WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell shape

  1. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy to be dissipated per unit volume. We use the model to understand and contrast growth in bacteria with different shapes such as spherical, ellipsoidal, cylindrical and toroidal morphologies. Coupling growth to cell wall constriction, we predict a discontinuous shape transformation, from partial constriction to cell division, as a function of the chemical potential driving cell-wall synthesis. Our model for cell wall energy and shape dynamics relates growth kinetics with cell geometry, and provides a unified framework to d...

  2. Shape of growth cells in directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocheau, A; Georgelin, M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize experimentally the whole shape of the growth cells displayed in directional solidification and its evolution with respect to control parameters. A library of cells is first built up from observation of directional solidification of a succinonitrile alloy in a large range of pulling velocity, cell spacing, and thermal gradient. Cell boundaries are then extracted from these images and fitted by trial functions on their whole profile, from cell tip to cell grooves. A coherent evolution of the fit parameters with the control parameters is evidenced. It enables us to characterize the whole cell shape by a single function involving only two parameters which vary smoothly in the control parameter space. This, in particular, evidences a continuous evolution of the cell geometry at the cell to dendrite transition which denies the existence of a change of branch of solutions at the occurrence of sidebranching. More generally, this global determination of cell shape complemented with a previous determination of the position of cells in the thermal field (the cell tip undercooling) provides a complete characterization of growth solutions and of their evolutions in this system. It thus brings about a relevant framework for testing and improving theoretical and numerical understanding of cell shapes and cell stability in directional solidification.

  3. Shape-dependent optoelectronic cell lysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kremer, Clemens; Witte, Christian; Neale, Steven L.; Reboud, Julien; Barrett, Michael P.; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    We show an electrical method to break open living cells amongst a population of different cell types, where cell selection is based upon their shape. We implement the technique on an optoelectronic platform, where light, focused onto a semiconductor surface from a video projector creates a reconfigurable pattern of electrodes. One can choose the area of cells to be lysed in real-time, from single cells to large areas, simply by redrawing the projected pattern. We show that the method, based o...

  4. Oriented Shape Index Histograms for Cell Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    evaluate our new feature descriptor using a public dataset consisting of HEp-2 cell images from indirect immunoflourescence lighting. Our results show that we can improve classification performance significantly when including the shape index orientation. Notably, we show that shape index orientation......We propose a novel extension to the shape index histogram feature descriptor where the orientation of the second-order curvature is included in the histograms. The orientation of the shape index is reminiscent but not equal to gradient orientation which is widely used for feature description. We...

  5. Shaping the Archaeal Cell Envelope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellen, Albert F.; Zolghadr, Behnam; Driessen, Arnold M. J.; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2010-01-01

    Although archaea have a similar cellular organization as other prokaryotes, the lipid composition of their membranes and their cell surface is unique. Here we discuss recent developments in our understanding of the archaeal protein secretion mechanisms, the assembly of macromolecular cell surface st

  6. Physics of cell elasticity, shape and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.; Gov, N.; Nicolas, A.; Schwarz, U. S.; Tlusty, T.

    2005-07-01

    We review recent theoretical work that analyzes experimental measurements of the shape, fluctuations and adhesion properties of biological cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the cytoskeleton and cell elasticity and we contrast the shape and adhesion of elastic cells with fluid-filled vesicles. In red blood cells (RBC), the cytoskeleton consists of a two-dimensional network of spectrin proteins. Our analysis of the wavevector and frequency dependence of the fluctuation spectrum of RBC indicates that the spectrin network acts as a confining potential that reduces the fluctuations of the lipid bilayer membrane. However, since the cytoskeleton is only sparsely connected to the bilayer, one cannot regard the composite cytoskeleton-membrane as a polymerized object with a shear modulus. The sensitivity of RBC fluctuations and shapes to ATP concentration may reflect topological defects induced in the cytoskeleton network by ATP. The shapes of cells that adhere to a substrate are strongly determined by the cytoskeletal elasticity that can be varied experimentally by drugs that depolymerize the cytoskeleton. This leads to a tension-driven retraction of the cell body and a pearling instability of the resulting ray-like protrusions. Recent experiments have shown that adhering cells exert polarized forces on substrates. The interactions of such “force dipoles” in either bulk gels or on surfaces can be used to predict the nature of self-assembly of cell aggregates and may be important in the formation of artificial tissues. Finally, we note that cell adhesion strongly depends on the forces exerted on the adhesion sites by the tension of the cytoskeleton. The size and shape of the adhesion regions are strongly modified as the tension is varied and we present an elastic model that relates this tension to deformations that induce the recruitment of new molecules to the adhesion region. In all these examples, cell shape and adhesion differ from vesicle shape and

  7. Cell shape regulation through mechanosensory feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Krithika; Luo, Tianzhi; Robinson, Douglas N; Iglesias, Pablo A

    2015-08-01

    Cells undergo controlled changes in morphology in response to intracellular and extracellular signals. These changes require a means for sensing and interpreting the signalling cues, for generating the forces that act on the cell's physical material, and a control system to regulate this process. Experiments on Dictyostelium amoebae have shown that force-generating proteins can localize in response to external mechanical perturbations. This mechanosensing, and the ensuing mechanical feedback, plays an important role in minimizing the effect of mechanical disturbances in the course of changes in cell shape, especially during cell division, and likely in other contexts, such as during three-dimensional migration. Owing to the complexity of the feedback system, which couples mechanical and biochemical signals involved in shape regulation, theoretical approaches can guide further investigation by providing insights that are difficult to decipher experimentally. Here, we present a computational model that explains the different mechanosensory and mechanoresponsive behaviours observed in Dictyostelium cells. The model features a multiscale description of myosin II bipolar thick filament assembly that includes cooperative and force-dependent myosin-actin binding, and identifies the feedback mechanisms hidden in the observed mechanoresponsive behaviours of Dictyostelium cells during micropipette aspiration experiments. These feedbacks provide a mechanistic explanation of cellular retraction and hence cell shape regulation. PMID:26224568

  8. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  9. Cell shape identification using digital holographic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zakrisson, Johan; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    We present a cost-effective, simple and fast digital holographic microscopy method based upon Rayleigh-Sommerfeld back propagation for identification of the geometrical shape of a cell. The method was tested using synthetic hologram images generated by ray-tracing software and from experimental images of semi-transparent spherical beads and living red blood cells. Our results show that by only using the real part of the back-reconstructed amplitude the proposed method can provide information of the geometrical shape of the object and at the same time accurately determine the axial position of the object under study. The proposed method can be used in flow chamber assays for pathophysiological studies where fast morphological changes of cells are studied in high numbers and at different heights.

  10. A Bacterial Cell Shape-Determining Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanjie; Frirdich, Emilisa; Taylor, Jennifer A; Chan, Anson C K; Blair, Kris M; Vermeulen, Jenny; Ha, Reuben; Murphy, Michael E P; Salama, Nina R; Gaynor, Erin C; Tanner, Martin E

    2016-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni are human pathogens and causative agents of gastric ulcers/cancer and gastroenteritis, respectively. Recent studies have uncovered a series of proteases that are responsible for maintaining the helical shape of these organisms. The H. pylori metalloprotease Csd4 and its C. jejuni homologue Pgp1 cleave the amide bond between meso-diaminopimelate and iso-d-glutamic acid in truncated peptidoglycan side chains. Deletion of either csd4 or pgp1 results in bacteria with a straight rod phenotype, a reduced ability to move in viscous media, and reduced pathogenicity. In this work, a phosphinic acid-based pseudodipeptide inhibitor was designed to act as a tetrahedral intermediate analog against the Csd4 enzyme. The phosphinic acid was shown to inhibit the cleavage of the alternate substrate, Ac-l-Ala-iso-d-Glu-meso-Dap, with a Ki value of 1.5 μM. Structural analysis of the Csd4-inhibitor complex shows that the phosphinic acid displaces the zinc-bound water and chelates the metal in a bidentate fashion. The phosphinate oxygens also interact with the key acid/base residue, Glu222, and the oxyanion-stabilizing residue, Arg86. The results are consistent with the "promoted-water pathway" mechanism for carboxypeptidase A catalysis. Studies on cultured bacteria showed that the inhibitor causes significant cell straightening when incubated with H. pylori at millimolar concentrations. A diminished, yet observable, effect on the morphology of C. jejuni was also apparent. Cell straightening was more pronounced with an acapsular C. jejuni mutant strain compared to the wild type, suggesting that the capsule impaired inhibitor accessibility. These studies demonstrate that a highly polar compound is capable of crossing the outer membrane and altering cell shape, presumably by inhibiting cell shape determinant proteases. Peptidoglycan proteases acting as cell shape determinants represent novel targets for the development of antimicrobials

  11. Pearling in cells: A clue to understanding cell shape

    CERN Document Server

    Bar-Ziv, Roy; Moses, Elisha; Safran, Samuel A; Bershadsky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Gradual disruption of the actin cytoskeleton induces a series of structural shape changes in cells leading to a transformation of cylindrical cell extensions into a periodic chain of "pearls". Quantitative measurements of the pearling instability give a square-root behavior for the wavelength as a function of drug concentration. We present a theory that explains these observations in terms of the interplay between rigidity of the submembranous actin shell and tension that is induced by boundary conditions set by adhesion points. The theory allows estimation of the rigidity and thickness of this supporting shell. The same theoretical considerations explain the shape of nonadherent edges in the general case of untreated cells.

  12. Joint modeling of cell and nuclear shape variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gregory R; Buck, Taraz E; Sullivan, Devin P; Rohde, Gustavo K; Murphy, Robert F

    2015-11-01

    Modeling cell shape variation is critical to our understanding of cell biology. Previous work has demonstrated the utility of nonrigid image registration methods for the construction of nonparametric nuclear shape models in which pairwise deformation distances are measured between all shapes and are embedded into a low-dimensional shape space. Using these methods, we explore the relationship between cell shape and nuclear shape. We find that these are frequently dependent on each other and use this as the motivation for the development of combined cell and nuclear shape space models, extending nonparametric cell representations to multiple-component three-dimensional cellular shapes and identifying modes of joint shape variation. We learn a first-order dynamics model to predict cell and nuclear shapes, given shapes at a previous time point. We use this to determine the effects of endogenous protein tags or drugs on the shape dynamics of cell lines and show that tagged C1QBP reduces the correlation between cell and nuclear shape. To reduce the computational cost of learning these models, we demonstrate the ability to reconstruct shape spaces using a fraction of computed pairwise distances. The open-source tools provide a powerful basis for future studies of the molecular basis of cell organization. PMID:26354424

  13. Cell sorting using efficient light shaping approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of diseases can save lives. Hence, there is emphasis in sorting rare disease-indicating cells within small dilute quantities such as in the confines of lab-on-a-chip devices. In our work, we use optical forces to isolate red blood cells detected by machine vision. This approach is gentler, less invasive and more economical compared to conventional FACS systems. As cells are less responsive to plastic or glass beads commonly used in the optical manipulation literature, and since laser safety would be an issue in clinical use, we develop efficient approaches in utilizing lasers and light modulation devices. The Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method that can be used for efficiently illuminating spatial light modulators or creating well-defined contiguous optical traps is supplemented by diffractive techniques capable of integrating the available light and creating 2D or 3D beam distributions aimed at the positions of the detected cells. Furthermore, the beam shaping freedom provided by GPC can allow optimizations in the beam's propagation and its interaction with the catapulted cells.

  14. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  15. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovicka, J.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Paunov, V.N.

    2013-01-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called "colloid antibodies", were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating

  16. Cell shape regulates global histone acetylation in human mammaryepithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Beyec, Johanne; Xu, Ren; Lee, Sun-Young; Nelson, Celeste M.; Rizki, Aylin; Alcaraz, Jordi; Bissell, Mina J.

    2007-02-28

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell morphology and gene expression in vivo; these relationships are maintained in three-dimensional (3D) cultures of mammary epithelial cells. In the presence of laminin-rich ECM (lrECM), mammary epithelial cells round up and undergo global histone deacetylation, a process critical for their functional differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether lrECM-dependent cell rounding and global histone deacetylation are indeed part of a common physical-biochemical pathway. Using 3D cultures as well as nonadhesive and micropatterned substrata, here we showed that the cell 'rounding' caused by lrECM was sufficient to induce deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 in the absence of biochemical cues. Microarray and confocal analysis demonstrated that this deacetylation in 3D culture is associated with a global increase in chromatin condensation and a reduction in gene expression. Whereas cells cultured on plastic substrata formed prominent stress fibers, cells grown in 3D lrECM or on micropatterns lacked these structures. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D phenocopied the lrECM-induced cell rounding and histone deacetylation. These results reveal a novel link between ECM-controlled cell shape and chromatin structure, and suggest that this link is mediated by changes in the actin cytoskeleton.

  17. HEp-2 Cell Classification Using Shape Index Histograms With Donut-Shaped Spatial Pooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method for automatic classification of indirect immunoflourescence images of HEp-2 cells into different staining pattern classes. Our method is based on a new texture measure called shape index histograms that captures second-order image structure at multiple scales. Moreover, we...... introduce a spatial decomposition scheme which is radially symmetric and suitable for cell images. The spatial decomposition is performed using donut-shaped pooling regions of varying sizes when gathering histogram contributions. We evaluate our method using both the ICIP 2013 and the ICPR 2012 competition...... datasets. Our results show that shape index histograms are superior to other popular texture descriptors for HEp-2 cell classification. Moreover, when comparing to other automated systems for HEp-2 cell classification we show that shape index histograms are very competitive; especially considering...

  18. Staying in Shape: the Impact of Cell Shape on Bacterial Survival in Diverse Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Desirée C; Blair, Kris M; Salama, Nina R

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria display an abundance of cellular forms and can change shape during their life cycle. Many plausible models regarding the functional significance of cell morphology have emerged. A greater understanding of the genetic programs underpinning morphological variation in diverse bacterial groups, combined with assays of bacteria under conditions that mimic their varied natural environments, from flowing freshwater streams to diverse human body sites, provides new opportunities to probe the functional significance of cell shape. Here we explore shape diversity among bacteria, at the levels of cell geometry, size, and surface appendages (both placement and number), as it relates to survival in diverse environments. Cell shape in most bacteria is determined by the cell wall. A major challenge in this field has been deconvoluting the effects of differences in the chemical properties of the cell wall and the resulting cell shape perturbations on observed fitness changes. Still, such studies have begun to reveal the selective pressures that drive the diverse forms (or cell wall compositions) observed in mammalian pathogens and bacteria more generally, including efficient adherence to biotic and abiotic surfaces, survival under low-nutrient or stressful conditions, evasion of mammalian complement deposition, efficient dispersal through mucous barriers and tissues, and efficient nutrient acquisition. PMID:26864431

  19. Staying in Shape: the Impact of Cell Shape on Bacterial Survival in Diverse Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Desirée C; Blair, Kris M; Salama, Nina R

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria display an abundance of cellular forms and can change shape during their life cycle. Many plausible models regarding the functional significance of cell morphology have emerged. A greater understanding of the genetic programs underpinning morphological variation in diverse bacterial groups, combined with assays of bacteria under conditions that mimic their varied natural environments, from flowing freshwater streams to diverse human body sites, provides new opportunities to probe the functional significance of cell shape. Here we explore shape diversity among bacteria, at the levels of cell geometry, size, and surface appendages (both placement and number), as it relates to survival in diverse environments. Cell shape in most bacteria is determined by the cell wall. A major challenge in this field has been deconvoluting the effects of differences in the chemical properties of the cell wall and the resulting cell shape perturbations on observed fitness changes. Still, such studies have begun to reveal the selective pressures that drive the diverse forms (or cell wall compositions) observed in mammalian pathogens and bacteria more generally, including efficient adherence to biotic and abiotic surfaces, survival under low-nutrient or stressful conditions, evasion of mammalian complement deposition, efficient dispersal through mucous barriers and tissues, and efficient nutrient acquisition.

  20. Cell shape and organelle modification in apoptotic U937 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Montinari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available U937 cells induced to apoptosis, progressively and dramatically modified their cell shape by intense blebbing formation, leading to the production of apoptotic bodies. The blebs evolved with time; milder forms of blebbing involving only a region or just the cortical part of the cytoplasm were observed within the first hour of incubation with puromycin; blebbing involving the whole cell body with very deep constrictions is the most frequent event observed during late times of incubation. The ultrastructural analysis of apoptotic cells revealed characteristic features of nuclear fragmentation (budding and cleavage mode and cytoplasmatic modifications. The cytoplasm of blebs does not contain organelles, such as ribosomes or mitochondria. Scarce presence of endoplasmic reticulum can be observed at the site of bleb detachment. However, blebbing is a dispensable event as evaluated by using inhibitor of actin polymerization. In the present study, the progressive modifications of the nucleus, mitochondria, nuclear fragmentation, cytoplasmic blebs formation and production of apoptotic bodies in U937 monocytic cells induced to apoptosis by puromycin (an inhibitor of protein synthesis were simultaneously analyzed.

  1. Light-dependent governance of cell shape dimensions in cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beronda L Montgomery

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of cellular dimension is important for the function and survival of cells. Cellular dimensions, such as size and shape, are regulated throughout the life cycle of bacteria and can be adapted in response to environmental changes to fine-tune cellular fitness. Cell size and shape are generally coordinated with cell growth and division. Cytoskeletal regulation of cell shape and cell wall biosynthesis and/or deposition occurs in a range of organisms. Photosynthetic organisms, such as cyanobacteria, particularly exhibit light-dependent regulation of morphogenes and generation of reactive oxygen species and other signals that can impact cellular dimensions. Environmental signals initiate adjustments of cellular dimensions, which may be vitally important for optimizing resource acquisition and utilization or for coupling the cellular dimensions with the regulation of subcellular organization to maintain optimal metabolism. Although the involvement of cytoskeletal components in the regulation of cell shape is widely accepted, the signaling factors that regulate cytoskeletal and other distinct components involved in cell shape control, particularly in response to changes in external light cues, remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, factors impacting the inter-coordination of growth and division, the relationship between the regulation of cellular dimensions and central carbon metabolism, and consideration of the effects of specific environment signals, primarily light, on cell dimensions in cyanobacteria will be discussed. Current knowledge about the molecular bases of the light-dependent regulation of cellular dimensions and cell shape in cyanobacteria will be highlighted.

  2. Shape representation by a network of V4-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Thomas M; Finkel, Leif H

    2007-10-01

    Cells in extrastriate visual cortex have been reported to be selective for various configurations of local contour shape [Pasupathy, A., & Connor, C. E. (2001). Shape representation in area V4: Position-specific tuning for boundary conformation. The Journal of Neurophysiology, 86 (5), 2505-2519; Hegdé, J., & Van Essen, D. C. (2003). Strategies of shape representation in macaque visual area V2. Visual Neuroscience, 20 (3), 313-328]. Specifically, Pasupathy and Connor found that in area V4 most cells are strongly responsive to a particular local contour conformation located at a specific position on the object's boundary. We used a population of "V4-like cells"-units sensitive to multiple shape features modeled after V4 cell behavior-to generate representations of different shapes. Standard classification algorithms (earth mover's distance, support vector machines) applied to this population representation demonstrate high recognition accuracies classifying handwritten digits in the MNIST database and objects in the MPEG-7 Shape Silhouette database. We compare the performance of the V4-like unit representation to the "shape context" representation of Belongie et al. [Belongie, S., Malik, J., & Puzicha, J. (2002). Shape matching and object recognition using shape contexts. IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 24 (24), 509-522]. Results show roughly comparable recognition accuracies using the two representations when tested on portions of the MNIST database. We analyze the relative contributions of various V4-like feature sensitivities to recognition accuracy and robustness to noise - feature sensitivities include curvature magnitude, direction of curvature, global orientation of the contour segment, distance of the contour segment from object center, and modulatory effect of adjacent contour regions. Among these, local curvature appears to be the most informative variable for shape recognition. Our results support the hypothesis that V4

  3. Cell sorting using efficient light shaping approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson;

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of diseases can save lives. Hence, there is emphasis in sorting rare disease-indicating cells within small dilute quantities such as in the confines of lab-on-a-chip devices. In our work, we use optical forces to isolate red blood cells detected by machine vision. This approach...... and light modulation devices. The Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method that can be used for efficiently illuminating spatial light modulators or creating well-defined contiguous optical traps is supplemented by diffractive techniques capable of integrating the available light and creating 2D or 3D beam...

  4. Influence of Helical Cell Shape on Motility of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Joseph; Martinez, Laura; Salama, Nina; Bansil, Rama; Boston University Collaboration; University of Washington Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria's body shape plays an important role in motility by effecting chemotaxis, swimming mechanisms, and swimming speed. A prime example of this is the bacteria Helicobacter Pylori;whose helical shape has long been believed to provide an advantage in penetrating the viscous mucus layer protecting the stomach lining, its niche environment. To explore this we have performed bacteria tracking experiments of both wild-type bacteria along with mutants, which have a straight rod shape. A wide distribution of speeds was found. This distribution reflects both a result of temporal variation in speed and different shape morphologies in the bacterial population. Our results show that body shape plays less role in a simple fluid. However, in a more viscous solution the helical shape results in increased swimming speeds. In addition, we use experimentally obtained cell shape measurements to model the hydrodynamic influence of cell shape on swimming speed using resistive force theory. The results agree with the experiment, especially when we fold in the temporal distribution. Interestingly, our results suggest distinct wild-type subpopulations with varying number of half helices can lead to different swimming speeds. NSF PHY

  5. Intergenerational continuity of cell shape dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Charles S.; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the intergenerational shape dynamics of single Caulobacter crescentus cells using a novel combination of imaging techniques and theoretical modeling. We determine the dynamics of cell pole-to-pole lengths, cross-sectional widths, and medial curvatures from high accuracy measurements of cell contours. Moreover, these shape parameters are determined for over 250 cells across approximately 10000 total generations, which affords high statistical precision. Our data and model show that constriction is initiated early in the cell cycle and that its dynamics are controlled by the time scale of exponential longitudinal growth. Based on our extensive and detailed growth and contour data, we develop a minimal mechanical model that quantitatively accounts for the cell shape dynamics and suggests that the asymmetric location of the division plane reflects the distinct mechanical properties of the stalked and swarmer poles. Furthermore, we find that the asymmetry in the division plane location is inherited from the previous generation. We interpret these results in terms of the current molecular understanding of shape, growth, and division of C. crescentus.

  6. Human disc cells in monolayer vs 3D culture: cell shape, division and matrix formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Edward N

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between cell shape, proliferation, and extracellular matrix (ECM production, important aspects of cell behavior, is examined in a little-studied cell type, the human annulus cell from the intervertebral disc, during monolayer vs three-dimensional (3D culture. Results Three experimental studies showed that cells respond specifically to culture microenvironments by changes in cell shape, mitosis and ECM production: 1 Cell passages showed extensive immunohistochemical evidence of Type I and II collagens only in 3D culture. Chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate were abundant in both monolayer and 3D cultures. 2 Cells showed significantly greater proliferation in monolayer in the presence of platelet-derived growth factor compared to cells in 3D. 3 Cells on Matrigel™-coated monolayer substrates became rounded and formed nodular colonies, a finding absent during monolayer growth. Conclusions The cell's in vivo interactions with the ECM can regulate shape, gene expression and other cell functions. The shape of the annulus cell changes markedly during life: the young, healthy disc contains spindle shaped cells and abundant collagen. With aging and degeneration, many cells assume a strikingly different appearance, become rounded and are surrounded by unusual accumulations of ECM products. In vitro manipulation of disc cells provides an experimental window for testing how disc cells from given individuals respond when they are grown in environments which direct cells to have either spindle- or rounded-shapes. In vitro assessment of the response of such cells to platelet-derived growth factor and to Matrigel™ showed a continued influence of cell shape even in the presence of a growth factor stimulus. These findings contribute new information to the important issue of the influence of cell shape on cell behavior.

  7. Testing for nonrandom shape similarity between sister cells using automated shape comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Monica; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2009-02-01

    Several reports in the biological literature have indicated that when a living cell divides, the two daughter cells have a tendency to be mirror images of each other in terms of their overall cell shape. This phenomenon would be consistent with inheritance of spatial organization from mother cell to daughters. However the published data rely on a small number of examples that were visually chosen, raising potential concerns about inadvertent selection bias. We propose to revisit this issue using automated quantitative shape comparison methods which would have no contribution from the observer and which would allow statistical testing of similarity in large numbers of cells. In this report we describe a first order approach to the problem using rigid curve matching. Using test images, we compare a pointwise correspondence based distance metric with a chamfer matching strategy and find that the latter provides better correspondence and smaller distances between aligned curves, especially when we allow nonrigid deformation of the outlines in addition to rotation.

  8. Cell shape recognition by colloidal cell imprints: Energy of the cell-imprint interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2015-09-01

    The results presented in this study are aimed at the theoretical estimate of the interactions between a spherical microbial cell and the colloidal cell imprints in terms of the Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek (DLVO) surface forces. We adapted the Derjaguin approximation to take into account the geometry factor in the colloidal interaction between a spherical target particle and a hemispherical shell at two different orientations with respect to each other. We took into account only classical DLVO surface forces, i.e., the van der Waals and the electric double layer forces, in the interaction of a spherical target cell and a hemispherical shell as a function of their size ratio, mutual orientation, distance between their surfaces, their respective surface potentials, and the ionic strength of the aqueous solution. We found that the calculated interaction energies are several orders higher when match and recognition between the target cell and the target cell imprint is achieved. Our analysis revealed that the recognition effect of the hemispherical shell towards the target microsphere comes from the greatly increased surface contact area when a full match of their size and shape is produced. When the interaction between the surfaces of the hemishell and the target cell is attractive, the recognition greatly amplifies the attraction and this increases the likelihood of them to bind strongly. However, if the surface interaction between the cell and the imprint is repulsive, the shape and size match makes this interaction even more repulsive and thus decreases the likelihood of binding. These results show that the surface chemistry of the target cells and their colloidal imprints is very important in controlling the outcome of the interaction, while the shape recognition only amplifies the interaction. In the case of nonmonotonous surface-to-surface interaction we discovered some interesting interplay between the effects of shape match and surface chemistry

  9. Volume changes during active shape fluctuations in cells

    CERN Document Server

    Taloni, Alessandro; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A M

    2015-01-01

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  10. Oriented cell division shapes carnivorous pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Fujita, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    Complex morphology is an evolutionary outcome of phenotypic diversification. In some carnivorous plants, the ancestral planar leaf has been modified to form a pitcher shape. However, how leaf development was altered during evolution remains unknown. Here we show that the pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea develop through cell division patterns of adaxial tissues that are distinct from those in bifacial and peltate leaves, subsequent to standard expression of adaxial and abaxial marker genes. Differences in the orientation of cell divisions in the adaxial domain cause bifacial growth in the distal region and adaxial ridge protrusion in the middle region. These different growth patterns establish pitcher morphology. A computer simulation suggests that the cell division plane is critical for the pitcher morphogenesis. Our results imply that tissue-specific changes in the orientation of cell division underlie the development of a morphologically complex leaf. PMID:25774486

  11. Lowering extracellular chloride concentration alters outer hair cell shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecola, R P; Bobbin, R P

    1992-08-01

    In general, increasing external K+ concentration, as well as exposure to hypotonic medium, induces a shortening of outer hair cells (OHCs) accompanied by an increase in width and volume. One possible mechanism suggested for these changes is a movement of Cl- and/or water across the cell membrane. We therefore examined the role of Cl- in OHC volume maintenance by testing the effect of decreasing extracellular Cl- concentration on OHC length and shape. In addition, the effect of hypotonic medium was examined. OHCs were isolated from guinea pig cochleae, mechanically dissociated and dispersed, and placed in a modified Hanks balanced salt solution (HBS). Exposing the cells to a Cl(-)-free HBS produced an initial shortening, which was rapidly followed by an increase in length. After about 9 min of exposure to Cl(-)-free HBS, the cells appeared to lose all water and collapsed. Upon return to normal HBS, the OHCs returned to their normal shape. We speculate that the collapse of the OHCs may be due to the loss of intracellular Cl-, which, in turn, resulted in the loss of intracellular K+ and water. The results indicate that Cl- contributes greatly to the maintenance of OHC volume. In addition, we confirmed that isolated OHCs swell in hypotonic medium and maintain their swollen state until returned to normal medium. The mechanism for maintenance of the swollen state is unknown.

  12. Shavenbaby couples patterning to epidermal cell shape control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Chanut-Delalande

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that developmental programs act during embryogenesis to determine animal morphogenesis. How these developmental cues produce specific cell shape during morphogenesis, however, has remained elusive. We addressed this question by studying the morphological differentiation of the Drosophila epidermis, governed by a well-known circuit of regulators leading to a stereotyped pattern of smooth cells and cells forming actin-rich extensions (trichomes. It was shown that the transcription factor Shavenbaby plays a pivotal role in the formation of trichomes and underlies all examined cases of the evolutionary diversification of their pattern. To gain insight into the mechanisms of morphological differentiation, we sought to identify shavenbaby's downstream targets. We show here that Shavenbaby controls epidermal cell shape, through the transcriptional activation of different classes of cellular effectors, directly contributing to the organization of actin filaments, regulation of the extracellular matrix, and modification of the cuticle. Individual inactivation of shavenbaby's targets produces distinct trichome defects and only their simultaneous inactivation prevent trichome formation. Our data show that shavenbaby governs an evolutionarily conserved developmental module consisting of a set of genes collectively responsible for trichome formation, shedding new light on molecular mechanisms acting during morphogenesis and the way they can influence evolution of animal forms.

  13. Anatomically shaped tooth and periodontal regeneration by cell homing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K; Lee, C H; Kim, B K; Mao, J J

    2010-08-01

    Tooth regeneration by cell delivery encounters translational hurdles. We hypothesized that anatomically correct teeth can regenerate in scaffolds without cell transplantation. Novel, anatomically shaped human molar scaffolds and rat incisor scaffolds were fabricated by 3D bioprinting from a hybrid of poly-epsilon-caprolactone and hydroxyapatite with 200-microm-diameter interconnecting microchannels. In each of 22 rats, an incisor scaffold was implanted orthotopically following mandibular incisor extraction, whereas a human molar scaffold was implanted ectopically into the dorsum. Stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF1) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) were delivered in scaffold microchannels. After 9 weeks, a putative periodontal ligament and new bone regenerated at the interface of rat incisor scaffold with native alveolar bone. SDF1 and BMP7 delivery not only recruited significantly more endogenous cells, but also elaborated greater angiogenesis than growth-factor-free control scaffolds. Regeneration of tooth-like structures and periodontal integration by cell homing provide an alternative to cell delivery, and may accelerate clinical applications.

  14. Electrokinetic shape changes of cochlear outer hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachar, Bechara; Brownell, William E.; Altschuler, Richard; Fex, Jörgen

    1986-07-01

    Rapid mechanical changes have been associated with electrical activity in a variety of non-muscle excitable cells1-5. Recently, mechanical changes have been reported in cochlear hair cells6-8. Here we describe electrically evoked mechanical changes in isolated cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) with characteristics which suggest that direct electrokinetic phenomena are implicated in the response. OHCs make up one of two mechanosensitive hair cell populations in the mammalian cochlea; their role may be to modulate the micromechanical properties of the hearing organ through mechanical feedback mechanisms6-10. In the experiments described here, we applied sinusoidally modulated electrical potentials across isolated OHCs; this produced oscillatory elongation and shortening of the cells and oscillatory displacements of intracellular organdies. The movements were a function of the direction and strength of the electrical field, were inversely related to the ionic concentration of the medium, and occurred in the presence of metabolic uncouplers. The cylindrical shape of the OHCs and the presence of a system of membranes within the cytoplasm-laminated cisternae11-may provide the anatomical substrate for electrokinetic phenomena such as electro-osmosis12,13.

  15. Glutaraldehyde induces cell shape changes in isolated outer hair cells from the inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepecky, N; Ulfendahl, M

    1988-01-01

    Individual isolated outer hair cells (OHCs) from the cochlea were maintained in a collagen gel and viewed in the light microscope. They were observed during fixation and processing for transmission electron microscopy and individual cells were selected for observation in the electron microscope. Application of glutaraldehyde at several concentrations caused OHCs to become shorter. Shrinkage occurred during dehydration but there was no further change during infiltration with the epoxy resin. Ultrastructural analysis of isolated cells fixed with glutaraldehyde and postfixed with osmium tetroxide showed that these cells were similar to cells fixed in the intact cochlea. The glutaraldehyde-induced cell shape change is similar to the shortening seen in intact OHCs in response to the application of solutions containing high potassium or caffeine. Application of glutaraldehyde to cells pretreated with potassium or caffeine caused further shortening. Glutaraldehyde-induced cell shape change was not blocked by the application of tetracaine, which did prevent potassium-induced and caffeine-induced shortening. Glutaraldehyde-induced cell shape change was not stopped by short treatment with N-ethylmaleimide, which did inhibit potassium-induced shortening. Results from these experiments suggest that the glutaraldehyde-induced OHC shape change is not caused by an effect on the membrane or by calcium activation of a contractile response. Shortening may be caused by shrinkage due to cross-linking of proteins.

  16. Understanding Cell Shape Phenotypes Associated with Stem Cell Differentiation Induced by Topographical Cues of Nanofiber Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Desu; Sarkar, Sumona; Losert, Wolfgang

    It is increasingly important to understand cell responses to bioinspired material structures and topographies designed to guide cell functional alterations. In this study, we investigated association between early stage cell morphological response and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) induced by poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofiber scaffolds (PCL-NF). Accounting for both multi-parametric complexity and biological heterogeneity, we developed an analysis framework based on support vector machines and a multi-cell level averaging method (supercell) to determine the most pronounced cell shape features describing shape phenotypes of cells in PCL-NF compared to cells on flat PCL films. We found that smaller size and more dendritic shape were the major morphological responses of hBMSCs to PCL-NF on day 1 of cell culture. Further, we investigated the shape phenotypes of hBMSCs in PCL-NF of different fiber densities to monitor the transition between 2-D and 3-D topographies. We tracked the genotypic, phenotypic and morphological responses of hBMSCs to different fiber densities at multiple time points to identify correlations between hBMSCs differentiation and early stage morphology in PCL-NF scaffolds.

  17. Withaferin a alters intermediate filament organization, cell shape and behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Grin

    Full Text Available Withaferin A (WFA is a steroidal lactone present in Withania somnifera which has been shown in vitro to bind to the intermediate filament protein, vimentin. Based upon its affinity for vimentin, it has been proposed that WFA can be used as an anti-tumor agent to target metastatic cells which up-regulate vimentin expression. We show that WFA treatment of human fibroblasts rapidly reorganizes vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF into a perinuclear aggregate. This reorganization is dose dependent and is accompanied by a change in cell shape, decreased motility and an increase in vimentin phosphorylation at serine-38. Furthermore, vimentin lacking cysteine-328, the proposed WFA binding site, remains sensitive to WFA demonstrating that this site is not required for its cellular effects. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, viscometry, electron microscopy and sedimentation assays we show that WFA has no effect on VIF assembly in vitro. Furthermore, WFA is not specific for vimentin as it disrupts the cellular organization and induces perinuclear aggregates of several other IF networks comprised of peripherin, neurofilament-triplet protein, and keratin. In cells co-expressing keratin IF and VIF, the former are significantly less sensitive to WFA with respect to inducing perinuclear aggregates. The organization of microtubules and actin/microfilaments is also affected by WFA. Microtubules become wavier and sparser and the number of stress fibers appears to increase. Following 24 hrs of exposure to doses of WFA that alter VIF organization and motility, cells undergo apoptosis. Lower doses of the drug do not kill cells but cause them to senesce. In light of our findings that WFA affects multiple IF systems, which are expressed in many tissues of the body, caution is warranted in its use as an anti-cancer agent, since it may have debilitating organism-wide effects.

  18. Tubular Scaffold with Shape Recovery Effect for Cell Guide Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi M. Zakir Hossain

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tubular scaffolds with aligned polylactic acid (PLA fibres were fabricated for cell guide applications by immersing rolled PLA fibre mats into a polyvinyl acetate (PVAc solution to bind the mats. The PVAc solution was also mixed with up to 30 wt % β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP content. Cross-sectional images of the scaffold materials obtained via scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed the aligned fibre morphology along with a significant number of voids in between the bundles of fibres. The addition of β-TCP into the scaffolds played an important role in increasing the void content from 17.1% to 25.3% for the 30 wt % β-TCP loading, which was measured via micro-CT (µCT analysis. Furthermore, µCT analyses revealed the distribution of aggregated β-TCP particles in between the various PLA fibre layers of the scaffold. The compressive modulus properties of the scaffolds increased from 66 MPa to 83 MPa and the compressive strength properties decreased from 67 MPa to 41 MPa for the 30 wt % β-TCP content scaffold. The scaffolds produced were observed to change into a soft and flexible form which demonstrated shape recovery properties after immersion in phosphate buffered saline (PBS media at 37 °C for 24 h. The cytocompatibility studies (using MG-63 human osteosarcoma cell line revealed preferential cell proliferation along the longitudinal direction of the fibres as compared to the control tissue culture plastic. The manufacturing process highlighted above reveals a simple process for inducing controlled cell alignment and varying porosity features within tubular scaffolds for potential tissue engineering applications.

  19. Cell shape, spreading symmetry, and the polarization of stress-fibers in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, A.; Rehfeldt, F.; Brown, A. E. X.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-05-01

    The active regulation of cellular forces during cell adhesion plays an important role in the determination of cell size, shape, and internal structure. While on flat, homogeneous and isotropic substrates some cells spread isotropically, others spread anisotropically and assume elongated structures. In addition, in their native environment as well as in vitro experiments, the cell shape and spreading asymmetry can be modulated by the local distribution of adhesive molecules and topography of the environment. We present a simple elastic model and experiments on stem cells to explain the variation of cell size with the matrix rigidity. In addition, we predict the experimental consequences of two mechanisms of acto-myosin polarization and focus here on the effect of the cell spreading asymmetry on the regulation of the stress-fiber alignment in the cytoskeleton. We show that when cell spreading is sufficiently asymmetric the alignment of acto-myosin forces in the cell increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity; however, in general this alignment is non-monotonic, as shown previously. These results highlight the importance of the symmetry characteristics of cell spreading in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and suggest a mechanism by which different cell types may acquire different morphologies and internal structures in different mechanical environments.

  20. Cell shape, spreading symmetry, and the polarization of stress-fibers in cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemel, A [Institute of Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dental Medicine, and the Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, 91120 (Israel); Rehfeldt, F [III. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universitaet, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Brown, A E X [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Discher, D E [Graduate Group of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Safran, S A [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-05-19

    The active regulation of cellular forces during cell adhesion plays an important role in the determination of cell size, shape, and internal structure. While on flat, homogeneous and isotropic substrates some cells spread isotropically, others spread anisotropically and assume elongated structures. In addition, in their native environment as well as in vitro experiments, the cell shape and spreading asymmetry can be modulated by the local distribution of adhesive molecules and topography of the environment. We present a simple elastic model and experiments on stem cells to explain the variation of cell size with the matrix rigidity. In addition, we predict the experimental consequences of two mechanisms of acto-myosin polarization and focus here on the effect of the cell spreading asymmetry on the regulation of the stress-fiber alignment in the cytoskeleton. We show that when cell spreading is sufficiently asymmetric the alignment of acto-myosin forces in the cell increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity; however, in general this alignment is non-monotonic, as shown previously. These results highlight the importance of the symmetry characteristics of cell spreading in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and suggest a mechanism by which different cell types may acquire different morphologies and internal structures in different mechanical environments.

  1. CELL SHAPE AND HEXOSE TRANSPORT IN NORMAL AND VIRUS-TRANSFORMED CELLS IN CULTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, M.J.; Farson, D.; Tung, A.S.C.

    1976-07-01

    The rate of hexose transport was compared in normal and virus-transformed cells on a monolayer and in suspension. It was shown that: (1) Both trypsin-removed cells and those suspended for an additional day in methyl cellulose had decreased rates of transport and lower available water space when compared with cells on a monolayer. Thus, cell shape affects the overall rate of hexose transport, especially at higher sugar concentrations. (2) Even in suspension, the initial transport rates remained higher in transformed cells with reference to normal cells. Scanning electron micrographs of normal and transformed chick cells revealed morphological differences only in the flat state. This indicates that the increased rate of hexose transport after transformation is not due to a difference in the shape of these cells on a monolayer. The relation between the geometry of cells, transport rates, and growth regulation is undoubtedly very complex, and our knowledge of these relationships is still very elementary. In a recent review on the influence of geometry on control of cell growth, Folkman and Greenspan (1) pointed out that the permeability of cells in a flat versus a spherical state may indeed be very different. The growth properties of cells on a surface and in suspension have been compared often (1-5). However, with one exception. little is known about the changes in transport properties when cell shape is changed. Foster and Pardee (6) demonstrated that the active transport of a-aminoisobutyric acid was reduced 2.5 times in suspension cultures of Chinese hamster cells with respect to the cells grown on a coverslip. They attributed this to the smaller surface area of suspended cells. While it is not clear why active transport should be dependent on the surface area available, it is possible that once the cells assume a spherical configuration, the carrier proteins are redistributed in such a way as to make them less accessible to the substrate. What happens to

  2. Automated three-dimensional single cell phenotyping of spindle dynamics, cell shape, and volume

    CERN Document Server

    Plumb, Kemp; Pelletier, Vincent; Kilfoil, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    We present feature finding and tracking algorithms in 3D in living cells, and demonstrate their utility to measure metrics important in cell biological processes. We developed a computational imaging hybrid approach that combines automated three-dimensional tracking of point-like features with surface determination from which cell (or nuclear) volume, shape, and planes of interest can be extracted. After validation, we applied the technique to real space context-rich dynamics of the mitotic spindle, and cell volume and its relationship to spindle length, in dividing living cells. These methods are additionally useful for automated segregation of pre-anaphase and anaphase spindle populations in budding yeast. We found that genetic deletion of the yeast kinesin-5 mitotic motor cin8 leads to large mother and daughter cells that were indistinguishable based on size, and that in those cells the spindle length becomes uncorrelated with cell size. The technique can be used to visualize and quantify tracked feature c...

  3. Single cells spreading on a protein lattice adopt an energy minimizing shape.

    OpenAIRE

    Vianay, Benoit; Käfer, Jos; Planus, Emmanuelle; Block, Marc,; Graner, François; Guillou, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    When spreading onto a protein microlattice living cells spontaneously acquire simple shapes determined by the lattice geometry. This suggests that, on a lattice, living cells' shapes are in thermodynamic metastable states. Using a model at thermodynamic equilibrium we are able to reproduce the observed shapes. We build a phase diagram based on two adimensional parameters characterizing essential cellular properties involved in spreading: the cell's compressibility and fluctuations.

  4. The taming of the cell: shape-memory nanopatterns direct cell orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Uto, Koichiro; Idota, Naokazu; Hoffman, John M; Aoyagi, Takao

    2014-01-01

    We report here that the direction of aligned cells on nanopatterns can be tuned to a perpendicular direction without use of any biochemical reagents. This was enabled by shape-memory activation of nanopatterns that transition from a memorized temporal pattern to the original permanent pattern by heating. The thermally induced shape-memory nanopatterns were prepared by chemically crosslinking semi-crystalline poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) in a mold to show shape-memory effects over its melting temperature (Tm = 33°C). Permanent surface patterns were first generated by crosslinking the PCL macromonomers in a mold, and temporary surface patterns were then embossed onto the permanent patterns. The temporary surface patterns could be easily triggered to transition quickly to the permanent surface patterns by a 37°C heat treatment, while surface wettability was independent of temperature. To investigate the role of dynamic and reversible surface nanopatterns on cell alignment on the PCL films before and after a topographic transition, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were seeded on fibronectin-coated PCL films with a temporary grooved topography (grooves with a height of 300 nm and width of 2 μm were spaced 9 μm apart). Interestingly, cells did not change their direction immediately after the surface transition. However, cell alignment was gradually lost with time, and finally cells realigned parallel to the permanent grooves that emerged. The addition of a cytoskeletal inhibitor prevented realignment. These results clearly indicate that cells can sense dynamic changes in the surrounding environments and spontaneously adapt to a new environment by remodeling their cytoskeleton. These findings will serve as the basis for new development of spatiotemporal tunable materials to direct cell fate. PMID:24872707

  5. Examination of Cell Shape in Wall Thickness Direction for Foamed Polyurethane Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Tsutomu; Matsuoka, Shin-Ichi; Araki, Kuninari; Iseki, Takashi

    The foaming flow process of polyurethane resin is difficult because temperature, density and thermal conductivity are changed greatly by heat generation resulting from the mixing reaction of polyol and polyisocyanate resin. It is thought that thermal conductivity and strength are influenced by cell shape after the foaming process. In this study, we evaluate three-dimensional cell shapes by quantitatively observation of the ratio of the diameter of the parallel and the perpendicular section to flow direction, the ratio of the major axis and the minor axis, and direction of the major axis of cells for closed cell shapes in foamed polyurethane resin. It is thought that cell shapes are mainly deformed by shear stress and pressure of adjacent cells. It becomes obvious by cell shape evaluation that cells in the skin layer are compressed in the thickness direction by pressure of adjacent cells, cells between the skin layer and the core layer are stretched perpendicular to the flow direction by shear stress, and cells in the core layer are similar to the sphere shape.

  6. The taming of the cell: shape-memory nanopatterns direct cell orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebara M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitsuhiro Ebara, Koichiro Uto, Naokazu Idota, John M Hoffman, Takao AoyagiBiomaterials Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS, Namiki, Tsukuba, JapanAbstract: We report here that the direction of aligned cells on nanopatterns can be tuned to a perpendicular direction without use of any biochemical reagents. This was enabled by shape-memory activation of nanopatterns that transition from a memorized temporal pattern to the original permanent pattern by heating. The thermally induced shape-memory nanopatterns were prepared by chemically crosslinking semi-crystalline poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL in a mold to show shape-memory effects over its melting temperature (Tm = 33°C. Permanent surface patterns were first generated by crosslinking the PCL macromonomers in a mold, and temporary surface patterns were then embossed onto the permanent patterns. The temporary surface patterns could be easily triggered to transition quickly to the permanent surface patterns by a 37°C heat treatment, while surface wettability was independent of temperature. To investigate the role of dynamic and reversible surface nanopatterns on cell alignment on the PCL films before and after a topographic transition, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were seeded on fibronectin-coated PCL films with a temporary grooved topography (grooves with a height of 300 nm and width of 2 µm were spaced 9 µm apart. Interestingly, cells did not change their direction immediately after the surface transition. However, cell alignment was gradually lost with time, and finally cells realigned parallel to the permanent grooves that emerged. The addition of a cytoskeletal inhibitor prevented realignment. These results clearly indicate that cells can sense dynamic changes in the surrounding environments and spontaneously adapt to a new environment by remodeling their cytoskeleton. These findings will serve as the basis for new

  7. Machine learning based methodology to identify cell shape phenotypes associated with microenvironmental cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Desu; Sarkar, Sumona; Candia, Julián; Florczyk, Stephen J; Bodhak, Subhadip; Driscoll, Meghan K; Simon, Carl G; Dunkers, Joy P; Losert, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    Cell morphology has been identified as a potential indicator of stem cell response to biomaterials. However, determination of cell shape phenotype in biomaterials is complicated by heterogeneous cell populations, microenvironment heterogeneity, and multi-parametric definitions of cell morphology. To associate cell morphology with cell-material interactions, we developed a shape phenotyping framework based on support vector machines. A feature selection procedure was implemented to select the most significant combination of cell shape metrics to build classifiers with both accuracy and stability to identify and predict microenvironment-driven morphological differences in heterogeneous cell populations. The analysis was conducted at a multi-cell level, where a "supercell" method used average shape measurements of small groups of single cells to account for heterogeneous populations and microenvironment. A subsampling validation algorithm revealed the range of supercell sizes and sample sizes needed for classifier stability and generalization capability. As an example, the responses of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) to fibrous vs flat microenvironments were compared on day 1. Our analysis showed that 57 cells (grouped into supercells of size 4) are the minimum needed for phenotyping. The analysis identified that a combination of minor axis length, solidity, and mean negative curvature were the strongest early shape-based indicator of hBMSCs response to fibrous microenvironment. PMID:27449947

  8. Collective motion of cells crawling on a substrate: roles of cell shape and contact inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Schnyder, Simon Kaspar; Molina, John Jairo; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    Contact inhibition plays a crucial role in the motility of cells, the process of wound healing, and the formation of tumors. By mimicking the mechanical motion of calls crawling on a substrate using a pseudopod, we constructed a minimal model for migrating cells which gives rise to contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) naturally. The model cell consists of two disks, one in the front (a pseudopod) and the other one in the back (cell body), connected by a finitely extensible spring. Despite the simplicity of the model, the cells' collective behavior is highly nontrivial, depending on the shape of cells and whether CIL is enabled or not. Cells with a small front circle (i.e. a narrow pseudopod) form immobile colonies. In contrast, cells with a large front circle (i.e. such as a lamellipodium) exhibit coherent migration without any explicit alignment mechanism being present in the model. This suggests that crawling cells often exhibit broad fronts because it helps them avoid clustering. Upon increasing the dens...

  9. Local positive feedback regulation determines cell shape in root hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Seiji; Gapper, Catherine; Kaya, Hidetaka; Bell, Elizabeth; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Dolan, Liam

    2008-02-29

    The specification and maintenance of growth sites are tightly regulated during cell morphogenesis in all organisms. ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE 2 reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (RHD2 NADPH) oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) stimulate a Ca2+ influx into the cytoplasm that is required for root hair growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that Ca2+, in turn, activated the RHD2 NADPH oxidase to produce ROS at the growing point in the root hair. Together, these components could establish a means of positive feedback regulation that maintains an active growth site in expanding root hair cells. Because the location and stability of growth sites predict the ultimate form of a plant cell, our findings demonstrate how a positive feedback mechanism involving RHD2, ROS, and Ca2+ can determine cell shape.

  10. Chorein Sensitivity of Actin Polymerization, Cell Shape and Mechanical Stiffness of Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Alesutan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Endothelial cell stiffness plays a key role in endothelium-dependent control of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure. Actin polymerization and distribution of microfilaments is essential for mechanical cell stiffness. Chorein, a protein encoded by the VPS13A gene, defective in chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc, is involved in neuronal cell survival as well as cortical actin polymerization of erythrocytes and blood platelets. Chorein is expressed in a wide variety of further cells, yet nothing is known about the impact of chorein on cells other than neurons, erythrocytes and platelets. The present study explored whether chorein is expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and addressed the putative role of chorein in the regulation of cytoskeletal architecture, stiffness and survival of those cells. Methods: In HUVECs with or without silencing of the VPS13A gene, VPS13A mRNA expression was determined utilizing quantitative RT-PCR, cytoskeletal organization visualized by confocal microscopy, G/F actin ratio and phosphorylation status of focal adhesion kinase quantified by western blotting, cell death determined by flow cytometry, mechanical properties studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM and cell morphology analysed by scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM. Results: VPS13A mRNA expression was detectable in HUVECs. Silencing of the VPS13A gene attenuated the filamentous actin network, decreased the ratio of soluble G-actin over filamentous F-actin, reduced cell stiffness and changed cell morphology as compared to HUVECs silenced with negative control siRNA. These effects were paralleled by a significant decrease in FAK phosphorylation following VPS13A silencing. Moreover, silencing of the VPS13A gene increased caspase 3 activity and induced necrosis in HUVECs. Conclusions: Chorein is a novel regulator of cytoskeletal architecture, cell shape, mechanical stiffness and survival of vascular endothelial cells.

  11. Single Cells Spreading on a Protein Lattice Adopt an Energy Minimizing Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianay, Benoit; Käfer, Jos; Planus, Emmanuelle; Block, Marc; Graner, François; Guillou, Hervé

    2010-09-01

    When spreading onto a protein microlattice living cells spontaneously acquire simple shapes determined by the lattice geometry. This suggests that, on a lattice, living cells’ shapes are in thermodynamic metastable states. Using a model at thermodynamic equilibrium we are able to reproduce the observed shapes. We build a phase diagram based on two adimensional parameters characterizing essential cellular properties involved in spreading: the cell’s compressibility and fluctuations.

  12. Hoxb1b controls oriented cell division, cell shape and microtubule dynamics in neural tube morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Mihaela; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Titus, Tom; Postlethwait, John; Moens, Cecilia B

    2014-02-01

    Hox genes are classically ascribed to function in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals; however, their role in directing molecular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis at the cellular level remains largely unstudied. We unveil a non-classical role for the zebrafish hoxb1b gene, which shares ancestral functions with mammalian Hoxa1, in controlling progenitor cell shape and oriented cell division during zebrafish anterior hindbrain neural tube morphogenesis. This is likely distinct from its role in cell fate acquisition and segment boundary formation. We show that, without affecting major components of apico-basal or planar cell polarity, Hoxb1b regulates mitotic spindle rotation during the oriented neural keel symmetric mitoses that are required for normal neural tube lumen formation in the zebrafish. This function correlates with a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Hoxb1b in regulating microtubule plus-end dynamics in progenitor cells in interphase. We propose that Hox genes can influence global tissue morphogenesis by control of microtubule dynamics in individual cells in vivo.

  13. Epithelial tricellular junctions act as interphase cell shape sensors to orient mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosveld, Floris; Markova, Olga; Guirao, Boris; Martin, Charlotte; Wang, Zhimin; Pierre, Anaëlle; Balakireva, Maria; Gaugue, Isabelle; Ainslie, Anna; Christophorou, Nicolas; Lubensky, David K; Minc, Nicolas; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-25

    The orientation of cell division along the long axis of the interphase cell--the century-old Hertwig's rule--has profound roles in tissue proliferation, morphogenesis, architecture and mechanics. In epithelial tissues, the shape of the interphase cell is influenced by cell adhesion, mechanical stress, neighbour topology, and planar polarity pathways. At mitosis, epithelial cells usually adopt a rounded shape to ensure faithful chromosome segregation and to promote morphogenesis. The mechanisms underlying interphase cell shape sensing in tissues are therefore unknown. Here we show that in Drosophila epithelia, tricellular junctions (TCJs) localize force generators, pulling on astral microtubules and orienting cell division via the Dynein-associated protein Mud independently of the classical Pins/Gαi pathway. Moreover, as cells round up during mitosis, TCJs serve as spatial landmarks, encoding information about interphase cell shape anisotropy to orient division in the rounded mitotic cell. Finally, experimental and simulation data show that shape and mechanical strain sensing by the TCJs emerge from a general geometric property of TCJ distributions in epithelial tissues. Thus, in addition to their function as epithelial barrier structures, TCJs serve as polarity cues promoting geometry and mechanical sensing in epithelial tissues.

  14. Epithelial tricellular junctions act as interphase cell shape sensors to orient mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosveld, Floris; Markova, Olga; Guirao, Boris; Martin, Charlotte; Wang, Zhimin; Pierre, Anaëlle; Balakireva, Maria; Gaugue, Isabelle; Ainslie, Anna; Christophorou, Nicolas; Lubensky, David K; Minc, Nicolas; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-25

    The orientation of cell division along the long axis of the interphase cell--the century-old Hertwig's rule--has profound roles in tissue proliferation, morphogenesis, architecture and mechanics. In epithelial tissues, the shape of the interphase cell is influenced by cell adhesion, mechanical stress, neighbour topology, and planar polarity pathways. At mitosis, epithelial cells usually adopt a rounded shape to ensure faithful chromosome segregation and to promote morphogenesis. The mechanisms underlying interphase cell shape sensing in tissues are therefore unknown. Here we show that in Drosophila epithelia, tricellular junctions (TCJs) localize force generators, pulling on astral microtubules and orienting cell division via the Dynein-associated protein Mud independently of the classical Pins/Gαi pathway. Moreover, as cells round up during mitosis, TCJs serve as spatial landmarks, encoding information about interphase cell shape anisotropy to orient division in the rounded mitotic cell. Finally, experimental and simulation data show that shape and mechanical strain sensing by the TCJs emerge from a general geometric property of TCJ distributions in epithelial tissues. Thus, in addition to their function as epithelial barrier structures, TCJs serve as polarity cues promoting geometry and mechanical sensing in epithelial tissues. PMID:26886796

  15. Helicobacter pylori strains vary cell shape and flagellum number to maintain robust motility in viscous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Laura E; Hardcastle, Joseph M; Wang, Jeffrey; Pincus, Zachary; Tsang, Jennifer; Hoover, Timothy R; Bansil, Rama; Salama, Nina R

    2016-01-01

    The helical shape of the human stomach pathogen Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to provide mechanical advantage for penetrating the viscous stomach mucus layer. Using single-cell tracking and quantitative morphology analysis, we document marked variation in cell body helical parameters and flagellum number among H. pylori strains leading to distinct and broad speed distributions in broth and viscous gastric mucin media. These distributions reflect both temporal variation in swimming speed and morphologic variation within the population. Isogenic mutants with straight-rod morphology showed 7-21% reduction in speed and a lower fraction of motile bacteria. Mutational perturbation of flagellum number revealed a 19% increase in speed with 4 versus 3 median flagellum number. Resistive force theory modeling incorporating variation of both cell shape and flagellum number predicts qualitative speed differences of 10-30% among strains. However, quantitative comparisons suggest resistive force theory underestimates the influence of cell body shape on speed for helical shaped bacteria.

  16. Changes in cell shape are correlated with metastatic potential in murine and human osteosarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanthe M. Lyons

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic cancer cells for many cancers are known to have altered cytoskeletal properties, in particular to be more deformable and contractile. Consequently, shape characteristics of more metastatic cancer cells may be expected to have diverged from those of their parental cells. To examine this hypothesis we study shape characteristics of paired osteosarcoma cell lines, each consisting of a less metastatic parental line and a more metastatic line, derived from the former by in vivo selection. Two-dimensional images of four pairs of lines were processed. Statistical analysis of morphometric characteristics shows that shape characteristics of the metastatic cell line are partly overlapping and partly diverged from the parental line. Significantly, the shape changes fall into two categories, with three paired cell lines displaying a more mesenchymal-like morphology, while the fourth displaying a change towards a more rounded morphology. A neural network algorithm could distinguish between samples of the less metastatic cells from the more metastatic cells with near perfect accuracy. Thus, subtle changes in shape carry information about the genetic changes that lead to invasiveness and metastasis of osteosarcoma cancer cells.

