cell compartment specific fluorescence stains including nuclear (HOECHST), membrane (Glut-1), cytoplasm (Calcein AM, CM-DiI) were tested on Cell-Fit-HDs and a single CLSM was employed to co-detect the physical (crystal) as well as the biological (cell layer) information. The FNTD provides a biocompatible surface. Among the cells tested, A549 cells formed the most uniform, viable, tightly packed epithelial like monolayer. The ion track information was not compromised in Cell-Fit-HD as compared to the FNTD alone. Neither cell coating and culturing, nor additional staining procedures affected the properties of the FNTD surface to detect ion tracks. Standard immunofluorescence and live staining procedures could be employed to co-register cell biology and ion track information. The Cell-Fit-Hybrid Detector system is a promising platform for a multitude of studies linking biological response to energy deposition at high level of optical microscopy resolution

  1. Development of yeast cell factories for consolidated bioprocessing of lignocellulose to bioethanol through cell surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    To build an energy and material secure future, a next generation of renewable fuels produced from lignocellulosic biomass is required. Although lignocellulosic biomass, which represents an abundant, inexpensive and renewable source for bioethanol production, is of great interest as a feedstock, the complicated ethanol production processes involved make the cost of producing bioethanol from it higher compared to corn starch and cane juice. Therefore, consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), which combines enzyme production, saccharification and fermentation in a single step, has gained increased recognition as a potential bioethanol production system. CBP requires a highly engineered microorganism developed for several different process-specific characteristics. The dominant strategy for engineering a CBP biocatalyst is to express multiple components of a cellulolytic system from either fungi or bacteria in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The development of recombinant yeast strains displaying cellulases and hemicellulases on the cell surface represents significant progress toward realization of CBP. Regardless of the process used for biomass hydrolysis, CBP-enabling microorganisms encounter a variety of toxic compounds produced during biomass pretreatment that inhibit microbial growth and ethanol yield. Systems biology approaches including disruptome screening, transcriptomics, and metabolomics have been recently exploited to gain insight into the molecular and genetic traits involved in tolerance and adaptation to the fermentation inhibitors. In this review, we focus on recent advances in development of yeast strains with both the ability to directly convert lignocellulosic material to ethanol and tolerance in the harsh environments containing toxic compounds in the presence of ethanol. PMID:22085593

  2. Environmental cues to guide stem cell fate decision for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsberg, Eben; von Recum, Horst A; Mahoney, Melissa J

    2006-09-01

    The human body contains a variety of stem cells capable of both repeated self-renewal and production of specialised, differentiated progeny. Critical to the implementation of these cells in tissue engineering strategies is a thorough understanding of which external signals in the stem cell microenvironment provide cues to control their fate decision in terms of proliferation or differentiation into a desired, specific phenotype. These signals must then be incorporated into tissue regeneration approaches for regulated exposure to stem cells. The precise spatial and temporal presentation of factors directing stem cell behaviour is extremely important during embryogenesis, development and natural healing events, and it is possible that this level of control will be vital to the success of many regenerative therapies. This review covers existing tissue engineering approaches to guide the differentiation of three disparate stem cell populations: mesenchymal, neural and endothelial. These progenitor cells will be of central importance in many future connective, neural and vascular tissue regeneration technologies. PMID:16918253

  3. Characterization of human skin cells for tissue engineering applications by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudlas, Marieke; Koch, Steffen; Bolwien, Carsten; Walles, Heike

    2010-02-01

    In the field of cell culture and tissue engineering is an increasing need for non-invasive methods to analyze living cells in vitro. One important application is the cell characterization in tissue engineering products. Raman spectroscopy is a method which analyzes cells without lysis, fixation or the use of any chemicals and do not affect cell vitality adversely if suitable laser powers and wavelength are used. This purely optical technique is based on inelastic scattering of laser photons by molecular vibrations of biopolymers. Basically Raman spectra of cells contain typical fingerprint regions and information about cellular properties. Characteristic peaks in Raman spectra could be assigned to biochemical molecules like proteins, nucleic acid or lipids. The distinction of cell types by a multivariate analysis of Raman spectra is possible due to their biochemical differences. As this method allows a characterization of cells without any cell damage it is a promising technology for the quality control of cells in tissue engineering or cell culture applications.

  4. Engineering complex tissue-like microgel arrays for evaluating stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermani, Enrico; Shaki, Hossein; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Mehrali, Mehdi; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Development of tissue engineering scaffolds with native-like biology and microarchitectures is a prerequisite for stem cell mediated generation of off-the-shelf-tissues. So far, the field of tissue engineering has not full-filled its grand potential of engineering such combinatorial scaffolds for engineering functional tissues. This is primarily due to the many challenges associated with finding the right microarchitectures and ECM compositions for optimal tissue regeneration. Here, we have developed a new microgel array to address this grand challenge through robotic printing of complex stem cell-laden microgel arrays. The developed microgel array platform consisted of various microgel environments that where composed of native-like cellular microarchitectures resembling vascularized and bone marrow tissue architectures. The feasibility of our array system was demonstrated through localized cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into complex tissue-like structures. In summary, we have developed a tissue-like microgel array for evaluating stem cell differentiation within complex and heterogeneous cell microenvironments. We anticipate that the developed platform will be used for high-throughput identification of combinatorial and native-like scaffolds for tissue engineering of functional organs. PMID:27465860

  5. Prototypical model for tensional wrinkling in thin sheets

    KAUST Repository

    Davidovitch, B.

    2011-10-31

    The buckling and wrinkling of thin films has recently seen a surge of interest among physicists, biologists, mathematicians, and engineers. This activity has been triggered by the growing interest in developing technologies at ever-decreasing scales and the resulting necessity to control the mechanics of tiny structures, as well as by the realization that morphogenetic processes, such as the tissue-shaping instabilities occurring in animal epithelia or plant leaves, often emerge from mechanical instabilities of cell sheets. Although the most basic buckling instability of uniaxially compressed plates was understood by Euler more than two centuries ago, recent experiments on nanometrically thin (ultrathin) films have shown significant deviations from predictions of standard buckling theory. Motivated by this puzzle, we introduce here a theoretical model that allows for a systematic analysis of wrinkling in sheets far from their instability threshold. We focus on the simplest extension of Euler buckling that exhibits wrinkles of finite length--a sheet under axisymmetric tensile loads. The first study of this geometry, which is attributed to Lamé, allows us to construct a phase diagram that demonstrates the dramatic variation of wrinkling patterns from near-threshold to far-from-threshold conditions. Theoretical arguments and comparison to experiments show that the thinner the sheet is, the smaller is the compressive load above which the far-from-threshold regime emerges. This observation emphasizes the relevance of our analysis for nanomechanics applications.

  6. Plasticity of Ectomesenchymal Stem Cells and its Ability of Producing Tissue Engineering Tooth by Recombining with Dental Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionRecently, it has been found that human dental pulp stem cells could generate dentin-pulp complex-like structures in nude mice, but studies on tissue engineering tooth-like structures by cultured human dental epithelial and mesenchymal stem cells are still reported rarely. Ectomesenchyme is an unique structure of vertebrates embryo compose of postmigratory cephalic neural crest cells (NCC) and its derivatives. The aim of the present study was to identify and isolate the ectomesenchymal stem cel...

  7. Challenges in tissue engineering - towards cell control inside artificial scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, M; Witzel, P; Heinrich, D

    2016-05-11

    Control of living cells is vital for the survival of organisms. Each cell inside an organism is exposed to diverse external mechano-chemical cues, all coordinated in a spatio-temporal pattern triggering individual cell functions. This complex interplay between external chemical cues and mechanical 3D environments is translated into intracellular signaling loops. Here, we describe how external mechano-chemical cues control cell functions, especially cell migration, and influence intracellular information transport. In particular, this work focuses on the quantitative analysis of (1) intracellular vesicle transport to understand intracellular state changes in response to external cues, (2) cellular sensing of external chemotactic cues, and (3) the cells' ability to migrate in 3D structured environments, artificially fabricated to mimic the 3D environment of tissue in the human body. PMID:27139622

  8. Human Cardiac Tissue Engineering: From Pluripotent Stem Cells to Heart Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Christopher P.; Shadrin, Ilya Y.; Carlson, Aaron L.; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Engineered cardiac tissues hold great promise for use in drug and toxicology screening, in vitro studies of human physiology and disease, and as transplantable tissue grafts for myocardial repair. In this review, we discuss recent progress in cell-based therapy and functional tissue engineering using pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and we describe methods for delivery of cells into the injured heart. While significant hurdles remain, notable advances have been made in the methods to derive large numbers of pure human cardiomyocytes, mature their phenotype, and produce and implant functional cardiac tissues, bringing the field a step closer to widespread in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:25599018

  9. Metabolically engineered cells for the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    improvement of the PUFA content in the host organism through fermentation optimization, e.g. decreasing the temperature and/or designing an optimal medium, or through improving the flux towards fatty acids by metabolic engineering, e.g. through over-expression of fatty acid synthases, over-expression of other...... enzymes involved in biosynthesis of the precursor for PUFAs, or codon optimization of the heterologous genes, or expression of heterologous enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the precursor for PUFAs....

  10. Macromolecular cell surface engineering for accelerated and reversible cellular aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Adérito J R; Pasparakis, George

    2015-12-25

    We report the synthesis of two simple copolymers that induce rapid cell aggregation within minutes in a fully reversible manner. The polymers can act as self-supporting "cellular glues" or as "drivers" of 3D cell spheroids/aggregates formation at minute concentrations. PMID:26478926

  11. Biomass gasification integrated with a solid oxide fuel cell and Stirling engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    An integrated gasification solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and Stirling engine for combined heat and power application is analyzed. The target for electricity production is 120 kW. Woodchips are used as gasification feedstock to produce syngas, which is then used to feed the SOFC stacks for electric......An integrated gasification solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and Stirling engine for combined heat and power application is analyzed. The target for electricity production is 120 kW. Woodchips are used as gasification feedstock to produce syngas, which is then used to feed the SOFC stacks...... for electricity production. Unreacted hydrocarbons remaining after the SOFC are burned in a catalytic burner, and the hot off-gases from the burner are recovered in a Stirling engine for electricity and heat production. Domestic hot water is used as a heat sink for the Stirling engine. A complete balance...

  12. In vitro evaluation of cell-seeded chitosan films for peripheral nerve tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wrobel, Sandra; Serra, Sofia Cristina; Samy, S. M.; Sousa, Nuno; Heimann, Claudia; Barwig, Christina; Grothe, Claudia; Salgado, A. J.; Talini, Kirsten Haastert

    2014-01-01

    Natural biomaterials have attracted an increasing interest in the field of tissue-engineered nerve grafts, representing a possible alternative to autologous nerve transplantation. With the prospect of developing a novel entubulation strategy for transected nerves with cell-seeded chitosan films, we examined the biocompatibility of such films in vitro. Different types of rat Schwann cells (SCs)—immortalized, neonatal, and adult—as well as rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC...

  13. Engineering Adolescence: Maturation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiulan; Pabon, Lil; Murry, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), has opened up novel paths for a wide range of scientific studies. The capability to direct the differentiation of hPSCs into functional cardiomyocytes has provided a platform for regenerative medicine, development, tissue engineering, disease modeling, and drug toxicity testing. Despite exciting progress, achieving the optimal benefits has...

  14. Molecular and Nanoscale Engineering of High Efficiency Excitonic Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenekhe, Samson A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Ginger, David S. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Cao, Guozhong [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We combined the synthesis of new polymers and organic-inorganic hybrid materials with new experimental characterization tools to investigate bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells and hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells during the 2007-2010 period (phase I) of this project. We showed that the bulk morphology of polymer/fullerene blend solar cells could be controlled by using either self-assembled polymer semiconductor nanowires or diblock poly(3-alkylthiophenes) as the light-absorbing and hole transport component. We developed new characterization tools in-house, including photoinduced absorption (PIA) spectroscopy, time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy (TR-EFM) and conductive and photoconductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM and pc-AFM), and used them to investigate charge transfer and recombination dynamics in polymer/fullerene BHJ solar cells, hybrid polymer-nanocrystal (PbSe) devices, and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs); we thus showed in detail how the bulk photovoltaic properties are connected to the nanoscale structure of the BHJ polymer solar cells. We created various oxide semiconductor (ZnO, TiO2) nanostructures by solution processing routes, including hierarchical aggregates and nanorods/nanotubes, and showed that the nanostructured photoanodes resulted in substantially enhanced light-harvesting and charge transport, leading to enhanced power conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells.

  15. Engineering controlled mammalian type O-Glycosylation in plant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhang; Drew, Damian Paul; Jørgensen, Bodil;

    2011-01-01

    Human mucins are large heavily O-glycosylated glycoproteins (>200 kDa), which account for the majority of proteins in mucus layers that e.g. hydrate, lubricate and protect cells from proteases as well as from pathogens. O-linked mucin glycans are truncated in many cancers, yielding truncated cancer...... specific glyco-peptide epitopes, such as the Tn epitope (GalNAc sugar attached to either Serine or Threonine), which are antigenic to the immune system. In the present study, we have identified plant cells as the only eukaryotic cells without mammalian type O-glycosylation or competing (for sites) O...

  16. Scaffoldless Tissue-engineered Dental Pulp Cell Constructs for Endodontic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Syed-Picard, F.N.; Ray, H.L.; Kumta, P.N.; Sfeir, C.

    2014-01-01

    A major cause of apical periodontitis after endodontic treatment is the bacterial infiltration which could have been challenged by the presence of a vital pulp. In this study, self-assembled, scaffoldless, three-dimensional (3D) tissues were engineered from dental pulp cells (DPCs) and assessed as a device for pulp regeneration. These engineered tissues were placed into the canal space of human tooth root segments that were capped on one end with calcium phosphate cement, and the entire syste...

  17. Metabolically engineered cells for the production of pinosylvin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A genetically engineered micro-organism having an operative metabolic pathway producing cinnamoyl-CoA and producing pinosylvin therefrom by the action of a stilbene synthase is used for pinosylvin production. Said cinnamic acid may be formed from L-phenylalanine by a L-phenylalanine ammonia lyase...... (PAL) which is one accepting phenylalanine as a substrate and producing cinammic acid therefrom, preferably such that if the PAL also accepts tyrosine as a substrate and forms coumaric acid therefrom, the ratio Km(phenylalanine)/Km(tyrosine) for said PAL is less than 1:1 and if said micro-organism...

  18. Human umbilical cord stem cell encapsulation in novel macroporous and injectable fibrin for muscle tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Xu, Hockin H K; Zhou, Hongzhi; Weir, Michael D; Chen, Qianming; Trotman, Carroll Ann

    2013-01-01

    There has been little research on the seeding of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) in three-dimensional scaffolds for muscle tissue engineering. The objectives of this study were: (i) to seed hUCMSCs in a fibrin hydrogel containing fast-degradable microbeads (dMBs) to create macropores to enhance cell viability; and (ii) to investigate the encapsulated cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation for muscle tissue engineering. Mass fractions of 0-80% of dMBs were tested, and 35% of dMBs in fibrin was shown to avoid fibrin shrinkage while creating macropores and promoting cell viability. This construct was referred to as "dMB35". Fibrin without dMBs was termed "dMB0". Microbead degradation created macropores in fibrin and improved cell viability. The percentage of live cells in dMB35 reached 91% at 16 days, higher than the 81% in dMB0 (pACTN3). Elongated, multinucleated cells were formed with positive staining of myogenic specific proteins including myogenin, MYH, ACTN and actin alpha 1. Moreover, a significant increase in cell fusion was detected with myogenic induction. In conclusion, hUCMSCs were encapsulated in fibrin with degradable microbeads for the first time, achieving greatly enhanced cell viability and successful myogenic differentiation with formation of multinucleated myotubes. The injectable and macroporous fibrin-dMB-hUCMSC construct may be promising for muscle tissue engineering applications. PMID:22902812

  19. Remote Control of Tissue Interactions via Engineered Photo-switchable Cell Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Pulsipher, Abigail; Dutta, Debjit; Lamb, Brian M.; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2014-09-01

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture spheroid tissue assembly in solution and co-culture tissue multilayer assembly on materials was demonstrated by an intercellular photo-oxime ligation that could be remotely cleaved and disassembled on demand. Spatial and temporal control of microtissue structures containing multiple cell types was demonstrated by the generation of patterned multilayers for controlling stem cell differentiation. Remote control of cell interactions via cell surface engineering that allows for real-time manipulation of tissue dynamics may provide tools with the scope to answer fundamental questions of cell communication and initiate new biotechnologies ranging from imaging probes to drug delivery vehicles to regenerative medicine, inexpensive bioreactor technology and tissue engineering therapies.

  20. Engineering hot-cell windows for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection considerations in the design and construction of hot-cell windows are discussed. The importance of evaluating the potential gamma spectra and neutron source terms is stressed. 11 references

  1. Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine - From molecular embryology to tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Maria J. Barrero and Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte sign a very interesting paper on EMBO reports (Regenerating the epigenome, EMBO reports 12:208-215, 2011 where they point out that Organisms have evolved two strategies by which to achieve this: the maintenance of adult stem cells and the induction of stemcell properties in differentiated cells. In both cases, cells must undergo extensive epigenetic reprogramming to attain the specialized functions of the new tissue. Ultimately, the regenerative capacity of a tissue might depend on the plasticity of the cellular epigenome, which determines the ability of the cell to respond to injuryrelated signals. Understanding this epigenetic plasticity will allow the development of strategies to stimulate the regeneration of damaged tissues and organs in humans...

  2. Engineered nanoparticles mimicking cell membranes for toxin neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ronnie H; Luk, Brian T; Hu, Che-Ming J; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-08-01

    Protein toxins secreted from pathogenic bacteria and venomous animals rely on multiple mechanisms to overcome the cell membrane barrier to inflict their virulence effect. A promising therapeutic concept toward developing a broadly applicable anti-toxin platform is to administer cell membrane mimics as decoys to sequester these virulence factors. As such, lipid membrane-based nanoparticulates are an ideal candidate given their structural similarity to cellular membranes. This article reviews the virulence mechanisms employed by toxins at the cell membrane interface and highlights the application of cell-membrane mimicking nanoparticles as toxin decoys for systemic detoxification. In addition, the implication of particle/toxin nanocomplexes in the development of toxoid vaccines is discussed. PMID:25868452

  3. Design of high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells. (Spent fuel inspection cells) in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ino, Hiroichi; Ueta, Shouhei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sawa, Kazuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tobita, Tsutomu [Nuclear Engineering Company, Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes design requirements and design results for shields, ventilation system and fuel handling devices for the high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells (spent fuel inspection cells). These cells are small cells to carry out few post-irradiation examinations of spent fuels, specimen, etc., which are irradiated in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, since the cells should be built in limited space in the HTTR reactor building, the cells are designed considering relationship between the cells and the reactor building to utilize the limited space effectively. The cells consist of three partitioned hot cells with wall for neutron and gamma-ray shields, ventilation system including filtering units and fuel handling devices. The post-irradiation examinations of the fuels and materials are planed by using the cells and the Hot Laboratory of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor to establish the technology basis on high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). In future, irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations will be carried out with the cells to upgrade present HTGR technologies and to make the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  4. Design of high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells. (Spent fuel inspection cells) in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes design requirements and design results for shields, ventilation system and fuel handling devices for the high temperature irradiation materials inspection cells (spent fuel inspection cells). These cells are small cells to carry out few post-irradiation examinations of spent fuels, specimen, etc., which are irradiated in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, since the cells should be built in limited space in the HTTR reactor building, the cells are designed considering relationship between the cells and the reactor building to utilize the limited space effectively. The cells consist of three partitioned hot cells with wall for neutron and gamma-ray shields, ventilation system including filtering units and fuel handling devices. The post-irradiation examinations of the fuels and materials are planed by using the cells and the Hot Laboratory of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor to establish the technology basis on high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). In future, irradiation tests and post-irradiation examinations will be carried out with the cells to upgrade present HTGR technologies and to make the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  5. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Targeting with Surface-Engineered Lentiviral Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Els Verhoeyen and Francois-Loic Cosset Adapted from [*Gene Transfer: Delivery and Expression of DNA and RNA*](http://www.cshlpress.com/link/genetrnp.htm) (eds. Friedmann and Rossi). CSHL Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA, 2007. ### INTRODUCTION In the protocol presented here, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are specifically transduced with a vector displaying the HSC-activating polypeptides, stem cell factor (SCF) and thrombopoietin (TPO). Targeted HSC transduction is e...

  6. Process Engineering of Stem Cells for Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Serra, Maria Margarida de Carvalho Negrão

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have garnered a lot of attention owing to their inherent self-renewal ability and pluripotency. These characteristics have opened opportunities for potential stem cell-based regenerative medicines, for development of drug discovery platforms and as unique in vitro models for the study of early human development.(...) Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia

  7. Systems biology and metabolic engineering of Arthrospira cell factories

    OpenAIRE

    Amornpan Klanchui; Tayvich Vorapreeda; Wanwipa Vongsangnak; Chiraphan Kannapho; Supapon Cheevadhanarak; Asawin Meechai

    2012-01-01

    Arthrospira are attractive candidates to serve as cell factories for production of many valuable compounds useful for food, feed, fuel and pharmaceutical industries. In connection with the development of sustainable bioprocessing, it is a challenge to design and develop efficient Arthrospira cell factories which can certify effective conversion from the raw materials (i.e. CO2 and sun light) into desired products. With the current availability of the genome sequences and metabolic models of A...

  8. Electron Acceptor Materials Engineering in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Huan

    2011-07-15

    Lead sulfide colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells with a solar power conversion efficiency of 5.6% are reported. The result is achieved through careful optimization of the titanium dioxide electrode that serves as the electron acceptor. Metal-ion-doped sol-gel-derived titanium dioxide electrodes produce a tunable-bandedge, well-passivated materials platform for CQD solar cell optimization. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Thermodynamic Analysis of a Woodchips Gasification Integrated with Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Stirling Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    Integrated gasification Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and Stirling engine for combined heat and power application is analysed. The target for electricity production is 120 kW. Woodchips are used as gasification feedstock to produce syngas which is utilized for feeding the SOFC stacks for electricity...... production. Unreacted hydrocarbons after SOFC are burned in a catalytic burner and the hot off-gases from the burner are recovered in a Stirling engine for electricity and heat production. The domestic hot water is used as heat sink for the Stirling engine. A complete balance of plant is designed...

  10. On the road to synthetic life: the minimal cell and genome-scale engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic biology employs rational engineering principles to build biological systems from the libraries of standard, well characterized biological parts. Biological systems designed and built by synthetic biologists fulfill a plethora of useful purposes, ranging from better healthcare and energy production to biomanufacturing. Recent advancements in the synthesis, assembly and "booting-up" of synthetic genomes and in low and high-throughput genome engineering have paved the way for engineering on the genome-wide scale. One of the key goals of genome engineering is the construction of minimal genomes consisting solely of essential genes (genes indispensable for survival of living organisms). Besides serving as a toolbox to understand the universal principles of life, the cell encoded by minimal genome could be used to build a stringently controlled "cell factory" with a desired phenotype. This review provides an update on recent advances in the genome-scale engineering with particular emphasis on the engineering of minimal genomes. Furthermore, it presents an ongoing discussion to the scientific community for better suitability of minimal or robust cells for industrial applications. PMID:25578717

  11. Versatile strategy for controlling the specificity and activity of engineered T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jennifer S Y; Kim, Ji Young; Kazane, Stephanie A; Choi, Sei-Hyun; Yun, Hwa Young; Kim, Min Soo; Rodgers, David T; Pugh, Holly M; Singer, Oded; Sun, Sophie B; Fonslow, Bryan R; Kochenderfer, James N; Wright, Timothy M; Schultz, Peter G; Young, Travis S; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Cao, Yu

    2016-01-26

    The adoptive transfer of autologous T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has emerged as a promising cancer therapy. Despite impressive clinical efficacy, the general application of current CAR-T--cell therapy is limited by serious treatment-related toxicities. One approach to improve the safety of CAR-T cells involves making their activation and proliferation dependent upon adaptor molecules that mediate formation of the immunological synapse between the target cancer cell and T-cell. Here, we describe the design and synthesis of structurally defined semisynthetic adaptors we refer to as "switch" molecules, in which anti-CD19 and anti-CD22 antibody fragments are site-specifically modified with FITC using genetically encoded noncanonical amino acids. This approach allows the precise control over the geometry and stoichiometry of complex formation between CD19- or CD22-expressing cancer cells and a "universal" anti-FITC-directed CAR-T cell. Optimization of this CAR-switch combination results in potent, dose-dependent in vivo antitumor activity in xenograft models. The advantage of being able to titrate CAR-T-cell in vivo activity was further evidenced by reduced in vivo toxicity and the elimination of persistent B-cell aplasia in immune-competent mice. The ability to control CAR-T cell and cancer cell interactions using intermediate switch molecules may expand the scope of engineered T-cell therapy to solid tumors, as well as indications beyond cancer therapy. PMID:26759368

  12. Microfluidic Buffer Exchange for Interference-free Micro/Nanoparticle Cell Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Hui Min; Yeo, David C; Wiraja, Christian; Xu, Chenjie; Hou, Han Wei

    2016-01-01

    Engineering cells with active-ingredient-loaded micro/nanoparticles (NPs) is becoming an increasingly popular method to enhance native therapeutic properties, enable bio imaging and control cell phenotype. A critical yet inadequately addressed issue is the significant number of particles that remain unbound after cell labeling which cannot be readily removed by conventional centrifugation. This leads to an increase in bio imaging background noise and can impart transformative effects onto neighboring non-target cells. In this protocol, we present an inertial microfluidics-based buffer exchange strategy termed as Dean Flow Fractionation (DFF) to efficiently separate labeled cells from free NPs in a high throughput manner. The developed spiral microdevice facilitates continuous collection (>90% cell recovery) of purified cells (THP-1 and MSCs) suspended in new buffer solution, while achieving >95% depletion of unbound fluorescent dye or dye-loaded NPs (silica or PLGA). This single-step, size-based cell purification strategy enables high cell processing throughput (10(6) cells/min) and is highly useful for large-volume cell purification of micro/nanoparticle engineered cells to achieve interference-free clinical application. PMID:27500904

  13. Bioreactor systems for tissue engineering II. Strategies for the expansion and directed differentiation of stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, Cornelia [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Chemie; Griensven, Martijn van [Ludwig Boltzmann Institut fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Traumatologie, Wien (Austria); Poertner, Ralf (eds.) [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg (Germany). Inst. Biotechnologie und Verfahrenstechnik

    2010-07-01

    Alternative Sources of Adult Stem Cells: Human Amniotic Membrane, by S. Wolbank, M. van Griensven, R. Grillari-Voglauer, and A. Peterbauer-Scherb; - Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Tissues: Primitive Cells with Potential for Clinical and Tissue Engineering Applications, by P. Moretti, T. Hatlapatka, D. Marten, A. Lavrentieva, I. Majore, R. Hass and C. Kasper; - Isolation, Characterization, Differentiation, and Application of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells, by J. W. Kuhbier, B. Weyand, C. Radtke, P. M. Vogt, C. Kasper and K. Reimers; - Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Characteristics and Perspectives, by T. Cantz and U. Martin; - Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Regenerative Medicine and Biology, by D. Pei, J. Xu, Q. Zhuang, H.-F. Tse and M. A. Esteban; - Production Process for Stem Cell Based Therapeutic Implants: Expansion of the Production Cell Line and Cultivation of Encapsulated Cells, by C. Weber, S. Pohl, R. Poertner, P. Pino-Grace, D. Freimark, C. Wallrapp, P. Geigle and P. Czermak; - Cartilage Engineering from Mesenchymal Stem Cells, by C. Goepfert, A. Slobodianski, A.F. Schilling, P. Adamietz and R. Poertner; - Outgrowth Endothelial Cells: Sources, Characteristics and Potential Applications in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, by S. Fuchs, E. Dohle, M. Kolbe, C. J. Kirkpatrick; - Basic Science and Clinical Application of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine, by I. Ribitsch, J. Burk, U. Delling, C. Geissler, C. Gittel, H. Juelke, W. Brehm; - Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Clinical Application: Harnessing Paracrine Roles and Niche Mechanisms, by R. M. El Backly, R. Cancedda; - Clinical Application of Stem Cells in the Cardiovascular System, C. Stamm, K. Klose, Y.-H. Choi. (orig.)

  14. Cartilage tissue engineering: towards a biomaterial-assisted mesenchymal stem cell therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinatier, Claire; Bouffi, Carine; Merceron, Christophe; Gordeladze, Jan; Brondello, Jean-Marc; Jorgensen, Christian; Weiss, Pierre; Guicheux, Jérôme; Noël, Danièle

    2009-01-01

    Injuries to articular cartilage are one of the most challenging issues of musculoskeletal medicine due to the poor intrinsic ability of this tissue for repair. Despite progress in orthopaedic surgery, the lack of efficient modalities of treatment for large chondral defects has prompted research on tissue engineering combining chondrogenic cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. The aim of this review is to focus on the recent advances made in exploiting the potentials of cell therapy for cartilage engineering. These include: 1) defining the best cell candidates between chondrocytes or multipotent progenitor cells, such as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), in terms of readily available sources for isolation, expansion and repair potential; 2) engineering biocompatible and biodegradable natural or artificial matrix scaffolds as cell carriers, chondrogenic factors releasing factories and supports for defect filling, 3) identifying more specific growth factors and the appropriate scheme of application that will promote both chondrogenic differentiation and then maintain the differentiated phenotype overtime and 4) evaluating the optimal combinations that will answer to the functional demand placed upon cartilage tissue replacement in animal models and in clinics. Finally, some of the major obstacles generally encountered in cartilage engineering are discussed as well as future trends to overcome these limiting issues for clinical applications. PMID:19804369

  15. Effect of Electrospun Mesh Diameter, Mesh Alignment, and Mechanical Stretch on Bone Marrow Stromal Cells for Ligament Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Bashur, Christopher Alan

    2009-01-01

    The overall goal of this research project is to develop methods for producing a tissue engineered ligament. The envisioned tissue engineering strategy involves three steps: seeding bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) onto electrospun scaffolds, processing them into cords that allow cell infiltration, and conditioning them with uniaxial cyclic stretch. These steps were addressed in three complimentary studies to establish new methods to engineer a tissue with ligament-like cells depositing org...

  16. The use of hTERT-immortalized cells in tissue engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Abdallah, Basem; Yu, Zentao;

    2004-01-01

    The use of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized cells in tissue engineering protocols is a potentially important application of telomere biology. Several human cell types have been created that overexpress the hTERT gene with enhanced telomerase activity, extended life span...... and maintained or even improved functional activities. Furthermore, some studies have employed the telomerized cells in tissue engineering protocols with very good results. However, high telomerase activity allows extensive cell proliferation that may be associated with genomic instability and risk...... for cell transformation. Thus, safety issues should be studied carefully before using the telomerized tissues in the clinic. Alternatively, the development of conditional or intermittent telomerase activation protocols is needed....

