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Sample records for cell rna reveals

  1. CeFra-seq reveals broad asymmetric mRNA and noncoding RNA distribution profiles in Drosophila and human cells.

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    Benoit Bouvrette, Louis Philip; Cody, Neal A L; Bergalet, Julie; Lefebvre, Fabio Alexis; Diot, Cédric; Wang, Xiaofeng; Blanchette, Mathieu; Lécuyer, Eric

    2018-01-01

    Cells are highly asymmetrical, a feature that relies on the sorting of molecular constituents, including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, to distinct subcellular locales. The localization of RNA molecules is an important layer of gene regulation required to modulate localized cellular activities, although its global prevalence remains unclear. We combine biochemical cell fractionation with RNA-sequencing (CeFra-seq) analysis to assess the prevalence and conservation of RNA asymmetric distribution on a transcriptome-wide scale in Drosophila and human cells. This approach reveals that the majority (∼80%) of cellular RNA species are asymmetrically distributed, whether considering coding or noncoding transcript populations, in patterns that are broadly conserved evolutionarily. Notably, a large number of Drosophila and human long noncoding RNAs and circular RNAs display enriched levels within specific cytoplasmic compartments, suggesting that these RNAs fulfill extra-nuclear functions. Moreover, fraction-specific mRNA populations exhibit distinctive sequence characteristics. Comparative analysis of mRNA fractionation profiles with that of their encoded proteins reveals a general lack of correlation in subcellular distribution, marked by strong cases of asymmetry. However, coincident distribution profiles are observed for mRNA/protein pairs related to a variety of functional protein modules, suggesting complex regulatory inputs of RNA localization to cellular organization. © 2018 Benoit Bouvrette et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. Inactivation of the type I interferon pathway reveals long double-stranded RNA-mediated RNA interference in mammalian cells.

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    Maillard, Pierre V; Van der Veen, Annemarthe G; Deddouche-Grass, Safia; Rogers, Neil C; Merits, Andres; Reis E Sousa, Caetano

    2016-12-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) elicited by long double-stranded (ds) or base-paired viral RNA constitutes the major mechanism of antiviral defence in plants and invertebrates. In contrast, it is controversial whether it acts in chordates. Rather, in vertebrates, viral RNAs induce a distinct defence system known as the interferon (IFN) response. Here, we tested the possibility that the IFN response masks or inhibits antiviral RNAi in mammalian cells. Consistent with that notion, we find that sequence-specific gene silencing can be triggered by long dsRNAs in differentiated mouse cells rendered deficient in components of the IFN pathway. This unveiled response is dependent on the canonical RNAi machinery and is lost upon treatment of IFN-responsive cells with type I IFN Notably, transfection with long dsRNA specifically vaccinates IFN-deficient cells against infection with viruses bearing a homologous sequence. Thus, our data reveal that RNAi constitutes an ancient antiviral strategy conserved from plants to mammals that precedes but has not been superseded by vertebrate evolution of the IFN system. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  3. Single-cell messenger RNA sequencing reveals rare intestinal cell types

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    Grün, Dominic; Lyubimova, Anna; Kester, Lennart; Wiebrands, Kay; Basak, Onur; Sasaki, Nobuo; Clevers, Hans; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the development and function of an organ requires the characterization of all of its cell types. Traditional methods for visualizing and isolating subpopulations of cells are based on messenger RNA or protein expression of only a few known marker genes. The unequivocal identification

  4. Single-cell nanobiopsy reveals compartmentalization of mRNA in neuronal cells.

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    Tóth, Eszter N; Lohith, Akshar; Mondal, Manas; Guo, Jia; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Pourmand, Nader

    2018-01-29

    In highly polarized cells such as neurons, compartmentalization of mRNA and of local protein synthesis enables remarkably fast, precise, and local responses to external stimuli. These responses are highly important for neuron growth cone guidance, synapse formation, and regeneration following injury. Because an altered spatial distribution of mRNA can result in mental retardation or neurodegenerative diseases, subcellular transcriptome analysis of neurons could be a useful tool for studying these conditions, but current techniques, such as in situ hybridization, bulk microarray, or RNA-Seq, impose tradeoffs between spatial resolution and multiplexing. To obtain a comprehensive analysis of the cell body versus neurite transcriptome from the same neuron, we have recently developed a label-free, single-cell nanobiopsy platform based on scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), that uses electrowetting within a quartz nanopipette to extract cellular material from living cells with minimal disruption of the cellular membrane and milieu. In this study, we used this platform to collect samples from the cell bodies and neurites of human neurons and analyzed the mRNA pool with multiplex RNA-Seq. The minute volume of a nanobiopsy sample allowed us to extract samples from several locations in the same cell and to map the various mRNA species to specific subcellular locations. In addition to previously identified transcripts, we discovered new sets of mRNAs localizing to neurites, including nuclear genes such as Eomes and Nap1l3. In summary, our single-neuron nanobiopsy analysis provides opportunities to improve our understanding of intracellular mRNA transport and local protein composition in neuronal growth, connectivity, and function. Copyright © 2018, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  5. The Dynamics of mRNA Turnover Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging in Single Cells.

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    Horvathova, Ivana; Voigt, Franka; Kotrys, Anna V; Zhan, Yinxiu; Artus-Revel, Caroline G; Eglinger, Jan; Stadler, Michael B; Giorgetti, Luca; Chao, Jeffrey A

    2017-11-02

    RNA degradation plays a fundamental role in regulating gene expression. In order to characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics of RNA turnover in single cells, we developed a fluorescent biosensor based on dual-color, single-molecule RNA imaging that allows intact transcripts to be distinguished from stabilized degradation intermediates. Using this method, we measured mRNA decay in single cells and found that individual degradation events occur independently within the cytosol and are not enriched within processing bodies. We show that slicing of an mRNA targeted for endonucleolytic cleavage by the RNA-induced silencing complex can be observed in real time in living cells. This methodology provides a framework for investigating the entire life history of individual mRNAs from birth to death in single cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Correlation analyses revealed global microRNA-mRNA expression associations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

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    Wang, Lan; Zhu, Jiang; Deng, Fei-Yan; Wu, Long-Fei; Mo, Xing-Bo; Zhu, Xiao-Wei; Xia, Wei; Xie, Fang-Fei; He, Pei; Bing, Peng-Fei; Qiu, Ying-Hua; Lin, Xiang; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Yi, Neng-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Lei, Shu-Feng

    2017-09-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate gene expression through binding to complementary sites in the 3'-untranslated regions of target mRNAs, which will lead to existence of correlation in expression between miRNA and mRNA. However, the miRNA-mRNA correlation patterns are complex and remain largely unclear yet. To establish the global correlation patterns in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), multiple miRNA-mRNA correlation analyses and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis were conducted in this study. We predicted and achieved 861 miRNA-mRNA pairs (65 miRNAs, 412 mRNAs) using multiple bioinformatics programs, and found global negative miRNA-mRNA correlations in PBMC from all 46 study subjects. Among the 861 pairs of correlations, 19.5% were significant (P correlation network was complex and highlighted key miRNAs/genes in PBMC. Some miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-29a, hsa-miR-148a, regulate a cluster of target genes. Some genes, e.g., TNRC6A, are regulated by multiple miRNAs. The identified genes tend to be enriched in molecular functions of DNA and RNA binding, and biological processes such as protein transport, regulation of translation and chromatin modification. The results provided a global view of the miRNA-mRNA expression correlation profile in human PBMCs, which would facilitate in-depth investigation of biological functions of key miRNAs/mRNAs and better understanding of the pathogenesis underlying PBMC-related diseases.