  17. Epithelial cell shape is regulated by Lulu proteins via myosin-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Tanoue, Takuji

    2010-02-15

    Cell-shape change in epithelial structures is fundamental to animal morphogenesis. Recent studies identified myosin-II as the major generator of driving forces for cell-shape changes during morphogenesis. Lulu (Epb41l5) is a major regulator of morphogenesis, although the downstream molecular and cellular mechanisms remain obscure in mammals. In Drosophila and zebrafish, Lulu proteins were reported to negatively regulate Crumbs, an apical domain regulator, thus regulating morphogenesis. In this study, we show that mammalian Lulu activates myosin-II, thus regulating epithelial cell shape. In our experiments, Lulu expression in epithelial cells resulted in apical constriction and lateral elongation in the cells, accompanied by upregulation of myosin-II. The inhibition of myosin-II activity almost completely blocked this Lulu-driven cell-shape change. We further found that Rock participates in the myosin-II activation. Additionally, RNAi-mediated depletion of Lulu in epithelial cells resulted in disorganization of myosin-II and a concomitant loss of proper lateral domain organization in the cells. From these results, we propose that Lulu regulates epithelial cell shape by controlling myosin-II activity. PMID:20103536

  18. Sorting of cells of the same size, shape, and cell cycle stage for a single cell level assay without staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomo Tetsuya

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell level studies are being used increasingly to measure cell properties not directly observable in a cell population. High-performance data acquisition systems for such studies have, by necessity, developed in synchrony. However, improvements in sample purification techniques are also required to reveal new phenomena. Here we assessed a cell sorter as a sample-pretreatment tool for a single-cell level assay. A cell sorter is routinely used for selecting one type of cells from a heterogeneous mixture of cells using specific fluorescence labels. In this case, we wanted to select cells of exactly the same size, shape, and cell-cycle stage from a population, without using a specific fluorescence label. Results We used four light scatter parameters: the peak height and area of the forward scatter (FSheight and FSarea and side scatter (SSheight and SSarea. The rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, a neuronal cell line, was used for all experiments. The living cells concentrated in the high FSarea and middle SSheight/SSarea fractions. Single cells without cell clumps were concentrated in the low SS and middle FS fractions, and in the higher FSheight/FSarea and SSheight/SSarea fractions. The cell populations from these viable, single-cell-rich fractions were divided into twelve subfractions based on their FSarea-SSarea profiles, for more detailed analysis. We found that SSarea was proportional to the cell volume and the FSarea correlated with cell roundness and elongation, as well as with the level of DNA in the cell. To test the method and to characterize the basic properties of the isolated single cells, sorted cells were cultured in separate wells. The cells in all subfractions survived, proliferated and differentiated normally, suggesting that there was no serious damage. The smallest, roundest, and smoothest cells had the highest viability. There was no correlation between proliferation and differentiation. NGF increases

  19. Crowded, cell-like environment induces shape changes in aspherical protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Margaret

    2009-03-01

    How the crowded environment inside cells affects the structures of proteins with aspherical shapes is a vital question because many proteins and protein--protein complexes in vivo adopt anisotropic shapes. Here we address this question by combining computational and experimental studies of a football-shaped protein (i.e. Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE) under crowded, cell-like conditions. The results show that macromolecular crowding affects protein-folding dynamics as well as overall protein shape. In crowded milieus, distinct conformational changes in VlsE are accompanied by secondary structure alterations that lead to exposure of a hidden antigenic region. Our work demonstrates the malleability of ``native'' proteins and implies that crowding-induced shape changes may be important for protein function and malfunction in vivo.

  20. Profilin Plays a Role in Cell Elongation, Cell Shape Maintenance, and Flowering in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, S.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager; Ishimaru, Y.;

    2000-01-01

    carrying a 35S-PFN-1 or 35S-antisense PFN-1 transgene. Etiolated seedlings underexpressing PFN (PFN-U) displayed an overall dwarf phenotype with short hypocotyls whose lengths were 20% to 25% that of wild type (WT) at low temperatures. Light-grown PFN-U plants were smaller in stature and flowered early......Profilin (PFN) is an ubiquitous, low-M-r, actin-binding protein involved in the organization of the cytoskeleton of eukaryotes including higher plants. PFNs are encoded by a multigene family in Arabidopsis. We have analyzed in vivo functions of Arabidopsis PFN by generating transgenic plants...... expressed in the vascular bundles of cotyledons and leaves. Our results show that Arabidopsis PFNs play a role in cell elongation, cell shape maintenance, polarized growth of root hair, and unexpectedly, in determination of flowering time....

  1. Active self-polarization of contractile cells in asymmetrically shaped domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemel, A.; Safran, S. A.

    2007-08-01

    Mechanical forces generated by contractile cells allow the cells to sense their environment and to interact with other cells. By locally pulling on their environment, cells can sense and respond to mechanical features such as the local stress (or strain), the shape of a cellular domain, and the surrounding rigidity; at the same time, they also modify the mechanical state of the system. This creates a mechanical feedback loop that can result in self-polarization of cells. In this paper, we present a quantitative mechanical model that predicts the self-polarization of cells in spheroidally shaped domains, comprising contractile cells and an elastic matrix, that are embedded in a three-dimensional, cell-free gel. The theory is based on a generalization of the known results for passive inclusions in solids to include the effects of cell activity. We use the active cellular susceptibility tensor presented by Zemel [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 128103 (2006)] to calculate the polarization response and hence the elastic stress field developed by the cells in the cellular domain. The cell polarization is analyzed as a function of the shape and the elastic moduli of the cellular domain compared with the cell-free surrounding material. Consistent with experiment, our theory predicts the development of a stronger contractile force for cells in a gel that is surrounded by a large, cell-free material whose elastic modulus is stiffer than that of the gel that contains the cells. This provides a quantitative explanation of the differences in the development of cellular forces as observed in free and fixed gels. In the case of an asymmetrically shaped (spheroidal) domain of cells, we show that the anisotropic elastic field within the domain leads to a spontaneous self-polarization of the cells along the long axis of the domain.

  2. Shape optimization of axisymmetric solids with the finite cell method using a fixed grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Liang; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Zhu, Ji-Hong; Xu, Zhao; Cai, Shou-Hu

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a design procedure extending the B-spline based finite cell method into shape optimization is developed for axisymmetric solids involving the centrifugal force effect. We first replace the traditional conforming mesh in the finite element method with structured cells that are fixed during the whole design process with a view to avoid the sophisticated re-meshing and eventual mesh distortion. Then, B-spline shape functions are further implemented to yield a high-order continuity field along the cell boundary in stress analysis. By means of the implicit description of the shape boundary, stress sensitivity is analytically derived with respect to shape design variables. Finally, we illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed protocol by several numerical test cases as well as a whole design procedure carried out on an aeronautic turbine disk.

  3. A cytoskeletal spring for the control of cell shape in outer hair cells isolated from the guinea pig cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, M C; Ashmore, J F

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional cortical cytoskeletal lattice associated with the lateral plasma membranes of mammalian outer hair cells maintains cell shape and provides a restoring force to oppose active changes in cell length. The lattice is composed of two morphologically distinct filaments which are arranged to reinforce the cell circumferentially whilst allowing limited changes in cell length and diameter. This function can only be fulfilled if intracellular pressure is high enough to put the lattice under tension.

  4. CELL TRACKING USING PARTICLE FILTERS WITH IMPLICIT CONVEX SHAPE MODEL IN 4D CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY IMAGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Nisha; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Bayesian frameworks are commonly used in tracking algorithms. An important example is the particle filter, where a stochastic motion model describes the evolution of the state, and the observation model relates the noisy measurements to the state. Particle filters have been used to track the lineage of cells. Propagating the shape model of the cell through the particle filter is beneficial for tracking. We approximate arbitrary shapes of cells with a novel implicit convex function. The importance sampling step of the particle filter is defined using the cost associated with fitting our implicit convex shape model to the observations. Our technique is capable of tracking the lineage of cells for nonmitotic stages. We validate our algorithm by tracking the lineage of retinal and lens cells in zebrafish embryos. PMID:27403085

  5. Optimizing micropattern geometries for cell shape and migration with genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Philipp J; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2016-07-11

    Adhesive micropatterns have become a standard tool to control cell shape and function in cell culture. However, the variety of possible patterns is infinitely large and experiments often restrict themselves to established designs. Here we suggest a systematic method to establish novel micropatterns for desired functions using genetic algorithms. The evolutionary fitness of a certain pattern is computed using a cellular Potts model that describes cell behavior on micropattern. We first predict optimal patterns for a desired cell shape. We then optimize ratchet geometries to bias cell migration in a certain direction and find that asymmetric triangles are superior over the symmetric ones often used in experiments. Finally we design geometries which reverse the migration direction of cells when cell density increases due to cell division. PMID:27334659

  6. Cell culture arrays using micron-sized ferromagnetic ring-shaped thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell patterning has become an important technology for tissue engineering. In this research, domain walls are formed at the two ends of a ferromagnetic ring thin film after applying a strong external magnetic field, which can effectively attract magnetically labeled cells and control the position for biological cell. Magnetophoresis experiment was conducted to quantify the magnetic nanoparticle inside the cells. A ring-shaped magnetic thin films array was fabricated through photolithography. It is observed that magnetically labeled cells can be successfully attracted to the two ends of the ring-shaped magnetic thin film structure and more cells were attracted and further attached to the structures. The cells are co-cultured with the structure and kept proliferating; therefore, such ring thin film can be an important candidate for in-vitro biomedical chips or tissue engineering

  7. Cell culture arrays using micron-sized ferromagnetic ring-shaped thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang, E-mail: wei@pme.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China); Lai, Mei-Feng; Ger, Tzong-Rong [Institute of NanoEngineering and MicroSystems, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-07

    Cell patterning has become an important technology for tissue engineering. In this research, domain walls are formed at the two ends of a ferromagnetic ring thin film after applying a strong external magnetic field, which can effectively attract magnetically labeled cells and control the position for biological cell. Magnetophoresis experiment was conducted to quantify the magnetic nanoparticle inside the cells. A ring-shaped magnetic thin films array was fabricated through photolithography. It is observed that magnetically labeled cells can be successfully attracted to the two ends of the ring-shaped magnetic thin film structure and more cells were attracted and further attached to the structures. The cells are co-cultured with the structure and kept proliferating; therefore, such ring thin film can be an important candidate for in-vitro biomedical chips or tissue engineering.

  8. Crawling and turning in a minimal reaction-diffusion cell motility model: coupling cell shape and biochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Camley, Brian A; Li, Bo; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2016-01-01

    We study a minimal model of a crawling eukaryotic cell with a chemical polarity controlled by a reaction-diffusion mechanism describing Rho GTPase dynamics. The size, shape, and speed of the cell emerge from the combination of the chemical polarity, which controls the locations where actin polymerization occurs, and the physical properties of the cell, including its membrane tension. We find in our model both highly persistent trajectories, in which the cell crawls in a straight line, and turning trajectories, where the cell transitions from crawling in a line to crawling in a circle. We discuss the controlling variables for this turning instability, and argue that turning arises from a coupling between the reaction-diffusion mechanism and the shape of the cell. This emphasizes the surprising features that can arise from simple links between cell mechanics and biochemistry. Our results suggest that similar instabilities may be present in a broad class of biochemical descriptions of cell polarity.

  9. Evolved Colloidosomes Undergoing Cell-like Autonomous Shape Oscillations with Buckling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamate, Ryota; Ueki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo

    2016-04-18

    In living systems, there are many autonomous and oscillatory phenomena to sustain life, such as heart contractions and breathing. At the microscopic level, oscillatory shape deformations of cells are often observed in dynamic behaviors during cell migration and morphogenesis. In many cases, oscillatory behaviors of cells are not simplistic but complex with diverse deformations. So far, we have succeeded in developing self-oscillating polymers and gels, but complex oscillatory behaviors mimicking those of living cells have yet to be reproduced. Herein, we report a cell-like hollow sphere composed of self-oscillating microgels, that is, a colloidosome, that exhibits drastic shape oscillation in addition to swelling/deswelling oscillations driven by an oscillatory reaction. The resulting oscillatory profile waveform becomes markedly more complex than a conventional one. Especially for larger colloidosomes, multiple buckling and moving buckling points are observed to be analogous to cells. PMID:26960167

  10. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-03-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape.

  11. Resistance to DNA denaturation in irradiated Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts is linked to cell shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exponentially growing Chinese hamster V79-171b lung fibroblasts seeded at high density on plastic (approximately 7 x 10(3) cells/cm2) flatten, elongate, and produce significant amounts of extracellular fibronectin. When lysed in weak alkali/high salt, the rate of DNA denaturation following exposure to ionizing radiation is exponential. Conversely, cells plated at low density (approximately 7 x 10(2) cells/cm2) on plastic are more rounded 24 h later, produce little extracellular fibronectin, and display unusual DNA denaturation kinetics after X-irradiation. DNA in these cells resists denaturation, as though constraints to DNA unwinding have developed. Cell doubling time and distribution of cells in the growth cycle are identical for both high and low density cultures as is cell survival in response to radiation damage. The connection between DNA conformation and cell shape was examined further in low density cultures grown in conditioned medium. Under these conditions, cells at low density were able to elongate, and DNA denaturation of low density cultures was identical to that of high density cultures. Conversely, cytochalasin D, which interferes with actin polymerization causing cells to round up and release fibronectin, allowed development of constraints in high density cultures. These results suggest that DNA conformation is sensitive to changes in cell shape which result when cells are grown in different environments. However, these changes in DNA conformation detected by the DNA unwinding assay do not appear to play a direct role in radiation-induced cell killing

  12. Geometrical shape design of nanophotonic surfaces for thin film solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, W I; Yoo, Y J; Song, Y M

    2016-07-11

    We present the effect of geometrical parameters, particularly shape, on optical absorption enhancement for thin film solar cells based on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs) using a rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) method. It is discovered that the "sweet spot" that maximizes efficiency of solar cells exists for the design of nanophotonic surfaces. For the case of ultrathin, rod array is practical due to the effective optical resonances resulted from the optimum geometry whereas parabola array is viable for relatively thicker cells owing to the effective graded index profile. A specific value of thickness, which is the median value of other two devices tailored by rod and paraboloid, is optimized by truncated shape structure. It is therefore worth scanning the optimum shape of nanostructures in a given thickness in order to achieve high performance. PMID:27410892

  13. Automated characterization of cell shape changes during amoeboid motility by skeletonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Douglas N

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of a cell to change shape is crucial for the proper function of many cellular processes, including cell migration. One type of cell migration, referred to as amoeboid motility, involves alternating cycles of morphological expansion and retraction. Traditionally, this process has been characterized by a number of parameters providing global information about shape changes, which are insufficient to distinguish phenotypes based on local pseudopodial activities that typify amoeboid motility. Results We developed a method that automatically detects and characterizes pseudopodial behavior of cells. The method uses skeletonization, a technique from morphological image processing to reduce a shape into a series of connected lines. It involves a series of automatic algorithms including image segmentation, boundary smoothing, skeletonization and branch pruning, and takes into account the cell shape changes between successive frames to detect protrusion and retraction activities. In addition, the activities are clustered into different groups, each representing the protruding and retracting history of an individual pseudopod. Conclusions We illustrate the algorithms on movies of chemotaxing Dictyostelium cells and show that our method makes it possible to capture the spatial and temporal dynamics as well as the stochastic features of the pseudopodial behavior. Thus, the method provides a powerful tool for investigating amoeboid motility.

  14. Calcium Signalling Triggered by NAADP in T Cells Determines Cell Shape and Motility During Immune Synapse Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Merle; Zhang, Bo; Odoardi, Francesca; Flügel, Alexander; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) has been implicated as an initial Ca2+ trigger in T cell Ca2+ signalling, but its role in formation of the immune synapse in CD4+ effector T cells has not been analysed. CD4+ T cells are activated by the interaction with peptide-MHCII complexes on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. Establishing a two-cell system including primary rat CD4+ T cells specific for myelin basic protein and rat astrocytes enabled us to mirror this activation process in vitro and to analyse Ca2+ signalling, cell shape changes and motility in T cells during formation and maintenance of the immune synapse. After immune synapse formation, T cells showed strong, antigen-dependent increases in free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Analysis of cell shape and motility revealed rounding and immobilization of T cells depending on the amplitude of the Ca2+ signal. NAADP-antagonist BZ194 effectively blocked Ca2+ signals in T cells evoked by the interaction with antigen-presenting astrocytes. BZ194 reduced the percentage of T cells showing high Ca2+ signals thereby supporting the proposed trigger function of NAADP for global Ca2+ signalling. Taken together, the NAADP signalling pathway is further confirmed as a promising target for specific pharmacological intervention to modulate T cell activation. PMID:27747143

  15. Fabrication of a membrane filter with controlled pore shape and its application to cell separation and strong single cell trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A porous membrane filter is one of the key components for sample preparation in lab-on-a-chip applications. However, most of the membranes reported to date have only been used for size-based separation since it is difficult to provide functionality to the membrane or improve the performance of the membrane. In this work, as a method to functionalize the membrane filter, controlling the shape of the membrane pores is suggested, and a convenient and mass-producible fabrication method is provided. With the proposed method, membrane filters with round, conical and funnel shape pores were successfully fabricated, and we demonstrated that the sidewall slope of the conical shape pores could be precisely controlled. To verify that the membrane filter can be functionalized by controlled pore shape, we investigated filtration and trapping performance of the membrane filter with conical shape pores. In a filtration test of 1000 cancer cells (MCF-7, a breast cancer cell line) spiked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, 77% of the total cancer cells were retained on the membrane, and each cell from among 99.3% of the retained cells was automatically isolated in a single conical pore during the filtration process. Thanks to its engineered pore shape, trapping ability of the membrane with conical pores is dramatically improved. Microparticles trapped in the conical pores maintain their locations without any losses even at a more than 30 times faster external flow rate com-pared with those mounted on conventional cylindrical pores. Also, 78% of the cells trapped in the conical pores withstand an external flow of over 300 μl min−1 whereas only 18% of the cells trapped in the cylindrical pores remain on the membrane after 120 μl min−1 of an external flow is applied. (paper)

  16. A colour-tunable, weavable fibre-shaped polymer light-emitting electrochemical cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhitao; Guo, Kunping; Li, Yiming; Li, Xueyi; Guan, Guozhen; Li, Houpu; Luo, Yongfeng; Zhao, Fangyuan; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Bin; Pei, Qibing; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-04-01

    The emergence of wearable electronics and optoelectronics requires the development of devices that are not only highly flexible but can also be woven into textiles to offer a truly integrated solution. Here, we report a colour-tunable, weavable fibre-shaped polymer light-emitting electrochemical cell (PLEC). The fibre-shaped PLEC is fabricated using all-solution-based processes that can be scaled up for practical applications. The design has a coaxial structure comprising a modified metal wire cathode and a conducting aligned carbon nanotube sheet anode, with an electroluminescent polymer layer sandwiched between them. The fibre shape offers unique and promising advantages. For example, the luminance is independent of viewing angle, the fibre-shaped PLEC can provide a variety of different and tunable colours, it is lightweight, flexible and wearable, and it can potentially be woven into light-emitting clothes for the creation of smart fabrics.

  17. Change in Cell Shape Is Required for Matrix Metalloproteinase-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2010-01-01

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a “cuboidal” epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-β-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents. PMID:18506791

  18. Change in cell shape is required for matrix metalloproteinase-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2008-06-26

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a 'cuboidal' epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-{beta}-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents.

  19. Gloss, colour and grip: multifunctional epidermal cell shapes in bee- and bird-pollinated flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower

  20. Glyco-gold nanoparticle shapes enhance carbohydrate-protein interactions in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangabathuni, Sivakoti; Vasudeva Murthy, Raghavendra; Chaudhary, Preeti Madhukar; Surve, Manalee; Banerjee, Anirban; Kikkeri, Raghavendra

    2016-06-01

    Advances in shape-dependent nanoparticle (NP) research have prompted a close scrutiny of the behaviour of nanostructures in vitro and in vivo. Data pertaining to cellular uptake and site specific sequestration of different shapes of NPs will undoubtedly assist researchers to design better nano-probes for therapeutic and imaging purposes. Herein, we investigated the shape dependent uptake of glyco-gold nanoparticles (G-AuNPs) in different cancer cell lines. Specifically, we have compared the behaviour of spherical, rod and star AuNPs with mannose and galactose conjugations. In vitro experiments showed that the rod-AuNPs exhibited the highest uptake over that of the star and spherical counterparts. Further, an investigation of the mechanism of the uptake clearly demonstrated clathrin mediated endocytosis of the specific G-AuNPs. These results reveal the benefits of different G-AuNP shapes in carbohydrate-mediated interactions.Advances in shape-dependent nanoparticle (NP) research have prompted a close scrutiny of the behaviour of nanostructures in vitro and in vivo. Data pertaining to cellular uptake and site specific sequestration of different shapes of NPs will undoubtedly assist researchers to design better nano-probes for therapeutic and imaging purposes. Herein, we investigated the shape dependent uptake of glyco-gold nanoparticles (G-AuNPs) in different cancer cell lines. Specifically, we have compared the behaviour of spherical, rod and star AuNPs with mannose and galactose conjugations. In vitro experiments showed that the rod-AuNPs exhibited the highest uptake over that of the star and spherical counterparts. Further, an investigation of the mechanism of the uptake clearly demonstrated clathrin mediated endocytosis of the specific G-AuNPs. These results reveal the benefits of different G-AuNP shapes in carbohydrate-mediated interactions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03008d

  1. Osteogenic Capacity of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells is Preserved Following Triggering of Shape Memory Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ling-Fang; Wang, Jing; Baker, Richard M; Wang, Guirong; Mather, Patrick T; Henderson, James H

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymers have enabled the study of programmable, shape-changing, cytocompatible tissue engineering scaffolds. For treatment of bone defects, scaffolds with shape memory functionality have been studied for their potential for minimally invasive delivery, conformal fitting to defect margins, and defect stabilization. However, the extent to which the osteogenic differentiation capacity of stem cells resident in shape memory scaffolds is preserved following programmed shape change has not yet been determined. As a result, the feasibility of shape memory polymer scaffolds being employed in stem cell-based treatment strategies remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that stem cell osteogenic differentiation can be preserved during and following triggering of programmed architectural changes in shape memory polymer scaffolds, human adipose-derived stem cells were seeded in shape memory polymer foam scaffolds or in shape memory polymer fibrous scaffolds programmed to expand or contract, respectively, when warmed to body temperature. Osteogenic differentiation in shape-changing and control scaffolds was compared using mineral deposition, protein production, and gene expression assays. For both shape-changing and control scaffolds, qualitatively and quantitatively comparable amounts of mineral deposition were observed; comparable levels of alkaline phosphatase activity were measured; and no significant differences in the expression of genetic markers of osteogenesis were detected. These findings support the feasibility of employing shape memory in scaffolds for stem cell-based therapies for bone repair.

  2. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Kyle E; Abbott, Timothy R; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-29

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure-function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA-RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA-RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell. PMID:26350218

  3. Calibration of sealed HCl cells used for TCCON instrumental line shape monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hase

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network FTIR network provides highly accurate observations of greenhouse gases column-averaged dry-air mole fractions. As an important component of TCCON quality assurance measures, sealed cells filled with approx. 5 mbar of HCl are used for instrumental line shape (ILS monitoring at all TCCON sites. Here, we introduce a calibration procedure for the HCl cells which applies a refillable, pressure-monitored reference cell filled with C2H2. Using this method, we identify residual variations of HCl purity between the TCCON cells as a non-negligible disturbance.

  4. Change in Shape and Crystal Structure of HAP Nanoparticles during Absorption into Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The change of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles in shape and crystal structure after endocytosis into cancer cells was studied. BEL7402 cells were incubated with HAP nanoparticles for 2 hour,8 hours, 20 hours, respectively. Then, the cells were collected and viewed under a transmission electronic microscope (TEM). Electronic diffraction (ED) attached to TEM was used to detect the properties of the particles. The results show that HAP particles in the cytoplasm can be degraded in cytoplasm. The degradation process is prolonged by more than 20 hours. Thus, it is concluded that HAP nanoparticles would be degraded after kill cells or delivery gene.

  5. Hollow Disc and Sphere-Shaped Particles from Red Blood Cell Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston B. Landon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal gold particles with uniform size distributions were fabricated utilizing human red blood cells (RBCs as templates. The gold shells were charged with a metal chelating agent to prevent flocculation. The procedure described here allows control over the shape of the colloidal particles. Thus, it was possible to fabricate discs and spheres by controlling the osmotic pressure.

  6. Shaped beam scattering from a single lymphocyte cell by generalized Lorenz-Mie theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia Jie; Han, Lu; Han, Yi Ping; Gouesbet, Gerard; Wu, Xuecheng; Wu, Yingchun

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of improving the measurement capabilities of laser-based diagnostic instruments for cells, an eccentric stratified dielectric sphere model illuminated by an arbitrary shaped beam is applied to the modeling of light scattering by a single nucleated cell within the framework of the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT). A particular attention is paid to the study of scattering properties of a lymphocyte cell from an arbitrary incident Gaussian beam. Numerical results concerning the influence of shaped beam parameters (beam waist radius, incident angle, location of beam center) as well as of cellular parameters (ratio of nucleus size to cell size, location of the nucleus within the cell) on the scattering properties are presented and discussed, with comparisons to the scattering behaviors from a concentric stratified sphere model. The results reveal that the forward scattering intensities are mainly determined by the cell size regardless of the nucleus/cell ratio, while sideward scattering signals are sensitive to the change of cell internal structure. As the beam waist radius varies, the scattering patterns in the present cases are similar to each other, although the absolute intensities are different. Additionally, location of the nucleus within the cell, incident angle of the beam as well as location of the beam waist center play significant effects on the light scattering intensity distributions.

  7. Intracellular Delivery by Shape Anisotropic Magnetic Particle-Induced Cell Membrane Cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Yu; Wu, Yi-Chien; Lee, Ji-Ann; Tung, Kuan-Wen; Zhou, Jessica; Teitell, Michael A; Yeh, J Andrew; Chiou, Pei Yu

    2016-08-01

    Introducing functional macromolecules into a variety of living cells is challenging but important for biology research and cell-based therapies. We report a novel cell delivery platform based on rotating shape anisotropic magnetic particles (SAMPs), which make very small cuts on cell membranes for macromolecule delivery with high efficiency and high survivability. SAMP delivery is performed by placing commercially available nickel powder onto cells grown in standard cell culture dishes. Application of a uniform magnetic field causes the magnetic particles to rotate because of mechanical torques induced by shape anisotropic magnetization. Cells touching these rotating particles are nicked, which generates transient membrane pores that enable the delivery of macromolecules into the cytosol of cells. Calcein dye, 3 and 40 kDa dextran polymers, a green fluorescence protein (GFP) plasmid, siRNA, and an enzyme (β-lactamase) were successfully delivered into HeLa cells, primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs), and mouse cortical neurons that can be difficult to transfect. The SAMP approach offers several advantages, including easy implementation, low cost, high throughput, and efficient delivery of a broad range of macromolecules. Collectively, SAMP delivery has great potential for a broad range of academic and industrial applications. PMID:26882924

  8. Nature of the motor element in electrokinetic shape changes of cochlear outer hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallos, P; Evans, B N; Hallworth, R

    1991-03-14

    It is the prevailing notion that cochlear outer hair cells function as mechanical effectors as well as sensory receptors. Electrically induced changes in the shape of mammalian outer hair cells, studied in vitro, are commonly assumed to represent an aspect of their effector process that may occur in vivo. The nature of the motile process is obscure, even though none of the established cellular motors can be involved. Although it is known that the motile response is under voltage control, it is uncertain whether the stimulus is a drop in the voltage along the long axis of the cell or variation in the transmembrane potential. We have now performed experiments with cells partitioned in differing degrees between two chambers. Applied voltage stimulates the cell membrane segments in opposite polarity to an amount dependent on the partitioning. The findings show, in accordance with previous suggestions, that the driving stimulus is a local transmembrane voltage drop and that the cellular motor consists of many independent elements, distributed along the cell membrane and its associated cortical structures. We further show that the primary action of the motor elements is along the longitudinal dimension of the cell without necessarily involving changes in intracellular hydrostatic pressure. This establishes the outer hair cell motor as unique among mechanisms that control cell shape.

  9. Compact disk (CD)-shaped device for single cell isolation and PCR of a specific gene in the isolated cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hidenori; Takamura, Yuzuru; Kubo, Izumi

    2010-12-01

    For immediate discrimination among isolated cells we propose a novel device and technique for isolation of cells and sequential detection of specific gene(s) within them by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, we isolated Salmonella enterica cells and detected the Salmonella-specific invA gene from isolated cells by PCR on a compact disk (CD)-shaped device. This device enabled liquid flow by centrifugal force without a micro pump, and was fabricated from silicon wafer and glass to avoid evaporation of a small amount of reagent. One device has 24 microchannels, and 313 microchambers integrated on each microchannel. One microliter of PCR mixture containing cells was separated into microchambers on the device at 5000 rpm for 30 s. Each microchamber contained approximately 1.5 nL PCR mixture. A Poisson distribution of S. enterica cells was observed for different densities of cell suspension. At 200 cells μL(-1) of S. enterica or less, isolated single cells could be determined on the device by amplification of DNA of the invA gene; at 400 cells μL(-1), chambers containing no, one, two, or three cells could be determined on the device. Selective detection of S. enterica was achieved by PCR from a mixture of S. enterica and Escherichia coli on the CD-shaped device.

  10. Cochlear outer hair cells undergo an apical circumference remodeling constrained by the hair bundle shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etournay, Raphaël; Lepelletier, Léa; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Michel, Vincent; Cayet, Nadège; Leibovici, Michel; Weil, Dominique; Foucher, Isabelle; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Petit, Christine

    2010-04-01

    Epithelial cells acquire diverse shapes relating to their different functions. This is particularly relevant for the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), whose apical and basolateral shapes accommodate the functioning of these cells as mechano-electrical and electromechanical transducers, respectively. We uncovered a circumferential shape transition of the apical junctional complex (AJC) of OHCs, which occurs during the early postnatal period in the mouse, prior to hearing onset. Geometric analysis of the OHC apical circumference using immunostaining of the AJC protein ZO1 and Fourier-interpolated contour detection characterizes this transition as a switch from a rounded-hexagon to a non-convex circumference delineating two lateral lobes at the neural side of the cell, with a negative curvature in between. This shape tightly correlates with the 'V'-configuration of the OHC hair bundle, the apical mechanosensitive organelle that converts sound-evoked vibrations into variations in cell membrane potential. The OHC apical circumference remodeling failed or was incomplete in all the mouse mutants affected in hair bundle morphogenesis that we tested. During the normal shape transition, myosin VIIa and myosin II (A and B isoforms) displayed polarized redistributions into and out of the developing lobes, respectively, while Shroom2 and F-actin transiently accumulated in the lobes. Defects in these redistributions were observed in the mutants, paralleling their apical circumference abnormalities. Our results point to a pivotal role for actomyosin cytoskeleton tensions in the reshaping of the OHC apical circumference. We propose that this remodeling contributes to optimize the mechanical coupling between the basal and apical poles of mature OHCs.

  11. Multiple peptidoglycan modification networks modulate Helicobacter pylori's cell shape, motility, and colonization potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K Sycuro

    Full Text Available Helical cell shape of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to promote virulence through viscosity-dependent enhancement of swimming velocity. However, H. pylori csd1 mutants, which are curved but lack helical twist, show normal velocity in viscous polymer solutions and the reason for their deficiency in stomach colonization has remained unclear. Characterization of new rod shaped mutants identified Csd4, a DL-carboxypeptidase of peptidoglycan (PG tripeptide monomers and Csd5, a putative scaffolding protein. Morphological and biochemical studies indicated Csd4 tripeptide cleavage and Csd1 crosslinking relaxation modify the PG sacculus through independent networks that coordinately generate helical shape. csd4 mutants show attenuation of stomach colonization, but no change in proinflammatory cytokine induction, despite four-fold higher levels of Nod1-agonist tripeptides in the PG sacculus. Motility analysis of similarly shaped mutants bearing distinct alterations in PG modifications revealed deficits associated with shape, but only in gel-like media and not viscous solutions. As gastric mucus displays viscoelastic gel-like properties, our results suggest enhanced penetration of the mucus barrier underlies the fitness advantage conferred by H. pylori's characteristic shape.

  12. Deformable L-shaped microwell array for trapping pairs of heterogeneous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gi-Hun; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kang, AhRan; Takayama, Shuichi; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Joong Yull

    2015-03-01

    To study cell-to-cell interactions, there has been a continuous demand on developing microsystems for trapping pairs of two different cells in microwell arrays. Here, we propose an L-shaped microwell (L-microwell) array that relies on the elasticity of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate for trapping and pairing heterogeneous cells. We designed an L-microwell suitable for trapping single cell in each branch via stretching/releasing the PDMS substrate, and also performed 3D time-dependent diffusion simulations to visualize how cell-secreted molecules diffuse in the L-microwell and communicate with the partner cell. The computational results showed that the secreted molecule first contacted the partner cell after 35 min, and the secreted molecule fully covered the partner cell in 4 h (when referenced to 10% of the secreted molecular concentration). The molecules that diffused to the outside of the L-microwell were significantly diluted by the bulk solution, which prevented unwanted cellular communication between neighboring L-microwells. We produced over 5000 cell pairs in one 2.25 cm2 array with about 30 000 L-microwells. The proposed L-microwell array offers a versatile and convenient cell pairing method to investigate cell-to-cell interactions in, for example, cell fusion, immune reactions, and cancer metastasis.

  13. Miniature wire-shaped solar cells, electrochemical capacitors and lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowu Pan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It is critically important to develop miniature energy harvesting and storage devices in modern electronics, for example, for portable and foldable electronic facilities. In this review article, novel miniature solar cells, electrochemical capacitors and lithium-ion batteries as well as their integrated devices are carefully summarized. Particular emphasis has been paid to wire-shape energy devices that exhibit unique and promising advantages such as being lightweight and weaveable compared with the conventional planar architecture. Recent new materials and attractive designs are highlighted for these wire-shaped energy devices.

  14. Enhanced cell adhesion to the dimpled surfaces of golf-ball-shaped microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Hyuk; Lee, Chang-Soo; Cho, Kuk Young

    2014-10-01

    Engineering surface morphology as in honeycomb-structured planar films is of great importance for providing new potential application and improved performance in biomedical fields. We demonstrate potential new applications for the uniform biocompatible golf-ball-shaped microparticles that resembles 3D feature of honeycomb-structured film. Dimple size controllable golf-ball-shaped microparticles were fabricated by microfluidic device. Surface dimples not only can act as picoliter beaker but also enhance cell adhesion without any chemical modification of the surface. PMID:25265359

  15. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  16. Gold nanoparticle size and shape influence on osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingchao; Li, Jia'en Jasmine; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xinlong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored for biomedical applications due to their advantages of facile synthesis and surface functionalization. Previous studies have suggested that AuNPs can induce differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts. However, how the size and shape of AuNPs affect the differentiation response of stem cells has not been elucidated. In this work, a series of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated Au nanospheres, Au nanostars and Au nanorods with different diameters of 40, 70 and 110 nm were synthesized and their effects on osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were investigated. All the AuNPs showed good cytocompatibility and did not influence proliferation of hMSCs at the studied concentrations. Osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was dependent on the size and shape of AuNPs. Sphere-40, sphere-70 and rod-70 significantly increased the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition of cells while rod-40 reduced the ALP activity and calcium deposition. Gene profiling revealed that the expression of osteogenic marker genes was down-regulated after incubation with rod-40. However, up-regulation of these genes was found in the sphere-40, sphere-70 and rod-70 treatment. Moreover, it was found that the size and shape of AuNPs affected the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs through regulating the activation of Yes-associated protein (YAP). These results indicate that the size and shape of AuNPs had an influence on the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, which should provide useful guidance for the preparation of AuNPs with defined size and shape for their biomedical applications.Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored for biomedical applications due to their advantages of facile synthesis and surface functionalization. Previous studies have suggested that AuNPs can induce differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts. However, how the size and shape of AuNPs affect the

  17. Arabidopsis FH1 Formin Affects Cotyledon Pavement Cell Shape by Modulating Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosero, Amparo; Oulehlová, Denisa; Stillerová, Lenka; Schiebertová, Petra; Grunt, Michal; Žárský, Viktor; Cvrčková, Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis involves concerted rearrangements of microtubules and actin microfilaments. We previously reported that FH1, the main Arabidopsis thaliana housekeeping Class I membrane-anchored formin, contributes to actin dynamics and microtubule stability in rhizodermis cells. Here we examine the effects of mutations affecting FH1 (At3g25500) on cell morphogenesis and above-ground organ development in seedlings, as well as on cytoskeletal organization and dynamics, using a combination of confocal and variable angle epifluorescence microscopy with a pharmacological approach. Homozygous fh1 mutants exhibited cotyledon epinasty and had larger cotyledon pavement cells with more pronounced lobes than the wild type. The pavement cell shape alterations were enhanced by expression of the fluorescent microtubule marker GFP-microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4). Mutant cotyledon pavement cells exhibited reduced density and increased stability of microfilament bundles, as well as enhanced dynamics of microtubules. Analogous results were also obtained upon treatments with the formin inhibitor SMIFH2 (small molecule inhibitor of formin homology 2 domains). Pavement cell shape in wild-type (wt) and fh1 plants in some situations exhibited a differential response towards anti-cytoskeletal drugs, especially the microtubule disruptor oryzalin. Our observations indicate that FH1 participates in the control of microtubule dynamics, possibly via its effects on actin, subsequently influencing cell morphogenesis and macroscopic organ development. PMID:26738547

  18. Shape changes in isolated outer hair cells: measurements with attached microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajic, G; Schacht, J

    1991-04-01

    Shape changes can be induced in isolated outer hair cells by various stimuli and quantified from digitized video-images. While overall changes in length between base and apex are easily measured, changes in defined segments of the cell require fixed landmarks on the cell body. The problem of locating such landmarks makes it difficult to assess if a change in length is uniform or largely confined to a particular segment of the cell. This information is important in identifying the location of a contractile apparatus and the elucidation of mechanisms of motility. We demonstrate here that microspheres can serve as reference points for such measurements. By attaching microspheres to cells we determined that, when outer hair cells increased their volume upon K(+)-depolarization, their middle segment shortened more significantly (14 +/- 6%) than either the basal (10 +/- 5%) or apical section (7 +/- 6%; P less than 0.01). In contrast, when cortical contractions were induced by elevating intracellular Ca2+, the elongation of the cells was more pronounced in their basal (8 +/- 2%) than their apical (6 +/- 2%; P = 0.06) or middle region (6 +/- 3%). This study provides further insight into the mechanisms of shape changes in isolated outer hair cells and illustrates a method to analyze localized changes in the absence of internal landmarks.

  19. The development and geometry of shape change in Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledon pavement cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halsey Leah E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The leaf epidermis is an important architectural control element that influences the growth properties of underlying tissues and the overall form of the organ. In dicots, interdigitated pavement cells are the building blocks of the tissue, and their morphogenesis includes the assembly of specialized cell walls that surround the apical, basal, and lateral (anticlinal cell surfaces. The microtubule and actin cytoskeletons are highly polarized along the cortex of the anticlinal wall; however, the relationships between these arrays and cell morphogenesis are unclear. Results We developed new quantitative tools to compare population-level growth statistics with time-lapse imaging of cotyledon pavement cells in an intact tissue. The analysis revealed alternating waves of lobe initiation and a phase of lateral isotropic expansion that persisted for days. During lateral isotropic diffuse growth, microtubule organization varied greatly between cell surfaces. Parallel microtubule bundles were distributed unevenly along the anticlinal surface, with subsets marking stable cortical domains at cell indentations and others clearly populating the cortex within convex cell protrusions. Conclusions Pavement cell morphogenesis is discontinuous, and includes punctuated phases of lobe initiation and lateral isotropic expansion. In the epidermis, lateral isotropic growth is independent of pavement cell size and shape. Cortical microtubules along the upper cell surface and stable cortical patches of anticlinal microtubules may coordinate the growth behaviors of orthogonal cell walls. This work illustrates the importance of directly linking protein localization data to the growth behavior of leaf epidermal cells.

  20. Dermal papilla cell number specifies hair size, shape and cycling and its reduction causes follicular decline

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Woo; Wu, Eleanor; Morgan, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Although the hair shaft is derived from the progeny of keratinocyte stem cells in the follicular epithelium, the growth and differentiation of follicular keratinocytes is guided by a specialized mesenchymal population, the dermal papilla (DP), that is embedded in the hair bulb. Here we show that the number of DP cells in the follicle correlates with the size and shape of the hair produced in the mouse pelage. The same stem cell pool gives rise to hairs of different sizes or types in successiv...

  1. A comparison of computational models for eukaryotic cell shape and motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Holmes

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cell motility involves complex interactions of signalling molecules, cytoskeleton, cell membrane, and mechanics interacting in space and time. Collectively, these components are used by the cell to interpret and respond to external stimuli, leading to polarization, protrusion, adhesion formation, and myosin-facilitated retraction. When these processes are choreographed correctly, shape change and motility results. A wealth of experimental data have identified numerous molecular constituents involved in these processes, but the complexity of their interactions and spatial organization make this a challenging problem to understand. This has motivated theoretical and computational approaches with simplified caricatures of cell structure and behaviour, each aiming to gain better understanding of certain kinds of cells and/or repertoire of behaviour. Reaction-diffusion (RD equations as well as equations of viscoelastic flows have been used to describe the motility machinery. In this review, we describe some of the recent computational models for cell motility, concentrating on simulations of cell shape changes (mainly in two but also three dimensions. The problem is challenging not only due to the difficulty of abstracting and simplifying biological complexity but also because computing RD or fluid flow equations in deforming regions, known as a "free-boundary" problem, is an extremely challenging problem in applied mathematics. Here we describe the distinct approaches, comparing their strengths and weaknesses, and the kinds of biological questions that they have been able to address.

  2. An insight into morphometric descriptors of cell shape that pertain to regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Joana; See, Eugene Yong-Shun; Biggs, Manus; Pandit, Abhay

    2016-07-01

    Cellular morphology has recently been indicated as a powerful indicator of cellular function. The analysis of cell shape has evolved from rudimentary forms of microscopic visual inspection to more advanced methodologies that utilize high-resolution microscopy coupled with sophisticated computer hardware and software for data analysis. Despite this progress, there is still a lack of standardization in quantification of morphometric parameters. In addition, uncertainty remains as to which methodologies and parameters of cell morphology will yield meaningful data, which methods should be utilized to categorize cell shape, and the extent of reliability of measurements and the interpretation of the resulting analysis. A large range of descriptors has been employed to objectively assess the cellular morphology in two-dimensional and three-dimensional domains. Intuitively, simple and applicable morphometric descriptors are preferable and standardized protocols for cell shape analysis can be achieved with the help of computerized tools. In this review, cellular morphology is discussed as a descriptor of cellular function and the current morphometric parameters that are used quantitatively in two- and three-dimensional environments are described. Furthermore, the current problems associated with these morphometric measurements are addressed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25757807

  3. Structure of Csd3 from Helicobacter pylori, a cell shape-determining metallopeptidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. pylori Csd3 (HP0506), together with other peptidoglycan hydrolases, plays an important role in determining cell shape. Its crystal structure in the latent state is reported. Helicobacter pylori is associated with various gastrointestinal diseases such as gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. Its colonization of the human gastric mucosa requires high motility, which depends on its helical cell shape. Seven cell shape-determining genes (csd1, csd2, csd3/hdpA, ccmA, csd4, csd5 and csd6) have been identified in H. pylori. Their proteins play key roles in determining the cell shape through modifications of the cell-wall peptidoglycan by the alteration of cross-linking or by the trimming of peptidoglycan muropeptides. Among them, Csd3 (also known as HdpA) is a bifunctional enzyme. Its d, d-endopeptidase activity cleaves the d-Ala4-mDAP3 peptide bond between cross-linked muramyl tetrapeptides and pentapeptides. It is also a d, d-carboxypeptidase that cleaves off the terminal d-Ala5 from the muramyl pentapeptide. Here, the crystal structure of this protein has been determined, revealing the organization of its three domains in a latent and inactive state. The N-terminal domain 1 and the core of domain 2 share the same fold despite a very low level of sequence identity, and their surface-charge distributions are different. The C-terminal LytM domain contains the catalytic site with a Zn2+ ion, like the similar domains of other M23 metallopeptidases. Domain 1 occludes the active site of the LytM domain. The core of domain 2 is held against the LytM domain by the C-terminal tail region that protrudes from the LytM domain

  4. Structure of Csd3 from Helicobacter pylori, a cell shape-determining metallopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Doo Ri [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun Sook [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151 742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jieun; Im, Ha Na; Yoon, Hye Jin; Yoon, Ji Young; Jang, Jun Young [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Kim, Soon-Jong [Mokpo National University, Chonnam 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Il [National Cancer Center, Gyeonggi 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Se Won, E-mail: sewonsuh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    H. pylori Csd3 (HP0506), together with other peptidoglycan hydrolases, plays an important role in determining cell shape. Its crystal structure in the latent state is reported. Helicobacter pylori is associated with various gastrointestinal diseases such as gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. Its colonization of the human gastric mucosa requires high motility, which depends on its helical cell shape. Seven cell shape-determining genes (csd1, csd2, csd3/hdpA, ccmA, csd4, csd5 and csd6) have been identified in H. pylori. Their proteins play key roles in determining the cell shape through modifications of the cell-wall peptidoglycan by the alteration of cross-linking or by the trimming of peptidoglycan muropeptides. Among them, Csd3 (also known as HdpA) is a bifunctional enzyme. Its d, d-endopeptidase activity cleaves the d-Ala{sup 4}-mDAP{sup 3} peptide bond between cross-linked muramyl tetrapeptides and pentapeptides. It is also a d, d-carboxypeptidase that cleaves off the terminal d-Ala{sup 5} from the muramyl pentapeptide. Here, the crystal structure of this protein has been determined, revealing the organization of its three domains in a latent and inactive state. The N-terminal domain 1 and the core of domain 2 share the same fold despite a very low level of sequence identity, and their surface-charge distributions are different. The C-terminal LytM domain contains the catalytic site with a Zn{sup 2+} ion, like the similar domains of other M23 metallopeptidases. Domain 1 occludes the active site of the LytM domain. The core of domain 2 is held against the LytM domain by the C-terminal tail region that protrudes from the LytM domain.

  5. Dermal papilla cell number specifies hair size, shape and cycling and its reduction causes follicular decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Woo; Wu, Eleanor; Morgan, Bruce A

    2013-04-01

    Although the hair shaft is derived from the progeny of keratinocyte stem cells in the follicular epithelium, the growth and differentiation of follicular keratinocytes is guided by a specialized mesenchymal population, the dermal papilla (DP), that is embedded in the hair bulb. Here we show that the number of DP cells in the follicle correlates with the size and shape of the hair produced in the mouse pelage. The same stem cell pool gives rise to hairs of different sizes or types in successive hair cycles, and this shift is accompanied by a corresponding change in DP cell number. Using a mouse model that allows selective ablation of DP cells in vivo, we show that DP cell number dictates the size and shape of the hair. Furthermore, we confirm the hypothesis that the DP plays a crucial role in activating stem cells to initiate the formation of a new hair shaft. When DP cell number falls below a critical threshold, hair follicles with a normal keratinocyte compartment fail to generate new hairs. However, neighbouring follicles with a few more DP cells can re-enter the growth phase, and those that do exploit an intrinsic mechanism to restore both DP cell number and normal hair growth. These results demonstrate that the mesenchymal niche directs stem and progenitor cell behaviour to initiate regeneration and specify hair morphology. Degeneration of the DP population in mice leads to the types of hair thinning and loss observed during human aging, and the results reported here suggest novel approaches to reversing hair loss.

  6. Relationship between stiffness, internal cell pressure and shape of outer hair cells isolated from the guinea-pig hearing organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, E; Ulfendahl, M

    1997-12-01

    The mechanical properties of outer hair cells are of importance for normal hearing, and it has been shown that damage of the cells can lead to a reduction in the hearing sensitivity. In this study, we measured the stiffness of isolated outer hair cells in hyper- and hypotonic conditions, and examined the change in stiffness in relation to the corresponding changes in internal cell pressure and cell shape. The results showed that the axial stiffness of isolated outer hair cells (30-90 microns in length, 8-12 microns in diameter), ranging from 0.13-5.39 mN m-1, was inversely related to cell length. Exposure to hyper- and hypotonic external media with a small percentage change in osmolality caused a similar magnitude of change in cell length and cell diameter, but an average 60% change in cell stiffness. Therefore, a moderate osmotic change in the external medium can lead to a significant alteration in cell stiffness. The findings thus indicate an important contribution of internal cell pressure to cell stiffness.

  7. An adhesion-dependent switch between mechanisms that determine motile cell shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L Barnhart

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes.

  8. A Miniaturized Prototype of Resonant Banana-Shaped Photoacoustic Cell for Gas Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Ulasevich, A L; Kouzmouk, A A; Starovoitov, V S

    2013-01-01

    A resonant photoacoustic cell intended for laser-spectroscopy gas sensing is represented. This cell is a miniature imitation of a macro-scale banana-shaped cell developed previously. The parameters, which specify the cavity shape, are chosen so as not only to provide optimal cell operation at a selected acoustic resonance but also to reduce substantially the cell sizes. A miniaturized prototype cell (the volume of acoustic cavity of ~ 5 mm^3) adapted to the narrow diffraction-limited beam of near-infrared laser is produced and examined experimentally. The noise-associated measurement error and laser-initiated signals are studied as functions of modulation frequency. The background signal and the useful response to light absorption by the gas are analyzed in measurements of absorption for ammonia in nitrogen flow with the help of a pigtailed DFB laser diode oscillated near a wavelength of 1.53 um. The performance of prototype operation at the second longitudinal acoustic resonance (the resonance frequency of ~...

  9. Dispersive radio frequency electrometry using Rydberg atoms in a prism-shaped atomic vapor cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, H. Q.; Kumar, S.; Kübler, H.; Shaffer, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a method to measure radio frequency (RF) electric fields (E-fields) using atoms contained in a prism-shaped vapor cell. The method utilizes the concept of electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms. The RF E-field induces changes in the index of refraction of the vapor resulting in deflection of the probe laser beam as it passes through the prism-shaped vapor cell. We measured a minimum RF E-field of 8.25 μ {{Vcm}}-1 with a sensitivity of ∼ 46.5 μ {{Vcm}}-1 {{Hz}}-1/2. The experimental results agree with a numerical model that includes dephasing effects. We discuss possible improvements to obtain higher sensitivity for RF E-field measurements.

  10. A parametric study of the natural vibration and mode shapes of PEM fuel cell stacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A PEM fuel cell stack is laminated with a number of plate-type cells, and the latest model is assembled by compression from both ends of plates.PEM fuel cells are exposed to high magnitude vibrations, shocks, and cyclic loads in many applications. Vibrations during operation show significant impact in the longer run of the fuel cells. Frequencies which are not close to the resonant frequencies or natural frequencies show very little effect on the overall performance. However, if the frequency ranges of operation approaches the resonant frequency range, the probability of component failure increases. It is possible that there will be lateral transition of cells or leakage of fuel gas and coolant water. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the effects vibration has on the fuel cell. This work aims to understand the vibration characteristics of a PEM fuel cell stack and to evaluate their seismic resistance under a vibration environment. Natural frequencies and mode shapes of the PEM fuel cell stack are modelling using finite element methods (FEM.A parametric study is conducted to investigate how the natural frequency varies as a function of thickness, Young’s modulus, and density for each component layer. In addition, this work provides insight into how the natural frequencies of the PEM fuel cell stack should be tuned to avoid high amplitude vibrations by modifying the material and geometric properties of individual components. The mode shapes of the PEM fuel cell stack provide insight into the maximum displacement exhibited under vibration conditions that should be considered for transportation and stationary applications.

  11. Fs-laser cell perforation using gold nanoparticles of different shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Markus; Fehlauer, Holger; Bintig, Willem; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Nolte, Ingo; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Lubatschowski, Holger; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2010-02-01

    The resulting effects of the interaction between nanoparticles and laser irradiation are a current matter in research. Depending on the laser parameters as well as the particles properties several effects may occur e.g. bubble formation, melting, fragmentation or an optical breakdown at the surface of the nanoparticle. Besides the investigations of these effects, we employed them to perforate the membrane of different cell lines and investigated nanoparticle mediated laser cell perforation as an alternative optical transfection method. Therefore, the gold nanoparticles (GNP) of different shapes were applied. Furthermore, we varied the methods for attaching GNP to the membrane, i.e. co-incubation of pure gold nanoparticles and bioconjugation of the surface of GNP. The optimal incubation time and the location of the GNP at the cell membrane were evaluated by multiphoton microscopy. If these GNP loaded cells are irradiated with a fs laser beam, small areas of the membrane can be perforated. Following, extra cellular molecules such as membrane impermeable dyes or foreign DNA (GFP vectors) are able to diffuse through the perforated area into the treated cells. We studied the dependence of the laser fluence, GNP concentration, GNP size and shape for successful nanoparticle mediated laser cell perforation. Due to a weak focusing of the laser beam a gentle cell treatment with high cell viabilities and high perforation efficiencies can be achieved. A further advantage of this perforation technique is the high number of cells that can be treated simultaneously. Additionally, we show applications of this method to primary and stem cells.

  12. Digital holography for recovering 3D shape of red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmolo, P.; Miccio, L.; Merola, F.; Gennari, O.; Netti, P.; Ferraro, Pietro

    2015-07-01

    Full morphometric data analysis and 3D rendering of Red Blood Cells (RBCs) is provided by means of Digital Holography (DH) in combination with Optical Tweezers (OT). The proposed method is compared with a geometrical model of RBC in order to evaluate its accuracy and tested for many kinds of RBCs, from healthy ones with double-concavity to that with abnormal shapes. Applications in diagnostics are foreseen.

  13. Influence of pore and strut shape on open cell metal foam bulk properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Hugo, Jean-Michel; Topin, Frederic; Vicente, Jerome

    2012-05-01

    The thermo-physical behavior of open-celled metal foams depends on their microscopic structure. An ideal periodic isotropic structure of tetrakaidecahedron shape i.e. Kelvin cell is studied. We have proposed an analytical model in order to obtain geometrical parameters correctly as they have substantial influence on thermal and hydraulic phenomena, where strut geometry is of prime importance. Various relationships between different geometrical parameters and porosities are presented. Consequently, empirical correlations are proposed to determine permeability and inertia coefficient using Ergun like model for computing pressure drop.

  14. Shape matters: effects of silver nanospheres and wires on human alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoehr Linda C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In nanotoxicology, the exact role of particle shape, in relation to the composition, on the capacity to induce toxicity is largely unknown. We investigated the toxic and immunotoxic effects of silver wires (length: 1.5 - 25 μm; diameter 100 - 160 nm, spherical silver nanoparticles (30 nm and silver microparticles ( Methods Wires and nanoparticles were synthesized by wet-chemistry methods and extensively characterized. Cell viability and cytotoxicity were assessed and potential immunotoxic effects were investigated. To compare the effects on an activated and a resting immune system, cells were stimulated with rhTNF-α or left untreated. Changes in intracellular free calcium levels were determined using calcium imaging. Finally, ion release from the particles was assessed by ICP-MS and the effects of released ions on cell viability and cytotoxicity were tested. Results No effects were observed for the spherical particles, whereas the silver wires significantly reduced cell viability and increased LDH release from A549 cells. Cytokine promoter induction and NF-κB activation decreased in a concentration dependent manner similar to the decrease seen in cell viability. In addition, a strong increase of intracellular calcium levels within minutes after addition of wires was observed. This toxicity was not due to free silver ions, since the samples with the highest ion release did not induce toxicity and ion release control experiments with cells treated with pre-incubated medium did not show any effects either. Conclusions These data showed that silver wires strongly affect the alveolar epithelial cells, whereas spherical silver particles had no effect. This supports the hypothesis that shape is one of the important factors that determine particle toxicity.

  15. Tuning Cell Differentiation into a 3D Scaffold Presenting a Pore Shape Gradient for Osteochondral Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Luca, Andrea; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Mota, Carlos; Lepedda, Antonio; Auhl, Dietmar; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Osteochondral regeneration remains nowadays a major problem since the outcome of current techniques is not satisfactory in terms of functional tissue formation and development. A possible solution is the combination of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate scaffolds with instructive properties. In this study, the differentiation of hMSCs within a scaffold presenting a gradient in pore shape is presented. The variation in pore shape is determined by varying the angle formed by the fibers of two consequent layers. The fiber deposition patterns are 0-90, which generate squared pores, 0-45, 0-30, and 0-15, that generate rhomboidal pores with an increasing major axis as the deposition angle decreases. Within the gradient construct, squared pores support a better chondrogenic differentiation whereas cells residing in the rhomboidal pores display a better osteogenic differentiation. When cultured under osteochondral conditions the trend in both osteogenic and chondrogenic markers is maintained. Engineering the pore shape, thus creating axial gradients in structural properties, seems to be an instructive strategy to fabricate functional 3D scaffolds that are able to influence hMSCs differentiation for osteochondral tissue regeneration. PMID:27109461

  16. Effects of adhesion dynamics and substrate compliance on the shape and motility of crawling cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Ziebert

    Full Text Available Computational modeling of eukaryotic cells moving on substrates is an extraordinarily complex task: many physical processes, such as actin polymerization, action of motors, formation of adhesive contacts concomitant with both substrate deformation and recruitment of actin etc., as well as regulatory pathways are intertwined. Moreover, highly nontrivial cell responses emerge when the substrate becomes deformable and/or heterogeneous. Here we extended a computational model for motile cell fragments, based on an earlier developed phase field approach, to account for explicit dynamics of adhesion site formation, as well as for substrate compliance via an effective elastic spring. Our model displays steady motion vs. stick-slip transitions with concomitant shape oscillations as a function of the actin protrusion rate, the substrate stiffness, and the rates of adhesion. Implementing a step in the substrate's elastic modulus, as well as periodic patterned surfaces exemplified by alternating stripes of high and low adhesiveness, we were able to reproduce the correct motility modes and shape phenomenology found experimentally. We also predict the following nontrivial behavior: the direction of motion of cells can switch from parallel to perpendicular to the stripes as a function of both the adhesion strength and the width ratio of adhesive to non-adhesive stripes.