  17. Environmental parameters influence non-viral transfection of human mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, William J; Kouris, Nicholas A; Choi, Siyoung; Ogle, Brenda M; Murphy, William L

    2012-03-01

    Non-viral transfection is a promising technique that could be used to increase the therapeutic potential of stem cells. The purpose of this study was to explore practical culture parameters of relevance in potential human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) clinical and tissue engineering applications, including type of polycationic transfection reagent, N/P ratio and dose of polycation/pDNA polyplexes, cell passage number, cell density and cell proliferation. The non-viral transfection efficiency was significantly influenced by N/P ratio, polyplex dose, cell density and cell passage number. hMSC culture conditions that inhibited cell division also decreased transfection efficiency, suggesting that strategies to promote hMSC proliferation may be useful to enhance transfection efficiency in future tissue engineering studies. Non-viral transfection treatments influenced hMSC phenotype, including the expression level of the hMSC marker CD105 and the ability of hMSCs to differentiate down the osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. The parameters found here to promote hMSC transfection efficiency, minimize toxicity and influence hMSC phenotype may be instructive in future non-viral transfection studies and tissue engineering applications. PMID:22277991

  18. Proteomics in Cell Culture: From Genomics to Combined ‘Omics for Cell Line Engineering and Bioprocess Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heffner, Kelley; Kaas, Christian Schrøder; Kumar, Amit;

    2015-01-01

    in media development and cell line engineering to improve growth or productivity, delay the onset of apoptosis, or utilize nutrients efficiently. Mass-spectrometry based and other proteomics methods can provide for the detection of thousands of proteins from cell culture and bioinformatics analysis...... protein production has increased significantly because proteomics can track changes in protein levels for different cell lines over time, which can be advantageous for bioprocess development and optimization. Specifically, the identification of proteins that affect cell culture processes can aid efforts...

  19. Sheet Beam Klystron Instability Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Jensen, A.; Li, Z.; Stupakov, G.; Adolphsen, C.; /SLAC

    2009-05-08

    Using the principle of energy balance we develop a 2D theory for calculating growth rates of instability in a two-cavity model of a sheet beam klystron. An important ingredient is a TE-like mode in the gap that also gives a longitudinal kick to the beam. When compared with a self-consistent particle-in-cell calculation, with sheet beam klystron-type parameters, agreement is quite good up to half the design current, 65 A; at full current, however, other, current-dependent effects come in and the results deviate significantly.

  20. Engineering Synthetic Gene Circuits in Living Cells with CRISPR Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusiak, Barbara; Cleto, Sara; Perez-Piñera, Pablo; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-07-01

    One of the goals of synthetic biology is to build regulatory circuits that control cell behavior, for both basic research purposes and biomedical applications. The ability to build transcriptional regulatory devices depends on the availability of programmable, sequence-specific, and effective synthetic transcription factors (TFs). The prokaryotic clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system, recently harnessed for transcriptional regulation in various heterologous host cells, offers unprecedented ease in designing synthetic TFs. We review how CRISPR can be used to build synthetic gene circuits and discuss recent advances in CRISPR-mediated gene regulation that offer the potential to build increasingly complex, programmable, and efficient gene circuits in the future. PMID:26809780

  1. Biofunctionalized Hydrogel Microscaffolds Promote 3D Hepatic Sheet Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung Hee; Kumar, Supriya K; Shirahama, Hitomi; Seo, Jeongeun; Lee, Jae-Ho; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-03-01

    Development of artificial tissues providing the proper geometrical, mechanical, and environmental cues for cells is highly coveted in the field of tissue engineering. Recently, microfabrication strategies in combination with other chemistries have been utilized to capture the architectural complexity of intricate organs, such as the liver, in in vitro platforms. Here it is shown that a biofunctionalized poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel scaffold, fabricated using a sphere-template, facilitates hepatic sheet formation that follows the microscale patterns of the scaffold surface. The design takes advantage of the excellent diffusion properties of porous, uniform 3D hydrogel platforms, and the enhanced-cell-extracellular matrix interaction with the display of conjugated collagen type I, which in turn elicits favorable Huh-7.5 response. Collectively, the experimental findings and corresponding simulations demonstrate the importance of biofunctionalized porous scaffolds and indicate that the microscaffold shows promise in liver tissue engineering applications and provides distinct advantages over current cell sheet and hepatocyte spheroid technologies. PMID:26612190

  2. A Dual Receptor and Reporter for Multi-Modal Cell Surface Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Westcott, Nathan; Dutta, Debjit; Pulsipher, Abigail; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Chen, Jean; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2015-10-16

    The rapid development of new small molecule drugs, nanomaterials, and genetic tools to modulate cellular function through cell surface manipulation has revolutionized the diagnosis, study, and treatment of disorders in human health. Since the cell membrane is a selective gateway barrier that serves as the first line of defense/offense and communication to its environment, new approaches that molecularly engineer or tailor cell membrane surfaces would allow for a new era in therapeutic design, therapeutic delivery, complex coculture tissue construction, and in situ imaging probe tracking technologies. In order to develop the next generation of multimodal therapies, cell behavior studies, and biotechnologies that focus on cell membrane biology, new tools that intersect the fields of chemistry, biology, and engineering are required. Herein, we develop a liposome fusion and delivery strategy to present a novel dual receptor and reporter system at cell surfaces without the use of molecular biology or metabolic biosynthesis. The cell surface receptor is based on bio-orthogonal functional groups that can conjugate a range of ligands while simultaneously reporting the conjugation through the emission of fluorescence. We demonstrate this dual receptor and reporter system by conjugating and tracking various cell surface ligands for temporal control of cell fluorescent signaling, cell-cell interaction, and tissue assembly construction. PMID:26204094

  3. Dendritic cells engineered to express defined allo-HLA peptide complexes induce antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells efficiently killing tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stronen, E; Abrahamsen, I W; Gaudernack, G; Wälchli, S; Munthe, E; Buus, S; Johansen, F-E; Lund-Johansen, F; Olweus, J

    2009-01-01

    , efficiently present externally loaded peptides from the antigen, Melan-A/MART-1 to T cells from HLA-A*0201-negative donors. CD8(+) T cells binding HLA-A*0201/MART-1 pentamers were detected already after 12 days of co-culture in 11/11 donors. The majority of cells from pentamer(+) cell lines were CTL and...... efficiently killed HLA-A*0201(+) melanoma cells, whilst sparing HLA-A*0201(+) B-cells. Allo-restricted CTL specific for peptides from the leukaemia-associated antigens CD33 and CD19 were obtained with comparable efficiency. Collectively, the results show that dendritic cells engineered to express defined allo...

  4. Genetically engineered dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2001), s. 475-478. ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526 Keywords : dendritic cells * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.330, year: 2001

  5. Construction of tissue-engineered heart valves by using decellularized scaffolds and endothelial progenitor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Ning-tao; XIE Shang-zhe; WANG Song-mei; GAO Hong-yang; WU Chun-gen; PAN Luan-feng

    2007-01-01

    Background Tissue-engineered heart valves have the potential to overcome the limitations of present heart valve replacements. This study was designed to develop a tissue engineering heart valve by using human umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and decellularized valve scaffolds.Methods Decellularized valve scaffolds were prepared from fresh porcine heart valves. EPCs were isolated from fresh human umbilical cord blood by density gradient centrifugation, cultured for 3 weeks in EGM-2-MV medium, by which time the resultant cell population became endothelial in nature, as assessed by immunofluorescent staining. EPC-derived endothelial cells were seeded onto the decellularized scaffold at 3 × 106 cells/cm2 and cultured under static conditions for 7 days. Proliferation of the seeded cells on the scaffolds was detected using the MTT assay. Tissue-engineered heart valves were analyzed by HE staining, immunofluorescent staining and scanning electron microscopy. The anti-thrombogenic function of the endothelium on the engineered heart valves was evaluated by platelet adhesion experiments and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis for the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA).Results EPC-derived endothelial cells showed a histolytic cobblestone morphology, expressed specific markers of the endothelial cell lineage including von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD31, bound a human endothelial cell-specific lectin,Ulex Europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1), and took up Dil-labeled low density lipoprotein (Dil-Ac-LDL). After seeding on the decellularized scaffold, the cells showed excellent metabolic activity and proliferation. The cells formed confluent endothelial monolayers atop the decellularized matrix, as assessed by HE staining and immunostaining for vWF and CD31. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated the occurrence of tight junctions between cells forming the

  6. Artificial membrane-binding proteins stimulate oxygenation of stem cells during engineering of large cartilage tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, James P. K.; Shakur, Rameen; Horne, Joseph P.; Dickinson, Sally C.; Armstrong, Craig T.; Lau, Katherine; Kadiwala, Juned; Lowe, Robert; Seddon, Annela; Mann, Stephen; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Perriman, Adam W.; Hollander, Anthony P.

    2015-06-01

    Restricted oxygen diffusion can result in central cell necrosis in engineered tissue, a problem that is exacerbated when engineering large tissue constructs for clinical application. Here we show that pre-treating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with synthetic membrane-active myoglobin-polymer-surfactant complexes can provide a reservoir of oxygen capable of alleviating necrosis at the centre of hyaline cartilage. This is achieved through the development of a new cell functionalization methodology based on polymer-surfactant conjugation, which allows the delivery of functional proteins to the hMSC membrane. This new approach circumvents the need for cell surface engineering using protein chimerization or genetic transfection, and we demonstrate that the surface-modified hMSCs retain their ability to proliferate and to undergo multilineage differentiation. The functionalization technology is facile, versatile and non-disruptive, and in addition to tissue oxygenation, it should have far-reaching application in a host of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies.

  7. Clean, Efficient, and Reliable Heat and Power for the 21st Century, Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCTP) (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-05-01

    This overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program describes the program's focus and goals, along with current fuel cell applications and future potential. The program focuses on research and development of fuel cell systems for diverse applications in the stationary power, portable power, and transportation sectors. It works to reduce costs and improve technologies to advance fuel cell uses in areas such as combined heat and power, auxiliary power units, portable power systems, and stationary and backup power. To help ensure that fuel cell advances are realized, the program rigorously analyzes energy efficiency, economic, and environmental benefits of fuel cells and seeks to optimize synergies among fuel cell applications and other renewable technologies.

  8. Selectively reflective transparent sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waché, Rémi; Florescu, Marian; Sweeney, Stephen J.; Clowes, Steven K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the possibility to selectively reflect certain wavelengths while maintaining the optical properties on other spectral ranges. This is of particular interest for transparent materials, which for specific applications may require high reflectivity at pre-determined frequencies. Although there exist currently techniques such as coatings to produce selective reflection, this work focuses on new approaches for mass production of polyethylene sheets which incorporate either additives or surface patterning for selective reflection between 8 to 13 μ m. Typical additives used to produce a greenhouse effect in plastics include particles such as clays, silica or hydroxide materials. However, the absorption of thermal radiation is less efficient than the decrease of emissivity as it can be compared with the inclusion of Lambertian materials. Photonic band gap engineering by the periodic structuring of metamaterials is known in nature for producing the vivid bright colors in certain organisms via strong wavelength-selective reflection. Research to artificially engineer such structures has mainly focused on wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. However few studies to date have been carried out to investigate the properties of metastructures in the mid infrared range even though the patterning of microstructure is easier to achieve. We present preliminary results on the diffuse reflectivity using FDTD simulations and analyze the technical feasibility of these approaches.

  9. Recent Progress on Systems and Synthetic Biology Approaches to Engineer Fungi As Microbial Cell Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores, Gerardo Ruiz; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Arruda, Letícia Magalhães; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Filamentous fungi are remarkable organisms naturally specialized in deconstructing plant biomass and this feature has a tremendous potential for biofuel production from renewable sources. The past decades have been marked by a remarkable progress in the genetic engineering of fungi to generate industry-compatible strains needed for some biotech applications. In this sense, progress in this field has been marked by the utilization of high-throughput techniques to gain deep understanding of the molecular machinery controlling the physiology of these organisms, starting thus the Systems Biology era of fungi. Additionally, genetic engineering has been extensively applied to modify wellcharacterized promoters in order to construct new expression systems with enhanced performance under the conditions of interest. In this review, we discuss some aspects related to significant progress in the understating and engineering of fungi for biotechnological applications, with special focus on the construction of synthetic promoters and circuits in organisms relevant for industry. Different engineering approaches are shown, and their potential and limitations for the construction of complex synthetic circuits in these organisms are examined. Finally, we discuss the impact of engineered promoter architecture in the single-cell behavior of the system, an often-neglected relationship with a tremendous impact in the final performance of the process of interest. We expect to provide here some new directions to drive future research directed to the construction of high-performance, engineered fungal strains working as microbial cell factories. PMID:27226765

  10. DEFINING PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS FOR ENGINEERING A VASCULAR MEDIA MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    U Cheema, E. A. H.; N Tamimi, B. A.; V Mudera, R. A. B.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tissue engineering of a blood vessel structure requires an understanding of the parameters governing the survival of resident vascular smooth muscle cells. We have developed a collagen-based vascular media model to examine the correlation between cell density, O2 requirements and cell viability. METHODS: Collagen type I gels were cast in rectangular wells and were compressed to produce 100μm thin, dense collagen sheets1. These were subsequently spiraled around a mandrel to mimic...

  11. Interface engineering for efficient fullerene-free organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the role of zinc oxide (ZnO) morphology and addition of an acceptor interlayer to achieve high efficiency fullerene-free bulk heterojunction inverted organic solar cells. Nanopatterning of the ZnO buffer layer enhances the effective light absorption in the active layer, and the insertion of a twisted perylene acceptor layer planarizes and decreases the electron extraction barrier. Along with an increase in current homogeneity, the reduced work function difference and selective transport of electrons prevent the accumulation of charges and decrease the electron-hole recombination at the interface. These factors enable an overall increase of efficiency to 4.6%, which is significant for a fullerene-free solution-processed organic solar cell

  12. Interface engineering for efficient fullerene-free organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivanna, Ravichandran; Narayan, K. S., E-mail: rajaram@jncasr.ac.in, E-mail: narayan@jncasr.ac.in [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India); Rajaram, Sridhar, E-mail: rajaram@jncasr.ac.in, E-mail: narayan@jncasr.ac.in [International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2015-03-23

    We demonstrate the role of zinc oxide (ZnO) morphology and addition of an acceptor interlayer to achieve high efficiency fullerene-free bulk heterojunction inverted organic solar cells. Nanopatterning of the ZnO buffer layer enhances the effective light absorption in the active layer, and the insertion of a twisted perylene acceptor layer planarizes and decreases the electron extraction barrier. Along with an increase in current homogeneity, the reduced work function difference and selective transport of electrons prevent the accumulation of charges and decrease the electron-hole recombination at the interface. These factors enable an overall increase of efficiency to 4.6%, which is significant for a fullerene-free solution-processed organic solar cell.

  13. Can Engineered “Designer” T Cells Outsmart Chronic Hepatitis B?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protzer, U.; Abken, H.

    2010-01-01

    More than 350 million people worldwide are persistently infected with human heptatitis B virus (HBV) and at risk to develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma making long-term treatment necessary. While a vaccine is available and new antiviral drugs are being developed, elimination of persistently infected cells is still a major issue. Recent efforts in adoptive cell therapy are experimentally exploring immunotherapeutic elimination of HBV-infected cells by means of a biological attack with genetically engineered “designer” T cells. PMID:21188203

  14. Can Engineered “Designer” T Cells Outsmart Chronic Hepatitis B?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Protzer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 350 million people worldwide are persistently infected with human heptatitis B virus (HBV and at risk to develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma making long-term treatment necessary. While a vaccine is available and new antiviral drugs are being developed, elimination of persistently infected cells is still a major issue. Recent efforts in adoptive cell therapy are experimentally exploring immunotherapeutic elimination of HBV-infected cells by means of a biological attack with genetically engineered “designer” T cells.

  15. Construction of tissue-engineered cartilage using human placenta-derived stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Human placenta-derived stem cells (hPDSCs) were isolated by trypsinization and further induced into cartilage cells in vitro.The engineered cartilage was constructed by combining hPDSCs with collagen sponge and the cartilage formation was observed by implantation into nude mice.Results showed that hPDSCs featured mesenchymal stem cells and maintained proliferation in vitro for over 30 passages while remaining undifferentiated.All results indicated that hPDSCs have the potential to differentiate into functional cartilage cells in vitro when combined with collagen sponge,which provided experimental evidence for prospective clinical application.

  16. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  17. Respirator Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products NIOSH-Issued Publications Publication Types Alerts Current Intelligence Bulletins Criteria Documents Fact Sheets Health Hazard Evaluations ( ... using gas mask and escape respirators. At the end of this Fact Sheet, you will find a ...

  18. Simple surface engineering of polydimethylsiloxane with polydopamine for stabilized mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and multipotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Yon Jin; Koh, Yi Ting; Lim, Kaiyang; Menon, Nishanth V; Wu, Yingnan; Kang, Yuejun

    2015-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has been extensively exploited to study stem cell physiology in the field of mechanobiology and microfluidic chips due to their transparency, low cost and ease of fabrication. However, its intrinsic high hydrophobicity renders a surface incompatible for prolonged cell adhesion and proliferation. Plasma-treated or protein-coated PDMS shows some improvement but these strategies are often short-lived with either cell aggregates formation or cell sheet dissociation. Recently, chemical functionalization of PDMS surfaces has proved to be able to stabilize long-term culture but the chemicals and procedures involved are not user- and eco-friendly. Herein, we aim to tailor greener and biocompatible PDMS surfaces by developing a one-step bio-inspired polydopamine coating strategy to stabilize long-term bone marrow stromal cell culture on PDMS substrates. Characterization of the polydopamine-coated PDMS surfaces has revealed changes in surface wettability and presence of hydroxyl and secondary amines as compared to uncoated surfaces. These changes in PDMS surface profile contribute to the stability in BMSCs adhesion, proliferation and multipotency. This simple methodology can significantly enhance the biocompatibility of PDMS-based microfluidic devices for long-term cell analysis or mechanobiological studies. PMID:26647719

  19. Apparatus for measuring the finite load-deformation behavior of a sheet of epithelial cells cultured on a mesoscopic freestanding elastomer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, John C.; Shannon, Mark A.

    2007-09-01

    Details are given for the design, calibration, and operation of an apparatus for measuring the finite load-deformation behavior of a sheet of living epithelial cells cultured on a mesoscopic freestanding elastomer membrane, 10μm thick and 5mm in diameter. Although similar in concept to bulge tests used to investigate the mechanical properties of micromachined thin films, cell-elastomer composite diaphragm inflation tests pose a unique set of experimental challenges. Composite diaphragm (CD) specimens are extremely compliant (Epump integrated with a modular specimen mounting fixture that constitutes a horizontally semi-infinite reservoir of liquid culture medium. In a deformation-controlled inflation test, pressurized air is used to inflate a CD specimen into the liquid reservoir with minimum disturbance of the liquid-air interface. Piston displacements and absolute pump chamber air pressures are utilized as feedback to cycle the displaced (or inflated) CD volume V in a 0.05Hz triangular or sinusoidal wave form (VMIN=0μl, VMAX⩽40μl) while simultaneously recording the inflation pressure acting at the fixed boundary of the specimen, p(r =a). Using a carefully prescribed six-cycle inflation test protocol, the apparatus is shown to be capable of measuring the [V,p(r=a)] inflation response of a cell-elastomer CD with random uncertainties estimated at ±0.45μl and ±2.5Pa, respectively.

  20. Tissue engineering, stem cells, cloning, and parthenogenesis: new paradigms for therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hipp, Jason; Atala, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Patients suffering from diseased and injured organs may be treated with transplanted organs. However, there is a severe shortage of donor organs which is worsening yearly due to the aging population. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering apply the principles of cell transplantation, materials science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Both therapeutic cloning (nucleus from a donor cell...

  1. Cardiovascular tissue engineering and regeneration based on adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Parvizi, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the pre-clinical field is rapidly progressing in search of new therapeutic modalities that replace or complement current medication to treat cardiovascular disease. Among these are the single or combined use of stem cells, biomaterials and instructive factors, which together form the triad of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapy is a promising approach for repair, remodeling and even regenerate tissue of otherwise irreparable damage, such as after myocard...

  2. Biosynthesis and characterization of a novel genetically engineered polymer for targeted gene transfer to cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Canine, Brenda F.; Wang, Yuhua; Hatefi, Arash

    2009-01-01

    A novel multi-domain biopolymer was designed and genetically engineered with the purpose to target and transfect cancer cells. The biopolymer contains at precise locations: 1) repeating units of arginine and histidine to condense pDNA and lyse endosome membranes, 2) a HER2 targeting affibody to target cancer cells, 3) a pH responsive fusogenic peptide to destabilize endosome membranes and enhance endosomolytic activity of histidine residues, and 4) a nuclear localization signal to enhance tra...

  3. Stem Cell Hydrogel, Jump-Starting Zika Drug Discovery, and Engineering RNA Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, Milka

    2016-08-18

    Every month the editors of Cell Chemical Biology bring you highlights of the most recent chemical biology literature that impressed them with creativity and potential for follow up work. Our August 2016 selection includes a description of hydrogels with self-tunable stiffness that are used to profile lipid metabolites during stems cell differentiation, a look at whether we can find a drug repurposing solution to Zika virus infection, and an engineered RNA recognition motif (RRM). PMID:27541191

  4. Scaffold- and Cell System-Based Bone Grafts in Tissue Engineering (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetsova D.S.; Timashev P.S.; Bagratashvili V.N.; Zagaynova Е.V.

    2014-01-01

    The review considers the current trends in tissue engineering including maxillofacial surgery based on the use of scaffolds, autologous stem cells and bioactive substances. The authors have shown the advantages and disadvantages of basic materials used for scaffold synthesis — three-dimensional porous or fiber matrices serving as a mechanical frame for cells; among such materials there are natural polymers (collagen, cellulose, fibronectin, chitosan, alginate and agarose, fibroin), synthetic ...

  5. Allogeneic Transplantation of Periodontal Ligament-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Sheets in Canine Critical-Size Supra-Alveolar Periodontal Defect Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tsumanuma, Yuka; Iwata, Takanori; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Washio, Kaoru; Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that induces the destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, followed by tooth loss. Although several approaches have been applied to periodontal regeneration, complete periodontal regeneration has not been accomplished. Tissue engineering using a combination of cells and scaffolds is considered to be a viable alternative strategy. We have shown that autologous transplantation of periodontal ligament-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal...

  6. Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Engineered T Cells for Immunotherapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Cartellieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are powerful components of adaptive immunity, which essentially contribute to the elimination of tumors. Due to their cytotoxic capacity, T cells emerged as attractive candidates for specific immunotherapy of cancer. A promising approach is the genetic modification of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs. First generation CARs consist of a binding moiety specifically recognizing a tumor cell surface antigen and a lymphocyte activating signaling chain. The CAR-mediated recognition induces cytokine production and tumor-directed cytotoxicity of T cells. Second and third generation CARs include signal sequences from various costimulatory molecules resulting in enhanced T-cell persistence and sustained antitumor reaction. Clinical trials revealed that the adoptive transfer of T cells engineered with first generation CARs represents a feasible concept for the induction of clinical responses in some tumor patients. However, further improvement is required, which may be achieved by second or third generation CAR-engrafted T cells.

  7. Pluripotency of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth for Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Vinicius; Dubey, Nileshkumar; Islam, Intekhab; Min, Kyung-San; Nör, Jacques E

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) are highly proliferative pluripotent cells that can be retrieved from primary teeth. Although SHED are isolated from the dental pulp, their differentiation potential is not limited to odontoblasts only. In fact, SHED can differentiate into several cell types including neurons, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. The high plasticity makes SHED an interesting stem cell model for research in several biomedical areas. This review will discuss key findings about the characterization and differentiation of SHED into odontoblasts, neurons, and hormone secreting cells (e.g., hepatocytes and islet-like cell aggregates). The outcomes of the studies presented here support the multipotency of SHED and their potential to be used for tissue engineering-based therapies. PMID:27313627

  8. Pluripotency of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED are highly proliferative pluripotent cells that can be retrieved from primary teeth. Although SHED are isolated from the dental pulp, their differentiation potential is not limited to odontoblasts only. In fact, SHED can differentiate into several cell types including neurons, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. The high plasticity makes SHED an interesting stem cell model for research in several biomedical areas. This review will discuss key findings about the characterization and differentiation of SHED into odontoblasts, neurons, and hormone secreting cells (e.g., hepatocytes and islet-like cell aggregates. The outcomes of the studies presented here support the multipotency of SHED and their potential to be used for tissue engineering-based therapies.

  9. Bioethanol Production from Uncooked Raw Starch by Immobilized Surface-engineered Yeast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jyh-Ping; Wu, Kuo-Wei; Fukuda, Hideki

    Surface-engineered yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae codisplaying Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase and Streptococcus bovis α-amylase on the cell surface was used for direct production of ethanol from uncooked raw starch. By using 50 g/L cells during batch fermentation, ethanol concentration could reach 53 g/L in 7 days. During repeated batch fermentation, the production of ethanol could be maintained for seven consecutive cycles. For cells immobilized in loofa sponge, the concentration of ethanol could reach 42 g/L in 3 days in a circulating packed-bed bioreactor. However, the production of ethanol stopped thereafter because of limited contact between cells and starch. The bioreactor could be operated for repeated batch production of ethanol, but ethanol concentration dropped to 55% of its initial value after five cycles because of a decrease in cell mass and cell viability in the bioreactor. Adding cells to the bioreactor could partially restore ethanol production to 75% of its initial value.

  10. Pluripotency of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth for Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Vinicius; Dubey, Nileshkumar; Islam, Intekhab; Min, Kyung-San; Nör, Jacques E.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) are highly proliferative pluripotent cells that can be retrieved from primary teeth. Although SHED are isolated from the dental pulp, their differentiation potential is not limited to odontoblasts only. In fact, SHED can differentiate into several cell types including neurons, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. The high plasticity makes SHED an interesting stem cell model for research in several biomedical areas. This review will discuss key findings about the characterization and differentiation of SHED into odontoblasts, neurons, and hormone secreting cells (e.g., hepatocytes and islet-like cell aggregates). The outcomes of the studies presented here support the multipotency of SHED and their potential to be used for tissue engineering-based therapies. PMID:27313627

  11. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  12. The cultivation of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in clinical grade medium for bone tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pytlík, R.; Stehlík, D.; Soukup, T.; Kalbáčová, M.; Rypáček, František; Trč, T.; Mulinková, Katarína; Michnová, P.; Kideryová, L.; Živný, J.; Klener, P.Jr.; Veselá, R.; Trněný, M.; Klener, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 20 (2009), s. 3415-3427. ISSN 0142-9612 R&D Projects: GA MZd ND7448 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : tissue engineering * multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells * human serum Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 7.365, year: 2009

  13. Surface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under fully defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Krishanu; Mei, Ying; Reisterer, Colin M; Pyzocha, Neena Kenton; Yang, Jing; Muffat, Julien; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-11-15

    The current gold standard for the culture of human pluripotent stem cells requires the use of a feeder layer of cells. Here, we develop a spatially defined culture system based on UV/ozone radiation modification of typical cell culture plastics to define a favorable surface environment for human pluripotent stem cell culture. Chemical and geometrical optimization of the surfaces enables control of early cell aggregation from fully dissociated cells, as predicted from a numerical model of cell migration, and results in significant increases in cell growth of undifferentiated cells. These chemically defined xeno-free substrates generate more than three times the number of cells than feeder-containing substrates per surface area. Further, reprogramming and typical gene-targeting protocols can be readily performed on these engineered surfaces. These substrates provide an attractive cell culture platform for the production of clinically relevant factor-free reprogrammed cells from patient tissue samples and facilitate the definition of standardized scale-up friendly methods for disease modeling and cell therapeutic applications. PMID:22065768

  14. The Response of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Osteogenic Signals and its Impact on Bone Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah; Fernandes, Hugo; Liu, Jun; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2007-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is a multidisciplinary field that aims to treat patients with trauma, spinal fusion and large bone defects. Cell-based bone tissue engineering encompasses the isolation of multipotent hMSCs from the bone marrow of the patient, in vit

  15. Stromal Cells in Dense Collagen Promote Cardiomyocyte and Microvascular Patterning in Engineered Human Heart Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Meredith A; Tran, Dominic; Coulombe, Kareen L K; Razumova, Maria; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles E; Zheng, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a strategy to replace damaged contractile tissue and model cardiac diseases to discover therapies. Current cardiac and vascular engineering approaches independently create aligned contractile tissue or perfusable vasculature, but a combined vascularized cardiac tissue remains to be achieved. Here, we sought to incorporate a patterned microvasculature into engineered heart tissue, which balances the competing demands from cardiomyocytes to contract the matrix versus the vascular lumens that need structural support. Low-density collagen hydrogels (1.25 mg/mL) permit human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) to form a dense contractile tissue but cannot support a patterned microvasculature. Conversely, high collagen concentrations (density ≥6 mg/mL) support a patterned microvasculature, but the hESC-CMs lack cell-cell contact, limiting their electrical communication, structural maturation, and tissue-level contractile function. When cocultured with matrix remodeling stromal cells, however, hESC-CMs structurally mature and form anisotropic constructs in high-density collagen. Remodeling requires the stromal cells to be in proximity with hESC-CMs. In addition, cocultured cardiac constructs in dense collagen generate measurable active contractions (on the order of 0.1 mN/mm(2)) and can be paced up to 2 Hz. Patterned microvascular networks in these high-density cocultured cardiac constructs remain patent through 2 weeks of culture, and hESC-CMs show electrical synchronization. The ability to maintain microstructural control within engineered heart tissue enables generation of more complex features, such as cellular alignment and a vasculature. Successful incorporation of these features paves the way for the use of large scale engineered tissues for myocardial regeneration and cardiac disease modeling. PMID:26955856

  16. Application of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Generation of a Tissue-Engineered Tooth-Like Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Yong; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Wencheng; Li, Yanhua; Yu, Meijiao; Nan, Xue; Chen, Lin; Yue, Wen; Xu, Xin; Pei, Xuetao

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells, such as adult stem cells or embryonic stem cells, are the most important seed cells employed in tooth tissue engineering. Even though dental-derived stem cells are a good source of seed cells for such procedures, they are not often used in clinical applications because of the limited supply. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, with their high proliferation and differentiation ability, are now considered a promising alternative. The objectives of this study were to assess the rol...

  17. Determining the fate of fluorescent quantum dots on surface of engineered budding S. cerevisiae cell molecular landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Chouhan, Raghuraj Singh; Qureshi, Anjum; Kolkar Mohammed, Javed Hussain Niazi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we surface engineered living S. cerevisiae cells by decorating quantum dots (QDs) and traced the fate of QDs on molecular landscape of single mother cell through several generation times (progeny cells). The fate of QDs on cell-surface was tracked through the cellular division events using confocal microscopy and fluorescence emission profiles. The extent of cell-surface QDs distribution among the offspring was determined as the mother cell divides into daughter cells. Fluoresc...