  7. Live Cell Imaging Reveals the Relocation of dsRNA Binding Proteins Upon Viral Infection.

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    Barton, Deborah A; Roovers, Elke F; Gouil, Quentin; da Fonseca, Guilherme C; Reis, Rodrigo S; Jackson, Craig; Overall, Robyn L; Fusaro, Adriana F; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    Viral infection triggers a range of plant responses such as the activation of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The double-stranded RNA binding (DRB) proteins DRB3 and DRB4 are part of this pathway and aid in defending against DNA and RNA viruses, respectively. Using live cell imaging, we show that DRB2, DRB3, and DRB5 relocate from their uniform cytoplasmic distribution to concentrated accumulation in nascent viral replication complexes (VRC) that develop following cell invasion by viral RNA. Inactivation of the DRB3 gene in Arabidopsis by T-DNA insertion rendered these plants less able to repress RNA viral replication. We propose a model for the early stages of virus defense in which DRB2, DRB3, and DRB5 are invasion sensors that relocate to nascent VRC, where they bind to viral RNA and inhibit virus replication.

  8. Profiling of microRNA in human and mouse ES and iPS cells reveals overlapping but distinct microRNA expression patterns.

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    Razak, Siti Razila Abdul; Ueno, Kazuko; Takayama, Naoya; Nariai, Naoki; Nagasaki, Masao; Saito, Rika; Koso, Hideto; Lai, Chen-Yi; Murakami, Miyako; Tsuji, Koichiro; Michiue, Tatsuo; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Otsu, Makoto; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2013-01-01

    Using quantitative PCR-based miRNA arrays, we comprehensively analyzed the expression profiles of miRNAs in human and mouse embryonic stem (ES), induced pluripotent stem (iPS), and somatic cells. Immature pluripotent cells were purified using SSEA-1 or SSEA-4 and were used for miRNA profiling. Hierarchical clustering and consensus clustering by nonnegative matrix factorization showed two major clusters, human ES/iPS cells and other cell groups, as previously reported. Principal components analysis (PCA) to identify miRNAs that segregate in these two groups identified miR-187, 299-3p, 499-5p, 628-5p, and 888 as new miRNAs that specifically characterize human ES/iPS cells. Detailed direct comparisons of miRNA expression levels in human ES and iPS cells showed that several miRNAs included in the chromosome 19 miRNA cluster were more strongly expressed in iPS cells than in ES cells. Similar analysis was conducted with mouse ES/iPS cells and somatic cells, and several miRNAs that had not been reported to be expressed in mouse ES/iPS cells were suggested to be ES/iPS cell-specific miRNAs by PCA. Comparison of the average expression levels of miRNAs in ES/iPS cells in humans and mice showed quite similar expression patterns of human/mouse miRNAs. However, several mouse- or human-specific miRNAs are ranked as high expressers. Time course tracing of miRNA levels during embryoid body formation revealed drastic and different patterns of changes in their levels. In summary, our miRNA expression profiling encompassing human and mouse ES and iPS cells gave various perspectives in understanding the miRNA core regulatory networks regulating pluripotent cells characteristics.

  9. Integrated mRNA and micro RNA profiling reveals epigenetic mechanism of differential sensitivity of Jurkat T cells to AgNPs and Ag ions.

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    Eom, Hyun-Jeong; Chatterjee, Nivedita; Lee, Jeongsoo; Choi, Jinhee

    2014-08-17

    In our previous in vitro study of the toxicity on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), we observed a dramatically higher sensitivity of Jurkat T cells to AgNPs than to Ag ions, and DNA damage and apoptosis were found to be involved in that toxicity. In this study, to understand underlying mechanism of different sensitivity of Jurket T cells to AgNPs and Ag ions, mRNA microarray and micro RNA microarray were concomitantly conducted on AgNPs and Ag ions exposed Jurkat T cells. Surprisingly only a small number of genes were differentially expressed by exposure to each of the silver (15 altered mRNA by AgNPs exposure, whereas 4 altered mRNA by Ag ions exposure, as determined 1.5-fold change as the cut-off value). miRNA microarray revealed that the expression of 63 miRNAs was altered by AgNPs exposure, whereas that of 32 miRNAs was altered by Ag ions exposure. An integrated analysis of mRNA and miRNA expression revealed that the expression of hsa-miR-219-5p, was negatively correlated with the expression of metallothionein 1F (MT1F) and tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3), in cells exposed to AgNPs; whereas, the expression of hsa-miR-654-3p was negatively correlated with the expression of mRNA, endonuclease G-like 1 (EDGL1) in cells exposed to Ag ions. Network analysis were further conducted on mRNA-miRNA pairs, which revealed that miR-219-5p-MT1F and -TRIB3 pairs by AgNPs are being involved in various cellular processes, such as, oxidative stress, cell cycle and apoptosis, whereas, miR-654-3p and ENDOGL1 pair by Ag ions generated a much simpler network. The putative target genes of AgNPs-induced miR-504, miR-33 and miR-302 identified by Tarbase 6.0 are also found to be involved in DNA damage and apoptosis. These results collectively suggest that distinct epigenetic regulation may be an underlying mechanism of different sensitivity of Jurkat T cells to AgNPs and Ag ion. Further identification of putative target genes of DE miRNA by AgNPs and Ag ions may provide additional clues for the

  10. RNA-Seq Reveals the Angiogenesis Diversity between the Fetal and Adults Bone Mesenchyme Stem Cell.

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    Xin Zhao

    Full Text Available In this research, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq to analyze 23 single cell samples and 2 bulk cells sample from human adult bone mesenchyme stem cell line and human fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell line. The results from the research demonstrated that there were big differences between two cell lines. Adult bone mesenchyme stem cell lines showed a strong trend on the blood vessel differentiation and cell motion, 48/49 vascular related differential expressed genes showed higher expression in adult bone mesenchyme stem cell lines (Abmsc than fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell lines (Fbmsc. 96/106 cell motion related genes showed the same tendency. Further analysis showed that genes like ANGPT1, VEGFA, FGF2, PDGFB and PDGFRA showed higher expression in Abmsc. This work showed cell heterogeneity between human adult bone mesenchyme stem cell line and human fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell line. Also the work may give an indication that Abmsc had a better potency than Fbmsc in the future vascular related application.

  11. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals changes in cell cycle and differentiation programs upon aging of hematopoietic stem cells

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    Kowalczyk, Monika S.; Tirosh, Itay; Heckl, Dirk; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Dixit, Atray; Haas, Brian J.; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Wagers, Amy J.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Both intrinsic cell state changes and variations in the composition of stem cell populations have been implicated as contributors to aging. We used single-cell RNA-seq to dissect variability in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell populations from young and old mice from two strains. We found that cell cycle dominates the variability within each population and that there is a lower frequency of cells in the G1 phase among old compared with young long-term HSCs, suggesting that they traverse through G1 faster. Moreover, transcriptional changes in HSCs during aging are inversely related to those upon HSC differentiation, such that old short-term (ST) HSCs resemble young long-term (LT-HSCs), suggesting that they exist in a less differentiated state. Our results indicate both compositional changes and intrinsic, population-wide changes with age and are consistent with a model where a relationship between cell cycle progression and self-renewal versus differentiation of HSCs is affected by aging and may contribute to the functional decline of old HSCs. PMID:26430063

  12. Next-Generation Sequencing Analysis Reveals Differential Expression Profiles of MiRNA-mRNA Target Pairs in KSHV-Infected Cells.