  17. The Drosophila actin regulator ENABLED regulates cell shape and orientation during gonad morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Sano

    Full Text Available Organs develop distinctive morphologies to fulfill their unique functions. We used Drosophila embryonic gonads as a model to study how two different cell lineages, primordial germ cells (PGCs and somatic gonadal precursors (SGPs, combine to form one organ. We developed a membrane GFP marker to image SGP behaviors live. These studies show that a combination of SGP cell shape changes and inward movement of anterior and posterior SGPs leads to the compaction of the spherical gonad. This process is disrupted in mutants of the actin regulator, enabled (ena. We show that Ena coordinates these cell shape changes and the inward movement of the SGPs, and Ena affects the intracellular localization of DE-cadherin (DE-cad. Mathematical simulation based on these observations suggests that changes in DE-cad localization can generate the forces needed to compact an elongated structure into a sphere. We propose that Ena regulates force balance in the SGPs by sequestering DE-cad, leading to the morphogenetic movement required for gonad compaction.

  18. Axial rotation in rat embryos: involvement of changes in the shapes and arrangement of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, M; Yasutomi, M

    1995-02-01

    Rat embryos at the head-fold stage (9.5 days of gestation) were cultured for 32 hours in rat serum. Embryos rotated their axes (changing from the shape of a concave mid-region to that of a convex mid-region) during the last 5 hours of culture (from 27 h to 32 h in culture). Addition of 0.1 micrograms/ml cytochalasin D to the culture medium for this 5-hour period prevented axial rotation in the embryos and disturbed the appearance of microfilaments in the dermatome, the dorsal region of the trunk neural tube, and the dorsal epidermis. During the period of axial rotation, the dermatome and the dorsal epidermis extended and showed the arrangement of microfilaments along the cranio-caudal axis in the control embryos but not in the treated embryos. The dorsal region of the trunk neural tube in the control embryos consisted of a seam of neuroepithelial cells in which microfilaments were apparently arranged along the cranio-caudal axis but the region in the treated embryos was crowded with the neuroepithelial cells piled up randomly and microfilaments showed no arrangement. These results suggest that changes in the shapes and arrangement of the cells in the dermatome, the dorsal region of the trunk neural tube, and the dorsal epidermis cause extension of these tissues along the cranio-caudal axis and result in axial rotation. Microfilaments may play an essential role in changes in the shapes and arrangement of the cells in these tissues. PMID:7796462

  19. Effects of Ag Nanocubes with Different Corner Shape on the Absorption Enhancement in Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Shan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of corner shape of silver (Ag nanocubes (NCs on optical absorptions of organic solar cells (OSCs are theoretically investigated by finite element method (FEM calculations. The absorption of sun light in the active layer is calculated. Significant absorption enhancements have been demonstrated in metallic region with different shapes of Ag NCs, among them corner radius (R is zero result in the best light absorption performance of up to 55% enhancement with respect to bare OSCs. The origins of increased absorption are believed to be the effects of the huge electric field enhancement and increased scattering upon the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR. Apart from using R=0, we show that R=3, 6, and 11.29 of Ag NCs in metallic region of active layer may also result in the maximum comparable absorption enhancement of 49%, 41%, and 28%, respectively. In addition, a significant effect of the period of NCs is observed.

  20. Light quantity affects the regulation of cell shape in Fremyella diplosiphon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagmi ePattanaik

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In some cyanobacteria, the color or prevalent wavelengths of ambient light can impact the protein or pigment composition of the light-harvesting complexes. In some cases, light color or quality impacts cellular morphology. The significance of changes in pigmentation is associated strongly with optimizing light absorption for photosynthesis, whereas the significance of changes in light quality-dependent cellular morphology is less well understood. In natural aquatic environments, light quality and intensity change simultaneously at varying depths of the water column. Thus, we hypothesize that changes in morphology that also have been attributed to differences in the prevalent wavelengths of available light may largely be associated with changes in light intensity. Fremyella diplosiphon shows highly reproducible light-dependent changes in pigmentation and morphology. Under red light (RL, F. diplosiphon cells are blue-green in color, due to the accumulation of high levels of phycocyanin, a RL- absorbing pigment in the light-harvesting complexes or phycobilisomes (PBSs, and the shape of cells are short and rounded. Conversely, under green light (GL, F. diplosiphon cells are red in color due to accumulation of GL- absorbing phycoerythrin in PBSs, and are longer and brick-shaped. GL is enriched at lower depths in the water column, where overall levels of light also are reduced, i.e., to 10% or less of the intensity found at the water surface. We hypothesize that longer cells under low light intensity, which is generally enriched in green wavelengths, are associated with greater levels of total photosynthetic pigments in the thylakoid membranes. To test this hypothesis, we grew F. diplosiphon under increasing intensities of GL and observed whether the length of cells diminished due to reduced pressure to maintain larger cells and the associated increased photosynthetic membrane capacity under high light intensity, independent of whether it is light of

  1. A three-dimensional tetrahedral-shaped conjugated small molecule for organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QIN Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of a novel three-dimensional tetrahedral-shaped small molecule,SO,containing a tetraphenylsilane core and cyanoester functionalized terthiophene arms.A deep lying HOMO energy level of -5.3 eV and a narrow bandgap of 1.9 eV were obtained from cyclic voltammetry measurements.Absorption,X-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry experiments all indicate high crystallinity of this compound.Solar cells employing SO were fabricated and evaluated.The relatively low performance was mainly ascribed to lack of appreciable phase separation,which is confirmed by optical microscopy.

  2. What shapes the stimulus to the inner hair cell?: A moderated discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridberger, Anders; Guinan, John J.

    2015-12-01

    The following is an edited transcript of a recorded discussion session on the topic of "What Shapes the Stimulus to the Inner Hair Cell?". The discussion, moderated by the authors, took place at the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing held at Cape Sounio, Greece, in June 2014. All participants knew that the session was being recorded. In view of both the spontaneous nature of the discussion and the editing, however, this transcript may not represent the considered or final views of the participants, and may not represent a consensus of experts in the field. The reader is advised to consult additional independent publications.

  3. Cytosolic organelles shape calcium signals and exo-endocytotic responses of chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Antonio G; Padín, Fernando; Fernández-Morales, José C; Maroto, Marcos; García-Sancho, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The concept of stimulus-secretion coupling was born from experiments performed in chromaffin cells 50 years ago. Stimulation of these cells with acetylcholine enhances calcium (Ca(2+)) entry and this generates a transient elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) that triggers the exocytotic release of catecholamines. The control of the [Ca(2+)](c) signal is complex and depends on various classes of plasmalemmal calcium channels, cytosolic calcium buffers, the uptake and release of Ca(2+) from cytoplasmic organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, chromaffin vesicles and the nucleus, and Ca(2+) extrusion mechanisms, such as the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase, and the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Computation of the rates of Ca(2+) fluxes between the different cell compartments support the proposal that the chromaffin cell has developed functional calcium tetrads formed by calcium channels, cytosolic calcium buffers, the endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria nearby the exocytotic plasmalemmal sites. These tetrads shape the Ca(2+) transients occurring during cell activation to regulate early and late steps of exocytosis, and the ensuing endocytotic responses. The different patterns of catecholamine secretion in response to stress may thus depend on such local [Ca(2+)](c) transients occurring at different cell compartments, and generated by redistribution and release of Ca(2+) by cytoplasmic organelles. In this manner, the calcium tetrads serve to couple the variable energy demands due to exo-endocytotic activities with energy production and protein synthesis. PMID:22209033

  4. The shape of radiation survival curves of mammalian cells cultured in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various in vivo and in vitro techniques to study the survival of single mammalian cells are now well known. The potential applications of formal data obtained by these methods to problems of human exposure, radiotherapy, radiation protection and the like are extensive. Mammalian cell techniques, particularly in vitro, have also extended greatly the opportunity to study basic interactions between radiation and processes occurring in cells at the time of exposure. In survival curve analysis and interpretation and the dependence of survival upon different types of radiation, formerly confined chiefly to microorganisms, single mammalian cell studies open new avenues. These cells are large, sensitive to radiation, and cytologically relatively well known. Although it would be rash to suggest that more is known about them than some microorganisms, at least some details of structure, chromosome morphology, and the pattern and order of DNA synthesis are quite well established. The prospects of quantitatively relating changes in structure and behaviour to radiation exposure in the form of some coherent model therefore seem enhanced. This paper discusses survival data for mammalian cells cultured in vitro from three points of view: first, technical or experimental factors which can vary the shape of the survival curve; second, the effect of heterogeneity among individuals of the populations generally studied; third, mathematical expressions or models other than which may fit the observed data better

  5. Slow motility in hair cells of the frog amphibian papilla: Ca2+-dependent shape changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahbakhsh, Nasser A; Narins, Peter M

    2006-02-01

    We investigated the process of slow motility in non-mammalian auditory hair cells by recording the time course of shape change in hair cells of the frog amphibian papilla. The tall hair cells in the rostral segment of this organ, reported to be the sole recipients of efferent innervation, were found to shorten in response to an increase in the concentration of the intracellular free calcium. These shortenings are composed of two partially-overlapping phases: an initial rapid iso-volumetric contraction, followed by a slower length decrease accompanied with swelling. It is possible to unmask the iso-volumetric contraction by delaying the cell swelling with the help of K+ or Cl- channel inhibitors, quinine or furosemide. Furthermore, it appears that the longitudinal contraction in these cells is Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent: in the presence of W-7, a calmodulin inhibitor, only a slow, swelling phase could be observed. These findings suggest that amphibian rostral AP hair cells resemble their mammalian counterparts in expressing both a Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent contractile structure and an "osmotic" mechanism capable of mediating length change in response to extracellular stimuli. Such a mechanism might be utilized by the efferent neurotransmitters for adaptive modulation of mechano-electrical transduction, sensitivity enhancement, frequency selectivity, and protection against over-stimulation.

  6. Cell shape change and invagination of the cephalic furrow involves reorganization of F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Allison K; Siddiqui, Bilal A; Thomas, Jeffrey H

    2015-06-15

    Invagination of epithelial sheets to form furrows is a fundamental morphogenetic movement and is found in a variety of developmental events including gastrulation and vertebrate neural tube formation. The cephalic furrow is a deep epithelial invagination that forms during Drosophila gastrulation. In the first phase of cephalic furrow formation, the initiator cells that will lead invagination undergo apicobasal shortening and apical constriction in the absence of epithelial invagination. In the second phase of cephalic furrow formation, the epithelium starts to invaginate, accompanied by both basal expansion and continued apicobasal shortening of the initiator cells. The cells adjacent to the initiator cells also adopt wedge shapes, but only after invagination is well underway. Myosin II does not appear to drive apical constriction in cephalic furrow formation. However, cortical F-actin is increased in the apices of the initiator cells and in invaginating cells during both phases of cephalic furrow formation. These findings suggest that a novel mechanism for epithelial invagination is involved in cephalic furrow formation.

  7. Analysis of a minimal Rho-GTPase circuit regulating cell shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, William R; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2016-07-19

    Networks of Rho-family GTPases regulate eukaryotic cell polarization and motility by controlling assembly and contraction of the cytoskeleton. The mutually inhibitory Rac-Rho circuit is emerging as a central, regulatory hub that can affect the shape and motility phenotype of eukaryotic cells. Recent experimental manipulation of the amounts of Rac and Rho or their regulators (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors) have been shown to bias the prevalence of these different states and promote transitions between them. Here we show that part of this data can be understood in terms of inherent Rac-Rho mutually inhibitory dynamics. We analyze a spatio-temporal mathematical model of Rac-Rho dynamics to produce a detailed set of predictions of how parameters such as GTPase rates of activation and total amounts affect cell decisions (such as Rho-dominated contraction, Rac-dominated spreading, and spatially segregated Rac-Rho polarization). We find that in some parameter regimes, a cell can take on any of these three fates depending on its environment or stimuli. We also predict how experimental manipulations (corresponding to parameter variations) can affect cell shapes observed. Our methods are based on local perturbation analysis (a kind of nonlinear stability analysis), and an approximation of nonlinear feedback by sharp switches. We compare the Rac-Rho model to an even simpler single-GTPase ('wave-pinning') model and demonstrate that the overall behavior is inherent to GTPase properties, rather than stemming solely from network topology.

  8. Theory of electrically driven shape changes of cochlear outer hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallos, P; Hallworth, R; Evans, B N

    1993-07-01

    1. A theory of cochlear outer hair cell electromotility is developed and specifically applied to somatic shape changes elicited in a microchamber. The microchamber permits the arbitrary electrical and mechanical partitioning of the outer hair cell along its length. This means that the two partitioned segments are stimulated with different input voltages and undergo different shape changes. Consequently, by imposing more constraints than other methods, experiments in the microchamber are particularly suitable for testing different theories of outer hair cell motility. 2. The present model is based on simple hypotheses. They include a distributed motor associated with the cell membrane or cortex and the assumption that the displacement generated by the motor is related to the transmembrane voltage across the associated membrane element. It is expected that the force generated by the motor is counterbalanced by an elastic restoring force indigenous to the cell membrane and cortex, and a tensile force due to intracellular pressure. It is assumed that all changes take place while total cell volume is conserved. The above elements of the theory taken together permit the development of qualitative and quantitative predictions about the expected motile responses of both partitioned segments of the cell. Only a DC treatment is offered here. 3. Both a linear motor and an expanded treatment that incorporates a stochastic molecular motor model are considered. The latter is represented by a two-state Boltzmann process. We show that the linear motor treatment is an appropriate extrapolation of the stochastic motor theory for the case of small voltage driving signals. Comparison of experimental results with model responses permits the estimation of model parameters. Good match of data is obtained if it is assumed that the molecular motors undergo conformational length changes of 0.7-1.0 nm, that they have an effective displacement vector at approximately -20 degrees with the long

  9. Loss of Cell-Substrate Adhesion Leads to Periodic Shape Oscillations in Fibroblasts

    CERN Document Server

    Pullarkat, P A

    2006-01-01

    We report the phenomenon of periodic shape oscillations occurring in 3T3 fibroblasts merely as a consequence of a loss of cell-substrate adhesion. The oscillatory behavior can last many hours at a constant frequency, and can be switched off and on using chemical agents. This robustness allows for the extraction of quantitative data using single cells. We demonstrate that the frequency of oscillations increases with increasing actomyosin contractility. Both the Myosin Light Chain Kinase as well as the Rho Kinase pathways are shown to operate during this process. Further, we reveal significant similarities between the oscillatory dynamics and the commonly observed phenomenon of blebbing. We show that both these processes ceases when extracellular calcium is depleted or when stretch activated calcium channels are blocked. This, along with the fact that these dynamical processes require actomyosin contactility points towards strong similarities in the respective mechanisms. Finally, we speculate on a possible mec...

  10. Wire-shaped perovskite solar cell based on TiO2 nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Kulkarni, Sneha A.; Li, Zhen; Xu, Wenjing; Batabyal, Sudip K.; Zhang, Sam; Cao, Anyuan; Wong, Lydia Helena

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a wire-shaped perovskite solar cell based on TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays is demonstrated for the first time by integrating a perovskite absorber on TNT-coated Ti wire. Anodization was adopted for the conformal growth of TNTs on Ti wire, together with the simultaneous formation of a compact TiO2 layer. A sequential step dipping process is employed to produce a uniform and compact perovskite layer on top of TNTs with conformal coverage as the efficient light absorber. Transparent carbon nanotube film is wrapped around Ti wire as the hole collector and counter electrode. The integrated perovskite solar cell wire by facile fabrication approaches shows a promising future in portable and wearable textile electronics.

  11. Specific biomolecule corona is associated with ring-shaped organization of silver nanoparticles in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Daniela; Guttmann, Peter; Büchner, Tina; Werner, Stephan; Laube, Gregor; Hornemann, Andrea; Tarek, Basel; Schneider, Gerd; Kneipp, Janina

    2013-09-01

    We correlate the localization of silver nanoparticles inside cells with respect to the cellular architecture with the molecular information in the vicinity of the particle surface by combining nanoscale 3D cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The interaction of the silver nanoparticle surface with small molecules and biopolymers was monitored by SERS in vitro over time in living cells. The spectra indicate a stable, time-independent surface composition of silver nanoparticles, despite the changing environment in the endosomal structure. Cryo-SXT reveals a characteristic ring-shaped organization of the silver nanoparticles in endosomes of different cell types. The ring-like structures inside the endosomes suggest a strong association among silver particles and with membrane structures. The comparison of the data with those obtained with gold nanoparticles suggests that the interactions between the nanoparticles and with the endosomal component are influenced by the molecular composition of the corona.We correlate the localization of silver nanoparticles inside cells with respect to the cellular architecture with the molecular information in the vicinity of the particle surface by combining nanoscale 3D cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The interaction of the silver nanoparticle surface with small molecules and biopolymers was monitored by SERS in vitro over time in living cells. The spectra indicate a stable, time-independent surface composition of silver nanoparticles, despite the changing environment in the endosomal structure. Cryo-SXT reveals a characteristic ring-shaped organization of the silver nanoparticles in endosomes of different cell types. The ring-like structures inside the endosomes suggest a strong association among silver particles and with membrane structures. The comparison of the data with those obtained with gold nanoparticles suggests that the

  12. Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2-Induced Signaling and Osteogenesis Is Regulated by Cell Shape, RhoA/ROCK, and Cytoskeletal Tension

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yang-Kao; Yu, Xiang; Cohen, Daniel M.; Wozniak, Michele A.; Yang, Michael T.; Gao, Lin; Eyckmans, Jeroen; Chen, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    Osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is classically thought to be mediated by different cytokines such as the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Here, we report that cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM), and its effects on cell shape and cytoskeletal mechanics, regulates BMP-induced signaling and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Using micropatterned substrates to progressively restrict cell spreading and flattening against ECM, we demonstrated that BM...

  13. How traditions of ethical reasoning and institutional processes shape stem cell research in Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauskeller, Christine

    2004-10-01

    This article aims to show how the traditions of ethical reasoning and policy-making shape stem cell research in Britain. To do so I give a detailed account of the earlier developments of regulations on embryo research and the specific scientific advances made in Britain. The subsequent regulation of stem cell research was largely predetermined by those structures and the different and partly opposing orientations of a utilitarian approach to policies on biomedicine. The setting up of the first stem cell bank and the directing of public funding into not only bioethical but also sociological guidance of the development of the new science field are aspects of the particular British way of supporting stem cell research. However, there is also an ongoing philosophical and juridical debate on the possible erosion of fundamental values caused by incremental regulatory weakening. Although I am highly sympathetic to the critical position that there is a need for a metaphysical anchor to secure individual human rights, one has to admit that the British mode of handling the inevitable ethical problems we face with biomedical progress is rather successful in terms of securing some of the basic needs and values of a modern democratic society. PMID:15545114

  14. Layer-shaped alginate hydrogels enhance the biological performance of human adipose-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galateanu Bianca

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reconstruction of adipose tissue defects is often challenged by the complications that may occur following plastic and reconstructive surgery, including donor-site morbidity, implant migration and foreign body reaction. To overcome these problems, adipose tissue engineering (ATE using stem cell-based regeneration strategies has been widely explored in the last years. Mounting evidence has shown that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs represent a promising cell source for ATE. In the context of a small number of reports concerning adipose tissue regeneration using three-dimensional (3-D systems, the present study was designed to evaluate the biological performance of a novel alginate matrix that incorporates human ADSCs (hADSCs. Results Culture-expanded cells isolated from the stromal vascular fraction (SVF, corresponding to the third passage which showed the expression of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC markers, were used in the 3-D culture systems. The latter represented a calcium alginate hydrogel, obtained by the diffusion of calcium gluconate (CGH matrix, and shaped as discoid-thin layer. For comparative purposes, a similar hADSC-laden alginate hydrogel cross-linked with calcium chloride was considered as reference hydrogel (RH matrix. Both hydrogels showed a porous structure under scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the hADSCs embedded displayed normal spherical morphologies, some of them showing signs of mitosis. More than 85% of the entrapped cells survived throughout the incubation period of 7 days. The percentage of viable cells was significantly higher within CGH matrix at 2 days post-seeding, and approximately similar within both hydrogels after 7 days of culture. Moreover, both alginate-based hydrogels stimulated cell proliferation. The number of hADSC within hydrogels has increased during the incubation period of 7 days and was higher in the case of CGH matrix. Cells grown under adipogenic conditions for

  15. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H(+)-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H(+)-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H(+)-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H(+)-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H(+)-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H(+)-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. PMID:27048369

  16. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H(+)-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H(+)-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H(+)-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H(+)-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H(+)-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H(+)-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species.

  17. Magnetic engineering of stable rod-shaped stem cell aggregates: circumventing the pitfall of self-bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, V; Fayol, D; Reffay, M; Luciani, N; Bacri, J-C; Gay, C; Wilhelm, C

    2015-02-01

    A current challenge for tissue engineering while restoring the function of diseased or damaged tissue is to customize the tissue according to the target area. Scaffold-free approaches usually yield spheroid shapes with the risk of necrosis at the center due to poor nutrient and oxygen diffusion. Here, we used magnetic forces developed at the cellular scale by miniaturized magnets to create rod-shaped aggregates of stem cells that subsequently matured into a tissue-like structure. However, during the maturation process, the tissue-rods spontaneously bent and coiled into sphere-like structures, triggered by the increasing cell-cell adhesion within the initially non-homogeneous tissue. Optimisation of the intra-tissular magnetic forces successfully hindered the transition, in order to produce stable rod-shaped stem cells aggregates. PMID:25580701

  18. Immunological identification of candidate proteins involved in regulating active shape changes of outer hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipper, M; Zimmermann, U; Köpschall, I; Rohbock, K; Jüngling, S; Zenner, H P

    1995-06-01

    By employing immunological methods, it has been demonstrated that myosin, myosin light chain (MLC) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) proteins in outer hair cells (OHC) are immunologically different from isoforms in platelets, smooth muscle and heart muscle, and are probably more related to isoforms found in red blood cells (RBC). Moreover, proteins related to band 3 protein (b3p) and protein 4.1 (p 4.1), ankyrin as well as fodrin and spectrin, but not glycophorin, have been identified in isolated OHCs. Both OHCs and RBC differ from other motile non-muscle cells in their lack of smooth muscle isoforms of actin, their common high levels of spectrin-, ankyrin- and band 3-like proteins, as well as the expression of the 80 kDa protein 4.1 isoform. The data support the notion that motility of OHC may be based upon regulation of the b3p/p 4.1/ankyrin complex, and thus may be reminiscent to the active shape changes in RBC.

  19. Size, Shape, and Arrangement of Cellulose Microfibril in Higher Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) are imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the sub-nanometer resolution. We found that the size and shape of fundamental cellulose elementary fibril (CEF) is essentially identical in different cell wall types, i.e., primary wall (PW), parenchyma secondary wall (pSW), and sclerenchyma secondary wall (sSW), which is consistent with previously proposed 36-chain model (Ding et al., 2006, J. Agric. Food Chem.). The arrangement of individual CEFs in these wall types exhibits two orientations. In PW, CEFs are horizontally associated through their hydrophilic faces, and the planar faces are exposed, forming ribbon-like macrofibrils. In pSW and sSW, CEFs are vertically oriented, forming layers, in which hemicelluloses are interacted with the hydrophobic faces of the CEF and serve as spacers between CEFs. Lignification occurs between CEF-hemicelluloses layers in secondary walls. Furthermore, we demonstrated quantitative analysis of plant cell wall accessibility to and digestibility by different cellulase systems at real-time using chemical imaging (e.g., stimulated Raman scattering) and fluorescence microscopy of labeled cellulases (Ding et al., 2012, Science, in press).

  20. Cytomegalovirus shapes long-term immune reconstitution after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzykson, Raphael; Robin, Marie; Moins-Teisserenc, Helene; Delord, Marc; Busson, Marc; Xhaard, Aliénor; de Fontebrune, Flore Sicre; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Toubert, Antoine; Socié, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Immune reconstitution after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a dynamic and complex process depending on the recipient and donor characteristics, on the modalities of transplantation, and on the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease. Multivariate methods widely used for gene expression profiling can simultaneously analyze the patterns of a great number of biological variables on a heterogeneous set of patients. Here we use these methods on flow cytometry assessment of up to 25 lymphocyte populations to analyze the global pattern of long-term immune reconstitution after transplantation. Immune patterns were most distinct from healthy controls at six months, and had not yet fully recovered as long as two years after transplant. The two principal determinants of variability were linked to the balance of B and CD8+ T cells and of natural killer and B cells, respectively. Recipient’s cytomegalovirus serostatus, cytomegalovirus replication, and chronic graft-versus-host disease were the main factors shaping the immune pattern one year after transplant. We identified a complex signature of under- and over-representation of immune populations dictated by recipient’s cytomegalovirus seropositivity. Finally, we identified dimensions of variance in immune patterns as significant predictors of long-term non-relapse mortality, independently of chronic graft-versus-host disease. PMID:25261095

  1. Effects of pattern shape on adaptation of dLGN cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Jianzhong; XU Pengjing; LI Xiangrui; ZHOU Yifeng

    2003-01-01

    Pattern adaptation is one of the fundamental sensory processes in the visual system. In this study, we compared pattern adaptation induced by two types of sinusoidal drifting grating in dLGN cells of cat. The two types ofgrating have the same parameters (e.g. spatial frequency, temporal frequency and contrast) except their pattern shapes, one of which is normal grating and the other annular grating. The results suggested that the annular grating elicited stronger response and stronger pattern adaptation than the normal grating. This is consistent with the adaptation and aftereffect to the two types of drifting gratings seen in psychology and may reflect the subcortical neural mechanism underlying these psychological phenomena.

  2. RESECTION OF THE S-SHAPED CROSSED DYSTOPIC KIDNEY IN A PATIENT WITH RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is one of the most urgent topics in modern oncourology. This is attributable to the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with this pathology. Renal dystopia is a rather rare developmental anomaly. The literature data describing cases of the diagnosis and treatment in patients with dystopic kidney malignancies are scarce. Moreover, if a tumor is present in the solitary dystopic kidney, it is often extremely difficult to perform an organ-saving operation for a number of features of the anatomic structure of the dystopic kidney and its vascular architectonics. The paper describes a clinical case of S-shaped crossed dystopic kidney resection in a patient with RCC.

  3. Ferrofluid patterns in Hele-Shaw cells: Exact, stable, stationary shape solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Sérgio A; Miranda, José A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a quasi-two-dimensional system composed of an initially circular ferrofluid droplet surrounded by a nonmagnetic fluid of higher density. These immiscible fluids flow in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell, under the influence of an in-plane radial magnetic field. We focus on the situation in which destabilizing bulk magnetic field effects are balanced by stabilizing centrifugal forces. In this framing, we consider the interplay of capillary and magnetic normal traction effects in determining the fluid-fluid interface morphology. By employing a vortex-sheet formalism, we have been able to find a family of exact stationary N-fold polygonal shape solutions for the interface. A weakly nonlinear theory is then used to verify that such exact interfacial solutions are in fact stable. PMID:26871176

  4. Electrochemical Properties of Electrodes with Different Shapes and Diffusion Kinetic Analysis of Microbial Fuel Cells on Ocean Floor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yubin; LIU Jia; SU Jia; ZHAO Zhongkai; LIU Yang; XU Qian

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) on the ocean floor is a kind of novel energy- harvesting device that can be developed to drive small instruments to work continuously.The shape of electrode has a great effect on the performance of the MFC.In this paper,several shapes of electrode and cell structure were designed,and their performance in MFC were compared in pairs:Mesh (cell-1) vs.flat plate (cell-2),branch (cell-3) vs.cylinder (cell-4),and forest (cell-5) vs.disk (cell-6) FC.Our results showed that the maximum power densities were 16.50,14.20,19.30,15.00,14.64,and 9.95 mWm-2 for cell-l,2,3,4,5 and 6 respectively.And the corresponding diffusion-limited currents were 7.16,2.80,18.86,10.50,18.00,and 6.900 mA.The mesh and branch anodes showed higher power densities and much higher diffusion-limited currents than the flat plate and the cylinder anodes respectively due to the low diffusion hindrance with the former anodes.The forest cathode improved by 47% of the power density and by 161% of diffusionlimited current than the disk cathode due to the former's extended solid/liquid/gas three-phase boundary.These results indicated that the shape of electrode is a major parameter that determining the diffusion-limited current of an MFC,and the differences in the electrode shape lead to the differences in cell performance.These results would be useful for MFC structure design in practical applications.

  5. Eu/Tb codoped spindle-shaped fluorinated hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for dual-color cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baojin; Zhang, Shan; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Sang, Yuanhua; Xia, Haibing; Jiang, Huaidong; Claverie, Jerome; Liu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide doped fluorinated hydroxyapatite (FAp) nanoparticles are promising cell imaging nanomaterials but they are excited at wavelengths which do not match the light sources usually found in a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). In this work, we have successfully prepared spindle-shaped Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles by a hydrothermal method. Compared with single Eu doped FAp, Eu/Tb codoped FAp can be excited by a 488 nm laser, and exhibit both green and red light emission. By changing the amounts of Eu and Tb peaks, the emission in the green region (500-580 nm) can be decreased to the benefit of the emission in the red region (580-720 nm), thus reaching a balanced dual color emission. Using MC3T3-E1 cells co-cultured with Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles, it is observed that the nanoparticles are cytocompatible even at a concentration as high as 800 μg ml-1. The Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles are located in the cytoplasm and can be monitored by dual color--green and red imaging with a single excitation light at 488 nm. At a concentration of 200 μg ml-1, the cytoplasm is saturated in 8 hours, and Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles retain their fluorescence for at least 3 days. The cytocompatible Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles with unique dual color emission will be of great use for cell and tissue imaging.Lanthanide doped fluorinated hydroxyapatite (FAp) nanoparticles are promising cell imaging nanomaterials but they are excited at wavelengths which do not match the light sources usually found in a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). In this work, we have successfully prepared spindle-shaped Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles by a hydrothermal method. Compared with single Eu doped FAp, Eu/Tb codoped FAp can be excited by a 488 nm laser, and exhibit both green and red light emission. By changing the amounts of Eu and Tb peaks, the emission in the green region (500-580 nm) can be decreased to the benefit of the emission in the

  6. Advanced Ring-Shaped Microelectrode Assay Combined with Small Rectangular Electrode for Quasi-In vivo Measurement of Cell-to-Cell Conductance in Cardiomyocyte Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Hamada, Tomoyo; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2013-06-01

    To predict the risk of fatal arrhythmia induced by cardiotoxicity in the highly complex human heart system, we have developed a novel quasi-in vivo electrophysiological measurement assay, which combines a ring-shaped human cardiomyocyte network and a set of two electrodes that form a large single ring-shaped electrode for the direct measurement of irregular cell-to-cell conductance occurrence in a cardiomyocyte network, and a small rectangular microelectrode for forced pacing of cardiomyocyte beating and for acquiring the field potential waveforms of cardiomyocytes. The advantages of this assay are as follows. The electrophysiological signals of cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped network are superimposed directly on a single loop-shaped electrode, in which the information of asynchronous behavior of cell-to-cell conductance are included, without requiring a set of huge numbers of microelectrode arrays, a set of fast data conversion circuits, or a complex analysis in a computer. Another advantage is that the small rectangular electrode can control the position and timing of forced beating in a ring-shaped human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPS)-derived cardiomyocyte network and can also acquire the field potentials of cardiomyocytes. First, we constructed the human iPS-derived cardiomyocyte ring-shaped network on the set of two electrodes, and acquired the field potential signals of particular cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped cardiomyocyte network during simultaneous acquisition of the superimposed signals of whole-cardiomyocyte networks representing cell-to-cell conduction. Using the small rectangular electrode, we have also evaluated the response of the cell network to electrical stimulation. The mean and SD of the minimum stimulation voltage required for pacing (VMin) at the small rectangular electrode was 166+/-74 mV, which is the same as the magnitude of amplitude for the pacing using the ring-shaped electrode (179+/-33 mV). The results showed that the

  7. Cell proliferation, cell shape, and microtubule and cellulose microfibril organization of tobacco BY-2 cells are not altered by exposure to near weightlessness in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberer, Björn J; Kieft, Henk; Franssen-Verheijen, Tiny; Emons, Anne Mie C; Vos, Jan W

    2009-11-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton and the cell wall both play key roles in plant cell growth and division, determining the plant's final stature. At near weightlessness, tubulin polymerizes into microtubules in vitro, but these microtubules do not self-organize in the ordered patterns observed at 1g. Likewise, at near weightlessness cortical microtubules in protoplasts have difficulty organizing into parallel arrays, which are required for proper plant cell elongation. However, intact plants do grow in space and therefore should have a normally functioning microtubule cytoskeleton. Since the main difference between protoplasts and plant cells in a tissue is the presence of a cell wall, we studied single, but walled, tobacco BY-2 suspension-cultured cells during an 8-day space-flight experiment on board of the Soyuz capsule and the International Space Station during the 12S mission (March-April 2006). We show that the cortical microtubule density, ordering and orientation in isolated walled plant cells are unaffected by near weightlessness, as are the orientation of the cellulose microfibrils, cell proliferation, and cell shape. Likely, tissue organization is not essential for the organization of these structures in space. When combined with the fact that many recovering protoplasts have an aberrant cortical microtubule cytoskeleton, the results suggest a role for the cell wall, or its production machinery, in structuring the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:19756725

  8. The effect of hair bundle shape on hair bundle hydrodynamics of inner ear hair cells at low and high frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatz, L F

    2000-03-01

    The relationship between size and shape of the hair bundle of a hair cell in the inner ear and its sensitivity at asymptotically high and low frequencies was determined, thereby extending the results of an analysis of hair bundle hydrodynamics in two dimensions (Freeman and Weiss, 1990. Hydrodynamic analysis of a two-dimensional model for micromechanical resonance of free-standing hair bundles. Hear. Res. 48, 37-68) to three dimensions. A hemispheroid was used to represent the hair bundle. The hemispheroid had a number of advantages: it could represent shapes that range from thin, pencil-like shapes, to wide, flat, disk-like shapes. Also analytic methods could be used in the high frequency range to obtain an exact solution to the equations of motion. In the low frequency range, where an approximate solution was found using boundary element methods, the sensitivity of the responses of hair cells was mainly proportional to the cube of the heights of their hair bundles, and at high frequencies, the sensitivity of the hair cells was mainly proportional to the inverse of their heights. An excellent match was obtained between measurements of sensitivity curves in the basillar papilla of the alligator and bobtail lizards and the model's predictions. These results also suggest why hair bundles of hair cells in vestibular organs which are sensitive to low frequencies have ranges of heights that are an order of magnitude larger than the range of heights of hair bundles of hair cells found in auditory organs.

  9. Chondrogenic potential of bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells on a novel, auricular-shaped, nanocomposite scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavi H Patel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of the human auricle remains a challenge to plastic surgeons, and current approaches are not ideal. Tissue engineering provides a promising alternative. This study aims to evaluate the chondrogenic potential of bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells on a novel, auricular-shaped polymer. The proposed polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-modified poly(hexanolactone/carbonateurethane/urea nanocomposite polymer has already been transplanted in patients as the world’s first synthetic trachea, tear duct and vascular bypass graft. The nanocomposite scaffold was fabricated via a coagulation/salt-leaching method and shaped into an auricle. Adult bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells were isolated, cultured and seeded onto the scaffold. On day 21, samples were sent for scanning electron microscopy, histology and immunofluorescence to assess for neocartilage formation. Cell viability assay confirmed cytocompatability and normal patterns of cellular growth at 7, 14 and 21 days after culture. This study demonstrates the potential of a novel polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-modified poly(hexanolactone/carbonateurethane/urea scaffold for culturing bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells in chondrogenic medium to produce an auricular-shaped construct. This is supported by scanning electron microscopy, histological and immunofluorescence analysis revealing markers of chondrogenesis including collagen type II, SOX-9, glycosaminoglycan and elastin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of stem cell application on an auricular-shaped scaffold for tissue engineering purposes. Although many obstacles remain in producing a functional auricle, this is a promising step forward.

  10. Cell differentiation on disk- and string-shaped hydrogels fabricated from Ca(2+) -responsive self-assembling peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Kazuto; Tsutsumi, Hiroshi; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2016-11-01

    We recently developed a self-assembling peptide, E1Y9, that self-assembles into nanofibers and forms a hydrogel in the presence of Ca(2+) . E1Y9 derivatives conjugated with functional peptide sequences derived from extracellular matrices (ECMs) reportedly self-assemble into peptide nanofibers that enhance cell adhesion and differentiation. In this study, E1Y9/E1Y9-IKVAV-mixed hydrogels were constructed to serve as artificial ECMs that promote cell differentiation. E1Y9 and E1Y9-IKVAV co-assembled into networked nanofibers, and hydrogels with disk and string shapes were formed in response to Ca(2+) treatment. The neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells was facilitated on hydrogels of both shapes that contained the IKVAV motifs. Moreover, long neurites extended along the long axis of the string-shaped gel, suggesting that the structure of hydrogels of this shape can affect cellular orientation. Thus, E1Y9 hydrogels can potentially be used as artificial ECMs with desirable bioactivities and shapes that could be useful in tissue engineering applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 476-483, 2016. PMID:26501895

  11. Cell differentiation on disk- and string-shaped hydrogels fabricated from Ca(2+) -responsive self-assembling peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Kazuto; Tsutsumi, Hiroshi; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2016-11-01

    We recently developed a self-assembling peptide, E1Y9, that self-assembles into nanofibers and forms a hydrogel in the presence of Ca(2+) . E1Y9 derivatives conjugated with functional peptide sequences derived from extracellular matrices (ECMs) reportedly self-assemble into peptide nanofibers that enhance cell adhesion and differentiation. In this study, E1Y9/E1Y9-IKVAV-mixed hydrogels were constructed to serve as artificial ECMs that promote cell differentiation. E1Y9 and E1Y9-IKVAV co-assembled into networked nanofibers, and hydrogels with disk and string shapes were formed in response to Ca(2+) treatment. The neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells was facilitated on hydrogels of both shapes that contained the IKVAV motifs. Moreover, long neurites extended along the long axis of the string-shaped gel, suggesting that the structure of hydrogels of this shape can affect cellular orientation. Thus, E1Y9 hydrogels can potentially be used as artificial ECMs with desirable bioactivities and shapes that could be useful in tissue engineering applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 476-483, 2016.

  12. The small protein MbiA interacts with MreB and modulates cell shape in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhnina, Anastasiya A; Gitai, Zemer

    2012-09-01

    In Caulobacter crescentus, the actin homologue MreB is critical for cell shape maintenance. Despite the central importance of MreB for cell morphology and viability, very little is known about MreB-interacting factors. Here, we use an overexpression approach to identify a novel MreB interactor, MbiA. MbiA interacts with MreB in both biochemical and genetic assays, colocalizes with MreB throughout the cell cycle, and relies on MreB for its localization. MbiA overexpression mimics the loss of MreB function, severely perturbing cell morphology, inhibiting growth and inducing cell lysis. Additionally, mbiA deletion shows a synthetic growth phenotype with a hypomorphic allele of the MreB interactor RodZ, suggesting that these two MreB-interacting proteins either have partially redundant functions or participate in the same functional complex. Our work thus establishes MbiA as a novel cell shape regulator that appears to function through regulating MreB, and opens avenues for discovery of more MreB-regulating factors by showing that overexpression screens are a valuable tool for uncovering potentially redundant cell shape effectors.

  13. Slow motility in hair cells of the frog amphibian papilla: Myosin light chain-mediated shape change

    OpenAIRE

    Farahbakhsh, Nasser A.; Narins, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Using video, fluorescence and confocal microscopy, quantitative analysis and modeling, we investigated intracellular processes mediating the calcium/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM)-dependent slow motility in hair cells dissociated from the rostral region of amphibian papilla, one of the two auditory organs in frogs. The time course of shape changes in these hair cells during the period of pretreatment with several specific inhibitors, as well as their response to the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, were ...

  14. The Mechanism Behind Beauty: Golden Ratio Appears in Red Blood Cell Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In the past two decades, under the conditions that both the osmotic pressure $\\Delta p$ and tensile stress $\\lambda$ equal zero, a rigorous solution (RS) of human red blood cell (RBC) with a minus spontaneous curvature $c_{0}$ has been derived with Helfrich model. And, by fitting with observed shapes of RBC, $c_{0}R_{0}$ has been predicted to be -1.62 as minus golden ratio, where $R_{0}$ is the radius of a sphere with the same area of RBC. In this Lett., it is also found $\\rho_{max}$ /$\\rho_{B}\\approx$ 1.6 shows a approximately beautiful golden cross section of RBC, where $\\rho_{max}$ is the radius of RBC and $\\rho_{B}$ is the radius at maximal thickness of RBC. With a complete numerical calculation, we find the mechanism behind the beauty that minus golden ratio of $c_{0}R_{0}$ is the balance between economical surface area and enough deformability to pass spleen, the so called "physical fitness test".

  15. TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  16. Sodium and calcium currents shape action potentials in immature mouse inner hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotti, Walter; Johnson, Stuart L; Rusch, Alfons; Kros, Corne J

    2003-11-01

    Before the onset of hearing at postnatal day 12, mouse inner hair cells (IHCs) produce spontaneous and evoked action potentials. These spikes are likely to induce neurotransmitter release onto auditory nerve fibres. Since immature IHCs express both alpha1D (Cav1.3) Ca2+ and Na+ currents that activate near the resting potential, we examined whether these two conductances are involved in shaping the action potentials. Both had extremely rapid activation kinetics, followed by fast and complete voltage-dependent inactivation for the Na+ current, and slower, partially Ca2+-dependent inactivation for the Ca2+ current. Only the Ca2+ current is necessary for spontaneous and induced action potentials, and 29 % of cells lacked a Na+ current. The Na+ current does, however, shorten the time to reach the action-potential threshold, whereas the Ca2+ current is mainly involved, together with the K+ currents, in determining the speed and size of the spikes. Both currents increased in size up to the end of the first postnatal week. After this, the Ca2+ current reduced to about 30 % of its maximum size and persisted in mature IHCs. The Na+ current was downregulated around the onset of hearing, when the spiking is also known to disappear. Although the Na+ current was observed as early as embryonic day 16.5, its role in action-potential generation was only evident from just after birth, when the resting membrane potential became sufficiently negative to remove a sizeable fraction of the inactivation (half inactivation was at -71 mV). The size of both currents was positively correlated with the developmental change in action-potential frequency.

  17. Some relationships between membrane phospholipid domains, conformational order, and cell shape in intact human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D J; Gioioso, S; Sills, R H; Mendelsohn, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel method developed in this laboratory [D.J. Moore et al., Biochemistry 35 (1996) 229-235; D.J. Moore et al., Biochemistry 36 (1997) 660-664] to study the conformational order and the propensity for domain formation of specific phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes is extended to two additional species. Acyl chain perdeuterated 1,2-dilauroylphosphatidylethanolamine (diC12PE-d46) was incorporated preferentially (in separate experiments) into the inner leaflet of stomatocytic erythrocytes and into the outer leaflet of echinocytic erythrocytes, while acyl chain perdeuterated 1,2-dipentadecanoylphosphatidylcholine (diC15PC-d58) was incorporated into the outer leaflet of echinocytic erythrocytes. The conformational order and phase behavior of the incorporated molecules were monitored through FT-IR studies of the temperature dependence of the CD2 stretching vibrations. For both diC12PE-d46 and diC15PC-d58, the gel-->liquid crystal phase transition persisted when these lipids were located in the outer leaflet of echinocytic cells, a result indicative of the persistence of phospholipid domains. In each case, the transition widths were broadened compared to the pure lipids, suggestive of either small domains or the presence of additional molecular components within the domains. The conformational order of diC12PE-d46 differed markedly depending on its location and the morphology of the cells. When located predominantly in the inner membrane of stomatocytes, the phase transition of this species was abolished and the conformational order compared with pure lipid vesicles at the same temperature was much lower. The current results along with our previous studies provide a sufficient experimental basis to deduce some general principles of phospholipid conformational order and organization in both normal and shape-altered erythrocytes. PMID:9889394

  18. Changes in size and shape of auditory hair cells in vivo during noise-induced temporary threshold shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, L A; Owen, R G; Mulroy, M J

    1993-03-01

    In this study we describe changes in the size and shape of auditory hair cells of the alligator lizard in vivo during noise-induced temporary threshold shift. These changes consist of a decrease in cell volume, a decrease in cell length and an increase in cell width. We speculate that these changes are due to relaxation of cytoskeletal contractile elements and osmotic loss of intracellular water. We also describe a decrease in the surface area of the hair cell plasmalemma, and speculate that it is related to the endocytosis and intracellular accumulation of cell membrane during synaptic vesicle recycling. Finally we describe an increase in the endolymphatic surface area of the hair cell, and speculate that this could alter the micromechanics of the stereociliary tuft to attenuate the effective stimulus.

  19. Eight-Shaped Hatching Increases the Risk of Inner Cell Mass Splitting in Extended Mouse Embryo Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng; Liang, Hongxing; Deng, Li; Long, Hui; Chen, Hong; Chai, Weiran; Suo, Lun; Xu, Chen; Kuang, Yanping; Wu, Lingqian; Lu, Shengsheng; Lyu, Qifeng

    2015-01-01

    Increased risk of monozygotic twinning (MZT) has been shown to be associated with assisted reproduction techniques, particularly blastocyst culture. Interestingly, inner cell mass (ICM) splitting in human '8'-shaped hatching blastocysts that resulted in MZT was reported. However, the underlying cause of MZT is not known. In this study, we investigated in a mouse model whether in vitro culture leads to ICM splitting and its association with hatching types. Blastocyst hatching was observed in: (i) in vivo developed blastocysts and (ii-iii) in vitro cultured blastocysts following in vivo or in vitro fertilization. We found that '8'-shaped hatching occurred with significantly higher frequency in the two groups of in vitro cultured blastocysts than in the group of in vivo developed blastocysts (24.4% and 20.4% versus 0.8%, respectively; n = 805, P split distribution of ICM cells was observed around the small zona opening of '8'-shaped hatching blastocysts. This occurred at a high frequency in the in vitro cultured groups. Furthermore, we found more double OCT4-positive masses, suggestive of increased ICM splitting in '8'-shaped hatching and hatched blastocysts than in 'U'-shaped hatching and hatched blastocysts (12.5% versus 1.9%, respectively; n = 838, P splitting in mouse blastocysts. These results may provide insights into the increased risk of human MZT after in vitro fertilization and blastocyst transfer.

  20. Eight-Shaped Hatching Increases the Risk of Inner Cell Mass Splitting in Extended Mouse Embryo Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Yan

    Full Text Available Increased risk of monozygotic twinning (MZT has been shown to be associated with assisted reproduction techniques, particularly blastocyst culture. Interestingly, inner cell mass (ICM splitting in human '8'-shaped hatching blastocysts that resulted in MZT was reported. However, the underlying cause of MZT is not known. In this study, we investigated in a mouse model whether in vitro culture leads to ICM splitting and its association with hatching types. Blastocyst hatching was observed in: (i in vivo developed blastocysts and (ii-iii in vitro cultured blastocysts following in vivo or in vitro fertilization. We found that '8'-shaped hatching occurred with significantly higher frequency in the two groups of in vitro cultured blastocysts than in the group of in vivo developed blastocysts (24.4% and 20.4% versus 0.8%, respectively; n = 805, P < 0.01. Moreover, Oct4 immunofluorescence staining was performed to identify the ICM in the hatching and hatched blastocysts. Scattered and split distribution of ICM cells was observed around the small zona opening of '8'-shaped hatching blastocysts. This occurred at a high frequency in the in vitro cultured groups. Furthermore, we found more double OCT4-positive masses, suggestive of increased ICM splitting in '8'-shaped hatching and hatched blastocysts than in 'U'-shaped hatching and hatched blastocysts (12.5% versus 1.9%, respectively; n = 838, P < 0.01. Therefore, our results demonstrate that extended in vitro culture can cause high frequencies of '8'-shaped hatching, and '8'-shaped hatching that may disturb ICM herniation leading to increased risk of ICM splitting in mouse blastocysts. These results may provide insights into the increased risk of human MZT after in vitro fertilization and blastocyst transfer.

  1. Dual-Doped Molybdenum Trioxide Nanowires: A Bifunctional Anode for Fiber-Shaped Asymmetric Supercapacitors and Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Minghao; Cheng, Xinyu; Zeng, Yinxiang; Wang, Zilong; Tong, Yexiang; Lu, Xihong; Yang, Shihe

    2016-06-01

    A novel in situ N and low-valence-state Mo dual doping strategy was employed to significantly improve the conductivity, active-site accessibility, and electrochemical stability of MoO3 , drastically boosting its electrochemical properties. Consequently, our optimized N-MoO3-x nanowires exhibited exceptional performances as a bifunctional anode material for both fiber-shaped asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) and microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The flexible fiber-shaped ASC and MFC device based on the N-MoO3-x anode could deliver an unprecedentedly high energy density of 2.29 mWh cm(-3) and a remarkable power density of 0.76 μW cm(-1) , respectively. Such a bifunctional fiber-shaped N-MoO3-x electrode opens the way to integrate the electricity generation and storage for self-powered sources.

  2. Acute mechanical overstimulation of isolated outer hair cells causes changes in intracellular calcium levels without shape changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridberger, A; Ulfendahl, M

    1996-01-01

    Impaired auditory function following acoustic overstimulation, or noise, is mainly reported to be accompanied by cellular changes such as damage to the sensory hair bundles, but changes in the cell bodies of the outer hair cells have also been described. To investigate more closely the immediate cellular responses to overstimulation, isolated guinea pig outer hair cells were subjected to a 200 Hz oscillating water jet producing intense mechanical stimulation. The water jet was aimed at the cell body of the isolated outer hair cell. Cell shape changes were studied using video microscopy, and intracellular calcium concentration changes were monitored by means of the fluorescent calcium indicator Fluo-3. Cells exposed to a high-intensity stimulus showed surprisingly small light-microscopical alterations. The cytoplasmic calcium concentration increased in most cells, although some cells appeared very resistant to the mechanical stress. No correlation could be found be tween the calcium concentration changes and the cell length. The changes in calcium concentration reported here are suggested to be involved in the long-term pathogenesis of noise-induced hair cell damage.

  3. Effects of salicylate on shape, electromotility and membrane characteristics of isolated outer hair cells from guinea pig cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, W E; Brownell, W E; Dieler, R

    1991-01-01

    A reversible tinnitus and hearing loss have long been known to result from large doses of salicylate. Cochlear electrophysiology and otoacoustic emission studies suggest that the drug may interfere with outer hair cell electromotility. Exposure of isolated outer hair cells to sodium salicylate concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 10 mM reveals a dose dependent, reversible loss of turgidity and dimunition of electromotility. There was also a change in membrane conductance with salicylate superfusion that occurred later in time from the onset of shape and electromotility changes. There was no evidence of dose dependence for the change in membrane conductance, nor was the change reversible. The changes in shape and electromotility that we observe in vitro may impair cochlear partition movements in vivo and could account, at least in part, for the salicylate-induced hearing loss and effects on otoacoustic emissions.

  4. MEASUREMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY AND FLOW-CELL SCINTILLATION COUNTING WITH PULSE SHAPE DISCRIMINATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Fjeld; T.A. DeVol; J.D. Leyba

    2000-03-30

    Radiological characterization and monitoring is an important component of environmental management activities throughout the Department of Energy complex. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is the technology most often used for the detection of radionuclides. However, radionuclides which cannot easily be detected by gamma-ray spectroscopy, such as pure beta emitters and transuranics, pose special problems because their quantification generally requires labor intensive radiochemical separations procedures that are time consuming and impractical for field applications. This project focused on a technology for measuring transuranics and pure beta emitters relatively quickly and has the potential of being field deployable. The technology combines ion exchange liquid chromatography and on-line alpha/beta pulse shape discriminating scintillation counting to produce simultaneous alpha and beta chromatograms. The basic instrumentation upon which the project was based was purchased in the early 1990's. In its original commercial form, the instrumentation was capable of separating select activation/fission products in ionic forms from relatively pure aqueous samples. We subsequently developed the capability of separating and detecting actinides (thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium) in less than 30 minutes (Reboul, 1993) and realized that the potential time savings over traditional radiochemical methods for isolating some of these radionuclides was significant. However, at that time, the technique had only been used for radionuclide concentrations that were considerably above environmental levels and for aqueous samples of relatively high chemical purity. For the technique to be useful in environmental applications, development work was needed in lowering detection limits; to be useful in applications involving non-aqueous matrices such as soils and sludges or complex aqueous matrices such as those encountered in waste samples, development work was needed

  5. Optical reprogramming of human somatic cells using ultrashort Bessel-shaped near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-11-01

    We report a virus-free optical approach to human cell reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cells with low-power nanoporation using ultrashort Bessel-shaped laser pulses. Picojoule near-infrared sub-20 fs laser pulses at a high 85 MHz repetition frequency are employed to generate transient nanopores in the membrane of dermal fibroblasts for the introduction of four transcription factors to induce the reprogramming process. In contrast to conventional approaches which utilize retro- or lentiviruses to deliver genes or transcription factors into the host genome, the laser method is virus-free; hence, the risk of virus-induced cancer generation limiting clinical application is avoided. PMID:26618522

  6. Optical reprogramming of human somatic cells using ultrashort Bessel-shaped near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-11-01

    We report a virus-free optical approach to human cell reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cells with low-power nanoporation using ultrashort Bessel-shaped laser pulses. Picojoule near-infrared sub-20 fs laser pulses at a high 85 MHz repetition frequency are employed to generate transient nanopores in the membrane of dermal fibroblasts for the introduction of four transcription factors to induce the reprogramming process. In contrast to conventional approaches which utilize retro- or lentiviruses to deliver genes or transcription factors into the host genome, the laser method is virus-free; hence, the risk of virus-induced cancer generation limiting clinical application is avoided.

  7. Light collection and pulse-shape discrimination in elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, B.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bowes, A.; Brodsky, J. P.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Commeford, K.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Goddard, B. W.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McKeown, R. D.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Mueller, P.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Qian, X.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Sheets, S.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Varner, R. L.; Viren, B.; Wang, W.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yeh, M.; Yen, Y. R.; Zangakis, G.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-01

    A meter-long, 23-liter EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector has been constructed to study the light collection and pulse-shape discrimination performance of elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment. The magnitude and uniformity of light collection and neutron-gamma discrimination power in the energy range of antineutrino inverse beta decay products have been studied using gamma and spontaneous fission calibration sources deployed along the cell axis. We also study neutron-gamma discrimination and light collection abilities for differing PMT and reflector configurations. Key design features for optimizing MeV-scale response and background rejection capabilities are identified.

  8. Light Collection and Pulse-Shape Discrimination in Elongated Scintillator Cells for the PROSPECT Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ashenfelter, J; Band, H R; Barclay, G; Bass, C D; Berish, D; Bowden, N S; Bowes, A; Brodsky, J P; Bryan, C D; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, R; Classen, T; Commeford, K; Davee, D; Dean, D; Deichert, G; Diwan, M V; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Dwyer, D A; Gaison, J K; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilje, K; Glenn, A; Goddard, B W; Green, M; Han, K; Hans, S; Heeger, K M; Heffron, B; Jaffe, D E; Langford, T J; Littlejohn, B R; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McKeown, R D; Mendenhall, M P; Mueller, P; Mumm, H P; Napolitano, J; Neilson, R; Norcini, D; Pushin, D; Qian, X; Romero, E; Rosero, R; Saldana, L; Seilhan, B S; Sharma, R; Sheets, S; Stemen, N T; Surukuchi, P T; Varner, R L; Viren, B; Wang, W; White, B; White, C; Wilhelmi, J; Williams, C; Wise, T; Yao, H; Yeh, M; Yen, Y -R; Zangakis, G; Zhang, C; Zhang, X

    2015-01-01

    A meter-long, 23-liter EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector has been constructed to study the light collection and pulse-shape discrimination performance of elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment. The magnitude and uniformity of light collection and neutron/gamma discrimination power in the energy range of antineutrino inverse beta decay products have been studied using gamma and spontaneous fission calibration sources deployed along the cell long axis. We also study neutron-gamma discrimination and light collection abilities for differing PMT and reflector configurations. Key design features for optimizing MeV-scale response and background rejection capabilities are identified.

  9. Robot-assisted heminephrectomy for chromophobe renal cell carcinoma in L-shaped fused crossed ectopia: Surgical challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Shivanshu; Jain, Siddharth; Bora, Girdhar Singh; Singh, Shrawan Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma associated with fused ectopic kidneys has rarely been reported in the literature. Here we report the first case of robot-assisted heminephrectomy for chromophobe renal cell carcinoma in an L-shaped fused ectopic kidney. The present case report highlights the importance of three-dimensional vision and enhanced maneuverability with the EndoWrist technology of the robotic surgical system for precise dissection. This report also highlights the importance of preoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomography with three-dimensional arterial reconstruction for surgical planning. PMID:26495075

  10. Pob1 ensures cylindrical cell shape by coupling two distinct rho signaling events during secretory vesicle targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kentaro; Toya, Mika; Yoneda, Aki; Asami, Yukiko; Yamashita, Akira; Kamasawa, Naomi; Osumi, Masako; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Proper cell morphogenesis requires the co-ordination of cell polarity, cytoskeletal organization and vesicle trafficking. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutant pob1-664 has a curious lemon-like shape, the basis of which is not understood. Here, we found abundant vesicle accumulation in these cells, suggesting that Pob1 plays a role in vesicle trafficking. We identified Rho3 as a multicopy suppressor of this phenotype. Because Rho3 function is related to For3, an actin-polymerizing protein, and Sec8, a component of the exocyst complex, we analyzed their functional relationship with Pob1. Pob1 was essential for the formation of actin cables (by interacting with For3) and for the polarized localization of Sec8. Although neither For3 nor Sec8 is essential for polarized growth, their simultaneous disruption prevented tip growth and yielded a lemon-like cell morphology similar to pob1-664. Thus, Pob1 may ensure cylindrical cell shape of S. pombe by coupling actin-mediated vesicle transport and exocyst-mediated vesicle tethering during secretory vesicle targeting.

  11. A CFD analysis of transport phenomena and electrochemical reactions in a tubular-shaped PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadiq Al-Baghdadi, Maher A.R. [Fuel Cell Research Center, International Energy and Environment Foundation, Al-Najaf, P.O.Box 39 (Iraq)

    2013-07-01

    A fuel cell is most interesting new power source because it solves not only the environment problem but also natural resource exhaustion problem. CFD modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in PEM fuel cells are being used extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of the fundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype for engineering application. In this research, full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a tubular-shaped proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has been developed. This comprehensive model accounts for the major transport phenomena such as convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer, electrode kinetics, transport and phase-change mechanism of water, and potential fields in a tubular-shaped PEM fuel cell. The model explains many interacting, complex electrochemical, and transport phenomena that cannot be studied experimentally. Three-dimensional results of the species profiles, temperature distribution, potential distribution, and local current density distribution are presented and analysed, with the focus on the physical insight and fundamental understanding.