  18. Engineered metal nanoparticles in the sub-nanomolar levels kill cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Daniels, Yasmine; Pustovyy, Oleg; MacCrehan, William A; Muramoto, Shin; Stan, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Background Small metal nanoparticles obtained from animal blood were observed to be toxic to cultured cancer cells, whereas noncancerous cells were much less affected. In this work, engineered zinc and copper metal nanoparticles were produced from bulk metal rods by an underwater high-voltage discharge method. The metal nanoparticles were characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The metal nanoparticles, with estimated diameters of 1 nm–2 nm, were determined to be more than 85% nonoxidized. A cell viability assay and high-resolution light microscopy showed that exposure of RG2, cultured rat brain glioma cancer cells, to the zinc and copper nanoparticles resulted in cell morphological changes, including decreased cell adherence, shrinking/rounding, nuclear condensation, and budding from cell bodies. The metal-induced cell injuries were similar to the effects of staurosporine, an active apoptotic reagent. The viability experiments conducted for zinc and copper yielded values of dissociation constants of 0.22±0.08 nmol/L (standard error [SE]) and 0.12±0.02 nmol/L (SE), respectively. The noncancerous astrocytes were not affected at the same conditions. Because metal nanoparticles were lethal to the cancer cells at sub-nanomolar concentrations, they are potentially important as nanomedicine. Purpose Lethal concentrations of synthetic metal nanoparticles reported in the literature are a few orders of magnitude higher than the natural, blood-isolated metal nanoparticles; therefore, in this work, engineered metal nanoparticles were examined to mimic the properties of endogenous metal nanoparticles. Materials and methods RG2, rat brain glioma cells CTX TNA2 brain rat astrocytes, obtained from the American Type Culture Collection, high-voltage discharge, atomic force microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution light microscopy, zeta potential measurements, and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium

  19. Genetically engineered K cells provide sufficient insulin to correct hyperglycemia in a nude murine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiqun Zhang; Liqing Yao; Kuntang Shen; Meidong Xu; Pinghong Zhou; Weige Yang; Xinyuan Liu; Xinyu Qin

    2008-01-01

    A gene therapy-based treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus requires the development of a surrogate β cell that can synthesize and secrete functionally active insulin in response to physiologically relevant changes in ambient glucose levels. In this study, the murine enteroendocrine cell line STC-1 was genetically modified by stable transfection. Two clone cells were selected (STC-1-2 and STC-1-14) that secreted the highest levels of insulin among the 22 clones expressing insulin from 0 to 157.2 μIU/ml/106 cells/d. After glucose concentration in the culture medium was increased from 1 mM to 10 mM, secreted insulin rose from 40.3±0.8 to 56.3±3.2 μIU/ml (STC-1-2), and from 10.8±0.8 to 23.6±2.3 μIU/ml (STC-1-14). After STC-1-14 cells were implanted into diabetic nude mice, their blood glucose levels were reduced to normal. Body weight loss was also ameliorated. Our data suggested that genetically engineered K cells secrete active insulin in a glucose-regulated manner, and in vivo study showed that hyperglycemia could be reversed by implantation of the cells, suggesting that the use of genetically engineered K cells to express human insulin might provide a glucose-regulated approach to treat diabetic hyperglycemia.

  20. Label free cell tracking in 3D tissue engineering constructs with high resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. A.; Lam, K.-P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Mazzocchi-Jones, D.; Richardson, J. B.; Yang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering there is an emphasis on studying 3-D live tissue structures. Consequently, to investigate and identify cellular activities and phenotypes in a 3-D environment for all in vitro experiments, including shape, migration/proliferation and axon projection, it is necessary to adopt an optical imaging system that enables monitoring 3-D cellular activities and morphology through the thickness of the construct for an extended culture period without cell labeling. This paper describes a new 3-D tracking algorithm developed for Cell-IQ®, an automated cell imaging platform, which has been equipped with an environmental chamber optimized to enable capturing time-lapse sequences of live cell images over a long-term period without cell labeling. As an integral part of the algorithm, a novel auto-focusing procedure was developed for phase contrast microscopy equipped with 20x and 40x objectives, to provide a more accurate estimation of cell growth/trajectories by allowing 3-D voxels to be computed at high spatiotemporal resolution and cell density. A pilot study was carried out in a phantom system consisting of horizontally aligned nanofiber layers (with precise spacing between them), to mimic features well exemplified in cellular activities of neuronal growth in a 3-D environment. This was followed by detailed investigations concerning axonal projections and dendritic circuitry formation in a 3-D tissue engineering construct. Preliminary work on primary animal neuronal cells in response to chemoattractant and topographic cue within the scaffolds has produced encouraging results.

  1. The experimental study of genetic engineering human neural stem cells mediated by lentivirus to express multigene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Pei-qiang; TANG Xun; LIN Yue-qiu; Oudega Martin; SUN Guang-yun; XU Lin; YANG Yun-kang; ZHOU Tian-hua

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To explore the feasibility to construct genetic engineering human neural stem cells (hNSCs)mediated by lentivirus to express multigene in order to provide a graft source for further studies of spinal cord injury (SCI).Methods: Human neural stem cells from the brain cortex of human abortus were isolated and cultured, then gene was modified by lentivirus to express both green fluorescence protein (GFP) and rat neurotrophin-3(NT-3); the transgenic expression was detected by the methods of fluorescence microscope, dorsal root ganglion of fetal rats and slot blot.Results: Genetic engineering hNSCs were successfully constructed. All of the genetic engineering hNSCs which expressed bright green fluorescence were observed under the fluorescence microscope. The conditioned medium of transgenic hNSCs could induce neurite flourishing outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion (DRG). The genetic engineering hNSCs expressed high level NT-3 which could be detected by using slot blot.Conclusions: Genetic engineering hNSCs mediated by lentivirus can be constructed to express multigene successfully.

  2. Photovoltaics Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-02-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Photovoltaics (PV) subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Solar Energy Technologies Office works with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies to advance solar PV, which is the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity by a semiconductor, in support of the goals of the SunShot Initiative. SunShot supports research and development to aggressively advance PV technology by improving efficiency and reliability and lowering manufacturing costs. SunShot’s PV portfolio spans work from early-stage solar cell research through technology commercialization, including work on materials, processes, and device structure and characterization techniques.

  3. Could Life Originate between Mica Sheets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansma, Helen

    2014-11-01

    Muscovite mica has many advantages as a site for the origins of life. Some of these advantages are: A. Spaces between mica sheets serve as cell-like compartments. B. K+ ions bridge Muscovite mica sheets, providing a high K+ environment, as found in all living cells. C. Mica's hexagonal 0.5-nm clay crystal lattice is comparable to the length of the amino acids, sugars, and nucleotides that polymerize to form life's major biological macromolecules. D. Mechanical energy from mica sheets, moving in response to water flows and temperature changes, provide an endless energy source for forming chemical bonds, rearranging polymers, and blebbing off protocells in a primitive form of cell division. How might fluid dynamics in the planar nanometer- to micron-high spaces between mica sheets affect the processes involved in the origins of life?

  4. Cell Surface and Membrane Engineering: Emerging Technologies and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T. Saeui

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Membranes constitute the interface between the basic unit of life—a single cell—and the outside environment and thus in many ways comprise the ultimate “functional biomaterial”. To perform the many and often conflicting functions required in this role, for example to partition intracellular contents from the outside environment while maintaining rapid intake of nutrients and efflux of waste products, biological membranes have evolved tremendous complexity and versatility. This article describes how membranes, mainly in the context of living cells, are increasingly being manipulated for practical purposes with drug discovery, biofuels, and biosensors providing specific, illustrative examples. Attention is also given to biology-inspired, but completely synthetic, membrane-based technologies that are being enabled by emerging methods such as bio-3D printers. The diverse set of applications covered in this article are intended to illustrate how these versatile technologies—as they rapidly mature—hold tremendous promise to benefit human health in numerous ways ranging from the development of new medicines to sensitive and cost-effective environmental monitoring for pathogens and pollutants to replacing hydrocarbon-based fossil fuels.

  5. Preparation and properties of microencapsulated genetically engineered bacteria cells for oral therapy of uremia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hong; YU Yaoting; CAI Baoli; WANG Manyan

    2004-01-01

    Microencapsulated genetically engineered bacteria cells are a novel approach of oral therapy for uremia.Klebsiella aerogenes urease genes (UreaDABCEFG) are transformed into E. coli DH5α cells through plasmid pKAU17. The transformant can use urea or ammonia as its sole nitrogen source through strain training. The urease genetically engineered bacteria cells are entrapped in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) microcapsules, which can be used to remove urea from uremia patients. The mechanical strength of PVA microcapsules is significantly higher than that of APA microcapsules. This suggests that the problem of friability of APA can be solved in this way. The optimal conditions for the preparation of PVA microencapsulated genetically engineered bacterial cells are: polyvinyl alcohol (PVA, 2450±50)used as the carrier at a concentration 6%, the pH value of boric acid as crosslinking reagent 6.5, crosslinking time 24 h,entrapment ratio of bacteria 8%, air flow rate of the encapsulate device 3 L/min and liquid flow rate at 1 mL/10 min.The average diameter of microcapsules prepared under these optimal conditions is 20-40 mesh. Experiments in vitro showed that one hundred milligrams of wet bacterial cells in PVA microcapsules could remove 18.4 mg of urea in 4 h.

  6. N-Glycosylation optimization of recombinant antibodies in CHO cell through process and metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou

    cell culture technology, upstream process engineering, metabolic engineering, and glycobiology into a systematic framework allow us to improve the production of recombinant therapeutic protein towards an optimal balance between quantity and quality. In the presented work, recent know-how on impact......Thanks to the recent advances in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) “omic” revolution, the development of recombinant therapeutic protein bioprocessing using CHO cell factory started to merge with the new biological mindset called systems biology. In order to produce a CHO-derived recombinant therapeutic......, analysis, control and optimization of N-glycosylation were thoroughly reviewed. In particular, how to control and optimize N-glycosylation in CHO cells was exclusively studied. The main focus of this PhD project is to find effective approaches of modulating N-glycosylation of CHO-derived recombinant...

  7. T cell engineering as therapy for cancer and HIV: our synthetic future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    June, Carl H; Levine, Bruce L

    2015-10-19

    It is now well established that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Adoptive T cell transfer has the potential to overcome the significant limitations associated with vaccine-based strategies in patients who are often immune compromised. Application of the emerging discipline of synthetic biology to cancer, which combines elements of genetic engineering and molecular biology to create new biological structures with enhanced functionalities, is the subject of this overview. Various chimeric antigen receptor designs, manufacturing processes and study populations, among other variables, have been tested and reported in recent clinical trials. Many questions remain in the field of engineered T cells, but the encouraging response rates pave a wide road for future investigation into fields as diverse as cancer and chronic infections. PMID:26416683

  8. Municipal Solid Waste Gasification with Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Stirling Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Fuel Cell (SOFC). In the present study, a MSW gasification plant int egrated with SOFC is combined with a Stirling engine to recover the energy of the off - gases from the topping SOFC cycle. Detailed plant design is proposed and thermodynamic analysis is performed. Relevant parameters have been...... studied to optimize the plant efficiency in terms of operating conditions. Compared with modern waste incinerators with heat recovery, the gasification process integrated with SOFC and Stirling engine permits an increase in electricity output up of 50%, which means that the solid waste gasification...

  9. A review of decellularized stem cell matrix: a novel cell expansion system for cartilage tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    M Pei; Li JT; Shoukry, M; Y Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising biological approach for the treatment of cartilage defects. Due to the small size of autologous cartilage samples available for cell transplantation in patients, cells need to be expanded to yield a sufficient cell number for cartilage repair. However, chondrocytes and adult stem cells tend to become replicatively senescent once they are expanded on conventional plastic flasks. Many studies demonstrate that the loss of cell properties is concomitant with the ...

  10. Metabolic engineering of Salmonella vaccine bacteria to boost human Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workalemahu, Grefachew; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Nada, Mohanad H; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Jones, Bradley D; Jin, Chenggang; Morita, Craig T

    2014-07-15

    Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells monitor isoprenoid metabolism by recognizing foreign (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a metabolite in the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway used by most eubacteria and apicomplexan parasites, and self isopentenyl pyrophosphate, a metabolite in the mevalonate pathway used by humans. Whereas microbial infections elicit prolonged expansion of memory Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, immunization with prenyl pyrophosphates or aminobisphosphonates elicit short-term Vγ2Vδ2 expansion with rapid anergy and deletion upon subsequent immunizations. We hypothesized that a live, attenuated bacterial vaccine that overproduces HMBPP would elicit long-lasting Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity by mimicking a natural infection. Therefore, we metabolically engineered the avirulent aroA(-) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 strain by deleting the gene for LytB (the downstream enzyme from HMBPP) and functionally complementing for this loss with genes encoding mevalonate pathway enzymes. LytB(-) Salmonella SL7207 had high HMBPP levels, infected human cells as efficiently as did the wild-type bacteria, and stimulated large ex vivo expansions of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells from human donors. Importantly, vaccination of a rhesus monkey with live lytB(-) Salmonella SL7207 stimulated a prolonged expansion of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells without significant side effects or anergy induction. These studies provide proof-of-principle that metabolic engineering can be used to derive live bacterial vaccines that boost Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity. Similar engineering of metabolic pathways to produce lipid Ags or B vitamin metabolite Ags could be used to derive live bacterial vaccine for other unconventional T cells that recognize nonpeptide Ags. PMID:24943221

  11. 不同表面处理方法对钛表面成骨细胞膜片 ALP活性的影响%Active Changes of ALP of Osteoblasts Cell Sheet with Different Treated Titanium Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛久凤; 夏茜; 吴镭; 杨红; 周成菊; 方艺; 董强

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨不同表面处理方法对钛表面的成骨细胞膜片碱性磷酸酶( ALP)活性的影响。方法:原代培养大鼠成骨细胞,通过形态学及ALP鉴定成骨细胞;以机械抛光处理的钛片为对照组,以棕刚玉颗粒喷砂材料处理的钛片为喷砂酸蚀( SLA)组,分别构建成骨细胞膜片,膜片连续培养1周或2周时,测量成骨细胞膜片中反映成骨效应的ALP活性的改变。结果:原代培养细胞ALP阳性,经形态及特性鉴定为成骨细胞;连续培养1周或2周时,SLA组ALP活性均高于对照组,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05);各组膜片ALP活性第1周高于第2周,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05)。结论:钛表面性质能够影响成骨细胞膜片的成骨分化能力。%[ Abstract]Objective:To study the ontogenesis of osteoblasts cell sheets with different treated surface of titanium. Methods:Primary cultured rat osteoblasts were identified through morphology observa-tion,alkaline phosphatase staining. Mechanically polished titanium sheets served as control group. The cell sheets were treated with brown fused alumina material as SLA group. Constructing osteoblast cell sheets respectively,and cultured successively for 1 or 2 weeks. Then,measuring changes of ALP activity. Results:Primary cultured cell ALP was positive,the morphology of cells conformed to the characteristics of osteoblasts. The alkaline phosphatase activity of the SLA group was higher than that of control group when cultured successively for 1 or 2 weeks,differences were statistically significant ( P<0 . 05 ). The alkaline phosphatase activity of the cell sheets formed in 1 st week was higher than that of 2nd week,differences were statistically significant(P<0. 05). Conclusion:The surface prop-erties of titanium could affect the osteogenic capacity of cell sheet.

  12. NASA Glenn's Engine Components Research Lab, Cell 2B, Reactivated to Support the U.S. Army Research Laboratory T700 Engine Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Luis R.; Griffin, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Army Vehicle Technology Directorate at the NASA Glenn Research Center has been directed by their parent command, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), to demonstrate active stall technology in a turboshaft engine as the next step in transitioning this technology to the Army and aerospace industry. Therefore, the Vehicle Technology Directorate requested the reactivation of Glenn's Engine Components Research Lab, Cell 2B, (ECRL 2B). They wanted to test a T700 engine that had been used previously for turboshaft engine research as a partnership between the Army and NASA on small turbine engine research. ECRL 2B had been placed in standby mode in 1997. Glenn's Testing Division initiated reactivation in May 2002 to support the new research effort, and they completed reactivation and improvements in September 2003.

  13. Time-lapse Imaging of Primary Preneoplastic Mammary Epithelial Cells Derived from Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nakles, Rebecca E.; Millman, Sarah L.; Cabrera, M. Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A.

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without...

  14. Energy Systems Integration: NREL + Google (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-02-01

    This fact sheet describes the collaboration between NREL, Google, and the IEEE Power Electronics Society at the ESIF to work on the Little Box Challenge, an open competition challenging engineers to build smaller power inverters for use in photovoltaic power systems.

  15. [Ocular surface reconstruction by tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2002-12-01

    Ocular surface reconstruction by tissue engineering using somatic stem cells is a second-generation modality. In order to treat bilaterally affected, severe ocular surface disorders, we investigated the transplantation of two types of cultivated mucosal epithelia: allogenic corneal epithelial stem cells, and autologous oral mucosal epithelial cells. For this, first, we summarized the clinical results of allogenic keratoepithelioplasty and limbal transplantation. In addition, we showed that the immunological shift from Th1 to Th2 by using keyhole limpet hemocyanin was effective in suppressing the incidence of immunological rejection. Second, we investigated the transplantation of cultivated human corneal epithelial stem cells onto amniotic membrane. The cultivated sheet was created by co-culture with 3T3 fibroblasts, using the air-lift method, in cultivating the corneal epithelial stem cell on the amniotic membrane. These cultivated cells demonstrated positive keratin 3 and 12 specific to in vivo corneal epithelium, tight junction related proteins, and telomerase activity. The transplanted allogenic human corneal epithelial sheet survived on the corneal surface in all cases, and was quite effective for achieving ocular surface stability in the acute phase of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, ocular cicatricial pemphigoid, or chemical injury. However, a few cases developed immunological rejection or opportunistic infection. Third, to establish the transplantation of the autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial sheet, we performed animal experiments using rabbits. In vitro oral mucosal epithelial sheet showed histology similar to that of in vivo corneal epithelial sheet. It expressed positive keratin 3 as well. Since the autologous transplantation of this sheet survived on the ocular surface with the recovery of corneal transparency, a cultivated oral mucosal epithelium may become a substitute for corneal epithelium. Fourth, we created a cultivated human corneal

  16. An Assessment of Cell Culture Plate Surface Chemistry for in Vitro Studies of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Röder

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of biopolymers as a three dimensional (3D support structure for cell growth is a leading tissue engineering approach in regenerative medicine. Achieving consistent cell seeding and uniform cell distribution throughout 3D scaffold culture in vitro is an ongoing challenge. Traditionally, 3D scaffolds are cultured within tissue culture plates to enable reproducible cell seeding and ease of culture media change. In this study, we compared two different well-plates with different surface properties to assess whether seeding efficiencies and cell growth on 3D scaffolds were affected. Cell attachment and growth of murine calvarial osteoblast (MC3T3-E1 cells within a melt-electrospun poly-ε-caprolactone scaffold were assessed when cultured in either “low-adhesive” non-treated or corona discharged-treated well-plates. Increased cell adhesion was observed on the scaffold placed in the surface treated culture plates compared to the scaffold in the non-treated plates 24 h after seeding, although it was not significant. However, higher cell metabolic activity was observed on the bases of all well-plates than on the scaffold, except for day 21, well metabolic activity was higher in the scaffold contained in non-treated plate than the base. These results indicate that there is no advantage in using non-treated plates to improve initial cell seeding in 3D polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds, however non-treated plates may provide an improved metabolic environment for long-term studies.

  17. In vitro evaluation of cytotoxicity of engineered carbon nanotubes in selected human cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiaoke; Cook, Sean; Wang, Peng [Department of Biology, Jackson State University, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217 (United States); Hwang, Huey-min, E-mail: huey-min.hwang@jsums.edu [Department of Biology, Jackson State University, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217 (United States); Liu, Xi; Williams, Quinton L. [Department of Physics, Atmospheric Sciences and Geoscience, Jackson State University, P.O. Box 17660, Jackson, MS 39217 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    In this study, we used a systematic approach to study and compare the in vitro cytotoxicity of selected engineered carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to test cell lines including human skin keratinocytes, lung cells and lymphocytes. Results of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) uptake in T4 lymphocyte A3 cells indicated cytotoxicity caused by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at concentrations of 2, 5 and 10 ppm. At 2 ppm, the SWCNT treatment group retained 71.3% viability compared to the PBS control group. At 10 ppm, cellular viability further decreased to 56.5% of the PBS control group. In the skin keratinocyte HaCaT cells and lung MSTO-211H cells, the SWCNT did not demonstrate any cytotoxicity at concentrations of 2 and 5 ppm but slightly inhibited HaCaT cells and caused significant toxicity to MSTO-211H cells at 10 ppm. Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) testing showed significant cytotoxicity to A3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. At 10 ppm the viability of the cells decreased to 89.1% compared to the PBS control. In MSTO-211H cells, MWCNT caused significant toxicity at concentrations of 2 ppm and higher. By comparison, HaCaT cells were inhibited significantly only at 10 ppm. Overall, the test CNTs inhibited cellular viabilities in a concentration, cell type, and CNT type-dependent pattern. The viabilities of the MWCNT-impacted cells are higher than the corresponding SWCNT groups. We speculate that on a per volume basis, the greater availability of defects and contaminants for cellular interaction may contribute to the higher cytotoxicity of SWCNT in this study. The interaction between the SWCNTs and A3 lymphocytes was also observed by scanning electron microscopy. The mechanism for causing cell death in this study was attributed to apoptosis and necrosis after physical penetration by CNTs and oxidative stress via formation of reactive oxygen species.

  18. In vitro evaluation of cytotoxicity of engineered carbon nanotubes in selected human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we used a systematic approach to study and compare the in vitro cytotoxicity of selected engineered carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to test cell lines including human skin keratinocytes, lung cells and lymphocytes. Results of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) uptake in T4 lymphocyte A3 cells indicated cytotoxicity caused by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at concentrations of 2, 5 and 10 ppm. At 2 ppm, the SWCNT treatment group retained 71.3% viability compared to the PBS control group. At 10 ppm, cellular viability further decreased to 56.5% of the PBS control group. In the skin keratinocyte HaCaT cells and lung MSTO-211H cells, the SWCNT did not demonstrate any cytotoxicity at concentrations of 2 and 5 ppm but slightly inhibited HaCaT cells and caused significant toxicity to MSTO-211H cells at 10 ppm. Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) testing showed significant cytotoxicity to A3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. At 10 ppm the viability of the cells decreased to 89.1% compared to the PBS control. In MSTO-211H cells, MWCNT caused significant toxicity at concentrations of 2 ppm and higher. By comparison, HaCaT cells were inhibited significantly only at 10 ppm. Overall, the test CNTs inhibited cellular viabilities in a concentration, cell type, and CNT type-dependent pattern. The viabilities of the MWCNT-impacted cells are higher than the corresponding SWCNT groups. We speculate that on a per volume basis, the greater availability of defects and contaminants for cellular interaction may contribute to the higher cytotoxicity of SWCNT in this study. The interaction between the SWCNTs and A3 lymphocytes was also observed by scanning electron microscopy. The mechanism for causing cell death in this study was attributed to apoptosis and necrosis after physical penetration by CNTs and oxidative stress via formation of reactive oxygen species.

  19. Tissue engineering approaches for studying the effect of biochemical and physiological stimuli on cell behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Vergara, Andrea Carolina

    Tissue engineering (TE) approaches have emerged as an alternative to traditional tissue and organ replacements. The aim of this work was to contribute to the understanding of the effects of cell-material and endothelial cell (EC) paracrine signaling on cell responses using poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels as a material platform. Three TE applications were explored. First, the effect of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) identity was evaluated for vocal fold restoration. Second, the influence of GAG identity was explored and a novel approach for stable endothelialization was developed for vascular graft applications. Finally, EC paracrine signaling in the presence of cyclic stretch, and hydrophobicity and inorganic content were studied for osteogenic applications. In terms of vocal fold restoration, it was found that vocal fold fibroblast (VFF) phenotype and extracellular matrix (ECM) production were impacted by GAG identity. VFF phenotype was preserved in long-term cultured hydrogels containing high molecular weight hyaluronan (HAHMW). Furthermore, collagen I deposition, fibronectin production and smooth muscle α-actin (SM-α-actin) expression in PEG-HA, PEG-chondroitin sulfate C and PEG-heparan sulfate (HS) gels suggest that CSC and HS may be undesirable for vocal fold implants. Regarding vascular graft applications, the impact of GAG identity on smooth muscle cell (SMC) foam cell formation was explored. Results support the increasing body of literature that suggests a critical role for dermatan sulfate (DS)-bearing proteoglycans in early atherosclerosis. In addition, an approach for fabricating bi-layered tissue engineering vascular grafts (TEVGs) with stable endothelialization was validated using PEGDA as an intercellular “cementing” agent between adjacent endothelial cells (ECs). Finally, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation toward osteogenic like cells was evaluated. ECM and cell phenotypic data showed that elevated scaffold inorganic

  20. Immunotoxicological impact of engineered nanomaterial exposure: mechanisms of immune cell modulation

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, XIAOJIA; Reece, Shaun P.; Brown, Jared M.

    2013-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) are increasingly being utilized in many consumer products and various medical applications thereby leading to the potentiality of increased human exposures. Assessment of the adverse effects on the immune system is an important component for evaluating the overall health and safety of ENM. Tasked with eliminating pathogens and removing cancerous cells, the immune system is constantly functioning to maintain homeostasis. Small modifications to the immune system w...

  1. Solving cell infiltration limitations of electrospun nanofiber meshes for tissue engineering applications

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, Ana; Martins, Albino; Pinho, Elisabete D.; Faria, Susana; Reis, R. L.; Neves, N. M.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: Utilize the dual composition strategy to increase the pore size and solve the low cell infiltration capacity on random nanofiber meshes, an intrinsic limitation of electrospun scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. MATERIALS & METHODS: Polycaprolactone and poly(ethylene oxide) solutions were electrospun simultaneously to obtain a dual composition nanofiber mesh. Selective dissolution of the poly(ethylene oxide) nanofiber fraction was performed. The biologic performance of these e...

  2. Epidermal stem cells and skin tissue engineering in hair follicle regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Balañá, María Eugenia; Charreau, Hernán Eduardo; Leirós, Gustavo José

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of a fully organized and functional hair follicle from dissociated cells propagated under defined tissue culture conditions is a challenge still pending in tissue engineering. The loss of hair follicles caused by injuries or pathologies such as alopecia not only affects the patients’ psychological well-being, but also endangers certain inherent functions of the skin. It is then of great interest to find different strategies aiming to regenerate or neogenerate the hair folli...

  3. Hepatic tissue engineering: from transplantation to customized cell-based liver directed therapies from the laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Fiegel, Henning C; Kaufmann, Peter M; Bruns, Helge; Kluth, Dietrich; Horch, Raymund E.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Kneser, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Today, liver transplantation is still the only curative treatment for liver failure due to end-stage liver diseases. Donor organ shortage, high cost and the need of immunosuppressive medications are still the major limitations in the field of liver transplantation. Thus, alternative innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, for example, liver tissue engineering, are under investigation with the aim that in future an artificial liver tissue could be created and be used for the r...

  4. Characterization of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells on Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk Henrich; René Verboket; Alexander Schaible; Kerstin Kontradowitz; Elsie Oppermann; Brune, Jan C; Christoph Nau; Simon Meier; Halvard Bonig; Ingo Marzi; Caroline Seebach

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, without coating or ...

  5. Cell interaction with cellulose-based scaffolds for tissue engineering: a review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bačáková, Lucie; Novotná, Katarína; Sopuch, T.; Havelka, P.

    New York: Nova Science Publishers, 2015 - (Mondal, M.), s. 341-375 ISBN 978-1-63483-553-4 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1168; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1857; GA MZd(CZ) NT13297; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04010065 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : polysaccharides * cellulose * biomaterial * tissue engineering * regenerative medicine * cell therapy Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  6. LU Decomposition on Cell Broadband Engine: An Empirical Study to Exploit Heterogeneous Chip Multiprocessors

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Feng; Shen, Xipeng

    2010-01-01

    To meet the needs of high performance computing, the Cell Broadband Engine owns many features that differ from traditional processors, such as the large number of synergistic processor elements, large register files, the ability to hide main-storage latency with concurrent computation and DMA transfers. The exploitation of those features requires the programmer to carefully tailor programs and simutaneously deal with various performance factors, including locality, load balance, communication...

  7. Preface to Special Topic: Microfluidics in cell biology and tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    In this special issue of Biomicrofluidics, a wide variety of applications of microfluidics to tissue engineering and cell biology are presented. The articles illustrate the benefits of using microfluidics for controlling the cellular environment in a precise yet high rate manner using minimum reagents. The topic is very timely and takes a stab at portraying a glimpse of what is to come in this exciting and emerging field of research.

  8. Perforating Thin Metal Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Sheets only few mils thick bonded together, punched, then debonded. Three-step process yields perforated sheets of metal. (1): Individual sheets bonded together to form laminate. (2): laminate perforated in desired geometric pattern. (3): After baking, laminate separates into individual sheets. Developed for fabricating conductive layer on blankets that collect and remove ions; however, perforated foils have other applications - as conductive surfaces on insulating materials; stiffeners and conductors in plastic laminates; reflectors in antenna dishes; supports for thermal blankets; lightweight grille cover materials; and material for mockup of components.