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    Coralie Viollet

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV causes several tumors, including primary effusion lymphoma (PEL and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. Cellular and viral microRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to play important roles in regulating gene expression. A better knowledge of the miRNA-mediated pathways affected by KSHV infection is therefore important for understanding viral infection and tumor pathogenesis. In this study, we used deep sequencing to analyze miRNA and cellular mRNA expression in a cell line with latent KSHV infection (SLKK as compared to the uninfected SLK line. This approach revealed 153 differentially expressed human miRNAs, eight of which were independently confirmed by qRT-PCR. KSHV infection led to the dysregulation of ~15% of the human miRNA pool and most of these cellular miRNAs were down-regulated, including nearly all members of the 14q32 miRNA cluster, a genomic locus linked to cancer and that is deleted in a number of PEL cell lines. Furthermore, we identified 48 miRNAs that were associated with a total of 1,117 predicted or experimentally validated target mRNAs; of these mRNAs, a majority (73% were inversely correlated to expression changes of their respective miRNAs, suggesting miRNA-mediated silencing mechanisms were involved in a number of these alterations. Several dysregulated miRNA-mRNA pairs may facilitate KSHV infection or tumor formation, such as up-regulated miR-708-5p, associated with a decrease in pro-apoptotic caspase-2 and leukemia inhibitory factor LIF, or down-regulated miR-409-5p, associated with an increase in the p53-inhibitor MDM2. Transfection of miRNA mimics provided further evidence that changes in miRNAs are driving some observed mRNA changes. Using filtered datasets, we also identified several canonical pathways that were significantly enriched in differentially expressed miRNA-mRNA pairs, such as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and the interleukin-8 signaling pathways. Overall, our data

  13. Differential gene expression analysis by RNA-seq reveals the importance of actin cytoskeletal proteins in erythroleukemia cells

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    Vanessa Fernández-Calleja

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of drug resistance limits the effectiveness of anticancer treatments. Understanding the molecular mechanisms triggering this event in tumor cells may lead to improved therapeutic strategies. Here we used RNA-seq to compare the transcriptomes of a murine erythroleukemia cell line (MEL and a derived cell line with induced resistance to differentiation (MEL-R. RNA-seq analysis identified a total of 596 genes (Benjamini–Hochberg adjusted p-value < 0.05 that were differentially expressed by more than two-fold, of which 81.5% (486/596 of genes were up-regulated in MEL cells and 110 up-regulated in MEL-R cells. These observations revealed that for some genes the relative expression of mRNA amount in the MEL cell line has decreased as the cells acquired the resistant phenotype. Clustering analysis of a group of genes showing the highest differential expression allowed identification of a sub-group among genes up-regulated in MEL cells. These genes are related to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton network. Moreover, the majority of these genes are preferentially expressed in the hematopoietic lineage and at least three of them, Was (Wiskott Aldrich syndrome, Btk (Bruton’s tyrosine kinase and Rac2, when mutated in humans, give rise to severe hematopoietic deficiencies. Among the group of genes that were up-regulated in MEL-R cells, 16% of genes code for histone proteins, both canonical and variants. A potential implication of these results on the blockade of differentiation in resistant cells is discussed.

  14. Differential gene expression analysis by RNA-seq reveals the importance of actin cytoskeletal proteins in erythroleukemia cells.

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    Fernández-Calleja, Vanessa; Hernández, Pablo; Schvartzman, Jorge B; García de Lacoba, Mario; Krimer, Dora B

    2017-01-01

    Development of drug resistance limits the effectiveness of anticancer treatments. Understanding the molecular mechanisms triggering this event in tumor cells may lead to improved therapeutic strategies. Here we used RNA-seq to compare the transcriptomes of a murine erythroleukemia cell line (MEL) and a derived cell line with induced resistance to differentiation (MEL-R). RNA-seq analysis identified a total of 596 genes (Benjamini-Hochberg adjusted p-value < 0.05) that were differentially expressed by more than two-fold, of which 81.5% (486/596) of genes were up-regulated in MEL cells and 110 up-regulated in MEL-R cells. These observations revealed that for some genes the relative expression of mRNA amount in the MEL cell line has decreased as the cells acquired the resistant phenotype. Clustering analysis of a group of genes showing the highest differential expression allowed identification of a sub-group among genes up-regulated in MEL cells. These genes are related to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton network. Moreover, the majority of these genes are preferentially expressed in the hematopoietic lineage and at least three of them, Was (Wiskott Aldrich syndrome), Btk (Bruton's tyrosine kinase) and Rac2, when mutated in humans, give rise to severe hematopoietic deficiencies. Among the group of genes that were up-regulated in MEL-R cells, 16% of genes code for histone proteins, both canonical and variants. A potential implication of these results on the blockade of differentiation in resistant cells is discussed.

  15. MicroRNA Profiling Reveals Unique miRNA Signatures in IGF-1 Treated Embryonic Striatal Stem Cell Fate Decisions in Striatal Neurogenesis In Vitro

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    Soumya Pati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is considered to be the central processing unit of the basal ganglia in locomotor activity and cognitive function of the brain. IGF-1 could act as a control switch for the long-term proliferation and survival of EGF + bFGF-responsive cultured embryonic striatal stem cell (ESSC, while LIF imposes a negative impact on cell proliferation. The IGF-1-treated ESSCs also showed elevated hTERT expression with demonstration of self-renewal and trilineage commitment (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons. In order to decipher the underlying regulatory microRNA (miRNAs in IGF-1/LIF-treated ESSC-derived neurogenesis, we performed in-depth miRNA profiling at 12 days in vitro and analyzed the candidates using the Partek Genome Suite software. The annotated miRNA fingerprints delineated the differential expressions of miR-143, miR-433, and miR-503 specific to IGF-1 treatment. Similarly, the LIF-treated ESSCs demonstrated specific expression of miR-326, miR-181, and miR-22, as they were nonsignificant in IGF-treated ESSCs. To elucidate the possible downstream pathways, we performed in silico mapping of the said miRNAs into ingenuity pathway analysis. Our findings revealed the important mRNA targets of the miRNAs and suggested specific interactomes. The above studies introduced a new genre of miRNAs for ESSC-based neuroregenerative therapeutic applications.

  16. Cells Respond to Distinct Nanoparticle Properties with Multiple Strategies As Revealed by Single-Cell RNA-Seq

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    Mitchell, Hugh D.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Chrisler, William B.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Xie, Yumei; Melby, Eric S.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Taylor, Ronald C.; Grate, Eva K.; Cooley, Scott K.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Orr, Galya

    2016-11-22

    The impact of distinct nanoparticle (NP) properties on cellular response and ultimately human health is unclear. This gap is partially due to experimental difficulties in achieving uniform NP loads in the studied cells, creating heterogeneous populations with some cells “overloaded” while other cells are loaded with few or no NPs. Yet gene expression studies have been conducted in the population as a whole, identifying generic responses, while missing unique responses due to signal averaging across many cells, each carrying different loads. Here we applied single-cell RNA-Seq to alveolar epithelial cells carrying defined loads of aminated or carboxylated quantum dots (QDs), showing higher or lower toxicity, respectively. Interestingly, cells carrying lower loads responded with multiple strategies, mostly with upregulated processes, which were nonetheless coherent and unique to each QD type. In contrast, cells carrying higher loads responded more uniformly, with mostly downregulated processes that were shared across QD types. Strategies unique to aminated QDs showed strong upregulation of stress responses, coupled in some cases with regulation of cell cycle, protein synthesis and organelle activities. In contrast, strategies unique to carboxylated QDs showed upregulation of DNA repair and RNA activities, and decreased regulation of cell division, coupled in some cases with upregulation of stress responses and ATP related functions. Together, our studies suggest scenarios where higher NP loads lock cells into uniform responses, mostly shutdown of cellular processes, whereas lower loads allow for unique responses to each NP type that are more diversified, proactive defenses or repairs of the NP insults.