  12. Regulation of cell shape, wing hair initiation and the actin cytoskeleton by Trc/Fry and Wts/Mats complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaolan; Adler, Paul N

    2010-05-15

    The two NDR kinase family genes in Drosophila are tricornered (trc) and warts (wts). Previous studies on trc have focused on its role in the morphogenesis of extensions of epidermal cells and in dendrite branching and tiling. Studies on wts have focused on its roles as a tumor suppressor, in controlling photoreceptor type and in the maintenance of dendrites. Here we examine and compare the function of these genes in wing cells prior to their terminal differentiation. Mutations in these genes lead to changes in cell shape, cellular levels of F-actin, the timing of differentiation, and the expression of multiple wing hairs and DE-Cadherin. We showed that the effects of wts on all of these processes appear to be mediated by its regulation of the Yorkie transcription factor. We also provide evidence that trc regulates the expression of DE-cadherin and mwh. In addition, we showed that the effects on cell shape and the timing of differentiation appear to be not linked to changes in relative growth rate of cells compared to their neighbors.

  13. Functional Characterization of Shape Memory CuZnAl Open-Cell Foams by Molten Metal Infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaboldi, S.; Bassani, P.; Passaretti, F.; Redaelli, A.; Tuissi, A.

    2011-07-01

    In the recent years, the research for novel materials with tailored mechanical properties, as well as functional properties, has encouraged the study of porous and cellular materials. Our previous work proposed and reported about the possibility to manufacture open-cell metal foams of CuZnAl shape memory alloy by liquid infiltration in a leachable bed of silica-gel particles. This innovative methodology is based on cheap commercial consumables and a simple technology, focusing on intermediate-density low-cost foams with interesting cost/benefits ratio. Microstructural analyses on foamed specimens showed uniform microstructure of ligaments and a very regular and well reproducible open-cell morphology. Moreover, calorimetric analysis detected a thermo-elastic martensitic transformation in the foamed material. In this study, a CuZnAl shape memory alloy was considered and tested to clarify possible effects of the foaming process on the functional properties of the material. Morphological, calorimetric, and thermo-mechanical analyses were carried out. The results show that it is possible to produce metal foams of CuZnAl shape memory alloy with different functional properties and able to recover mono-axial compressive strains up to 3%.

  14. Peanut shaped ZnO microstructures: controlled synthesis and nucleation growth toward low-cost dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, M.; Mayandi, J.; Mariammal, R. N.; Vishnukanthan, V.; Pearce, J. M.; Soundararajan, N.; Ramachandran, K.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a simple, low-temperature and cost effective chemical precipitation method in aqueous media to synthesis uniformly distributed zinc oxide (ZnO) microstructures for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The size and morphology of the ZnO microstructures are systematically controlled by adjusting the concentration of the precursors, zinc acetate dihydrate and ammonium hydroxide. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy are used for the structural characterizations and photoluminescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to characterize the optical properties of the ZnO, respectively. The results reveal that ZnO crystallites exhibit hexagonal wurtzite structure with preferential orientation along c-axis. The effect of ammonia concentration on the crystallinity, morphology and optical properties of ZnO microstructures and the concomitant effect on the efficiency of DSSCs is also quantified. The peanut-shaped ZnO microstructure, which was found to increase DSSCs performance over other microstructure, is studied in detail in order to develop a formation mechanism. A sandwich type eosin yellow sensitized solar cell is prepared using peanut-shaped ZnO microstructures, which showed an efficiency of 0.37%. Ammonia was found to play a crucial role in the evolution of ZnO morphologies. These results are promising and provide a path towards low-cost high-performance DSSCs based on peanut-shaped ZnO microstructures and produced with only relatively simple wet chemistry synthesis.

  15. Slow motility in hair cells of the frog amphibian papilla: myosin light chain-mediated shape change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahbakhsh, Nasser A; Narins, Peter M

    2008-07-01

    Using video, fluorescence and confocal microscopy, quantitative analysis and modeling, we investigated intracellular processes mediating the calcium/calmodulin (Ca(2+)/CaM)-dependent slow motility in hair cells dissociated from the rostral region of amphibian papilla, one of the two auditory organs in frogs. The time course of shape changes in these hair cells during the period of pretreatment with several specific inhibitors, as well as their response to the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, were recorded and compared. These cells respond to ionomycin with a tri-phasic shape change: an initial phase of iso-volumetric length decrease; a period of concurrent shortening and swelling; and the final phase of increase in both length and volume. We found that both the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7, and antagonists of the multifunctional Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent kinases, KN-62 and KN-93, inhibit the iso-volumetric shortening phase of the response to ionomycin. The type 1 protein phosphatase inhibitors, calyculin A and okadaic acid induce minor shortening on their own, but do not significantly alter phase 1 response. However, they appear to counter effects of the inhibitors of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent kinases. We hypothesize that an active actomyosin-based process mediates the iso-volumetric shortening in the frog rostral amphibian papillar hair cells.

  16. Induction of predominant tenogenic phenotype in human dermal fibroblasts via synergistic effect of TGF-β and elongated cell shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbo; Li, Jie; Wang, Keyun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wenjie; Zhou, Guangdong; Cao, Yilin; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa; Liu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Micropattern topography is widely investigated for its role in mediating stem cell differentiation, but remains unexplored for phenotype switch between mature cell types. This study investigated the potential of inducing tenogenic phenotype in human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) by artificial elongation of cultured cells. Our results showed that a parallel microgrooved topography could convert spread hDFs into an elongated shape and induce a predominant tenogenic phenotype as the expression of biomarkers was significantly enhanced, such as scleraxis, tenomodulin, collagens I, III, VI, and decorin. It also enhanced the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, but not α-smooth muscle actin. Elongated hDFs failed to induce other phenotypes, such as adiopogenic, chondrogenic, neurogenic, and myogenic lineages. By contrast, no tenogenic phenotype could be induced in elongated human chondrocytes, although chondrogenic phenotype was inhibited. Exogenous TGF-β1 could enhance the tenogenic phenotype in elongated hDFs at low dose (2 ng/ml), but promoted myofibroblast transdifferentiation of hDFs at high dose (10 ng/ml), regardless of cell shape. Elongated shape also resulted in decreased RhoA activity and increased Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) activity. Antagonizing TGF-β or inhibiting ROCK activity with Y27632 or depolymerizing actin with cytochalasin D could all significantly inhibit tenogenic phenotype induction, particularly in elongated hDFs. In conclusion, elongation of cultured dermal fibroblasts can induce a predominant tenogenic phenotype likely via synergistic effect of TGF-β and cytoskeletal signaling. PMID:26632599

  17. Features that shape CD8+ T-cell responses to viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia de Almeida Fontaine Costa, A.I.

    2014-01-01

    CD8+ T cells, via their specific T-cell receptor (TCR), target infected cells when recognizing pathogen-derived peptides (epitopes) bound to class I major histocompatibility complex molecules (MHCI, or HLA-class I in humans). HLA-B is the most polymorphic of the classical HLA-I molecules. HLA-B-rest

  18. A simple model to understand the effect of membrane shear elasticity and stress-free shape on the motion of red blood cells in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupire, Jules; Abkarian, Manouk; Viallat, Annie

    2015-11-14

    An analytical model was proposed by Keller and Skalak in 1982 to understand the motion of red blood cells in shear flow. The cell was described as a fluid ellipsoid of fixed shape. This model was extended in 2007 to introduce shear elasticity of the red blood cell membrane. Here, this model is further extended to take into account that the cell discoid shape physiologically observed is not a stress-free shape. The model shows that spheroid stress-free shapes allow us to fit the experimental data with the values of shear elasticity typical to that found with micropipette and optical tweezer experiments. In the range of moderate shear rates (for which RBCs keep their discoid shape) this model enables us to quantitatively determine (i) an effective cell viscosity, which combines membrane and hemoglobin viscosities and (ii) an effective shear modulus of the membrane that combines the shear modulus and the stress-free shape. This model can also be used to determine RBC mechanical parameters not only in the tanktreading regime when cells are suspended in medium of high viscosity but also in the tumbling regime characteristic of cells suspended in media of low viscosity. In this regime, a transition is predicted between a rigid-like tumbling motion and a fluid-like tumbling motion above a critical shear rate, which is directly related to the mechanical parameters of the cell. PMID:26352875

  19. Flower-shaped gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and their application as SERS-active tags inside living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boca, Sanda; Astilean, Simion [Nanobiophotonics Center, Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Nanobioscience, Babes-Bolyai University, Treboniu Laurian 42, 400271 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Rugina, Dumitrita; Pintea, Adela [Department of Biochemistry, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Manastur 3-5, 400372, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian, E-mail: sanda.boca@phys.ubbcluj.ro, E-mail: simion.astilean@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Electron Microscopy Center, Faculty of Biology and Geology, Babes-Bolyai University, Clinicilor 5-7, 400006, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2011-02-04

    The detection of Raman signals inside living cells is a topic of great interest in the study of cell biology mechanisms and for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This work presents the synthesis and characterization of flower-shaped gold nanoparticles and demonstrates their applicability as SERS-active tags for cellular spectral detection. The particles were synthesized by a facile, rapid new route that uses ascorbic acid as a reducing agent of gold salt. Two triarylmethane dyes which are widely used as biological stains, namely malachite green oxalate and basic fuchsin, were used as Raman-active molecules and the polymer mPEG-SH as capping material. The as-prepared SERS-active nanoparticles were tested on a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line and found to present a low level of cytotoxicity and high chemical stability together with SERS sensitivity down to picomolar particle concentrations.

  20. Spatiotemporal Pattern Formation in BioFluids I: Cell Shape Perturbants As Evidence of Spatially-Organised Membrane Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Lofthouse, J T

    2003-01-01

    I show the assumed Bilayer structure of cell membranes is Topologically falsified by known aminophospholipid dynamics in metabolically-active, Far from Equilibrium cells. The sensitivity of lipid and cytoplasmic flows to temperature, surfactants, viscosity and the gravity vector are used to suggest that rather than being random viscous fluids as currently assumed, both are actually spatially-organised by convective and shear driven mechanisms in vivo. I show how protein-lipid feedback provokes a Gestalt Shift in Cell Mechanics by demonstrating that the primary forces involved in shape changes are generated by bifurcations in fluid flow Topology, which induce affine deformations of the cytoskeletal lattice. The feedback model allows the transduction of Gravitational information into biological form, is universally applicable, and provides a rationale for Homeoviscous Adaptation, and the extensive lipid polymorphism observed in Nature.

  1. Local 3D matrix confinement determines division axis through cell shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lijuan; Chen, Weitong; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Jimenez, Angela; Wong, Bin Sheng; San, Angela; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-02-01

    How the division axis is determined in mammalian cells embedded in three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains elusive, despite that many types of cells divide in 3D environments. Cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates typically round up completely to divide. Here, we show that in 3D collagen matrices, mammalian cells such as HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibit division modes distinct from their Counterparts on 2D substrates, with a markedly higher fraction of cells remaining highly elongated through mitosis in 3D matrices. The long axis of elongated mitotic cells accurately predicts the division axis, independently of matrix density and cell-matrix interactions. This 3D-specific elongated division mode is determined by the local confinement produced by the matrix and the ability of cells to protrude and locally remodel the matrix via β1 integrin. Elongated division is readily recapitulated using collagen-coated microfabricated channels. Cells depleted of β1 integrin still divide in the elongated mode in microchannels, suggesting that 3D confinement is sufficient to induce the elongated cell-division phenotype.

  2. ShaPINg cell fate upon DNA damage:role of Pin1 isomerase in DNA damage-induced cell death and repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Hofmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1 acts as a molecular timer in proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase signaling and shapes cellular responses based on recognition of phosphorylation marks and implementing conformational changes in its substrates. Accordingly, Pin1 has been linked to numerous phosphorylation-controlled signaling pathways and cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, proliferation and differentiation. In addition, Pin1 plays a pivotal role in DNA damage-triggered cell fate decisions. Whereas moderate DNA damage is balanced by DNA repair, cells confronted with massive genotoxic stress are eliminated by the induction of programmed cell death or cellular senescence. In this review we summarize and discuss the current knowledge on how Pin1 specifies cell fate through regulating key players of the apoptotic and the repair branch of the DNA damage response.

  3. Influence of Polyplex Formation on the Performance of Star-Shaped Polycationic Transfection Agents for Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Raup

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic modification (“transfection” of mammalian cells using non-viral, synthetic agents such as polycations, is still a challenge. Polyplex formation between the DNA and the polycation is a decisive step in such experiments. Star-shaped polycations have been proposed as superior transfection agents, yet have never before been compared side-by-side, e.g., in view of structural effects. Herein four star-shaped polycationic structures, all based on (2-dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA building blocks, were investigated for their potential to deliver DNA to adherent (CHO, L929, HEK-293 and non-adherent (Jurkat, primary human T lymphocytes mammalian cells. The investigated vectors included three structures where the PDMAEMA arms (different arm length and grafting densities had been grown from a center silsesquioxane or silica-coated γ-Fe2O3-core and one micellar structure self-assembled from poly(1,2-butadiene-block PDMAEMA polymers. All nano-stars combined high transfection potential with excellent biocompatibility. The micelles slightly outperformed the covalently linked agents. For method development and optimization, the absolute amount of polycation added to the cells was more important than the N/P-ratio (ratio between polycation nitrogen and DNA phosphate, provided a lower limit was passed and enough polycation was present to overcompensate the negative charge of the plasmid DNA. Finally, the matrix (NaCl vs. HEPES-buffered glucose solution, but also the concentrations adjusted during polyplex formation, affected the results.

  4. Cell biology is different in small volumes: endogenous signals shape phenotype of primary hepatocytes cultured in microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Amranul; Gheibi, Pantea; Gao, Yandong; Foster, Elena; Son, Kyung Jin; You, Jungmok; Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Patel, Dipali; Revzin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The approaches for maintaining hepatocytes in vitro are aimed at recapitulating aspects of the native liver microenvironment through the use of co-cultures, surface coatings and 3D spheroids. This study highlights the effects of spatial confinement-a less studied component of the in vivo microenvironment. We demonstrate that hepatocytes cultured in low-volume microfluidic channels (microchambers) retain differentiated hepatic phenotype for 21 days whereas cells cultured in regular culture plates under identical conditions de-differentiate after 7 days. Careful consideration of nutrient delivery and oxygen tension suggested that these factors could not solely account for enhanced cell function in microchambers. Through a series of experiments involving microfluidic chambers of various heights and inhibition of key molecular pathways, we confirmed that phenotype of hepatocytes in small volumes was shaped by endogenous signals, both hepato-inductive growth factors (GFs) such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and hepato-disruptive GFs such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Hepatocytes are not generally thought of as significant producers of GFs–this role is typically assigned to nonparenchymal cells of the liver. Our study demonstrates that, in an appropriate microenvironment, hepatocytes produce hepato-inductive and pro-fibrogenic signals at the levels sufficient to shape their phenotype and function. PMID:27681582

  5. Cell and nanoparticle transport in tumour microvasculature: the role of size, shape and surface functionality of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Lian, Yanping; Zhang, Lucy T; Aldousari, Saad M; Hedia, Hassan S; Asiri, Saeed A; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-02-01

    Through nanomedicine, game-changing methods are emerging to deliver drug molecules directly to diseased areas. One of the most promising of these is the targeted delivery of drugs and imaging agents via drug carrier-based platforms. Such drug delivery systems can now be synthesized from a wide range of different materials, made in a number of different shapes, and coated with an array of different organic molecules, including ligands. If optimized, these systems can enhance the efficacy and specificity of delivery compared with those of non-targeted systems. Emerging integrated multiscale experiments, models and simulations have opened the door for endless medical applications. Current bottlenecks in design of the drug-carrying particles are the lack of knowledge about the dispersion of these particles in the microvasculature and of their subsequent internalization by diseased cells (Bao et al. 2014 J. R. Soc. Interface 11, 20140301 (doi:10.1098/rsif.2014.0301)). We describe multiscale modelling techniques that study how drug carriers disperse within the microvasculature. The immersed molecular finite-element method is adopted to simulate whole blood including blood plasma, red blood cells and nanoparticles. With a novel dissipative particle dynamics method, the beginning stages of receptor-driven endocytosis of nanoparticles can be understood in detail. Using this multiscale modelling method, we elucidate how the size, shape and surface functionality of nanoparticles will affect their dispersion in the microvasculature and subsequent internalization by targeted cells. PMID:26855759

  6. Numerical study of the electroporation pulse shape effect on molecular uptake of biological cells

    OpenAIRE

    Miklavčič, Damijan; Towhidi, Leila

    2010-01-01

    Background In order to reduce the side-effects of chemotherapy, combined chemotherapy-electroporation (electrochemotherapy) has been suggested. Electroporation, application of appropriate electric pulses to biological cells, can significantly enhance molecular uptake of cells due to formation of transient pores in the cell membrane. It was experimentally demonstrated that the efficiency of electroporation is under the control of electric pulse parameters. However, the theoretical basis for th...

  7. Anaesthetics may change the shape of isolated type I hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfone, E; Ulfendahl, M; Figueroa, L; Flock, A

    1991-08-01

    Type I hair cells isolated from animals anaesthetised with barbiturates or ether were found to be shorter and to lack a prominent 'neck' region when compared to cells isolated from non-anaesthetised animals. Ketamine did not have this effect. The changes observed could have important implications for the physiology of inner ear receptors. These findings infer that care should be taken in the choice of anaesthetics used in studies on cells from the inner ear.

  8. Cell shape impacts on the positioning of the mitotic spindle with respect to the substratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Müsch, Anne

    2015-04-01

    All known mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation rely on astral microtubules. We report that even in the absence of astral microtubules, metaphase spindles in MDCK and HeLa cells are not randomly positioned along their x-z dimension, but preferentially adopt shallow β angles between spindle pole axis and substratum. The nonrandom spindle positioning is due to constraints imposed by the cell cortex in flat cells that drive spindles that are longer and/or wider than the cell's height into a tilted, quasidiagonal x-z position. In rounder cells, which are taller, fewer cortical constraints make the x-z spindle position more random. Reestablishment of astral microtubule-mediated forces align the spindle poles with cortical cues parallel to the substratum in all cells. However, in flat cells, they frequently cause spindle deformations. Similar deformations are apparent when confined spindles rotate from tilted to parallel positions while MDCK cells progress from prometaphase to metaphase. The spindle disruptions cause the engagement of the spindle assembly checkpoint. We propose that cell rounding serves to maintain spindle integrity during its positioning. PMID:25657320

  9. Myoferlin depletion in breast cancer cells promotes mesenchymal to epithelial shape change and stalls invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Li

    Full Text Available Myoferlin (MYOF is a mammalian ferlin protein with homology to ancestral Fer-1, a nematode protein that regulates spermatic membrane fusion, which underlies the amoeboid-like movements of its sperm. Studies in muscle and endothelial cells have reported on the role of myoferlin in membrane repair, endocytosis, myoblast fusion, and the proper expression of various plasma membrane receptors. In this study, using an in vitro human breast cancer cell model, we demonstrate that myoferlin is abundantly expressed in invasive breast tumor cells. Depletion of MYOF using lentiviral-driven shRNA expression revealed that MDA-MB-231 cells reverted to an epithelial morphology, suggesting at least some features of mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET. These observations were confirmed by the down-regulation of some mesenchymal cell markers (e.g., fibronectin and vimentin and coordinate up-regulation of the E-cadherin epithelial marker. Cell invasion assays using Boyden chambers showed that loss of MYOF led to a significant diminution in invasion through Matrigel or type I collagen, while cell migration was unaffected. PCR array and screening of serum-free culture supernatants from shRNA(MYOF transduced MDA-MB-231 cells indicated a significant reduction in the steady-state levels of several matrix metalloproteinases. These data when considered in toto suggest a novel role of MYOF in breast tumor cell invasion and a potential reversion to an epithelial phenotype upon loss of MYOF.

  10. New M- and V-shaped perylene diimide small molecules for high-performance nonfullerene polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gi Eun; Kim, Hyung Jong; Choi, Suna; Lee, Dae Hee; Uddin, Mohammad Afsar; Woo, Han Young; Cho, Min Ju; Choi, Dong Hoon

    2016-07-01

    New M- and V-shaped perylene diimide (PDI)-based small molecules using a non-conjugated 1,1-diphenylcyclohexane linker (CP-M and CP-V, respectively) were designed and synthesized as new n-type acceptors for nonfullerene-based polymer solar cells. The blended film with poly[(2,5-bis(2-hexyldecyloxy)phenylene)-alt-(5,6-difluoro-4,7-di(thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole)] (PPDT2FBT) and CP-V displayed a higher power conversion efficiency of 5.28% due to higher short circuit current and fill factor values. PMID:27351371

  11. Changes in the survival curve shape of E. coli cells following irradiation in the presence of uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R F; Patel, K B; Evans, M D

    1985-10-01

    Four uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation (UOP) (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2,4-dinitrophenol, 4-hydroxybenzylidenemalonitrile and N-phenylanthranilic acid) have been found to alter the shape of the radiation survival curves of several cell lines of E. coli when present during irradiation in oxia. Incubation of cells with high concentrations of UOP for 30 min before irradiation induced an increase in extrapolation number (n) in cell lines AB 1157 (wild-type), AB 1886(uvrA-) and KMBL(polA-) but not GR 501(lig-)ts, AB 2463(recA-) and AB 2480(uvrA-recA-). In addition the UOP all effect a decrease in mean lethal dose (D0) even when tested at low concentrations or short contact times. Studies with wild-type cells correlate the increase in n with measured increased levels of ATP (above oxic control cells) produced upon incubation with UOP. The increased levels of ATP most likely arise from the UOP overstimulating glycolysis. The decrease in D0 cannot be associated with any of the repair pathways investigated and it is concluded that the highly lipophilic UOP directly or indirectly potentiate other target(s) to radiation damage as well as DNA under oxic conditions. Treatment of the cells with UOP did not result in the deleterious depletion of energy substrates, loss of non-protein thiols or the production of cytotoxins upon irradiation.

  12. How numbers, nature and immune status of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells shape the early immunological events in tumor development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume eDarrasse-Jeze

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs on cancer progression has been demonstrated in a large number of preclinical models and confirmed in several types of malignancies. Neoplastic processes trigger an increase of Treg numbers in draining lymph nodes, spleen, blood, and tumors, leading to the suppression of anti-tumor responses. Treg depletion before or early in tumor development may lead to complete tumor eradication and extends survival of mice and humans. However this strategy is ineffective in established tumors, highlighting the critical role of the early Treg-tumor encounters. In this review, after discussing old and new concepts of immunological tumor tolerance, we focus on the nature (thymus-derived vs. peripherally-derived and status (naïve or activated / memory of the regulatory T cells at tumor emergence. The recent discoveries in this field suggest that the activation status of Tregs and effector T cells (Teffs at the first encounter with the tumor are essential to shape the fate and speed of the immune response across a variety of tumor models. The relative timing of activation/recruitment of antitumor cells versus tolerogenic cells at tumor emergence appears to be crucial in the identification of tumor cells as friend or foe, which has broad implications for the design of cancer immunotherapies.

  13. Leaf-shape remodeling: programmed cell death in fistular leaves of Allium fistulosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xi-Lu; Su, Hui; Zhou, Ya-fu; Wang, Feng-Hua; Liu, Wen-Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Some species of Allium in Liliaceae have fistular leaves. The fistular lamina of Allium fistulosum undergoes a process from solid to hollow during development. The aims were to reveal the process of fistular leaf formation involved in programmed cell death (PCD) and to compare the cytological events in the execution of cell death to those in the unusual leaf perforations or plant aerenchyma formation. In this study, light and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the development of fistular leaves and cytological events. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays and gel electrophoresis were used to determine nuclear DNA cleavage during the PCD. The cavity arises in the leaf blade by degradation of specialized cells, the designated pre-cavity cells, in the center of the leaves. Nuclei of cells within the pre-cavity site become TUNEL-positive, indicating that DNA cleavage is an early event. Gel electrophoresis revealed that DNA internucleosomal cleavage occurred resulting in a characteristic DNA ladder. Ultrastructural analysis of cells at the different stages showed disrupted vacuoles, misshapen nuclei with condensed chromatin, degraded cytoplasm and organelles and emergence of secondary vacuoles. The cell walls degraded last, and residue of degraded cell walls aggregated together. These results revealed that PCD plays a critical role in the development of A. fistulosum fistular leaves. The continuous cavity in A. fistulosum leaves resemble the aerenchyma in the pith of some gramineous plants to improve gas exchange.

  14. My oh my(osin): Insights into how auditory hair cells count, measure, and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Lana M; Chou, Shih-Wei; McDermott, Brian M

    2016-01-18

    The mechanisms underlying mechanosensory hair bundle formation in auditory sensory cells are largely mysterious. In this issue, Lelli et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201509017) reveal that a pair of molecular motors, myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb, is involved in the hair bundle's morphology and hearing.

  15. My oh my(osin): Insights into how auditory hair cells count, measure, and shape

    OpenAIRE

    Pollock, Lana M.; Chou, Shih-Wei; McDermott, Brian M., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying mechanosensory hair bundle formation in auditory sensory cells are largely mysterious. In this issue, Lelli et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201509017) reveal that a pair of molecular motors, myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb, is involved in the hair bundle’s morphology and hearing.

  16. Biological responses according to the shape and size of carbon nanotubes in BEAS-2B and MESO-1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haniu H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hisao Haniu,1,2 Naoto Saito,2,3 Yoshikazu Matsuda,4 Tamotsu Tsukahara,5 Yuki Usui,1,6,7 Kayo Maruyama,2,3 Seiji Takanashi,1 Kaoru Aoki,1 Shinsuke Kobayashi,1 Hiroki Nomura,1 Manabu Tanaka,1 Masanori Okamoto,1 Hiroyuki Kato1 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Nagano, Japan; 2Insutitute for Biomedical Sciences, Shinshu University, Nagano, Japan; 3Department of Applied Physical Therapy, Shinshu University School of Health Sciences, Nagano, Japan; 4Clinical Pharmacology Educational Center, Nihon Pharmaceutical University, Saitama, Japan; 5Department of Hematology and Immunology, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa, Japan; 6Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons, Shinshu University, Nagano, Japan; 7Aizawa Hospital, Sports Medicine Center, Nagano, Japan Abstract: This study aimed to investigate the influence of the shape and size of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and cup-stacked carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs on biological responses in vitro. Three types of MWCNTs – VGCF®-X, VGCF®-S, and VGCF® (vapor grown carbon fibers; with diameters of 15, 80, and 150 nm, respectively – and three CSCNTs of different lengths (CS-L, 20–80 µm; CS-S, 0.5–20 µm; and CS-M, of intermediate length were tested. Human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B and malignant pleural mesothelioma cells were exposed to the CNTs (1–50 µg/mL, and cell viability, permeability, uptake, total reactive oxygen species/superoxide production, and intracellular acidity were measured. CSCNTs were less toxic than MWCNTs in both cell types over a 24-hour exposure period. The cytotoxicity of endocytosed MWCNTs varied according to cell type/size, while that of CSCNTs depended on tube length irrespective of cell type. CNT diameter and length influenced cell aggregation and injury extent. Intracellular acidity increased independently of lysosomal activity along with the number of vacuoles in BEAS-2B cells exposed for 24 hours to either CNT

  17. Behavior of osteoblast-like cells on calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite ceramics composed of particles with different shapes and sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Uno, Yuika; Ioku, Koji

    2014-01-01

    In designing the biomaterials, it is important to control their surface morphologies, because they affect the interactions between the materials and cells. We previously reported that porous calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics composed of rod-like particles had advantages over sintered porous HA ceramics; however, the effects of the surface morphology of calcium-deficient HA ceramics on cell behavior have remained unclear. Using a hydrothermal process, we successfully prepared porous calcium-deficient HA ceramics with different surface morphologies, composed of plate-like particles of 200-300, 500-800 nm, or 2-3 μm in width and rod-like particles of 1 or 3-5 μm in width, respectively. The effects of these surface morphologies on the behavior of osteoblast-like cells were examined. Although the numbers of cells adhered to the ceramic specimens did not differ significantly among the specimens, the proliferation rates of cells on the ceramics decreased with decreasing particle size. Our results reveal that controlling the surface morphology that is governed by particle shape and size is important for designing porous calcium-deficient HA ceramics.

  18. Shape-induced terminal differentiation of human epidermal stem cells requires p38 and is regulated by histone acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T Connelly

    Full Text Available Engineered model substrates are powerful tools for examining interactions between stem cells and their microenvironment. Using this approach, we have previously shown that restricted cell adhesion promotes terminal differentiation of human epidermal stem cells via activation of serum response factor (SRF and transcription of AP-1 genes. Here we investigate the roles of p38 MAPK and histone acetylation. Inhibition of p38 activity impaired SRF transcriptional activity and shape-induced terminal differentiation of human keratinocytes. In addition, inhibiting p38 reduced histone H3 acetylation at the promoters of SRF target genes, FOS and JUNB. Although histone acetylation correlated with SRF transcriptional activity and target gene expression, treatment with the histone de-acetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA blocked terminal differentiation on micro-patterned substrates and in suspension. TSA treatment simultaneously maintained expression of LRIG1, TP63, and ITGB1. Therefore, global histone de-acetylation represses stem cell maintenance genes independent of SRF. Our studies establish a novel role for extrinsic physical cues in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, transcription, and differentiation of human epidermal stem cells.

  19. Shape reconstruction and height fluctuations of red blood cells using defocusing microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Siman, L; Amaral, F T; Agero, U; Mesquita, O N

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the bright-field defocusing microscopy (DM) technique is presented. DM is able to obtain quantitative information of each plane/surface of pure phase objects, as live unlabeled cells, and its application to red blood cells (RBCs) is demonstrated. Based on contrast, simple methods to obtain thickness profile and three dimensional (3D) total reconstruction of RBCs are proposed and the actual height profiles of upper and lower surface-membranes (lipid bilayer$/$cytoskeleton) of discocyte and stomatocyte red cells are presented as examples. In addition, using the mean square contrast fluctuation and modeling the RBC membranes fluctuations spectra as dependent of a bending modulus $(\\kappa_c)$, a surface tension $(\\sigma)$ and a confining potential $(\\gamma)$ term, slowly varying quantities along the cell radius, a genetic algorithm (GA) is used and the radial height fluctuations of each surface-membrane are accessed, separately. The radial behaviors of $\\kappa_c$, $\\sigma$ and $\\gamma$ are also obta...

  20. Shaping and preserving β-cell identity with microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumortier, O; Fabris, G; Van Obberghen, E

    2016-09-01

    The highly sophisticated identity of pancreatic β-cells is geared to accomplish its unique feat of providing insulin for organismal glucose and lipid homeostasis. This requires a particular and streamlined fuel metabolism which defines mature β-cells as glucose sensors linked to an insulin exocytosis machinery. The establishment of an appropriate β-cell mass and function during development as well as the maintenance of their identity throughout life are necessary for energy homeostasis. The small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), are now well-recognized regulators of gene transcripts, which in general are negatively affected by them. Convincing evidence exists to view miRNAs as major actors in β-cell development and function, suggesting an important role for them in the distinctive β-cell 'identity card'. Here, we summarize key features that associate miRNAs and the establishment of the appropriate β-cell identity and its necessary maintenance during their 'long life'. PMID:27615131

  1. Shape-Dependent Activity of Ceria for Hydrogen Electro-Oxidation in Reduced-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaofeng; Luo, Ting; Meng, Xie; Wu, Hao; Li, Junliang; Liu, Xuejiao; Ji, Xiaona; Wang, Jianqiang; Chen, Chusheng; Zhan, Zhongliang

    2015-11-01

    Single crystalline ceria nanooctahedra, nanocubes, and nanorods are hydrothermally synthesized, colloidally impregnated into the porous La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O3-δ (LSGM) scaffolds, and electrochemically evaluated as the anode catalysts for reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Well-defined surface terminations are confirmed by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy--(111) for nanooctahedra, (100) for nanocubes, and both (110) and (100) for nanorods. Temperature-programmed reduction in H2 shows the highest reducibility for nanorods, followed sequentially by nanocubes and nanooctahedra. Measurements of the anode polarization resistances and the fuel cell power densities reveal different orders of activity of ceria nanocrystals at high and low temperatures for hydrogen electro-oxidation, i.e., nanorods > nanocubes > nanooctahedra at T ≤ 450 °C and nanooctahedra > nanorods > nanocubes at T ≥ 500 °C. Such shape-dependent activities of these ceria nanocrystals have been correlated to their difference in the local structure distortions and thus in the reducibility. These findings will open up a new strategy for design of advanced catalysts for reduced-temperature SOFCs by elaborately engineering the shape of nanocrystals and thus selectively exposing the crystal facets.

  2. Shape-Dependent Activity of Ceria for Hydrogen Electro-Oxidation in Reduced-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaofeng; Luo, Ting; Meng, Xie; Wu, Hao; Li, Junliang; Liu, Xuejiao; Ji, Xiaona; Wang, Jianqiang; Chen, Chusheng; Zhan, Zhongliang

    2015-11-01

    Single crystalline ceria nanooctahedra, nanocubes, and nanorods are hydrothermally synthesized, colloidally impregnated into the porous La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O3-δ (LSGM) scaffolds, and electrochemically evaluated as the anode catalysts for reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Well-defined surface terminations are confirmed by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy--(111) for nanooctahedra, (100) for nanocubes, and both (110) and (100) for nanorods. Temperature-programmed reduction in H2 shows the highest reducibility for nanorods, followed sequentially by nanocubes and nanooctahedra. Measurements of the anode polarization resistances and the fuel cell power densities reveal different orders of activity of ceria nanocrystals at high and low temperatures for hydrogen electro-oxidation, i.e., nanorods > nanocubes > nanooctahedra at T ≤ 450 °C and nanooctahedra > nanorods > nanocubes at T ≥ 500 °C. Such shape-dependent activities of these ceria nanocrystals have been correlated to their difference in the local structure distortions and thus in the reducibility. These findings will open up a new strategy for design of advanced catalysts for reduced-temperature SOFCs by elaborately engineering the shape of nanocrystals and thus selectively exposing the crystal facets. PMID:26307555

  3. In vitro organotin administration alters guinea pig cochlear outer hair cell shape and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, W J; Chertoff, M E; Brownell, W E; Fechter, L D

    1993-06-01

    Trimethyltin (TMT) and triethyltin (TET) disrupt auditory function at doses far below those shown to be neurotoxic. In vivo studies suggest that the initial effect of TMT on hearing occurs at the inner hair cell/spiral ganglion cell synapse, while later, the outer hair cell (OHC) undergoes structural and functional damage. TET produces acute effects upon afferent neurotransmission similar to those observed following TMT, but TET's effects on OHC structure and function have not been examined. OHCs are motile elements within the cochlea, believed to modulate the sensitivity and tuning within the inner ear. Changes in OHC length may alter hearing function, and length changes have been reported following exposure to various ototoxic agents in vitro. In the present study, 77 OHCs from 45 pigmented male guinea pigs were isolated in primary culture and exposed for 90 min to concentrations between 30 microM and 1.0 mM of TMT or TET and then to bathing medium for 30 min to remove the toxicant. Significant shortening of the OHC cell body occurred at all doses to both organotins, with a mean reduction in length of 15.1 and 20.2% for 1.0 mM TMT and TET, respectively, at the end of testing; control cells were only 3.4% shorter at the end of 90 min of perfusion with bathing medium. The effect of organotin exposure on OHC volume was not consistently related to either TMT or TET concentration or altered cell length. In addition, disruption of the plasma membrane characterized by bleb formation, the forceful ejection of cytoplasm, or bursting was seen in 80% of cells exposed to 1.0 mM TET, although not TMT; lower concentrations of both organotins disrupted the cell membrane in 10-30% of cells. Membrane rupture was not reliably associated with either increased cell volume or decreased length, implicating a weakening of the plasma membrane or cortical lattice as the basis for this effect. Consistent with the irreversible structural weakening of the lateral wall, resorption of

  4. Shaping T Cell – B Cell Collaboration in the Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Glycoprotein gp120 by Peptide Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steede, N. Kalaya; Rust, Blake J.; Hossain, Mohammad M.; Freytag, Lucy C.; Robinson, James E.; Landry, Samuel J.

    2013-01-01

    Prime-boost vaccination regimes have shown promise for obtaining protective immunity to HIV. Poorly understood mechanisms of cellular immunity could be responsible for improved humoral responses. Although CD4+ T-cell help promotes B-cell development, the relationship of CD4+ T-cell specificity to antibody specificity has not been systematically investigated. Here, protein and peptide-specific immune responses to HIV-1 gp120 were characterized in groups of ten mucosally immunized BALB/c mice. Protein and peptide reactivity of serum antibody was tested for correlation with cytokine secretion by splenocytes restimulated with individual gp120 peptides. Antibody titer for gp120 correlated poorly with the peptide-stimulated T-cell response. In contrast, titers for conformational epitopes, measured as crossreactivity or CD4-blocking, correlated with average interleukin-2 and interleukin-5 production in response to gp120 peptides. Antibodies specific for conformational epitopes and individual gp120 peptides typically correlated with T-cell responses to several peptides. In order to modify the specificity of immune responses, animals were primed with a gp120 peptide prior to immunization with protein. Priming induced distinct peptide-specific correlations of antibodies and T-cells. The majority of correlated antibodies were specific for the primed peptides or other peptides nearby in the gp120 sequence. These studies suggest that the dominant B-cell subsets recruit the dominant T-cell subsets and that T-B collaborations can be shaped by epitope-specific priming. PMID:23776539

  5. Shaping T cell - B cell collaboration in the response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 by peptide priming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kalaya Steede

    Full Text Available Prime-boost vaccination regimes have shown promise for obtaining protective immunity to HIV. Poorly understood mechanisms of cellular immunity could be responsible for improved humoral responses. Although CD4+ T-cell help promotes B-cell development, the relationship of CD4+ T-cell specificity to antibody specificity has not been systematically investigated. Here, protein and peptide-specific immune responses to HIV-1 gp120 were characterized in groups of ten mucosally immunized BALB/c mice. Protein and peptide reactivity of serum antibody was tested for correlation with cytokine secretion by splenocytes restimulated with individual gp120 peptides. Antibody titer for gp120 correlated poorly with the peptide-stimulated T-cell response. In contrast, titers for conformational epitopes, measured as crossreactivity or CD4-blocking, correlated with average interleukin-2 and interleukin-5 production in response to gp120 peptides. Antibodies specific for conformational epitopes and individual gp120 peptides typically correlated with T-cell responses to several peptides. In order to modify the specificity of immune responses, animals were primed with a gp120 peptide prior to immunization with protein. Priming induced distinct peptide-specific correlations of antibodies and T-cells. The majority of correlated antibodies were specific for the primed peptides or other peptides nearby in the gp120 sequence. These studies suggest that the dominant B-cell subsets recruit the dominant T-cell subsets and that T-B collaborations can be shaped by epitope-specific priming.

  6. Direct effects of reactive oxygen species on cochlear outer hair cell shape in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, W J; DiMartino, D L; Prasad, M R

    1995-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the ototoxicity of various agents. This study examines the effects of superoxide anion (O2), hydroxyl radical (OH.) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), on isolated cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) morphology. OHCs were superfused with artificial perilymph (AP) or AP containing a specific ROS scavenger, and then with AP, ROS system or scavenger plus ROS system for 90 min. The generation of ROS as well as the scavenging properties of other agents were confirmed by specific biochemical assays. Control cells decreased 4.8% in mean length, and showed no obvious membrane damage. Generation of O2. or OH. resulted in high rates (85.7 and 42.9%, respectively) of bleb formation at the synaptic pole, and decreased (O2., 15.2%; OH., 17.3%) mean cell length. Length change and bleb formation rate were H2O2 concentration-dependent. 20 mM H2O2 led to 33.3% decreased mean cell length, and only 20% bleb formation; 0.1 mM H2O2 led to 83.3% bleb formation, with no length decrease. Superoxide dismutase, deferoxamine and catalase protected against O2., OH. and H2O2 effects, respectively. Bleb formation and diminished cell length likely represent differential lipid peroxidative outcomes at supra- and infranuclear membranes, and are consistent with effects of certain ototoxicants.

  7. The effect of quinine on outer hair cell shape, compliance and force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, J K; Hallworth, R

    1999-06-01

    Quinine intoxication causes a well-described syndrome that includes tinnitus, sensorineural hearing loss and vertigo. The pathophysiology of quinine's effects on hearing is unknown, but may include a peripheral component. The cochlear outer hair cell is known to be motile and to contribute force to amplify the vibration pattern of the organ of Corti. The outer hair cell is also a target of diseases involving tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss, including salicylate intoxication. These effects may be mediated through changes either in motile force or in mechanical properties. Quinine's effects on outer hair cell motility and mechanical properties have therefore been examined in vitro. Quinine at 5.0 mM substantially decreased active force generation in isolated guinea pig cochlear outer hair cells. Isolated cells also elongated and dilated in diameter when exposed to 5.0 mM quinine. No consistent changes in mechanical properties were observed. 1.0 mM quinine was ineffective in either force reduction or elongation. Trifluoperazine, a calmodulin inhibitor, and ML-9, a blocker of myosin light chain kinases, were ineffective in blocking quinine-induced force reduction or elongation. Deferoxamine, a hydroxyl free radical scavenger, also failed to block either the force decrease or the elongation.

  8. A compact resonant \\Pi-shaped photoacoustic cell with low window background for gas sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Ulasevich, A L; Kouzmouk, A A; Starovoitov, V S

    2013-01-01

    A resonant photoacoustic cell capable of detecting the traces of gases at an amplitude-modulation regime is represented. The cell is designed so as to minimize the window background for the cell operation at a selected acoustic resonance. A compact prototype cell (the volume of acoustic cavity of ~ 0.2 cm^3, total cell weight of 3.5 g) adapted to the narrow diffraction-limited beam of near-infrared laser is produced and examined experimentally. The noise-associated measurement error and laser-initiated signals are studied as functions of modulation frequency. The background signal and useful response to light absorption by the gas are analyzed in measurements of absorption for ammonia traces in nitrogen flow with the help of a pigtailed DFB laser diode operated near a wavelength of 1.53 um. The performance of absorption detection and gas-leak sensing for the prototype operated at the second longitudinal acoustic resonance (the resonance frequency of ~ 4.38 kHz, Q-factor of ~ 13.9) is estimated. The noise-equi...

  9. T-cell recognition is shaped by epitope sequence conservation in the host proteome and microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresciani, Anne Gøther; Paul, Sinu; Schommer, Nina;

    2016-01-01

    Several mechanisms exist to avoid or suppress inflammatory T-cell immune responses that could prove harmful to the host due to targeting self-antigens or commensal microbes. We hypothesized that these mechanisms could become evident when comparing the immunogenicity of a peptide from a pathogen...... as a result of negative selection of T cells capable of recognizing such peptides. Moreover, we also found a reduced level of immune recognition for epitopes conserved in the commensal microbiome, presumably as a result of peripheral tolerance. These findings indicate that the existence (and potentially...... the polarization) of T-cell responses to a given epitope is influenced and to some extent predictable based on its similarity to self-antigens and commensal antigens....

  10. X-shape oligo(thiophene)s as donor materials for vacuum-deposited organic photovoltaic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ya-Nan; Zhou Yin-Hua; Xu Yue; Sun Xiao-Bo; Wu Wei-Cai; Tian Wen-Jing; Liu Yun-Qi

    2008-01-01

    The films of two x-shape oligo(thiophene)s, 3, 4-dibithienyl-2, 5-dithienylthiophene (TT) and 2, 5-dibithienyl-3, 4-ditrithienylthiophene (11T), which are prepared by vacuum evaporation, have been investigated as novel electron donor layers in two-layer photovoltaic cells. UV-Vis absorptions show red-shifted and broadened absorptions of the vacuumevaporated films as compared with those of the corresponding solutions and spin-coating films, which is beneficial for photovoltaic properties. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements show that the vacuum-evaporated films are almost amorphous. Two-layer photovoltaic cells have been realized by the thermal evaporation of 7T and 11T as donors and N, N'-bis(1-ethylpropyl)-3, 4:9,10-perylene bis(tetracarboxyl diimide) (EPPTC) as an acceptor. An energy conversion efficiency (ECE) of 0.18% of the cell based on 7T with an irradiation of white light at 100 mw/cm2 has been demonstrated by the measurements of current (Ⅰ)- voltage (Ⅴ) curves of the cells to be higher than the ECE of the reference system based on donor dihexylterthienyl (H3T) that is linear and without á, a linkage.

  11. Comparative study of shape, intensity and texture features and support vector machine for white blood cell classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Habibzadeh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The complete blood count (CBC is widely used test for counting and categorizing various peripheral particles in the blood. The main goal of the paper is to count and classify white blood cells (leukocytes in microscopic images into five major categories using features such as shape, intensity and texture features. The first critical step of counting and classification procedure involves segmentation of individual cells in cytological images of thin blood smears. The quality of segmentation has significant impact on the cell type identification, but poor quality, noise, and/or low resolution images make segmentation less reliable. We analyze the performance of our system for three different sets of features and we determine that the best performance is achieved by wavelet features using the Dual-Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DT-CWT which is based on multi-resolution characteristics of the image. These features are combined with the Support Vector Machine (SVM which classifies white blood cells into their five primary types. This approach was validated with experiments conducted on digital normal blood smear images with low resolution.

  12. Cholangiocarcinoma Stem-like Cells Shapes Tumor-initiating Niche by Regulating Associated Macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raggi, Chiara; Correnti, Margherita; Sica, Antonio;

    2016-01-01

    -SPHs were highly enriched for CSC, liver cancer and embryonic stem cell markers both at gene and protein levels. Next, FACS-analysis showed that in presence of CCA-SPH-CM, CD14+ expressed key macrophage (MØ) markers (CD68, CD115, HLA-DR, CD206) indicating that CCA-SPH- conditioned medium was a strong MØ...

  13. A Clostridium difficile Cell Wall Glycopolymer Locus Influences Bacterial Shape, Polysaccharide Production and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolo, Lisa; Monteiro, Mario A.; Agellon, Al; Viswanathan, V. K.; Vedantam, Gayatri

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a diarrheagenic pathogen associated with significant mortality and morbidity. While its glucosylating toxins are primary virulence determinants, there is increasing appreciation of important roles for non-toxin factors in C. difficile pathogenesis. Cell wall glycopolymers (CWGs) influence the virulence of various pathogens. Five C. difficile CWGs, including PSII, have been structurally characterized, but their biosynthesis and significance in C. difficile infection is unknown. We explored the contribution of a conserved CWG locus to C. difficile cell-surface integrity and virulence. Attempts at disrupting multiple genes in the locus, including one encoding a predicted CWG exporter mviN, were unsuccessful, suggesting essentiality of the respective gene products. However, antisense RNA-mediated mviN downregulation resulted in slight morphology defects, retarded growth, and decreased surface PSII deposition. Two other genes, lcpA and lcpB, with putative roles in CWG anchoring, could be disrupted by insertional inactivation. lcpA- and lcpB- mutants had distinct phenotypes, implying non-redundant roles for the respective proteins. The lcpB- mutant was defective in surface PSII deposition and shedding, and exhibited a remodeled cell surface characterized by elongated and helical morphology, aberrantly-localized cell septae, and an altered surface-anchored protein profile. Both lcpA- and lcpB- strains also displayed heightened virulence in a hamster model of C. difficile disease. We propose that gene products of the C. difficile CWG locus are essential, that they direct the production/assembly of key antigenic surface polysaccharides, and thereby have complex roles in virulence. PMID:27741317

  14. Interactions between hair cells shape spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in a model of the tokay gecko's cochlea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gelfand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hearing of tetrapods including humans is enhanced by an active process that amplifies the mechanical inputs associated with sound, sharpens frequency selectivity, and compresses the range of responsiveness. The most striking manifestation of the active process is spontaneous otoacoustic emission, the unprovoked emergence of sound from an ear. Hair cells, the sensory receptors of the inner ear, are known to provide the energy for such emissions; it is unclear, though, how ensembles of such cells collude to power observable emissions. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have measured and modeled spontaneous otoacoustic emissions from the ear of the tokay gecko, a convenient experimental subject that produces robust emissions. Using a van der Pol formulation to represent each cluster of hair cells within a tonotopic array, we have examined the factors that influence the cooperative interaction between oscillators. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: A model that includes viscous interactions between adjacent hair cells fails to produce emissions similar to those observed experimentally. In contrast, elastic coupling yields realistic results, especially if the oscillators near the ends of the array are weakened so as to minimize boundary effects. Introducing stochastic irregularity in the strength of oscillators stabilizes peaks in the spectrum of modeled emissions, further increasing the similarity to the responses of actual ears. Finally, and again in agreement with experimental findings, the inclusion of a pure-tone external stimulus repels the spectral peaks of spontaneous emissions. Our results suggest that elastic coupling between oscillators of slightly differing strength explains several properties of the spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in the gecko.

  15. Cytomegalovirus shapes long-term immune reconstitution after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Itzykson, Raphael; Robin, Marie; Moins-Teisserenc, Helene; Delord, Marc; Busson, Marc; Xhaard, Aliénor; de Fontebrune, Flore Sicre; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Toubert, Antoine; Socié, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Immune reconstitution after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a dynamic and complex process depending on the recipient and donor characteristics, on the modalities of transplantation, and on the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease. Multivariate methods widely used for gene expression profiling can simultaneously analyze the patterns of a great number of biological variables on a heterogeneous set of patients. Here we use these methods on flow cytometry assessment of up to 25 lymphoc...

  16. The Spectrum and Regulatory Landscape of Intestinal Innate Lymphoid Cells Are Shaped by the Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gury-BenAri, Meital; Thaiss, Christoph A; Serafini, Nicolas; Winter, Deborah R; Giladi, Amir; Lara-Astiaso, David; Levy, Maayan; Salame, Tomer Meir; Weiner, Assaf; David, Eyal; Shapiro, Hagit; Dori-Bachash, Mally; Pevsner-Fischer, Meirav; Lorenzo-Vivas, Erika; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Paul, Franziska; Harmelin, Alon; Eberl, Gérard; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Tanay, Amos; Di Santo, James P; Elinav, Eran; Amit, Ido

    2016-08-25

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are critical modulators of mucosal immunity, inflammation, and tissue homeostasis, but their full spectrum of cellular states and regulatory landscapes remains elusive. Here, we combine genome-wide RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, and ATAC-seq to compare the transcriptional and epigenetic identity of small intestinal ILCs, identifying thousands of distinct gene profiles and regulatory elements. Single-cell RNA-seq and flow and mass cytometry analyses reveal compartmentalization of cytokine expression and metabolic activity within the three classical ILC subtypes and highlight transcriptional states beyond the current canonical classification. In addition, using antibiotic intervention and germ-free mice, we characterize the effect of the microbiome on the ILC regulatory landscape and determine the response of ILCs to microbial colonization at the single-cell level. Together, our work characterizes the spectrum of transcriptional identities of small intestinal ILCs and describes how ILCs differentially integrate signals from the microbial microenvironment to generate phenotypic and functional plasticity.

  17. In vitro developmental competence of pig nuclear transferred embryos: effects of GFP transfection, refrigeration, cell cycle synchronization and shapes of donor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Hai; Pan, Deng-Ke; Sun, Xiu-Zhu; Sun, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Tian, Xing-Hua; Li, Yan; Dai, Yun-Ping; Li, Ning

    2006-08-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of producing pig transgenic blastocysts expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) and to examine the effects of shape and preparation methods of donor cells on in vitro developmental ability of pig nuclear transferred embryos (NTEs). In experiment 1, the effect of GFP transfection on development of pig NTEs was evaluated. The cleavage and blastocyst rates showed no significant difference between NTEs derived from transfected and non-transfected donors. In experiment 2, the effect of different nuclear donor preparation methods on in vitro development of NTEs was examined. The cleavage rate showed no statistically significant differences among three preparation methods. The blastocyst rates of donor cells treated once at -4 degrees C and those of freshly digested cells were similar to each other (26.3% vs 17.9%). The lowest blastocyst rates (5.88%) were observed when cells cryopreserved at -196 degrees C were used as donors. In experiment 3, the effect of different cell cycle synchronization methods on the in vitro development potential of pig NTEs was evaluated. The cleavage rate of NTEs derived from cycling cells was much better than that of NTEs derived from serum-starved cells (64.4% vs 50.5%, p refrigerated pig GFP-transfected cells could be used as donors in nuclear transfer and these NTEs could be effectively developed to blastocyst stage; (ii) serum starvation of GFP-transfected cells is not required for preimplantation development of pig NTEs; and (iii) a rough surface of GFP-transfected donor cells affects fusion rate negatively but has no influence on the cleavage rate or blastocyst rate of pig NTEs. PMID:16822335

  18. Immune tolerance maintained by cooperative interactions between T cells and antigen presenting cells shapes a diverse TCR repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine eBest

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The T cell population in an individual needs to avoid harmful activation by self-peptides while maintaining the ability to respond to an unknown set of foreign peptides. This property is acquired by a combination of thymic and extra-thymic mechanisms. We extend current models for the development of self/non-self discrimination to consider the acquisition of self-tolerance as an emergent system level property of the overall T cell receptor repertoire. We propose that tolerance is established at the level of the antigen presenting cell/T cell cluster, which facilitates and integrates co-operative interactions between T cells of different specificity. The threshold for self-reactivity is therefore imposed at a population level, and not at the level of the individual T cell/antigen encounter. Mathematically, the model can be formulated as a linear programming optimisation problem, which can be implemented as a multiplicative update algorithm which shows a rapid convergence to a stable state. The model constrains self-reactivity within a predefined threshold, but maintains the diversity and cross reactivity which are key characteristics of human T cell immunity. We show further that the size of individual clones in the model repertoire remains heterogeneous, and that new clones can establish themselves even when the repertoire is stable. Our study combines the salient features of the danger model of self/non-self discrimination with the concepts of quorum sensing, and extends repertoire generation models to encompass the establishment of tolerance. Furthermore, the dynamic and continuous repertoire reshaping which underlies tolerance in this model suggests opportunities for therapeutic intervention to achieve long-term tolerance following transplantation.

  19. Formalin-induced fluorescence reveals cell shape and morphology in biological tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Leischner

    Full Text Available Ultramicroscopy is a powerful tool to reveal detailed three-dimensional structures of large microscopical objects. Using high magnification, we observed that formalin induces fluorescence more in extra-cellular space and stains cellular structures negatively, rendering cells as dark objects in front of a bright background. Here, we show this effect on a three-dimensional image stack of a hippocampus sample, focusing on the CA1 region. This method, called FIF-Ultramicroscopy, allows for the three-dimensional observation of cellular structures in various tissue types without complicated staining techniques.

  20. Cell shape and spreading of stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells cultured on fibronectin coated gold and hydroxyapatite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A; Jensen, Thomas Hartvig Lindkjær; Kolind, Kristian;

    2011-01-01

    In order to identify the cellular mechanisms leading to the biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite implants, we studied the interaction of human bone marrow derived stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) with fibronectin-coated gold (Au) and hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces. The adsorption of fibronectin...... as compared to Au. Moreover, the results revealed that the morphology of cells cultured on fibronectin coated HA surfaces were less irregular. In summary we find that fibronectin adsorbs in a more activated state on the HA surfaces, resulting in a slightly different cellular response as compared...

  1. Measurement of radionuclides using ion chromatography and flow-cell scintillation counting with pulse shape discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVol, T.A.; Fjeld, R.A. [Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The use of ion chromatography (IC) for radiochemical separations is a well established technique. IC is commonly used in routine environmental monitoring applications as well as in specialized research applications. Typical usage involves the separation of a single radionuclide from the non-radioactive constituents. During the past decade, a limited amount of research has been conducted using automated IC systems in actinide separation applications (e.g.). More recently, separation procedures for common non-gamma emitting activation and fission products were developed utilizing a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. In addition, a separation procedure for six common actinides has been developed using a HPLC system. These latter systems used on-line flow-cell detectors for quantification of the radioactive constituents of the effluent stream.

  2. Immobilization of Electroporated Cells for Fabrication of Cellular Biosensors: Physiological Effects of the Shape of Calcium Alginate Matrices and Foetal Calf Serum

    OpenAIRE

    Nikos Katsanakis; Andreas Katsivelis; Spiridon Kintzios

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effect of transfected cell immobilization in calcium alginate gels, we immobilized electroporated Vero cells in gels shaped either as spherical beads or as thin membrane layers. In addition, we investigated whether serum addition had a positive effect on cell proliferation and viability in either gel configuration. The gels were stored for four weeks in a medium supplemented or not with 20% (v/v) foetal calf serum. Throughout a culture period of four ...

  3. Two modes of release shape the postsynaptic response at the inner hair cell ribbon synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Lisa; Yi, Eunyoung; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2010-03-24

    Cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) convert sounds into receptor potentials and via their ribbon synapses into firing rates in auditory nerve fibers. Multivesicular release at individual IHC ribbon synapses activates AMPA-mediated EPSCs with widely ranging amplitudes. The underlying mechanisms and specific role for multivesicular release in encoding sound are not well understood. Here we characterize the waveforms of individual EPSCs recorded from afferent boutons contacting IHCs and compare their characteristics in immature rats (postnatal days 8-11) and hearing rats (postnatal days 19-21). Two types of EPSC waveforms were found in every recording: monophasic EPSCs, with sharp rising phases and monoexponential decays, and multiphasic EPSCs, exhibiting inflections on rising and decaying phases. Multiphasic EPSCs exhibited slower rise times and smaller amplitudes than monophasic EPSCs. Both types of EPSCs had comparable charge transfers, suggesting that they were activated by the release of similar numbers of vesicles, which for multiphasic EPSCs occurred in a less coordinated manner. On average, a higher proportion of larger, monophasic EPSCs was found in hearing compared to immature rats. In addition, EPSCs became significantly faster with age. The developmental increase in size and speed could improve auditory signaling acuity. Multiphasic EPSCs persisted in hearing animals, in some fibers constituting half of the EPSCs. The proportion of monophasic versus multiphasic EPSCs varied widely across fibers, resulting in marked heterogeneity of amplitude distributions. We propose that the relative contribution of two modes of multivesicular release, generating monophasic and multiphasic EPSCs, may underlie fundamental characteristics of auditory nerve fibers.

  4. Shape deformation of the organ of Corti associated with length changes of outer hair cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, U.; Fermin, C.