  9. Design, Engineering, and Construction of Photosynthetic Microbial Cell Factories for Renewable Solar Fuel Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindblad, Peter; Lindberg, Pia; Stensjoe, Karin (Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Dept. of Chemistry-Aangstroem Laboratory, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)), E-mail: Peter.Lindblad@kemi.uu.se; Oliveira, Paulo (Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Porto (Portugal)); Heidorn, Thorsten (Bioforsk-Norwegian Inst. for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Aas Oslo, (Norway))

    2012-03-15

    There is an urgent need to develop sustainable solutions to convert solar energy into energy carriers used in the society. In addition to solar cells generating electricity, there are several options to generate solar fuels. This paper outlines and discusses the design and engineering of photosynthetic microbial systems for the generation of renewable solar fuels, with a focus on cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are prokaryotic microorganisms with the same type of photosynthesis as higher plants. Native and engineered cyanobacteria have been used by us and others as model systems to examine, demonstrate, and develop photobiological H{sub 2} production. More recently, the production of carbon-containing solar fuels like ethanol, butanol, and isoprene have been demonstrated. We are using a synthetic biology approach to develop efficient photosynthetic microbial cell factories for direct generation of biofuels from solar energy. Present progress and advances in the design, engineering, and construction of such cyanobacterial cells for the generation of a portfolio of solar fuels, e.g., hydrogen, alcohols, and isoprene, are presented and discussed. Possibilities and challenges when introducing and using synthetic biology are highlighted

  10. Interface Engineering of High Efficiency Organic-Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lixia; Liu, Yaoping; Chen, Wei; Wang, Yan; Liang, Huili; Mei, Zengxia; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Du, Xiaolong

    2016-01-13

    Insufficient interface conformity is a challenge faced in hybrid organic-silicon heterojunction solar cells because of using conventional pyramid antireflection texturing provoking the porosity of interface. In this study, we tested alternative textures, in particular rounded pyramids and inverted pyramids to compare the performance. It was remarkably improved delivering 7.61%, 8.91% and 10.04% efficiency employing conventional, rounded, and inverted pyramids, respectively. The result was interpreted in terms of gradually improving conformity of the Ag/organic/silicon interface, together with the gradually decreasing serial resistance. Altogether, the present data may guide further efforts arising the interface engineering for mastering high efficient heterojunction solar cells. PMID:26701061

  11. Systemic treatment with CAR-engineered T cells against PSCA delays subcutaneous tumor growth and prolongs survival of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically engineered with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has successfully been used to treat both chronic and acute lymphocytic leukemia as well as other hematological cancers. Experimental therapy with CAR-engineered T cells has also shown promising results on solid tumors. The prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a protein expressed on the surface of prostate epithelial cells as well as in primary and metastatic prostate cancer cells and therefore a promising target for immunotherapy of prostate cancer. We developed a third-generation CAR against PSCA including the CD28, OX-40 and CD3 ζ signaling domains. T cells were transduced with a lentivirus encoding the PSCA-CAR and evaluated for cytokine production (paired Student’s t-test), proliferation (paired Student’s t-test), CD107a expression (paired Student’s t-test) and target cell killing in vitro and tumor growth and survival in vivo (Log-rank test comparing Kaplan-Meier survival curves). PSCA-CAR T cells exhibit specific interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 secretion and specific proliferation in response to PSCA-expressing target cells. Furthermore, the PSCA-CAR-engineered T cells efficiently kill PSCA-expressing tumor cells in vitro and systemic treatment with PSCA-CAR-engineered T cells significantly delays subcutaneous tumor growth and prolongs survival of mice. Our data confirms that PSCA-CAR T cells may be developed for treatment of prostate cancer

  12. Fuel cells science and engineering. Materials, processes, systems and technology. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolten, Detlef; Emonts, Bernd (eds.) [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energieforschung (IEF), Brennstoffzellen (IEF-3)

    2012-07-01

    The second volume is divided in four parts and 19 chapters. It is structured as follows: PART V: Modeling and Simulation. Chapter 23: Messages from Analytical Modeling of Fuel Cells (Andrei Kulikovsky); 24: Stochastic Modeling of Fuel-Cell Components (Ralf Thiedmann, Gerd Gaiselmann, Werner Lehnert and Volker Schmidt); 25: Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulation Using Supercomputer Calculation Capacity (Ralf Peters and Florian Scharf); 26 Modeling Solid Oxide Fuel Cells from the Macroscale to the Nanoscale (Emily M. Ryan and Mohammad A. Khaleel); 27: Numerical Modeling of the Thermomechanically Induced Stress in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (Murat Peksen); 28: Modeling of Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (Peter Heidebrecht, Silvia Piewek and Kai Sundmacher); Chapter 29: High-Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Fuel-Cell Modeling (Uwe Reimer); Chapter 30: Modeling of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel-Cell Components (Yun Wang and Ken S. Chen); 31: Modeling of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells and Stacks (Yun Wang and Ken S. Chen). PART VI: Balance of Plant Design and Components. Chapter 32: Principles of Systems Engineering (Ludger Blum, Ralf Peters and Remzi Can Samsun); 33: System Technology for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (Nguyen Q. Minh); 34: Desulfurization for Fuel-Cell Systems (Joachim Pasel and Ralf Peters); 35: Design Criteria and Components for Fuel Cell Powertrains (Lutz Eckstein and Bruno Gnoerich); 36: Hybridization for Fuel Cells (Joerg Wilhelm). PART VII: Systems Verification and Market Introduction. Chapter 37: Off-Grid Power Supply and Premium Power Generation (Kerry-Ann Adamson); 38: Demonstration Projects and Market Introduction (Kristin Deason). PART VIII: Knowledge Distribution and Public Awareness. Chapter 39: A Sustainable Framework for International Collaboration: the IEA HIA and Its Strategic Plan for 2009-2015 (Mary-Rose de Valladares); 40: Overview of Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Organizations and Initiatives Worldwide (Bernd Emonts) 41: Contributions for

  13. Comparative study on seeding methods of human bone marrow stromal cells in bone tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐欣; 刘建国; 常颖; 徐莘香

    2004-01-01

    Background In general the traditional static seeding method has its limitation while the dynamic seeding method reveals its advantages over traditional static method. We compared static and dynamic seeding method for human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in bone tissue engineering.Methods DNA assay was used for detecting the maximal initial seeding concentration for static seeding. Dynamic and static seeding methods were compared, when scaffolds were loaded with hBMSCs at this maximal initial cell seeding concentration. Histology and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were examined to evaluate the distribution of cells inside the constructs. Markers encoding osteogenic genes were measured by fluorescent RT-PCR. The protocol for dynamic seeding of hBMSCs was also investigated.Results DNA assay showed that the static maximal initial seeding concentration was lower than that in dynamic seeding. Histology and SEM showed even distribution and spread of cells in the dynamically seeded constructs, while their statically seeded counterparts showed cell aggregation.Fluorescent RT-PCR again showed stronger osteogenic potential of dynamically seeded constructs.Conclusion dynamic seeding of hBMSCs is a promising technique in bone tissue engineering.

  14. Tissue engineering by self-assembly and bio-printing of living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakab, Karoly; Marga, Francoise; Forgacs, Gabor [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Norotte, Cyrille [Department of Biology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Murphy, Keith [Organovo, Inc., 5871 Oberlin Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana, E-mail: forgacsg@missouri.ed [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Biofabrication of living structures with desired topology and functionality requires the interdisciplinary effort of practitioners of the physical, life and engineering sciences. Such efforts are being undertaken in many laboratories around the world. Numerous approaches are pursued, such as those based on the use of natural or artificial scaffolds, decellularized cadaveric extracellular matrices and, most lately, bioprinting. To be successful in this endeavor, it is crucial to provide in vitro micro-environmental clues for the cells resembling those in the organism. Therefore, scaffolds, populated with differentiated cells or stem cells, of increasing complexity and sophistication are being fabricated. However, no matter how sophisticated scaffolds are, they can cause problems stemming from their degradation, eliciting immunogenic reactions and other a priori unforeseen complications. It is also being realized that ultimately the best approach might be to rely on the self-assembly and self-organizing properties of cells and tissues and the innate regenerative capability of the organism itself, not just simply prepare tissue and organ structures in vitro followed by their implantation. Here we briefly review the different strategies for the fabrication of three-dimensional biological structures, in particular bioprinting. We detail a fully biological, scaffoldless, print-based engineering approach that uses self-assembling multicellular units as bio-ink particles and employs early developmental morphogenetic principles, such as cell sorting and tissue fusion. (topical review)

  15. Tissue engineering by self-assembly and bio-printing of living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofabrication of living structures with desired topology and functionality requires the interdisciplinary effort of practitioners of the physical, life and engineering sciences. Such efforts are being undertaken in many laboratories around the world. Numerous approaches are pursued, such as those based on the use of natural or artificial scaffolds, decellularized cadaveric extracellular matrices and, most lately, bioprinting. To be successful in this endeavor, it is crucial to provide in vitro micro-environmental clues for the cells resembling those in the organism. Therefore, scaffolds, populated with differentiated cells or stem cells, of increasing complexity and sophistication are being fabricated. However, no matter how sophisticated scaffolds are, they can cause problems stemming from their degradation, eliciting immunogenic reactions and other a priori unforeseen complications. It is also being realized that ultimately the best approach might be to rely on the self-assembly and self-organizing properties of cells and tissues and the innate regenerative capability of the organism itself, not just simply prepare tissue and organ structures in vitro followed by their implantation. Here we briefly review the different strategies for the fabrication of three-dimensional biological structures, in particular bioprinting. We detail a fully biological, scaffoldless, print-based engineering approach that uses self-assembling multicellular units as bio-ink particles and employs early developmental morphogenetic principles, such as cell sorting and tissue fusion. (topical review)

  16. Parallel local search for solving Constraint Problems on the Cell Broadband Engine (Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvator Abreu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We explore the use of the Cell Broadband Engine (Cell/BE for short for combinatorial optimization applications: we present a parallel version of a constraint-based local search algorithm that has been implemented on a multiprocessor BladeCenter machine with twin Cell/BE processors (total of 16 SPUs per blade. This algorithm was chosen because it fits very well the Cell/BE architecture and requires neither shared memory nor communication between processors, while retaining a compact memory footprint. We study the performance on several large optimization benchmarks and show that this achieves mostly linear time speedups, even sometimes super-linear. This is possible because the parallel implementation might explore simultaneously different parts of the search space and therefore converge faster towards the best sub-space and thus towards a solution. Besides getting speedups, the resulting times exhibit a much smaller variance, which benefits applications where a timely reply is critical.

  17. Evolution of oxygen utilization in multicellular organisms and implications for cell signalling in tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Stamati

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen is one of the critically defining elements resulting in the existence of eukaryotic life on this planet. The rise and fall of this element can be tracked through time and corresponds with the evolution of diverse life forms, development of efficient energy production (oxidative phosphorylation in single cell organisms, the evolution of multicellular organisms and the regulation of complex cell phenotypes. By understanding these events, we can plot the effect of oxygen on evolution and its direct influence on different forms of life today, from the whole organism to specific cells within multicellular organisms. In the emerging field of tissue engineering, understanding the role of different levels of oxygen for normal cell function as well as control of complex signalling cascades is paramount to effectively build 3D tissues in vitro and their subsequent survival when implanted.

  18. Fibronectin-Alginate microcapsules improve cell viability and protein secretion of encapsulated Factor IX-engineered human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyar, Bahareh; Dodd, Megan; Marquez-Curtis, Leah; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Continuous delivery of proteins by engineered cells encapsu-lated in biocompatible polymeric microcapsules is of considerable therapeutic potential. However, this technology has not lived up to expectations due to inadequate cell--matrix interactions and subsequent cell death. In this study we hypoth-esize that the presence of fibronectin in an alginate matrix may enhance the viability and functionality of encapsulated human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) expressing the human Factor IX (FIX) gene. MSCs were encapsulated in alginate-PLL microcapsules containing 10, 100, or 500 μg/ml fibronectin to ameliorate cell survival. MSCs in microcapsules with 100 and 500 μg/ml fibronectin demonstrated improved cell viability and proliferation and higher FIX secretion compared to MSCs in non-supplemented microcapsules. In contrast, 10 μg/ml fibronectin did not significantly affect the viability and protein secretion from the encapsulated cells. Differentiation studies demonstrated osteogenic (but not chondrogenic or adipogenic) differentiation capability and efficient FIX secretion of the enclosed MSCs in the fibronectin-alginate suspension culture. Thus, the use of recombinant MSCs encapsulated in fibronectin-alginate microcapsules in basal or osteogenic cultures may be of practical use in the treatment of hemophilia B. PMID:24564349

  19. Fuel cells science and engineering. Materials, processes, systems and technology. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolten, Detlef; Emonts, Bernd (eds.) [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energieforschung (IEF), Brennstoffzellen (IEF-3)

    2012-07-01

    -Temperature Fuel Cells (Juergen Wackerl); 20: Degradation Caused by Dynamic Operation and Starvation Conditions (Jan Hendrik Ohs, Ulrich S. Sauter and Sebastian Maass). PART IV: Quality Assurance. Chapter 21: Quality Assurance for Characterizing Low-Temperature Fuel Cells (Viktor Hacker, Eva Wallnoefer-Ogris, Georgios Tsotridis and Thomas Malkow); 22: Methodologies for Fuel Cell Process Engineering (Remzi Can Samsun and Ralf Peters).

  20. High-throughput transfection and engineering of primary cells and cultured cell lines - an invaluable tool for research as well as drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Hartmann, Herbert; Faust, Nicole; Kazinski, Michael; Kretzschmar, Titus

    2007-11-01

    The manipulation of eukaryotic cells by introducing nucleic acids and other substrates using chemical, physical or viral methods is one of the ground-breaking tools in the life sciences. Changes in the molecular equipment of a cell induced by introducing different molecules not only enable the dissection of signal transduction and metabolic pathways, but also allow the exploitation of engineered cells as bio-factories for the production of proteins in the processes of target research and drug development. In addition to the application of engineered cells for modern cell-based assays, medically relevant engineered cells can be used in clinical settings for adoptive immunotherapy or gene therapy. With the advent of methods exploiting RNA interference (RNAi), gene identification and functional validation in eukaryotic cells have clearly become one of the most exciting methods in life sciences during the past few years. To accelerate research and development in these areas, high-quality, high-throughput approaches (i.e., using sample formats of at least 96 wells) for cell engineering are needed with increasing demand. Recent developments, especially in the field of electroporation, now allow the efficient, high-throughput engineering of virtually any cell type, including primary cells, many of which were previously considered difficult or even impossible to transfect. Primary cells freshly isolated from native tissues are gaining more and more interest, as data obtained with these cells are considered to be of higher physiological relevance than data obtained with immortalized cell lines that have been cultured for extensive periods. In this review, the various methods for cell engineering (with focus on higher eukaryotic cells) are summarized and their impact for high-throughput applications in research and drug development is discussed. PMID:23484597

  1. A Porous Tissue Engineering Scaffold Selectively Degraded by Cell-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John R.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Page, Jonathan M.; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous

  2. Recent Advances in Interface Engineering for Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells are considered as one of the most promising next-generation solar cells due to their advantages of low-cost precursors, high power conversion efficiency (PCE and easy of processing. In the past few years, the PCEs have climbed from a few to over 20% for perovskite solar cells. Recent developments demonstrate that perovskite exhibits ambipolar semiconducting characteristics, which allows for the construction of planar heterojunction (PHJ perovskite solar cells. PHJ perovskite solar cells can avoid the use of high-temperature sintered mesoporous metal oxides, enabling simple processing and the fabrication of flexible and tandem perovskite solar cells. In planar heterojunction materials, hole/electron transport layers are introduced between a perovskite film and the anode/cathode. The hole and electron transporting layers are expected to enhance exciton separation, charge transportation and collection. Further, the supporting layer for the perovskite film not only plays an important role in energy-level alignment, but also affects perovskite film morphology, which have a great effect on device performance. In addition, interfacial layers also affect device stability. In this review, recent progress in interfacial engineering for PHJ perovskite solar cells will be reviewed, especially with the molecular interfacial materials. The supporting interfacial layers for the optimization of perovskite films will be systematically reviewed. Finally, the challenges remaining in perovskite solar cells research will be discussed.

  3. Recent Advances in Interface Engineering for Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wei; Pan, Lijia; Yang, Tingbin; Liang, Yongye

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells are considered as one of the most promising next-generation solar cells due to their advantages of low-cost precursors, high power conversion efficiency (PCE) and easy of processing. In the past few years, the PCEs have climbed from a few to over 20% for perovskite solar cells. Recent developments demonstrate that perovskite exhibits ambipolar semiconducting characteristics, which allows for the construction of planar heterojunction (PHJ) perovskite solar cells. PHJ perovskite solar cells can avoid the use of high-temperature sintered mesoporous metal oxides, enabling simple processing and the fabrication of flexible and tandem perovskite solar cells. In planar heterojunction materials, hole/electron transport layers are introduced between a perovskite film and the anode/cathode. The hole and electron transporting layers are expected to enhance exciton separation, charge transportation and collection. Further, the supporting layer for the perovskite film not only plays an important role in energy-level alignment, but also affects perovskite film morphology, which have a great effect on device performance. In addition, interfacial layers also affect device stability. In this review, recent progress in interfacial engineering for PHJ perovskite solar cells will be reviewed, especially with the molecular interfacial materials. The supporting interfacial layers for the optimization of perovskite films will be systematically reviewed. Finally, the challenges remaining in perovskite solar cells research will be discussed. PMID:27347923

  4. Engineered Microenvironments for the Maturation and Observation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salick, Max R.

    The human heart is a dynamic system that undergoes substantial changes as it develops and adapts to the body's growing needs. To better understand the physiology of the heart, researchers have begun to produce immature heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, from pluripotent stem cell sources with remarkable efficiency. These stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes hold great potential in the understanding and treatment of heart disease; however, even after prolonged culture, these cells continue to exhibit an immature phenotype, as indicated by poor sarcomere organization and calcium handling, among other features. The lack of maturation that is observed in these cardiomyocytes greatly limits their applicability towards drug screening, disease modeling, and cell therapy applications. The mechanical environment surrounding a cell has been repeatedly shown to have a large impact on that cell's behavior. For this reason, we have implemented micropatterning methods to mimic the level of alignment that occurs in the heart in vivo in order to study how this alignment may help the cells to produce a more mature sarcomere phenotype. It was discovered that the level of sarcomere organization of a cardiomyocyte can be strongly influenced by the micropattern lane geometry on which it adheres. Steps were taken to optimize this micropattern platform, and studies of protein organization, gene expression, and myofibrillogenesis were conducted. Additionally, a set of programs was developed to provide quantitative analysis of the level of sarcomere organization, as well as to assist with several other tissue engineering applications.

  5. Advantages of Sheep Infrapatellar Fat Pad Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Parviz; Soleimanirad, Jafar; Roshangar, Leila; Shafaei, Hajar; Jarolmasjed, Seyedhosein; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study has been to evaluate adipose tissue derived stem cells (ADSCs) from infrapatellar fat pad and characterize their cell surface markers using anti-human antibodies, as adipose tissue derived stem cells (ADSCs) have great potential for cellular therapies to restore injured tissues. Methods: Adipose tissue was obtained from infrapatellar fat pad of sheep. Surface markers evaluated by flow cytometry. In order to evaluate cell adhesion, the Polycaprolactone (PCL) was sterilized under Ultraviolet (UV) light and about 1×105 cells were seeded on PCL. Then, ASCs- PCL construct were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (Mira3 Te Scan, Czech Republic). Results: We showed that adipose tissue derived stem cells (ADSCs) maintain their fibroblastic-like morphology during different subcultures and cell adhesion. They were positive for CD44 and CD90 markers and negative for CD31 and Cd45 markers by human antibodies. Conclusion: Our results suggest that ASCs surface markers can be characterized by anti-human antibodies in sheep. As stem cells, they can be used in tissue engineering. PMID:27123425

  6. Human amniotic fluid derived cells can competently substitute dermal fibroblasts in a tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin analog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; Hosper, Nynke; Luginbuehl, Joachim; Biedermann, Thomas; Reichmann, Ernst; Meuli, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Human amniotic fluid comprises cells with high differentiation capacity, thus representing a potential cell source for skin tissue engineering. In this experimental study, we investigated the ability of human amniotic fluid derived cells to substitute dermal fibroblasts and support epidermis formati

  7. A special issue on reviews in biomedical applications of nanomaterials, tissue engineering, stem cells, bioimaging, and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2014-10-01

    This second special issue of the Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology in a series contains another 30 state-of-the-art reviews focused on the biomedical applications of nanomaterials, biosensors, bone tissue engineering, MRI and bioimaging, single-cell detection, stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, toxicity and biosafety of nanodrugs, nanoparticle-based new therapeutic approaches for cancer, hepatic and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25992404

  8. Automatically extracting sheet-metal features from solid model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志坚; 李建军; 王义林; 李材元; 肖祥芷

    2004-01-01

    With the development of modern industry,sheet-metal parts in mass production have been widely applied in mechanical,communication,electronics,and light industries in recent decades; but the advances in sheet-metal part design and manufacturing remain too slow compared with the increasing importance of sheet-metal parts in modern industry. This paper proposes a method for automatically extracting features from an arbitrary solid model of sheet-metal parts; whose characteristics are used for classification and graph-based representation of the sheet-metal features to extract the features embodied in a sheet-metal part. The extracting feature process can be divided for valid checking of the model geometry,feature matching,and feature relationship. Since the extracted features include abundant geometry and engineering information,they will be effective for downstream application such as feature rebuilding and stamping process planning.

  9. Infertility Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > ePublications > Our ePublications > Infertility fact sheet ePublications Infertility fact sheet This information in Spanish (en español) ... to the fallopian tube instead of the uterus. Gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) involves transferring eggs and sperm into the ...

  10. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions...

  11. A validated system for ligation-free USER™ -based assembly of expression vectors for mammalian cell engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Holm, Dorte Koefoed; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    The development in the field of mammalian cell factories require fast and high-throughput methods, this means a high need for simpler and more efficient cloning techniques. For optimization of protein expression by genetic engineering and for allowing metabolic engineering in mammalian cells, a n...... versatile expression vector system was developed. This vector system applies the ligation-free uracilexcision cloning technique to construct mammalian expression vectors of multiple parts and with maximum flexibility.......The development in the field of mammalian cell factories require fast and high-throughput methods, this means a high need for simpler and more efficient cloning techniques. For optimization of protein expression by genetic engineering and for allowing metabolic engineering in mammalian cells, a new...

  12. Biocompatible Azide-Alkyne "Click" Reactions for Surface Decoration of Glyco-Engineered Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Marcus; Memmel, Elisabeth; Braun, Alexandra C; Seibel, Jürgen; Meinel, Lorenz; Lühmann, Tessa

    2016-05-01

    Bio-orthogonal copper (I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has been widely used to modify azide- or alkyne-bearing monosaccharides on metabolic glyco-engineered mammalian cells. Here, we present a systematic study to elucidate the design space for the cytotoxic effects of the copper catalyst on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and on HEK 293-F cells. Monitoring membrane integrity by flow cytometry and RT-PCR analysis with apoptotic and anti-apoptotic markers elucidated the general feasibility of CuAAC, with exposure time of the CuAAC reaction mixture having the major influence on biocompatibility. A high labeling efficiency of HEK 293-F cells with a fluorescent alkyne dye was rapidly achieved by CuAAC in comparison to copper free strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). The study details effective and biocompatible conditions for CuAAC-based modification of glyco-engineered cells in comparison to its copper free alternative. PMID:26818821

  13. Spatial Engineering of Osteochondral Tissue Constructs Through Microfluidically Directed Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Stephen M.; Barabino, Gilda A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The development of tissue engineered osteochondral units has been slowed by a number of technical hurdles associated with recapitulating their heterogeneous nature ex vivo. Subsequently, numerous approaches with respect to cell sourcing, scaffolding composition, and culture media formulation have been pursued, which have led to high variability in outcomes and ultimately the lack of a consensus bioprocessing strategy. As such, the objective of this study was to standardize the design process by focusing on differentially supporting formation of cartilaginous and bony matrix by a single cell source in a spatially controlled manner within a single material system. A cell-polymer solution of bovine mesenchymal stem cells and agarose was cast against micromolds of a serpentine network and stacked to produce tissue constructs containing two independent microfluidic networks. Constructs were fluidically connected to two controlled flow loops and supplied with independently tuned differentiation parameters for chondrogenic and osteogenic induction, respectively. Constructs receiving inductive media showed differential gene expression of both chondrogenic and osteogenic markers in opposite directions along the thickness of the construct that was recapitulated at the protein level with respect to collagens I, II, and X. A control group receiving noninductive media showed homogeneous expression of these biomarkers measured in lower concentrations at both the mRNA and protein level. This work represents an important step in the rational design of engineered osteochondral units through establishment of an enabling technology for further optimization of scaffolding formulations and bioprocessing conditions toward the production of commercially viable osteochondral tissue products.

  14. Suicide Gene-Engineered Stromal Cells Reveal a Dynamic Regulation of Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Keyue; Luk, Samantha; Elman, Jessica; Murray, Ryan; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Parekkadan, Biju

    2016-02-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cancer-promoting component in the tumor microenvironment (TME). The dynamic role of human CAFs in cancer progression has been ill-defined because human CAFs lack a unique marker needed for a cell-specific, promoter-driven knockout model. Here, we developed an engineered human CAF cell line with an inducible suicide gene to enable selective in vivo elimination of human CAFs at different stages of xenograft tumor development, effectively circumventing the challenge of targeting a cell-specific marker. Suicide-engineered CAFs were highly sensitive to apoptosis induction in vitro and in vivo by the addition of a simple small molecule inducer. Selection of timepoints for targeted CAF apoptosis in vivo during the progression of a human breast cancer xenograft model was guided by a bi-phasic host cytokine response that peaked at early timepoints after tumor implantation. Remarkably, we observed that the selective apoptosis of CAFs at these early timepoints did not affect primary tumor growth, but instead increased the presence of tumor-associated macrophages and the metastatic spread of breast cancer cells to the lung and bone. The study revealed a dynamic relationship between CAFs and cancer metastasis that has counter-intuitive ramifications for CAF-targeted therapy.

  15. Spatial Engineering of Osteochondral Tissue Constructs Through Microfluidically Directed Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Stephen M; Barabino, Gilda A

    2016-01-01

    The development of tissue engineered osteochondral units has been slowed by a number of technical hurdles associated with recapitulating their heterogeneous nature ex vivo. Subsequently, numerous approaches with respect to cell sourcing, scaffolding composition, and culture media formulation have been pursued, which have led to high variability in outcomes and ultimately the lack of a consensus bioprocessing strategy. As such, the objective of this study was to standardize the design process by focusing on differentially supporting formation of cartilaginous and bony matrix by a single cell source in a spatially controlled manner within a single material system. A cell-polymer solution of bovine mesenchymal stem cells and agarose was cast against micromolds of a serpentine network and stacked to produce tissue constructs containing two independent microfluidic networks. Constructs were fluidically connected to two controlled flow loops and supplied with independently tuned differentiation parameters for chondrogenic and osteogenic induction, respectively. Constructs receiving inductive media showed differential gene expression of both chondrogenic and osteogenic markers in opposite directions along the thickness of the construct that was recapitulated at the protein level with respect to collagens I, II, and X. A control group receiving noninductive media showed homogeneous expression of these biomarkers measured in lower concentrations at both the mRNA and protein level. This work represents an important step in the rational design of engineered osteochondral units through establishment of an enabling technology for further optimization of scaffolding formulations and bioprocessing conditions toward the production of commercially viable osteochondral tissue products. PMID:27190700

  16. Development of large engineered cartilage constructs from a small population of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Jillian M; Kunz, Manuela; Tse, Man Yat; Winterborn, Andrew; Bardana, Davide D; Pang, Stephen C; Waldman, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    Confronted with articular cartilage's limited capacity for self-repair, joint resurfacing techniques offer an attractive treatment for damaged or diseased tissue. Although tissue engineered cartilage constructs can be created, a substantial number of cells are required to generate sufficient quantities of tissue for the repair of large defects. As routine cell expansion methods tend to elicit negative effects on chondrocyte function, we have developed an approach to generate phenotypically stable, large-sized engineered constructs (≥3 cm(2) ) directly from a small amount of donor tissue or cells (as little as 20,000 cells to generate a 3 cm(2) tissue construct). Using rabbit donor tissue, the bioreactor-cultivated constructs were hyaline-like in appearance and possessed a biochemical composition similar to native articular cartilage. Longer bioreactor cultivation times resulted in increased matrix deposition and improved mechanical properties determined over a 4 week period. Additionally, as the anatomy of the joint will need to be taken in account to effectively resurface large affected areas, we have also explored the possibility of generating constructs matched to the shape and surface geometry of a defect site through the use of rapid-prototyped defect tissue culture molds. Similar hyaline-like tissue constructs were developed that also possessed a high degree of shape correlation to the original defect mold. Future studies will be aimed at determining the effectiveness of this approach to the repair of cartilage defects in an animal model and the creation of large-sized osteochondral constructs. PMID:23197468

  17. Stem cell-derived vasculature: A potent and multidimensional technology for basic research, disease modeling, and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Justin; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-05-01

    Proper blood vessel networks are necessary for constructing and re-constructing tissues, promoting wound healing, and delivering metabolic necessities throughout the body. Conversely, an understanding of vascular dysfunction has provided insight into the pathogenesis and progression of diseases both common and rare. Recent advances in stem cell-based regenerative medicine - including advances in stem cell technologies and related progress in bioscaffold design and complex tissue engineering - have allowed rapid advances in the field of vascular biology, leading in turn to more advanced modeling of vascular pathophysiology and improved engineering of vascularized tissue constructs. In this review we examine recent advances in the field of stem cell-derived vasculature, providing an overview of stem cell technologies as a source for vascular cell types and then focusing on their use in three primary areas: studies of vascular development and angiogenesis, improved disease modeling, and the engineering of vascularized constructs for tissue-level modeling and cell-based therapies. PMID:26427871

  18. Engineering Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters March 3, 2014 Engineering Cartilage Artistic rendering of human stem cells on ... situations has been a major goal in tissue engineering. Cartilage contains water, collagen, proteoglycans, and chondrocytes. Collagens ...

  19. Cell painting with an engineered EPCR to augment the protein C system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwens, Eveline A M; Stavenuiter, Fabian; Mosnier, Laurent O

    2015-11-25

    The protein C (PC) system conveys beneficial anticoagulant and cytoprotective effects in numerous in vivo disease models. The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) plays a central role in these pathways as cofactor for PC activation and by enhancing activated protein C (APC)-mediated protease-activated receptor (PAR) activation. During inflammatory disease, expression of EPCR on cell membranes is often diminished thereby limiting PC activation and APC's effects on cells. Here a caveolae-targeting glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored EPCR (EPCR-GPI) was engineered to restore EPCR's bioavailability via "cell painting." The painting efficiency of EPCR-GPI on EPCR-depleted endothelial cells was time- and dose-dependent. The EPCR-GPI bioavailability after painting was long lasting since EPCR surface levels reached 400 % of wild-type cells after 2 hours and remained > 200 % for 24 hours. EPCR-GPI painting conveyed APC binding to EPCR-depleted endothelial cells where EPCR was lost due to shedding or shRNA. EPCR painting normalised PC activation on EPCR-depleted cells indicating that EPCR-GPI is functional active on painted cells. Caveolin-1 lipid rafts were enriched in EPCR after painting due to the GPI-anchor targeting caveolae. Accordingly, EPCR painting supported PAR1 and PAR3 cleavage by APC and augmented PAR1-dependent Akt phosphorylation by APC. Thus, EPCR-GPI painting achieved physiological relevant surface levels on endothelial cells, restored APC binding to EPCR-depleted cells, supported PC activation, and enhanced APC-mediated PAR cleavage and cytoprotective signalling. Therefore, EPCR-GPI provides a novel tool to restore the bioavailability and functionality of EPCR on EPCR- depleted and -deficient cells. PMID:26272345

  20. Continuous release of interleukin 12 from microencapsulated engineered cells for colon cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Zheng; Zuo-Xiang Xiao; Yue-Long Pan; Ming-Yong Han; Qi Dong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the anti-tumor immunity against CT26 colon tumor of the microencapsulated cells modified with murine interleukine-12 (mIL-12) gene.METHODS: Mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) were stably transfected to express mIL-12 using expression plasmids carrying mIL-12 gene (p35 and p40), and NIH3T3-mIL-12cells were encapsulated in alginate microcapsules for longterm delivery of mIL-12. mIL-12 released from the microencapsulated NIH3T3-mIL-12 cells was confirmed using ELISA assay. Transplantation of the microencapsulated NIH3T3-mIL-12 cells was performed in the tumor-bearing mice with CT26 cells. The anti-tumor responses and the anti-tumor activities of the microencapsulated NIH3T3-mIL12 cells were evaluated.RESULTS: Microencapsulated NIH3T3-mIL-12 cells could release mIL-12 continuously and stably for a long time. After the microencapsulated NIH3T3-mIL-12 cells were transplanted subcutaneously into the tumor-bearing mice for 21 d, the serum concentrations of mIL-12, mIL-2 and mIFN-γ the cytotoxicity of the CTL from the splenocytes and the NK activity in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the controls. Moreover, mIL-12 released from the microencapsulated NIH3T3-mIL-12 cells resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor proliferation and a prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice.CONCLUSION: The microencapsulated NIH3T3-mIL-12cells have a significant therapeutic effect on the experimental colon tumor by activating anti-tumor immune responses in vivo. Microencapsulated and genetically engineered cells may be an extremely versatile tool for tumor gene therapy.