  17. Single-cell duplex RT-LATE-PCR reveals Oct4 and Xist RNA gradients in 8-cell embryos

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    Hartung Odelya

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The formation of two distinctive cell lineages in preimplantation mouse embryos is characterized by differential gene expression. The cells of the inner cell mass are pluripotent and express high levels of Oct4 mRNA, which is down-regulated in the surrounding trophectoderm. In contrast, the trophectoderm of female embryos contains Xist mRNA, which is absent from cells of the inner mass. Prior to blastocyst formation, all blastomeres of female embryos still express both of these RNAs. We, thus, postulated that simultaneous quantification of Oct4 and Xist transcripts in individual blastomeres at the 8-cell stage could be informative as to their subsequent fate. Testing this hypothesis, however, presented numerous technical challenges. We overcame these difficulties by combining PurAmp, a single-tube method for RNA preparation and quantification, with LATE-PCR, an advanced form of asymmetric PCR. Results We constructed a duplex RT-LATE-PCR assay for real-time measurement of Oct4 and Xist templates and confirmed its specificity and quantitative accuracy with different methods. We then undertook analysis of sets of blastomeres isolated from embryos at the 8-cell stage. At this stage, all cells in the embryo are still pluripotent and morphologically equivalent. Our results demonstrate, however, that both Oct4 and Xist RNA levels vary in individual blastomeres comprising the same embryo, with some cells having particularly elevated levels of either transcript. Analysis of multiple embryos also shows that Xist and Oct4 expression levels are not correlated at the 8-cell stage, although transcription of both genes is up-regulated at this time in development. In addition, comparison of data from males and females allowed us to determine that the efficiency of the Oct4/Xist assay is unaffected by sex-related differences in gene expression. Conclusion This paper describes the first example of multiplex RT-LATE-PCR and its utility, when

  18. RNA-Seq following PCR-based sorting reveals rare cell transcriptional signatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pellegrino, Maurizio; Sciambi, Adam; Yates, Jamie L; Mast, Joshua D; Silver, Charles; Eastburn, Dennis J

    2016-01-01

    .... PCR-activated cell sorting (PACS) is a novel cytometry method that uses single-cell TaqMan PCR reactions performed in microfluidic droplets to identify and isolate cell subtypes with high-throughput...

  19. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Reveals T Helper Cells Synthesizing Steroids De Novo to Contribute to Immune Homeostasis

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    Bidesh Mahata

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available T helper 2 (Th2 cells regulate helminth infections, allergic disorders, tumor immunity, and pregnancy by secreting various cytokines. It is likely that there are undiscovered Th2 signaling molecules. Although steroids are known to be immunoregulators, de novo steroid production from immune cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we demonstrate production of the steroid pregnenolone by Th2 cells in vitro and in vivo in a helminth infection model. Single-cell RNA sequencing and quantitative PCR analysis suggest that pregnenolone synthesis in Th2 cells is related to immunosuppression. In support of this, we show that pregnenolone inhibits Th cell proliferation and B cell immunoglobulin class switching. We also show that steroidogenic Th2 cells inhibit Th cell proliferation in a Cyp11a1 enzyme-dependent manner. We propose pregnenolone as a “lymphosteroid,” a steroid produced by lymphocytes. We speculate that this de novo steroid production may be an intrinsic phenomenon of Th2-mediated immune responses to actively restore immune homeostasis.

  20. Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals T helper cells synthesizing steroids de novo to contribute to immune homeostasis.

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    Mahata, Bidesh; Zhang, Xiuwei; Kolodziejczyk, Aleksandra A; Proserpio, Valentina; Haim-Vilmovsky, Liora; Taylor, Angela E; Hebenstreit, Daniel; Dingler, Felix A; Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Arlt, Wiebke; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2014-05-22

    T helper 2 (Th2) cells regulate helminth infections, allergic disorders, tumor immunity, and pregnancy by secreting various cytokines. It is likely that there are undiscovered Th2 signaling molecules. Although steroids are known to be immunoregulators, de novo steroid production from immune cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we demonstrate production of the steroid pregnenolone by Th2 cells in vitro and in vivo in a helminth infection model. Single-cell RNA sequencing and quantitative PCR analysis suggest that pregnenolone synthesis in Th2 cells is related to immunosuppression. In support of this, we show that pregnenolone inhibits Th cell proliferation and B cell immunoglobulin class switching. We also show that steroidogenic Th2 cells inhibit Th cell proliferation in a Cyp11a1 enzyme-dependent manner. We propose pregnenolone as a "lymphosteroid," a steroid produced by lymphocytes. We speculate that this de novo steroid production may be an intrinsic phenomenon of Th2-mediated immune responses to actively restore immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Small RNA profiling reveals deregulated phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway in bronchial smooth muscle cells from asthmatic patients.

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    Alexandrova, Elena; Miglino, Nicola; Hashim, Adnan; Nassa, Giovanni; Stellato, Claudia; Tamm, Michael; Baty, Florent; Brutsche, Martin; Weisz, Alessandro; Borger, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs) and PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in particular, define several pathologic processes. Asthma is characterized by airway hyperreactivity, chronic inflammation, and airway wall remodeling. Asthma-specific miRNA profiles were reported for bronchial epithelial cells, whereas sncRNA expression in asthmatic bronchial smooth muscle (BSM) cells is almost completely unexplored. We sought to determine whether the primary BSM sncRNA expression profile is altered in asthmatic patients and identify targets of differentially expressed sncRNAs. Small RNA sequencing was used for sncRNA profiling in BSM cells (from 8 asthmatic and 6 nonasthmatic subjects). sncRNA identification and differential expression analysis was performed with iMir software. Experimentally validated miRNA targets were identified by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, and putative piRNA targets were identified by using miRanda software. BSM cells from asthmatic patients showed abnormal expression of 32 sncRNAs (26 miRNAs, 5 piRNAs, and 1 small nucleolar RNA). Target prediction for deregulated miRNAs and piRNAs revealed experimentally validated and predicted mRNA targets expressed in the BSM cells. Thirty-eight of these mRNAs represent major targets for deregulated miRNAs and might play important roles in the pathophysiology of asthma. Interestingly, 6 of these mRNAs were previously associated with asthma, considered as novel therapeutic targets for treatment of this disease, or both. Signaling pathway analysis revealed involvement of 38 miRNA-targeted mRNAs in increased cell proliferation through phosphatase and tensin homolog and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathways. BSM cells of asthmatic patients are characterized by aberrant sncRNA expression that recapitulates multiple pathologic phenotypes of these cells. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Using RNA Interference to Reveal Genetic Vulnerabilities in Human Cancer Cells

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    Siolas, Despina; Hannon, Gregory J

    2004-01-01

    .... Studies in a multitude of organisms led to the development of a methodology for experimentally programming the RNAi machinery in mammalian cells by direct delivery of chemically synthesized siRNAs. A second approach for triggering RNAi in mammalian cells came about using DNA vectors encoding short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), modeled roughly after endogenous microRNAs.

  3. Proteomic interrogation of androgen action in prostate cancer cells reveals roles of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases.

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    Adaikkalam Vellaichamy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer remains the most common malignancy among men in United States, and there is no remedy currently available for the advanced stage hormone-refractory cancer. This is partly due to the incomplete understanding of androgen-regulated proteins and their encoded functions. Whole-cell proteomes of androgen-starved and androgen-treated LNCaP cells were analyzed by semi-quantitative MudPIT ESI- ion trap MS/MS and quantitative iTRAQ MALDI- TOF MS/MS platforms, with identification of more than 1300 high-confidence proteins. An enrichment-based pathway mapping of the androgen-regulated proteomic data sets revealed a significant dysregulation of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, indicating an increase in protein biosynthesis- a hallmark during prostate cancer progression. This observation is supported by immunoblot and transcript data from LNCaP cells, and prostate cancer tissue. Thus, data derived from multiple proteomics platforms and transcript data coupled with informatics analysis provides a deeper insight into the functional consequences of androgen action in prostate cancer.