    1996-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) are commonly assumed to function as mechanical effectors as well as sensory receptors in the organ of Corti (OC) of the inner ear. OHC in vitro and in organ explants exhibit mechanical responses to electrical, chemical or mechanical stimulation which may represent an aspect of their effector process that is expected in vivo. A detailed description, however, of an OHC effector operation in situ is still missing. Specifically, little is known as to how OHC movements influence the geometry of the OC in situ. Previous work has demonstrated that the motility of isolated OHCs in response to electrical stimulation and to K(+)-gluconate is probably under voltage control and causes depolarisation (shortening) and hyperpolarization (elongation). This work was undertaken to investigate if the movements that were observed in isolated OHC, and which are induced by ionic stimulation, could change the geometry of the OC. A synchronized depolarization of OHC was induced in guinea pig cochleae by exposing the entire OC to artificial endolymph (K+). Subsequent morphometry of mid-modiolar sections from these cochleae revealed that the distance between the basilar membrane (BM) and the reticular lamina (RL) had decreased considerably. Furthermore, in the three upper turns OHC had significantly shortened in all rows. The results suggest that OHC can change their length in the organ of Corti (OC) thus deforming the geometry of the OC. The experiments reveal a tonic force generation within the OC that may change the position of RL and/or BM, contribute to damping, modulate the BM-RL-distance and control the operating points of RL and sensory hair bundles. Thus, the results suggest active self-adjustments of cochlear mechanics by slow OHC length changes. Such mechanical adjustments have recently been postulated to correspond to timing elements of animal communication, speech or music.

  5. Wet-process Fabrication of Low-cost All-solid Wire-shaped Solar Cells on Manganese-plated Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • All-solid wire-shaped flexible solar cells are firstly assembled on low-cost Mn-plated fibers. • Energy efficiency improved by >27% after coating a layer of Mn on various substrates. • The cell is fabricated via wet process under low temperature and mild pH conditions. • Stable flexible solar cells are realized on lightweight and low-cost polymer fiber. - Abstract: All-solid wire-shaped flexible solar cells are assembled for the first time on low-cost Mn-plated wires through wet-process fabrication under low temperature and mild pH conditions. With a price cheap as the steel, metal Mn can be easily plated on almost any substrates, and evidently promote the photovoltaic efficiency of wire-shaped solar cells on various traditional metal wire substrates, such as Fe and Ti, by 27% and 65%, respectively. Flexible solar cell with much lower cost and weight is assembled on Mn-plated polymer substrate, and is still capable of giving better performance than that on Fe or Ti substrate. Both its mechanical and chemical stability are good for future weaving applications. Owing to the wire-type structure, such low-cost metals as Mn, which are traditionally regarded as unsuitable for solar cells, may provide new opportunities for highly efficient solar cells

  6. Understanding S-shaped current-voltage characteristics of organic solar cells: Direct measurement of potential distributions by scanning Kelvin probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saive, Rebecca, E-mail: rebecca.saive@innovationlab.de; Kowalsky, Wolfgang [InnovationLab GmbH, 69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, TU Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Mueller, Christian [InnovationLab GmbH, 69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schinke, Janusz; Lovrincic, Robert [InnovationLab GmbH, 69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, TU Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-12-09

    We present a comparison of the potential distribution along the cross section of bilayer poly(3-hexylthiophene)/1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)propyl-1-phenyl[6,6]C61 (P3HT/PCBM) solar cells, which show normal and anomalous, S-shaped current-voltage (IV) characteristics. We expose the cross sections of the devices with a focussed ion beam and measure them with scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. We find that in the case of S-shaped IV-characteristics, there is a huge potential drop at the PCBM/Al top contact, which does not occur in solar cells with normal IV-characteristics. This behavior confirms the assumption that S-shaped curves are caused by hindered charge transport at interfaces.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced inverted U-shaped dose responsiveness in anchorage independent growth and cell proliferation of human breast epithelial cells with stem cell characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has a variety of carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic effects in experimental animals, its role in human carcinogenicity remain controversial. A simian virus 40-immortalized cell line from normal human breast epithelial cells with stem cells and luminal characteristics (M13SV1) was used to study whether TCDD can induce AIG positive colony formation and cause increased cell numbers in a inverted U-shaped dose-response manner. TCDD activated Akt, ERK2, and increased the expression of CYP1A1, PAI-2, IL-lb mRNA, and ERK2 protein levels. TCDD was able to increased phosphorylation and expression of ERK2 in same dose-response manner as AIG positive colony formation. Thus, TCDD induced tumorigenicity in M13SV1, possibly through the phosphorylation of ERK2 and/or Akt. Further, cDNA microarray with 7448 sequence-verified clones was used to profile various gene expression patterns after treatment of TCDD. Three clear patterns could be delineated: genes that were dose-dependently up-regulated, genes expressed in either U-shape and/or inverted U-shape. The fact that these genes are intrinsically related to breast epithelial cell proliferation and survival clearly suggests that they may be involved in the TCDD-induced breast tumorigenesis

  8. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq and simulations to probe structure-function design principles of RNA transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Watters, Kyle E; Gasper, Paul M; Abbott, Timothy R; Carlson, Paul D; Chen, Alan A; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-06-01

    Antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators are powerful tools for controlling gene expression and creating synthetic gene networks. RNA transcriptional repressors derived from natural mechanisms called attenuators are particularly versatile, though their mechanistic complexity has made them difficult to engineer. Here we identify a new structure-function design principle for attenuators that enables the forward engineering of new RNA transcriptional repressors. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq to characterize the structures of attenuator variants within Escherichia coli, we show that attenuator hairpins that facilitate interaction with antisense RNAs require interior loops for proper function. Molecular dynamics simulations of these attenuator variants suggest these interior loops impart structural flexibility. We further observe hairpin flexibility in the cellular structures of natural RNA mechanisms that use antisense RNA interactions to repress translation, confirming earlier results from in vitro studies. Finally, we design new transcriptional attenuators in silico using an interior loop as a structural requirement and show that they function as desired in vivo. This work establishes interior loops as an important structural element for designing synthetic RNA gene regulators. We anticipate that the coupling of experimental measurement of cellular RNA structure and function with computational modeling will enable rapid discovery of structure-function design principles for a diverse array of natural and synthetic RNA regulators.

  9. Impact of particle shape on electron transport and lifetime in zinc oxide nanorod-based dye-sensitized solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to its high electron mobility, zinc oxide represents a promising alternative to titanium dioxide as the working electrode material in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs. When zinc oxide is grown into 1-D nanowire arrays and incorporated into the working electrode of DSCs, enhanced electron dynamics and even a decoupling of electron transport (τd and electron lifetime (τn have been observed. In this work, DSCs with working electrodes composed of solution-grown, unarrayed ZnO nanorods are investigated. In order to determine whether such devices give rise to similar decoupling, intensity modulated photocurrent and photovoltage spectroscopies are used to measure τd and τn, while varying the illumination intensity. In addition, ZnO nanorod-based DSCs are compared with ZnO nanoparticle-based DSCs and nanomaterial shape is shown to affect electron dynamics. Nanorod-based DSCs exhibit shorter electron transport times, longer electron lifetimes, and a higher τn/τd ratio than nanoparticle-based DSCs.

  10. Dendritic HCN channels shape excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the inner hair cell afferent synapse in the mammalian cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Eunyoung; Roux, Isabelle; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Synaptic transmission at the inner hair cell (IHC) afferent synapse, the first synapse in the auditory pathway, is specialized for rapid and reliable signaling. Here we investigated the properties of a hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)), expressed in the afferent dendrite of auditory nerve fibers, and its role in shaping postsynaptic activity. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings from afferent dendrites directly where they contact the IHC in excised postnatal rat cochlear turns. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) of variable amplitude (1-35 mV) were found with 10-90% rise times of about 1 ms and time constants of decay of about 5 ms at room temperature. Current-voltage relations recorded in afferent dendrites revealed I(h). The pharmacological profile and reversal potential (-45 mV) indicated that I(h) is mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels. The HCN channel subunits HCN1, HCN2, and HCN4 were found to be expressed in afferent dendrites using immunolabeling. Raising intracellular cAMP levels sped up the activation kinetics, increased the magnitude of I(h) and shifted the half activation voltage (V(half)) to more positive values (-104 +/- 3 to -91 +/- 2 mV). Blocking I(h) with 50 microM ZD7288 resulted in hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential (approximately 4 mV) and slowing the decay of the EPSP by 47%, suggesting that I(h) is active at rest and shortens EPSPs, thereby potentially improving rapid and reliable signaling at this first synapse in the auditory pathway.

  11. Immobilization of Electroporated Cells for Fabrication of Cellular Biosensors: Physiological Effects of the Shape of Calcium Alginate Matrices and Foetal Calf Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Katsanakis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the physiological effect of transfected cell immobilization in calcium alginate gels, we immobilized electroporated Vero cells in gels shaped either as spherical beads or as thin membrane layers. In addition, we investigated whether serum addition had a positive effect on cell proliferation and viability in either gel configuration. The gels were stored for four weeks in a medium supplemented or not with 20% (v/v foetal calf serum. Throughout a culture period of four weeks, cell proliferation and cell viability were assayed by optical microscopy after provision of Trypan Blue. Non-elaborate culture conditions (room temperature, non-CO2 enriched culture atmosphere were applied throughout the experimental period in order to evaluate cell viability under less than optimal storage conditions. Immobilization of electroporated cells was associated with an initially reduced cell viability, which was gradually increased. Immobilization was associated with maintenance of cell growth for the duration of the experimental period, whereas electroporated cells essentially died after a week in suspension culture. Considerable proliferation of immobilized cells was observed in spherical alginate beads. In both gel configurations, addition of serum was associated with increased cell proliferation. The results of the present study could contribute to an improvement of the storability of biosensors based on electroporated, genetically or membrane-engineered cells.

  12. Creating and shaping innovation systems: Formal networks in the innovation system for stationary fuel cells in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and diffusion of novel technologies, e.g. for decentralized energy generation, crucially depends on supportive institutional structures such as R and D programs, specific regulations, technical standards, or positive expectations. Such structures are not given but emerge through the interplay of different kinds of actors. In this paper, we study the role of formal networks in creating supportive structures in the technological innovation system for stationary fuel cells in Germany. Our findings are based on an in-depth study of five selected innovation networks. The analysis shows that the networks were strategically set up to support the creation of a variety of elements including public R and D programs, modules for vocational training, technical guidelines, standardized components, or a positive image of the technology. These elements have been reported to generate positive externalities in the field, e.g. as they help to establish user-supplier linkages in the emerging value chain. We conclude that, from a firm perspective such elements may represent strategically relevant resources made available at the innovation system level. This view opens up a link to the literature of strategic management, thus highlighting the importance of strategic action and cooperation in emerging technological fields. - Research Highlights: → We combine technological innovation systems with resource-based reasoning. → Formal networks are strategically set up to create and shape technological innovation systems. → Formal networks create system resources which provide positive externalities in emerging fields. → Collective action is essential for the build-up of energy innovation systems.

  13. Star-shaped and linear π-conjugated oligomers consisting of a tetrathienoanthracene core and multiple diketopyrrolopyrrole arms for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    Summary Solution-processable star-shaped and linear π-conjugated oligomers consisting of an electron-donating tetrathienoanthracene (TTA) core and electron-accepting diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) arms, namely, TTA-DPP4 and TTA-DPP2, were designed and synthesized. Based on density functional theory calculations, the star-shaped TTA-DPP4 has a larger oscillator strength than the linear TTA-DPP2, and consequently, better photoabsorption property over a wide range of visible wavelengths. The photovoltaic properties of organic solar cells based on TTA-DPP4 and TTA-DPP2 with a fullerene derivative were evaluated by varying the thickness of the bulk heterojunction active layer. As a result of the enhanced visible absorption properties of the star-shaped π-conjugated structure, better photovoltaic performances were obtained with relatively thin active layers (40–60 nm). PMID:27559398

  14. Star-shaped and linear π-conjugated oligomers consisting of a tetrathienoanthracene core and multiple diketopyrrolopyrrole arms for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    Summary Solution-processable star-shaped and linear π-conjugated oligomers consisting of an electron-donating tetrathienoanthracene (TTA) core and electron-accepting diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) arms, namely, TTA-DPP4 and TTA-DPP2, were designed and synthesized. Based on density functional theory calculations, the star-shaped TTA-DPP4 has a larger oscillator strength than the linear TTA-DPP2, and consequently, better photoabsorption property over a wide range of visible wavelengths. The photovoltaic properties of organic solar cells based on TTA-DPP4 and TTA-DPP2 with a fullerene derivative were evaluated by varying the thickness of the bulk heterojunction active layer. As a result of the enhanced visible absorption properties of the star-shaped π-conjugated structure, better photovoltaic performances were obtained with relatively thin active layers (40–60 nm).

  15. Star-shaped and linear π-conjugated oligomers consisting of a tetrathienoanthracene core and multiple diketopyrrolopyrrole arms for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Hideaki; Adachi, Chihaya; Yasuda, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processable star-shaped and linear π-conjugated oligomers consisting of an electron-donating tetrathienoanthracene (TTA) core and electron-accepting diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) arms, namely, TTA-DPP4 and TTA-DPP2, were designed and synthesized. Based on density functional theory calculations, the star-shaped TTA-DPP4 has a larger oscillator strength than the linear TTA-DPP2, and consequently, better photoabsorption property over a wide range of visible wavelengths. The photovoltaic properties of organic solar cells based on TTA-DPP4 and TTA-DPP2 with a fullerene derivative were evaluated by varying the thickness of the bulk heterojunction active layer. As a result of the enhanced visible absorption properties of the star-shaped π-conjugated structure, better photovoltaic performances were obtained with relatively thin active layers (40-60 nm). PMID:27559398

  16. Star-shaped and linear π-conjugated oligomers consisting of a tetrathienoanthracene core and multiple diketopyrrolopyrrole arms for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Hideaki; Adachi, Chihaya; Yasuda, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processable star-shaped and linear π-conjugated oligomers consisting of an electron-donating tetrathienoanthracene (TTA) core and electron-accepting diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) arms, namely, TTA-DPP4 and TTA-DPP2, were designed and synthesized. Based on density functional theory calculations, the star-shaped TTA-DPP4 has a larger oscillator strength than the linear TTA-DPP2, and consequently, better photoabsorption property over a wide range of visible wavelengths. The photovoltaic properties of organic solar cells based on TTA-DPP4 and TTA-DPP2 with a fullerene derivative were evaluated by varying the thickness of the bulk heterojunction active layer. As a result of the enhanced visible absorption properties of the star-shaped π-conjugated structure, better photovoltaic performances were obtained with relatively thin active layers (40-60 nm).

  17. Saddle-shaped porphyrins for dye-sensitized solar cells: new insight into the relationship between nonplanarity and photovoltaic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahroosvand, Hashem; Zakavi, Saeed; Sousaraei, Ahmad; Eskandari, Mortaza

    2015-03-01

    We report on the theoretical and experimental studies of the new dye-sensitized solar cells functionalized with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin zinc(II) complexes bearing 2- and 8-bromo substituents at the β positions. In agreement with the results of TD-DFT calculations, the absorption maxima of di- and octa-brominated Zn(II) complexes, ZnTCPPBr2 and ZnTCPPBr8, exhibited large red-shift compared to that of the non-brominated free base porphyrin (H2TCPP). Furthermore, DFT calculations showed that the higher stabilization of the LUMO levels relative to the HOMO ones makes the HOMO-LUMO gap of the brominated Zn-porphyrins models smaller compared to that of the nonbrominated counterparts, which explains the red shifts of the Soret and Q bands of the brominated compounds. Solar cells containing the new saddle-shaped Zn(II) porphyrins were subjected to analysis in a photovoltaic calibration laboratory to determine their solar to electric energy conversion. In this regard, we found that the overall conversion efficiency of ZnTCPPBr8 adsorbed on TiO2 nanocrystalline films was 5 times as large as that of ZnTCPPBr2 adsorbed on the same films. The effect of the increasing number of Br groups on the photovoltaic performance of the complexes was compared to the results of computational methods using ab initio DFT molecular dynamics simulations and quantum dynamics calculations of electronic relaxation to investigate the interfacial electron transfer (IET) in TCPPBrx/TiO2-anatase nanostructures. Better IET in ZnTCPPBr8 compared to ZnTCPPBr2, and in H2TCPP was evaluated from interfacial electron transfer (IET) simulations. The IET results indicate that electron injection in ZnTCPPBr8-TiO2 (τ = 25 fs) can be up to 5 orders of magnitude faster than ZnTCPPBr2-TiO2 (τ = 125 fs). Both experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that the increase of the number of bromo-substituents at the β-pyrrole positions of the porphyrin macrocycle created a new class of

  18. Quantitative analysis of Plasmodium ookinete motion in three dimensions suggests a critical role for cell shape in the biomechanics of malaria parasite gliding motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Andrey; Tan, Yan-Hong; Angrisano, Fiona; Hanssen, Eric; Rogers, Kelly L; Whitehead, Lachlan; Mollard, Vanessa P; Cozijnsen, Anton; Delves, Michael J; Crawford, Simon; Sinden, Robert E; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Leckie, Christopher; Bailey, James; Baum, Jake

    2014-05-01

    Motility is a fundamental part of cellular life and survival, including for Plasmodium parasites--single-celled protozoan pathogens responsible for human malaria. The motile life cycle forms achieve motility, called gliding, via the activity of an internal actomyosin motor. Although gliding is based on the well-studied system of actin and myosin, its core biomechanics are not completely understood. Currently accepted models suggest it results from a specifically organized cellular motor that produces a rearward directional force. When linked to surface-bound adhesins, this force is passaged to the cell posterior, propelling the parasite forwards. Gliding motility is observed in all three life cycle stages of Plasmodium: sporozoites, merozoites and ookinetes. However, it is only the ookinetes--formed inside the midgut of infected mosquitoes--that display continuous gliding without the necessity of host cell entry. This makes them ideal candidates for invasion-free biomechanical analysis. Here we apply a plate-based imaging approach to study ookinete motion in three-dimensional (3D) space to understand Plasmodium cell motility and how movement facilitates midgut colonization. Using single-cell tracking and numerical analysis of parasite motion in 3D, our analysis demonstrates that ookinetes move with a conserved left-handed helical trajectory. Investigation of cell morphology suggests this trajectory may be based on the ookinete subpellicular cytoskeleton, with complementary whole and subcellular electron microscopy showing that, like their motion paths, ookinetes share a conserved left-handed corkscrew shape and underlying twisted microtubular architecture. Through comparisons of 3D movement between wild-type ookinetes and a cytoskeleton-knockout mutant we demonstrate that perturbation of cell shape changes motion from helical to broadly linear. Therefore, while the precise linkages between cellular architecture and actomyosin motor organization remain unknown, our

  19. Loss of miR-203 regulates cell shape and matrix adhesion through ROBO1/Rac/FAK in response to stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Lily Thao-Nhi; Cazares, Oscar; Mouw, Janna K; Chatterjee, Sharmila; Macias, Hector; Moran, Angel; Ramos, Jillian; Keely, Patricia J; Weaver, Valerie M; Hinck, Lindsay

    2016-03-14

    Breast tumor progression is accompanied by changes in the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) that increase stiffness of the microenvironment. Mammary epithelial cells engage regulatory pathways that permit dynamic responses to mechanical cues from the ECM. Here, we identify a SLIT2/ROBO1 signaling circuit as a key regulatory mechanism by which cells sense and respond to ECM stiffness to preserve tensional homeostasis. We observed that Robo1 ablation in the developing mammary gland compromised actin stress fiber assembly and inhibited cell contractility to perturb tissue morphogenesis, whereas SLIT2 treatment stimulated Rac and increased focal adhesion kinase activity to enhance cell tension by maintaining cell shape and matrix adhesion. Further investigation revealed that a stiff ECM increased Robo1 levels by down-regulating miR-203. Consistently, patients whose tumor expressed a low miR-203/high Robo1 expression pattern exhibited a better overall survival prognosis. These studies show that cells subjected to stiffened environments up-regulate Robo1 as a protective mechanism that maintains cell shape and facilitates ECM adherence.

  20. Loss of miR-203 regulates cell shape and matrix adhesion through ROBO1/Rac/FAK in response to stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Lily Thao-Nhi; Cazares, Oscar; Mouw, Janna K.; Chatterjee, Sharmila; Macias, Hector; Moran, Angel; Ramos, Jillian; Keely, Patricia J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2016-01-01

    Breast tumor progression is accompanied by changes in the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) that increase stiffness of the microenvironment. Mammary epithelial cells engage regulatory pathways that permit dynamic responses to mechanical cues from the ECM. Here, we identify a SLIT2/ROBO1 signaling circuit as a key regulatory mechanism by which cells sense and respond to ECM stiffness to preserve tensional homeostasis. We observed that Robo1 ablation in the developing mammary gland compromised actin stress fiber assembly and inhibited cell contractility to perturb tissue morphogenesis, whereas SLIT2 treatment stimulated Rac and increased focal adhesion kinase activity to enhance cell tension by maintaining cell shape and matrix adhesion. Further investigation revealed that a stiff ECM increased Robo1 levels by down-regulating miR-203. Consistently, patients whose tumor expressed a low miR-203/high Robo1 expression pattern exhibited a better overall survival prognosis. These studies show that cells subjected to stiffened environments up-regulate Robo1 as a protective mechanism that maintains cell shape and facilitates ECM adherence. PMID:26975850

  1. Cell-cell interactions impacts on the rate of swarm expansion and the edge shape of a colony swarming Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Aboutaleb; Tierra, Giordano; Xu, Zhiliang; Shrout, Joshua; Alber, Mark

    Collective motion has been observed by several bacterial species including the pathogenic bacterium P. aeruginosa. A flagellum at the pole is known to generate a self-propulsion motion. However, the role of type IV pili (TFP), distributed on the cell membrane, during swarming needs to be investigated in more details. In this work we introduce a model that combines the hydrodynamic and biophysical interactions in order to study the impact of the TFP interactions on swarming behavior of the colony. The model describes the motion and interactions of rod-shaped self propelled bacteria inside a thin liquid film. It also includes the equations describing the production and diffusion of surfactant rhamnolipids that is responsible for extraction of water from substrate, and Marangoni driven expansion of the thin liquid film by altering the surface tension. We show that TFP interactions are responsible for slower expansion rate of colonies of TFP deficient mutants compared to wild type. Experimental observations were used to calibrate the model and verify the model assumptions and predictions.

  2. Performance enhancement in titania based quantum dot sensitized solar cells through incorporation of disc shaped ZnO nanoparticles into photoanode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bin Bin; Wang, Ye Feng; Zeng, Jing Hui

    2016-09-01

    Disc shaped ZnO particles are embedded into traditional titanium dioxide photoanodes and quantum dot sensitized solar cells are assembled using these electrodes. With the aid of ZnO discs cells display enhanced performances that peaks at 5% disc loadings with a short circuit current density of 15.34 mA/cm2, open circuit voltage of 659 mV and power conversion efficiency of 5.36% respectively. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy suggest that performance enhancement is as a result of improved conductivity of ZnO discs in the photoanodes.

  3. 微柱对细胞核形态影响的研究%Studys on Effects of Micropillars on Cell Nucleus Shapes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安燕飞; 王进义

    2015-01-01

    目的::探讨微柱对3种细胞细胞核形态的影响。方法:在高度10μm,直径18μm,间距15μm 的 PDMS 微柱上分别培养3种细胞(表皮细胞、内皮细胞和成纤维细胞),24 h 后对其细胞核形态参数包括平均面积、周长、纵横比以及圆度值进行测量,并与其在平面上的相应值进行比较分析。结果:微柱上表皮细胞和内皮细胞的细胞核变形明显,核平均面积较平面上小很多,出现了弯月形和哑铃形;而成纤维细胞核则变形较小,仍为椭圆形,只是纵横比增大。结论:本实验采用的微柱尺度会使得3种细胞有不同程度的细胞核变形。%Objective:Effects of micropillar on cell nucleus shapes of three different kinds of cells was discussed.Methods:First, these three different kinds of cells(epithelial cell,fibroblast and endothelial cell)were cultured on an array of PDMS micropillars which were 10 μm in height,18 μm in diameter and 15 μm in edge to edge spacing.Then,a quantitative and comparative analysis of the cell nucleus shapes was given by measuring the average area,aspect ratio and their circularity of the cells both on the micropillars and on the flat substrate.Results:Distinct nuclear deformation such as crescent,and dumbbell was observed of epithelial cells and endothelial cells on the micropillar substrate and their nuclear average areas were much smaller than that of the the cells on the flat substrate,when nucleus shape of fibroblasts was still in oval but just with a larger aspect ratio.Conclusion:Different degree of nuclear deformation would be induced by the micropillars that we used in this paper.

  4. Quantitative proteomics reveals significant changes in cell shape and an energy shift after IPTG induction via an optimized SILAC approach for Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Lingyan; Zhang, Heng; Zhai, Linhui; Dammer, Eric B; Duong, Duc M; Li, Ning; Yan, Zili; Wu, Junzhu; Xu, Ping

    2013-12-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) has been widely used in yeast, mammalian cells, and even some multicellular organisms. However, the lack of optimized SILAC media limits its application in Escherichia coli, the most commonly used model organism. We optimized SILACE medium (SILAC medium created in this study for E. coli) for nonauxotrophic E. coli with high growth speed and complete labeling efficiency of the whole proteome in 12 generations. We applied a swapped SILAC workflow and pure null experiment with the SILACE medium using E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells hosting a recombinant plasmid coding for glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and ubiquitin binding domain before and after isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG) induction. Finally, we identified 1251 proteins with a significant change in abundance. Pathway analysis suggested that cell growth and fissiparism were inhibited accompanied by the down-regulation of proteins related to energy and metabolism, cell division, and the cell cycle, resulting in the size and shape change of the induced cells. Taken together, the results confirm the development of SILACE medium suitable for efficient and complete labeling of E. coli cells and a data filtering strategy for SILAC-based quantitative proteomics studies of E. coli.

  5. Plasmonic spectrum on 1D and 2D periodic arrays of rod-shape metal nanoparticle pairs with different core patterns for biosensor and solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumara, N. T. R. N.; Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Huang, Jin-Wei; Huang, Hung Ji; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the near field intensity and absorption spectra of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) periodic arrays of rod-shape metal nanoparticle (MNP) pairs using the finite element method (FEM) and taking into account the different core patterns for biosensor and solar cell applications are investigated. A tunable optical spectrum corresponding to the transverse SPR modes is observed. The peak resonance wavelength (λ res) can be shifted to red as the core patterns in rod-shape MNPs have been changed. We find that the 2D periodic array of core–shell MNP pairs (case 2) exhibit a red shifted SPR that can be tuned the gap enhancement and absorption efficiency simultaneously over an extended wavelength range. The tunable optical performances give us a qualitative idea of the geometrical properties of the periodic array of rod-shape MNP pairs on SPRs that can be as a promising candidate for plasmonic biosensor and solar cell applications.

  6. Synthesis of the cell surface during the division cycle of rod-shaped, gram-negative bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, S

    1991-01-01

    When the growth of the gram-negative bacterial cell wall is considered in relation to the synthesis of the other components of the cell, a new understanding of the pattern of wall synthesis emerges. Rather than a switch in synthesis between the side wall and pole, there is a partitioning of synthesis such that the volume of the cell increases exponentially and thus perfectly encloses the exponentially increasing cytoplasm. This allows the density of the cell to remain constant during the divi...

  7. Continuous wet-process growth of ZnO nanoarrays for wire-shaped photoanode of dye-sensitized solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Pan; Guo, Wanwan; Du, Jun; Tao, Changyuan; Qing, Shenglan; Fan, Xing

    2016-09-15

    Well-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays have been grown on metal-plated polymer fiber via a mild wet process in a newly-designed continuous reactor, aiming to provide wire-shaped photoanodes for wearable dye-sensitized solar cells. The growth conditions were systematically optimized with the help of computational flow-field simulation. The flow field in the reactor will not only affect the morphology of the ZnO nanorod⧹nanowire but also affect the pattern distribution of nanoarray on the electrode surface. Unlike the sectional structure from the traditional batch-type reactor, ZnO nanorods with finely-controlled length and uniform morphology could be grown from the continuous reactor. After optimization, the wire-shaped ZnO-type photoanode grown from the continuous reactor exhibited better photovoltaic performance than that from the traditional batch-type reactor. PMID:27289432

  8. Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 sequentially shapes the NK cell repertoire during the course of asymptomatic infection and Kaposi sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Dupuy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of innate immunity to immunosurveillance of the oncogenic Human Herpes Virus 8 (HHV8 has not been studied in depth. We investigated NK cell phenotype and function in 70 HHV8-infected subjects, either asymptomatic carriers or having developed Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. Our results revealed substantial alterations of the NK cell receptor repertoire in healthy HHV8 carriers, with reduced expression of NKp30, NKp46 and CD161 receptors. In addition, down-modulation of the activating NKG2D receptor, associated with impaired NK-cell lytic capacity, was observed in patients with active KS. Resolution of KS after treatment was accompanied with restoration of NKG2D levels and NK cell activity. HHV8-latently infected endothelial cells overexpressed ligands of several NK cell receptors, including NKG2D ligands. The strong expression of NKG2D ligands by tumor cells was confirmed in situ by immunohistochemical staining of KS biopsies. However, no tumor-infiltrating NK cells were detected, suggesting a defect in NK cell homing or survival in the KS microenvironment. Among the known KS-derived immunoregulatory factors, we identified prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 as a critical element responsible for the down-modulation of NKG2D expression on resting NK cells. Moreover, PGE2 prevented up-regulation of the NKG2D and NKp30 receptors on IL-15-activated NK cells, and inhibited the IL-15-induced proliferation and survival of NK cells. Altogether, our observations are consistent with distinct immunoevasion mechanisms that allow HHV8 to escape NK cell responses stepwise, first at early stages of infection to facilitate the maintenance of viral latency, and later to promote tumor cell growth through suppression of NKG2D-mediated functions. Importantly, our results provide additional support to the use of PGE2 inhibitors as an attractive approach to treat aggressive KS, as they could restore activation and survival of tumoricidal NK cells.

  9. A novel tomato mutant, Solanum lycopersicum elongated fruit1 (Slelf1), exhibits an elongated fruit shape caused by increased cell layers in the proximal region of the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusreeaeom, Katarut; Ariizumi, Tohru; Asamizu, Erika; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Shirasawa, Kenta; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Genes controlling fruit morphology offer important insights into patterns and mechanisms determining organ shape and size. In cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), a variety of fruit shapes are displayed, including round-, bell pepper-, pear-, and elongate-shaped forms. In this study, we characterized a tomato mutant possessing elongated fruit morphology by histologically analyzing its fruit structure and genetically analyzing and mapping the genetic locus. The mutant line, Solanum lycopersicum elongated fruit 1 (Slelf1), was selected in a previous study from an ethylmethane sulfonate-mutagenized population generated in the background of Micro-Tom, a dwarf and rapid-growth variety. Histological analysis of the Slelf1 mutant revealed dramatically increased elongation of ovary and fruit. Until 6 days before flowering, ovaries were round and they began to elongate afterward. We also determined pericarp thickness and the number of cell layers in three designated fruit regions. We found that mesocarp thickness, as well as the number of cell layers, was increased in the proximal region of immature green fruits, making this the key sector of fruit elongation. Using 262 F2 individuals derived from a cross between Slelf1 and the cultivar Ailsa Craig, we constructed a genetic map, simple sequence repeat (SSR), cleaved amplified polymorphism sequence (CAPS), and derived CAPS (dCAPS) markers and mapped to the 12 tomato chromosomes. Genetic mapping placed the candidate gene locus within a 0.2 Mbp interval on the long arm of chromosome 8 and was likely different from previously known loci affecting fruit shape. PMID:24519535

  10. The critical role of the tumor microenvironment in shaping natural killer cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eBaginska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence has been gathered over the last 10 years showing that the tumor microenvironment (TME is not simply a passive recipient of immune cells, but an active participant in the establishment of immunosuppressive conditions. It is now well documented that hypoxia, within the TME, affects the functions of immune effectors including natural killer (NK cells by multiple overlapping mechanisms. Indeed, each cell in the TME, irrespective of its transformation status, has the capacity to adapt to the hostile TME and produce immune modulatory signals or mediators affecting the function of immune cells either directly or through the stimulation of other cells present in the tumor site. This observation has led to intense research efforts focused mainly on tumor-derived factors. Notably, it has become increasingly clear that tumor cells secrete a number of environmental factors such as cytokines, growth factors, exosomes, and microRNAs impacting the immune cell response. Moreover, tumor cells in hostile microenvironments may activate their own intrinsic resistance mechanisms, such as autophagy, to escape the effective immune response. Such adaptive mechanisms may also include the ability of tumor cells to modify their metabolism and release several metabolites to impair the function of immune cells. In this review, we summarize the different mechanisms involved in the TME that affect the anti-tumor immune function of NK cells.

  11. Endocytosis Pathways of the Folate Tethered Star-Shaped PEG-PCL Micelles in Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lun Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on the cellular uptake of folate tethered micelles using a branched skeleton of poly(ethylene glycol and poly(ε-caprolactone. The chemical structures of the copolymers were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Doxorubicin (DOX was utilized as an anticancer drug. The highest drug loading efficiencies of DOX in the folate decorated micelle (DMCF and folate-free micelle (DMC were found to be 88.5% and 88.2%, respectively, depending on the segment length of the poly(ε-caprolactone in the copolymers. A comparison of fluorescent microscopic images of the endocytosis pathway in two cell lines, human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and human oral cavity carcinoma cells (KB, revealed that the micelles were engulfed by KB and MCF-7 cells following in vitro incubation for one hour. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that free folic acid can inhibit the uptake of DOX by 48%–57% and 26%–39% in KB cells and MCF-7 cells, respectively. These results prove that KB cells are relatively sensitive to folate-tethered micelles. Upon administering methyl-β-cyclodextrin, an inhibitor of the caveolae-mediated endocytosis pathway, the uptake of DOX by KB cells was reduced by 69% and that by MCF-7 cells was reduced by 56%. This finding suggests that DMCF enters cells via multiple pathways, thus implying that the folate receptor is not the only target of tumor therapeutics.

  12. Surface shape memory in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    Many crosslinked polymers exhibit a shape memory effect wherein a permanent shape can be prescribed during crosslinking and arbitrary temporary shapes may be set through network chain immobilization. Researchers have extensively investigated such shape memory polymers in bulk form (bars, films, foams), revealing a multitude of approaches. Applications abound for such materials and a significant fraction of the studies in this area concern application-specific characterization. Recently, we have turned our attention to surface shape memory in polymers as a means to miniaturization of the effect, largely motivated to study the interaction of biological cells with shape memory polymers. In this presentation, attention will be given to several approaches we have taken to prepare and study surface shape memory phenomenon. First, a reversible embossing study involving a glassy, crosslinked shape memory material will be presented. Here, the permanent shape was flat while the temporary state consisted of embossed parallel groves. Further the fixing mechanism was vitrification, with Tg adjusted to accommodate experiments with cells. We observed that the orientation and spreading of adherent cells could be triggered to change by the topographical switch from grooved to flat. Second, a functionally graded shape memory polymer will be presented, the grading being a variation in glass transition temperature in one direction along the length of films. Characterization of the shape fixing and recovery of such films utilized an indentation technique that, along with polarizing microscopy, allowed visualization of stress distribution in proximity to the indentations. Finally, very recent research concerning shape memory induced wrinkle formation on polymer surfaces will be presented. A transformation from smooth to wrinkled surfaces at physiological temperatures has been observed to have a dramatic effect on the behavior of adherent cells. A look to the future in research and

  13. Osteochondral Regeneration: Tuning Cell Differentiation into a 3D Scaffold Presenting a Pore Shape Gradient for Osteochondral Regeneration (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 14/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Luca, Andrea; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Mota, Carlos; Lepedda, Antonio; Auhl, Dietmar; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    A combination of human mesenchymal stem cells with additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of scaffolds with instructive properties is presented by Lorenzo Moroni and co-workers on page 1753. This new fiber deposition pattern allows the generation of pores of different shapes within the same construct. The most rhomboidal pore geometry sustained enhances alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic related genes expression with respect to the other gradient zones when the gradient scaffold is cultured in a medium supporting both osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. This may contribute to enhance osteochondral regeneration in orthopedic treatments. PMID:27436107

  14. Enhanced Efficiency of GaAs Single-Junction Solar Cells with Inverted-Cone-Shaped Nanoholes Fabricated Using Anodic Aluminum Oxide Masks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangho Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The GaAs solar cells are grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LP-MOCVD and fabricated by photolithography, metal evaporation, annealing, and wet chemical etch processes. Anodized aluminum oxide (AAO masks are prepared from an aluminum foil by a two-step anodization method. Inductively coupled plasma dry etching is used to etch and define the nanoarray structures on top of an InGaP window layer of the GaAs solar cells. The inverted-cone-shaped nanoholes with a surface diameter of about 50 nm are formed on the top surface of the solar cells after the AAO mask removal. Photovoltaic and optical characteristics of the GaAs solar cells with and without the nanohole arrays are investigated. The reflectance of the AAO nanopatterned samples is lower than that of the planar GaAs solar cell in the measured range. The short-circuit current density increased up to 11.63% and the conversion efficiency improved from 10.53 to 11.57% under 1-sun AM 1.5 G conditions by using the nanohole arrays. Dependence of the efficiency enhancement on the etching depth of the nanohole arrays is also investigated. These results show that the nanohole arrays fabricated with an AAO technique may be employed to improve the light absorption and, in turn, the conversion efficiency of the GaAs solar cell.

  15. MyD88 Shapes Vaccine Immunity by Extrinsically Regulating Survival of CD4+ T Cells during the Contraction Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huafeng; Li, Mengyi; Hung, Chiung Yu; Sinha, Meenal; Lee, Linda M; Wiesner, Darin L; LeBert, Vanessa; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Galles, Kevin; Suresh, Marulasiddappa; DeFranco, Anthony L; Lowell, Clifford A; Klein, Bruce S; Wüthrich, Marcel

    2016-08-01

    Soaring rates of systemic fungal infections worldwide underscore the need for vaccine prevention. An understanding of the elements that promote vaccine immunity is essential. We previously reported that Th17 cells are required for vaccine immunity to the systemic dimorphic fungi of North America, and that Card9 and MyD88 signaling are required for the development of protective Th17 cells. Herein, we investigated where, when and how MyD88 regulates T cell development. We uncovered a novel mechanism in which MyD88 extrinsically regulates the survival of activated T cells during the contraction phase and in the absence of inflammation, but is dispensable for the expansion and differentiation of the cells. The poor survival of activated T cells in Myd88-/- mice is linked to increased caspase3-mediated apoptosis, but not to Fas- or Bim-dependent apoptotic pathways, nor to reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Moreover, TLR3, 7, and/or 9, but not TLR2 or 4, also were required extrinsically for MyD88-dependent Th17 cell responses and vaccine immunity. Similar MyD88 requirements governed the survival of virus primed T cells. Our data identify unappreciated new requirements for eliciting adaptive immunity and have implications for designing vaccines. PMID:27542117

  16. Hair cell-type dependent expression of basolateral ion channels shapes response dynamics in the frog utricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eVenturino

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of vestibular afferent responses are thought to be strongly influenced by presynaptic properties. In this paper, by performing whole-cell perforated-patch experiments in the frog utricle, we characterized voltage-dependent currents and voltage responses to current steps and 0.3-100 Hz sinusoids. Current expression and voltage responses are strongly related to hair cell type. In particular, voltage responses of extrastriolar type eB (low pass, -3 dB corner at 52.512.8 Hz and striolar type F cells (resonant, tuned at 6046 Hz agree with the dynamics (tonic and phasic, respectively of the afferent fibers they contact. On the other hand, hair cell release (measured with single-sine membrane Cm measurements was linearly related to Ca in both cell types, and therefore did not appear to contribute to dynamics differences. As a tool for quantifying the relative contribution of basolateral currents and other presynaptic factors to afferent dynamics, the recorded current, voltage and release data were used to build a NEURON model of the average extrastriolar type eB and striolar type F hair cell. The model contained all recorded conductances, a basic mechanosensitive hair bundle and a ribbon synapse sustained by stochastic voltage-dependent Ca channels, and could reproduce the recorded hair cell voltage responses. Simulated release obtained from eB-type and F-type models display significant differences in dynamics, supporting the idea that basolateral currents are able to contribute to afferent dynamics; however, release in type eB and F cell models does not reproduce tonic and phasic dynamics, mainly because of an excessive phase lag present in both cell types. This suggests the presence in vestibular hair cells of an additional, phase-advancing mechanism, in cascade with voltage modulation.

  17. B7-H1 shapes T-cell–mediated brain endothelial cell dysfunction and regional encephalitogenicity in spontaneous CNS autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Luisa; Kuzmanov, Ivan; Hucke, Stephanie; Gross, Catharina C.; Posevitz, Vilmos; Dreykluft, Angela; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Janoschka, Claudia; Lindner, Maren; Herold, Martin; Schwab, Nicholas; Ludwig-Portugall, Isis; Kurts, Christian; Meuth, Sven G.; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms that determine lesion localization or phenotype variation in multiple sclerosis are mostly unidentified. Although transmigration of activated encephalitogenic T cells across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a crucial step in the disease pathogenesis of CNS autoimmunity, the consequences on brain endothelial barrier integrity upon interaction with such T cells and subsequent lesion formation and distribution are largely unknown. We made use of a transgenic spontaneous mouse model of CNS autoimmunity characterized by inflammatory demyelinating lesions confined to optic nerves and spinal cord (OSE mice). Genetic ablation of a single immune-regulatory molecule in this model [i.e., B7-homolog 1 (B7-H1, PD-L1)] not only significantly increased incidence of spontaneous CNS autoimmunity and aggravated disease course, especially in the later stages of disease, but also importantly resulted in encephalitogenic T-cell infiltration and lesion formation in normally unaffected brain regions, such as the cerebrum and cerebellum. Interestingly, B7-H1 ablation on myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific CD4+ T cells, but not on antigen-presenting cells, amplified T-cell effector functions, such as IFN-γ and granzyme B production. Therefore, these T cells were rendered more capable of eliciting cell contact-dependent brain endothelial cell dysfunction and increased barrier permeability in an in vitro model of the BBB. Our findings suggest that a single immune-regulatory molecule on T cells can be ultimately responsible for localized BBB breakdown, and thus substantial changes in lesion topography in the context of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27671636

  18. The effect of hair bundle shape on hair bundle hydrodynamics of non-mammalian inner ear hair cells for the full frequency range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatz, Lisa F

    2004-09-01

    The effect of the size and the shape of the hair bundle of a hair cell in the inner ear of non-mammals on its motion for the full range of frequencies is determined thereby extending the results of a previous analysis of hair bundle motion for high and low frequencies [Hear Res. 141 (2000) 39-50]. A hemispheroid is used to represent the hair bundle because it can represent a full range of shapes, from thin, pencil-like shapes to wide, flat, disk-like shapes. Boundary element methods are used to approximate the solution for the hydrodynamics. For physiologically relevant parameters, an excellent match is obtained between the model's predictions and measurements of hair bundle motion in the free-standing region of the basilar papilla of the alligator lizard [Aranyosi, Measuring sound-induced motions of the alligator lizard cochlea. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, PhD Thesis, 2002]. Neither in the model's predictions nor in experimental measurements is sharp tuning observed. The model predicted the low frequency region of neural tuning curves for the alligator lizard and bobtail lizard, but could not predict the sharp tuning or the high frequency region. An element that represents an active mechanism is added to the hair bundle model to predict neural tuning curves, which are sharply tuned, and an excellent match is obtained for all the characteristics of neural tuning curves for the alligator lizard, and for the low and high frequency regions for the bobtail lizard. The model does not predict well the sharp tuning of the shorter hair bundles of the bobtail lizard, possibly because it does not represent tectorial sallets.

  19. Novel design of a disk-shaped compacted micro-structured air-breathing PEM fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of microelectromechanical system (MEMS technology makes it possible to manufacture the miniaturized fuel cell systems for application in portable electronic devices. The majority of research on micro-scale fuel cells is aimed at micro-power applications. There are many new miniaturized applications which can only be realized if a higher energy density power source is available compared to button cells and other small batteries. In small-scale applications, the fuel cell should be exceptionally small and have highest energy density. One way to achieve these requirements is to reduce the thickness of the cell (compacted-design for increasing the volumetric power density of a fuel cell power supply. A novel, simple to construct, air-breathing micro-structured PEM fuel cell which work in still or slowly moving air has been developed. The novel geometry enables optimum air access to the cathode without the need for pumps, fans or similar devices. In addition, the new design can achieve much higher active area to volume ratios, and hence higher volumetric power densities. Three-dimensional, multi-phase, non-isothermal CFD model of this novel design has been developed. This comprehensive model account for the major transport phenomena in an air-breathing micro-structured PEM fuel cell: convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer, electrode kinetics, transport and phase-change mechanism of water, and potential fields. The model is shown to understand the many interacting, complex electrochemical, and transport phenomena that cannot be studied experimentally. Fully three-dimensional results of the species profiles, temperature distribution, potential distribution, and local current density distribution are presented and analyzed with a focus on the physical insight and fundamental understanding. They can provide a solid basis for optimizing the geometry of the PEM micro fuel cell stack running with a passive mode.

  20. Evaluation of sentinel lymph node size and shape as a predictor of occult metastasis in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhans, Linnea; Bilde, Anders; Charabi, Birgitte;

    2013-01-01

    node axis lengths were compared with the histopathological results. Data were analysed using Microsoft Excel 2008 for Mac, version 12.0. A total of 167 sentinel nodes was excised with a median of 3.3 per patient. Following SNB 18% of the patients was upstaged at the subsequent histopathological......The aim of the study was to evaluate sentinel lymph node size as a predictor of metastasis in N0 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma treated by individual sentinel node biopsy (SNB) guided neck dissection. In addition, to evaluate lymph node shape as an indicator of malignancy....... A retrospective study based on data from 50 patients with clinically N0 neck and oral squamous cell carcinoma stage T1-2N0M0, SNB and consecutive neck dissection was performed. Excised sentinel nodes were measured in three axes by the surgeons before undergoing histopathological examination. Measured sentinel...

  1. Quantitative analysis of nuclear shape in oral squamous cell carcinoma is useful for predicting the chemotherapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Maki; Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Miyashita, Hitoshi; Kumamoto, Hiroyuki; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    The number of people afflicted with oral carcinoma in Japan has increased in recent years. Although preoperative neoadjuvant therapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil are performed, chemotherapeutic response varies widely among the patients. With the aim of establishing novel indices to predict the therapeutic response to chemotherapy, we investigated the relationship between morphological features of pre-treatment oral carcinoma nuclei and the chemotherapeutic response using quantifying morphology of cell nuclei in pathological specimen images. We measured 4 morphological features of the nucleus of oral squamous cell carcinoma cases classified by the response to chemotherapy: No Change (NC) group, Partial Response (PR) group and Complete Response (CR) group. Furthermore, we performed immunohistochemical staining for p53 and Ki67 and calculated their positive rates in cancer tissues. Compactness and symmetry of the nucleus were significantly higher and nuclear edge response was significantly lower in cancer cells with lower chemotherapeutic responses compared high chemotherapeutic responders. As for positive rates of p53 and Ki67, there were no significant differences between any of the response groups. Morphological features of cancer cell nuclei in pathological specimens are sensitive predictive factors for the chemotherapeutic response to oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  2. BacM, an N-terminally processed bactofilin of Myxococcus xanthus, is crucial for proper cell shape

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Matthias K.; McHugh, Colleen A; Hoiczyk, Egbert

    2011-01-01

    Bactofilins are fibre-forming bacterial cytoskeletal proteins. Here, we report the structural and biochemical characterization of MXAN_7475 (BacM), one of the four bactofilins of Myxococcus xanthus. Absence of BacM leads to a characteristic ‘crooked’ cell morphology and an increased sensitivity to antibiotics targeting cell wall biosynthesis. The absence of the other three bactofilins MXAN_4637–4635 (BacN-P) has no obvious phenotype. In M. xanthus, BacM exists as a 150-amino-acid full-length ...

  3. In vitro osteoblast-like cell proliferation on nano-hydroxyapatite coatings with different morphologies on a titanium-niobium shape memory alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jianyu; Li, Yuncang; Hodgson, Peter D; Wen, Cui'e

    2010-12-01

    The morphology of nanomaterials significantly affects their physical, chemical, and biological properties. In the present study, nano-hydroxyapatite coatings with different morphologies were produced on the surface of a titanium-niobium shape memory alloy via a hydrothermal process. The effect of the nano-hydroxyapatite coatings on the in vitro proliferation of SaOS-2 osteoblast-like cells was investigated. Factors including crystallinity, surface micro-roughness, and surface energy of the nano-hydroxyapatite coatings were discussed. Results show that in vitro proliferation of the osteoblast-like cells was significantly enhanced on the nano-hydroxyapatite-coated titanium-niobium alloy compared to the titanium-niobium alloy without coating. The cell numbers on the nano-hydroxyapatite-coated titanium-niobium alloy changed consistently with the surface energy of the hydroxyapatite coatings. This study suggests that surface energy as a characteristic parameter influencing the in vitro proliferation of osteoblast-like cells was predominant over the crystallinity and surface micro-roughness of the nano-hydroxyapatite coatings. PMID:20725978

  4. Bacterial mitosis: partitioning protein ParA oscillates in spiral-shaped structures and positions plasmids at mid-cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2004-01-01

    The par2 locus of Escherichia coli plasmid pB171 encodes oscillating ATPase ParA, DNA binding protein ParB and two cis-acting DNA regions to which ParB binds (parC1 and parC2). Three independent techniques were used to investigate the subcellular localization of plasmids carrying par2. In cells w...

  5. Myosin VIIa, harmonin and cadherin 23, three Usher I gene products that cooperate to shape the sensory hair cell bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boëda, Batiste; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Bahloul, Amel; Goodyear, Richard; Daviet, Laurent; Blanchard, Stéphane; Perfettini, Isabelle; Fath, Karl R; Shorte, Spencer; Reiners, Jan; Houdusse, Anne; Legrain, Pierre; Wolfrum, Uwe; Richardson, Guy; Petit, Christine

    2002-12-16

    Deaf-blindness in three distinct genetic forms of Usher type I syndrome (USH1) is caused by defects in myosin VIIa, harmonin and cadherin 23. Despite being critical for hearing, the functions of these proteins in the inner ear remain elusive. Here we show that harmonin, a PDZ domain-containing protein, and cadherin 23 are both present in the growing stereocilia and that they bind to each other. Moreover, we demonstrate that harmonin b is an F-actin-bundling protein, which is thus likely to anchor cadherin 23 to the stereocilia microfilaments, thereby identifying a novel anchorage mode of the cadherins to the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, harmonin b interacts directly with myosin VIIa, and is absent from the disorganized hair bundles of myosin VIIa mutant mice, suggesting that myosin VIIa conveys harmonin b along the actin core of the developing stereocilia. We propose that the shaping of the hair bundle relies on a functional unit composed of myosin VIIa, harmonin b and cadherin 23 that is essential to ensure the cohesion of the stereocilia.

  6. A thermo-stabilized flow cell for surface plasmon resonance sensors in D-shaped plastic optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, N.; Chiavaioli, F.; Trono, C.; Tombelli, S.; Giannetti, A.; Baldini, F.; Zeni, L.

    2016-05-01

    The first example of an optical sensor platform based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a plastic optical fiber (POF) integrated into a thermo-stabilized flow cell for biochemical sensing applications is proposed. In this work, an IgG/anti-IgG assay was implemented as model bioassay, with the IgG biolayer deposited on the sensor gold surface and the biological target, anti-IgG, transported through a new thermo-stabilized flow cell. The experimental results show that the proposed device can be successfully used for label-free biochemical sensing. This complete optical sensor system can be used for the future reduction of the device cost and dimension, with the possibility of integrating the POF-SPR sensing platform with microfluidic and optoelectronic devices.

  7. Interface-designed Membranes with Shape-controlled Patterns for High-performance Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yukwon Jeon; Dong Jun Kim; Jong Kwan Koh; Yunseong Ji; Jong Hak Kim; Yong-Gun Shul

    2015-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell is a promising zero-emission power generator for stationary/automotive applications. However, key issues, such as performance and costs, are still remained for an economical commercialization. Here, we fabricated a high-performance membrane electrode assembly (MEA) using an interfacial design based on well-arrayed micro-patterned membranes including circles, squares and hexagons with different sizes, which are produced by a facile elastomeric mold method...

  8. Cytoskeletal and Focal Adhesion Influences on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Shape, Mechanical Properties, and Differentiation Down Osteogenic, Adipogenic, and Chondrogenic Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Pattie S.; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great potential for regenerative medicine and tissue-engineering applications. They have multipotent differentiation capabilities and have been shown to differentiate down various lineages, including osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, myocytes, and possibly neurons. The majority of approaches to control the MSC fate have been via the use of chemical factors in the form of growth factors within the culture medium. More recently, it has been understood tha...

  9. Shaping T Cell – B Cell Collaboration in the Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Glycoprotein gp120 by Peptide Priming

    OpenAIRE

    N Kalaya Steede; Rust, Blake J.; Hossain, Mohammad M.; Freytag, Lucy C.; Robinson, James E.; Landry, Samuel J.

    2013-01-01

    Prime-boost vaccination regimes have shown promise for obtaining protective immunity to HIV. Poorly understood mechanisms of cellular immunity could be responsible for improved humoral responses. Although CD4+ T-cell help promotes B-cell development, the relationship of CD4+ T-cell specificity to antibody specificity has not been systematically investigated. Here, protein and peptide-specific immune responses to HIV-1 gp120 were characterized in groups of ten mucosally immunized BALB/c mice. ...

  10. Evolution of stalk/spore ratio in a social amoeba: cell-to-cell interaction via a signaling chemical shaped by cheating risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchinomiya, Kouki; Iwasa, Yoh

    2013-11-01

    The social amoeba (or cellular slime mold) is a model system for cell cooperation. When food is depleted in the environment, cells aggregate together. Some of these cells become stalks, raising spores to aid in their dispersal. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) is a signaling chemical produced by prespore cells and decomposed by prestalk cells. It affects the rate of switching between prestalk and prespore cells, thereby achieving a stable stalk/spore ratio. In this study we analyzed the evolution of the stalk/spore ratio. Strains may differ in the production and decomposition rates of the signaling chemical, and in the sensitivity of cells to switch in response to the signaling chemical exposure. When two strains with the same stalk/spore ratio within their own fruiting body are combined into a single fruiting body, one strain may develop into prespores to a greater degree than the other. Direct evolutionary simulations and quantitative genetic dynamics demonstrate that if a fruiting body is always formed by a single strain, the cells evolve to produce less signaling chemical and become more sensitive to the signaling chemical due to the cost of producing the chemical. In contrast, if a fruiting body is formed by multiple strains, the cells evolve to become less sensitive to the signaling chemical and produce more signaling chemical in order to reduce the risk of being exploited. In contrast, the stalk-spore ratio is less likely to be affected by small cheating risk.

  11. Evolution of stalk/spore ratio in a social amoeba: cell-to-cell interaction via a signaling chemical shaped by cheating risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchinomiya, Kouki; Iwasa, Yoh

    2013-11-01

    The social amoeba (or cellular slime mold) is a model system for cell cooperation. When food is depleted in the environment, cells aggregate together. Some of these cells become stalks, raising spores to aid in their dispersal. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) is a signaling chemical produced by prespore cells and decomposed by prestalk cells. It affects the rate of switching between prestalk and prespore cells, thereby achieving a stable stalk/spore ratio. In this study we analyzed the evolution of the stalk/spore ratio. Strains may differ in the production and decomposition rates of the signaling chemical, and in the sensitivity of cells to switch in response to the signaling chemical exposure. When two strains with the same stalk/spore ratio within their own fruiting body are combined into a single fruiting body, one strain may develop into prespores to a greater degree than the other. Direct evolutionary simulations and quantitative genetic dynamics demonstrate that if a fruiting body is always formed by a single strain, the cells evolve to produce less signaling chemical and become more sensitive to the signaling chemical due to the cost of producing the chemical. In contrast, if a fruiting body is formed by multiple strains, the cells evolve to become less sensitive to the signaling chemical and produce more signaling chemical in order to reduce the risk of being exploited. In contrast, the stalk-spore ratio is less likely to be affected by small cheating risk. PMID:23911583

  12. One-step process for the synthesis and deposition of anatase, two-dimensional, disk-shaped TiO₂ for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Soo; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lim, Jung Yup; Kim, Jong Hak

    2014-12-10

    We report a one-step process for the synthesis and deposition of anatase, two-dimensional (2D), disk-shaped TiO2 (DS-TiO2) using titanium isopropoxide (TTIP), ethyl cellulose (EC), and solvents. The planar structure of EC plays a pivotal role as the sacrificing template to generate the 2D disk-shaped structure with a thickness of 1.5-3.5 μm, while a disk-like structure was well developed in the tetrahydrofuran (THF)/toluene mixed solvent. The quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (qssDSSCs), fabricated with a nanogel electrolyte and a DS-TiO2 layer on a nanocrystalline (NC)-TiO2 photoanode, showed an energy conversion efficiency of 5.0% without any TiCl4 post-treatment, which is higher than that fabricated without DS-TiO2 (4.2%). When utilizing a poly((1-(4-ethenylphenyl)methyl)-3-butyl-imidazolium iodide) (PEBII) as the solid electrolyte, a high efficiency of 6.6% was achieved due to the combination of high mobility PEBII and a bifunctional DS-TiO2 layer with a 2D structure and anatase phase. The bifunctionality of the DS-TiO2 layer allows greater light scattering back into the device and provides additional surface area for improved dye adsorption, resulting in short circuit current density (Jsc). PMID:25397581

  13. A CFD study of hygro-thermal stresses distribution in tubular-shaped ambient air-breathing PEM micro fuel cell during regular cell operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for improved lifetime of air-breathing proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cells for portable applications necessitates that the failure mechanisms be clearly understood and life prediction models be developed, so that new designs can be introduced to improve long-term performance. An operating air-breathing PEM fuel cell has varying local conditions of temperature, humidity. As a result of in the changes in temperature and moisture, the membrane, GDL and bipolar plates will all experience expansion and contraction. Because of the different thermal expansion and swelling coefficients between these materials, hygro-thermal stresses are introduced into the unit cell during operation. In addition, the non-uniform current and reactant flow distributions in the cell result in non-uniform temperature and moisture content of the cell which could in turn, potentially causing localized increases in the stress magnitudes, and this leads to mechanical damage, which can appear as through-the-thickness flaws or pinholes in the membrane, or delaminating between the polymer membrane and gas diffusion layers. Therefore, in order to acquire a complete understanding of these damage mechanisms in the membranes and gas diffusion layers, mechanical response under steady-state hygro-thermal stresses should be studied under real cell operation conditions. A three-dimensional, multi–phase, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a novel, tubular, ambient air-breathing, proton exchange membrane micro fuel cell has been developed and used to investigate the displacement, deformation, and stresses inside the whole cell, which developed during the cell operation due to the changes of temperature and relative humidity. The behaviour of the fuel cell during operation has been studied and investigated under real cell operating conditions. In addition to the new and complex geometry, a unique feature of the present model is to incorporate the effect of

  14. Self-Targeted, Shape-Assisted, and Controlled-Release Self-Delivery Nanodrug for Synergistic Targeting/Anticancer Effect of Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Huang, Yu; Li, Yanxiu; Yang, Xiangrui; Wu, Hongjie; Wu, Shichao; Xie, Liya; Dai, Lizong; Hou, Zhenqing

    2015-11-25

    We constructed 10-hydroxycamptothecin (CPT) "nanodrugs" with functionalization of lipid-PEG-methotrexate (MTX) to prepare high-drug-loaded, and sustained/controlled-release MTX-PEG-CPT nanorods (NRs), in which MTX drug itself can serve as a specific "targeting ligand". The self-targeted nanodrug can codeliver both CPT and MTX drugs with distinct anticancer mechanisms. Furthermore, MTX-PEG-CPT NRs significantly reduced burst release, improved blood circulation and tumor accumulation, enhanced cellular uptake, and synergistically increased anticancer effect against tumor cells compared with MTX-PEG-CPT nanospheres (NSs) and either both free drugs or individual free drug. Therefore, the synergistic targeting/therapeuticy nano-multi-drug codelivery assisted by shape design may advantageously offer a promising new strategy for nanomedicine. PMID:26529185

  15. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E;

    2014-01-01

    ) clonotypes within individual HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations was also apparent, independent of clonal dominance hierarchies. Positive correlations were detected between PD-1 expression and plasma viral load, which were reinforced by stratification for epitope sequence stability and dictated...... by effector memory CD8+ T cells. CONCLUSION: Collectively, these data suggest that PD-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells tracks antigen load at the level of epitope specificity and TCR clonotype usage. These findings are important because they provide evidence that PD-1 expression levels......OBJECTIVES: Although CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the control of HIV-1 infection,their antiviral efficacy can be limited by antigenic variation and immune exhaustion.The latter phenomenon is characterized by the upregulation of multiple inhibitory receptors, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1...