  1. Development of Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Genetic Engineering and Tracking of Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher; Israel, Liron Limor; Ostrovsky, Stella; Taylor, Arthur; Poptani, Harish; Lellouche, Jean-Paul; Chari, Divya

    2016-04-01

    Genetic modification of cell transplant populations and cell tracking ability are key underpinnings for effective cell therapies. Current strategies to achieve these goals utilize methods which are unsuitable for clinical translation because of related safety issues, and multiple protocol steps adding to cost and complexity. Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) offering dual mode gene delivery and imaging contrast capacity offer a valuable tool in this context. Despite their key benefits, there is a critical lack of neurocompatible and multifunctional particles described for use with transplant populations for neurological applications. Here, a systematic screen of MNPs (using a core shown to cause contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) bearing various surface chemistries (polyethylenimine (PEI) and oxidized PEI and hybrids of oxidized PEI/alginic acid, PEI/chitosan and PEI/polyamidoamine) is performed to test their ability to genetically engineer neural stem cells (NSCs; a cell population of high clinical relevance for central nervous system disorders). It is demonstrated that gene delivery to NSCs can be safely achieved using two of the developed formulations (PEI and oxPEI/alginic acid) when used in conjunction with oscillating magnetofection technology. After transfection, intracellular particles can be detected by histological procedures with labeled cells displaying contrast in MRI (for real time cell tracking). PMID:26867130

  2. A validated system for ligation-free USER™ -based assembly of expression vectors for mammalian cell engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Holm, Dorte Koefoed; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2013-01-01

    The development in the field of mammalian cell factories require fast and high-throughput methods, this means a high need for simpler and more efficient cloning techniques. For optimization of protein expression by genetic engineering and for allowing metabolic engineering in mammalian cells, a new versatile expression vector system was developed. This vector system applies the ligation-free uracilexcision cloning technique to construct mammalian expression vectors of multiple parts and with ...

  3. Functional stability of endothelial cells on a novel hybrid scaffold for vascular tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankajakshan, Divya; Krishnan, Lissy K [Thrombosis Research Unit, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojapura, Trivandrum 695 012 (India); Krishnan V, Kalliyana, E-mail: lissykk@sctimst.ac.i [Division of Polymer Technology, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojapura, Trivandrum 695 012 (India)

    2010-12-15

    Porous and pliable conduits made of biodegradable polymeric scaffolds offer great potential for the development of blood vessel substitutes but they generally lack signals for cell proliferation, survival and maintenance of a normal phenotype. In this study we have prepared and evaluated porous poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) (PCL) integrated with fibrin composite (FC) to get a biomimetic hybrid scaffold (FC PCL) with the biological properties of fibrin, fibronectin (FN), gelatin, growth factors and glycosaminoglycans. Reduced platelet adhesion on a human umbilical vein endothelial cell-seeded hybrid scaffold as compared to bare PCL or FC PCL was observed, which suggests the non-thrombogenic nature of the tissue-engineered scaffold. Analysis of real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) after 5 days of endothelial cell (EC) culture on a hybrid scaffold indicated that the prothrombotic von Willebrand factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) were quiescent and stable. Meanwhile, dynamic expressions of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase indicated the desired cell phenotype on the scaffold. On the hybrid scaffold, shear stress could induce enhanced nitric oxide release, which implicates vaso-responsiveness of EC grown on the tissue-engineered construct. Significant upregulation of mRNA for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, collagen IV and elastin, in EC was detected by RT-PCR after growing them on the hybrid scaffold and FC-coated tissue culture polystyrene (FC TCPS) but not on FN-coated TCPS. The results indicate that the FC PCL hybrid scaffold can accomplish a remodeled ECM and non-thrombogenic EC phenotype, and can be further investigated as a scaffold for cardiovascular tissue engineering. (communication)

  4. Functional stability of endothelial cells on a novel hybrid scaffold for vascular tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous and pliable conduits made of biodegradable polymeric scaffolds offer great potential for the development of blood vessel substitutes but they generally lack signals for cell proliferation, survival and maintenance of a normal phenotype. In this study we have prepared and evaluated porous poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) integrated with fibrin composite (FC) to get a biomimetic hybrid scaffold (FC PCL) with the biological properties of fibrin, fibronectin (FN), gelatin, growth factors and glycosaminoglycans. Reduced platelet adhesion on a human umbilical vein endothelial cell-seeded hybrid scaffold as compared to bare PCL or FC PCL was observed, which suggests the non-thrombogenic nature of the tissue-engineered scaffold. Analysis of real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) after 5 days of endothelial cell (EC) culture on a hybrid scaffold indicated that the prothrombotic von Willebrand factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) were quiescent and stable. Meanwhile, dynamic expressions of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase indicated the desired cell phenotype on the scaffold. On the hybrid scaffold, shear stress could induce enhanced nitric oxide release, which implicates vaso-responsiveness of EC grown on the tissue-engineered construct. Significant upregulation of mRNA for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, collagen IV and elastin, in EC was detected by RT-PCR after growing them on the hybrid scaffold and FC-coated tissue culture polystyrene (FC TCPS) but not on FN-coated TCPS. The results indicate that the FC PCL hybrid scaffold can accomplish a remodeled ECM and non-thrombogenic EC phenotype, and can be further investigated as a scaffold for cardiovascular tissue engineering. (communication)

  5. Muscle Tissue Engineering Using Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells Encapsulated in Alginate Hydrogels Containing Multiple Growth Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sahar; Chen, Chider; Xu, Xingtian; Annabi, Nasim; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Wu, Benjamin M; Khademhosseini, Ali; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2016-06-01

    Repair and regeneration of muscle tissue following traumatic injuries or muscle diseases often presents a challenging clinical situation. If a significant amount of tissue is lost the native regenerative potential of skeletal muscle will not be able to grow to fill the defect site completely. Dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in combination with appropriate scaffold material, present an advantageous alternative therapeutic option for muscle tissue engineering in comparison to current treatment modalities available. To date, there has been no report on application of gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) in three-dimensional scaffolds for muscle tissue engineering. The objectives of the current study were to develop an injectable 3D RGD-coupled alginate scaffold with multiple growth factor delivery capacity for encapsulating GMSCs, and to evaluate the capacity of encapsulated GMSCs to differentiate into myogenic tissue in vitro and in vivo where encapsulated GMSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice. The results demonstrate that after 4 weeks of differentiation in vitro, GMSCs as well as the positive control human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) exhibited muscle cell-like morphology with high levels of mRNA expression for gene markers related to muscle regeneration (MyoD, Myf5, and MyoG) via qPCR measurement. Our quantitative PCR analyzes revealed that the stiffness of the RGD-coupled alginate regulates the myogenic differentiation of encapsulated GMSCs. Histological and immunohistochemical/fluorescence staining for protein markers specific for myogenic tissue confirmed muscle regeneration in subcutaneous transplantation in our in vivo animal model. GMSCs showed significantly greater capacity for myogenic regeneration in comparison to hBMMSCs (p < 0.05). Altogether, our findings confirmed that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel with multiple growth factor delivery capacity is a promising

  6. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into neuronal cells on fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix as a tissue engineered nerve scaffold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuping Feng; Jiao Wang; Shixin Ling; Zhuo Li; Mingsheng Li; Qiongyi Li; Zongren Ma; Sijiu Yu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix as a scaffold for supporting the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into neural cells fol-lowing induction with neural differentiation medium. We performed long-term, continuous observation of cell morphology, growth, differentiation, and neuronal development using several microscopy techniques in conjunction with immunohistochemistry. We examined speciifc neu-ronal proteins and Nissl bodies involved in the differentiation process in order to determine the neuronal differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The results show that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells that differentiate on fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix display neuronal morphology with unipolar and bi/multipolar neurite elongations that express neuro-nal-speciifc proteins, includingβIII tubulin. The bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells grown on fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix and induced for long periods of time with neural differen-tiation medium differentiated into a multilayered neural network-like structure with long nerve ifbers that was composed of several parallel microifbers and neuronal cells, forming a complete neural circuit with dendrite-dendrite to axon-dendrite to dendrite-axon synapses. In addition, growth cones with filopodia were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Paraffin sec-tioning showed differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with the typical features of neuronal phenotype, such as a large, round nucleus and a cytoplasm full of Nissl bodies. The data suggest that the biological scaffold fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix is capable of supporting human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into functional neurons and the subsequent formation of tissue engineered nerve.

  7. Towards Engineered Processes for Sequencing-Based Analysis of Single Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalsteinsson, Viktor A; Love, J Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Sequencing-based analysis of single circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of metastatic cancer and improve clinical care. Technologies exist to enrich, identify, recover, and sequence single cells, but to enable systematic routine analysis of single CTCs from a range of cancer patients, there is a need to establish processes that efficiently integrate these specific operations. Such engineered processes should address challenges associated with the yield and viability of enriched CTCs, the robust identification of candidate single CTCs with minimal degradation of DNA, the bias in whole-genome amplification, and the efficient handling of candidate single CTCs or their amplified DNA products. Advances in methods for single-cell analysis and nanoscale technologies suggest opportunities to overcome these challenges, and could create integrated platforms that perform several of the unit operations together. Ultimately, technologies should be selected or adapted for optimal performance and compatibility in an integrated process. PMID:24839591

  8. Physiological, pathological, and engineered cell identity reprogramming in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Derek K; Wang, Lei-Lei; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2016-07-01

    Multipotent neural stem cells persist in restricted regions of the adult mammalian central nervous system. These proliferative cells differentiate into diverse neuron subtypes to maintain neural homeostasis. This endogenous process can be reprogrammed as a compensatory response to physiological cues, traumatic injury, and neurodegeneration. In addition to innate neurogenesis, recent research has demonstrated that new neurons can be engineered via cell identity reprogramming in non-neurogenic regions of the adult central nervous system. A comprehensive understanding of these reprogramming mechanisms will be essential to the development of therapeutic neural regeneration strategies that aim to improve functional recovery after injury and neurodegeneration. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:499-517. doi: 10.1002/wdev.234 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27258392

  9. Accelerating the Execution of Matrix Languages on the Cell Broadband Engine Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Raymes; Scholz, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Matrix languages, including MATLAB and Octave, are established standards for applications in science and engineering. They provide interactive programming environments that are easy to use due to their script languages with matrix data types. Current implementations of matrix languages do not fully utilize high-performance, special-purpose chip architectures such as the IBM PowerXCell processor (Cell), which is currently used in the fastest computer in the world. We present a new framework that extends Octave to harvest the computational power of the Cell. With this framework the programmer is alleviated of the burden of introducing explicit notions of parallelism. Instead the programmer uses a new matrix data-type to execute matrix operations in parallel on the synergistic processing elements (SPEs) of the Cell. We employ lazy evaluation semantics for our new matrix data-type to obtain execution traces of matrix operations. Traces are converted to data dependence graphs; operations in the data dependence gra...

  10. Investigation the Porous Collagen-Chitosan /Glycosaminoglycans for Corneal Cell Culture as Tissue Engineering Scaffold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qin-Hua; CHEN Jian-Su

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to produce the porous collagen-chitosan/Glycosanminglycans (GAG) for corneal ceil-seed implant as a three-dimensional tissue engineering scaffold to improve the regeneration corneas. The effect of various content of glycerol as form porous agent to collagen-chitosan/GAG preserved a porous dimensional structure was investigated. The heat-drying was used to prepare porous collagen-chitosan /GAG scaffold. The pore morphology of collagenchitosan/GAG was controlled by changing the concentration of glycerol solution and drying methods. The porous structure morphology was observed by SEM. The diameter of the pores form 10 to 50 μm. The highly porous scaffold had interconnecting pores. The corneal cell morphology was observed under the light microscope. These results suggest that collagen-chitosan/GAG showed that corneal cell have formed confluent layers and resemble the surface of normal corneal cell surface.

  11. Integrated cell and process engineering for improved transient production of a "difficult-to-express" fusion protein by CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Yusuf B; Estes, Scott D; Alves, Christina S; Sinacore, Marty S; James, David C

    2015-12-01

    Based on an optimized electroporation protocol, we designed a rapid, milliliter-scale diagnostic transient production assay to identify limitations in the ability of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to produce a model "difficult-to-express" homodimeric Fc-fusion protein, Sp35Fc, that exhibited very low volumetric titer and intracellular formation of disulfide-bonded oligomeric aggregates post-transfection. As expression of Sp35Fc induced an unfolded protein response in transfected host cells, we utilized the transient assay to compare, in parallel, multiple functionally diverse strategies to engineer intracellular processing of Sp35Fc in order to increase production and reduce aggregation as two discrete design objectives. Specifically, we compared the effect of (i) co-expression of ER-resident molecular chaperones (BiP, PDI, CypB) or active forms of UPR transactivators (ATF6c, XBP1s) at varying recombinant gene load, (ii) addition of small molecules known to act as chemical chaperones (PBA, DMSO, glycerol, betaine, TMAO) or modulate UPR signaling (PERK inhibitor GSK2606414) at varying concentration, (iii) a reduction in culture temperature to 32°C. Using this information, we designed a biphasic, Sp35Fc-specific transient manufacturing process mediated by lipofection that utilized CypB co-expression at an optimal Sp35Fc:CypB gene ratio of 5:1 to initially maximize transfected cell proliferation, followed by addition of a combination of PBA (0.5 mM) and glycerol (1% v/v) at the onset of stationary phase to maximize cell specific production and eliminate Sp35Fc aggregation. Using this optimal, engineered process transient Sp35Fc production was significantly increased sixfold over a 12 day production process with no evidence of disulfide-bonded aggregates. Finally, transient production in clonally derived sub-populations (derived from parental CHO host) screened for a heritably improved capability to produce Sp35Fc was also significantly improved by the optimized

  12. A Cell Lysis and Protein Purification - Single Molecule Assay Devices for Evaluation of Genetically Engineered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakyama, Tetsuya; Tabata, Kazuhito; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    We have developed two devices applicable to evaluate genetically engineered proteins in single molecule assay: on-chip cell lysis device, and protein purification - assay device. A motor protein, F1-ATPase expressed in E.coli, was focused in this report as a target protein. Cell lysis was simply performed by applying pulse voltage between Au electrodes patterned by photolithography, and its efficiency was determined by absorptiometry. The subsequent processes, purification and assay of extracted proteins, were demonstrated in order to detect F1-ATPase and to evaluate its activity. The specific bonding between his-tag in F1-ATPase and Ni-NTA coated on a glass surface was utilized for the purification process. After immobilization of F1-ATPase, avidin-coated microspheres and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) solution were infused sequentially to assay the protein. Microsphere rotation was realized by activity of F1-ATPase corresponding to ATP hydrolysis. Results show that the cell lysis device, at the optimum condition, extracts enough amount of protein for single molecule assay. Once cell lysate was injected to the purification - assay device, proteins were diffused in the lateral direction in a Y-shape microchannel. The gradient of protein concentratioin provides an optimal concentration for the assay i.e. the highest density of rotating beads. Density of rotating beads is also affected by the initial concentration of protein injected to the device. The optimum concentration was achieved by our cell lysis device not by the conventional method by ultrasonic wave. Rotation speed was analyzed for several microspheres assayed in the purification - assay device, and the results were compatible to that of conventional assay in which F1-ATPase was purified in bulk scale. In conclusion, we have demonstrated on-chip cell lysis and assay appropriate for the sequential analysis without any pretreatment. On-chip devices replacing conventional bioanalytical methods will be

  13. Decolorization of industrial synthetic dyes using engineered Pseudomonas putida cells with surface-immobilized bacterial laccase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial laccases are highly useful in textile effluent dye biodegradation. However, the bioavailability of cellularly expressed or purified laccases in continuous operations is usually limited by mass transfer impediment or enzyme regeneration difficulty. Therefore, this study develops a regenerable bacterial surface-displaying system for industrial synthetic dye decolorization, and evaluates its effects on independent and continuous operations. Results A bacterial laccase (WlacD was engineered onto the cell surface of the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida to construct a whole-cell biocatalyst. Ice nucleation protein (InaQ anchor was employed, and the ability of 1 to 3 tandemly aligned N-terminal repeats to direct WlacD display were compared. Immobilized WlacD was determined to be surface-displayed in functional form using Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and whole-cell enzymatic activity assay. Engineered P. putida cells were then applied to decolorize the anthraquinone dye Acid Green (AG 25 and diazo-dye Acid Red (AR 18. The results showed that decolorization of both dyes is Cu2+- and mediator-independent, with an optimum temperature of 35°C and pH of 3.0, and can be stably performed across a temperature range of 15°C to 45°C. A high activity toward AG25 (1 g/l with relative decolorization values of 91.2% (3 h and 97.1% (18 h, as well as high activity to AR18 (1 g/l by 80.5% (3 h and 89.0% (18 h, was recorded. The engineered system exhibited a comparably high activity compared with those of separate dyes in a continuous three-round shake-flask decolorization of AG25/AR18 mixed dye (each 1 g/l. No significant decline in decolorization efficacy was noted during first two-rounds but reaction equilibriums were elongated, and the residual laccase activity eventually decreased to low levels. However, the decolorizing capacity of the system was easily retrieved

  14. Biomass gasification integrated with a solid oxide fuel cell and Stirling engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated gasification solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and Stirling engine for combined heat and power application is analyzed. The target for electricity production is 120 kW. Woodchips are used as gasification feedstock to produce syngas, which is then used to feed the SOFC stacks for electricity production. Unreacted hydrocarbons remaining after the SOFC are burned in a catalytic burner, and the hot off-gases from the burner are recovered in a Stirling engine for electricity and heat production. Domestic hot water is used as a heat sink for the Stirling engine. A complete balance-of-plant is designed and suggested. Thermodynamic analysis shows that a thermal efficiency of 42.4% based on the lower heating value (LHV) can be achieved if all input parameters are selected conservatively. Different parameter studies are performed to analyze the system behavior under different conditions. The analysis shows that the decreasing number of stacks from a design viewpoint, indicating that plant efficiency decreases but power production remains nearly unchanged. Furthermore, the analysis shows that there is an optimum value for the utilization factor of the SOFC for the suggested plant design with the suggested input parameters. This optimum value is approximately 65%, which is a rather modest value for SOFC. In addition, introducing a methanator increases plant efficiency slightly. If SOFC operating temperature decreases due to new technology then plant efficiency will slightly be increased. Decreasing gasifier temperature, which cannot be controlled, causes the plant efficiency to increase also. - Highlights: • Design of integrated gasification with solid oxide fuel and Stirling engine. • Important plant parameters study. • Plant running on biomass with and without methanator. • Thermodynamics of integrated gasification SOFC-Stirling engine plants

  15. Brain microvascular endothelial cell association and distribution of a 5 nm ceria engineered nanomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mo Dan,1,2 Michael T Tseng,3 Peng Wu,4 Jason M Unrine,5 Eric A Grulke,4 Robert A Yokel1,21Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 2Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA; 3Departments of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA; 4Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, 5Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USAPurpose: Ceria engineered nanomaterials (ENMs have current commercial applications and both neuroprotective and toxic effects. Our hypothesis is that ceria ENMs can associate with brain capillary cells and/or cross the blood–brain barrier.Methods: An aqueous dispersion of ~5 nm ceria ENM was synthesized and characterized in house. Its uptake space in the Sprague Dawley rat brain was determined using the in situ brain perfusion technique at 15 and 20 mL/minute flow rates; 30, 100, and 500 µg/mL ceria perfused for 120 seconds at 20 mL/minute; and 30 µg/mL perfused for 20, 60, and 120 seconds at 20 mL/minute. The capillary depletion method and light and electron microscopy were used to determine its capillary cell and brain parenchymal association and localization.Results: The vascular space was not significantly affected by brain perfusion flow rate or ENM, demonstrating that this ceria ENM did not influence blood–brain barrier integrity. Cerium concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, were significantly higher in the choroid plexus than in eight brain regions in the 100 and 500 µg/mL ceria perfusion groups. Ceria uptake into the eight brain regions was similar after 120-second perfusion of 30, 100, and 500 µg ceria/mL. Ceria uptake space significantly increased in the eight brain regions and choroid plexus after 60 versus 20 seconds, and it was similar after 60 and 120 seconds. The capillary depletion method showed 99.4% ± 1.1% of the ceria ENM associated

  16. Multilineage co-culture of adipose-derived stem cells for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yimu; Waldman, Stephen D; Flynn, Lauren E

    2015-07-01

    Stem cell interactions through paracrine cell signalling can regulate a range of cell responses, including metabolic activity, proliferation and differentiation. Moving towards the development of optimized tissue-engineering strategies with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), the focus of this study was on developing indirect co-culture models to study the effects of mature adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts on bovine ASC multilineage differentiation. For each lineage, ASC differentiation was characterized by histology, gene expression and protein expression, in the absence of key inductive differentiation factors for the ASCs. Co-culture with each of the mature cell populations was shown to successfully induce or enhance lineage-specific differentiation of the ASCs. In general, a more homogeneous but lower-level differentiation response was observed in co-culture as compared to stimulating the bovine ASCs with inductive differentiation media. To explore the role of the Wnt canonical and non-canonical signalling pathways within the model systems, the effects of the Wnt inhibitors WIF-1 and DKK-1 on multilineage differentiation in co-culture were assessed. The data indicated that Wnt signalling may play a role in mediating ASC differentiation in co-culture with the mature cell populations. PMID:23135884

  17. Armed and accurate: engineering cytotoxic T cells for eradication of leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radic Marko

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Translational medicine depends on a rapid and efficient exchange of results between the bench and the bedside. A recent example from the field of cancer immunotherapy highlights the essential nature of this exchange. Methods have been developed to convert a patient's cytotoxic T cells into efficient and specific killers of cancer cells in patients with leukemia. By using recombinant DNA techniques, a lentiviral vector was constructed to express chimeric antigen receptors in cytotoxic T cells from patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The purpose of the chimeric receptors was to direct the cytotoxic T cell activity against cells causing the cancer. The effect of infusing the engineered T cells back into the cancer patients was tested in a Phase I trial at the University of Pennsylvania, and the initial results were described in two articles from the research team of Dr. Carl June. The remarkable success of this trial should energize further applications of biotechnology in the development of new cancer immunotherapies.

  18. Streaming Model Based Volume Ray Casting Implementation for Cell Broadband Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jusub Kim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactive high quality volume rendering is becoming increasingly more important as the amount of more complex volumetric data steadily grows. While a number of volumetric rendering techniques have been widely used, ray casting has been recognized as an effective approach for generating high quality visualization. However, for most users, the use of ray casting has been limited to datasets that are very small because of its high demands on computational power and memory bandwidth. However the recent introduction of the Cell Broadband Engine (Cell B.E. processor, which consists of 9 heterogeneous cores designed to handle extremely demanding computations with large streams of data, provides an opportunity to put the ray casting into practical use. In this paper, we introduce an efficient parallel implementation of volume ray casting on the Cell B.E. The implementation is designed to take full advantage of the computational power and memory bandwidth of the Cell B.E. using an intricate orchestration of the ray casting computation on the available heterogeneous resources. Specifically, we introduce streaming model based schemes and techniques to efficiently implement acceleration techniques for ray casting on Cell B.E. In addition to ensuring effective SIMD utilization, our method provides two key benefits: there is no cost for empty space skipping and there is no memory bottleneck on moving volumetric data for processing. Our experimental results show that we can interactively render practical datasets on a single Cell B.E. processor.

  19. Extracellular matrix of dental pulp stem cells: Applications in pulp tissue engineering using somatic MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram eRavindran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental Caries affects approximately 90% of the world’s population. At present, the clinical treatment for dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality. Tissue engineering can potentially solve this problem by enabling regeneration of a functional pulp tissue. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs have been shown to be an excellent source for pulp regeneration. However, limited availability of these cells hinders its potential for clinical translation. We have investigated the possibility of using somatic mesenchymal stem cells from other sources for dental pulp tissue regeneration using a biomimetic dental pulp extracellular matrix (ECM incorporated scaffold. Human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and human bone marrow stromal cells (HMSCs were investigated for their ability to differentiate towards an odontogenic lineage. In vitro real-time PCR results coupled with histological and immunohistochemical examination of the explanted tissues confirmed the ability of PDLSCs and HMSCs to form a vascularized pulp-like tissue. These findings indicate that the dental pulp stem derived ECM scaffold stimulated odontogenic differentiation of PDLSCs and HMSCs without the need for exogenous addition of growth and differentiation factors. This study represents a translational perspective toward possible therapeutic application of using a combination of somatic stem cells and extracellular matrix for pulp regeneration.

  20. Sensor Needs and Requirements for Fuel Cells and CIDI/SIDI Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.S.

    2000-03-01

    To reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, improve urban air quality, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, the Department of Energy (DOE) is developing advanced vehicle technologies and fuels. Enabling technologies for fuel cell power systems and direct-injection engines are being developed by DOE through the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry collaboration to produce vehicles having up to three times the fuel economy of conventional mid-size automobiles. Sensors have been identified as a research and development need for both fuel cell and direct-injection systems, because current sensor technologies do not adequately meet requirements. Sensors are needed for emission control, for passenger safety and comfort, to increase system lifetime, and for system performance enhancement through feedback and control. These proceedings document the results of a workshop to define sensor requirements for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems and direct-injection engines for automotive applications. The recommendations from this workshop will be incorporated into the multi-year R&D plan of the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies. The objectives of the workshop were to: define the requirements for sensors; establish R&D priorities; identify the technical targets and technical barriers; and facilitate collaborations among participants. The recommendations from this workshop will be incorporated into the multi-year R&D plan of the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies.

  1. Cell-mediated retraction versus hemodynamic loading - A delicate balance in tissue-engineered heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loosdregt, Inge A E W; Argento, Giulia; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Oomens, Cees W J; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2014-06-27

    Preclinical studies of tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) showed retraction of the heart valve leaflets as major failure of function mechanism. This retraction is caused by both passive and active cell stress and passive matrix stress. Cell-mediated retraction induces leaflet shortening that may be counteracted by the hemodynamic loading of the leaflets during diastole. To get insight into this stress balance, the amount and duration of stress generation in engineered heart valve tissue and the stress imposed by physiological hemodynamic loading are quantified via an experimental and a computational approach, respectively. Stress generation by cells was measured using an earlier described in vitro model system, mimicking the culture process of TEHVs. The stress imposed by the blood pressure during diastole on a valve leaflet was determined using finite element modeling. Results show that for both pulmonary and systemic pressure, the stress imposed on the TEHV leaflets is comparable to the stress generated in the leaflets. As the stresses are of similar magnitude, it is likely that the imposed stress cannot counteract the generated stress, in particular when taking into account that hemodynamic loading is only imposed during diastole. This study provides a rational explanation for the retraction found in preclinical studies of TEHVs and represents an important step towards understanding the retraction process seen in TEHVs by a combined experimental and computational approach. PMID:24268314

  2. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki eYoshida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications.

  3. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications. PMID:24098302

  4. Algebra task & drill sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2011-01-01

    For grades 3-5, our State Standards-based combined resource meets the algebraic concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills. Included are opportunities for problem-solving, patterning, algebraic graphing, equations and determining averages. The combined task & drill sheets

  5. Algebra task & drill sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2011-01-01

    For grades 6-8, our State Standards-based combined resource meets the algebraic concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills. Included are opportunities for problem-solving, patterning, algebraic graphing, equations and determining averages. The combined task & drill sheets

  6. Engineering of silicon surfaces at the micro- and nanoscales for cell adhesion and migration control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Costa V

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vicente Torres-Costa1, Gonzalo Martínez-Muñoz2, Vanessa Sánchez-Vaquero3, Álvaro Muñoz-Noval1, Laura González-Méndez3, Esther Punzón-Quijorna1,4, Darío Gallach-Pérez1, Miguel Manso-Silván1, Aurelio Climent-Font1,4, Josefa P García-Ruiz3, Raúl J Martín-Palma11Department of Applied Physics, 2Department of Computer Science, 3Department of Molecular Biology, 4Centre for Micro Analysis of Materials, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The engineering of surface patterns is a powerful tool for analyzing cellular communication factors involved in the processes of adhesion, migration, and expansion, which can have a notable impact on therapeutic applications including tissue engineering. In this regard, the main objective of this research was to fabricate patterned and textured surfaces at micron- and nanoscale levels, respectively, with very different chemical and topographic characteristics to control cell–substrate interactions. For this task, one-dimensional (1-D and two-dimensional (2-D patterns combining silicon and nanostructured porous silicon were engineered by ion beam irradiation and subsequent electrochemical etch. The experimental results show that under the influence of chemical and morphological stimuli, human mesenchymal stem cells polarize and move directionally toward or away from the particular stimulus. Furthermore, a computational model was developed aiming at understanding cell behavior by reproducing the surface distribution and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells observed experimentally.Keywords: surface patterns, silicon, hMSCs, ion-beam patterning

  7. A bioactive hybrid three-dimensional tissue-engineering construct for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainola, Mari; Tomaszewski, Waclaw; Ostrowska, Barbara; Wesolowska, Ewa; Wagner, H Daniel; Swieszkowski, Wojciech; Sillat, Tarvo; Peltola, Emilia; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to develop a hybrid three-dimensional-tissue engineering construct for chondrogenesis. The hypothesis was that they support chondrogenesis. A biodegradable, highly porous polycaprolactone-grate was produced by solid freeform fabrication. The polycaprolactone support was coated with a chitosan/polyethylene oxide nanofibre sheet produced by electrospinning. Transforming growth factor-β3-induced chondrogenesis was followed using the following markers: sex determining region Y/-box 9, runt-related transcription factor 2 and collagen II and X in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, histology and immunostaining. A polycaprolactone-grate and an optimized chitosan/polyethylene oxide nanofibre sheet supported cellular aggregation, chondrogenesis and matrix formation. In tissue engineering constructs, the sheets were seeded first with mesenchymal stem cells and then piled up according to the lasagne principle. The advantages of such a construct are (1) the cells do not need to migrate to the tissue engineering construct and therefore pore size and interconnectivity problems are omitted and (2) the cell-tight nanofibre sheet and collagen-fibre network mimic a cell culture platform for mesenchymal stem cells/chondrocytes (preventing escape) and hinders in-growth of fibroblasts and fibrous scarring (preventing capture). This allows time for the slowly progressing, multiphase true cartilage regeneration. PMID:26341661

  8. Cell Break: How Cell-Free Biology Is Finally Putting the Engineering Back in Bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, the California-based company Genomatica reported its success in rigging Escherichia coli microbes to convert sugar into the industrial chemical 1,4-butanediol (BDO). It was a feat of metabolic engineering: BDO is a key ingredient in the production of goods like running shoes, solvents, and spandex. At the time of the company?s announcement, 2.8 billion tons of BDO were produced every year in a multistep, fossil fuel-based process. Genomatica?s system neatly reduced all of that into a cheap, sustainable, one-step fermentation process. The company spent another year refining its technique and finally went commercial with the platform in late 2012. From start to commercialization, the process took about five years. PMID:26978845

  9. HRSA Data Fact Sheets

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Data Fact Sheets provide summary data about HRSA’s activities in each Congressional District, County, State,...