  4. Integrated miRNA, mRNA and protein expression analysis reveals the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling CHO cell growth rate

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    Clarke Colin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the role of microRNA (miRNA in the regulation of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell growth, qPCR, microarray and quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis were utilised for simultaneous expression profiling of miRNA, mRNA and protein. The sample set under investigation consisted of clones with variable cellular growth rates derived from the same population. In addition to providing a systems level perspective on cell growth, the integration of multiple profiling datasets can facilitate the identification of non-seed miRNA targets, complement computational prediction tools and reduce false positive and false negative rates. Results 51 miRNAs were associated with increased growth rate (35 miRNAs upregulated and 16 miRNAs downregulated. Gene ontology (GO analysis of genes (n=432 and proteins (n=285 found to be differentially expressed (DE identified biological processes driving proliferation including mRNA processing and translation. To investigate the influence of miRNA on these processes we combined the proteomic and transcriptomic data into two groups. The first set contained candidates where evidence of translational repression was observed (n=158. The second group was a mixture of proteins and mRNAs where evidence of translational repression was less clear (n=515. The TargetScan algorithm was utilised to predict potential targets within these two groups for anti-correlated DE miRNAs. Conclusions The evidence presented in this study indicates that biological processes such as mRNA processing and protein synthesis are correlated with growth rate in CHO cells. Through the integration of expression data from multiple levels of the biological system a number of proteins central to these processes including several hnRNPs and components of the ribosome were found to be post-transcriptionally regulated. We utilised the expression data in conjunction with in-silico tools to identify potential miRNA-mediated regulation of mRNA

  5. Multiple correlation analyses revealed complex relationship between DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang-Fei; Deng, Fei-Yan; Wu, Long-Fei; Mo, Xing-Bo; Zhu, Hong; Wu, Jian; Guo, Yu-Fan; Zeng, Ke-Qin; Wang, Ming-Jun; Zhu, Xiao-Wei; Xia, Wei; Wang, Lan; He, Pei; Bing, Peng-Fei; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Lei, Shu-Feng

    2017-07-22

    DNA methylation is an important regulator on the mRNA expression. However, a genome-wide correlation pattern between DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) is largely unknown. The comprehensive relationship between mRNA and DNA methylation was explored by using four types of correlation analyses and a genome-wide methylation-mRNA expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in PBMCs in 46 unrelated female subjects. An enrichment analysis was performed to detect biological function for the detected genes. Single pair correlation coefficient (r T1) between methylation level and mRNA is moderate (-0.63-0.62) in intensity, and the negative and positive correlations are nearly equal in quantity. Correlation analysis on each gene (T4) found 60.1% genes showed correlations between mRNA and gene-based methylation at P correlation (R T4 > 0.8). Methylation sites have regulation effects on mRNA expression in eQTL analysis, with more often observations in region of transcription start site (TSS). The genes under significant methylation regulation both in correlation analysis and eQTL analysis tend to cluster to the categories (e.g., transcription, translation, regulation of transcription) that are essential for maintaining the basic life activities of cells. Our findings indicated that DNA methylation has predictive regulation effect on mRNA with a very complex pattern in PBMCs. The results increased our understanding on correlation of methylation and mRNA and also provided useful clues for future epigenetic studies in exploring biological and disease-related regulatory mechanisms in PBMC.

  6. Genome Wide Expression Profiling of Cancer Cell Lines Cultured in Microgravity Reveals Significant Dysregulation of Cell Cycle and MicroRNA Gene Networks.

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    Prasanna Vidyasekar

    Full Text Available Zero gravity causes several changes in metabolic and functional aspects of the human body and experiments in space flight have demonstrated alterations in cancer growth and progression. This study reports the genome wide expression profiling of a colorectal cancer cell line-DLD-1, and a lymphoblast leukemic cell line-MOLT-4, under simulated microgravity in an effort to understand central processes and cellular functions that are dysregulated among both cell lines. Altered cell morphology, reduced cell viability and an aberrant cell cycle profile in comparison to their static controls were observed in both cell lines under microgravity. The process of cell cycle in DLD-1 cells was markedly affected with reduced viability, reduced colony forming ability, an apoptotic population and dysregulation of cell cycle genes, oncogenes, and cancer progression and prognostic markers. DNA microarray analysis revealed 1801 (upregulated and 2542 (downregulated genes (>2 fold in DLD-1 cultures under microgravity while MOLT-4 cultures differentially expressed 349 (upregulated and 444 (downregulated genes (>2 fold under microgravity. The loss in cell proliferative capacity was corroborated with the downregulation of the cell cycle process as demonstrated by functional clustering of DNA microarray data using gene ontology terms. The genome wide expression profile also showed significant dysregulation of post transcriptional gene silencing machinery and multiple microRNA host genes that are potential tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes including MIR22HG, MIR17HG and MIR21HG. The MIR22HG, a tumor-suppressor gene was one of the highest upregulated genes in the microarray data showing a 4.4 log fold upregulation under microgravity. Real time PCR validated the dysregulation in the host gene by demonstrating a 4.18 log fold upregulation of the miR-22 microRNA. Microarray data also showed dysregulation of direct targets of miR-22, SP1, CDK6 and CCNA2.

  7. Epitranscriptomic profiling across cell types reveals associations between APOBEC1-mediated RNA editing, gene expression outcomes, and cellular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayon-Estrada, Violeta; Harjanto, Dewi; Hamilton, Claire E; Berchiche, Yamina A; Gantman, Emily Conn; Sakmar, Thomas P; Bulloch, Karen; Gagnidze, Khatuna; Harroch, Sheila; McEwen, Bruce S; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2017-12-12

    Epitranscriptomics refers to posttranscriptional alterations on an mRNA sequence that are dynamic and reproducible, and affect gene expression in a similar way to epigenetic modifications. However, the functional relevance of those modifications for the transcript, the cell, and the organism remain poorly understood. Here, we focus on RNA editing and show that Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-1 (APOBEC1), together with its cofactor RBM47, mediates robust editing in different tissues. The majority of editing events alter the sequence of the 3'UTR of targeted transcripts, and we focus on one cell type (monocytes) and on a small set of highly edited transcripts within it to show that editing alters gene expression by modulating translation (but not RNA stability or localization). We further show that specific cellular processes (phagocytosis and transendothelial migration) are enriched for transcripts that are targets of editing and that editing alters their function. Finally, we survey bone marrow progenitors and demonstrate that common monocyte progenitor cells express high levels of APOBEC1 and are susceptible to loss of the editing enzyme. Overall, APOBEC1-mediated transcriptome diversification is required for the fine-tuning of protein expression in monocytes, suggesting an epitranscriptomic mechanism for the proper maintenance of homeostasis in innate immune cells. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  8. RNAi screening reveals requirement for host cell secretory pathway in infection by diverse families of negative-strand RNA viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Debasis; Das, Anshuman; Dinh, Phat X.; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Nayak, Debasis; Barrows, Nicholas J.; Pearson, James L.; Thompson, Jesse; Kelly, David L.; Ladunga, Istvan; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2011-01-01

    Negative-strand (NS) RNA viruses comprise many pathogens that cause serious diseases in humans and animals. Despite their clinical importance, little is known about the host factors required for their infection. Using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototypic NS RNA virus in the family Rhabdoviridae, we conducted a human genome-wide siRNA screen and identified 72 host genes required for viral infection. Many of these identified genes were also required for infection by two other NS RNA viruses, the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus of the Arenaviridae family and human parainfluenza virus type 3 of the Paramyxoviridae family. Genes affecting different stages of VSV infection, such as entry/uncoating, gene expression, and assembly/release, were identified. Depletion of the proteins of the coatomer complex I or its upstream effectors ARF1 or GBF1 led to detection of reduced levels of VSV RNA. Coatomer complex I was also required for infection of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type 3. These results highlight the evolutionarily conserved requirements for gene expression of diverse families of NS RNA viruses and demonstrate the involvement of host cell secretory pathway in the process. PMID:22065774

  9. Whole transcriptome analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii assessed by RNA-sequencing reveals different mRNA expression profiles in biofilm compared to planktonic cells.