  16. Interface-designed Membranes with Shape-controlled Patterns for High-performance Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yukwon; Kim, Dong Jun; Koh, Jong Kwan; Ji, Yunseong; Kim, Jong Hak; Shul, Yong-Gun

    2015-11-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell is a promising zero-emission power generator for stationary/automotive applications. However, key issues, such as performance and costs, are still remained for an economical commercialization. Here, we fabricated a high-performance membrane electrode assembly (MEA) using an interfacial design based on well-arrayed micro-patterned membranes including circles, squares and hexagons with different sizes, which are produced by a facile elastomeric mold method. The best MEA performance is achieved using patterned Nafion membrane with a circle 2 μm in size, which exhibited a very high power density of 1906 mW/cm2 at 75 °C and Pt loading of 0.4 mg/cm2 with 73% improvement compared to the commercial membrane. The improved performance are attributed to the decreased MEA resistances and increased surface area for higher Pt utilization of over 80%. From these enhanced properties, it is possible to operate at lower Pt loading of 0.2 mg/cm2 with an outstanding performance of 1555 mW/cm2 and even at air/low humidity operations.

  17. Synthesis of Octahedral-Shaped NiO and Approaches to an Anode Material of Manufactured Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Using the Decalcomania Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haeran Cho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Micrometer-sized and octahedral-shaped NiO particles were synthesized by microwave thermal treatment at 300 watt power for 15 min in a microwave chamber to be used as an anode material in solid oxide fuel cells. SEM image and particle size distribution revealed near-perfect octahedral NiO microparticle with sizes ranging from 4.0~11.0 μm. The anode functional layer (AFL, 60 wt% NiO synthesized: commercial 40 wt% YSZ, electrolyte (commercial Yttria-stabilized zirconia, YSZ, and cathode (commercial La0.8Sr0.2MnO3, LSM layers were manufactured using the decalcomania method on a porous anode support, sequentially. The sintered electrolyte at 1450°C for 2 h using the decalcomania method was dense and had a thickness of about 10 μm. The cathode was sintered at 1250°C for 2 h, and it was porous. Using humidified hydrogen as a fuel, a coin cell with a 15 μm thick anode functional layer exhibited maximum power densities of 0.28, 0.38, and 0.65 W/cm2 at 700, 750, and 800°C, respectively. Otherwise, when a commercial YSZ anode functional layer was used, the maximum power density was 0.55 W/cm2 at 800°C.

  18. Shape of optimal active flagella

    CERN Document Server

    Eloy, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells use the active waving motion of flexible flagella to self-propel in viscous fluids. However, the criteria governing the selection of particular flagellar waveforms among all possible shapes has proved elusive so far. To address this question, we derive computationally the optimal shape of an internally-forced periodic planar flagellum deforming as a travelling wave. The optimum is here defined as the shape leading to a given swimming speed with minimum energetic cost. To calculate the energetic cost though, we consider the irreversible internal power expanded by the molecular motors forcing the flagellum, only a portion of which ending up dissipated in the fluid. This optimisation approach allows us to derive a family of shapes depending on a single dimensionless number quantifying the relative importance of elastic to viscous effects: the Sperm number. The computed optimal shapes are found to agree with the waveforms observed on spermatozoon of marine organisms, thus suggesting that the...

  19. Effects of Chrysobalanus icaco on the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m and on the shape of the red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presta, Giuseppe Antonio; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Paoli, Severo de; Giani, Tania Santos; Maiworm, Adalgisa Ieda; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Medeiros, Aldo da Cunha [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude. Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias da Saude]. E-mail: giuseppenadia@uol.com.br; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria

    2007-09-15

    Chrysobalanus icaco (abajeru; C.icaco) is recommended in the treatment of diabetes and other clinical disorders. Blood constituents labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc) are used in nuclear medicine. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of an abajeru extract on the labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc and on the shape of red blood cells (RBC). Blood samples(Wistar rats) were incubated with abajeru extract and the labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc and morphology of RBC were carried out. The results showed significant (P<0.05) alteration of labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc and the morphometry (perimeter/area ratio) of the RBC in presence of the extract. These data suggest that this abajeru extract could alter the labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc by its chelating/antioxidant action and/or effects on membrane structures involved in the ion transport. (author)

  20. Shape-memory polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Behl

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Shape-memory polymers are an emerging class of active polymers that have dual-shape capability. They can change their shape in a predefined way from shape A to shape B when exposed to an appropriate stimulus. While shape B is given by the initial processing step, shape A is determined by applying a process called programming. We review fundamental aspects of the molecular design of suitable polymer architectures, tailored programming and recovery processes, and the quantification of the shape-memory effect. Shape-memory research was initially founded on the thermally induced dual-shape effect. This concept has been extended to other stimuli by either indirect thermal actuation or direct actuation by addressing stimuli-sensitive groups on the molecular level. Finally, polymers are introduced that can be multifunctional. Besides their dual-shape capability, these active materials are biofunctional or biodegradable. Potential applications for such materials as active medical devices are highlighted.

  1. On-chip constructive cell-network study (II: on-chip quasi-in vivo cardiac toxicity assay for ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation measurement using ring-shaped closed circuit microelectrode with lined-up cardiomyocyte cell network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuda Kenji

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds Conventional in vitro approach using human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG assay has been considered worldwide as the first screening assay for cardiac repolarization safety. However, it does not always oredict the potential QT prolongation risk or pro-arrhythmic risk correctly. For adaptable preclinical strategiesto evaluate global cardiac safety, an on-chip quasi-in vivo cardiac toxicity assay for lethal arrhythmia (ventricular tachyarrhythmia measurement using ring-shaped closed circuit microelectrode chip has been developed. Results The ventricular electrocardiogram (ECG-like field potential data, which includes both the repolarization and the conductance abnormality, was acquired from the self-convolutied extracellular field potentials (FPs of a lined-up cardiomyocyte network on a circle-shaped microelectrode in an agarose microchamber. When Astemisol applied to the closed-loop cardiomyocyte network, self-convoluted FP profile of normal beating changed into an early afterdepolarization (EAD like waveform, and then showed ventricular tachyarrhythmias and ventricular fibrilations (VT/Vf. QT-prolongation-like self-convoluted FP duration prolongation and its fluctuation increase was also observed according to the increase of Astemizole concentration. Conclusions The results indicate that the convoluted FPs of the quasi-in vivo cell network assay includes both of the repolarization data and the conductance abnormality of cardiomyocyte networks has the strong potential to prediction lethal arrhythmia.

  2. Reinforced Airfoil Shaped Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to an airfoil shaped body with a leading edge and a trailing edge extending along the longitudinal extension of the body and defining a profile chord, the airfoil shaped body comprising an airfoil shaped facing that forms the outer surface of the airfoil shaped body...

  3. Shape memory polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  4. Cationic star-shaped polymer as an siRNA carrier for reducing MMP-9 expression in skin fibroblast cells and promoting wound healing in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li N

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Na Li,1,* Heng-Cong Luo,1,* Chuan Yang,1 Jun-Jie Deng,2 Meng Ren,1 Xiao-Ying Xie,1 Diao-Zhu Lin,1 Li Yan,1 Li-Ming Zhang2 1Department of Endocrinology, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2DSAPM Lab and PCFM Lab, Institute of Polymer Science, Department of Polymer and Materials Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Excessive expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 is deleterious to the cutaneous wound-healing process in the context of diabetes. The aim of the present study was to explore whether a cationic star-shaped polymer consisting of ß-cyclodextrin (ß-CD core and poly(amidoamine dendron arms (ß-CD-[D3]7 could be used as the gene carrier of small interfering RNA (siRNA to reduce MMP-9 expression for enhanced diabetic wound healing. Methods: The cytotoxicity of ß-CD-(D37 was investigated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (MMT method in the rat CRL1213 skin fibroblast cell line. The transfection efficiency of ß-CD-(D37/MMP-9-small interfering RNA (siRNA complexes was determined by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Quantitative real time (RT polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure the gene expression of MMP-9 after the transfection by ß-CD-(D37/MMP-9-siRNA complexes. The ß-CD-(D37/MMP-9-siRNA complexes were injected on the wounds of streptozocin-induced diabetic rats. Wound closure was measured on days 4 and 7 post-wounding. Results: ß-CD-(D37 exhibited low cytotoxicity in fibroblast cells, and easily formed the complexes with MMP-9-siRNA. The ß-CD-(D37/MMP-9-siRNA complexes were readily taken up by fibroblast cells, resulting in the downregulation of MMP-9 gene expression (P<0.01. Animal experiments revealed that the treatment by ß-CD-(D37/MMP-9-siRNA complexes enhanced wound

  5. Evaluation of granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, CaF sub 2 :Eu and ZnS:Ag for alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination in a flow-cell radiation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Devol, T A; Fjeld, R A

    1999-01-01

    Granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, and CaF sub 2 :Eu; CaF sub 2 :Eu coated with a fluorescent polymer, and combinations of coated and uncoated CaF sub 2 :Eu with ZnS:Ag were evaluated for their ability to discriminate between alpha and beta particles in a flow-cell radiation detector. The evaluations were based on the analysis of pulse shape spectra. Various granulated scintillators were packed into flow cell detectors that were coils of 3.0 mm ODx1.5 mm ID fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon[reg] tubing positioned between dual photomultiplier tubes for analysis. The best pulse shape discrimination was obtained for a combination of equal masses of uncoated CaF sub 2 :Eu (63-90 mu m) and ZnS:Ag (10 mu m), which had a 9% spillover. Additional research is needed to reduce the spillover.

  6. Discriminative Shape Alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loog, M.; de Bruijne, M.

    2009-01-01

    The alignment of shape data to a common mean before its subsequent processing is an ubiquitous step within the area shape analysis. Current approaches to shape analysis or, as more specifically considered in this work, shape classification perform the alignment in a fully unsupervised way......, not taking into account that eventually the shapes are to be assigned to two or more different classes. This work introduces a discriminative variation to well-known Procrustes alignment and demonstrates its benefit over this classical method in shape classification tasks. The focus is on two...

  7. Effects of Chrysobalanus icaco on the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m and on the shape of the red blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Antonio Presta

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Chrysobalanus icaco (abajeru; C.icaco is recommended in the treatment of diabetes and other clinical disorders. Blood constituents labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc are used in nuclear medicine. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of an abajeru extract on the labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc and on the shape of red blood cells (RBC. Blood samples(Wistar rats were incubated with abajeru extract and the labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc and morphology of RBC were carried out. The results showed significant (PChrysobalanus icaco (abajeru; C.icaco é recomendado para tratar diabetes e outras desordens clínicas. Constituintes sangüíneos marcados com tecnécio -99m (99mTc são usados em medicina nuclear. O objetivo desse estudo foi verificar os efeitos de um extrato de abajetu na radiomarcação de constituintes sangüíneos com 99mTc e na forma de células vermelhas do sangue (RBC. Amostras de sangue retiradas de ratos Wistar foram incubadas com extrato de abajeru e a marcação dos constituintes sanguíneos com 99mTc e a morfologia das RBC foram realizadas. Os resultados mostraram alteração significativa (P<0.05 da marcação dos constituintes sangüíneos com 99mTc e a morfometria (relação perímetro/área das RBC na presença do extrato. Esses resultados sugerem que esse extrato de abajeru poderia alterar a marcação de constituintes sangüíneos com 99mTc pela sua ação quelante/antioxidante e/ou seus efeitos nas estruturas de membrana envolvidas no transporte de íons.

  8. Synthesis and shaping of new cathode materials for ITSOFC fuel cell: fabrication and test cells; Synthese et mise en forme de nouveaux materiaux de cathode pour piles ITSOFC: realisation et tests de cellules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalanne, C.

    2005-10-15

    The development of the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells is dependent on the reduction of the cathodic over-potential measured at 600-700 Celsius degrees. In this way, in the last few years, we have made a selection from new cathode materials in the Institute; the oxygen over-stoichiometric oxides formulated A{sub 2}MO{sub 4+{delta}} (K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}-type structure), show enhanced electrocatalytic and oxygen conduction properties. A detailed study has been performed on the compositions Nd{sub 2-x}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} (x = 0 and 0.05): the oxygen reduction is characterised by impedance spectroscopy and voltametry measurements (symmetrical configuration cell under air). Electrochemical analysis carried out under different oxygen partial pressures and various cathodic over-potentials have led us to identify the various contributions of the mechanism of the dioxygen reduction. Using powders with controlled morphology (coming from different synthesis ways) has resulted in a reduction of the electrode polarisation phenomena, which is the limiting step of the process still remaining in the interface cathode / electrolyte ionic transfer. In addition, due to these promising results (low area specific resistances and minimized cathodic over-potentials), the first tests in a complete fuel cell device have been performed. After an optimisation of the shaping parameters, i.e. selection of the suitable coating process and of the sintering thermal cycle, promising current densities of 1,3 A/cm{sup 2}, for 0,7 V have been measured at 800 Celsius degrees, the operating temperature. (author)

  9. Curvature and shape determination of growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2009-12-01

    Bacterial cells come in a variety of shapes, determined by the stress-bearing cell wall. Though many molecular details about the cell wall are known, our understanding of how a particular shape is produced during cell growth is at its infancy. Experiments on curved Escherichia coli grown in microtraps, and on naturally curved Caulobacter crescentus, reveal different modes of growth: one preserving arc length and the other preserving radius of curvature. We present a simple model for curved cell growth that relates these two growth modes to distinct but related growth rules—“hooplike growth” and “self-similar growth”—and discuss the implications for microscopic growth mechanisms.

  10. The Hue of Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertazzi, Liliana; Da Pos, Osvaldo; Canal, Luisa; Micciolo, Rocco; Malfatti, Michela; Vescovi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an experimental study on the naturally biased association between shape and color. For each basic geometric shape studied, participants were asked to indicate the color perceived as most closely related to it, choosing from the Natural Color System Hue Circle. Results show that the choices of color for each shape were not…

  11. Modeling of Asteroid Shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Kokorev, Andrii

    2016-01-01

    In this article we consider different methods of modeling asteroid shapes, especially lightcurve inversion technique, and scattering laws used for it. We also introduce our program, which constructs lightcurves for a given asteroid shape model. It can be used to comparing shape model with observational data.

  12. Fragment oriented molecular shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Ethan; Camacho, Carlos J; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Molecular shape is an important concept in drug design and virtual screening. Shape similarity typically uses either alignment methods, which dynamically optimize molecular poses with respect to the query molecular shape, or feature vector methods, which are computationally less demanding but less accurate. The computational cost of alignment can be reduced by pre-aligning shapes, as is done with the Volumetric-Aligned Molecular Shapes (VAMS) method. Here, we introduce and evaluate fragment oriented molecular shapes (FOMS), where shapes are aligned based on molecular fragments. FOMS enables the use of shape constraints, a novel method for precisely specifying molecular shape queries that provides the ability to perform partial shape matching and supports search algorithms that function on an interactive time scale. When evaluated using the challenging Maximum Unbiased Validation dataset, shape constraints were able to extract significantly enriched subsets of compounds for the majority of targets, and FOMS matched or exceeded the performance of both VAMS and an optimizing alignment method of shape similarity search. PMID:27085751

  13. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells deposited under well controlled ion bombardment using pulse-shaped substrate biasing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wank, M. A.; van Swaaij, R.; R. van de Sanden,; Zeman, M.

    2012-01-01

    We applied pulse-shaped biasing (PSB) to the expanding thermal plasma deposition of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers at substrate temperatures of 200 degrees C and growth rates of about 1?nm/s. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of intrinsic films showed a densification with incr

  14. Shape-changing interfaces:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegård; Pedersen, Esben Warming; Petersen, Marianne Graves;

    2015-01-01

    these shortcomings. We identify eight types of shape that are transformed in various ways to serve both functional and hedonic design purposes. Interaction with shape-changing interfaces is simple and rarely merges input and output. Three questions are discussed based on the review: (a) which design purposes may......Shape change is increasingly used in physical user interfaces, both as input and output. Yet, the progress made and the key research questions for shape-changing interfaces are rarely analyzed systematically. We review a sample of existing work on shape-changing interfaces to address...

  15. Interactive Shape Design

    CERN Document Server

    Cani, Marie-Paule; Wyvill, Geoff

    2008-01-01

    Providing an intuitive modeling system, which would enable us to communicate about any free-form shape we have in mind at least as quickly as with real-world tools, is one of the main challenges of digital shape design. The user should ideally be able to create, deform, and progressively add details to a shape, without being aware of the underlying mathematical representation nor being tied by any constraint on the geometrical or topological nature of the model. This book presents the field of interactive shape design from this perspective. Since interactively creating a shape builds on the hu

  16. Local Solid Shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Koenderink

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution.

  17. Transforming shape in design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats, Miquel; Lim, Sungwoo; Jowers, Iestyn;

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with how design shapes are generated and explored by means of sketching. It presents research into the way designers transform shapes from one state to another using sketch representations. An experimental investigation of the sketching processes of designers is presented....... Connections between sketches are defined in terms of shape transformations and described according to shape rules. These rules provide a formal description of the shape exploration process and develop understanding of the mechanics of sketching in design. The paper concludes by discussing the important...

  18. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  19. General shape optimization capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  20. Multi-scale and angular analysis of ray-optical light trapping schemes in thin-film solar cells: micro lens array, V-shaped configuration, and double parabolic trapper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Changsoon; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2013-03-11

    An efficient light trapping scheme is a key to enhancing the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of thin-film photovoltaic (PV) cells by compensating for the insufficient light absorption. To handle optical components from nano-scale to micro-scale seamlessly, a multi-scale optical simulation is carefully designed in this study and is used to qualitatively analyze the light trapping performances of a micro lens array (MLA), a V-shaped configuration, and the newly proposed scheme, which is termed a double parabolic trapper (DPT) according to both daily and annual movement of the sun. DPT has the potential to enhance the PCE significantly, from 5.9% to 8.9%, for PCDTBT:PC(70)BM-based polymer solar cells by perfectly trapping the incident light between two parabolic PV cells.

  1. Perspectives in shape analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bruckstein, Alfred; Maragos, Petros; Wuhrer, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    This book presents recent advances in the field of shape analysis. Written by experts in the fields of continuous-scale shape analysis, discrete shape analysis and sparsity, and numerical computing who hail from different communities, it provides a unique view of the topic from a broad range of perspectives. Over the last decade, it has become increasingly affordable to digitize shape information at high resolution. Yet analyzing and processing this data remains challenging because of the large amount of data involved, and because modern applications such as human-computer interaction require real-time processing. Meeting these challenges requires interdisciplinary approaches that combine concepts from a variety of research areas, including numerical computing, differential geometry, deformable shape modeling, sparse data representation, and machine learning. On the algorithmic side, many shape analysis tasks are modeled using partial differential equations, which can be solved using tools from the field of n...

  2. The shape of Tethys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P. C.; Dermott, S. F.

    1991-01-01

    After considering the most important relationships between density, rotation rate, shape, and internal structure on the basis of equilibrium figures, the shape of the Saturn satellite Tethys is established from limb-coordinate data. Attention is given to the shape's significance for Tethys' internal structure. It is alternatively concluded that Tethys is either differentiated, and possesses a small rocky core, or has been interpreted as possessing a mass that is too low by about 15 percent.

  3. The Shape of Eros

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Looking at a few pictures of Eros under the right lighting conditions gives a reasonable idea of the shape of the asteroid, but analysis of NEAR Shoemaker data requires a very accurate digital model of Eros' shape. This 'shape model' helps the NEAR team analyze images and other types of data. For example, comparing the brightness of imaged regions with the orientation of the corresponding parts of the surface, taken from the shape model, allows scientists to determine whether bright areas are due to just surface orientation or also to surface properties. By 'filling

  4. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part I: Analysis of infiltration shape on two different waste deposit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, M; Clément, R; Moreau, S; Duquennoi, C; Loisel, S; Touze-Foltz, N

    2016-09-01

    Landfill bioreactors are based on an acceleration of in-situ waste biodegradation by performing leachate recirculation. To quantify the water content and to evaluate the leachate injection system, in-situ methods are required to obtain spatially distributed information, usually electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). In a previous study, the MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to improve the hydrodynamic interpretation of ERT results by a precise delimitation of the infiltration area. In this study, MICS was applied on two ERT time-lapse data sets recorded on different waste deposit cells in order to compare the hydrodynamic behaviour of leachate flow between the two cells. This comparison is based on an analysis of: (i) the volume of wetted waste assessed by MICS and the wetting rate, (ii) the infiltration shapes and (iii) the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This paper shows that leachate hydrodynamic behaviour is comparable from one waste deposit cell to another with: (i) a high leachate infiltration speed at the beginning of the infiltration, which decreases with time, (ii) a horizontal anisotropy of the leachate infiltration shape and (iii) a very small fraction of the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This hydrodynamic information derived from MICS results can be useful for subsurface flow modelling used to predict leachate flow at the landfill scale. PMID:27103399

  5. Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Proteins of the G(12) Family Shape Immune Functions by Controlling CD4(+) T Cell Adhesiveness and Motility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Herroeder; P. Reichardt; A. Sassmann; B. Zimmermann; D. Jaeneke; J. Hoeckner; M.W. Hollmann; K.D. Fischer; S. Vogt; R. Grosse; N. Hogg; M. Gunzer; S. Offermanns; N. Wettschureck

    2009-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesion plays a central role in T cell trafficking and activation. Genetic inactivation of the guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein alpha-subunits G alpha(12) and G alpha(13) resulted in an increased activity of integrin leukocyte-function-antigen-1 in murine CD4(+) T cells. The

  6. Rollercoaster loop shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2005-11-01

    Many modern rollercoasters feature loops. Although textbook loops are often circular, real rollercoaster loops are not. In this paper, we look into the mathematical description of various possible loop shapes, as well as their riding properties. We also discuss how a study of loop shapes can be used in physics education.

  7. One-step sonochemical syntheses of Ni@Pt core-shell nanoparticles with controlled shape and shell thickness for fuel cell electrocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjik; Jang, Ji-Hoon; Matin, Md Abdul; Kwon, Young-Uk

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a facile one-step method to synthesize Ni@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) with a control over the shape and the Pt-shell thickness of the NPs. By adjusting the relative reactivity of the Pt and Ni reagents in ultrasound-assisted polyol reactions, two Ni@Pt NP samples of the same composition (Ni/Pt=1) and size (3-4 nm) but with different particle shape (octahedral vs. truncated octahedral) and different Pt-shell thicknesses (1-2 vs. 2-3 monolayer) are obtained. The control is achieved by using different Ni reagents, Ni(acac)2 (acac=acetylacetonate) and Ni(hfac)2 (hfac=hexafluoroacetylacetonate). A reaction mechanism that can explain all of the observations is proposed. The Ni@Pt NPs show up to threefold higher mass activity than pure Pt NPs in oxygen reduction reaction. Between the two Ni@Pt NP samples, the one composed of octahedral NPs with the thicker Pt-shell has higher activity than the other. PMID:23769750

  8. Shaping Robust System through Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2008-01-01

    Biological functions are generated as a result of developmental dynamics that form phenotypes governed by genotypes. The dynamical system for development is shaped through genetic evolution following natural selection based on the fitness of the phenotype. Here we study how this dynamical system is robust to noise during development and to genetic change by mutation. We adopt a simplified transcription regulation network model to govern gene expression, which gives a fitness function. Through simulations of the network that undergoes mutation and selection, we show that a certain level of noise in gene expression is required for the network to acquire both types of robustness. The results reveal how the noise that cells encounter during development shapes any network's robustness, not only to noise but also to mutations. We also establish a relationship between developmental and mutational robustness through phenotypic variances caused by genetic variation and epigenetic noise. A universal relationship betwee...

  9. Proinsulin Expression Shapes the TCR Repertoire but Fails to Control the Development of Low-Avidity Insulin-Reactive CD8+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, James A; Thayer, Terri C; McLaren, James E; Ladell, Kristin; De Leenheer, Evy; Phillips, Amy; Davies, Joanne; Kakabadse, Dimitri; Miners, Kelly; Morgan, Peter; Wen, Li; Price, David A; Wong, F Susan

    2016-06-01

    NOD mice, a model strain for human type 1 diabetes, express proinsulin (PI) in the thymus. However, insulin-reactive T cells escape negative selection, and subsequent activation of the CD8(+) T-cell clonotype G9C8, which recognizes insulin B15-23 via an αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) incorporating TRAV8-1/TRAJ9 and TRBV19/TRBJ2-3 gene rearrangements, contributes to the development of diabetes. In this study, we used fixed TRAV8-1/TRAJ9 TCRα-chain transgenic mice to assess the impact of PI isoform expression on the insulin-reactive CD8(+) T-cell repertoire. The key findings were: 1) PI2 deficiency increases the frequency of insulin B15-23-reactive TRBV19(+)CD8(+) T cells and causes diabetes; 2) insulin B15-23-reactive TRBV19(+)CD8(+) T cells are more abundant in the pancreatic lymph nodes of mice lacking PI1 and/or PI2; 3) overexpression of PI2 decreases TRBV19 usage in the global CD8(+) T-cell compartment; 4) a biased repertoire of insulin-reactive CD8(+) T cells emerges in the periphery regardless of antigen exposure; and 5) low-avidity insulin-reactive CD8(+) T cells are less affected by antigen exposure in the thymus than in the periphery. These findings inform our understanding of the diabetogenic process and reveal new avenues for therapeutic exploitation in type 1 diabetes. PMID:26953160

  10. The temporal characteristics of Ca2+ entry through L-type and T-type Ca2+ channels shape exocytosis efficiency in chick auditory hair cells during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levic, Snezana; Dulon, Didier

    2012-12-01

    During development, synaptic exocytosis by cochlear hair cells is first initiated by patterned spontaneous Ca(2+) spikes and, at the onset of hearing, by sound-driven graded depolarizing potentials. The molecular reorganization occurring in the hair cell synaptic machinery during this developmental transition still remains elusive. We characterized the changes in biophysical properties of voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents and exocytosis in developing auditory hair cells of a precocial animal, the domestic chick. We found that immature chick hair cells (embryonic days 10-12) use two types of Ca(2+) currents to control exocytosis: low-voltage-activating, rapidly inactivating (mibefradil sensitive) T-type Ca(2+) currents and high-voltage-activating, noninactivating (nifedipine sensitive) L-type currents. Exocytosis evoked by T-type Ca(2+) current displayed a fast release component (RRP) but lacked the slow sustained release component (SRP), suggesting an inefficient recruitment of distant synaptic vesicles by this transient Ca(2+) current. With maturation, the participation of L-type Ca(2+) currents to exocytosis largely increased, inducing a highly Ca(2+) efficient recruitment of an RRP and an SRP component. Notably, L-type-driven exocytosis in immature hair cells displayed higher Ca(2+) efficiency when triggered by prerecorded native action potentials than by voltage steps, whereas similar efficiency for both protocols was found in mature hair cells. This difference likely reflects a tighter coupling between release sites and Ca(2+) channels in mature hair cells. Overall, our results suggest that the temporal characteristics of Ca(2+) entry through T-type and L-type Ca(2+) channels greatly influence synaptic release by hair cells during cochlear development.

  11. The exchangeability of shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaba Dramane

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Landmark based geometric morphometrics (GM allows the quantitative comparison of organismal shapes. When applied to systematics, it is able to score shape changes which often are undetectable by traditional morphological studies and even by classical morphometric approaches. It has thus become a fast and low cost candidate to identify cryptic species. Due to inherent mathematical properties, shape variables derived from one set of coordinates cannot be compared with shape variables derived from another set. Raw coordinates which produce these shape variables could be used for data exchange, however they contain measurement error. The latter may represent a significant obstacle when the objective is to distinguish very similar species. Results We show here that a single user derived dataset produces much less classification error than a multiple one. The question then becomes how to circumvent the lack of exchangeability of shape variables while preserving a single user dataset. A solution to this question could lead to the creation of a relatively fast and inexpensive systematic tool adapted for the recognition of cryptic species. Conclusions To preserve both exchangeability of shape and a single user derived dataset, our suggestion is to create a free access bank of reference images from which one can produce raw coordinates and use them for comparison with external specimens. Thus, we propose an alternative geometric descriptive system that separates 2-D data gathering and analyzes.

  12. Shape memory materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Compared with piezoelectric ceramics and magnetostrictive materials, the shape memory materials possess larger recoverable strain and recovery stress but slower response to external field. It is expected that the magneto-shape memory materials may develop considerable strain as well as rapid and precise shape control. Pseudoelasticity and shape memory effect (SME) resulted from martensitic transformation and its reverse transformation in shape memory materials were generally described. The requirements of appearing the shape memory effect in materials and the criteria for thermoelastic martensitic transformation were given. Some aspects concerning characteristics of martensitic transformation, and factors affecting SME in Ni-Ti, Cu-Zn-Al and Fe-Mn-Si based alloys as well as ZrO2 containing ceramics were briefly reviewed. Thermodynamic calculation of Ms temperature as function of grain size and parent ordering in Cu-Zn-Al was presented. The works on prediction of Ms in Fe-Mn-Si based alloys and in ZrO2-CeO2 were mentioned. Magnetic shape memory materials were briefly introduced.

  13. Hyperbolically Shaped Centrifugal Compressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Romuald Puzyrewski; Pawel Flaszy(n)ski

    2003-01-01

    Starting from the classical centrifugal compressor, cone shaped in meridional cross section, two modifications are considered on the basis of results from 2D and 3D flow models. The first modification is the change of the meridional cross section to hyperbolically shaped channel. The second modification, proposed on the basis of 2D axisymmetric solution, concerns the shape of blading. On the strength of this solution the blades are formed as 3D shaped blades, coinciding with the recent tendency in 3D designs. Two aims were considered for the change of meridional compressor shape. The first was to remove the separation zone which appears as the flow tums from axial to radial direction. The second aim is to uniformize the flow at exit of impeller. These two goals were considered within the frame of 2D axisymmetric model. Replacing the cone shaped compressor by a hyperbolically shaped one, the separation at the corner was removed. The disc and shroud shape of the compressor was chosen in the way which satisfies the condition of most uniform flow at the compressor exit. The uniformity of exit flow from the rotor can be considered as the factor which influences the performance of the diffuser following the rotor. In the 2D model a family of stream surfaces of S1 type is given in order to find S2 surfaces which may be identified with the midblade surfaces of compressor blading. A computation of 3D type has been performed in order to establish the relations between 2D and 3D models in the calculation of flow parameters. In the presented example the 2D model appears as the inverse model which leads to 3D shape of blading whereas the 3D model has been used for the direct solution. In the presented example the confrontation of two models, 2D and 3D, leads to a better understanding of the application of these models to the design procedure.

  14. Shapes of the Proton

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Gerald A.

    2003-01-01

    A model proton wave function, constructed using Poincare invariance, and constrained by recent electromagnetic form factor data, is used to study the shape of the proton. Spin-dependent quark densities are defined as matrix elements of density operators in proton states of definite spin-polarization, and shown to have an infinite variety of non-spherical shapes. For high momentum quarks with spin parallel to that of the proton, the shape resembles that of a peanut, but for quarks with anti-pa...

  15. Quantum Shape Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Dündar, Furkan Semih

    2015-01-01

    Shape dynamics is a theory first proposed by Julian Barbour which states that physics happen uniquely in the reduced configuration space of a theory. So far, studies in the area have focused on gravitational systems. Here we first contemplate on the implications of this idea on quantum mechanics. We summarize the idea of shape dynamics and then give physical configurations of multi qubit systems. It is observed that inclusion of the spacetime curvature introduces a new qubit degree of freedom. This is a novel effect of general relativity on a quantum system. Our aim in the grand picture, is to initiate a research program translating classical shape dynamics to quantum realm.

  16. Shape memory polymer foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, Loredana

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymer (SMP) foam research are reviewed. The SMPs belong to a new class of smart polymers which can have interesting applications in microelectromechanical systems, actuators and biomedical devices. They can respond to specific external stimulus changing their configuration and then remember the original shape. In the form of foams, the shape memory behaviour can be enhanced because they generally have higher compressibility. Considering also the low weight, and recovery force, the SMP foams are expected to have great potential applications primarily in aerospace. This review highlights the recent progress in characterization, evaluation, and proposed applications of SMP foams mainly for aerospace applications.

  17. Effect of laser treatment on the attachment and viability of mesenchymal stem cell responses on shape memory NiTi alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, C.W., E-mail: c.w.chan@qub.ac.uk [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hussain, I. [School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, Lincolnshire LN6 7TU (United Kingdom); Waugh, D.G.; Lawrence, J. [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Group, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Parkgate Road, Chester, CH1 4BJ (United Kingdom); Man, H.C. [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of laser-induced surface features on the morphology, attachment and viability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) at different periods of time, and to evaluate the biocompatibility of different zones: laser-melted zone (MZ), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and base metal (BM) in laser-treated NiTi alloy. The surface morphology and composition were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The cell morphology was examined by SEM while the cell counting and viability measurements were done by hemocytometer and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay. The results indicated that the laser-induced surface features, such as surface roughening, presence of anisotropic dendritic pattern and complete surface Ni oxidation were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility of NiTi as evidenced by the highest cell attachment (4 days of culture) and viability (7 days of culture) found in the MZ. The biocompatibility of the MZ was the best, followed by the BM with the HAZ being the worst. The defective and porous oxide layer as well as the coarse grained structure might attribute to the inferior cell attachment (4 days of culture) and viability (7 days of culture) on the HAZ compared with the BM which has similar surface morphology. - Highlights: • Laser-treated surface induces a more spreading cell morphology than the non-treated. • Laser-treated surface shows higher cell attachment and viability than the non-treated. • Laser surface treatment is a feasible method to improve the responses of MSCs. • The improvement is attributed to the surface features induced by laser treatment.

  18. Ankyrin-B directs membrane tethering of periaxin and is required for maintenance of lens fiber cell hexagonal shape and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Walters, Mark; Brophy, Peter J; Bennett, Vann; Rao, Ponugoti V

    2016-01-15

    Periaxin (Prx), a PDZ domain protein expressed preferentially in myelinating Schwann cells and lens fibers, plays a key role in membrane scaffolding and cytoarchitecture. Little is known, however, about how Prx is anchored to the plasma membrane. Here we report that ankyrin-B (AnkB), a well-characterized adaptor protein involved in linking the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to integral membrane proteins, is required for membrane association of Prx in lens fibers and colocalizes with Prx in hexagonal fiber cells. Under AnkB haploinsufficiency, Prx accumulates in the soluble fraction with a concomitant loss from the membrane-enriched fraction of mouse lenses. Moreover, AnkB haploinsufficiency induced age-dependent disruptions in fiber cell hexagonal geometry and radial alignment and decreased compressive stiffness in mouse lenses parallel to the changes observed in Prx null mouse lens. Both AnkB- and Prx-deficient mice exhibit disruptions in membrane organization of the spectrin-actin network and the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in lens fiber cells. Taken together, these observations reveal that AnkB is required for Prx membrane anchoring and for maintenance of lens fiber cell hexagonal geometry, membrane skeleton organization, and biomechanics. PMID:26538089

  19. Molecular functions of genes related to grain shape in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Jia; Zhang, Yadong; Wang, Cailin

    2015-01-01

    Because grain shape is an important component of rice grain yield, the discovery of genes related to rice grain shape has attracted much attention of rice breeding programs. In recent years, some of these genes have been cloned and studied. They have been found not only regulate grain shape by changing the shape of the spikelet hull, but also regulate endosperm development through control of cell division using different molecular mechanisms. In this paper, we review the recent research on ge...

  20. Shape control of inorganic nanoparticles from solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Shuanglei; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic materials with controllable shapes have been an intensely studied subject in nanoscience over the past decades. Control over novel and anisotropic shapes of inorganic nanomaterials differing from those of bulk materials leads to unique and tunable properties for widespread applications such as biomedicine, catalysis, fuels or solar cells and magnetic data storage. This review presents a comprehensive overview of shape-controlled inorganic nanomaterials via nucleation and growth theory and the control of experimental conditions (including supersaturation, temperature, surfactants and secondary nucleation), providing a brief account of the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles during wet-chemistry synthetic processes. Subsequently, typical mechanisms for shape-controlled inorganic nanoparticles and the general shape of the nanoparticles formed by each mechanism are also expounded. Furthermore, the differences between similar mechanisms for the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles are also clearly described. The authors envision that this review will provide valuable guidance on experimental conditions and process control for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles with tunable shapes in the solution state.

  1. Shape memory polyurethane foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molded flexible polyurethane (PU foams have been synthesized from polypropylene glycol (PPG with different molecular weights (Mw and functionalities (f, and 2,4/2,6-toluene diisocyanate (TDI-80 with water as blowing agent. It was found that the glassy state properties of the foam mainly depended on the urethane group content while the rubbery state properties on the crosslink density. That is, PPG of low MW and low f (more urethane groups provided superior glass state modulus, strength, density, shape fixity and glass transition temperature (Tg, while that of high Mw and high f (higher crosslink density showed high rubbery modulus and shape recovery. Consequently shape fixity of low Mw PPG decreased from 85 to 72% while shape recovery increased from 52 to 63% as the content of high Mw PPG increased from 0 to 40%.

  2. Shape Memory Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deexith Reddy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs are metals that "remember" their original shapes. SMAs are useful for such things as actuators which are materials that "change shape, stiffness, position, natural frequency, and other mechanical characteristics in response to temperature or electromagnetic fields" The potential uses for SMAs especially as actuators have broadened the spectrum of many scientific fields. The study of the history and development of SMAs can provide an insight into a material involved in cutting-edge technology. The diverse applications for these metals have made them increasingly important and visible to the world. This paper presents the working of shape memory alloys , the phenomenon of super-elasticity and applications of these alloys.

  3. Shape memory polyurethane nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feina

    Shape memory polymers are smart materials which can remember their original shapes. However, the low recovery stress and low mechanical strength limit the commercial applications of shape memory polymers. In this study, nanoclays were introduced to shape memory polyurethanes (SMPU) to augment these properties by enhance the network of SMPU. Several factors which influence the shape recovery stress were evaluated, including the nature of polymer chain by using different monomers, type of clay particles, extent of filler dispersion, clay content and deformation conditions. It was found that only reactive clay particles were well dispersed into polyurethane matrix by the tethering between --CH2CH 2OH functional groups in clay surfactants and polyurethane chains. Two different shape memory polyurethanes (Systems I & II) prepared by bulk polymerization were compared. The shape memory effect of System I was triggered by melting of the soft segment crystals, while that of System II was by glass transition of the soft segments. It was seen that the reactive clay particles dispersed well in both polyurethane matrices and augmented the recovery stress, e.g., 20% increase with 1 wt % nanoclay in System I and 40% increase with 5 wt % nanoclay in System II were observed. In System I, clay particles interfered with soft segment crystallization, and promoted phase mixing between the hard and soft segments, thus affecting the fixity and recovery ratio. Nevertheless, the soft segment crystallinity was still enough and in some cases increased due to stretching to exhibit excellent shape fixity and shape recovery ratio. The higher loading of clay particles accelerated the stress relaxation, resulting in reduction of recovery stress. In System II, no significant effect of clay particles in phase separation was observed, so there was no influence of clay on shape fixity and recovery ratio. The recovery stress increased with reactive nanoclay content. It was also found that the recovery

  4. Email shape analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sroufe, Paul; Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Dantu, Ram; Cangussu, João

    2010-01-01

    Email has become an integral part of everyday life. Without a second thought we receive bills, bank statements, and sales promotions all to our inbox. Each email has hidden features that can be extracted. In this paper, we present a new mechanism to characterize an email without using content or context called Email Shape Analysis. We explore the applications of the email shape by carrying out a case study; botnet detection and two possible applications: spam filtering, and social-context bas...

  5. On Characterizing Particle Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Bryan J.; Rickman, Douglas; Rollins, A. Brent; Ennis, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that particle shape affects flow characteristics of granular materials, as well as a variety of other solids processing issues such as compaction, rheology, filtration and other two-phase flow problems. The impact of shape crosses many diverse and commercially important applications, including pharmaceuticals, civil engineering, metallurgy, health, and food processing. Two applications studied here include the dry solids flow of lunar simulants (e.g. JSC-1, NU-LHT-2M, OB-1), and the flow properties of wet concrete, including final compressive strength. A multi-dimensional generalized, engineering method to quantitatively characterize particle shapes has been developed, applicable to both single particle orientation and multi-particle assemblies. The two-dimension, three dimension inversion problem is also treated, and the application of these methods to DEM model particles will be discussed. In the case of lunar simulants, flow properties of six lunar simulants have been measured, and the impact of particle shape on flowability - as characterized by the shape method developed here -- is discussed, especially in the context of three simulants of similar size range. In the context of concrete processing, concrete construction is a major contributor to greenhouse gas production, of which the major contributor is cement binding loading. Any optimization in concrete rheology and packing that can reduce cement loading and improve strength loading can also reduce currently required construction safety factors. The characterization approach here is also demonstrated for the impact of rock aggregate shape on concrete slump rheology and dry compressive strength.

  6. Corticosteroid effects in the brain: U-shape it.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Joëls

    2006-01-01

    The existence of U-shaped dose dependencies has been known for a long time. With regard to corticosteroid action in brain cells, a dual receptor system that works in opposing directions can explain the occurrence of a U-shaped dose dependency. However, recent evidence indicates that many cell- and t

  7. The Dynamics of Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of two parts, connected by one central theme: the dynamics of the "shape of space". The first part of the thesis concerns the construction of a theory of gravity dynamically equivalent to general relativity (GR) in 3+1 form (ADM). What is special about this theory is that it does not possess foliation invariance, as does ADM. It replaces that "symmetry" by another: local conformal invariance. In so doing it more accurately reflects a theory of the "shape of space", giving us reason to call it \\emph{shape dynamics} (SD). In the first part we will try to present some of the highlights of results so far, and indicate what we can and cannot do with shape dynamics. Because this is a young, rapidly moving field, we have necessarily left out some interesting new results which are not yet in print and were developed alongside the writing of the thesis. The second part of the thesis will develop a gauge theory for "shape of space"--theories. To be more precise, if one admits that the physically re...

  8. Oligocrystalline shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueland, Stian M.; Chen, Ying; Schuh, Christopher A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-05-23

    Copper-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit excellent shape memory properties in single crystalline form. However, when they are polycrystalline, their shape memory properties are severely compromised by brittle fracture arising from transformation strain incompatibility at grain boundaries and triple junctions. Oligocrystalline shape memory alloys (oSMAs) are microstructurally designed SMA structures in which the total surface area exceeds the total grain boundary area, and triple junctions can even be completely absent. Here it is shown how an oligocrystalline structure provides a means of achieving single crystal-like SMA properties without being limited by constraints of single crystal processing. Additionally, the formation of oSMAs typically involves the reduction of the size scale of specimens, and sample size effects begin to emerge. Recent findings on a size effect on the martensitic transformation in oSMAs are compared and a new regime of heat transfer associated with the transformation heat evolution in these alloys is discussed. New results on unassisted two-way shape memory and the effect of loading rate in oSMAs are also reported. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Shapes of interacting RNA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Benjamin Mingming; Reidys, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological ...... sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus.......Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological...... genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows to compute the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform...

  10. Rational design of multifunctional star-shaped molecules with a 1,3,5-triazine core and different arms for application in organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ruifa

    2015-08-01

    A series of star-shaped 1,3,5-triazine derivatives for intended application in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic solar cells (OSCs) were investigated theoretically to explore their optical, electronic, and charge-transport properties. Analysis of their frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) indicated that vertical electronic transitions associated with absorption and emission by these derivatives can be characterized as intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) processes. The calculated results show that the optical, electronic, and charge-transport properties of the derivatives are influenced by the end groups and π-bridges present. Our results suggest that the molecules under investigation could serve as donor materials in OSCs and/or luminescent materials in OLEDs. In addition, all of the molecules are expected to be promising candidates for hole- and electron-transport materials. Based on our results, we were able to propose a rational method of designing multifunctional materials for application in OLEDs and OSCs. Graphical abstract A series of multifunctional star-shaped small molecules were investigated as charge-transport and luminescent materials for OLEDs as well as charge-transport and donor materials for OSCs.

  11. Shape memory polymer medical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitland, Duncan; Benett, William J.; Bearinger, Jane P.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Small, IV, Ward; Schumann, Daniel L.; Jensen, Wayne A.; Ortega, Jason M.; Marion, III, John E.; Loge, Jeffrey M.

    2010-06-29

    A system for removing matter from a conduit. The system includes the steps of passing a transport vehicle and a shape memory polymer material through the conduit, transmitting energy to the shape memory polymer material for moving the shape memory polymer material from a first shape to a second and different shape, and withdrawing the transport vehicle and the shape memory polymer material through the conduit carrying the matter.

  12. Analysis of () Line Shape

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xu Wei; Li Yan

    2014-09-01

    The particles energy distribution is derived directly from the () line shape, which is measured by two sets of OMA. The dissociative excitation of molecular is dominating when the local electron temperature is > 10 eV. The line shape is also simulated by the Monte–Carlo method, the molecular dissociation contributes to 57% neutral atoms and 53% emission intensity in front of the limiter, and 85% neutral atoms and 82% emission intensity in front of the wall. The processes of atoms and molecules influence on the energy balance is discussed in SOL, the power loss from molecular dissociation is 6 × 104 kW at SOL.

  13. Social Shaping of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Mack, Alexandra

    to consider other media) • Ideas need socialization (ideas are linked to people, we need to be careful about how we support the social innovation context) • Ideas are local (ideas spring out of a local contingency, we need to take care in how we like them to travel)....... - in particular in a large corporation? This workshop explores how innovation is socially shaped in organizations. Based on our experiences with practices around innovation and collaboration, we start from three proposition about the social shaping of innovation: • Ideas don't thrive as text (i.e. we need...

  14. Abnormal fetal head shape: aetiology and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Olav Bjørn; David, Anna; Thomasson, Louise;

    2007-01-01

    Background: Abnormal head shape is an uncommon finding on prenatal ultrasound, often associated with breech presentation, spinabifida, aneuploidy or secondary to oligohydramnios or fetal position. Other aetiologies are rarer and may be more difficult to define. Objective: To determine the aetiology...... (lemon-shaped), 18.4% with aneuploidy (mostly strawberry-shaped). 19.5% were dolicocephalic, most secondary to fetal position or oligohydramnios (see table). 13 had confirmed craniosynostosis, including thanatophoric dysplasia, Craniofrontonasal dysplasia, Aperts syndrome, Baller-Gerold syndrome, I......-cell disease, Muenke craniosynostosis and two with an as yet undefined craniosynostosis syndrome. Overall, 16.5 % had an underlying genetic syndrome. Conclusions: Abnormal fetal head shape may be a normal variant, but is commonly associated with a wide variety of underlying pathologies. In view of the high...

  15. U-shaped association between telomere length and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk: a case-control study in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiangbo; Xue, Wenjie; Ji, Yong; Zhu, Xun; Gu, Yayun; Zhu, Meng; Wang, Cheng; Gao, Yong; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Jiaping; Hu, Zhibin; Jin, Guangfu; Shen, Hongbing

    2015-12-01

    Telomeres play a critical role in biological ageing by maintaining chromosomal integrity and preventing chromosome ends fusion. Epidemiological studies have suggested that inter-individual differences of telomere length could affect predisposition to multiple cancers, but evidence regarding esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was still uncertain. Several telomere length-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (TLSNPs) in Caucasians have been reported in genome-wide association studies. However, the effects of telomere length and TL-SNPs on ESCC development are unclear. Therefore, we conducted a case-control study (1045 ESCC cases and 1433 controls) to evaluate the associations between telomere length, TL-SNPs, and ESCC risk in Chinese population. As a result, ESCC cases showed overall shorter relative telomere length (RTL) (median: 1.34) than controls (median: 1.50, P telomeres may be risk factors for ESCC in the Chinese population.

  16. Bend me, shape me

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A Japanese team has found a way to bend and shape silicon substrates by growing a thin layer of diamond on top. The technique has been proposed as an alternative to mechanical bending, which is currently used to make reflective lenses for X-ray systems and particle physics systems (2 paragraphs).

  17. How life shaped Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Earth is much more complex than all the other solar system objects that we know. Thanks to its rich and diverse geology, our planet can offer habitats to a wide range of living species. Emerging insights suggest that this is not just a happy coincidence, but that life itself has in many ways helped to shape the planet. PMID:26726334

  18. Aerodynamically shaped vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Velte, Clara Marika; Øye, Stig;

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamically shaped vortex generator has been proposed, manufactured and tested in a wind tunnel. The effect on the overall performance when applied on a thick airfoil is an increased lift to drag ratio compared with standard vortex generators. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  19. Shape Up Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka; Jensen, Bjarne Bruun

    "Shape Up: a School Community Approach to Influencing the Determinants of Childhood Overweight and Obesity, Lessons Learnt" is a report that aims to provide a synthesis of the project overall evaluation documentation, with a view to systematically review and discuss lessons learnt, and to suggest...

  20. Spatio-temporal light shaping for parallel nano-biophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    of geometry, where the wavelength of light sets a lower limit in how small we can shape light’s thickness and width. This light shaping process suggests a natural marriage of spatial and temporal shaping (i.e., spatio-temporal modulation). However, the spatial and temporal light sciences have traditionally...... developed Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) [1] for diverse spatial light-shaping applications. We can dynamically shape light to interact with microscopic matter and we have contributed to the field of optical micromanipulation [2]. Beyond microscopy, we can apply non-contact forces onto biological cells...

  1. Dendritic spine shape analysis using disjunctive normal shape models

    OpenAIRE

    Ghani, Muhammad Usman; Mesadi, Fitsum; Demir Kanık, Sümerya Ümmühan; Demir Kanik, Sumerya Ummuhan; Argunşah, Ali Özgür; Argunsah, Ali Ozgur; Israely, Inbal; Ünay, Devrim; Unay, Devrim; Taşdizen, Tolga; Tasdizen, Tolga; Çetin, Müjdat; Cetin, Mujdat

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of dendritic spines is an essential task to understand the functional behavior of neurons. Their shape variations are known to be closely linked with neuronal activities. Spine shape analysis in particular, can assist neuroscientists to identify this relationship. A novel shape representation has been proposed recently, called Disjunctive Normal Shape Models (DNSM). DNSM is a parametric shape representation and has proven to be successful in several segmentation problems. In this pap...

  2. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  3. The Role of Chemokines in Shaping the Balance Between CD4(+) T Cell Subsets and Its Therapeutic Implications in Autoimmune and Cancer Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Nathan; Wildbaum, Gizi

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are the key activators of adhesion molecule and also drivers of leukocyte migration to inflammatory sites and are therefore mostly considered as proinflammatory mediators. Many studies, including ours, imply that targeting the function of several key chemokines, but not many others, could effectively suppress inflammatory responses and inflammatory autoimmunity. Along with this, a single chemokine named CXCL10 could be used to induce antitumor immunity, and thereby suppress myeloma. Our working hypothesis is that some chemokines differ from others as aside from being chemoattractants for leukocytes and effective activators of adhesion receptors that possess additional biological properties making them "driver chemokines." We came up with this notion when studying the interlay between CXCR4 and CXCL12 and between CXCR3 and its three ligands: CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11. The current mini-review focuses on these ligands and their biological properties. First, we elaborate the role of cytokines in directing the polarization of effector and regulatory T cell subset and the plasticity of this process. Then, we extend this notion to chemokines while focusing on CXCL 12 and the CXCR3 ligands. Finally, we elaborate the potential clinical implications of these studies for therapy of autoimmunity, graft-versus-host disease, and cancer. PMID:26648938

  4. Metal-free polymer/MWCNT composite fiber as an efficient counter electrode in fiber shape dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abid; Mujtaba Shah, Syed; Bozar, Sinem; Kazici, Mehmet; Keskin, Bahadır; Kaleli, Murat; Akyürekli, Salih; Günes, Serap

    2016-09-01

    Highly aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) as fiber were modified with a conducting polymer via a simple dip coating method. Modified MWCNT exhibited admirable improvement in electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of tri-iodide in dye sensitized solar cells. Scanning electron microscopy images confirm the successful deposition of polymer on MWCNT. Cyclic voltammetry, square wave voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies were carried out to investigate the inner mechanism for the charge transfer behaviour. Results from bare and modified electrodes revealed that the MWCNT/(poly (3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) composite electrode is much better at catalysing the {{{{I}}}3}-/{{{I}}}- redox couple compared to the pristine fiber electrode. The photoelectric conversion efficiency of 5.03% for the modified MWCNT electrodes was comparable with that of the conventional Pt-based electrode. The scientific results of this study reveal that MWCNT/PEDOT:PSS may be a better choice for the replacement of cost intensive electrode materials such as platinum. Good performance even after bending up to 90° and in-series connection to enhance the output voltage were also successfully achieved, highlighting the practical application of this novel device.

  5. Shape of black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Clement, María E Gabach

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that celestial bodies tend to be spherical due to gravity and that rotation produces deviations from this sphericity. We discuss what is known and expected about the shape of black holes' horizons from their formation to their final, stationary state. We present some recent results showing that black hole rotation indeed manifests in the widening of their central regions, limits their global shapes and enforces their whole geometry to be close to the extreme Kerr horizon geometry at almost maximal rotation speed. The results depend only on the horizon area and angular momentum. In particular they are entirely independent of the surrounding geometry of the spacetime and of the presence of matter satisfying the strong energy condition. We also discuss the the relation of this result with the Hoop conjecture.

  6. Shaping 3-D boxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenholt, Rasmus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2011-01-01

    Enabling users to shape 3-D boxes in immersive virtual environments is a non-trivial problem. In this paper, a new family of techniques for creating rectangular boxes of arbitrary position, orientation, and size is presented and evaluated. These new techniques are based solely on position data......, making them different from typical, existing box shaping techniques. The basis of the proposed techniques is a new algorithm for constructing a full box from just three of its corners. The evaluation of the new techniques compares their precision and completion times in a 9 degree-of-freedom (Do......F) docking experiment against an existing technique, which requires the user to perform the rotation and scaling of the box explicitly. The precision of the users' box construction is evaluated by a novel error metric measuring the difference between two boxes. The results of the experiment strongly indicate...

  7. Shaping the Social

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Susan; Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Rod, Morten Hulvej;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The social environment at schools is an important setting to promote educational attainment, and health and well-being of young people. However, within upper secondary education there is a need for evidence-based school intervention programmes. The Shaping the Social intervention...... is a comprehensive programme integrating social and educational activities to promote student well-being and reduce smoking and dropout in upper secondary vocational education. The evaluation design is reported here. METHODS/DESIGN: The evaluation employed a non-randomised cluster controlled design, and schools were...... national education registers through a 2-year follow-up period. DISCUSSION: Shaping the Social was designed to address that students at Danish vocational schools constitute a high risk population concerning health behaviour as well as school dropout by modifying the school environment, alongside developing...

  8. Antiferroelectric Shape Memory Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Uchino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiferroelectrics (AFE can exhibit a “shape memory function controllable by electric field”, with huge isotropic volumetric expansion (0.26% associated with the AFE to Ferroelectric (FE phase transformation. Small inverse electric field application can realize the original AFE phase. The response speed is quick (2.5 ms. In the Pb0.99Nb0.02[(Zr0.6Sn0.41-yTiy]0.98O3 (PNZST system, the shape memory function is observed in the intermediate range between high temperature AFE and low temperature FE, or low Ti-concentration AFE and high Ti-concentration FE in the composition. In the AFE multilayer actuators (MLAs, the crack is initiated in the center of a pair of internal electrodes under cyclic electric field, rather than the edge area of the internal electrodes in normal piezoelectric MLAs. The two-sublattice polarization coupling model is proposed to explain: (1 isotropic volume expansion during the AFE-FE transformation; and (2 piezoelectric anisotropy. We introduce latching relays and mechanical clampers as possible unique applications of shape memory ceramics.