  10. Polarised light sheet tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidt, Sascha L; O'Brien, Daniel J; Wood, Kenneth; MacDonald, Michael P

    2016-05-16

    The various benefits of light sheet microscopy have made it a widely used modality for capturing three-dimensional images. It is mostly used for fluorescence imaging, but recently another technique called light sheet tomography solely relying on scattering was presented. The method was successfully applied to imaging of plant roots in transparent soil, but is limited when it comes to more turbid samples. This study presents a polarised light sheet tomography system and its advantages when imaging in highly scattering turbid media. The experimental configuration is guided by Monte Carlo radiation transfer methods, which model the propagation of a polarised light sheet in the sample. Images of both reflecting and absorbing phantoms in a complex collagenous matrix were acquired, and the results for different polarisation configurations are compared. Focus scanning methods were then used to reduce noise and produce three-dimensional reconstructions of absorbing targets. PMID:27409945

  11. Global ice sheet modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed

  12. Ovarian Cancer Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... widgets/current/fahc.html/ Search Share Embed Ovarian cancer fact sheet Ovarian cancer is cancer that begins in the ovaries. ... make female hormones and produce a woman's eggs. Ovarian cancer is a serious cancer that is more ...

  13. Engine-integrated solid oxide fuel cells for efficient electrical power generation on aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Daniel F.; Cadou, Christopher P.

    2015-06-01

    This work investigates the use of engine-integrated catalytic partial oxidation (CPOx) reactors and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to reduce fuel burn in vehicles with large electrical loads like sensor-laden unmanned air vehicles. Thermodynamic models of SOFCs, CPOx reactors, and three gas turbine (GT) engine types (turbojet, combined exhaust turbofan, separate exhaust turbofan) are developed and checked against relevant data and source material. Fuel efficiency is increased by 4% and 8% in the 50 kW and 90 kW separate exhaust turbofan systems respectively at only modest cost in specific power (8% and 13% reductions respectively). Similar results are achieved in other engine types. An additional benefit of hybridization is the ability to provide more electric power (factors of 3 or more in some cases) than generator-based systems before encountering turbine inlet temperature limits. A sensitivity analysis shows that the most important parameters affecting the system's performance are operating voltage, percent fuel oxidation, and SOFC assembly air flows. Taken together, this study shows that it is possible to create a GT-SOFC hybrid where the GT mitigates balance of plant losses and the SOFC raises overall system efficiency. The result is a synergistic system with better overall performance than stand-alone components.

  14. Protein-engineered block-copolymers as stem cell delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilshorn, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising therapy for a myriad of debilitating diseases and injuries; however, current delivery protocols are inadequate. Transplantation by direct injection, which is clinically preferred for its minimal invasiveness, commonly results in less than 5% cell viability, greatly inhibiting clinical outcomes. We demonstrate that mechanical membrane disruption results in significant acute loss of viability at clinically relevant injection rates. As a strategy to protect cells from these damaging forces, we show that cell encapsulation within hydrogels of specific mechanical properties will significantly improve viability. Building on these fundamental studies, we have designed a reproducible, bio-resorbable, customizable hydrogel using protein-engineering technology. In our Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogel (MITCH), network assembly is driven by specific and stoichiometric peptide-peptide binding interactions. By integrating protein science methodologies with simple polymer physics models, we manipulate the polypeptide chain interactions and demonstrate the direct ability to tune the network crosslinking density, sol-gel phase behavior, and gel mechanics. This is in contrast to many other physical hydrogels, where predictable tuning of bulk mechanics from the molecular level remains elusive due to the reliance on non-specific and non-stoichiometric chain interactions for network formation. Furthermore, the hydrogel network can be easily modified to deliver a variety of bioactive payloads including growth factors, peptide drugs, and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Through a series of in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrate that these materials may significantly improve transplanted stem cell retention and function.

  15. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reendothelialize Porcine Heart Valve Scaffolds: Novel Perspectives in Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanuti, Paola; Serafini, Francesco; Pierdomenico, Laura; Simeone, Pasquale; Bologna, Giuseppina; Ercolino, Eva; Di Silvestre, Sara; Guarnieri, Simone; Canosa, Carlo; Impicciatore, Gianna Gabriella; Chiarini, Stella; Magnacca, Francesco; Mariggiò, Maria Addolorata; Pandolfi, Assunta; Marchisio, Marco; Di Giammarco, Gabriele; Miscia, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Heart valve diseases are usually treated by surgical intervention addressed for the replacement of the damaged valve with a biosynthetic or mechanical prosthesis. Although this approach guarantees a good quality of life for patients, it is not free from drawbacks (structural deterioration, nonstructural dysfunction, and reintervention). To overcome these limitations, the heart valve tissue engineering (HVTE) is developing new strategies to synthesize novel types of valve substitutes, by identifying efficient sources of both ideal scaffolds and cells. In particular, a natural matrix, able to interact with cellular components, appears to be a suitable solution. On the other hand, the well-known Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs) plasticity, regenerative abilities, and their immunomodulatory capacities make them highly promising for HVTE applications. In the present study, we investigated the possibility to use porcine valve matrix to regenerate in vitro the valve endothelium by WJ-MSCs differentiated along the endothelial lineage, paralleled with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), used as positive control. Here, we were able to successfully decellularize porcine heart valves, which were then recellularized with both differentiated-WJ-MSCs and HUVECs. Data demonstrated that both cell types were able to reconstitute a cellular monolayer. Cells were able to positively interact with the natural matrix and demonstrated the surface expression of typical endothelial markers. Altogether, these data suggest that the interaction between a biological scaffold and WJ-MSCs allows the regeneration of a morphologically well-structured endothelium, opening new perspectives in the field of HVTE. PMID:26309804

  16. THE FUNCTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS OF A CELL-ENGINEERED CONSTRUCT FOR THE REGENERATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Sevastianov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is an analysis of the functional effectiveness of a biomedical cell product consisting of a biopolymer microheterogeneous collagen-containing hydrogel (BMCH, human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hADMSCs, and chondrogenic induction medium in the regeneration of articular cartilage. Materials and methods. The test model of the adjuvant arthritis was used (female Soviet Chinchilla rabbits with the further development into osteoarthrosis (OA combined with the clinical, biochemical, radiological, and histochemical trials. Results. On Day 92 of the OA model it has been found that the intra-articular introduction of a BMCH with hADMSCs into the left knee joint (n = 3 30 days after the OA modeling, as opposed to the right joint (negative control, n = 3, stimulates the regenerative processes of the cartilaginous tissue structure characterized by the formation of chondrocyte «columns», the emergence of isogenic groups in the intracellular matrix and the regeneration of its structure. Upon the intra-articular introduction of a BMCH (n = 3 such effects are markedly less pronounced. Conclusions. A significant regenerative potential of a cell-engineered construct of human articular tissue (CEC ATh has been proven. It is possible to presume that biostimulating properties of CEC ATh are due to the activating effect of a biomedical cell product on the stem cell migration processes from the surrounding tissue into the injured area with their subsequent differentiation. 

  17. 3D Printing of Scaffold for Cells Delivery: Advances in Skin Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury or damage to tissue and organs is a major health problem, resulting in about half of the world’s annual healthcare expenditure every year. Advances in the fields of stem cells (SCs and biomaterials processing have provided a tremendous leap for researchers to manipulate the dynamics between these two, and obtain a skin substitute that can completely heal the wounded areas. Although wound healing needs a coordinated interplay between cells, extracellular proteins and growth factors, the most important players in this process are the endogenous SCs, which activate the repair cascade by recruiting cells from different sites. Extra cellular matrix (ECM proteins are activated by these SCs, which in turn aid in cellular migrations and finally secretion of growth factors that can seal and heal the wounds. The interaction between ECM proteins and SCs helps the skin to sustain the rigors of everyday activity, and in an attempt to attain this level of functionality in artificial three-dimensional (3D constructs, tissue engineered biomaterials are fabricated using more advanced techniques such as bioprinting and laser assisted printing of the organs. This review provides a concise summary of the most recent advances that have been made in the area of polymer bio-fabrication using 3D bio printing used for encapsulating stem cells for skin regeneration. The focus of this review is to describe, in detail, the role of 3D architecture and arrangement of cells within this system that can heal wounds and aid in skin regeneration.

  18. Are Graphene Sheets Stable?

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, N.

    2007-01-01

    The answer to the title question is yes and the sheets exhibit diffraction peaks but may not have long range crystalline order. This is not a trivial question and answer and is immersing in the very active field now days of the study of properties of graphite and specially of graphene. This note is motivated in fact by a recent paper by Meyer et al (1) on the structure of suspended graphene sheets.

  19. Energy information sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the public. The Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide general information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption, and capability. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering of CHO cell factories: application and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jae Seong; Grav, Lise Marie; Lewis, Nathan E.;

    2015-01-01

    repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system enables rapid,easy and efficient engineering of mammalian genomes. It has a wide range of applications frommodification of individual genes to genome-wide screening or regulation of genes. Facile genomeediting using CRISPR/Cas9 empowers...... researchers in the CHO community to elucidate the mechanisticbasis behind high level production of proteins and product quality attributes of interest. Inthis review, we describe the basis of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing and its applicationfor development of next generation CHO cell factories while...... highlighting both future perspectivesand challenges. As one of the main drivers for the CHO systems biology era, genome engineeringwith CRISPR/Cas9 will pave the way for rational design of CHO cell factories....

  1. Immobilized WNT Proteins Act as a Stem Cell Niche for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Lowndes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The timing, location, and level of WNT signaling are highly regulated during embryonic development and for the maintenance of adult tissues. Consequently the ability to provide a defined and directed source of WNT proteins is crucial to fully understand its role in tissue development and to mimic its activity in vitro. Here we describe a one-step immobilization technique to covalently bind WNT3A proteins as a basal surface with easy storage and long-lasting activity. We show that this platform is able to maintain adult and embryonic stem cells while also being adaptable for 3D systems. Therefore, this platform could be used for recapitulating specific stem cell niches with the goal of improving tissue engineering.

  2. Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed: A Facility for Space Calibration and Measurement of Solar Cells on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Jenkins, Phillip; Sexton, J. Andrew; Scheiman, David; Christie, Robert; Charpie, James; Gerber, Scott S.; Johnson, D. Bruce

    2001-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed ("PET") is a facility to be flown on the International Space Station to perform calibration, measurement, and qualification of solar cells in the space environment and then returning the cells to Earth for laboratory use. PET will allow rapid turnaround testing of new photovoltaic technology under AM0 conditions.

  3. Acute pergolide exposure stiffens engineered valve interstitial cell tissues and reduces contractility in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capulli, Andrew K; MacQueen, Luke A; O'Connor, Blakely B; Dauth, Stephanie; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    Medications based on ergoline-derived dopamine and serotonin agonists are associated with off-target toxicities that include valvular heart disease (VHD). Reports of drug-induced VHD resulted in the withdrawal of appetite suppressants containing fenfluramine and phentermine from the US market in 1997 and pergolide, a Parkinson's disease medication, in 2007. Recent evidence suggests that serotonin receptor activity affected by these medications modulates cardiac valve interstitial cell activation and subsequent valvular remodeling, which can lead to cardiac valve fibrosis and dysfunction similar to that seen in carcinoid heart disease. Failure to identify these risks prior to market and continued use of similar drugs reaffirm the need to improve preclinical evaluation of drug-induced VHD. Here, we present two complimentary assays to measure stiffness and contractile stresses generated by engineered valvular tissues in vitro. As a case study, we measured the effects of acute (24 h) pergolide exposure to engineered porcine aortic valve interstitial cell (AVIC) tissues. Pergolide exposure led to increased tissue stiffness, but it decreased both basal and active contractile tone stresses generated by AVIC tissues. Pergolide exposure also disrupted AVIC tissue organization (i.e., tissue anisotropy), suggesting that the mechanical properties and contractile functionality of these tissues are governed by their ability to maintain their structure. We expect further use of these assays to identify off-target drug effects that alter the phenotypic balance of AVICs, disrupt their ability to maintain mechanical homeostasis, and lead to VHD. PMID:27174867

  4. Before the endless forms: embodied model of transition from single cells to aggregates to ecosystem engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Ricard V; Valverde, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of complex multicellular systems and their associated developmental programs is one of the major problems of evolutionary biology. The advantages of cooperation over individuality seem well known but it is not clear yet how such increase of complexity emerged from unicellular life forms. Current multicellular systems display a complex cell-cell communication machinery, often tied to large-scale controls of body size or tissue homeostasis. Some unicellular life forms are simpler and involve groups of cells cooperating in a tissue-like fashion, as it occurs with biofilms. However, before true gene regulatory interactions were widespread and allowed for controlled changes in cell phenotypes, simple cellular colonies displaying adhesion and interacting with their environments were in place. In this context, models often ignore the physical embedding of evolving cells, thus leaving aside a key component. The potential for evolving pre-developmental patterns is a relevant issue: how far a colony of evolving cells can go? Here we study these pre-conditions for morphogenesis by using CHIMERA, a physically embodied computational model of evolving virtual organisms in a pre-Mendelian world. Starting from a population of identical, independent cells moving in a fluid, the system undergoes a series of changes, from spatial segregation, increased adhesion and the development of generalism. Eventually, a major transition occurs where a change in the flow of nutrients is triggered by a sub-population. This ecosystem engineering phenomenon leads to a subsequent separation of the ecological network into two well defined compartments. The relevance of these results for evodevo and its potential ecological triggers is discussed. PMID:23596506

  5. Robot automated EMPT sheet welding

    OpenAIRE

    Pasquale, Pablo; Schäfer, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Many industrial applications require sheet to sheet or sheet to tube joints. The electromagnetic pulse technology is capable to produce these kinds of joints. In literature many examples of sheet to sheet solid state welding between similar and dissimilar metals are presented and analyzed in detail. However, the most of the presented welding applications, which are very focussed on the academic level, are simple specimens for example for tensile test. These specimens are usuall...

  6. 324 Radiochemical engineering cells and high level vault tanks mixed waste compliance status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 324 Building in the Hanford 300 Area contains Radiochemical Engineering Cells and High Level Vault tanks (the open-quotes REC/HLVclose quotes) for research and development activities involving radioactive materials. Radioactive mixed waste within this research installation, found primarily in B-Cell and three of the high level vault tanks, is subject to RCRA/DWR (open-quotes RCRAclose quotes) regulations for storage. This white paper provides a baseline RCRA compliance summary of MW management in the REC/HLV, based on best available knowledge. The REC/HLV compliance project, of which this paper is a part, is intended to achieve the highest degree of compliance practicable given the special technical difficulties of managing high activity radioactive materials, and to assure protection of human health and safety and the environment. The REC/HLV was constructed in 1965 to strict standards for the safe management of highly radioactive materials. Mixed waste in the REC/HLV consists of discarded tools and equipment, dried feed stock from nuclear waste melting experiments, contaminated particulate matter, and liquid feed stock from various experimental programs in the vault tanks. B-Cell contains most of these materials. Total radiological inventory in B-Cell is estimated at 3 MCi, about half of which is potentially open-quotes dispersibleclose quotes, that is, it is in small pieces or mobile particles. Most of the mixed waste currently in the REC/HLV was generated or introduced before mixed wastes were subjected to RCRA in 1987

  7. Direct Mechanical Stimulation of Stem Cells: A Beating Electromechanically Active Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmi, Amy; Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; de Muinck, Ebo; Los, Marek; Rafat, Mehrdad; Jager, Edwin W H

    2016-06-01

    The combination of stem cell therapy with a supportive scaffold is a promising approach to improving cardiac tissue engineering. Stem cell therapy can be used to repair nonfunctioning heart tissue and achieve myocardial regeneration, and scaffold materials can be utilized in order to successfully deliver and support stem cells in vivo. Current research describes passive scaffold materials; here an electroactive scaffold that provides electrical, mechanical, and topographical cues to induced human pluripotent stem cells (iPS) is presented. The poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) fiber scaffold coated with conductive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) is capable of delivering direct electrical and mechanical stimulation to the iPS. The electroactive scaffolds demonstrate no cytotoxic effects on the iPS as well as an increased expression of cardiac markers for both stimulated and unstimulated protocols. This study demonstrates the first application of PPy as a supportive electroactive material for iPS and the first development of a fiber scaffold capable of dynamic mechanical actuation. PMID:27126086

  8. Optimal Design of Sheet Pile Wall Embedded in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manas Ranjan; Das, Sarat Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Sheet pile wall is a type of flexible earth retaining structure used in waterfront offshore structures, river protection work and temporary supports in foundations and excavations. Economy is an essential part of a good engineering design and needs to be considered explicitly in obtaining an optimum section. By considering appropriate embedment depth and sheet pile section it may be possible to achieve better economy. This paper describes optimum design of both cantilever and anchored sheet pile wall penetrating clay using a simple optimization tool Microsoft Excel ® Solver. The detail methodology and its application with examples are presented for cantilever and anchored sheet piles. The effects of soil properties, depth of penetration and variation of ground water table on the optimum design are also discussed. Such a study will help professional while designing the sheet pile wall penetrating clay.

  9. Analyzing Biological Performance of 3D-Printed, Cell-Impregnated Hybrid Constructs for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Chang, Tuanjie; Kulyk, William; Chen, Xiongbiao; Eames, B Frank

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting of hybrid constructs is a promising biofabrication method for cartilage tissue engineering because a synthetic polymer framework and cell-impregnated hydrogel provide structural and biological features of cartilage, respectively. During bioprinting, impregnated cells may be subjected to high temperatures (caused by the adjacent melted polymer) and process-induced mechanical forces, potentially compromising cell function. This study addresses these biofabrication issues, evaluating the heat distribution of printed polycaprolactone (PCL) strands and the rheological property and structural stability of alginate hydrogels at various temperatures and concentrations. The biocompatibility of parameters from these studies was tested by culturing 3D hybrid constructs bioprinted with primary cells from embryonic chick cartilage. During initial two-dimensional culture expansion of these primary cells, two morphologically and molecularly distinct cell populations ("rounded" and "fibroblastic") were isolated. The biological performance of each population was evaluated in 3D hybrid constructs separately. The cell viability, proliferation, and cartilage differentiation were observed at high levels in hybrid constructs of both cell populations, confirming the validity of these 3D bioprinting parameters for effective cartilage tissue engineering. Statistically significant performance variations were observed, however, between the rounded and fibroblastic cell populations. Molecular and morphological data support the notion that such performance differences may be attributed to the relative differentiation state of rounded versus fibroblastic cells (i.e., differentiated chondrocytes vs. chondroprogenitors, respectively), which is a relevant issue for cell-based tissue engineering strategies. Taken together, our study demonstrates that bioprinting 3D hybrid constructs of PCL and cell-impregnated alginate hydrogel is a promising approach for

  10. The Future of Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering in Cardiovascular Disease: The New Era of Biological Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh; Nsair, Ali; Beygui, Ramin E.; Shemin, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    The use of living cells as a therapeutic option presents several challenges including identification of a suitable source, development of adequate derivation, maintenance and differentiation methods, and very importantly proof of safety and efficacy. One of the major issues for cardiovascular tissue engineering is determining the ideal cell type for use in regenerative therapies.Many clinical trials have used bone marrow derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNC) (Schächinger V 2006). These clinical ...

  11. Impairments of cells and genomic DNA by environmentally transformed engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Philip; Sugino, Sakiko; Yamamura, Shohei; Lacy, Fred; Biju, Vasudevanpillai

    2013-09-01

    Enormous increase in the production of nanomaterials and their growing applications in the device technology, biotechnology and biomedical areas suggest the need for developing models for predicting the environmental health and safety (EHS) risks posed by such nanomaterials. We hypothesize that CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) encompassed in liposomes or not and transformed by simulated solar UV light can be model systems for studying the environmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cells (H1650) are exposed to photoirradiated CdSe QDs or ZnO nanopowder included or not in liposomes. The release of cadmium and zinc ions from the nanomaterials exposed to solar simulated UV radiation is detected and quantified by measuring the steady-state and time resolved fluorescence of the metal ion sensor tetracarboxyphenylporphyrin (TCPP) or the commercial Measure iT Pd/Cd sensor. Viability of cells treated with nanomaterials exposed to solar simulated UV radiation for different durations is measured by MTT assay. Enhanced etching of the nanoparticles exposed to solar simulated UV radiation results in the release of toxic levels of heavy metal ions, which considerably lower the viability of H1650 cells is due to the deactivation of DNA repair enzymes as evidenced by the pinching off of nuclear DNA in comet assays and DNA samples in electrophoresis. Results from this study highlight the need to obtain not only quantitative information about the environmental risks posed by engineered nanomaterials but also environment friendly nanomaterials for practical applications.Enormous increase in the production of nanomaterials and their growing applications in the device technology, biotechnology and biomedical areas suggest the need for developing models for predicting the environmental health and safety (EHS) risks posed by such nanomaterials. We hypothesize that CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and ZnO nanoparticles

  12. Stem cell differentiation on electrospun nanofibrous substrates for vascular tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Lin [Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, No. 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai 201620 (China); Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, E3-05-14, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Prabhakaran, Molamma P., E-mail: nnimpp@nus.edu.sg [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, E3-05-14, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Qin, Xiaohong, E-mail: xhqin@dhu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, No. 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai 201620 (China); Ramakrishna, Seeram [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, E3-05-14, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2013-12-01

    Nanotechnology has enabled the engineering of a variety of materials to meet the current challenges and requirements in vascular tissue regeneration. In our study, poly-L-lactide (PLLA) and hybrid PLLA/collagen (PLLA/Coll) nanofibers (3:1 and 1:1) with fiber diameters of 210 to 430 nm were fabricated by electrospinning. Their morphological, chemical and mechanical characterizations were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), and tensile instrument, respectively. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on electrospun nanofibers that are capable of differentiating into vascular cells have great potential for repair of the vascular system. We investigated the potential of MSCs for vascular cell differentiation in vitro on electrospun PLLA/Coll nanofibrous scaffolds using endothelial differentiation media. After 20 days of culture, MSC proliferation on PLLA/Coll(1:1) scaffolds was found 256% higher than the cell proliferation on PLLA scaffolds. SEM images showed that the MSC differentiated endothelial cells on PLLA/Coll scaffolds showed cobblestone morphology in comparison to the fibroblastic type of undifferentiated MSCs. The functionality of the cells in the presence of ‘endothelial induction media’, was further demonstrated from the immunocytochemical analysis, where the MSCs on PLLA/Coll (1:1) scaffolds differentiated to endothelial cells and expressed the endothelial cell specific proteins such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 or CD31) and Von Willebrand factor (vWF). From the results of the SEM analysis and protein expression studies, we concluded that the electrospun PLLA/Coll nanofibers could mimic the native vascular ECM environment and might be promising substrates for potential application towards vascular regeneration. - Highlights: • PLLA and PLLA/Coll nanofibers were electrospun. • Incorporation of collagen reduced fiber

  13. Stem cell differentiation on electrospun nanofibrous substrates for vascular tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanotechnology has enabled the engineering of a variety of materials to meet the current challenges and requirements in vascular tissue regeneration. In our study, poly-L-lactide (PLLA) and hybrid PLLA/collagen (PLLA/Coll) nanofibers (3:1 and 1:1) with fiber diameters of 210 to 430 nm were fabricated by electrospinning. Their morphological, chemical and mechanical characterizations were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), and tensile instrument, respectively. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on electrospun nanofibers that are capable of differentiating into vascular cells have great potential for repair of the vascular system. We investigated the potential of MSCs for vascular cell differentiation in vitro on electrospun PLLA/Coll nanofibrous scaffolds using endothelial differentiation media. After 20 days of culture, MSC proliferation on PLLA/Coll(1:1) scaffolds was found 256% higher than the cell proliferation on PLLA scaffolds. SEM images showed that the MSC differentiated endothelial cells on PLLA/Coll scaffolds showed cobblestone morphology in comparison to the fibroblastic type of undifferentiated MSCs. The functionality of the cells in the presence of ‘endothelial induction media’, was further demonstrated from the immunocytochemical analysis, where the MSCs on PLLA/Coll (1:1) scaffolds differentiated to endothelial cells and expressed the endothelial cell specific proteins such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 or CD31) and Von Willebrand factor (vWF). From the results of the SEM analysis and protein expression studies, we concluded that the electrospun PLLA/Coll nanofibers could mimic the native vascular ECM environment and might be promising substrates for potential application towards vascular regeneration. - Highlights: • PLLA and PLLA/Coll nanofibers were electrospun. • Incorporation of collagen reduced fiber

  14. Interface Engineering of Organic Schottky Barrier Solar Cells and Its Application in Enhancing Performances of Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fangming; Su, Zisheng; Chu, Bei; Cheng, Pengfei; Wang, Junbo; Zhao, Haifeng; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Xingwu; Li, Wenlian

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we describe the performance of organic Schottky barrier solar cells with the structure of ITO/molybdenum oxide (MoOx)/boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen)/Al. The SubPc-based Schottky barrier solar cells exhibited a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.59 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.06 V, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.82% under simulated AM1.5 G solar illumination at 100 mW/cm2. Device performance was substantially enhanced by simply inserting thin organic hole transport material into the interface of MoOx and SubPc. The optimized devices realized a 180% increase in PCE of 2.30% and a peak Voc as high as 1.45 V was observed. We found that the improvement is due to the exciton and electron blocking effect of the interlayer and its thickness plays a vital role in balancing charge separation and suppressing quenching effect. Moreover, applying such interface engineering into MoOx/SubPc/C60 based planar heterojunction cells substantially enhanced the PCE of the device by 44%, from 3.48% to 5.03%. Finally, we also investigated the requirements of the interface material for Schottky barrier modification.

  15. Interface Engineering of Organic Schottky Barrier Solar Cells and Its Application in Enhancing Performances of Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fangming; Su, Zisheng; Chu, Bei; Cheng, Pengfei; Wang, Junbo; Zhao, Haifeng; Gao, Yuan; Yan, Xingwu; Li, Wenlian

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe the performance of organic Schottky barrier solar cells with the structure of ITO/molybdenum oxide (MoOx)/boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen)/Al. The SubPc-based Schottky barrier solar cells exhibited a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.59 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.06 V, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.82% under simulated AM1.5 G solar illumination at 100 mW/cm2. Device performance was substantially enhanced by simply inserting thin organic hole transport material into the interface of MoOx and SubPc. The optimized devices realized a 180% increase in PCE of 2.30% and a peak Voc as high as 1.45 V was observed. We found that the improvement is due to the exciton and electron blocking effect of the interlayer and its thickness plays a vital role in balancing charge separation and suppressing quenching effect. Moreover, applying such interface engineering into MoOx/SubPc/C60 based planar heterojunction cells substantially enhanced the PCE of the device by 44%, from 3.48% to 5.03%. Finally, we also investigated the requirements of the interface material for Schottky barrier modification. PMID:27185635

  16. Using qualimetric engineering and extremal analysis to optimize a proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We consider the optimal configuration of a PEMFC stack. • We utilize qualimetric engineering tools (Taguchi screening, regression analysis). • We achieve analytical solution on a restructured power-law fitting. • We discuss the Pt-cost involvement in the unit and area minimization scope. - Abstract: The optimal configuration of the proton exchange membrane fuel-cell (PEMFC) stack has received attention recently because of its potential use as an isolated energy distributor for household needs. In this work, the original complex problem for generating an optimal PEMFC stack based on the number of cell units connected in series and parallel arrangements as well as on the cell area is revisited. A qualimetric engineering strategy is formulated which is based on quick profiling the PEMFC stack voltage response. Stochastic screening is initiated by employing an L9(33) Taguchi-type OA for partitioning numerically the deterministic expression of the output PEMFC stack voltage such that to facilitate the sizing of the magnitude of the individual effects. The power and current household specifications for the stack system are maintained at the typical settings of 200 W at 12 V, respectively. The minimization of the stack total-area requirement becomes explicit in this work. The relationship of cell voltage against cell area is cast into a power-law model by regression fitting that achieves a coefficient of determination value of 99.99%. Thus, the theoretical formulation simplifies into a non-linear extremal problem with a constrained solution due to a singularity which is solved analytically. The optimal solution requires 22 cell units connected in series where each unit is designed with an area value of 151.4 cm2. It is also demonstrated how to visualize the optimal solution using the graphical method of operating lines. The total area of 3270.24 cm2 becomes a new benchmark for the optimal design of the studied PEMFC stack configuration. It is

  17. Scaffold- and Cell System-Based Bone Grafts in Tissue Engineering (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsova D.S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The review considers the current trends in tissue engineering including maxillofacial surgery based on the use of scaffolds, autologous stem cells and bioactive substances. The authors have shown the advantages and disadvantages of basic materials used for scaffold synthesis — three-dimensional porous or fiber matrices serving as a mechanical frame for cells; among such materials there are natural polymers (collagen, cellulose, fibronectin, chitosan, alginate and agarose, fibroin, synthetic polymers (polylactide, polyglycolide, polycaprolactone, polyvinyl alcohol and bioceramics (hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate and bioactive glasses. There have been demonstrated the matrix techniques, special attention being paid to innovative technologies of rapid prototyping — the process of 3D-imaging according to a digital model. The most applicable of these techniques for biopolymers are laser stereolithography, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modeling, and 3D-printing. Great emphasis has been put on the use of bioactive substances in the process of obtaining scaffold-based bioengineered constructions — setting of stem cells on matrices before their transplantation to the defect area. Special attention has been given to a current trend of cellular biology — the application of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (most common marrow cells used in bone tissue regeneration, in particular, the available sources of their isolation and the variants of directed osteogenic differentiation have been presented. The review covers the characteristics and aims of bioactive substance inclusion in scaffold structure — not only to induce osteogenic differentiation, but also to attract new stem cells of a carrier, as well as promote angiogenesis.

  18. Material Characterization for FEM Simulation of Sheet Metal Stamping Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Quesada; Antonio Gauchia; Carolina Álvarez-Caldas; José Luis San Román

    2014-01-01

    Sheet metal forming is an important technology in manufacturing, especially in the automotive industry. Today, engineering simulation tools based on the finite elements method are employed regularly in the design of stamping dies for sheet metal parts. However, a bad material model choice or the use of nonaccurate enough parameters can lead to imprecise simulation results. This work uses ANSYS LS-DYNA software to analyze several material models and the influence of their parameter values in F...