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    Soraya Rumbo-Feal

    Full Text Available Acinetobacterbaumannii has emerged as a dangerous opportunistic pathogen, with many strains able to form biofilms and thus cause persistent infections. The aim of the present study was to use high-throughput sequencing techniques to establish complete transcriptome profiles of planktonic (free-living and sessile (biofilm forms of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and thereby identify differences in their gene expression patterns. Collections of mRNA from planktonic (both exponential and stationary phase cultures and sessile (biofilm cells were sequenced. Six mRNA libraries were prepared following the mRNA-Seq protocols from Illumina. Reads were obtained in a HiScanSQ platform and mapped against the complete genome to describe the complete mRNA transcriptomes of planktonic and sessile cells. The results showed that the gene expression pattern of A. baumannii biofilm cells was distinct from that of planktonic cells, including 1621 genes over-expressed in biofilms relative to stationary phase cells and 55 genes expressed only in biofilms. These differences suggested important changes in amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, motility, active transport, DNA-methylation, iron acquisition, transcriptional regulation, and quorum sensing, among other processes. Disruption or deletion of five of these genes caused a significant decrease in biofilm formation ability in the corresponding mutant strains. Among the genes over-expressed in biofilm cells were those in an operon involved in quorum sensing. One of them, encoding an acyl carrier protein, was shown to be involved in biofilm formation as demonstrated by the significant decrease in biofilm formation by the corresponding knockout strain. The present work serves as a basis for future studies examining the complex network systems that regulate bacterial biofilm formation and maintenance.

  10. Corona cell RNA sequencing from individual oocytes revealed transcripts and pathways linked to euploid oocyte competence and live birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Jason C; Patton, Alyssa L; McCallie, Blair R; Griffin, Darren K; Schoolcraft, William B; Katz-Jaffe, Mandy G

    2016-05-01

    Corona cells surround the oocyte and maintain a close relationship through transzonal processes and gap junctions, and may be used to assess oocyte competence. In this study, the corona cell transcriptome of individual cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) was investigated. Isolated corona cells were collected from COCs that developed into euploid blastocysts and were transferred in a subsequent frozen embryo transfer. Ten corona cell samples underwent RNA-sequencing to generate unique gene expression profiles. Live birth was compared with negative implantation after the transfer of a euploid blastocyst using bioinformatics and statistical analysis. Individual corona cell samples produced a mean of 21.2 million sequence reads, and 307 differentially expressed transcrpits (P corona cell transcriptome was successfully generated using RNA-sequencing. Key genes and signalling pathways were identified in association with implantation outcome after the transfer of a euploid blastocyst in a frozen embryo transfer. These data could provide novel biomarkers for the non-invasive assessment of embryo viability. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Next Generation Sequencing Analysis Reveals Segmental Patterns of microRNA Expression in Mouse Epididymal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Brett; Stanger, Simone J.; Mihalas, Bettina P.; Reilly, Jackson N.; Anderson, Amanda L.; Dun, Matthew D.; Tyagi, Sonika; Holt, Janet E.; McLaughlin, Eileen A.

    2015-01-01

    The functional maturation of mammalian spermatozoa is accomplished as the cells descend through the highly specialized microenvironment of the epididymis. This dynamic environment is, in turn, created by the combined secretory and absorptive activity of the surrounding epithelium and displays an extraordinary level of regionalization. Although the regulatory network responsible for spatial coordination of epididymal function remains unclear, recent evidence has highlighted a novel role for the RNA interference pathway. Indeed, as noncanonical regulators of gene expression, small noncoding RNAs have emerged as key elements of the circuitry involved in regulating epididymal function and hence sperm maturation. Herein we have employed next generation sequencing technology to profile the genome-wide miRNA signatures of mouse epididymal cells and characterize segmental patterns of expression. An impressive profile of some 370 miRNAs were detected in the mouse epididymis, with a subset of these specifically identified within the epithelial cells that line the tubule (218). A majority of the latter miRNAs (75%) were detected at equivalent levels along the entire length of the mouse epididymis. We did however identify a small cohort of miRNAs that displayed highly regionalized patterns of expression, including miR-204-5p and miR-196b-5p, which were down- and up-regulated by approximately 39- and 45-fold between the caput/caudal regions, respectively. In addition we identified 79 miRNAs (representing ~ 21% of all miRNAs) as displaying conserved expression within all regions of the mouse, rat and human epididymal tissue. These included 8/14 members of let-7 family of miRNAs that have been widely implicated in the control of androgen signaling and the repression of cell proliferation and oncogenic pathways. Overall these data provide novel insights into the sophistication of the miRNA network that regulates the function of the male reproductive tract. PMID:26270822

  12. Identification of TTP mRNA targets in human dendritic cells reveals TTP as a critical regulator of dendritic cell maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Jillian; Townley-Tilson, W.H. Davin; Deleault, Kristen M.; Skinner, Stephen J.; Gross, Robert H.; Whitfield, Michael L.; Brooks, Seth A.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells provide a critical link between innate and adaptive immunity and are essential to prime a naive T-cell response. The transition from immature dendritic cells to mature dendritic cells involves numerous changes in gene expression; however, the role of post-transcriptional changes in this process has been largely ignored. Tristetraprolin is an AU-rich element mRNA-binding protein that has been shown to regulate the stability of a number of cytokines and chemokines of mRNAs. Using TTP immunoprecipitations and Affymetrix GeneChips, we identified 393 messages as putative TTP mRNA targets in human dendritic cells. Gene ontology analysis revealed that ∼25% of the identified mRNAs are associated with protein synthesis. We also identified six MHC Class I alleles, five MHC Class II alleles, seven chemokine and chemokine receptor genes, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, and CD86 as putative TTP ligands. Real-time PCR was used to validate the GeneChip data for 15 putative target genes and functional studies performed for six target genes. These data establish that TTP regulates the expression of DUSP1, IDO, SOD2, CD86, and MHC Class I-B and F via the 3′-untranslated region of each gene. A novel finding is the demonstration that TTP can interact with and regulate the expression of non-AU-rich element-containing messages. The data implicate TTP as having a broader role in regulating and limiting the immune response than previously suspected. PMID:18367721

  13. RNA Sequencing Analysis Reveals Interactions between Breast Cancer or Melanoma Cells and the Tissue Microenvironment during Brain Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ryo; Nakano, Teppei; Hosonaga, Mari; Sampetrean, Oltea; Harigai, Ritsuko; Sasaki, Takashi; Koya, Ikuko; Okano, Hideyuki; Kudoh, Jun; Saya, Hideyuki; Arima, Yoshimi

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of treatment failure and death in cancer patients. Metastasis of tumor cells to the brain occurs frequently in individuals with breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, or melanoma. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the causes and in the treatment of primary tumors, the biological and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastasis of cancer cells to the brain have remained unclear. Metastasizing cancer cells interact with their microenvironment in the brain to establish metastases. We have now developed mouse models of brain metastasis based on intracardiac injection of human breast cancer or melanoma cell lines, and we have performed RNA sequencing analysis to identify genes in mouse brain tissue and the human cancer cells whose expression is associated specifically with metastasis. We found that the expressions of the mouse genes Tph2, Sspo, Ptprq, and Pole as well as those of the human genes CXCR4, PLLP, TNFSF4, VCAM1, SLC8A2, and SLC7A11 were upregulated in brain tissue harboring metastases. Further characterization of such genes that contribute to the establishment of brain metastases may provide a basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies and consequent improvement in the prognosis of cancer patients.

  14. RNA Sequencing Analysis Reveals Interactions between Breast Cancer or Melanoma Cells and the Tissue Microenvironment during Brain Metastasis

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    Ryo Sato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the main cause of treatment failure and death in cancer patients. Metastasis of tumor cells to the brain occurs frequently in individuals with breast cancer, non–small cell lung cancer, or melanoma. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the causes and in the treatment of primary tumors, the biological and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastasis of cancer cells to the brain have remained unclear. Metastasizing cancer cells interact with their microenvironment in the brain to establish metastases. We have now developed mouse models of brain metastasis based on intracardiac injection of human breast cancer or melanoma cell lines, and we have performed RNA sequencing analysis to identify genes in mouse brain tissue and the human cancer cells whose expression is associated specifically with metastasis. We found that the expressions of the mouse genes Tph2, Sspo, Ptprq, and Pole as well as those of the human genes CXCR4, PLLP, TNFSF4, VCAM1, SLC8A2, and SLC7A11 were upregulated in brain tissue harboring metastases. Further characterization of such genes that contribute to the establishment of brain metastases may provide a basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies and consequent improvement in the prognosis of cancer patients.