  9. Lp shape deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Lin; ZHANG GuoXin; LAI YuKun

    2012-01-01

    Shape deformation is a fundamental tool in geometric modeling.Existing methods consider preserving local details by minimizing some energy functional measuring local distortions in the L2 norm.This strategy distributes distortions quite uniformly to all the vertices and penalizes outliers.However,there is no unique answer for a natural deformation as it depends on the nature of the objects.Inspired by recent sparse signal reconstruction work with non L2 norm,we introduce general Lp norms to shape deformation; the positive parameter p provides the user with a flexible control over the distribution of unavoidable distortions.Compared with the traditional L2 norm,using smaller p,distortions tend to be distributed to a sparse set of vertices,typically in feature regions,thus making most areas less distorted and structures better preserved. On the other hand,using larger p tends to distribute distortions more evenly across the whole model.This flexibility is often desirable as it mimics objects made up with different materials.By specifying varying p over the shape,more flexible control can be achieved.We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm with various examples.

  10. Towards robust and effective shape modeling: sparse shape composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoting; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dewan, Maneesh; Huang, Junzhou; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Zhou, Xiang Sean

    2012-01-01

    Organ shape plays an important role in various clinical practices, e.g., diagnosis, surgical planning and treatment evaluation. It is usually derived from low level appearance cues in medical images. However, due to diseases and imaging artifacts, low level appearance cues might be weak or misleading. In this situation, shape priors become critical to infer and refine the shape derived by image appearances. Effective modeling of shape priors is challenging because: (1) shape variation is complex and cannot always be modeled by a parametric probability distribution; (2) a shape instance derived from image appearance cues (input shape) may have gross errors; and (3) local details of the input shape are difficult to preserve if they are not statistically significant in the training data. In this paper we propose a novel Sparse Shape Composition model (SSC) to deal with these three challenges in a unified framework. In our method, a sparse set of shapes in the shape repository is selected and composed together to infer/refine an input shape. The a priori information is thus implicitly incorporated on-the-fly. Our model leverages two sparsity observations of the input shape instance: (1) the input shape can be approximately represented by a sparse linear combination of shapes in the shape repository; (2) parts of the input shape may contain gross errors but such errors are sparse. Our model is formulated as a sparse learning problem. Using L1 norm relaxation, it can be solved by an efficient expectation-maximization (EM) type of framework. Our method is extensively validated on two medical applications, 2D lung localization in X-ray images and 3D liver segmentation in low-dose CT scans. Compared to state-of-the-art methods, our model exhibits better performance in both studies. PMID:21963296

  11. Styrene-based shape memory foam: fabrication and mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yongtao; Zhou, Tianyang; Qin, Chao; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-10-01

    Shape memory polymer foam is a promising kind of structure in the biomedical and aerospace field. Shape memory styrene foam with uniform and controlled open-cell structure was successfully fabricated using a salt particulate leaching method. Shape recovery capability exists for foam programming in both high-temperature compression and low-temperature compression (Shape recovery properties such as shape fixing property and shape recovery ratio were also characterized. In order to provide guidance for the future fabrication of shape memory foam, the theories of Gibson and Ashby as well as differential micromechanics theory were applied to predict Young’s modulus and the mechanical behavior of SMP styrene foams during the compression process.

  12. Landscape of atomic nuclear shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Chang-Bum

    2016-01-01

    We exhibit a wide variety of the nuclear shape phases over the nuclear chart along with a shell model scheme. Various nuclear shapes are demonstrated within the framework of proton-neutron spin-orbital interactions; ferro-deformed, sub-ferro-deformed, and spherical shapes. The spherical shape is classified into the three magic-number categories in view of a large shell gap mechanism; double-magic nuclei I, double magic nuclei II, and double magic nuclei III. We discuss nuclear shape coexistence in the space Z = 76 to 84 as providing a new way to understanding the dynamical shape phases.

  13. 'Shape Dynamics': Foundations Reassessed

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Edward

    2015-01-01

    `Shape dynamics' is meant here in the sense of a type of conformogeometrical reformulation of GR, some of which have of late been considered as generalizations of or alternatives to GR. This note concerns in particular cases based on the notion of volume-preserving conformal transformations (VPCTs), in the sense of preserving a solitary global volume of the universe degree of freedom. The extent to which various ways of modelling VPCTs make use of group theory at all, in a congruous manner, a...

  14. Pairwise harmonics for shape analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Youyi

    2013-07-01

    This paper introduces a simple yet effective shape analysis mechanism for geometry processing. Unlike traditional shape analysis techniques which compute descriptors per surface point up to certain neighborhoods, we introduce a shape analysis framework in which the descriptors are based on pairs of surface points. Such a pairwise analysis approach leads to a new class of shape descriptors that are more global, discriminative, and can effectively capture the variations in the underlying geometry. Specifically, we introduce new shape descriptors based on the isocurves of harmonic functions whose global maximum and minimum occur at the point pair. We show that these shape descriptors can infer shape structures and consistently lead to simpler and more efficient algorithms than the state-of-the-art methods for three applications: intrinsic reflectional symmetry axis computation, matching shape extremities, and simultaneous surface segmentation and skeletonization. © 2012 IEEE.

  15. Similarity of molecular shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A Y; Richards, W G

    1991-10-01

    The similarity of one molecule to another has usually been defined in terms of electron densities or electrostatic potentials or fields. Here it is expressed as a function of the molecular shape. Formulations of similarity (S) reduce to very simple forms, thus rendering the computerised calculation straightforward and fast. 'Elements of similarity' are identified, in the same spirit as 'elements of chirality', except that the former are understood to be variable rather than present-or-absent. Methods are presented which bypass the time-consuming mathematical optimisation of the relative orientation of the molecules. Numerical results are presented and examined, with emphasis on the similarity of isomers. At the extreme, enantiomeric pairs are considered, where it is the dissimilarity (D = 1 - S) that is of consequence. We argue that chiral molecules can be graded by dissimilarity, and show that D is the shape-analog of the 'chirality coefficient', with the simple form of the former opening up numerical access to the latter. PMID:1770379

  16. A mathematical approach to human pterygium shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajic B

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bojan Pajic,1–4 Iraklis Vastardis,1 Predrag Rajkovic,5 Brigitte Pajic-Eggspuehler,1 Daniel M Aebersold,6 Zeljka Cvejic2 1Eye Clinic ORASIS, Swiss Eye Research Foundation, Reinach AG, Switzerland; 2Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad,3Faculty of Medicine of the Military Medical Academy, University of Defence, Belgrade, Serbia; 4Division of Ophthalmology, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland; 5Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Niš, Niš, Serbia; 6Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland Purpose: Pterygium is a common lesion affecting the population in countries with high levels of ultraviolet exposure. The final shape of a pterygium is the result of a growth pattern, which remains poorly understood. This manuscript provides a mathematical analysis as a tool to determine the shape of human pterygia.Materials and methods: Eighteen patients, all affected by nasal unilateral pterygia, were randomly selected from our patient database independently of sex, origin, or race. We included all primary or recurrent pterygia with signs of proliferation, dry eye, and induction of astigmatism. Pseudopterygia were excluded from this study. Pterygia were outlined and analyzed mathematically using a Cartesian coordinate system with two axes (X, Y and five accurate landmarks of the pterygium.Results: In 13 patients (72%, the shape of the pterygia was hyperbolic and in five patients (28%, the shape was rather elliptical.Conclusion: This analysis gives a highly accurate mathematical description of the shape of human pterygia. This might help to better assess the clinical results and outcome of the great variety of therapeutic approaches concerning these lesions. Keywords: etiology, pterygium, limbal stem cells, stem cells dysfunction, mathematical shape analysis

  17. Shaping the endoplasmic reticulum in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, Csilla-Maria; Guigas, Gernot; Veres, Andreas; Neumann, Brigitte; Stemmann, Olaf; Weiss, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Organelles in eukaryotic cells often have complex shapes that deviate significantly from simple spheres. A prime example is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that forms an extensive network of membrane tubules in many mammalian cell types and in reconstitution assays in vitro. Despite the successful hunt for molecular determinants of ER shape we are still far from having a comprehensive understanding of ER network morphogenesis. Here, we have studied the hitherto neglected influence of the host substrate when reconstituting ER networks in vitro as compared to ER networks in vivo. In culture cells we observed cytoplasm-spanning ER networks with tubules being connected almost exclusively by three-way junctions and segment lengths being narrowly distributed around a mean length of about 1μm. In contrast, networks reconstituted from purified ER microsomes on flat glass or gel substrates of varying stiffness showed significantly broader length distributions with an up to fourfold larger mean length. Self-assembly of ER microsomes on small oil droplets, however, yielded networks that resembled more closely the native ER network of mammalian cells. We conclude from these observations that the ER microsomes' inherent self-assembly capacity is sufficient to support network formation with a native geometry if the influence of the host substrate's surface chemistry becomes negligible. We hypothesize that under these conditions the networks' preference for three-way junctions follows from creating 'starfish-shaped' vesicles when ER microsomes with a protein-induced spontaneous curvature undergo fusion. PMID:27287725

  18. Analytical theory for shape stiffness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张进之

    2000-01-01

    The shape stiffness of mill m is defined as the crosswise rigidity of the unit width of steel plate, that is, m = k/b. By differentiating the steel plate crown equation in the vector model of steel plate shape, a new concise equation for the shape stiffness, kc = m + q, is obtained. Furthermore, by combining the calculation equation for steel plate crown derived from Castigliano’s theorem, an analytical calculation equation for the shape rigidity of rolled steel plate is derived. The correctness and practicability of the theory for the shape stiffness are demonstrated by comparing the results from the numerical calculation with the practical data of a rolling mill.

  19. Analytical theory for shape stiffness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The shape stiffness of mill m is defined as the crosswise rigidity of the unit width of steel plate, that is, m=k/b. By differentiating the steel plate crown equation in the vector model of steel plate shape, a new concise equation for the shape stiffness, kc=m+q, is obtained. Furthermore, by combining the calculation equation for steel plate crown derived from Castigliano's theorem, an analytical calculation equation for the shape rigidity of rolled steel plate is derived. The correctness and practicability of the theory for the shape stiffness are demonstrated by comparing the results from the numerical calculation with the practical data of a rolling mill.

  20. Landscape of atomic nuclear shapes

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Chang-Bum

    2016-01-01

    We exhibit a wide variety of the nuclear shape phases over the nuclear chart along with a shell model scheme. Various nuclear shapes are demonstrated within the framework of proton-neutron spin-orbital interactions; ferro-deformed, sub-ferro-deformed, and spherical shapes. The spherical shape is classified into the three magic-number categories in view of a large shell gap mechanism; double-magic nuclei I, double magic nuclei II, and double magic nuclei III. We discuss nuclear shape coexisten...

  1. Boosted Higgs Shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Schlaffer, Matthias; Takeuchi, Michihisa; Weiler, Andreas; Wymant, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The inclusive Higgs production rate through gluon fusion has been measured to be in agreement with the Standard Model (SM). We show that even if the inclusive Higgs production rate is very SM-like, a precise determination of the boosted Higgs transverse momentum shape offers the opportunity to see effects of natural new physics. These measurements are generically motivated by effective field theory arguments and specifically in extensions of the SM with a natural weak scale, like composite Higgs models and natural supersymmetry. We show in detail how a measurement at high transverse momentum of $H\\to 2\\ell+\\mathbf{p}\\!\\!/_T$ via $H\\to \\tau\\tau$ and $H\\to WW^*$ could be performed and demonstrate that it offers a compelling alternative to the $t\\bar t H$ channel. We discuss the sensitivity to new physics in the most challenging scenario of an exactly SM-like inclusive Higgs cross-section.

  2. A Shape Dynamics Tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Mercati, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Shape Dynamics (SD) is a new theory of gravity that is based on fewer and more fundamental first principles than General Relativity (GR). The most important feature of SD is the replacement of GR's relativity of simultaneity with a more tractable gauge symmetry, namely invariance under spatial conformal transformations. This Tutorial contains both a quick introduction for readers curious about SD and a detailed walk-through of the historical and conceptual motivations for the theory, its logical development from first principles and an in-depth description of its present status. The Tutorial is sufficiently self-contained for an undergrad student with some basic background in General Relativity and Lagrangian/Hamiltonian mechanics. It is intended both as a reference text for students approaching the subject, and as a review article for researchers interested in the theory. This is a first version of the Tutorial, which will be periodically expanded and updated with the latest results.

  3. Boosted Higgs shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaffer, Matthias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Spannowsky, Michael [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Takeuchi, Michihisa [King' s College London (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics and Cosmology Group; Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Wymant, Chris [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique Theorique, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)

    2014-05-15

    The inclusive Higgs production rate through gluon fusion has been measured to be in agreement with the Standard Model (SM). We show that even if the inclusive Higgs production rate is very SM-like, a precise determination of the boosted Higgs transverse momentum shape offers the opportunity to see effects of natural new physics. These measurements are generically motivated by effective field theory arguments and specifically in extensions of the SM with a natural weak scale, like composite Higgs models and natural supersymmetry. We show in detail how a measurement at high transverse momentum of H→2l+p{sub T} via H→ττ and H→WW{sup *} could be performed and demonstrate that it offers a compelling alternative to the t anti tH channel. We discuss the sensitivity to new physics in the most challenging scenario of an exactly SM-like inclusive Higgs cross-section.

  4. Boosted Higgs shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaffer, Matthias [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Spannowsky, Michael [Durham University, Department of Physics, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); Takeuchi, Michihisa [King' s College London, Theoretical Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Weiler, Andreas [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); CERN, Theory Division, Physics Department, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Wymant, Chris [Durham University, Department of Physics, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique Theorique, 9 Chemin de Bellevue, 74940, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Imperial College London, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    The inclusive Higgs production rate through gluon fusion has been measured to be in agreement with the Standard Model (SM). We show that even if the inclusive Higgs production rate is very SM-like, a precise determination of the boosted Higgs transverse momentum shape offers the opportunity to see effects of natural new physics. These measurements are generically motivated by effective field theory arguments and specifically in extensions of the SM with a natural weak scale, like composite Higgs models and natural supersymmetry. We show in detail how a measurement at high transverse momentum of H → 2l + p{sub T} via H → ττ and H → WW* could be performed and demonstrate that it offers a compelling alternative to the t anti tH channel. We discuss the sensitivity to newphysics in the most challenging scenario of an exactly SM-like inclusive Higgs cross section. (orig.)

  5. SHAPE selection (SHAPES) enrich for RNA structure signal in SHAPE sequencing-based probing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Line Dahl; Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan; Salama, Sofie R;

    2015-01-01

    Selective 2' Hydroxyl Acylation analyzed by Primer Extension (SHAPE) is an accurate method for probing of RNA secondary structure. In existing SHAPE methods, the SHAPE probing signal is normalized to a no-reagent control to correct for the background caused by premature termination of the reverse...

  6. Shape integral method for magnetospheric shapes. [boundary layer calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    A method is developed for calculating the shape of any magnetopause to arbitrarily high precision. The method uses an integral equation which is evaluated for a trial shape. The resulting values of the integral equation as a function of auxiliary variables indicate how close one is to the desired solution. A variational method can then be used to improve the trial shape. Some potential applications are briefly mentioned.

  7. Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They ... last as long as normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also ...

  8. Shaped gold and silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yugang; An, Changhua

    2011-03-01

    Advance in the synthesis of shaped nanoparticles made of gold and silver is reviewed in this article. This review starts with a new angle by analyzing the relationship between the geometrical symmetry of a nanoparticle shape and its internal crystalline structures. According to the relationship, the nanoparticles with well-defined shapes are classified into three categories: nanoparticles with single crystallinity, nanoparticles with angular twins, and nanoparticles with parallel twins. Discussion and analysis on the classical methods for the synthesis of shaped nanoparticles in each category are also included and personal perspectives on the future research directions in the synthesis of shaped metal nanoparticles are briefly summarized. This review is expected to provide a guideline in designing the strategy for the synthesis of shaped nanoparticles and analyzing the corresponding growth mechanism.

  9. Combined Shape and Topology Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Asger Nyman

    Shape and topology optimization seeks to compute the optimal shape and topology of a structure such that one or more properties, for example stiffness, balance or volume, are improved. The goal of the thesis is to develop a method for shape and topology optimization which uses the Deformable...... Simplicial Complex (DSC) method. Consequently, we present a novel method which combines current shape and topology optimization methods. This method represents the surface of the structure explicitly and discretizes the structure into non-overlapping elements, i.e. a simplicial complex. An explicit surface...... representation usually limits the optimization to minor shape changes. However, the DSC method uses a single explicit representation and still allows for large shape and topology changes. It does so by constantly applying a set of mesh operations during deformations of the structure. Using an explicit instead...

  10. Constructal blade shape in nanofluids

    OpenAIRE

    Bai Chao; Wang Liqiu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Blade configuration of nanofluids has been proven to perform much better than dispersed configuration for some heat conduction systems. The analytical analysis and numerical calculation are made for the cylinder--shaped and regular-rectangular-prism--shaped building blocks of the blade-configured heat conduction systems (using nanofluids as the heat conduction media) to find the optimal cross-sectional shape for the nanoparticle blade under the same composing materials, composition r...

  11. Laser Engineered Net Shaping Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚晓峰; 刘伟军; 王天然; 胡芳友; 李艳丽

    2004-01-01

    Laser engineered net shaping (LENS) technology is a new type of rapid prototyping technology, which combines the conventional rapid prototyping technology with the laser cladding technology, and studies the rapid manufacture technology of metal components and moulds with comparatively complex shape or complex component. The laser engineered net shaping system is made up of by five modules. The hardware composition and operating principle of the modules are introduced in detail.

  12. Shape resonances in molecular fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A shape resonance is a quasibound state in which a particle is temporarily trapped by a potential barrier (i.e., the shape of the potential), through which it may eventually tunnel and escape. This simple mechanism plays a prominent role in a variety of excitation processes in molecules, ranging from vibrational excitation by slow electrons to ionization of deep core levels by x-rays. Moreover, their localized nature makes shape resonances a unifying link between otherwise dissimilar circumstances. One example is the close connection between shape resonances in electron-molecule scattering and in molecular photoionization. Another is the frequent persistence of free-molecule shape resonant behavior upon adsorption on a surface or condensation into a molecular solid. The main focus of this article is a discussion of the basic properties of shape resonances in molecular fields, illustrated by the more transparent examples studied over the last ten years. Other aspects to be discussed are vibrational effects of shape resonances, connections between shape resonances in different physical settings, and examples of shape resonant behavior in more complex cases, which form current challenges in this field

  13. Shape resonances in molecular fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1984-01-01

    A shape resonance is a quasibound state in which a particle is temporarily trapped by a potential barrier (i.e., the shape of the potential), through which it may eventually tunnel and escape. This simple mechanism plays a prominent role in a variety of excitation processes in molecules, ranging from vibrational excitation by slow electrons to ionization of deep core levels by x-rays. Moreover, their localized nature makes shape resonances a unifying link between otherwise dissimilar circumstances. One example is the close connection between shape resonances in electron-molecule scattering and in molecular photoionization. Another is the frequent persistence of free-molecule shape resonant behavior upon adsorption on a surface or condensation into a molecular solid. The main focus of this article is a discussion of the basic properties of shape resonances in molecular fields, illustrated by the more transparent examples studied over the last ten years. Other aspects to be discussed are vibrational effects of shape resonances, connections between shape resonances in different physical settings, and examples of shape resonant behavior in more complex cases, which form current challenges in this field.

  14. Women in Shape Modeling Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Tari, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Presenting the latest research from the growing field of mathematical shape analysis, this volume is comprised of the collaborations of participants of the Women in Shape Modeling (WiSh) workshop, held at UCLA's Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics in July 2013. Topics include: Simultaneous spectral and spatial analysis of shape Dimensionality reduction and visualization of data in tree-spaces, such as classes of anatomical trees like airways and blood vessels Geometric shape segmentation, exploring shape segmentation from a Gestalt perspective, using information from the Blum medial axis of edge fragments in an image Representing and editing self-similar details on 3D shapes, studying shape deformation and editing techniques Several chapters in the book directly address the problem of continuous measures of context-dependent nearness and right shape models. Medical and biological applications have been a major source of motivation in shape research, and key topics are examined here in detail. All...

  15. Smelling shapes: crossmodal correspondences between odors and shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson-Vaux, Grant; Crisinel, Anne-Sylvie; Spence, Charles

    2013-02-01

    Crossmodal correspondences between odors and visual stimuli-particularly colors-are well-established in the literature, but there is a paucity of research involving visual shape correspondences. Crossmodal associations between 20 odors (a selection of those commonly found in wine) and visual shape stimuli ("kiki"/"bouba" forms-Köhler W. 1929. Gestalt psychology. New York: Liveright.) were investigated in a sample of 25 participants (mean age of 21 years). The odors were rated along a form scale anchored by 2 shapes, as well as several descriptive adjective scales. Two of the odors were found to be significantly associated with an angular shape (lemon and pepper) and two others with a rounded shape (raspberry and vanilla). Principal component analysis indicated that the hedonic value and intensity of odors are important in this crossmodal association, with more unpleasant and intense smells associated with more angular forms. These results are discussed in terms of their practical applications, such as in the use of bottle, logo, or label shape by marketers of perfume and wine to convey the prominent notes through congruent odor-shape pairing. In conclusion, these results support the existence of widespread crossmodal associations (or correspondences) between odors and visual shape stimuli. PMID:23118203

  16. Sawtooth oscillations in shaped plasmasa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, E. A.; Luce, T. C.; Austin, M. E.; Brennan, D. P.; Burrell, K. H.; Chu, M. S.; Ferron, J. R.; Hyatt, A. W.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Lao, L. L.; Lohr, J.; Makowski, M. A.; Osborne, T. H.; Petty, C. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Prater, R.; Rhodes, T. L.; Scoville, J. T.; Solomon, W. M.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; Waelbroeck, F. L.; Zhang, C.

    2007-05-01

    The role of interchange and internal kink modes in the sawtooth oscillations is explored by comparing bean- and oval-shaped plasmas. The n =1 instability that results in the collapse of the sawtooth has been identified as a quasi-interchange in the oval cases and the internal kink in the bean shape. The ion and electron temperature profiles are followed in detail through the sawtooth ramp. It is found that electron energy transport rates are very high in the oval and quite low in the bean shape. Ion energy confinement in the oval is excellent and the sawtooth amplitude (δT/T) in the ion temperature is much larger than that of the electrons. The sawtooth amplitudes for ions and electrons are comparable in the bean shape. The measured q profiles in the bean and oval shapes are found to be consistent with neoclassical current diffusion of the toroidal current, and the observed differences in q largely result from the severe differences in electron energy transport. For both shapes the collapse flattens the q profile and after the collapse return to q0≳1. Recent results on intermediate shapes are reported. These shapes show that the electron energy transport improves gradually as the plasma triangularity is increased.

  17. Young Children's Concepts of Shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Douglas H.; Swaminathan, Sudha; Hannibal, Mary Anne Zeitler; Sarama, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Investigates, by conducting individual clinical interviews of 97 children ages 3 to 6, the criteria preschool children use to distinguish members of a class of shapes from other figures, emphasizing identification and descriptions of shapes and reasons for these identifications. Concludes that young children initially form schemas on the basis of…

  18. Shape Preserving Filament Enhancement Filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.; Westenberg, Michel A.

    2001-01-01

    Morphological connected set filters for extraction of filamentous details from medical images are developed. The advantages of these filters are that they are shape preserving and do not amplify noise. Two approaches are compared: (i) multi-scale filtering (ii) single-step shape filtering using conn

  19. Q-MAF Shape Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Eiriksson, Hrafnkell; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille

    2001-01-01

    This paper address the problems of generating a low dimensional representation of the shape variation present in a set of shapes represented by a number of landmark points. First, we will present alternatives to the featured Least-Squares Procrustes alignment based on the L1-norm and the L-inf-no...

  20. Functional and shape data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    This textbook for courses on function data analysis and shape data analysis describes how to define, compare, and mathematically represent shapes, with a focus on statistical modeling and inference. It is aimed at graduate students in analysis in statistics, engineering, applied mathematics, neuroscience, biology, bioinformatics, and other related areas. The interdisciplinary nature of the broad range of ideas covered—from introductory theory to algorithmic implementations and some statistical case studies—is meant to familiarize graduate students with an array of tools that are relevant in developing computational solutions for shape and related analyses. These tools, gleaned from geometry, algebra, statistics, and computational science, are traditionally scattered across different courses, departments, and disciplines; Functional and Shape Data Analysis offers a unified, comprehensive solution by integrating the registration problem into shape analysis, better preparing graduate students for handling fu...

  1. Pileup subtraction for jet shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyez, Gregory; Salam, Gavin P; Kim, Ji-Hun; Dutta, Souvik; Cacciari, Matteo

    2013-04-19

    Jets in high energy hadronic collisions often contain the fingerprints of the particles that produced them. Those fingerprints, and thus the nature of the particles that produced the jets, can be read off with the help of quantities known as jet shapes. Jet shapes are, however, severely affected by pileup, the accumulation in the detector of the residues of the many simultaneous collisions taking place in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We introduce a method to correct for pileup effects in jet shapes. Relative to earlier, limited approaches, the key advance resides in its full generality, achieved through a numerical determination, for each jet, of a given shape's susceptibility to pileup. The method rescues the possibility of using jet shapes in the high pileup environment of current and future LHC running, as we show with examples of quark-gluon discrimination and top tagging.

  2. Shape-Driven Nested Markov Tessellations

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiber, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    A new and rather broad class of stationary (i.e. stochastically translation invariant) random tessellations of the $d$-dimensional Euclidean space is introduced, which are called shape-driven nested Markov tessellations. Locally, these tessellations are constructed by means of a spatio-temporal random recursive split dynamics governed by a family of Markovian split kernel, generalizing thereby the -- by now classical -- construction of iteration stable random tessellations. By providing an explicit global construction of the tessellations, it is shown that under suitable assumptions on the split kernels (shape-driven), there exists a unique time-consistent whole-space tessellation-valued Markov process of stationary random tessellations compatible with the given split kernels. Beside the existence and uniqueness result, the typical cell and some aspects of the first-order geometry of these tessellations are in the focus of our discussion.

  3. Acoustophoresis in Variously Shaped Liquid Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Gan; Xu, Jie; 10.1039/c1sm05871a

    2012-01-01

    The ability to precisely trap, transport and manipulate micrometer-sized objects, including biological cells, DNA-coated microspheres and microorganisms, is very important in life science studies and biomedical applications. In this study, acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave field is used for micro-objects manipulation, a technique termed as acoustophoresis. Free surfaces of liquid droplets are used as sound reflectors to confine sound waves inside the droplets. Two techniques were developed for precise control of droplet shapes: edge pinning and hydrophilic/hydrophobic interface pinning. For all tested droplet shapes, including circular, annular and rectangular, our experiments show that polymer micro particles can be manipulated by ultrasound and form into a variety of patterns, for example, concentric rings and radial lines in an annular droplet. The complexity of the pattern increases with increasing frequency, and the observations are in line with simulation results. The acoustic mani...

  4. Ethyl Cellulose and Cetrimonium Bromide Assisted Synthesis of Mesoporous, Hexagon Shaped ZnO Nanodisks with Exposed ±{0001} Polar Facets for Enhanced Photovoltaic Performance in Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetia, Tridip Ranjan; Ansari, Mohammad Shaad; Qureshi, Mohammad

    2015-06-24

    Hexagon shaped mesoporous zinc oxide nanodisks (ZnO NDs) with exposed ±{0001} polar facets have been synthesized by using ethyl cellulose (EC) and cetrimonium bromide (CTAB) as the capping and structure directing agents. We have characterized ZnO NDs using analytical techniques, such as powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), diffuse reflectance UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis and proposed a plausible mechanism for the formation of ZnO NDs. EC molecules form a colloidal solution in a 1-butanol:water (3:1) solvent system having a negative zeta potential (ζ ≈ -32 mV) value which can inhibit CTAB assisted c-axis growth of ZnO crystal and encourage the formation of ZnO NDs. In the control reactions carried out in presence of only CTAB and only EC, formation of hexagonal ZnO nanorods (NRs) and ZnO nanosheets (NSs) composed of numerous ZnO nanoparticles are observed, respectively. Photovoltaic properties of ZnO NDs as compared to ZnO NRs, ZnO NSs, and conventional ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are investigated by co-sensitizing with CdS/CdSe quantum dots (QDs). An ∼35% increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE, η) is observed in ZnO NDs (η ≈ 4.86%) as compared to ZnO NPs (η ≈ 3.14%) while the values of PCE for ZnO NR and ZnO NS based devices are found to be ∼2.52% and ∼1.64%, respectively. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of the ZnO NDs based solar cell is attributed to an efficient charge separation and collection, boosted by the exposed ±(0001) facets apart from the single crystalline nature, better light-scattering effects, and high BET surface area for sensitizer particle adsorption. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis further reveals that the charge recombination resistance and photoinduced electron lifetime are substantially higher in the ZnO ND based

  5. A theory of shape identification

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Frédéric; Morel, Jean-Michel; Musé, Pablo; Sur, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    Recent years have seen dramatic progress in shape recognition algorithms applied to ever-growing image databases. They have been applied to image stitching, stereo vision, image mosaics, solid object recognition and video or web image retrieval. More fundamentally, the ability of humans and animals to detect and recognize shapes is one of the enigmas of perception. The book describes a complete method that starts from a query image and an image database and yields a list of the images in the database containing shapes present in the query image. A false alarm number is associated to each detection. Many experiments will show that familiar simple shapes or images can reliably be identified with false alarm numbers ranging from 10-5 to less than 10-300. Technically speaking, there are two main issues. The first is extracting invariant shape descriptors from digital images. The second is deciding whether two shape descriptors are identifiable as the same shape or not. A perceptual principle, the Helmholtz princi...

  6. Do rats use shape to solve "shape discriminations"?

    OpenAIRE

    Minini, L.; Jeffery, K J

    2006-01-01

    Visual discrimination tasks are increasingly used to explore the neurobiology of vision in rodents, but it remains unclear flow the animals solve these tasks: Do they process shapes holistically, or by using low-level features such as luminance and angle acuity? In the present Study we found that when discriminating triangles from squares, rats did not use shape but instead relied oil local luminance differences in the lower hemifield. A second experiment prevented this strategy by using stim...

  7. Development of shape memory polyurethane fiber with complete shape recoverability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Hu, Jinlian; Yeung, Lap-Yan; Liu, Yan; Ji, Fenglong; Yeung, Kwok-wing

    2006-10-01

    To illustrate the shape memory properties of shape memory polyurethane (SMPU) fiber and the difference of thermal/mechanical properties between SMPU fiber and other various man-made fibers, series of shape memory polyurethane having various hard segment content were synthesized with the pre-polymerization method and spun with the wet spinning process. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and mechanical testing were conducted to study the particular thermal/mechanical properties of shape memory polyurethane fiber in comparison with other man-made fibers such as nylon6, polyester, Lycra and XLA. In addition, in the preparation of shape memory polyurethane fiber, the effect of thermal setting temperature was systematically investigated by mechanical properties testing, DMA and cyclic tensile testing, suggesting that the thermal setting temperature has a huge influence on the mechanical properties and shape memory property due to the elimination of internal stress. Thermal setting with a higher temperature will give rise to a lower tensile modulus and tenacity and a higher elongation ratio at break. Through employing the optimal thermal setting treatment, the complete heating responsive recovery in SMPU fiber can be achieved because of the counteracting effect of the irreversible strain and thermal shrinkage.

  8. The earth's shape and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, G D; Wilson, J T

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's Shape and Gravity focuses on the progress of the use of geophysical methods in investigating the interior of the earth and its shape. The publication first offers information on gravity, geophysics, geodesy, and geology and gravity measurements. Discussions focus on gravity measurements and reductions, potential and equipotential surfaces, absolute and relative measurements, and gravity networks. The text then elaborates on the shape of the sea-level surface and reduction of gravity observations. The text takes a look at gravity anomalies and structures in the earth's crust; interp

  9. Topological Coarse Shape Homotopy Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanei, Fateme; Mirebrahimi, Hanieh; Mashayekhy, Behrooz; Nasri, Tayyebe

    2016-01-01

    Uchillo-Ibanez et al. introduced a topology on the sets of shape morphisms between arbitrary topological spaces in 1999. In this paper, applying a similar idea, we introduce a topology on the set of coarse shape morphisms $Sh^*(X,Y)$, for arbitrary topological spaces $X$ and $Y$. In particular, we can consider a topology on the coarse shape homotopy group of a topological space $(X,x)$, $Sh^*((S^k,*),(X,x))=\\check{\\pi}_k^{*}(X,x)$, which makes it a Hausdorff topological group. Moreover, we st...

  10. On Topological Shape Homotopy Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Nasri, Tayyebe; Ghanei, Fatemeh; Mashayekhy, Behrooz; Mirebrahimi, Hanieh

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, using the topology on the set of shape morphisms between arbitrary topological spaces $X$, $Y$, $Sh(X,Y)$, defined by Cuchillo-Ibanez et al. in 1999, we consider a topology on the shape homotopy groups of arbitrary topological spaces which make them Hausdorff topological groups. We then exhibit an example in which $\\check{\\pi}_k^{top}$ succeeds in distinguishing the shape type of $X$ and $Y$ while $\\check{\\pi}_k$ fails, for all $k\\in \\Bbb{N}$. Moreover, we present some basic pr...

  11. Determining nuclear shape: The role of farnesylated nuclear membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Polychronidou, Maria; Großhans, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Changes in nuclear morphology are observed in diverse developmental processes as well as in pathological conditions. Modification of nuclear membrane and nuclear lamina protein levels results in altered nuclear shapes, as it has been demonstrated in experimental systems ranging from yeast to human cells. The important role of nuclear membrane components in regulating nuclear morphology is additionally highlighted by the abnormally shaped nuclei observed in diseases where nuclear lamina protei...

  12. FMRI evidence of 'mirror' responses to geometric shapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Press

    Full Text Available Mirror neurons may be a genetic adaptation for social interaction. Alternatively, the associative hypothesis proposes that the development of mirror neurons is driven by sensorimotor learning, and that, given suitable experience, mirror neurons will respond to any stimulus. This hypothesis was tested using fMRI adaptation to index populations of cells with mirror properties. After sensorimotor training, where geometric shapes were paired with hand actions, BOLD response was measured while human participants experienced runs of events in which shape observation alternated with action execution or observation. Adaptation from shapes to action execution, and critically, observation, occurred in ventral premotor cortex (PMv and inferior parietal lobule (IPL. Adaptation from shapes to execution indicates that neuronal populations responding to the shapes had motor properties, while adaptation to observation demonstrates that these populations had mirror properties. These results indicate that sensorimotor training induced populations of cells with mirror properties in PMv and IPL to respond to the observation of arbitrary shapes. They suggest that the mirror system has not been shaped by evolution to respond in a mirror fashion to biological actions; instead, its development is mediated by stimulus-general processes of learning within a system adapted for visuomotor control.

  13. Measuring shape fluctuations in biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzel, C.; Sengupta, K.

    2016-06-01

    Shape fluctuations of lipid membranes have intrigued cell biologists and physicists alike. In the cellular context, their origin—thermal or active—and their physiological significance are open questions. These small incessant displacements, also called membrane undulations, have mostly been studied in model membranes and membranes of simple cells like erythrocytes. Thermal fluctuations of such membranes have been very well described both theoretically and experimentally; active fluctuations are a topic of current interest. Experimentally, membrane fluctuations are not easy to measure, the main challenge being to develop techniques which are capable of measuring very small displacements at very high speed, and preferably over a large area and long time. Scattering techniques have given access to fluctuations in membrane stacks and a variety of optical microscopy based techniques have been devised to study membrane fluctuations of unilamellar vesicles, erythrocytes and other cells. Among them are flicker spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, diffraction phase microscopy and reflection interference contrast microscopy. Each of these techniques has its advantages and limitations. Here we review the basic principles of the major experimental techniques used to measure bending or shape fluctuations of biomembranes. We report seminal results obtained with each technique and highlight how these studies furthered our understanding of physical properties of membranes and their interactions. We also discuss suggested role of membrane fluctuations in different biological processes.

  14. Aging changes in body shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003998.htm Aging changes in body shape To use the sharing ... and both sexes. Height loss is related to aging changes in the bones, muscles, and joints. People ...

  15. Shape morphing Kirigami mechanical metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Robin M.; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Pirrera, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical metamaterials exhibit unusual properties through the shape and movement of their engineered subunits. This work presents a new investigation of the Poisson’s ratios of a family of cellular metamaterials based on Kirigami design principles. Kirigami is the art of cutting and folding paper to obtain 3D shapes. This technique allows us to create cellular structures with engineered cuts and folds that produce large shape and volume changes, and with extremely directional, tuneable mechanical properties. We demonstrate how to produce these structures from flat sheets of composite materials. By a combination of analytical models and numerical simulations we show how these Kirigami cellular metamaterials can change their deformation characteristics. We also demonstrate the potential of using these classes of mechanical metamaterials for shape change applications like morphing structures.

  16. Shape morphing Kirigami mechanical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Robin M; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Pirrera, Alberto

    2016-08-05

    Mechanical metamaterials exhibit unusual properties through the shape and movement of their engineered subunits. This work presents a new investigation of the Poisson's ratios of a family of cellular metamaterials based on Kirigami design principles. Kirigami is the art of cutting and folding paper to obtain 3D shapes. This technique allows us to create cellular structures with engineered cuts and folds that produce large shape and volume changes, and with extremely directional, tuneable mechanical properties. We demonstrate how to produce these structures from flat sheets of composite materials. By a combination of analytical models and numerical simulations we show how these Kirigami cellular metamaterials can change their deformation characteristics. We also demonstrate the potential of using these classes of mechanical metamaterials for shape change applications like morphing structures.

  17. Barrel-shaped supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors argue that the majority of radio supernova remnants have a three-dimensional distribution of emissivity which is barrel shaped, with little emission from the end-caps. They examine some mechanisms which could produce this distribution

  18. The Thoracic Shape of Hominoids

    OpenAIRE

    Lap Ki Chan

    2014-01-01

    In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cad...

  19. Shape Analysis for Unstructured Sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huisong; Rival, Xavier; Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan

    2015-01-01

    Shape analysis aims to infer precise structural properties of imperative memory states and has been applied heavily to verify safety properties on imperative code over pointer-based data structures. Recent advances in shape analysis based on separation logic has leveraged sum-marization predicates that describe unbounded heap regions like lists or trees using inductive definitions. Unfortunately, data structures with un-structured sharing, such as graphs, are challenging to describe and reaso...

  20. Determination of hair structure and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlake, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    The hair follicle attracted significant attention as a model for the investigation of diverse biological problems. Whereas its morphology and the structure of the hair shaft are known in detail, the molecular biology of this miniorgan is significantly less characterised. Many efforts focussed on the development of the hair follicle and its stem cell reservoir; by contrast, the follicular product, the hair, which is interesting not only in terms of cosmetics was neglected. This review highlights our current knowledge of the control of hair structure and shape with emphasis on mouse hair follicle biology and discusses continuing problems.

  1. Shape analysis of synthetic diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional images of synthetic industrial diamond particles were obtained using a camera, framegrabber and PC-based image analysis software. Various methods for shape quantification were applied, including two-dimensional shape factors, Fourier series expansion of radius as a function of angle, boundary fractal analysis, polygonal harmonics, and comer counting methods. The shape parameter found to be the most relevant was axis ratio, defined as the ratio of the minor axis to the major axis of the ellipse with the same second moments of area as the particle. Axis ratio was used in an analysis of the sorting of synthetic diamonds on a vibrating table. A model was derived based on the probability that a particle of a given axis ratio would travel to a certain bin. The model described the sorting of bulk material accurately but it was found not to be applicable if the shape mix of the feed material changed dramatically. This was attributed to the fact that the particle-particle interference was not taken into account. An expert system and a neural network were designed in an attempt to classify particles by a combination of four shape parameters. These systems gave good results when discriminating between particles from bin 1 and bin 9 but not for neighbouring bins or for more than two classes. The table sorting process was discussed in light of the findings and it was demonstrated that the shape distributions of sorted diamond fractions can be quantified in a useful and meaningful way. (author)

  2. MULTISCALE DISCRETIZATION OF SHAPE CONTOURS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, L.; Rao, R.

    2000-09-01

    We present an efficient multi-scale scheme to adaptively approximate the continuous (or densely sampled) contour of a planar shape at varying resolutions. The notion of shape is intimately related to the notion of contour, and the efficient representation of the contour of a shape is vital to a computational understanding of the shape. Any polygonal approximation of a planar smooth curve is equivalent to a piecewise constant approximation of the parameterized X and Y coordinate functions of a discrete point set obtained by densely sampling the curve. Using the Haar wavelet transform for the piecewise approximation yields a hierarchical scheme in which the size of the approximating point set is traded off against the morphological accuracy of the approximation. Our algorithm compresses the representation of the initial shape contour to a sparse sequence of points in the plane defining the vertices of the shape's polygonal approximation. Furthermore, it is possible to control the overall resolution of the approximation by a single, scale-independent parameter.

  3. Optimal stimulus shapes for neuronal excitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Forger

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in neuronal computation is to discern how features of stimuli control the timing of action potentials. One aspect of this problem is to determine how an action potential, or spike, can be elicited with the least energy cost, e.g., a minimal amount of applied current. Here we show in the Hodgkin & Huxley model of the action potential and in experiments on squid giant axons that: 1 spike generation in a neuron can be highly discriminatory for stimulus shape and 2 the optimal stimulus shape is dependent upon inputs to the neuron. We show how polarity and time course of post-synaptic currents determine which of these optimal stimulus shapes best excites the neuron. These results are obtained mathematically using the calculus of variations and experimentally using a stochastic search methodology. Our findings reveal a surprising complexity of computation at the single cell level that may be relevant for understanding optimization of signaling in neurons and neuronal networks.

  4. Shape analysis in medical image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, João

    2014-01-01

    This book contains thirteen contributions from invited experts of international recognition addressing important issues in shape analysis in medical image analysis, including techniques for image segmentation, registration, modelling and classification, and applications in biology, as well as in cardiac, brain, spine, chest, lung and clinical practice. This volume treats topics such as, anatomic and functional shape representation and matching; shape-based medical image segmentation; shape registration; statistical shape analysis; shape deformation; shape-based abnormity detection; shape tracking and longitudinal shape analysis; machine learning for shape modeling and analysis; shape-based computer-aided-diagnosis; shape-based medical navigation; benchmark and validation of shape representation, analysis and modeling algorithms. This work will be of interest to researchers, students, and manufacturers in the fields of artificial intelligence, bioengineering, biomechanics, computational mechanics, computationa...

  5. Blocked Shape Memory Effect in Negative Poisson's Ratio Polymer Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boba, Katarzyna; Bianchi, Matteo; McCombe, Greg; Gatt, Ruben; Griffin, Anselm C; Richardson, Robert M; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Hamerton, Ian; Grima, Joseph N

    2016-08-10

    We describe a new class of negative Poisson's ratio (NPR) open cell PU-PE foams produced by blocking the shape memory effect in the polymer. Contrary to classical NPR open cell thermoset and thermoplastic foams that return to their auxetic phase after reheating (and therefore limit their use in technological applications), this new class of cellular solids has a permanent negative Poisson's ratio behavior, generated through multiple shape memory (mSM) treatments that lead to a fixity of the topology of the cell foam. The mSM-NPR foams have Poisson's ratio values similar to the auxetic foams prior their return to the conventional phase, but compressive stress-strain curves similar to the ones of conventional foams. The results show that by manipulating the shape memory effect in polymer microstructures it is possible to obtain new classes of materials with unusual deformation mechanisms.

  6. Shape memory polymer foams for endovascular therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2012-03-13

    A system for occluding a physical anomaly. One embodiment comprises a shape memory material body wherein the shape memory material body fits within the physical anomaly occluding the physical anomaly. The shape memory material body has a primary shape for occluding the physical anomaly and a secondary shape for being positioned in the physical anomaly.

  7. Trichomes control flower bud shape by linking together young petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiafu; Walford, Sally-Anne; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Llewellyn, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Trichomes are widespread in plants and develop from surface cells on different tissues(1). They have many forms and functions, from defensive spines to physical barriers that trap layers of air to insulate against desiccation, but there is growing evidence that trichomes can also have developmental roles in regulating flower structure(2,3). We report here that the trichomes on petals of cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., are essential for correct flower bud shape through a mechanical entanglement of the trichomes on adjacent petals that anchor the edges to counter the opposing force generated by asymmetric expansion of overlapping petals. Silencing a master regulator of petal trichomes, GhMYB-MIXTA-Like10 (GhMYBML10), by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed petal trichome growth and resulted in flower buds forming into abnormal corkscrew shapes that exposed developing anthers and stigmas to desiccation damage. Artificially gluing petal edges together could partially restore correct bud shape and fertility. Such petal 'Velcro' is present in other Malvaceae and perhaps more broadly in other plant families, although it is not ubiquitous. This mechanism for physical association between separate organs to regulate flower shape and function is different from the usual organ shape control(4) exerted through cell-to-cell communication and differential cell expansion within floral tissues(5,6). PMID:27322517

  8. New pulse shape analysis method with multi-shaping amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel pulse-shape-analysis method that uses 'similarity' to recognize an individual pulse shape is presented. We obtain four pulse heights by using four linear amplifiers with time constants of 0.5, 2, 3 and 6 μs. We treat a combination of four pulse heights as a pattern vector. Each pulse shape is analyzed by using the similarity. The method has been applied to the improvement of characteristics of a CdZnTe semiconductor detector (eV Products 180.5.5.5s, 5x5x5 mm). A CdZnTe semiconductor detector has prominent properties that are desirable as a radiation detector. The high atomic numbers indicate a larger detection efficiency for X or gamma rays than that of other semiconductor detectors such as Si or Ge ones. The large forbidden band gap energy permits room temperature operation. However, as is common with other compound semiconductor materials, the pulse shapes from CdZnTe detectors differ from event to event depending on the positions of radiation interaction because of the different mobilities of the holes and electrons, and the short life time of the holes or trapping in the bulk. We tried to correct each pulse height by analyzing and compensating through the analysis of the pulse shapes with the similarity. After the correction procedure with the similarity, characteristics of the energy spectrum of the CdZnTe semiconductor detector such as peak-to-valley ratio or photopeak efficiency were improved. The results are tabulated. This method is simple and useful for pulse shape analysis, which can be used for many other applications

  9. Shape Control of Solar Collectors Using Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobitz, D. W.; Grossman, J. W.; Allen, J. J.; Rice, T. M.; Liang, C.; Davidson, F. M.

    1996-01-01

    Solar collectors that are focused on a central receiver are designed with a mechanism for defocusing the collector or disabling it by turning it out of the path of the sun's rays. This is required to avoid damaging the receiver during periods of inoperability. In either of these two cases a fail-safe operation is very desirable where during power outages the collector passively goes to its defocused or deactivated state. This paper is principally concerned with focusing and defocusing the collector in a fail-safe manner using shape memory alloy actuators. Shape memory alloys are well suited to this application in that once calibrated the actuators can be operated in an on/off mode using a minimal amount of electric power. Also, in contrast to other smart materials that were investigated for this application, shape memory alloys are capable of providing enough stroke at the appropriate force levels to focus the collector. Design and analysis details presented, along with comparisons to test data taken from an actual prototype, demonstrate that the collector can be repeatedly focused and defocused within accuracies required by typical solar energy systems. In this paper the design, analysis and testing of a solar collector which is deformed into its desired shape by shape memory alloy actuators is presented. Computations indicate collector shapes much closer to spherical and with smaller focal lengths can be achieved by moving the actuators inward to a radius of approximately 6 inches. This would require actuators with considerably more stroke and some alternate SMA actuators are currently under consideration. Whatever SMA actuator is finally chosen for this application, repeatability and fatigue tests will be required to investigate the long term performance of the actuator.

  10. Fiber-shaped energy harvesting and storage devices

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Huisheng

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive book covers flexible fiber-shaped devices in the area of energy conversion and storage. The first part of the book introduces recently developed materials, particularly, various nanomaterials and composite materials based on nanostructured carbon such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, metals and polymers for the construction of fiber electrodes. The second part of the book focuses on two typical twisted and coaxial architectures of fiber-shaped devices for energy conversion and storage. The emphasis is placed on dye-sensitized solar cells, polymer solar cells, lithium-ion b

  11. Shape classification and analysis theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da Fona

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTION TO SHAPE ANALYSISCASE STUDIESCOMPUTATIONAL SHAPE ANALYSISADDITIONAL MATERIALORGANIZATION OF THE BOOK BASIC MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTSBASIC CONCEPTSLINEAR ALGEBRADIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRYMULTIVARIATE CALCULUSCONVOLUTION AND CORRELATIONPROBABILITY AND STATISTICSFOURIER ANALYSISGRAPHS AND COMPLEX NETWORKS SHAPE ACQUISITION AND PROCESSINGIMAGE REPRESENTATIONIMAGE PROC

  12. Quantifying the shape of aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrycza, Tomasz F; Missov, Trifon I; Baudisch, Annette

    2015-01-01

    In Biodemography, aging is typically measured and compared based on aging rates. We argue that this approach may be misleading, because it confounds the time aspect with the mere change aspect of aging. To disentangle these aspects, here we utilize a time-standardized framework and, instead...... of aging rates, suggest the shape of aging as a novel and valuable alternative concept for comparative aging research. The concept of shape captures the direction and degree of change in the force of mortality over age, which—on a demographic level—reflects aging. We 1) provide a list of shape properties...... suggested here aim to provide a general means to classify aging patterns independent of any particular mortality model and independent of any species-specific time-scale. Thereby they support systematic comparative aging research across different species or between populations of the same species under...

  13. Topological Derivatives in Shape Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Novotny, Antonio André

    2013-01-01

    The topological derivative is defined as the first term (correction) of the asymptotic expansion of a given shape functional with respect to a small parameter that measures the size of singular domain perturbations, such as holes, inclusions, defects, source-terms and cracks. Over the last decade, topological asymptotic analysis has become a broad, rich and fascinating research area from both theoretical and numerical standpoints. It has applications in many different fields such as shape and topology optimization, inverse problems, imaging processing and mechanical modeling including synthesis and/or optimal design of microstructures, sensitivity analysis in fracture mechanics and damage evolution modeling. Since there is no monograph on the subject at present, the authors provide here the first account of the theory which combines classical sensitivity analysis in shape optimization with asymptotic analysis by means of compound asymptotic expansions for elliptic boundary value problems. This book is intende...

  14. Fragmentation Function and Jet Shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Asaduzzaman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    In this project work, fragmentation function, jet shapes for hard particles and jet shapes for soft particles have been calculated in different $P_{t}$ range using Pythia Monte-Carlo Simulation at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV. For Jet reconstruction, anti-$k_{t}$ algorithm has been used with jet resolution parameter R=0.6 and with momentum cut of particles at 4 GeV. Pseudorapidity was taken to be $|\\eta| 4$ GeV) have been studied. For verification of the working procedure, jet shape for all particles were also calculated with no transverse momentum cut during jet reconstruction and the results were compared to the results of ATLAS measurements. Statistical errors were computed and is well-matched with the order of error with ATLAS measurements.

  15. Nuclear shapes: from earliest ideas to multiple shape coexisting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyde, K.; Wood, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of the atomic nucleus being characterized by an intrinsic property such as shape came as a result of high precision hyperfine studies in the field of atomic physics, which indicated a non-spherical nuclear charge distribution. Herein, we describe the various steps taken through ingenious experimentation and bold theoretical suggestions that mapped the way for later work in the early 50s by Aage Bohr, Ben Mottelson and James Rainwater. We lay out a long and winding road that marked, in the period of 50s to 70s, the way shell-model and collective-model concepts were reconciled. A rapid increase in both accelerator and detection methods (70s towards the early 2000s) opened new vistas into nuclear shapes, and their coexistence, in various regions of the nuclear mass table. Next, we outline a possible unified view of nuclear shapes: emphasizing decisive steps taken as well as questions remaining, next to the theoretical efforts that could result in an emerging understanding of nuclear shapes, building on the nucleus considered as a strongly interacting system of nucleons as the microscopic starting point.

  16. What determines a leaf's shape?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dkhar, Jeremy; Pareek, Ashwani

    2014-01-01

    The independent origin and evolution of leaves as small, simple microphylls or larger, more complex megaphylls in plants has shaped and influenced the natural composition of the environment. Significant contributions have come from megaphyllous leaves, characterized usually as flat, thin lamina entrenched with photosynthetic organelles and stomata, which serve as the basis of primary productivity. During the course of evolution, the megaphylls have attained complexity not only in size or venation patterns but also in shape. This has fascinated scientists worldwide, and research has progressed tremendously in understanding the concept of leaf shape determination. Here, we review these studies and discuss the various factors that contributed towards shaping the leaf; initiated as a small bulge on the periphery of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) followed by asymmetric outgrowth, expansion and maturation until final shape is achieved. We found that the underlying factors governing these processes are inherently genetic: PIN1 and KNOX1 are indicators of leaf initiation, HD-ZIPIII, KANADI, and YABBY specify leaf outgrowth while ANGUSTIFOLIA3 and GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR5 control leaf expansion and maturation; besides, recent research has identified new players such as APUM23, known to specify leaf polarity. In addition to genetic control, environmental factors also play an important role during the final adjustment of leaf shape. This immense amount of information available will serve as the basis for studying and understanding innovative leaf morphologies viz. the pitchers of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes which have evolved to provide additional support to the plant survival in its nutrient-deficient habitat. In hindsight, formation of the pitcher tube in Nepenthes might involve the recruitment of similar genetic mechanisms that occur during sympetaly in Petunia. PMID:25584185

  17. Lithographically defined shape-specific polymeric particulates for nanomedicine application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li

    Size and shape are fundamental properties of micro/nano particles that are critically important for nanomedicine applications. Extensive studies have revealed the effect particle size has on spherical particles with respect to biological behaviors such as blood circulation time or targeting efficacy to specific receptors on the cell. In contrast, the importance of particle shape has been less understood. The major contributing factor is that conventional bottom-up fabrication methods are limited in their ability to control the shape of polymeric particles precisely. This dissertation will mainly focus on the development of top-down platforms to fabricate shape-specific polymeric particles. Shape-specific polymeric particles incorporated with fluorescent or magnetic agents were demonstrated with high uniformity. Microfluidic testing platform was built to verify the shape effect on the flow behavior of fabricated particles. The fabrication platform developed here opened up the opportunity to perform fundamental study on how shape can alter the biological behavior of polymeric nanomedicine, thus leading to a more rational design of nanomedicine with enhanced efficacy but reduced toxicity.

  18. Star-Shaped Conjugated Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiner Detert

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The present review deals with the preparation and the properties of star-shaped conjugated compounds. Three, four or six conjugated arms are attached to cross-conjugated cores, which consist of single atoms (B, C+, N, benzene or azine rings or polycyclic ring systems, as for example triphenylene or tristriazolotriazine. Many of these shape-persistent [n]star compounds tend to π-stacking and self-organization, and exhibit interesting properties in materials science: Linear and non-linear optics, electrical conductivity, electroluminescence, formation of liquid crystalline phases, etc.

  19. Abrasion of flat rotating shapes

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, A.E.; Marques, C. M.; Durian, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the erosion of flat linoleum "pebbles" under steady rotation in a slurry of abrasive grit. To quantify shape as a function of time, we develop a general method in which the pebble is photographed from multiple angles with respect to the grid of pixels in a digital camera. This reduces digitization noise, and allows the local curvature of the contour to be computed with a controllable degree of uncertainty. Several shape descriptors are then employed to follow the evolution of dif...

  20. Signed shape tilings of squares

    OpenAIRE

    Keating, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    Let T be a tile in the Cartesian plane made up of finitely many rectangles whose corners have rational coordinates and whose sides are parallel to the coordinate axes. This paper gives necessary and sufficient conditions for a square to be tilable by finitely many \\Q-weighted tiles with the same shape as T, and necessary and sufficient conditions for a square to be tilable by finitely many \\Z-weighted tiles with the same shape as T. The main tool we use is a variant of F. W. Barnes's algebrai...

  1. Acoustic Echoes Reveal Room Shape

    OpenAIRE

    Dokmanic, Ivan; Parhizkar, Reza; Walther, Andreas; Lu, Yue M.; Vetterli, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Imagine that you are blindfolded inside an unknown room. You snap your fingers and listen to the room’s response. Can you hear the shape of the room? Some people can do it naturally, but can we design computer algorithms that hear rooms? We show how to compute the shape of a convex polyhedral room from its response to a known sound, recorded by a few microphones. Geometric relationships between the arrival times of echoes enable us to “blindfoldedly” estimate the room geometry. This is achiev...

  2. Shaping the American School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogletree, Earl J.; Fakhri, Muhammad A. W.

    1977-01-01

    Asserts that historically, the American schools have been shaped by a myriad of social, political and economic forces. The transformation of the schools from the first, but sectarian schools of New England in 1635 to the secular alternative schools of today has reflected the desire of Americans to provide equal educational opportunities."…

  3. Shape from Shading in Pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Robert G.; Qadri, Muhammad A. J.; Kieres, Art; Commons-Miller, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Light is the origin of vision. The pattern of shading reflected from object surfaces is one of several optical features that provide fundamental information about shape and surface orientation. To understand how surface and object shading is processed by birds, six pigeons were tested with differentially illuminated convex and concave curved…

  4. Graphical fiber shaping control interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Eric T.; Ninomiya, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present an improved graphical user interface for defining single-pass novel shaping techniques on glass processing machines that allows for streamlined process development. This approach offers unique modularity and debugging capability to researchers during the process development phase not usually afforded with similar scripting languages.

  5. Familial band-shaped keratopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticho, U; Lahav, M; Ivry, M

    1979-01-01

    A brother and sister out of a consanguinous family of four siblings are presented as prototypes of primary band-shaped keratopathy. The disease manifested sever progressive changes of secondary nature over two years of follow-up. Histology and treatment are described.