  19. Role of metal/silicon semiconductor contact engineering for enhanced output current in micro-sized microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2013-11-25

    We show that contact engineering plays an important role to extract the maximum performance from energy harvesters like microbial fuel cells (MFCs). We experimented with Schottky and Ohmic methods of fabricating contact areas on silicon in an MFC contact material study. We utilized the industry standard contact material, aluminum, as well as a metal, whose silicide has recently been recognized for its improved performance in smallest scale integration requirements, cobalt. Our study shows that improvements in contact engineering are not only important for device engineering but also for microsystems. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Microbial desalination cell for enhanced biodegradation of waste engine oil using a novel bacterial strain Bacillus subtilis moh3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabina, K; Fayidh, Mohammed A; Archana, G; Sivarajan, M; Babuskin, S; Babu, P Azhagu Saravana; Radha, K Krishnan; Sukumar, M

    2014-01-01

    Microbial desalination cell (MDC) is a bioelectrochemical system developed recently from microbial fuel cells (MFCs), for producing green energy from organic wastes along with desalination of saltwater. MDC is proved to be a better performer than MFC in terms of power output and chemical oxygen demand removal, with desalination as an additional feature. This study investigates the application potential of MDC for integrated biodegradation of waste engine oil. This study showed, for the first time, that waste engine oil could be used as an organic substrate in MDC, achieving biodegradation of engine oil along with considerable desalination and power production. Utilization of these wastes in MDC can protect the environment from waste engine oil contamination. Indigenous oil-degrading bacteria were isolated and identified from engine oil contaminated sludge. Degradation of waste engine oil by these novel isolates was studied in batch cultures and optimized the growth conditions. The same cultures when used in MDC, gave enhanced biodegradation (70.1 +/- 0.5%) along with desalination (68.3 +/- 0.6%) and power production (3.1 +/- 0.3 mW/m2). Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses were performed to characterize the degradation metabolites in the anolyte of MDC which clearly indicated the biodegradation of long chain, branched and cyclic hydrocarbons present in waste engine oil. PMID:25145172

  1. High-efficiency screen-printed solar cell on edge-defined film-fed grown ribbon silicon through optimized rapid belt co-firing of contacts and high-sheet-resistance emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Hilali, Mohamed M.; Nakayashiki, Kenta

    2004-04-01

    High-quality screen-printed contacts were achieved on a high-sheet-resistance emitter (˜100 Ω/sq.) using PV168 Ag paste and rapid co-firing in the belt furnace. The optimized co-firing cycle developed for a 100 Ω/sq. emitter produced 16.1% efficient 4 cm2 planar edge-defined film-fed grown (EFG) ribbon Si cells with a low series-resistance (0.8 Ω cm2), high fill factor of ˜0.77, along with very significant bulk lifetime enhancement from 3 to 100 μs. This represents the highest-efficiency screen-printed EFG Si cells with single-layer antireflection (AR) coating. These cells were fabricated using a simple process involving POCl3 diffusion for a high-sheet-resistance emitter, SiNx AR coating and rapid cofiring of Ag grid and Al-doped back-surface field in a conventional belt furnace. The rapid cofiring process also prevented junction shunting while maintaining very effective SiNx-induced hydrogen passivation of defects, resulting in an average bulk lifetime exceeding 100 μs.

  2. Time-lapse imaging of primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah L; Cabrera, M Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without palpable tumor. Glands are carefully resected with clear separation from adjacent muscle, lymph nodes are removed, and single-cell suspensions of enriched mammary epithelial cells are generated by mincing mammary tissue followed by enzymatic dissociation and filtration. Single-cell suspensions are plated and placed directly under a microscope within an incubator chamber for live-cell imaging. Sixteen 650 μm x 700 μm fields in a 4x4 configuration from each well of a 6-well plate are imaged every 15 min for 5 days. Time-lapse images are examined directly to measure cellular behaviors that can include mechanism and frequency of cell colony formation within the first 24 hr of plating the cells (aggregation versus cell proliferation), incidence of apoptosis, and phasing of morphological changes. Single-cell tracking is used to generate cell fate maps for measurement of individual cell lifetimes and investigation of cell division patterns. Quantitative data are statistically analyzed to assess for significant differences in behavior correlated with specific genetic lesions. PMID:23425702

  3. Current and future regenerative medicine - principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    be recorded and reported.Stem cell and tissue engineering research in the horse has exciting comparative and equine specific perspectives that most likely will benefit the health of horses and humans. Controlled, well-designed studies are needed to move this new equine research field forward.......This paper provides a bird's-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine.The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds......, and their potential therapeutic use in horses are rudimentary at present. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation has been proclaimed from several equine tissues in the past few years. Based on the criteria of the International Society for Cellular Therapy, most of these cells are more correctly referred to as multipotent...

  4. Safety advice sheets

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    You never know when you might be faced with questions such as: when/how should I dispose of a gas canister? Where can I find an inspection report? How should I handle/store/dispose of a chemical substance…?   The SI section of the DGS/SEE Group is primarily responsible for safety inspections, evaluating the safety conditions of equipment items, premises and facilities. On top of this core task, it also regularly issues “Safety Advice Sheets” on various topics, designed to be of assistance to users but also to recall and reinforce safety rules and procedures. These clear and concise sheets, complete with illustrations, are easy to display in the appropriate areas. The following safety advice sheets have been issued so far: Other sheets will be published shortly. Suggestions are welcome and should be sent to the SI section of the DGS/SEE Group. Please send enquiries to general-safety-visits.service@cern.ch.

  5. Projection Stereolithographic Fabrication of Human Adipose Stem Cell-incorporated Biodegradable Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron X Sun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Poor self-healing ability of cartilage necessitates the development of methods for cartilage regeneration. Scaffold construction with live stem cell incorporation and subsequent differentiation presents a promising route. Projection stereolithography (PSL offers high resolution and processing speed as well as the ability to fabricate scaffolds that precisely fit the anatomy of cartilage defects using medical imaging as the design template. We report here the use of a visible-light based PSL (VL-PSL system to encapsulate human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs into a biodegradable polymer (poly-D,L-lactic acid/polyethylene glycol/ poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA-PEG/hyaluronic acid (HA matrix to produce live cell constructs with customized architectures. After fabrication, hASCs showed high viability (84% and were uniformly distributed throughout the constructs, which possessed high mechanical property with a compressive modulus of 780 kPa. The hASC-seeded constructs were then cultured in Control or TGF-β3-containing chondrogenic medium for up to 28 days. In chondrogenic medium treated group (TGF-β3 group hASCs maintained 77% viability and expressed chondrogenic genes Sox9, collagen type II, and aggrecan at 11, 232, and 2.29 x 10(5 fold increases, respectively, compared to levels at day 0 in non-chondrogenic medium. The TGF-β3 group also produced a collagen type II and glycosaminoglycan (GAG-rich extracellular matrix, detected by immunohistochemistry, and Alcian blue and Safranin O staining suggesting robust chondrogenesis within the scaffold. Without chondroinductive addition (Control group, cell viability decreased with time (65% at 28 days and showed poor cartilage matrix deposition. After 28 days, mechanical strength of the TGF-β3 group remained high at 240 kPa. Thus, the PSL- and PLLA-PEG/HA based fabrication method using adult stem cells is a promising approach in producing mechanically competent engineered cartilage for joint cartilage

  6. Stochastic signaling in biochemical cascades and genetic systems in genetically engineered living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Ramiz; Almog, Ronen; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2010-04-01

    Living cells, either prokaryote or eukaryote, can be integrated within whole-cell biochips (WCBCs) for various applications. We investigate WCBCs where information is extracted from the cells via a cascade of biochemical reactions that involve gene expression. The overall biological signal is weak due to small sample volume, low intrinsic cell response, and extrinsic signal loss mechanisms. The low signal-to-noise ratio problem is aggravated during initial detection stages and limits the minimum detectable signal or, alternatively, the minimum detection time. Taking into account the stochastic nature of biochemical process, we find that the signal is accompanied by relatively large noise disturbances. In this work, we use genetically engineered microbe sensors as a model to study the biochips output signal stochastic behavior. In our model, the microbes are designed to express detectable reporter proteins under external induction. We present analytical approximated expressions and numerical simulations evaluating the fluctuations of the synthesized reporter proteins population based on a set of equations modeling a cascade of biochemical and genetic reactions. We assume that the reporter proteins decay more slowly than messenger RNA molecules. We calculate the relation between the noise of the input signal (extrinsic noise) and biochemical reaction statistics (intrinsic noise). We discuss in further details two cases: (1) a cascade with large decay rates of all biochemical reactions compared to the protein decay rate. We show that in this case, the noise amplitude has a positive linear correlation with the number of stages in the cascade. (2) A cascade which includes a stable enzymatic-binding reaction with slow decay rate. We show that in this case, the noise strongly depends on the protein decay rate. Finally, a general observation is presented stating that the noise in whole-cell biochip sensors is determined mainly by the first reactions in the genetic system

  7. Boron nitride nanotube-mediated stimulation of cell co-culture on micro-engineered hydrogels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Ricotti

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the effects of the combination of topographical, mechanical, chemical and intracellular electrical stimuli on a co-culture of fibroblasts and skeletal muscle cells. The co-culture was anisotropically grown onto an engineered micro-grooved (10 µm-wide grooves polyacrylamide substrate, showing a precisely tuned Young's modulus (∼ 14 kPa and a small thickness (∼ 12 µm. We enhanced the co-culture properties through intracellular stimulation produced by piezoelectric nanostructures (i.e., boron nitride nanotubes activated by ultrasounds, thus exploiting the ability of boron nitride nanotubes to convert outer mechanical waves (such as ultrasounds in intracellular electrical stimuli, by exploiting the direct piezoelectric effect. We demonstrated that nanotubes were internalized by muscle cells and localized in both early and late endosomes, while they were not internalized by the underneath fibroblast layer. Muscle cell differentiation benefited from the synergic combination of topographical, mechanical, chemical and nanoparticle-based stimuli, showing good myotube development and alignment towards a preferential direction, as well as high expression of genes encoding key proteins for muscle contraction (i.e., actin and myosin. We also clarified the possible role of fibroblasts in this process, highlighting their response to the above mentioned physical stimuli in terms of gene expression and cytokine production. Finally, calcium imaging-based experiments demonstrated a higher functionality of the stimulated co-cultures.

  8. Use of Adult Stem Cells for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Current Status and Future Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Baugé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. So, in recent years, researchers and surgeons have been working hard to elaborate cartilage repair interventions for patients who suffer from cartilage damage. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or hypertrophic cartilage. In the next years, the development of new strategies using adult stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium and/or culture in low oxygen tension should improve the quality of neoformed cartilage. Through these solutions, some of the latest technologies start to bring very promising results in repairing cartilage from traumatic injury or chondropathies. This review discusses the current knowledge about the use of adult stem cells in the context of cartilage tissue engineering and presents clinical trials in progress, as well as in the future, especially in the field of bioprinting stem cells.

  9. Ambient Engineering for High-Performance Organic-Inorganic Perovskite Hybrid Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiabin; Yu, Xuegong; Xie, Jiangsheng; Xu, Dikai; Tang, Zeguo; Cui, Can; Yang, Deren

    2016-08-24

    Considering the evaporation of solvents during fabrication of perovskite films, the organic ambience will present a significant influence on the morphologies and properties of perovskite films. To clarify this issue, various ambiences of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and chlorobenzene (CBZ) are introduced during fabrication of perovskite films by two-step sequential deposition method. The results reveal that an ambient CBZ atmosphere is favorable to control the nucleation and growth of CH3NH3PbI3 grains while the others present a negative effect. The statistical results show that the average efficiencies of perovskite solar cells processed in an ambient CBZ atmosphere can be significantly improved by a relatively average value of 35%, compared with those processed under air. The efficiency of the best perovskite solar cells can be improved from 10.65% to 14.55% by introducing this ambience engineering technology. The CH3NH3PbI3 film with large-size grains produced in an ambient CBZ atmosphere can effectively reduce the density of grain boundaries, and then the recombination centers for photoinduced carriers. Therefore, a higher short-circuit current density is achieved, which makes main contribution to the improvement in efficiency. These results provide vital progress toward understanding the role of ambience in the realization of highly efficient perovskite solar cells. PMID:27489961

  10. Engineering a 70-percent efficient, indirect-fired fuel-cell bottomed turbine cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M.C.; Micheli, P.L.; Parson, E.L. Jr. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1995-08-01

    We introduce the natural gas, indirect-fired fuel-cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFFC) as a novel power plant system for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20 to 200 megawatt (MW) size range. The NG-IFFC system is a new METC-patented system. This power-plant system links the ambient pressure, carbonate fuel cell in tandem with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger. Performance calculations based on Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) simulations show material and energy balances with expected power output. Early results indicated efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-EFFC are comparable to conventionally bottomed, carbonate fuel-cell steam-bottomed cycles, but with smaller and less expensive components. More recent calculations extended the in-tandem concept to produce near-stoichiometric usage of the oxygen. This is made possible by reforming the anode stream to completion and using all hydrogen fuel in what will need to be a special combustor. The performance increases dramatically to greater than 70 percent.

  11. Engineering nanoparticles surface for biosensing: "Chemical noses" to detect and identify proteins, bacteria and cancerous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Sanchez, Oscar Ramon

    Rapid and sensitive detection of biomolecules is an important issue in nanomedicine. Many disorders are manifested by changes in protein levels of serum and other biofluids. Rapid and effective differentiation between normal and cancerous cells is an important challenge for the diagnosis and treatment of tumor. Likewise, rapid and effective identification of pathogens is a key target in both biomedical and environmental monitoring. Most biological recognition processes occur via specific interactions. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP s) feature sizes commensurate with biomacromolecules, coupled with useful physical and optical properties. A key issue in the use of nanomaterials is controlling the interfacial interactions of these complex systems. Modulation of these physicochemical properties can be readily achieved by engineering nanoparticles surface. Inspired by the idea of mimicking nature, a convenient, precise and rapid method for sensing proteins, cancerous cells and bacteria has been developed by overtaking the superb performance of biological olfactory systems in odor detection, identification, tracking, and location. On the fundamental side, an array-based/'chemical nose' sensor composed of cationic functionalized AuNPs as receptors and anionic fluorescent conjugated polymers or green fluorescent proteins or enzyme/substrates as transducers that can properly detect and identify proteins, bacteria, and cancerous cells has been successfully fabricated.

  12. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Engineering Model Powerplant. Test Report: Benchmark Tests in Three Spatial Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyselle, Patricia; Prokopius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology is the leading candidate to replace the aging alkaline fuel cell technology, currently used on the Shuttle, for future space missions. This test effort marks the final phase of a 5-yr development program that began under the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program, transitioned into the Next Generation Launch Technologies (NGLT) Program, and continued under Constellation Systems in the Exploration Technology Development Program. Initially, the engineering model (EM) powerplant was evaluated with respect to its performance as compared to acceptance tests carried out at the manufacturer. This was to determine the sensitivity of the powerplant performance to changes in test environment. In addition, a series of tests were performed with the powerplant in the original standard orientation. This report details the continuing EM benchmark test results in three spatial orientations as well as extended duration testing in the mission profile test. The results from these tests verify the applicability of PEM fuel cells for future NASA missions. The specifics of these different tests are described in the following sections.

  13. Implantable tissue-engineered blood vessels from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Liqiong; Dash, Biraja C; Luo, Jiesi; Qin, Lingfeng; Zhao, Liping; Yamamoto, Kota; Hashimoto, Takuya; Wu, Hongwei; Dardik, Alan; Tellides, George; Niklason, Laura E; Qyang, Yibing

    2016-09-01

    Derivation of functional vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to generate tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) holds great potential in treating patients with vascular diseases. Herein, hiPSCs were differentiated into alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and calponin-positive VSMCs, which were seeded onto polymer scaffolds in bioreactors for vascular tissue growth. A functional TEBV with abundant collagenous matrix and sound mechanics resulted, which contained cells largely positive for α-SMA and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). Moreover, when hiPSC-derived TEBV segments were implanted into nude rats as abdominal aorta interposition grafts, they remained unruptured and patent with active vascular remodeling, and showed no evidence of teratoma formation during a 2-week proof-of-principle study. Our studies represent the development of the first implantable TEBVs based on hiPSCs, and pave the way for developing autologous or allogeneic grafts for clinical use in patients with vascular disease. PMID:27336184

  14. Bachelor of Science-Engineering Technology Program and Fuel Cell Education Program Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L.; Sleiti, Ahmad

    2011-09-19

    The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology education project has addressed DOE goals by supplying readily available, objective, technical, and accurate information that is available to students, industry and the public. In addition, the program has supplied educated trainers and training opportunities for the next generation workforce needed for research, development, and demonstration activities in government, industry, and academia. The project has successfully developed courses and associated laboratories, taught the new courses and labs and integrated the HFCT option into the accredited engineering technology and mechanical engineering programs at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC). The project has also established ongoing collaborations with the UNCC energy related centers of the Energy Production & Infrastructure Center (EPIC), the NC Motorsports and Automotive Research Center (NCMARC) and the Infrastructure, Design, Environment and Sustainability Center (IDEAS). The results of the project activities are presented as two major areas – (1) course and laboratory development, offerings and delivery, and (2) program recruitment, promotions and collaborations. Over the project period, the primary activity has been the development and offering of 11 HFCT courses and accompanying laboratories. This process has taken three years with the courses first being developed and then offered each year over the timeframe.

  15. Complete biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by engineered Pseudomonas putida cells expressing surface-immobilized laccases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Tan, Luming; Wang, Jing; Wang, Zhiyong; Ni, Hong; Li, Lin

    2016-08-01

    The long-term abuse use of chlorpyrifos-like pesticides in agriculture and horticulture has resulted in significant soil or water contamination and a worldwide ecosystem threat. In this study, the ability of a solvent-tolerant bacterium, Pseudomonas putida MB285, with surface-displayed bacterial laccase, to biodegrade chlorpyrifos was investigated. The results of compositional analyses of the degraded products demonstrate that the engineered MB285 was capable of completely eliminating chlorpyrifos via direct biodegradation, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assays. Two intermediate metabolites, namely 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and diethyl phosphate, were temporarily detectable, verifying the joint and stepwise degradation of chlorpyrifos by surface laccases and certain cellular enzymes, whereas the purified free laccase incompletely degraded chlorpyrifos into TCP. The degradation reaction can be conducted over a wide range of pH values (2-7) and temperatures (5-55 °C) without the need for Cu(2+). Bioassays using Caenorhabditis elegans as an indicator organism demonstrated that the medium was completely detoxified of chlorpyrifos by degradation. Moreover, the engineered cells exhibited a high capacity of repeated degradation and good performance in continuous degradation cycles, as well as a high capacity to degrade real effluents containing chlorpyrifos. Therefore, the developed system exhibited a high degradation capacity and performance and constitutes an improved approach to address chlorpyrifos contamination in chlorpyrifos-remediation practice. PMID:27231878

  16. Development of a dose-controlled multiculture cell exposure chamber for efficient delivery of airborne and engineered nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the various health influencing parameters related to engineered nanoparticles as well as to soot emitted by Diesel engines, there is an urgent need for appropriate sampling devices and methods for cell exposure studies that simulate the respiratory system and facilitate associated biological and toxicological tests. The objective of the present work was the further advancement of a Multiculture Exposure Chamber (MEC) into a dose-controlled system for efficient delivery of nanoparticles to cells. It was validated with various types of nanoparticles (Diesel engine soot aggregates, engineered nanoparticles for various applications) and with state-of-the-art nanoparticle measurement instrumentation to assess the local deposition of nanoparticles on the cell cultures. The dose of nanoparticles to which cell cultures are being exposed was evaluated in the normal operation of the in vitro cell culture exposure chamber based on measurements of the size specific nanoparticle collection efficiency of a cell free device. The average efficiency in delivering nanoparticles in the MEC was approximately 82%. The nanoparticle deposition was demonstrated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Analysis and design of the MEC employs Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and true to geometry representations of nanoparticles with the aim to assess the uniformity of nanoparticle deposition among the culture wells. Final testing of the dose-controlled cell exposure system was performed by exposing A549 lung cell cultures to fluorescently labeled nanoparticles. Delivery of aerosolized nanoparticles was demonstrated by visualization of the nanoparticle fluorescence in the cell cultures following exposure. Also monitored was the potential of the aerosolized nanoparticles to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) (e.g. free radicals and peroxides generation), thus expressing the oxidative stress of the cells which can cause extensive cellular damage or damage on DNA.

  17. Dynamic Characteristic of a Fuel Cell Micro-Grid Using an Engine Generator to Base Load Operation

    OpenAIRE

    OBARA, Shinya

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic of a micro-grid consisting of an engine generator and sixteen fuel cells was clarified by the transfer function model using actual data from power generators. The micro-grid was composed of a 3kW engine generator and 1kW fuel cells, and the dynamic characteristics of the grid were analyzed using the energy demand model in February of a cold region. Consequently, the settling time (Time taken to converge on +-5% of the limit of an output target) of a micro-grid is 15 seconds from 1...

  18. Energy information sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-02

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the general public. Written for the general public, the EIA publication Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption and capability. The information contained herein pertains to energy data as of December 1991. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other EIA publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  19. Surface engineered antifouling optomagnetic SPIONs for bimodal targeted imaging of pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang X

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaohui Wang,1 Xiaohong Xing,1 Bingbo Zhang,1 Fengjun Liu,1 Yingsheng Cheng,2 Donglu Shi1,31Radiology Department of the Tenth People’s Hospital,The Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nano Science, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Materials Science and Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USAAbstract: Targeted imaging contrast agents for early pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma diagnosis was developed using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs. For phase transfer of SPIONs, the hydrophobic SPIONs are first treated with tetrafluoroborate and then capped by bovine serum albumin (BSA via ligand exchange. It was experimentally found that nitrosyl tetrafluoroborate pretreatment and proper structures of molecules are essential to the effective surface functionalization of SPIONs. Nonspecific binding was found to be significantly reduced by BSA surface functionalized hydrophobic SPIONs (BSA·SPIONs. The BSA·SPIONs were monodispersed with an average size of approximately 18.0 nm and stable in a wide pH range and various ionic strengths even after 7 days of storage. The longitudinal and transverse proton relaxation rate (r1, r2 values of the BSA·SPIONs were determined to be 11.6 and 154.2 s-1 per mM of Fe3+ respectively. The r2/r1 ratio of 13.3 ensured its application as the T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. When conjugated with near-infrared fluorescent dye and monoclonal antibody, the dyeBSA·SPION-monoclonal antibody bioconjugates showed excellent targeting capability with minimal nonspecific binding in the bimodal imaging of pancreatic cancer cells. The experimental approach is facile, environmentally benign, and

  20. Energy Supply Characteristics of a Combined Solar Cell and Diesel Engine System with a Prediction Algorithm for Solar Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Abeer Galal; Obara, Shin'ya

    The production of electricity from the solar cells continues to attract interest as a power source for distributed energy generation. It is important to be able to estimate solar cell power to optimize system energy management. This paper proposes a prediction algorithm based on a neural network (NN) to predict the electricity production from a solar cell. The operation plan for a combined solar cell and diesel engine generator system is examined using the NN prediction algorithm. Two systems are examined in this paper: one with and one without a power storage facility. Comparisons are presented of the results from the two systems with respect to the actual calculations of output power and the predicted electricity production from the solar cell. The exhaust heat from the engine is used to supply the heat demand. A back-up boiler is operated when the engine exhaust heat is insufficient to meet the heat demand. Electricity and heat are supplied to the demand side from the proposed systems, and no external sources are used. When the NN production-of-electricity prediction was introduced, the engine generator operating time was reduced by 12.5% in December and 16.7% for March and September. Moreover, an operation plan for the combined system exhaust heat is proposed, and the heat output characteristics of the back-up boiler are characterized.

  1. Analysis and metabolic engineering of lipid-linked oligosaccharides in glycosylation-deficient CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Meredith B., E-mail: mbauman7@jhu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Maryland Hall 221, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tomiya, Noboru, E-mail: ntomiya1@jhu.edu [Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Mudd Hall 104A, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Betenbaugh, Michael J., E-mail: beten@jhu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Maryland Hall 221, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Krag, Sharon S., E-mail: skrag@jhsph.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2010-04-23

    Glycosylation-deficient Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines can be used to expand our understanding of N-glycosylation pathways and to study Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation, diseases caused by defects in the synthesis of N-glycans. The mammalian N-glycosylation pathway involves the step-wise assembly of sugars onto a dolichol phosphate (P-Dol) carrier, forming a lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO), followed by the transfer of the completed oligosaccharide onto the protein of interest. In order to better understand how deficiencies in this pathway affect the availability of the completed LLO donor for use in N-glycosylation, we used a non-radioactive, HPLC-based assay to examine the intermediates in the LLO synthesis pathway for CHO-K1 cells and for three different glycosylation-deficient CHO cell lines. B4-2-1 cells, which have a mutation in the dolichol phosphate-mannose synthase (DPM2) gene, accumulated LLO with the structure Man{sub 5}GlcNAc{sub 2}-P-P-Dol, while MI8-5 cells, which lack glucosyltransferase I (ALG6) activity, accumulated Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}-P-P-Dol. CHO-K1 and MI5-4 cells both produced primarily the complete LLO, Glc{sub 3}Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}-P-P-Dol, though the relative quantity was lower in MI5-4. MI5-4 cells have reduced hexokinase activity which could affect the availability of many of the substrates required for LLO synthesis and, consequently, impair production of the final LLO donor. Increasing hexokinase activity by overexpressing hexokinase II in MI5-4 caused a decrease in the relative quantities of the incomplete LLO intermediates from Man{sub 5}GlcNAc{sub 2}-PP-Dol through Glc{sub 1}Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}-PP-Dol, and an increase in the relative quantity of the final LLO donor, Glc{sub 3}Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}-P-P-Dol. This study suggests that metabolic engineering may be a useful strategy for improving LLO availability for use in N-glycosylation.

  2. Biomolecular interactions and responses of human epithelial and macrophage cells to engineered nanomaterials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Brozik, Susan Marie; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Greene, Adrienne Celeste; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Bachand, George David; Bachand, Marlene; Aaron, Jesse S.; Allen, Amy; Seagrave, Jean-Clare

    2011-12-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being used in commercial products, particularly in the biomedical, cosmetic, and clothing industries. For example, pants and shirts are routinely manufactured with silver nanoparticles to render them 'wrinkle-free.' Despite the growing applications, the associated environmental health and safety (EHS) impacts are completely unknown. The significance of this problem became pervasive within the general public when Prince Charles authored an article in 2004 warning of the potential social, ethical, health, and environmental issues connected to nanotechnology. The EHS concerns, however, continued to receive relatively little consideration from federal agencies as compared with large investments in basic nanoscience R&D. The mounting literature regarding the toxicology of ENMs (e.g., the ability of inhaled nanoparticles to cross the blood-brain barrier; Kwon et al., 2008, J. Occup. Health 50, 1) has spurred a recent realization within the NNI and other federal agencies that the EHS impacts related to nanotechnology must be addressed now. In our study we proposed to address critical aspects of this problem by developing primary correlations between nanoparticle properties and their effects on cell health and toxicity. A critical challenge embodied within this problem arises from the ability to synthesize nanoparticles with a wide array of physical properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, surface chemistry, etc.), which in turn creates an immense, multidimensional problem in assessing toxicological effects. In this work we first investigated varying sizes of quantum dots (Qdots) and their ability to cross cell membranes based on their aspect ratio utilizing hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy. We then studied toxicity of epithelial cell lines that were exposed to different sized gold and silver nanoparticles using advanced imaging techniques, biochemical analyses, and optical and mass spectrometry

  3. Surface engineering and characterization of quantum dots and its application in living cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han QIU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective  Surface modification of hydrophobic nanoparticles is a key process for their application in the biological medicine fields. The aim of present study is to prepare the immunofluorescent probes by conjugation of hydrophilic surface-engineered quantum dots (QDs and monoclonal antibody for use of fluorescence labeled cells tracing. Methods  The bovine serum albumin (BSA with excellent water-solubility and biocompatibility was employed as the emulsifying agent, and used for surface modification of hydrophobic QDs under ultrasonication. The diameter, fluorescence spectrum and cytotoxicity of BSA-coated QDs (BSA-triP.QDs were analyzed. Then the BSA-coated QDs were conjugated with trastuzumab, which can be recognized and bound specifically to HER2. SKBR-3 breast cancer cells, with over-expression of HER-2, were labeled with hydrophilic QDstrastuzumab and imaged on a fluorescence planar imaging system. Results  The experimental results revealed that BSA as the emulsifying agent, combined with other polymers, can effectively phase transfer hydrophobic QDs. The BSA functionalized QDs exhibited excellent colloidal stability with fine hydrodynamic size distribution (about 70nm in a wide range of pH and ionic strengths values. Moreover, no significant cytotoxic effect was observed in SKBR-3 cells treated with BSA-coated QDs. After being coupled with trastuzumab, the hydrophilic QDs can be used as an immunofluorescence probe for HER2-positive breast cancer cell imaging. Conclusions  The advantages of BSA-coated QDs include straight forward synthesis, high colloidal stability, and promising immunofluorescence characteristic when coupled with specific antibody. These are therefore proved to be ideal nano systems for biomedical labeling, targeting, and imaging. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.05.04

  4. Engineering aspects and hardware verification of a volume producable solid oxide fuel cell stack design for diesel auxiliary power units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelter, Michael; Reinert, Andreas; Mai, Björn Erik; Kuznecov, Mihail

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack module is presented that is designed for operation on diesel reformate in an auxiliary power unit (APU). The stack was designed using a top-down approach, based on a specification of an APU system that is installed on board of vehicles. The stack design is planar, modular and scalable with stamped sheet metal interconnectors. It features thin membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs), such as electrolyte supported cells (ESC) and operates at elevated temperatures around 800 °C. The stack has a low pressure drop in both the anode and the cathode to facilitate a simple system layout. An overview of the technical targets met so far is given. A stack power density of 0.2 kW l -1 has been demonstrated in a fully integrated, thermally self-sustaining APU prototype running with diesel and without an external water supply.

  5. Pseudomonas - Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2012-01-01

    Fact sheet on Pseudomonas, including:What is Pseudomonas?What infections does it cause?Who is susceptible to pseudomonas infection?How will I know if I have pseudomonas infection?How can Pseudomonas be prevented from spreading?How can I protect myself from Pseudomonas?How is Pseudomonas infection treated?

  6. Fact Sheet on Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... items) NIMH (7 items) Share Fact Sheet on Stress Download PDF Download ePub Q&A on Stress for Adults: How it affects your health and ... to avoid more serious health effects. What is stress? Stress can be defined as the brain's response ...

  7. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  8. CSS - Cascading Style Sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Martinelli, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Curso "CSS - Cascading Style Sheets" sobre programación web con CSS para el "Máster doble competencia en ciencias informáticas y ciencias sociales" ("Master double competence in computer science and social science"). Proyecto TEMPUS JEP – 26235-2005

  9. A high-yielding, generic fed-batch process for recombinant antibody production of GS-engineered cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Li; Zhao, Liang; Sun, Yating;

    2009-01-01

    An animal component-free and chemically defined fed-batch process for GS-engineered cell lines producing recombinant antibodies has been developed. The fed-batch process relied on supplying sufficient nutrients to match their consumption, simultaneously minimizing the accumulation of byproducts....... Compared to batch cultures, the fed-batch technology generated the magnitude of the increase in cell yields (5 fold) and final antibody concentrations (4-8 fold). The majority of the increase in final antibody concentration was functions of the increased cell density and the prolonged culture time. This...... generic and high-yielding fed-batch process would shorten development time, and ensure process stability, thereby facilitating the manufacture of therapeutic antibodies by GS-engineered cell lines....

  10. Combination of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) pathway engineering and molecular engineering of L-amino acid deaminase improves PPA production with an Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying; Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long

    2016-03-01

    In our previous study, we produced phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) in one step from L-phenylalanine by using an Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst expressing an L-amino acid deaminase (L-AAD) from Proteus mirabilis KCTC2566. However, the PPA titer was low due to the degradation of PPA and low substrate specificity of L-AAD. In this study, metabolic engineering of the L-phenylalanine degradation pathway in E. coli and protein engineering of L-AAD from P. mirabilis were performed to improve the PPA titer. First, three aminotransferase genes were knocked out to block PPA degradation, which increased the PPA titer from 3.3 ± 0.2 to 3.9 ± 0.1 g/L and the substrate conversion ratio to 97.5 %. Next, L-AAD was engineered via error-prone polymerase chain reaction, followed by site-saturation mutation to improve its catalytic performance. The triple mutant D165K/F263M/L336M produced the highest PPA titer of 10.0 ± 0.4 g/L, with a substrate conversion ratio of 100 %, which was 3.0 times that of wild-type L-AAD. Comparative kinetics analysis showed that compared with wild-type L-AAD, the triple mutant had higher substrate-binding affinity and catalytic efficiency. Finally, an optimal fed-batch biotransformation process was developed to achieve a maximal PPA titer of 21 ± 1.8 g/L within 8 h. This study developed a robust whole-cell E. coli biocatalyst for PPA production by integrating metabolic and protein engineering, strategies that may be useful for the construction of other biotransformation biocatalysts. PMID:26552798

  11. Computer-Aided Design Of Sheet-Material Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Paternoster, Vincent Y.; Levitt, Maureen L.; Osterloh, Mark R.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-aided-design system partly automates tedious process of designing and guiding assembly of small pieces of flat sheet material into large surfaces that approximate smoothly curved surfaces having complicated three-dimensional shapes. Capability provides for flexibility enabling designer to assess quickly and easily effects of changes in design in making engineering compromises among various sizes and shapes. Saves time and money in both design and fabrication. Used in rocket-engine application and other applications requiring design of sheet-material parts.