  15. RNA expression in a cartilaginous fish cell line reveals ancient 3' noncoding regions highly conserved in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, David; Nishikawa, Ryuhei; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Parton, Angela; Bayne, Christopher J; Barnes, David W

    2007-01-23

    We have established a cartilaginous fish cell line [Squalus acanthias embryo cell line (SAE)], a mesenchymal stem cell line derived from the embryo of an elasmobranch, the spiny dogfish shark S. acanthias. Elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) first appeared >400 million years ago, and existing species provide useful models for comparative vertebrate cell biology, physiology, and genomics. Comparative vertebrate genomics among evolutionarily distant organisms can provide sequence conservation information that facilitates identification of critical coding and noncoding regions. Although these genomic analyses are informative, experimental verification of functions of genomic sequences depends heavily on cell culture approaches. Using ESTs defining mRNAs derived from the SAE cell line, we identified lengthy and highly conserved gene-specific nucleotide sequences in the noncoding 3' UTRs of eight genes involved in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation. Conserved noncoding 3' mRNA regions detected by using the shark nucleotide sequences as a starting point were found in a range of other vertebrate orders, including bony fish, birds, amphibians, and mammals. Nucleotide identity of shark and human in these regions was remarkably well conserved. Our results indicate that highly conserved gene sequences dating from the appearance of jawed vertebrates and representing potential cis-regulatory elements can be identified through the use of cartilaginous fish as a baseline. Because the expression of genes in the SAE cell line was prerequisite for their identification, this cartilaginous fish culture system also provides a physiologically valid tool to test functional hypotheses on the role of these ancient conserved sequences in comparative cell biology.

  16. RNA-seq reveals novel transcriptome of genes and their isoforms in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells treated with thrombin.

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    Li Qin Zhang

    Full Text Available The dysregulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin has been implicated in the development of a number of pathologic disorders such as inflammatory conditions, cancer, diabetes, coronary heart disease. However, transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin is not completely understood. In the present study, Illumina RNA-seq was used to profile the transcriptome in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L treated with thrombin for 6 h to gain insight into thrombin's direct effects on the endothelial function. Out of 100 million total reads from a paired end sequencing assay, 91-94% of the reads were aligned to over 16,000 genes in the reference human genome. Thrombin upregulated 150 known genes and 480 known isoforms, and downregulated 2,190 known genes and 3,574 known isoforms by at least 2 fold. Of note, thrombin upregulated 1,775 previously unknown isoforms and downregulated 12,202 previously unknown isoforms by at least 2 fold. Many genes displayed isoform specific differential expression levels and different usage of transcriptional start sites after the thrombin treatment. The cross comparisons between our RNA-seq data and those of DNA microarray analysis of either 6 h thrombin treated HUVEC or 5 h TNFα treated HMVEC have provided a significant overlapping list of differentially expressed genes, supporting the robust utility of our dataset. Further in-depth follow-up analysis of the transcriptional regulation reported in this study may shed light on molecular pathogenic mechanisms underlying thrombin mediated endothelial dysfunction in various diseases and provide new leads of potential therapeutic targets.

  17. RNA-seq Reveals Novel Transcriptome of Genes and Their Isoforms in Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells Treated with Thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li Qin; Cheranova, Dilyara; Gibson, Margaret; Ding, Shinghua; Heruth, Daniel P.; Fang, Deyu; Ye, Shui Qing

    2012-01-01

    The dysregulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin has been implicated in the development of a number of pathologic disorders such as inflammatory conditions, cancer, diabetes, coronary heart disease. However, transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin is not completely understood. In the present study, Illumina RNA-seq was used to profile the transcriptome in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) treated with thrombin for 6 h to gain insight into thrombin's direct effects on the endothelial function. Out of 100 million total reads from a paired end sequencing assay, 91–94% of the reads were aligned to over 16,000 genes in the reference human genome. Thrombin upregulated 150 known genes and 480 known isoforms, and downregulated 2,190 known genes and 3,574 known isoforms by at least 2 fold. Of note, thrombin upregulated 1,775 previously unknown isoforms and downregulated 12,202 previously unknown isoforms by at least 2 fold. Many genes displayed isoform specific differential expression levels and different usage of transcriptional start sites after the thrombin treatment. The cross comparisons between our RNA-seq data and those of DNA microarray analysis of either 6 h thrombin treated HUVEC or 5 h TNFα treated HMVEC have provided a significant overlapping list of differentially expressed genes, supporting the robust utility of our dataset. Further in-depth follow-up analysis of the transcriptional regulation reported in this study may shed light on molecular pathogenic mechanisms underlying thrombin mediated endothelial dysfunction in various diseases and provide new leads of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:22359579

  18. Transcriptomic analyses of RNA-binding proteins reveal eIF3c promotes cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tangjian; Li, Shengli; Chen, Di; Chen, Bing; Yu, Tao; Zhao, Fangyu; Wang, Qifeng; Yao, Ming; Huang, Shenglin; Chen, Zhiao; He, Xianghuo

    2017-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play fundamental roles in the RNA life cycle. The aberrant expression of RBPs is often observed in human disease, including cancer. In this study, we screened for the expression levels of 1542 human RBPs in The Cancer Genome Atlas liver hepatocellular carcinoma samples and found 92 consistently upregulated RBP genes in HCC compared with normal samples. Additionally, we undertook a Kaplan-Meier analysis and found that high expression of 15 RBP genes was associated with poor prognosis in patients with HCC. Furthermore, we found that eIF3c promotes HCC cell proliferation in vitro as well as tumorigenicity in vivo. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis showed that high eIF3c expression is positively associated with KRAS, vascular endothelial growth factor, and Hedgehog signaling pathways, all of which are closely associated with specific cancer-related gene sets. Our study provides the basis for further investigation of the molecular mechanism by which eIF3c promotes the development and progression of HCC. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Single cardiomyocyte nuclear transcriptomes reveal a lincRNA-regulated de-differentiation and cell cycle stress-response in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Kelvin; Tan, Wilson L W; Lim, Eng How; Tiang, Zenia; Lee, Li Ting; Li, Peter Y Q; Luu, Tuan D A; Ackers-Johnson, Matthew; Foo, Roger S

    2017-08-09

    Cardiac regeneration may revolutionize treatment for heart failure but endogenous progenitor-derived cardiomyocytes in the adult mammalian heart are few and pre-existing adult cardiomyocytes divide only at very low rates. Although candidate genes that control cardiomyocyte cell cycle re-entry have been implicated, expression heterogeneity in the cardiomyocyte stress-response has never been explored. Here, we show by single nuclear RNA-sequencing of cardiomyocytes from both mouse and human failing, and non-failing adult hearts that sub-populations of cardiomyocytes upregulate cell cycle activators and inhibitors consequent to the stress-response in vivo. We characterize these subgroups by weighted gene co-expression network analysis and discover long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA) as key nodal regulators. KD of nodal lincRNAs affects expression levels of genes related to dedifferentiation and cell cycle, within the same gene regulatory network. Our study reveals that sub-populations of adult cardiomyocytes may have a unique endogenous potential for cardiac regeneration in vivo.Adult mammalian cardiomyocytes are predominantly binucleated and unable to divide. Using single nuclear RNA-sequencing of cardiomyocytes from mouse and human failing and non-failing adult hearts, See et al. show that some cardiomyocytes respond to stress by dedifferentiation and cell cycle re-entry regulated by lncRNAs.