  6. SHAPE CHARACTERIZATION OF CONCRETE AGGREGATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available As a composite material, the performance of concrete materials can be expected to depend on the properties of the interfaces between its two major components, aggregate and cement paste. The microstructure at the interfacial transition zone (ITZ is assumed to be different from the bulk material. In general, properties of conventional concrete have been found favoured by optimum packing density of the aggregate. Particle size is a common denominator in such studies. Size segregation in the ITZ among the binder particles in the fresh state, observed in simulation studies by concurrent algorithm-based SPACE system, additionally governs density as well as physical bonding capacity inside these shell-like zones around aggregate particles. These characteristics have been demonstrated qualitatively pertaining also after maturation of the concrete. Such properties of the ITZs have direct impact on composite properties. Despite experimental approaches revealed effects of aggregate grain shape on different features of material structure (among which density, and as a consequence on mechanical properties, it is still an underrated factor in laboratory studies, probably due to the general feeling that a suitable methodology for shape characterization is not available. A scientific argument hindering progress is the interconnected nature of size and shape. Presently, a practical problem preventing shape effects to be emphasized is the limitation of most computer simulation systems in concrete technology to spherical particles. New developments at Delft University of Technology will make it possible in the near future to generate jammed states, or other high-density fresh particle mixtures of non-spherical particles, which thereupon can be subjected to hydration algorithms. This paper will sketch the outlines of a methodological approach for shape assessment of loose (non-embedded aggregate grains, and demonstrate its use for two types of aggregate, allowing

  7. Method and apparatus for determining the shape characteristics of particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heffels, C.M.G

    1995-01-01

    To determine the shape characteristics of particles, a light beam (preferably a laser beam) is directed onto a transparent cell containing particles flowing therein and the intensity of the light scattered by the particles is measured with the aid of a photodetector array or a mask containing progra

  8. Second Shape Finding Analysis of Membrane Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨维国; 甄伟; 徐福江; 那向谦

    2004-01-01

    A second shape finding method was developed to improve the nonlinear finite element based shape finding method. The curved shape is obtained by raising the control points above the projection plane. The convergence was improved using pseudo material properties to get a preliminary shape, and then using the real properties to get the final shape. A large number of examples were analyzed to verify the validity and practicality of this method. The results show that the final curved surface after the second shape finding process is always quite similar to the first one. Moreover, the curved surface obtained after the second shape finding process is accurate and will be realized in real materials.

  9. A numerical study of channel-to-channel flow cross-over through the gas diffusion layer in a PEM-fuel-cell flow system using a serpentine channel with a trapezoidal cross-sectional shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lan; Oosthuizen, Patrick H. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, McLaughlin Hall, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); McAuley, Kim B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Dupuis Hall, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2006-10-15

    A numerical study of pressure distribution and flow cross-over through the gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a PEMFC flow plate using a serpentine channel system has been undertaken for the case where the channel has a trapezoidal cross-sectional shape. The flow has been assumed to be 3-D, steady, incompressible and single-phase. The flow through the porous diffusion layer has been described using the Darcy model. The governing equations have been written in dimensionless form and solved by using the commercial CFD solver, FIDAP. The results obtained indicate that: (1) the size ratio, R, of trapezoidal cross-sectional shape has a significant effect on the flow cross-over. As R increases, the flow cross-over through GDL increases; (2) the ratio R also has a significant effect on the pressure variation in the flow field for both cross-over and no cross-over cases; (3) flow cross-over has a significant influence on the pressure variation through the channel, tending to decrease the pressure drop across the channel; (4) an increase in Re number can lead to a slight increase in the flow cross-over. (author)

  10. Reliability of PET/CT shape and heterogeneity features in functional and morphological components of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer tumors: a repeatability analysis in a prospective multi-center cohort

    CERN Document Server

    Desseroit, Marie-Charlotte; Weber, Wolfgang; Siegel, Barry A; Rest, Catherine Cheze Le; Visvikis, Dimitris; Hatt, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of shape and heterogeneity features in both Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and low-dose Computed Tomography (CT) components of PET/CT. A secondary objective was to investigate the impact of image quantization.Material and methods: A Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act -compliant secondary analysis of deidentified prospectively acquired PET/CT test-retest datasets of 74 patients from multi-center Merck and ACRIN trials was performed. Metabolically active volumes were automatically delineated on PET with Fuzzy Locally Adaptive Bayesian algorithm. 3DSlicerTM was used to semi-automatically delineate the anatomical volumes on low-dose CT components. Two quantization methods were considered: a quantization into a set number of bins (quantizationB) and an alternative quantization with bins of fixed width (quantizationW). Four shape descriptors, ten first-order metrics and 26 textural features were computed. Bland-Altman analysi...

  11. Release of Compact Nucleoids with Characteristic Shapes from Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Steven B.; Murphy, Lizabeth D.

    2001-01-01

    The genomic DNA of bacteria is contained in one or a few compact bodies known as nucleoids. We describe a simple procedure that retains the general shape and compaction of nucleoids from Escherichia coli upon cell lysis and nucleoid release from the cell envelope. The procedure is a modification of that used for the preparation of spermidine nucleoids (nucleoids released in the presence of spermidine) (T. Kornberg, A. Lockwood, and A. Worcel, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 71:3189–3193, 1974). Polylysine is added to prevent the normal decompaction of nucleoids which occurs upon cell lysis. Nucleoids retained their characteristic shapes in lysates of exponential-phase cells or in lysates of cells treated with chloramphenicol or nalidixate to alter nucleoid morphology. The notably unstable nucleoids of rifampin-treated cells were obtained in compact, stable form in such lysates. Nucleoids released in the presence of polylysine were easily processed and provided well-defined DNA fluorescence and phase-contrast images. Uniform populations of nucleoids retaining characteristic shapes could be isolated after formaldehyde fixation and heating with sodium dodecyl sulfate. PMID:11489856

  12. A Crescent Shaped Split Ring Resonator to Form a New Metamaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Nidal Abutahoun; Mohamed Ouda

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new planner metamaterial consisting of crescent shaped split ring resonator unit cells. The cell is composed of a crescent shaped strip over one face of a dielectric substrate, and an oblong over the second face. The cell is very thin and easy to fabricate. The transmission characteristics of the structure were obtained using High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) commercial software by ANSOFT. Then the effective material properties were retrieved. All the transmissio...

  13. Optogenetic signaling-pathway regulation through scattering skull using wavefront shaping

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Jonghee; Lee, KyeoReh; Kim, Nury; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Jongchan; Choi, Chulhee; Heo, Won Do; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a non-invasive approach for optogenetic regulation in biological cells through highly scattering skull tissue using wavefront shaping. The wavefront of the incident light was systematically controlled using a spatial light modulator in order to overcome multiple light-scattering in a mouse skull layer and to focus light on the target cells. We demonstrate that illumination with shaped waves enables spatiotemporal regulation of intracellular Ca2+ level at the individual-cell level.

  14. Polygonal Shape Blending with Topological Evolutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Gang Liu; Bo Zhang; Bai-Ning Guo; Heung-Yeung Shum

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new general approach to blend 2D shapes with different topologies. All possible topolog ical evolutions are classified into three types by attaching three different topological cells. This formalism is resulted from Morse theory on the behavior of the 3D surface around a non-degenerate critical point. Also we incorporate degenerate topological evolutions into our framework which produce more attractive morphing effects. The user controls the morph by specifying the types of topological evolutions as well as the feature correspondences between the source and target shapes.Some techniques are also provided to control the vertex path during the morphing process. The amount of user input required to produce a morph is directly proportional to the amount of control the user wishes to impose on the process.The user may allow the system to automatically generate the morph as well. Our approaches are totally geometric based and are easy and fast enough in fully interactive time. Many experimental results show the applicability and flexibility of our approaches.

  15. Familial band-shaped nodular keratopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisler, D M; Tabbara, K F; Wood, I S; Alvarado, J A; Biswell, R

    1985-02-01

    A family is reported in which two brothers have a bilateral, symmetrical corneal disorder characterized by small yellowish to amber-colored globules arranged in a band-shaped configuration in the central superficial layers of the cornea. The globules have a similar clinical appearance to those found in Bietti's "band-shaped nodular dystrophy," a keratopathy that is nonfamilial, has an onset later in life, and initially involves the peripheral cornea. Light and electron microscopic studies of corneal tissue obtained from the proband showed that the globular deposits autofluoresce, that they stain black with Verhoeff's elastic stain, and that they correspond to an electron-dense material found within corneal epithelial cells and keratocytes and within the extracellular tissues of the anterior cornea. A third, younger brother appears to have the early corneal signs of the condition. Unlike the condition described by Bietti, the keratopathy we report is unique in its familial nature, early onset in life, and initial, marked central corneal involvement.

  16. Boomerang-shaped VOX nanocrystallites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlecht, U.; Kienle, L.; Duppel, V.; Burghard, M.; Kern, K.

    2004-09-01

    "L"-shaped VOX nanobelts were obtained by hydrothermal synthesis. These nanobelts represent the first example of nano-sized objects, containing well-defined kinks. The angle was found to be 96° ± 3°. Here we report on initial experiments with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), which revealed twinning to be the origin of the kinked structure. The interesting boomerang-shaped nanocrystallites were compared with their more widely known counterpart, the V2O5 nanofibers. Furthermore, thin films with areas exceeding 10 × 10 μm2 have been found to be produced by the hydrothermal synthesis route. The SAED data revealed, that all three morphologies are based on a similar crystal structure.

  17. Shape-Shifting Droplet Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Wan, Duanduan; Schwarz, J. M.; Bowick, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a three-dimensional network of aqueous droplets joined by single lipid bilayers to form a cohesive, tissuelike material. The droplets in these networks can be programed to have distinct osmolarities so that osmotic gradients generate internal stresses via local fluid flows to cause the network to change shape. We discover, using molecular dynamics simulations, a reversible folding-unfolding process by adding an osmotic interaction with the surrounding environment which necessarily evolves dynamically as the shape of the network changes. This discovery is the next important step towards osmotic robotics in this system. We also explore analytically and numerically how the networks become faceted via buckling and how quasi-one-dimensional networks become three dimensional.

  18. Shape analysis with subspace symmetries

    KAUST Repository

    Berner, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    We address the problem of partial symmetry detection, i.e., the identification of building blocks a complex shape is composed of. Previous techniques identify parts that relate to each other by simple rigid mappings, similarity transforms, or, more recently, intrinsic isometries. Our approach generalizes the notion of partial symmetries to more general deformations. We introduce subspace symmetries whereby we characterize similarity by requiring the set of symmetric parts to form a low dimensional shape space. We present an algorithm to discover subspace symmetries based on detecting linearly correlated correspondences among graphs of invariant features. We evaluate our technique on various data sets. We show that for models with pronounced surface features, subspace symmetries can be found fully automatically. For complicated cases, a small amount of user input is used to resolve ambiguities. Our technique computes dense correspondences that can subsequently be used in various applications, such as model repair and denoising. © 2010 The Author(s).

  19. Shape coexistence in 153Ho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Dibyadyuti; Sarkar, S.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta; Dasgupta, Shinjinee; Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan, Kshetri, Ritesh; Ray, Indrani; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Ray Basu, M.; Raut, R.; Ganguly, G.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Basu, S. K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, P.; Goswami, A.

    2016-08-01

    The high-spin states in 153Ho have been studied by the La57(20Ne139,6 n ) reaction at a projectile energy of 139 MeV at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata, India, utilizing an earlier campaign of the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA) setup. Data from γ -γ coincidence, directional correlation, and polarization measurements have been analyzed to assign and confirm the spins and parities of the levels. We have suggested a few additions and revisions of the reported level scheme of 153Ho. The RF-γ time difference spectra have been useful to confirm the half-life of an isomer in this nucleus. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical results, it is found that there are definite indications of shape coexistence in this nucleus. The experimental and calculated lifetimes of several isomers have been compared to follow the coexistence and evolution of shape with increasing spin.

  20. Shape coexistence in 153Ho

    CERN Document Server

    Pramanik, Dibyadyuti; Sarkar, M Saha; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta; Dasgupta, Shinjinee; Chakraborty, A; Krishichayan,; Kshetri, Ritesh; Ray, Indrani; Ganguly, S; Pradhan, M K; Basu, M Ray; Raut, R; Ganguly, G; Ghugre, S S; Sinha, A K; Basu, S K; Bhattacharya, S; Mukherjee, A; Banerjee, P; Goswami, A

    2016-01-01

    The high-spin states in 153Ho, have been studied by 139 57 La(20Ne, 6n) reaction at a projectile energy of 139 MeV at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata, India, utilizing an earlier campaign of Indian National Gamma Array (INGA) setup. Data from gamma-gamma coincidence, directional correlation and polarization measurements have been analyzed to assign and confirm the spins and parities of the levels. We have suggested a few additions and revisions of the reported level scheme of 153Ho. The RF-gamma time difference spectra have been useful to confirm the half-life of an isomer in this nucleus. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical results, it is found that there are definite indications of shape coexistence in this nucleus. The experimental and calculated lifetimes of several isomers have been compared to follow the coexistence and evolution of shape with increasing spin.

  1. Shaping the nonlinear near field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Daniela; Schumacher, Thorsten; Lippitz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Light scattering at plasmonic nanoparticles and their assemblies has led to a wealth of applications in metamaterials and nano-optics. Although shaping of fields around nanostructures is widely studied, the influence of the field inside the nanostructures is often overlooked. The linear field distribution inside the structure taken to the third power causes third-harmonic generation, a nonlinear optical response of matter. Here we demonstrate by a far field Fourier imaging method how this simple fact can be used to shape complex fields around a single particle alone. We employ this scheme to switch the third-harmonic emission from a single point source to two spatially separated but coherent sources, as in Young's double-slit assembly. We envision applications as diverse as coherently feeding antenna arrays and optical spectroscopy of spatially extended electronic states.

  2. Specification of ROP flux shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Byung Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Gray, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1997-06-01

    The CANDU 9 480/SEU core uses 0.9% SEU (Slightly Enriched Uranium) fuel. The use f SEU fuel enables the reactor to increase the radial power form factor from 0.865, which is typical in current natural uranium CANDU reactors, to 0.97 in the nominal CANDU 9 480/SEU core. The difference is a 12% increase in reactor power. An additional 5% increase can be achieved due to a reduced refuelling ripple. The channel power limits were also increased by 3% for a total reactor power increase of 20%. This report describes the calculation of neutron flux distributions in the CANDU 9 480/SEU core under conditions specified by the C and I engineers. The RFSP code was used to calculate of neutron flux shapes for ROP analysis. Detailed flux values at numerous potential detector sites were calculated for each flux shape. (author). 6 tabs., 70 figs., 4 refs.

  3. New trends in shape optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Leugering, Günter

    2015-01-01

    This volume reflects “New Trends in Shape Optimization” and is based on a workshop of the same name organized at the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg in September 2013. During the workshop senior mathematicians and young scientists alike presented their latest findings. The format of the meeting allowed fruitful discussions on challenging open problems, and triggered a number of new and spontaneous collaborations. As such, the idea was born to produce this book, each chapter of which was written by a workshop participant, often with a collaborator. The content of the individual chapters ranges from survey papers to original articles; some focus on the topics discussed at the Workshop, while others involve arguments outside its scope but which are no less relevant for the field today. As such, the book offers readers a balanced introduction to the emerging field of shape optimization.

  4. Biofabrication of multi-material anatomically shaped tissue constructs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additive manufacturing in the field of regenerative medicine aims to fabricate organized tissue-equivalents. However, the control over shape and composition of biofabricated constructs is still a challenge and needs to be improved. The current research aims to improve shape, by converging a number of biocompatible, quality construction materials into a single three-dimensional fiber deposition process. To demonstrate this, several models of complex anatomically shaped constructs were fabricated by combined deposition of poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(ε-caprolactone), gelatin methacrylamide/gellan gum and alginate hydrogel. Sacrificial components were co-deposited as temporary support for overhang geometries and were removed after fabrication by immersion in aqueous solutions. Embedding of chondrocytes in the gelatin methacrylamide/gellan component demonstrated that the fabrication and the sacrificing procedure did not affect cell viability. Further, it was shown that anatomically shaped constructs can be successfully fabricated, yielding advanced porous thermoplastic polymer scaffolds, layered porous hydrogel constructs, as well as reinforced cell-laden hydrogel structures. In conclusion, anatomically shaped tissue constructs of clinically relevant sizes can be generated when employing multiple building and sacrificial materials in a single biofabrication session. The current techniques offer improved control over both internal and external construct architecture underscoring its potential to generate customized implants for human tissue regeneration. (paper)

  5. Particle plasmons: Why shape matters

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, William L

    2016-01-01

    Simple analytic expressions for the polarizability of metallic nanoparticles are in wide use in the field of plasmonics, but their origins are not obvious. In this article, expressions for the polarizability of a particle are derived in the quasistatic limit in a manner that allows the physical origin of the terms to be clearly seen. The discussion is tutorial in nature, with particular attention given to the role of particle shape since this is a controlling factor in particle plasmon resonances.

  6. Particle plasmons: Why shape matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, William L.

    2016-08-01

    Simple analytic expressions for the polarizability of metallic nanoparticles are in wide use in the field of plasmonics, but their origins are not obvious. In this article, expressions for the polarizability of a particle are derived in the quasistatic limit in a manner that allows the physical origin of the terms to be clearly seen. The discussion is tutorial in nature, with particular attention given to the role of particle shape since this is a controlling factor in particle plasmon resonances.

  7. The Thoracic Shape of Hominoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lap Ki Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality.

  8. The thoracic shape of hominoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2014-01-01

    In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels) and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels) than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality. PMID:24818026

  9. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L . It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V =L3/6 π2 , and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V <α L3/6 π2 , with α ≈0.21 , such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V <α L3/6 π2 cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance.

  10. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Preve, Deison

    2015-01-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume $V$ and with a fixed equatorial perimeter $L$. It is well known that the sphere is the solution for $V=L^3/6\\pi^2$, and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for $V<\\alpha L^3/6\\pi^2$, with $\\alpha\\approx 0.21$, such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtainin...

  11. A nanoscale shape memory oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinxing; Ke, Xiaoxing; Gou, Gaoyang; Seidel, Jan; Xiang, Bin; Yu, Pu; Liang, Wen-I; Minor, Andrew M; Chu, Ying-Hao; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ren, Xiaobing; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2013-01-01

    Stimulus-responsive shape-memory materials have attracted tremendous research interests recently, with much effort focused on improving their mechanical actuation. Driven by the needs of nanoelectromechanical devices, materials with large mechanical strain, particularly at nanoscale level, are therefore desired. Here we report on the discovery of a large shape-memory effect in bismuth ferrite at the nanoscale. A maximum strain of up to ~14% and a large volumetric work density of ~600±90 J cm(-3) can be achieved in association with a martensitic-like phase transformation. With a single step, control of the phase transformation by thermal activation or electric field has been reversibly achieved without the assistance of external recovery stress. Although aspects such as hysteresis, microcracking and so on have to be taken into consideration for real devices, the large shape-memory effect in this oxide surpasses most alloys and, therefore, demonstrates itself as an extraordinary material for potential use in state-of-art nanosystems. PMID:24253399

  12. Digital Shaping Algorithms for GODDESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Sarah-Jane; Cizewski, Jolie; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Pain, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Gammasphere-ORRUBA: Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) combines the highly segmented position-sensitive silicon strip detectors of ORRUBA with up to 110 Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors from Gammasphere, for high resolution for particle-gamma coincidence measurements. The signals from the silicon strip detectors have position-dependent rise times, and require different forms of pulse shaping for optimal position and energy resolutions. Traditionally, a compromise was achieved with a single shaping of the signals performed by conventional analog electronics. However, there are benefits to using digital acquisition of the detector signals, including the ability to apply multiple custom shaping algorithms to the same signal, each optimized for position and energy, in addition to providing a flexible triggering system, and a reduction in rate-limitation due to pile-up. Recent developments toward creating digital signal processing algorithms for GODDESS will be discussed. This work is supported in part by the U.S. D.O.E. and N.S.F.

  13. Shaping tissues by balancing active forces and geometric constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foolen, Jasper; Yamashita, Tadahiro; Kollmannsberger, Philip

    2016-02-01

    The self-organization of cells into complex tissues during growth and regeneration is a combination of physical-mechanical events and biochemical signal processing. Cells actively generate forces at all stages in this process, and according to the laws of mechanics, these forces result in stress fields defined by the geometric boundary conditions of the cell and tissue. The unique ability of cells to translate such force patterns into biochemical information and vice versa sets biological tissues apart from any other material. In this topical review, we summarize the current knowledge and open questions of how forces and geometry act together on scales from the single cell to tissues and organisms, and how their interaction determines biological shape and structure. Starting with a planar surface as the simplest type of geometric constraint, we review literature on how forces during cell spreading and adhesion together with geometric constraints impact cell shape, stress patterns, and the resulting biological response. We then move on to include cell-cell interactions and the role of forces in monolayers and in collective cell migration, and introduce curvature at the transition from flat cell sheets to three-dimensional (3D) tissues. Fibrous 3D environments, as cells experience them in the body, introduce new mechanical boundary conditions and change cell behaviour compared to flat surfaces. Starting from early work on force transmission and collagen remodelling, we discuss recent discoveries on the interaction with geometric constraints and the resulting structure formation and network organization in 3D. Recent literature on two physiological scenarios—embryonic development and bone—is reviewed to demonstrate the role of the force-geometry balance in living organisms. Furthermore, the role of mechanics in pathological scenarios such as cancer is discussed. We conclude by highlighting common physical principles guiding cell mechanics, tissue patterning and

  14. Importance of spectrin network reorganization in computer simulations of RBC shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Ulf; Ladd, Tony

    2011-03-01

    The shape of red blood cells (RBCs) has been the subject of intensive investigations in both experiments and theoretical models. Various computational models for RBCs have also been developed. However, a rigorous quantitative comparison of the observed shapes is still lacking. We have developed a flexible model that allows to study the influence of the various contributions to the membrane stress and their relevance for RBC shape. Our model reveals that a pure curvature model does not fully explain the experimentally observed discocyte shapes. We demonstrate that the in-plane stresses of the spectrin network have a crucial effect on the cell shapes and their transitions, and that the dynamic relaxation of the stresses due to spectrin reorganization is important. We present an extended model that incorporates the effects of dynamic spectrin remodeling and study their role on the dynamics of RBC shapes. Financial support from the Volkswagen Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Surface parametrization and shape description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechbuehler, Christian; Gerig, Guido; Kuebler, Olaf

    1992-09-01

    Procedures for the parameterization and description of the surface of simply connected 3-D objects are presented. Critical issues for shape-based categorization and comparison of 3-D objects are addressed, which are generality with respect to object complexity, invariance to standard transformations, and descriptive power in terms of object geometry. Starting from segmented volume data, a relational data structure describing the adjacency of local surface elements is generated. The representation is used to parametrize the surface by defining a continuous, one-to-one mapping from the surface of the original object to the surface of a unit sphere. The mapping is constrained by two requirements, minimization of distortions and preservation of area. The former is formulated as the goal function of a nonlinear optimization problem and the latter as its constraints. Practicable starting values are obtained by an initial mapping based on a heat conduction model. In contract to earlier approaches, the novel parameterization method provides a mapping of arbitrarily shaped simply connected objects, i.e., it performs an unfolding of convoluted surface structures. This global parameterization allows the systematical scanning of the object surface by the variation of two parameters. As one possible approach to shape analysis, it enables us to expand the object surface into a series of spherical harmonic functions, extending the concept of elliptical Fourier descriptors for 2-D closed curves. The novel parameterization overcomes the traditional limitations of expressing an object surface in polar coordinates, which restricts such descriptions to star-shaped objects. The numerical coefficients in the Fourier series form an object-centered, surface-oriented descriptor of the object''s form. Rotating the coefficients in parameter space and object space puts the object into a standard position and yields a spherical harmonic descriptor which is invariant to translations, rotations

  16. Body shape preferences: associations with rater body shape and sociosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Michael E; Pound, Nicholas; Dunn, James; Hopkins, Sian; Kang, Jinsheng

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence of condition-dependent mate choice in many species, that is, individual preferences varying in strength according to the condition of the chooser. In humans, for example, people with more attractive faces/bodies, and who are higher in sociosexuality, exhibit stronger preferences for attractive traits in opposite-sex faces/bodies. However, previous studies have tended to use only relatively simple, isolated measures of rater attractiveness. Here we use 3D body scanning technology to examine associations between strength of rater preferences for attractive traits in opposite-sex bodies, and raters' body shape, self-perceived attractiveness, and sociosexuality. For 118 raters and 80 stimuli models, we used a 3D scanner to extract body measurements associated with attractiveness (male waist-chest ratio [WCR], female waist-hip ratio [WHR], and volume-height index [VHI] in both sexes) and also measured rater self-perceived attractiveness and sociosexuality. As expected, WHR and VHI were important predictors of female body attractiveness, while WCR and VHI were important predictors of male body attractiveness. Results indicated that male rater sociosexuality scores were positively associated with strength of preference for attractive (low) VHI and attractive (low) WHR in female bodies. Moreover, male rater self-perceived attractiveness was positively associated with strength of preference for low VHI in female bodies. The only evidence of condition-dependent preferences in females was a positive association between attractive VHI in female raters and preferences for attractive (low) WCR in male bodies. No other significant associations were observed in either sex between aspects of rater body shape and strength of preferences for attractive opposite-sex body traits. These results suggest that among male raters, rater self-perceived attractiveness and sociosexuality are important predictors of preference strength for attractive opposite

  17. Body shape preferences: associations with rater body shape and sociosexuality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Price

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence of condition-dependent mate choice in many species, that is, individual preferences varying in strength according to the condition of the chooser. In humans, for example, people with more attractive faces/bodies, and who are higher in sociosexuality, exhibit stronger preferences for attractive traits in opposite-sex faces/bodies. However, previous studies have tended to use only relatively simple, isolated measures of rater attractiveness. Here we use 3D body scanning technology to examine associations between strength of rater preferences for attractive traits in opposite-sex bodies, and raters' body shape, self-perceived attractiveness, and sociosexuality. For 118 raters and 80 stimuli models, we used a 3D scanner to extract body measurements associated with attractiveness (male waist-chest ratio [WCR], female waist-hip ratio [WHR], and volume-height index [VHI] in both sexes and also measured rater self-perceived attractiveness and sociosexuality. As expected, WHR and VHI were important predictors of female body attractiveness, while WCR and VHI were important predictors of male body attractiveness. Results indicated that male rater sociosexuality scores were positively associated with strength of preference for attractive (low VHI and attractive (low WHR in female bodies. Moreover, male rater self-perceived attractiveness was positively associated with strength of preference for low VHI in female bodies. The only evidence of condition-dependent preferences in females was a positive association between attractive VHI in female raters and preferences for attractive (low WCR in male bodies. No other significant associations were observed in either sex between aspects of rater body shape and strength of preferences for attractive opposite-sex body traits. These results suggest that among male raters, rater self-perceived attractiveness and sociosexuality are important predictors of preference strength for

  18. Self-shaping of bioinspired chiral composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Qing-Qing; Cui, Yu-Hong; Shimada, Takahiro; Wang, Jian-Shan; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2014-08-01

    Self-shaping materials such as shape memory polymers have recently drawn considerable attention owing to their high shape-changing ability in response to changes in ambient conditions, and thereby have promising applications in the biomedical, biosensing, soft robotics and aerospace fields. Their design is a crucial issue of both theoretical and technological interest. Motivated by the shape-changing ability of Towel Gourd tendril helices during swelling/deswelling, we present a strategy for realizing self-shaping function through the deformation of micro/nanohelices. To guide the design and fabrication of self-shaping materials, the shape equations of bent configurations, twisted belts, and helices of slender chiral composite are developed using the variation method. Furthermore, it is numerically shown that the shape changes of a chiral composite can be tuned by the deformation of micro/nanohelices and the fabricated fiber directions. This work paves a new way to create self-shaping composites.

  19. Forming of shape memory composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    A new forming procedure was developed to produce shape memory composite structures having structural composite skins over a shape memory polymer core. Core material was obtained by solid state foaming of an epoxy polyester resin with remarkably shape memory properties. The composite skin consisted...... tomography. Final shape memory composite panels were mechanically tested by three point bending before and after a shape memory step. This step consisted of a compression to reduce the panel thickness up to 60%. At the end of the bending test the panel shape was recovered by heating and a new memory step...... was performed with a higher thickness reduction. Memory steps were performed at room temperature and 120 °C so as to test the foam core in the glassy and rubbery state, respectively. Shape memory tests revealed the ability of the shape memory composite structures to recover the initial shape also after severe...

  20. Analysis of the shapes of hemocytes of Callista brevisiphonata in vitro (Bivalvia, Veneridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karetin, Yu A; Pushchin, I I

    2015-08-01

    Fractal formalism in conjunction with linear methods of image analysis is suitable for the comparative analysis of such "irregular" shapes (from the point of view of classical Euclidean geometry) as flattened amoeboid cells of invertebrates in vitro. Cell morphology of in vitro spreading hemocytes from the bivalve mollusc Callista brevisiphonata was analyzed using correlation, factor and cluster analysis. Four significantly different cell types were identified on the basis of 36 linear and nonlinear parameters. The analysis confirmed the adequacy of the selected methodology for numerical description of the shape and the adequacy of classification of nonlinear shapes of spread hemocytes belonging to the same species. Investigation has practical significance for the description of the morphology of cultured cells, since cell shape is a result of summation of a number of extracellular and intracellular factors.

  1. Mass production of shaped particles through vortex ring freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Duo; Warning, Alex; Yancey, Kenneth G.; Chang, Chun-Ti; Kern, Vanessa R.; Datta, Ashim K.; Steen, Paul H.; Luo, Dan; Ma, Minglin

    2016-08-01

    A vortex ring is a torus-shaped fluidic vortex. During its formation, the fluid experiences a rich variety of intriguing geometrical intermediates from spherical to toroidal. Here we show that these constantly changing intermediates can be `frozen' at controlled time points into particles with various unusual and unprecedented shapes. These novel vortex ring-derived particles, are mass-produced by employing a simple and inexpensive electrospraying technique, with their sizes well controlled from hundreds of microns to millimetres. Guided further by theoretical analyses and a laminar multiphase fluid flow simulation, we show that this freezing approach is applicable to a broad range of materials from organic polysaccharides to inorganic nanoparticles. We demonstrate the unique advantages of these vortex ring-derived particles in several applications including cell encapsulation, three-dimensional cell culture, and cell-free protein production. Moreover, compartmentalization and ordered-structures composed of these novel particles are all achieved, creating opportunities to engineer more sophisticated hierarchical materials.

  2. Shaping tissues by balancing active forces and geometric constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-organization of cells into complex tissues during growth and regeneration is a combination of physical–mechanical events and biochemical signal processing. Cells actively generate forces at all stages in this process, and according to the laws of mechanics, these forces result in stress fields defined by the geometric boundary conditions of the cell and tissue. The unique ability of cells to translate such force patterns into biochemical information and vice versa sets biological tissues apart from any other material. In this topical review, we summarize the current knowledge and open questions of how forces and geometry act together on scales from the single cell to tissues and organisms, and how their interaction determines biological shape and structure. Starting with a planar surface as the simplest type of geometric constraint, we review literature on how forces during cell spreading and adhesion together with geometric constraints impact cell shape, stress patterns, and the resulting biological response. We then move on to include cell–cell interactions and the role of forces in monolayers and in collective cell migration, and introduce curvature at the transition from flat cell sheets to three-dimensional (3D) tissues. Fibrous 3D environments, as cells experience them in the body, introduce new mechanical boundary conditions and change cell behaviour compared to flat surfaces. Starting from early work on force transmission and collagen remodelling, we discuss recent discoveries on the interaction with geometric constraints and the resulting structure formation and network organization in 3D. Recent literature on two physiological scenarios—embryonic development and bone—is reviewed to demonstrate the role of the force-geometry balance in living organisms. Furthermore, the role of mechanics in pathological scenarios such as cancer is discussed. We conclude by highlighting common physical principles guiding cell mechanics, tissue patterning

  3. Investigation of interfacial shear stresses, shape fixity, and actuation strain in composites incorporating shape memory polymers and shape memory alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungkyu ePark

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory composites (SMCs based on shape memory alloys (SMAs and shape memory polymers (SMPs allow many design possibilities due to their controllable temperature-dependent mechanical properties. The complementary characteristics of SMAs and SMPs can be utilized in systems with shape recovery created by the SMA and shape fixity provided by the SMP. In this research, three SMC operating regimes are identified and the behavior of SMC structures is analyzed by focusing on composite shape fixity and interfacial stresses. Analytical models show that SMPs can be used to adequately fix the shape of SMA actuators and springs. COMSOL finite element simulations are in agreement with analytical expressions for shape fixity and interfacial stresses. Analytical models are developed for an end-coupled linear SMP-SMA two-way actuator and the predicted strain is shown to be in good agreement with experimental test results.

  4. Shape regulation generates elastic interaction between active force dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Golkov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The organization of live cells to tissues is associated with the mechanical interaction between cells, which is mediated through their mechanical environment. We model live cells as spherical active force dipoles surrounded by an infinite elastic matrix, and analytically evaluate their elastic interaction energy for different scenarios of their regulatory behavior. For purely dilational eigenstrains the elastic interaction energy between any two bodies vanishes. We identify mechanical interactions between active cells applying non isotropic displacements with a regulation mechanism designed so that they will preserve their spherical shape. We express the resultant non-isotropic deformation field by a multipole expansion in terms of spherical harmonics. Mechanical self-regulation of live cells is not fully understood, and we compare homeostatic (set point) force applied by the cells on their environment versus homeostatic displacements on their surface. By including or excluding the first term of the expansion...

  5. Isogeometric Analysis and Shape Optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Evgrafov, Anton; Gersborg, Allan Roulund;

    will explain how the validity of a parametrisation can be checked and we will describe various ways to parametrise a domain. We will in particular study the Winslow functional which turns out to have some desirable properties. Other problems we touch upon is clustering of boundary control points (design......One of the attractive features of isogeometric analysis is the exact representation of the geometry. The geometry is furthermore given by a relative low number of control points and this makes isogeometric analysis an ideal basis for shape optimisation. I will describe some of the results we have...

  6. Cartography of irregularly shaped satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, R. M.; Edwards, Kathleen

    1987-01-01

    Irregularly shaped satellites, such as Phobos and Amalthea, do not lend themselves to mapping by conventional methods because mathematical projections of their surfaces fail to convey an accurate visual impression of the landforms, and because large and irregular scale changes make their features difficult to measure on maps. A digital mapping technique has therefore been developed by which maps are compiled from digital topographic and spacecraft image files. The digital file is geometrically transformed as desired for human viewing, either on video screens or on hard copy. Digital files of this kind consist of digital images superimposed on another digital file representing the three-dimensional form of a body.

  7. The Topological "Shape" of Brexit

    CERN Document Server

    Stolz, Bernadette J; Porter, Mason A

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology is a method from computational algebraic topology that can be used to study the "shape" of data. We illustrate two filtrations --- the weight rank clique filtration and the Vietoris--Rips (VR) filtration --- that are commonly used in persistent homology, and we apply these filtrations to a pair of data sets that are both related to the 2016 European Union "Brexit" referendum in the United Kingdom. These examples consider a topical situation and give useful illustrations of the strengths and weaknesses of these methods.

  8. Hair shape of curly hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Bruno A

    2003-06-01

    The hair follicle is a unique composite organ, composed of epithelial and dermal compartments interacting with each other in a surprisingly autonomous way. This is a self-renewing organ that seems to be a true paradigm of epithelial and mesenchymal interactions. Each of the follicular compartments is endowed with a specific differentiation pathway under the control of an intricate network of growth factors, cytokines, and hormones. As observed for ethnic hairs, even the shape of the hair shaft is intrinsically programmed from the bulb.

  9. Shape and Dimensions of Ripples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl

    to the critical one is varied in the range 1.31-3.45. A detailed flow description in terms of phase resolved quantities and period averaged quantities are given. The former are phase lag between the free stream flow and the separation and a description of the lee side vortices behind vortex ripples. The latter...... is to investigate how a perturbation on top of the ripple influences the flow. It will be seen that both the shape and the velocity of the crest are affecting the period averaged flow globally....

  10. Ugo Fano and shape resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugo Fano has been a leader in theoretical Physics in the XX century giving key contributions to our understanding of quantum phenomena. He passed away on 13 February 2001 after 67 years of research activity. I will focus on his prediction of the quantum interference effects to understand the high-energy photoabsorption cross section giving the 'Fano lineshapes'. The Fano results led to the theoretical understanding of 'shape resonances' (called also 'Feshbach resonances') that should be better called 'Fano resonances'. Finally I will show that today this Fano quantum interference effect is behind several new physical phenomena in different fields

  11. Young Children's Developing Understanding of Geometric Shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Mary Anne

    1999-01-01

    Presents research findings and suggestions on how children learn to categorize shapes. Discusses specific ways to present developmentally appropriate activities designed to enhance children's understanding of basic shapes. Contains 12 references. (ASK)

  12. Shape Memory Effect Actuators from Chlorides Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Shape Change Technologies is developing a radical new technique for the fabrication of Shape Memory alloys, such as TiNi and its ternary alloys of Hf, Zr, and Cu....

  13. Generalized Models for Rock Joint Surface Shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigui Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized models of joint surface shapes are the foundation for mechanism studies on the mechanical effects of rock joint surface shapes. Based on extensive field investigations of rock joint surface shapes, generalized models for three level shapes named macroscopic outline, surface undulating shape, and microcosmic roughness were established through statistical analyses of 20,078 rock joint surface profiles. The relative amplitude of profile curves was used as a borderline for the division of different level shapes. The study results show that the macroscopic outline has three basic features such as planar, arc-shaped, and stepped; the surface undulating shape has three basic features such as planar, undulating, and stepped; and the microcosmic roughness has two basic features such as smooth and rough.

  14. Joint shape segmentation with linear programming

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Qixing

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to segmenting shapes in a heterogenous shape database. Our approach segments the shapes jointly, utilizing features from multiple shapes to improve the segmentation of each. The approach is entirely unsupervised and is based on an integer quadratic programming formulation of the joint segmentation problem. The program optimizes over possible segmentations of individual shapes as well as over possible correspondences between segments from multiple shapes. The integer quadratic program is solved via a linear programming relaxation, using a block coordinate descent procedure that makes the optimization feasible for large databases. We evaluate the presented approach on the Princeton segmentation benchmark and show that joint shape segmentation significantly outperforms single-shape segmentation techniques. © 2011 ACM.

  15. Shaping of Location Conscious Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palson Kennedy .R

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays mobile technology is part of daily life and behavior and the mobile ecosystems areemerging, with smart phones and tablets being the foremost growth drivers. The mobile phonesare no longer just another device, we rely on their competence in work and in private. We look toour mobile phones for timely and restructured information and we rely on this being provided anytime of any day at any place. Nevertheless, no matter how much you depend and adore yourmobile phone the quality of the information and the user experience is directly associated with thefoundations and presentation of information. In this location, our activities, interactions andpreferences help shape the quality of service, content and products we use. Location-awaresystems use such information about end-users as input mechanisms for producing applicationsbased on mobile, location, social, cloud and customized content services. This represents newpossibilities for haul outing aggregated user-need information and includes novel sources forsituation-aware applications. Accordingly, a Design Research based approach has been taken tofurther investigate the creation, presentation and tailoring of user-centric information. Throughuser evaluated experiments findings show how multi-dimensional location-aware information canbe used to create adaptive solutions shaping the user experience to the users’ needs. Researchfindings in this work; highlight possible architectures for integration of cloud computing servicesin diverse mobile environment in future location-aware solutions.

  16. Cocklebur-shaped colloidal dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestage, David J; Urban, Marek W

    2005-11-01

    Unique cocklebur-shaped colloidal dispersions were prepared using a combination of a nanoextruder applied to the aqueous solution containing methyl methacrylate (MMA) and n-butyl acrylate (n-BA) with azo-bis-isobutyronitrile (AIBN) or potassium persulfate (KPS) initiators and stabilized by a mixture of sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (SDOSS) and 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DCPC) phospholipid. Upon extrusion and heating to 75 degrees C, methyl methacrylate/n-butyl acrylate (MMA/nBA) colloidal particles containing tubules pointing outward were obtained as a result of DCPC phospholipids present at the particle surfaces. The same cocklebur-shaped particles were obtained when classical polymerization was used without a nanoextruder under similar compositional and thermal conditions, giving a particle size of 159 nm. However, when Ca(2+) ions are present during polymerization, cocklebur morphologies are disrupted. Because DCPC tubules undergo a transition at 38 degrees C, such cocklebur morphologies may offer numerous opportunities for devices with stimuli-responsive characteristics. PMID:16262269

  17. Acoustic echoes reveal room shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokmanic, Ivan; Parhizkar, Reza; Walther, Andreas; Lu, Yue M; Vetterli, Martin

    2013-07-23

    Imagine that you are blindfolded inside an unknown room. You snap your fingers and listen to the room's response. Can you hear the shape of the room? Some people can do it naturally, but can we design computer algorithms that hear rooms? We show how to compute the shape of a convex polyhedral room from its response to a known sound, recorded by a few microphones. Geometric relationships between the arrival times of echoes enable us to "blindfoldedly" estimate the room geometry. This is achieved by exploiting the properties of Euclidean distance matrices. Furthermore, we show that under mild conditions, first-order echoes provide a unique description of convex polyhedral rooms. Our algorithm starts from the recorded impulse responses and proceeds by learning the correct assignment of echoes to walls. In contrast to earlier methods, the proposed algorithm reconstructs the full 3D geometry of the room from a single sound emission, and with an arbitrary geometry of the microphone array. As long as the microphones can hear the echoes, we can position them as we want. Besides answering a basic question about the inverse problem of room acoustics, our results find applications in areas such as architectural acoustics, indoor localization, virtual reality, and audio forensics. PMID:23776236

  18. Definition and Verification of Shape Meter Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Two experimental methods were adopted to verify the correctness and practicability of the shape meter method: one is to roll aluminum plate, calculate the shape stiffness of mill and rolled piece, and then measure aluminum plate crown to verify shape stiffness equation; the other is to calculate the measured off-line data of hot continuous roll and verify the shape mathematical model for measuring and controlling by self-adaptation method.

  19. Statistical models of shape optimisation and evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Rhodri; Taylor, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Addresses one of the key issues in shape modelling: that of establishing a meaningful correspondence between a set of shapesUses a novel approach to establishing correspondence by casting model-building as an optimisation problem Includes practical examples of applications for both 2D and 3D sets of shapesFull implementation details, perviously unpublished, provided

  20. A METHOD OF SHAPE ENCODING AND RETRIEVAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xianglin; Song Lei; Shen Lansun

    2002-01-01

    A method of shape encoding and retrieval is proposed in this letter, which uses centripetal code to encode shape and extracts shape's convex for retrieval. For the rotation invariance and translation invariance of the centripetal code and the normalization of convex,the proposed retrieval method is similarity transform resistant, Experimental results confirm this capability.

  1. Proteins interacting with Membranes: Protein Sorting and Membrane Shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan-Jones, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Membrane-bound transport in cells requires generating membrane curvature. In addition, transport is selective, in order to establish spatial gradients of membrane components in the cell. The mechanisms underlying cell membrane shaping by proteins and the influence of curvature on membrane composition are active areas of study in cell biophysics. In vitro approaches using Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) are a useful tool to identify the physical mechanisms that drive sorting of membrane components and membrane shape change by proteins. I will present recent work on the curvature sensing and generation of IRSp53, a protein belonging to the BAR family, whose members, sharing a banana-shaped backbone, are involved in endocytosis. Pulling membrane tubes with 10-100 nm radii from GUVs containing encapsulated IRSp53 have, unexpectedly, revealed a non-monotonic dependence of the protein concentration on the tube as a function of curvature. Experiments also show that bound proteins alter the tube mechanics and that protein phase separation along the tube occurs at low tensions. I will present accompanying theoretical work that can explain these findings based on the competition between the protein's intrinsic curvature and the effective rigidity of a membrane-protein patch.

  2. Spatial organization in nano-sculptured bacteria, a tale of shape, scale, patterns, and genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, F.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most basic features that pervade biology is the existence of boundaries that separate living cells from their outer environments. Molecules responsible for the internal organization of a living cell must adapt to its boundaries, as the cell grows, divides, and changes in shape and size. I

  3. Shape recovery and irrecoverable strain control in polyurethane shape-memory polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisaaki Tobushi et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In shape-memory polymers, large strain can be fixed at a low temperature and thereafter recovered at a high temperature. If the shape-memory polymer is held at a high temperature for a long time, the irrecoverable strain can attain a new intermediate shape between the shape under the maximum stress and the primary shape. Irrecoverable strain control can be applied to the fabrication of a shape-memory polymer element with a complex shape in a simple method. In the present study, the influence of the strain-holding conditions on the shape recovery and the irrecoverable strain control in polyurethane shape-memory polymer is investigated by tension test of a film and three-point bending test of a sheet. The higher the shape-holding temperature and the longer the shape-holding time, the higher the irrecoverable strain rate. The equation that expresses the characteristics of the irrecoverable strain control is formulated.

  4. Effects of Microstimulation in the Anterior Intraparietal Area during Three-Dimensional Shape Categorization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram-Ernst Verhoef

    Full Text Available The anterior intraparietal area (AIP of rhesus monkeys is part of the dorsal visual stream and contains neurons whose visual response properties are commensurate with a role in three-dimensional (3D shape perception. Neuronal responses in AIP signal the depth structure of disparity-defined 3D shapes, reflect the choices of monkeys while they categorize 3D shapes, and mirror the behavioral variability across different stimulus conditions during 3D-shape categorization. However, direct evidence for a role of AIP in 3D-shape perception has been lacking. We trained rhesus monkeys to categorize disparity-defined 3D shapes and examined AIP's contribution to 3D-shape categorization by microstimulating in clusters of 3D-shape selective AIP neurons during task performance. We find that microstimulation effects on choices (monkey M1 and reaction times (monkey M1 and M2 depend on the 3D-shape preference of the stimulated site. Moreover, electrical stimulation of the same cells, during either the 3D-shape-categorization task or a saccade task, could affect behavior differently. Interestingly, in one monkey we observed a strong correlation between the strength of choice-related AIP activity (choice probabilities and the influence of microstimulation on 3D-shape-categorization behavior (choices and reaction time. These findings propose AIP as part of the network responsible for 3D-shape perception. The results also show that the anterior intraparietal cortex contains cells with different tuning properties, i.e. 3D-shape- or saccade-related, that can be dynamically read out depending on the requirements of the task at hand.

  5. Shaped charge with an axial channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malygin, A. V.; Proskuryakov, E. V.; Sorokin, M. V.; Fomin, V. M.

    2011-05-01

    A shaped charge with an axial channel is considered. The charge is initiated by an impact of an annular plate. As a result, the shaped charge is initiated at all points of the domain shaped as a ring. The impact plate material and parameters (velocity, thickness, width, and distance covered by the plate) that ensure stable penetration of the shaped charge are determined. The results obtained can be used to develop a composite (e.g., "tandem") shaped charge of the "base-head" type (the charge located farther from the target is first initiated, followed by initiation of the charge located closer to the target).

  6. Shape theory categorical methods of approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Cordier, J M

    2008-01-01

    This in-depth treatment uses shape theory as a ""case study"" to illustrate situations common to many areas of mathematics, including the use of archetypal models as a basis for systems of approximations. It offers students a unified and consolidated presentation of extensive research from category theory, shape theory, and the study of topological algebras.A short introduction to geometric shape explains specifics of the construction of the shape category and relates it to an abstract definition of shape theory. Upon returning to the geometric base, the text considers simplical complexes and

  7. Social reward shapes attentional biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    Paying attention to stimuli that predict a reward outcome is important for an organism to survive and thrive. When visual stimuli are associated with tangible, extrinsic rewards such as money or food, these stimuli acquire high attentional priority and come to automatically capture attention. In humans and other primates, however, many behaviors are not motivated directly by such extrinsic rewards, but rather by the social feedback that results from performing those behaviors. In the present study, I examine whether positive social feedback can similarly influence attentional bias. The results show that stimuli previously associated with a high probability of positive social feedback elicit value-driven attentional capture, much like stimuli associated with extrinsic rewards. Unlike with extrinsic rewards, however, such stimuli also influence task-specific motivation. My findings offer a potential mechanism by which social reward shapes the information that we prioritize when perceiving the world around us. PMID:25941868

  8. Shape memory alloy based motor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S V Sharma; M M Nayak; N S Dinesh

    2008-10-01

    Design and characterization of a new shape memory alloy wire based Poly Phase Motor has been reported in this paper. The motor can be used either in stepping mode or in servo mode of operation. Each phase of the motor consists of an SMA wire with a spring in series. The principle of operation of the poly phase motor is presented. The motor resembles a stepper motor in its functioning though the actuation principles are different and hence has been characterized similar to a stepper motor. The motor can be actuated in either direction with different phase sequencing methods, which are presented in this work. The motor is modelled and simulated and the results of simulations and experiments are presented. The experimental model of the motor is of dimension 150 mm square, 20 mm thick and uses SMA wire of 0·4 mm diameter and 125 mm of length in each phase.

  9. The shape of mammalian phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purvis, Andy; Fritz, Susanne A; Rodríguez, Jesús;

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian phylogeny is far too asymmetric for all contemporaneous lineages to have had equal chances of diversifying. We consider this asymmetry or imbalance from four perspectives. First, we infer a minimal set of 'regime changes'-points at which net diversification rate has changed-identifying 15...... significant radiations and 12 clades that may be 'downshifts'. We next show that mammalian phylogeny is similar in shape to a large set of published phylogenies of other vertebrate, arthropod and plant groups, suggesting that many clades may diversify under a largely shared set of 'rules'. Third, we simulate...... six simple macroevolutionary models, showing that those where speciation slows down as geographical or niche space is filled, produce more realistic phylogenies than do models involving key innovations. Lastly, an analysis of the spatial scaling of imbalance shows that the phylogeny of species within...

  10. Shape Memory Composite Hybrid Hinge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Scarborough, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    There are two conventional types of hinges for in-space deployment applications. The first type is mechanically deploying hinges. A typical mechanically deploying hinge is usually composed of several tens of components. It is complicated, heavy, and bulky. More components imply higher deployment failure probability. Due to the existence of relatively moving components among a mechanically deploying hinge, it unavoidably has microdynamic problems. The second type of conventional hinge relies on strain energy for deployment. A tape-spring hinge is a typical strain energy hinge. A fundamental problem of a strain energy hinge is that its deployment dynamic is uncontrollable. Usually, its deployment is associated with a large impact, which is unacceptable for many space applications. Some damping technologies have been experimented with to reduce the impact, but they increased the risks of an unsuccessful deployment. Coalescing strain energy components with shape memory composite (SMC) components to form a hybrid hinge is the solution. SMCs are well suited for deployable structures. A SMC is created from a high-performance fiber and a shape memory polymer resin. When the resin is heated to above its glass transition temperature, the composite becomes flexible and can be folded or packed. Once cooled to below the glass transition temperature, the composite remains in the packed state. When the structure is ready to be deployed, the SMC component is reheated to above the glass transition temperature, and it returns to its as-fabricated shape. A hybrid hinge is composed of two strain energy flanges (also called tape-springs) and one SMC tube. Two folding lines are placed on the SMC tube to avoid excessive strain on the SMC during folding. Two adapters are used to connect the hybrid hinge to its adjacent structural components. While the SMC tube is heated to above its glass transition temperature, a hybrid hinge can be folded and stays at folded status after the temperature

  11. Children Literature: Shaping Gender Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IQRA JABEEN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze stereotype construction of gender roles in the text of children's stories which inculcate in the children’s crude minds socially developed gender differences. For this purpose, the study followed Dell Hymes’ speaking model. This model has sixteen components that can be applied to different types of Discourse (speech interaction: message form; message content; setting; scene; Speaker/sender; address or; the hearer/receiver/audience; addressee; purposes (outcomes; purposes (goals; key; channels; forms of speech; norms of interaction; norms of interpretation; and genres. Selected children's stories were analyzed to identify their role as primary thought developing sources in the mind of young learners thus shaping their gender identities. This study would be beneficial in drawing the attention of authors, editors and writers of children's literature to redefine gender roles in order to minimize gender differences.

  12. Variations of femoral condyle shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscević, Mirza; Hebibović, Mujo; Smrke, Dragica

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to mathematically approximate the shape of the femoral articulating line and compare radiuses of condylar curves within and between males and females. Ten male and ten female participants were included in the study. Radiuses of medial and lateral condylar curves were calculated from the side view knee X-ray by original mathematical equation. Average radiuses of condylar curves were between 4.5 and 1.7 cm medially, and between 3.2 and 1.8 cm laterally, for 0 degrees and 90 degrees flexion contact point respectively. Males had longer curve radiuses of both condyles (p knee geometry, and other ellipsoidal structures in human body, like wrist, scull segments, dental arches, etc.

  13. Shape memory thermal conduction switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Rajan (Inventor); Krishnan, Vinu (Inventor); Notardonato, William U. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A thermal conduction switch includes a thermally-conductive first member having a first thermal contacting structure for securing the first member as a stationary member to a thermally regulated body or a body requiring thermal regulation. A movable thermally-conductive second member has a second thermal contacting surface. A thermally conductive coupler is interposed between the first member and the second member for thermally coupling the first member to the second member. At least one control spring is coupled between the first member and the second member. The control spring includes a NiTiFe comprising shape memory (SM) material that provides a phase change temperature <273 K, a transformation range <40 K, and a hysteresis of <10 K. A bias spring is between the first member and the second member. At the phase change the switch provides a distance change (displacement) between first and second member by at least 1 mm, such as 2 to 4 mm.

  14. electrode of an arbitrary shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Krutitskii

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A problem on electric current in a semiconductor film from an electrode of an arbitrary shape is studied in the presence of a magnetic field. This situation describes the Hall effect, which indicates the deflection of electric, current from electric field in a semiconductor. From mathematical standpoint we consider the skew derivative problem for harmonic functions in the exterior of an open arc in a plane. By means of potential theory the problem is reduced to the Cauchy singular integral equation and next to the Fredholm equation of the 2nd kind which is uniquely solvable. The solution of the integral equation can be computed by standard codes by discretization and inversion of the matrix. The uniqueness and existence theorems are formulated.

  15. Analysis of toxin induced changes in action potential shape for drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Akanda, Nesar; Molnar, Peter; Stancescu, Maria; Hickman, James J.

    2009-01-01

    The generation of an action potential is a complex process in excitable cells which involves the temporal opening and closing of several voltage-dependent ion channels in the cell membrane. The shape of an action potential can carry information concerning the state of the involved ion channels and their relationship to cellular processes. Alteration of these ion channels by the administration of toxins, drugs, and biochemicals can change the action potential’s shape in a specific way which ca...

  16. Nanoparticle shape, thermodynamics and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles can be beautiful, as in stained glass windows, or they can be ugly as in wear and corrosion debris from implants. We estimate that there will be about 70 000 papers in 2015 with nanoparticles as a keyword, but only one in thirteen uses the nanoparticle shape as an additional keyword and research focus, and only one in two hundred has thermodynamics. Methods for synthesizing nanoparticles have exploded over the last decade, but our understanding of how and why they take their forms has not progressed as fast. This topical review attempts to take a critical snapshot of the current understanding, focusing more on methods to predict than a purely synthetic or descriptive approach. We look at models and themes which are largely independent of the exact synthetic method whether it is deposition, gas-phase condensation, solution based or hydrothermal synthesis. Elements are old dating back to the beginning of the 20th century—some of the pioneering models developed then are still relevant today. Others are newer, a merging of older concepts such as kinetic-Wulff constructions with methods to understand minimum energy shapes for particles with twins. Overall we find that while there are still many unknowns, the broad framework of understanding and predicting the structure of nanoparticles via diverse Wulff constructions, either thermodynamic, local minima or kinetic has been exceedingly successful. However, the field is still developing and there remain many unknowns and new avenues for research, a few of these being suggested towards the end of the review. (topical review)

  17. Nanoparticle shape, thermodynamics and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, L. D.; Peng, L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles can be beautiful, as in stained glass windows, or they can be ugly as in wear and corrosion debris from implants. We estimate that there will be about 70 000 papers in 2015 with nanoparticles as a keyword, but only one in thirteen uses the nanoparticle shape as an additional keyword and research focus, and only one in two hundred has thermodynamics. Methods for synthesizing nanoparticles have exploded over the last decade, but our understanding of how and why they take their forms has not progressed as fast. This topical review attempts to take a critical snapshot of the current understanding, focusing more on methods to predict than a purely synthetic or descriptive approach. We look at models and themes which are largely independent of the exact synthetic method whether it is deposition, gas-phase condensation, solution based or hydrothermal synthesis. Elements are old dating back to the beginning of the 20th century—some of the pioneering models developed then are still relevant today. Others are newer, a merging of older concepts such as kinetic-Wulff constructions with methods to understand minimum energy shapes for particles with twins. Overall we find that while there are still many unknowns, the broad framework of understanding and predicting the structure of nanoparticles via diverse Wulff constructions, either thermodynamic, local minima or kinetic has been exceedingly successful. However, the field is still developing and there remain many unknowns and new avenues for research, a few of these being suggested towards the end of the review.

  18. Updated Methods for Seed Shape Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Cervantes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphological variation in seed characters includes differences in seed size and shape. Seed shape is an important trait in plant identification and classification. In addition it has agronomic importance because it reflects genetic, physiological, and ecological components and affects yield, quality, and market price. The use of digital technologies, together with development of quantification and modeling methods, allows a better description of seed shape. Image processing systems are used in the automatic determination of seed size and shape, becoming a basic tool in the study of diversity. Seed shape is determined by a variety of indexes (circularity, roundness, and J index. The comparison of the seed images to a geometrical figure (circle, cardioid, ellipse, ellipsoid, etc. provides a precise quantification of shape. The methods of shape quantification based on these models are useful for an accurate description allowing to compare between genotypes or along developmental phases as well as to establish the level of variation in different sets of seeds.

  19. A Note on Unification of Translational Shape Invariant Potential and Scaling Shape Invariant Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Bo-Wen; GU Zhi-Yu; QIAN Shang-Wu

    2005-01-01

    This article puts forward a general shape invariant potential, which includes the translational shape invariant potential and scaling shape invariant potential as two particular cases, and derives the set of linear differential equations for obtaining general solutions of the generalized shape invariance condition.

  20. Solar granulation and statistical crystallography: A modeling approach using size-shape relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The irregular polygonal pattern of solar granulation is analyzed for size-shape relations using statistical crystallography. In contrast to previous work which has assumed perfectly hexagonal patterns for granulation, more realistic accounting of cell (granule) shapes reveals a broader basis for quantitative analysis. Several features emerge as noteworthy: (1) a linear correlation between number of cell-sides and neighboring shapes (called Aboav-Weaire's law); (2) a linear correlation between both average cell area and perimeter and the number of cell-sides (called Lewis's law and a perimeter law, respectively) and (3) a linear correlation between cell area and squared perimeter (called convolution index). This statistical picture of granulation is consistent with a finding of no correlation in cell shapes beyond nearest neighbors. A comparative calculation between existing model predictions taken from luminosity data and the present analysis shows substantial agreements for cell-size distributions. A model for understanding grain lifetimes is proposed which links convective times to cell shape using crystallographic results.