  12. Non-virally engineered human adipose mesenchymal stem cells produce BMP4, target brain tumors, and extend survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Gullotti, David; Kozielski, Kristen L; Kim, Jennifer E; Seng, Michael; Abbadi, Sara; Schiapparelli, Paula; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Vescovi, Angelo; Brem, Henry; Olivi, Alessandro; Tyler, Betty; Green, Jordan J; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for enabling non-viral nanobiotechnology to allow safe and effective gene therapy and cell therapy, which can be utilized to treat devastating diseases such as brain cancer. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) display high anti-glioma tropism and represent a promising delivery vehicle for targeted brain tumor therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that non-viral, biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) can be used to engineer hAMSCs with higher efficacy (75% of cells) than leading commercially available reagents and high cell viability. To accomplish this, we engineered a poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE) polymer structure to transfect hAMSCs with significantly higher efficacy than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We then assessed the ability of NP-engineered hAMSCs to deliver bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), which has been shown to have a novel therapeutic effect by targeting human brain tumor initiating cells (BTIC), a source of cancer recurrence, in a human primary malignant glioma model. We demonstrated that hAMSCs genetically engineered with polymeric nanoparticles containing BMP4 plasmid DNA (BMP4/NP-hAMSCs) secrete BMP4 growth factor while maintaining their multipotency and preserving their migration and invasion capacities. We also showed that this approach can overcome a central challenge for brain therapeutics, overcoming the blood brain barrier, by demonstrating that NP-engineered hAMSCs can migrate to the brain and penetrate the brain tumor after both intranasal and systemic intravenous administration. Critically, athymic rats bearing human primary BTIC-derived tumors and treated intranasally with BMP4/NP-hAMSCs showed significantly improved survival compared to those treated with control GFP/NP-hAMCSs. This study demonstrates that synthetic polymeric nanoparticles are a safe and effective approach for stem cell-based cancer-targeting therapies. PMID:27240162

  13. Unit cell-based computer-aided manufacturing system for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffolds play an important role in the regeneration of artificial tissues or organs. A scaffold is a porous structure with a micro-scale inner architecture in the range of several to several hundreds of micrometers. Therefore, computer-aided construction of scaffolds should provide sophisticated functionality for porous structure design and a tool path generation strategy that can achieve micro-scale architecture. In this study, a new unit cell-based computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) system was developed for the automated design and fabrication of a porous structure with micro-scale inner architecture that can be applied to composite tissue regeneration. The CAM system was developed by first defining a data structure for the computing process of a unit cell representing a single pore structure. Next, an algorithm and software were developed and applied to construct porous structures with a single or multiple pore design using solid freeform fabrication technology and a 3D tooth/spine computer-aided design model. We showed that this system is quite feasible for the design and fabrication of a scaffold for tissue engineering. (paper)

  14. Clinical trial perspective for adult and juvenile Huntington's disease using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peter; Torrest, Audrey; Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Annett, Geralyn; Nolta, Jan A; Fink, Kyle D

    2016-05-01

    Progress to date from our group and others indicate that using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to secrete brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) supports our plan to submit an Investigational New Drug application to the Food and Drug Administration for the future planned Phase 1 safety and tolerability trial of MSC/BDNF in patients with Huntington's disease (HD). There are also potential applications of this approach beyond HD. Our biological delivery system for BDNF sets the precedent for adult stem cell therapy in the brain and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. The MSC/BDNF product could also be considered for studies of regeneration in traumatic brain injury, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. This work also provides a platform for our future gene editing studies, since we will again use MSCs to deliver the needed molecules into the central nervous system. PMID:27335539

  15. Engineered band structure for an enhanced performance on quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bin Bin; Wang, Ye Feng; Wei, Dong; Cui, Bin; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Jing Hui

    2016-06-01

    A photon-to-current efficiency of 2.93% is received for the Mn-doped CdS (MCdS)-quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) using Mn:ZnO (MZnO) nanowire as photoanode. Hydrothermal synthesized MZnO are spin-coated on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass with P25 paste to serve as photoanode after calcinations. MCdS was deposited on the MZnO film by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method. The long lived excitation energy state of Mn2+ is located inside the conduction band in the wide bandgap ZnO and under the conduction band of CdS, which increases the energetic overlap of donor and acceptor states, reducing the "loss-in-potential," inhibiting charge recombination, and accelerating electron injection. The engineered band structure is well reflected by the electrochemical band detected using cyclic voltammetry. Cell performances are evidenced by current density-voltage (J-V) traces, diffuse reflectance spectra, transient PL spectroscopy, and incident photon to current conversion efficiency characterizations. Further coating of CdSe on MZnO/MCdS electrode expands the light absorption band of the sensitizer, an efficiency of 4.94% is received for QDSSCs.

  16. Engineering Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration: A novel chassis strain for whole-cell catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Martina; Brandner, Christoph; Strohmeier, Gernot A; Hall, Mélanie; Hartner, Franz S; Glieder, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Many synthetically useful reactions are catalyzed by cofactor-dependent enzymes. As cofactors represent a major cost factor, methods for efficient cofactor regeneration are required especially for large-scale synthetic applications. In order to generate a novel and efficient host chassis for bioreductions, we engineered the methanol utilization pathway of Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration. By deleting the genes coding for dihydroxyacetone synthase isoform 1 and 2 (DAS1 and DAS2), NADH regeneration via methanol oxidation (dissimilation) was increased significantly. The resulting Δdas1 Δdas2 strain performed better in butanediol dehydrogenase (BDH1) based whole-cell conversions. While the BDH1 catalyzed acetoin reduction stopped after 2 h reaching ~50% substrate conversion when performed in the wild type strain, full conversion after 6 h was obtained by employing the knock-out strain. These results suggest that the P. pastoris Δdas1 Δdas2 strain is capable of supplying the actual biocatalyst with the cofactor over a longer reaction period without the over-expression of an additional cofactor regeneration system. Thus, focusing the intrinsic carbon flux of this methylotrophic yeast on methanol oxidation to CO2 represents an efficient and easy-to-use strategy for NADH-dependent whole-cell conversions. At the same time methanol serves as co-solvent, inductor for catalyst and cofactor regeneration pathway expression and source of energy. PMID:26664594

  17. Clinical trial perspective for adult and juvenile Huntington's disease using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peter; Torrest, Audrey; Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Annett, Geralyn; Nolta, Jan A.; Fink, Kyle D.

    2016-01-01

    Progress to date from our group and others indicate that using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to secrete brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) supports our plan to submit an Investigational New Drug application to the Food and Drug Administration for the future planned Phase 1 safety and tolerability trial of MSC/BDNF in patients with Huntington's disease (HD). There are also potential applications of this approach beyond HD. Our biological delivery system for BDNF sets the precedent for adult stem cell therapy in the brain and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. The MSC/BDNF product could also be considered for studies of regeneration in traumatic brain injury, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. This work also provides a platform for our future gene editing studies, since we will again use MSCs to deliver the needed molecules into the central nervous system. PMID:27335539

  18. Engineering design of the IFMIF EVEDA reference test cell and key components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latest design updates of the IFMIF-EVEDA reference test cell (TC) are described with emphasis on the following key components: active cooling pipes for concrete biological shielding walls and stainless steel liner, TC gas leak tight boundary, and piping and cabling inside TC and between TC and the access cell (AC). Water cooling is adopted for concrete shielding walls and the liner. Buried pipes are selected for active cooling of the TC surrounding shielding walls; directly welded pipes on the liner are used to remove nuclear heat of the liner. Technical features and layout of the cooling pipes are preliminary defined. The TC vacuum boundary, which includes the TC liner, an independent TC cover plate, a rubber based sealing gasket, and welding seams between interface shielding plugs and TC liner, is described. Engineering design of the piping and cabling plugs as well as the arrangement of pipes and cables under the TC covering plate and the AC floor are updated. Pipes and cable tunnels inside the shielding plugs are arranged with several bends for minimizing neutron streaming from inside to outside of the TC. Pipes, cables, and the corresponding penetrations between the TC and the AC are carefully arranged for convenient access and maintenances

  19. Efficient myogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells by the transduction of engineered MyoD protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Min Sun [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Biosystems and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Mun, Ji-Young [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ohsuk [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Biosystems and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ki-Sun [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Doo-Byoung, E-mail: dboh@kribb.re.kr [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Biosystems and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •MyoD was engineered to contain protein transduction domain and endosome-disruptive INF7 peptide. •The engineered MyoD-IT showed efficient nuclear targeting through an endosomal escape by INF7 peptide. •By applying MyoD-IT, human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) were differentiated into myogenic cells. •hASCs differentiated by applying MyoD-IT fused to myotubes through co-culturing with mouse myoblasts. •Myogenic differentiation using MyoD-IT is a safe method without the concern of altering the genome. -- Abstract: Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) have great potential as cell sources for the treatment of muscle disorders. To provide a safe method for the myogenic differentiation of hASCs, we engineered the MyoD protein, a key transcription factor for myogenesis. The engineered MyoD (MyoD-IT) was designed to contain the TAT protein transduction domain for cell penetration and the membrane-disrupting INF7 peptide, which is an improved version of the HA2 peptide derived from influenza. MyoD-IT showed greatly improved nuclear targeting ability through an efficient endosomal escape induced by the pH-sensitive membrane disruption of the INF7 peptide. By applying MyoD-IT to a culture, hASCs were efficiently differentiated into long spindle-shaped myogenic cells expressing myosin heavy chains. Moreover, these cells differentiated by an application of MyoD-IT fused to myotubes with high efficiency through co-culturing with mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Because internalized proteins can be degraded in cells without altering the genome, the myogenic differentiation of hASCs using MyoD-IT would be a safe and clinically applicable method.

  20. Combining decellularized human adipose tissue extracellular matrix and adipose-derived stem cells for adipose tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lina; Johnson, Joshua A.; Zhang, Qixu; Elisabeth K. Beahm

    2013-01-01

    Repair of soft-tissue defects resulting from lumpectomy or mastectomy has become an important rehabilitation process for breast cancer patients. This study aimed to provide an adipose tissue engineering platform for soft-tissue defect repair by combining decellularized human adipose tissue extracellular matrix (hDAM) and human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). To derive hDAM, incised human adipose tissues underwent a decellularization process. Effective cell removal and lipid removal were p...

  1. Efficient myogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells by the transduction of engineered MyoD protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •MyoD was engineered to contain protein transduction domain and endosome-disruptive INF7 peptide. •The engineered MyoD-IT showed efficient nuclear targeting through an endosomal escape by INF7 peptide. •By applying MyoD-IT, human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) were differentiated into myogenic cells. •hASCs differentiated by applying MyoD-IT fused to myotubes through co-culturing with mouse myoblasts. •Myogenic differentiation using MyoD-IT is a safe method without the concern of altering the genome. -- Abstract: Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) have great potential as cell sources for the treatment of muscle disorders. To provide a safe method for the myogenic differentiation of hASCs, we engineered the MyoD protein, a key transcription factor for myogenesis. The engineered MyoD (MyoD-IT) was designed to contain the TAT protein transduction domain for cell penetration and the membrane-disrupting INF7 peptide, which is an improved version of the HA2 peptide derived from influenza. MyoD-IT showed greatly improved nuclear targeting ability through an efficient endosomal escape induced by the pH-sensitive membrane disruption of the INF7 peptide. By applying MyoD-IT to a culture, hASCs were efficiently differentiated into long spindle-shaped myogenic cells expressing myosin heavy chains. Moreover, these cells differentiated by an application of MyoD-IT fused to myotubes with high efficiency through co-culturing with mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Because internalized proteins can be degraded in cells without altering the genome, the myogenic differentiation of hASCs using MyoD-IT would be a safe and clinically applicable method

  2. Release of tensile strain on engineered human tendon tissue disturbs cell adhesions, changes matrix architecture, and induces an inflammatory phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayer, Monika L; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas; Zeltz, Cedric; Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Christensen, Lise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Gullberg, Donald; Kjaer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    -inflammatory mediators and tendon phenotypic specific molecules, in an in vitro model where tendon-like tissue was engineered from human tendon cells. Tissue sampling was performed 1, 2, 4 and 6 days after surgical de-tensioning of the tendon construct. When tensile stimulus was removed, integrin type collagen receptors...

  3. Evaluation of viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells cultured onto xenogenic tissue-engineered extracellular matrices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells (HUCs) cultured on tissue-engineered extracellular matrix scaffolds and to assess the potential of extracellular matrixes to support the growth of HUCs in their expected in vivo urine environment.

  4. Towards injectable cell-based tissue-engineered bone : The effect of different calcium phosphate microparticles and pre-culturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persson, C; Johansson, G; Dhert, WJA; Kruyt, Moyo C.; de Bruijn, Joost D.

    2006-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering by combining bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) with a porous scaffold is a promising technology. Current major challenges are to upscale the technique for clinical application and to improve the handling characteristics. With respect to minimal invasive surgery, moldable and/

  5. Stem cell-derived vasculature: A potent and multidimensional technology for basic research, disease modeling, and tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Justin; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Proper blood vessel networks are necessary for constructing and re-constructing tissues, promoting wound healing, and delivering metabolic necessities throughout the body. Conversely, an understanding of vascular dysfunction has provided insight into the pathogenesis and progression of diseases both common and rare. Recent advances in stem cell-based regenerative medicine – including advances in stem cell technologies and related progress in bioscaffold design and complex tissue engineering – have allowed rapid advances in the field of vascular biology, leading in turn to more advanced modeling of vascular pathophysiology and improved engineering of vascularized tissue constructs. In this review we examine recent advances in the field of stem cell-derived vasculature, providing an overview of stem cell technologies as a source for vascular cell types and then focusing on their use in three primary areas: studies of vascular development and angiogenesis, improved disease modeling, and the engineering of vascularized constructs for tissue-level modeling and cell-based therapies. PMID:26427871

  6. New transposon tools tailored for metabolic engineering of Gram-negative microbial cell factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban eMartínez-García

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Re-programming microorganisms to modify their existing functions and/or to bestow bacteria with entirely new-to-Nature tasks have largely relied so far on specialized molecular biology tools. Such endeavors are not only relevant in the burgeoning metabolic engineering arena, but also instrumental to explore the functioning of complex regulatory networks from a fundamental point of view. À la carte modification of bacterial genomes thus calls for novel tools to make genetic manipulations easier. We propose the use of a series of new broad-host-range mini-Tn5 vectors, termed pBAMDs, for the delivery of gene(s into the chromosome of Gram-negative bacteria and for generating saturated mutagenesis libraries in gene function studies. These delivery vectors endow the user with the possibility of easy cloning and subsequent insertion of functional cargoes with three different antibiotic resistance markers (kanamycin, streptomycin, and gentamicin. After validating the pBAMD vectors in the environmental bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440, their use was also illustrated by inserting the entire poly(3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB synthesis pathway from Cupriavidus necator in the chromosome of a phosphotransacetylase mutant of Escherichia coli. PHB is a completely biodegradable polyester with a number of industrial applications that make it attractive as a potential replacement of oil-based plastics. The non-selective nature of chromosomal insertions of the biosynthetic genes was evidenced by a large landscape of PHB synthesis levels in independent clones. One clone was selected and further characterized as a microbial cell factory for PHB accumulation, and it achieved polymer accumulation levels comparable to those of a plasmid-bearing recombinant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the new mini-Tn5 vectors can be used to confer interesting phenotypes in Gram-negative bacteria that would be very difficult to engineer through direct manipulation of the

  7. New Transposon Tools Tailored for Metabolic Engineering of Gram-Negative Microbial Cell Factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Esteban; Aparicio, Tomás; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Nikel, Pablo I.

    2014-01-01

    Re-programming microorganisms to modify their existing functions and/or to bestow bacteria with entirely new-to-Nature tasks have largely relied so far on specialized molecular biology tools. Such endeavors are not only relevant in the burgeoning metabolic engineering arena but also instrumental to explore the functioning of complex regulatory networks from a fundamental point of view. À la carte modification of bacterial genomes thus calls for novel tools to make genetic manipulations easier. We propose the use of a series of new broad-host-range mini-Tn5-vectors, termed pBAMDs, for the delivery of gene(s) into the chromosome of Gram-negative bacteria and for generating saturated mutagenesis libraries in gene function studies. These delivery vectors endow the user with the possibility of easy cloning and subsequent insertion of functional cargoes with three different antibiotic-resistance markers (kanamycin, streptomycin, and gentamicin). After validating the pBAMD vectors in the environmental bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440, their use was also illustrated by inserting the entire poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthesis pathway from Cupriavidus necator in the chromosome of a phosphotransacetylase mutant of Escherichia coli. PHB is a completely biodegradable polyester with a number of industrial applications that make it attractive as a potential replacement of oil-based plastics. The non-selective nature of chromosomal insertions of the biosynthetic genes was evidenced by a large landscape of PHB synthesis levels in independent clones. One clone was selected and further characterized as a microbial cell factory for PHB accumulation, and it achieved polymer accumulation levels comparable to those of a plasmid-bearing recombinant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the new mini-Tn5-vectors can be used to confer interesting phenotypes in Gram-negative bacteria that would be very difficult to engineer through direct manipulation of the structural genes

  8. New design of the forming equipment DRECE for obtaining UFG structure in strip of sheet

    OpenAIRE

    J. Kedron; T. Donic; L. Cizek; Dutkiewicz, J.; K. Malanik; S. Rusz; S. Tylsar

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is realisation of engineering design and manufacture of new type of equipment DRECE (Dual Rolling Equal Channel Extrusion), designated for obtaining UFG structure in strip of sheet.Design/methodology/approach: The equipment enables refinement of grain in strip of sheet by extrusion technology without change of cross-section. Special attention is paid to the design of the forming tool in order to prevent upsetting of sheet or its undulation during the forming process.Fin...

  9. The healing of bony defects by cell-free collagen-based scaffolds compared to stem cell-seeded tissue engineered constructs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, Frank G

    2010-12-01

    One of the key challenges in tissue engineering is to understand the host response to scaffolds and engineered constructs. We present a study in which two collagen-based scaffolds developed for bone repair: a collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) and biomimetic collagen-calcium phosphate (CCP) scaffold, are evaluated in rat cranial defects, both cell-free and when cultured with MSCs prior to implantation. The results demonstrate that both cell-free scaffolds showed excellent healing relative to the empty defect controls and somewhat surprisingly, to the tissue engineered (MSC-seeded) constructs. Immunological analysis of the healing response showed higher M1 macrophage activity in the cell-seeded scaffolds. However, when the M2 macrophage response was analysed, both groups (MSC-seeded and non-seeded scaffolds) showed significant activity of these cells which are associated with an immunomodulatory and tissue remodelling response. Interestingly, the location of this response was confined to the construct periphery, where a capsule had formed, in the MSC-seeded groups as opposed to areas of new bone formation in the non-seeded groups. This suggests that matrix deposited by MSCs during in vitro culture may adversely affect healing by acting as a barrier to macrophage-led remodelling when implanted in vivo. This study thus improves our understanding of host response in bone tissue engineering.

  10. Evaluation of overhead guide sign sheeting materials to increase visibility and safety for drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidat, Mohammed Said; Rys, Malgorzata J; Rys, Andrew; Du, Juan

    2016-09-01

    Overhead guide sign visibility must increase to improve driver safety on roadways. Two methods increase overhead guide sign visibility: sign illumination and use of retroreflective sheeting materials. This paper compares three types of retroreflective sheeting: Engineering Grade (type I), Diamond Grade (type XI), and High Intensity (type IV). A field experiment was conducted at night using licensed drivers to determine the optimum retroreflective sheeting material that increases sign visibility and legibility. Results showed that, of the three types of retroreflective sheeting, Diamond Grade (type XI) sheeting requires minimum illuminance to be visible, followed by High Intensity (type IV) sheeting. Cost analysis, including labor, maintenance, and material cost components of the three retroreflective sheeting materials, showed that High Intensity (type IV) could increase sign visibility and legibility at night for Departments of Transportation with limited budgets, consequently increasing driver safety on roadways. PMID:27184321

  11. T Cells Engineered With Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting NKG2D Ligands Display Lethal Toxicity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSeggelen, Heather; Hammill, Joanne A; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Tantalo, Daniela G M; Kwiecien, Jacek M; Denisova, Galina F; Rabinovich, Brian; Wan, Yonghong; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2015-10-01

    Ligands for the NKG2D receptor are overexpressed on tumors, making them interesting immunotherapy targets. To assess the tumoricidal properties of T cells directed to attack NKG2D ligands, we engineered murine T cells with two distinct NKG2D-based chimeric antigen receptors (CARs): (i) a fusion between the NKG2D receptor and the CD3ζ chain and (ii) a conventional second-generation CAR, where the extracellular domain of NKG2D was fused to CD28 and CD3ζ. To enhance the CAR surface expression, we also engineered T cells to coexpress DAP10. In vitro functionality and surface expression levels of all three CARs was greater in BALB/c T cells than C57BL/6 T cells, indicating strain-specific differences. Upon adoptive transfer of NKG2D-CAR-T cells into syngeneic animals, we observed significant clinical toxicity resulting in morbidity and mortality. The severity of these toxicities varied between the CAR configurations and paralleled their in vitro NKG2D surface expression. BALB/c mice were more sensitive to these toxicities than C57BL/6 mice, consistent with the higher in vitro functionality of BALB/c T cells. Treatment with cyclophosphamide prior to adoptive transfer exacerbated the toxicity. We conclude that while NKG2D ligands may be useful targets for immunotherapy, the pursuit of NKG2D-based CAR-T cell therapies should be undertaken with caution. PMID:26122933

  12. Development of Collagen/Demineralized Bone Powder Scaffolds and Periosteum-Derived Cells for Bone Tissue Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilairat Leeanansaksiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate physical and biological properties of collagen (COL and demineralized bone powder (DBP scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. DBP was prepared and divided into three groups, based on various particle sizes: 75–125 µm, 125–250 µm, and 250–500 µm. DBP was homogeneously mixed with type I collagen and three-dimensional scaffolds were constructed, applying chemical crosslinking and lyophilization. Upon culture with human periosteum-derived cells (PD cells, osteogenic differentiation of PD cells was investigated using alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and calcium assay kits. The physical properties of the COL/DBP scaffolds were obviously different from COL scaffolds, irrespective of the size of DBP. In addition, PD cells cultured with COL scaffolds showed significantly higher cell adhesion and proliferation than those with COL/DBP scaffolds. In contrast, COL/DBP scaffolds exhibited greater osteoinductive potential than COL scaffolds. The PD cells with COL/DBP scaffolds possessed higher ALP activity than those with COL scaffolds. PD cells cultured with COL/DBP scaffolds with 250–500 mm particle size yielded the maximum calcium deposition. In conclusion, PD cells cultured on the scaffolds could exhibit osteoinductive potential. The composite scaffold of COL/DBP with 250–500 mm particle size could be considered a potential bone tissue engineering implant.

  13. Fiber/collagen composites for ligament tissue engineering: influence of elastic moduli of sparse aligned fibers on mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Patrick S; Verbridge, Scott S; Dahlgren, Linda A; Kakar, Sanjeev; Guelcher, Scott A; Goldstein, Aaron S

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun microfibers are attractive for the engineering of oriented tissues because they present instructive topographic and mechanical cues to cells. However, high-density microfiber networks are too cell-impermeable for most tissue applications. Alternatively, the distribution of sparse microfibers within a three-dimensional hydrogel could present instructive cues to guide cell organization while not inhibiting cell behavior. In this study, thin (∼5 fibers thick) layers of aligned microfibers (0.7 μm) were embedded within collagen hydrogels containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cultured for up to 14 days, and assayed for expression of ligament markers and imaged for cell organization. These microfibers were generated through the electrospinning of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(ester-urethane) (PEUR), or a 75/25 PEUR/PCL blend to produce microfiber networks with elastic moduli of 31, 15, and 5.6 MPa, respectively. MSCs in composites containing 5.6 MPa fibers exhibited increased expression of the ligament marker scleraxis and the contractile phenotype marker α-smooth muscle actin versus the stiffer fiber composites. Additionally, cells within the 5.6 MPa microfiber composites were more oriented compared to cells within the 15 and 31 MPa microfiber composites. Together, these data indicate that the mechanical properties of microfiber/collagen composites can be tuned for the engineering of ligament and other target tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1894-1901, 2016. PMID:27037972

  14. Light trapping in thin film solar cells using photonic engineering device concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutitu, James Gichuhi

    In this era of uncertainty concerning future energy solutions, strong reservations have arisen over the continued use and pursuit of fossil fuels and other conventional sources of energy. Moreover, there is currently a strong and global push for the implementation of stringent measures, in order to reduce the amount of green house gases emitted by every nation. As a consequence, there has emerged a sudden and frantic rush for new renewable energy solutions. In this world of renewable energy technologies is where we find photovoltaic (PV) technology today. However, as is, there are still many issues that need to be addressed before solar energy technologies become economically viable and available to all people, in every part of the world. This renewed interest in the development of solar electricity, has led to the advancement of new avenues that address the issues of cost and efficiency associated with PV. To this end, one of the prominent approaches being explored is thin film solar cell (TFSC) technology, which offers prospects of lower material costs and enables larger units of manufacture than conventional wafer based technology. However, TFSC technologies suffer from one major problem; they have lower efficiencies than conventional wafer based solar cell technologies. This lesser efficiency is based on a number of reasons, one of which is that with less material, there is less volume for the absorption of incident photons. This shortcoming leads to the need for optical light trapping; which is concerned with admitting the maximum amount of light into the solar cell and keeping the light within the structure for as long as possible. In this thesis, I present the fundamental scientific ideas, practice and methodology behind the application of photonic engineering device concepts to increase the light trapping capacity of thin film solar cells. In the introductory chapters, I develop the basic ideas behind light trapping in a sequential manner, where the effects

  15. Synchronization of flexible sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Elfring, Gwynn J; 10.1017/S0022112011000814

    2011-01-01

    When swimming in close proximity, some microorganisms such as spermatozoa synchronize their flagella. Previous work on swimming sheets showed that such synchronization requires a geometrical asymmetry in the flagellar waveforms. Here we inquire about a physical mechanism responsible for such symmetry-breaking in nature. Using a two-dimensional model, we demonstrate that flexible sheets with symmetric internal forcing, deform when interacting with each other via a thin fluid layer in such a way as to systematically break the overall waveform symmetry, thereby always evolving to an in-phase conformation where energy dissipation is minimized. This dynamics is shown to be mathematically equivalent to that obtained for prescribed waveforms in viscoelastic fluids, emphasizing the crucial role of elasticity in symmetry-breaking and synchronization.

  16. HPV-E7 Delivered by Engineered Exosomes Elicits a Protective CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Di Bonito

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed an innovative strategy to induce a cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response against protein antigens of choice. It relies on the production of exosomes, i.e., nanovesicles spontaneously released by all cell types. We engineered the upload of huge amounts of protein antigens upon fusion with an anchoring protein (i.e., HIV-1 Nefmut, which is an inactive protein incorporating in exosomes at high levels also when fused with foreign proteins. We compared the immunogenicity of engineered exosomes uploading human papillomavirus (HPV-E7 with that of lentiviral virus-like particles (VLPs incorporating equivalent amounts of the same antigen. These exosomes, whose limiting membrane was decorated with VSV-G, i.e., an envelope protein inducing pH-dependent endosomal fusion, proved to be as immunogenic as the cognate VLPs. It is noteworthy that the immunogenicity of the engineered exosomes remained unaltered in the absence of VSV-G. Most important, we provide evidence that the inoculation in mouse of exosomes uploading HPV-E7 induces production of anti-HPV E7 CTLs, blocks the growth of syngeneic tumor cells inoculated after immunization, and controls the development of tumor cells inoculated before the exosome challenge. These results represent the proof-of-concept about both feasibility and efficacy of the Nefmut-based exosome platform for the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity.

  17. Tissue-engineered endothelial cell layers on surface-modified Ti for inhibiting in vitro platelet adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tissue-engineered endothelial layer was prepared by culturing endothelial cells on a fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)–l-ascorbic acid phosphate magnesium salt n-hydrate (AsMg)–apatite (Ap) coated titanium plate. The FGF-2–AsMg–Ap coated Ti plate was prepared by immersing a Ti plate in supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions supplemented with FGF-2 and AsMg. The FGF-2–AsMg–Ap layer on the Ti plate accelerated proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and showed slightly higher, but not statistically significant, nitric oxide release from HUVECs than on as-prepared Ti. The endothelial layer maintained proper function of the endothelial cells and markedly inhibited in vitro platelet adhesion. The tissue-engineered endothelial layer formed on the FGF-2–AsMg–Ap layer is promising for ameliorating platelet activation and thrombus formation on cardiovascular implants. (paper)

  18. Analysis of Survivin-Specific T Cells in Breast Cancer Patients Using Human DCs Engineered with Survivin mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Met, Ozcan; Svane, Inge Marie

    2013-01-01

    The observation that dendritic cells (DCs) charged with tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is a potent strategy to elicit protective immunity in tumor-bearings hosts has prompted extensive testing of DCs as cellular adjuvant in cancer vaccines. To improve the clinical development of DC-based cancer...... vaccines, it may be beneficial to analyze preexistent immunity against TAAs in cancer patients because it may be easier to expand a memory pool of T cells compared to generating new immunity. Recent research shows that engineering DCs to synthesize tumor epitopes endogenously by transfecting DCs with m......RNA-encoding TAAs are particular effective in stimulating robust T-responses in vitro and in vivo. In this chapter, we describe the methodology to analyze for survivin-specific T cells in breast cancer patients using human DCs engineered with survivin mRNA....

  19. Information sheets on energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These sheets, presented by the Cea, bring some information, in the energy domain, on the following topics: the world energy demand and the energy policy in France and in Europe, the part of the nuclear power in the energy of the future, the greenhouse gases emissions and the fight against the greenhouse effect, the carbon dioxide storage cost and the hydrogen economy. (A.L.B.)

  20. Biomolecular Science (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-04-01

    A brief fact sheet about NREL Photobiology and Biomolecular Science. The research goal of NREL's Biomolecular Science is to enable cost-competitive advanced lignocellulosic biofuels production by understanding the science critical for overcoming biomass recalcitrance and developing new product and product intermediate pathways. NREL's Photobiology focuses on understanding the capture of solar energy in photosynthetic systems and its use in converting carbon dioxide and water directly into hydrogen and advanced biofuels.