  20. Silencing tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) with short interfering RNA reveals a role for TIMP-1 in hepatic stellate cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowell, Andrew J., E-mail: ajf2@soton.ac.uk [Liver and Pancreas Group, University of Southampton, Division of Infection, Inflammation and Immunity, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Collins, Jane E.; Duncombe, Dale R.; Pickering, Judith A. [Liver and Pancreas Group, University of Southampton, Division of Infection, Inflammation and Immunity, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Rosenberg, William M.C. [Centre for Hepatology, Division of Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Benyon, R. Christopher [Liver and Pancreas Group, University of Southampton, Division of Infection, Inflammation and Immunity, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Myofibroblastic, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in the development of liver fibrosis. {yields} We used short interfering RNA (siRNA) to investigate the effects of autocrine TIMP-1 and -2 on HSC proliferation. {yields} Specific silencing of TIMP-1, but not TIMP-2, significantly reduces HSC proliferation and is associated with reduced Akt phosphorylation. {yields} TIMP-1 is localised in part to the HSC nucleus. {yields} TIMP-1 might promote liver fibrosis by means other than its previously described anti-apoptotic effect on HSC. -- Abstract: Myofibroblastic, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in the development of liver fibrosis through the secretion of fibrillar collagens and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and -2. TIMPs are believed to promote hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting both matrix degradation and apoptosis of HSC. In other cell types, there is evidence that TIMP-1 has effects on proliferation, however the role of TIMPs in the regulation of HSC proliferation remains unexplored. Therefore, we have used short interfering RNA (siRNA) to investigate the effects of autocrine TIMP-1 and -2 on HSC proliferation. TIMP-1 and -2 siRNA were highly effective, producing peak target protein knockdown compared to negative control siRNA of 92% and 63%, respectively. Specific silencing of TIMP-1, using siRNA, significantly reduced HSC proliferation. TIMP-1 was localised in part to the HSC nucleus and TIMP-1 siRNA resulted in loss of both cytoplasmic and nuclear TIMP-1. Attenuated proliferation was associated with reduced Akt phosphorylation and was partially rescued by addition of recombinant TIMP-1. We have revealed a novel autocrine mitogenic effect of TIMP-1 on HSC, which may involve Akt-dependent and specific nuclear mechanisms of action. We suggest that TIMP-1 might promote liver fibrosis by means other than its previously described anti-apoptotic effect on HSC. Moreover

  1. High-throughput sequencing reveals miRNA effects on the primary and secondary production properties in long-term subcultured Taxus cells

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    Meng eZhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant-cell culture technology is a promising alternative for production of high-value secondary metabolites but is limited by the decreased metabolite production after long-term subculture. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of miRNAs on altered gene expression profiles during long-term subculture. Two Taxus cell lines, CA (subcultured for 10 years and NA (subcultured for 6 months, were high-throughput sequenced at the mRNA and miRNA levels. A total of 265 known (78.87% of 336 and 221 novel (79.78% of 277 miRNAs were differentially expressed. Furthermore, 67.17% of the known differentially expressed (DE miRNAs (178 and 60.63% of the novel DE-miRNAs (134 were upregulated in NA. A total of 275 inverse-related miRNA/mRNA modules were identified by target prediction analysis. Functional annotation of the targets revealed that the high-ranking miRNA targets were those implicated in primary metabolism and abiotic or biotic signal transduction. For example, various genes for starch metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation were inversely related to the miRNA levels, thereby indicating that miRNAs have important roles in these pathways. Interestingly, only a few genes for secondary metabolism were inversely related to miRNA, thereby indicating that factors other than miRNA are present in the regulatory system. Moreover, miR8154 and miR5298b were upregulated miRNAs that targeted a mass of DE genes. The overexpression of these miRNAs in CA increased the genes of taxol, phenylpropanoid, and flavonoid biosynthesis, thereby suggesting their function as crucial factors that regulate the entire metabolic network during long-term subculture. Our current studies indicated that a positive conversion of production properties from secondary metabolism to primary metabolism occurred in long-term subcultured cells. miRNAs are important regulators in the upregulation of primary metabolism.

  2. RNA Sequencing of Murine Norovirus-Infected Cells Reveals Transcriptional Alteration of Genes Important to Viral Recognition and Antigen Presentation

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    Daniel Enosi Tuipulotu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Viruses inherently exploit normal cellular functions to promote replication and survival. One mechanism involves transcriptional control of the host, and knowledge of the genes modified and their molecular function can aid in understanding viral-host interactions. Norovirus pathogenesis, despite the recent advances in cell cultivation, remains largely uncharacterized. Several studies have utilized the related murine norovirus (MNV to identify innate response, antigen presentation, and cellular recognition components that are activated during infection. In this study, we have used next-generation sequencing to probe the transcriptomic changes of MNV-infected mouse macrophages. Our in-depth analysis has revealed that MNV is a potent stimulator of the innate response including genes involved in interferon and cytokine production pathways. We observed that genes involved in viral recognition, namely IFIH1, DDX58, and DHX58 were significantly upregulated with infection, whereas we observed significant downregulation of cytokine receptors (Il17rc, Il1rl1, Cxcr3, and Cxcr5 and TLR7. Furthermore, we identified that pathways involved in protein degradation (including genes Psmb3, Psmb4, Psmb5, Psmb9, and Psme2, antigen presentation, and lymphocyte activation are downregulated by MNV infection. Thus, our findings illustrate that MNV induces perturbations in the innate immune transcriptome, particularly in MHC maturation and viral recognition that can contribute to disease pathogenesis.

  3. Cytokine-dependent and–independent gene expression changes and cell cycle block revealed in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected host cells by comparative mRNA profiling

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    Burleigh Barbara A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The requirements for growth and survival of the intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi within mammalian host cells are poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling of the host cell response to infection serves as a rapid read-out for perturbation of host physiology that, in part, reflects adaptation to the infective process. Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide array analysis we identified common and disparate host cell responses triggered by T. cruzi infection of phenotypically diverse human cell types. Results We report significant changes in transcript abundance in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (2852, 2155 and 531 genes respectively; fold-change ≥ 2, p-value T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts and endothelial cells transwell plates were used to distinguish cytokine-dependent and -independent gene expression profiles. This approach revealed the induction of metabolic and signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, amino acid catabolism and response to wounding as common themes in T. cruzi-infected cells. In addition, the downregulation of genes involved in mitotic cell cycle and cell division predicted that T. cruzi infection may impede host cell cycle progression. The observation of impaired cytokinesis in T. cruzi-infected cells, following nuclear replication, confirmed this prediction. Conclusion Metabolic pathways and cellular processes were identified as significantly altered at the transcriptional level in response to T. cruzi infection in a cytokine-independent manner. Several of these alterations are supported by previous studies of T. cruzi metabolic requirements or effects on the host. However, our methods also revealed a T. cruzi-dependent block in the host cell cycle, at the level of cytokinesis, previously unrecognized for this pathogen-host cell interaction.

  4. Global mRNA expression analysis in myosin II deficient strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals an impairment of cell integrity functions

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    Rivera-Molina Félix E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MYO1 gene encodes the myosin II heavy chain (Myo1p, a protein required for normal cytokinesis in budding yeast. Myo1p deficiency in yeast (myo1Δ causes a cell separation defect characterized by the formation of attached cells, yet it also causes abnormal budding patterns, formation of enlarged and elongated cells, increased osmotic sensitivity, delocalized chitin deposition, increased chitin synthesis, and hypersensitivity to the chitin synthase III inhibitor Nikkomycin Z. To determine how differential expression of genes is related to these diverse cell wall phenotypes, we analyzed the global mRNA expression profile of myo1Δ strains. Results Global mRNA expression profiles of myo1Δ strains and their corresponding wild type controls were obtained by hybridization to yeast oligonucleotide microarrays. Results for selected genes were confirmed by real time RT-PCR. A total of 547 differentially expressed genes (p ≤ 0.01 were identified with 263 up regulated and 284 down regulated genes in the myo1Δ strains. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed the significant over-representation of genes in the protein biosynthesis and stress response categories. The SLT2/MPK1 gene was up regulated in the microarray, and a myo1Δslt2Δ double mutant was non-viable. Overexpression of ribosomal protein genes RPL30 and RPS31 suppressed the hypersensitivity to Nikkomycin Z and increased the levels of phosphorylated Slt2p in myo1Δ strains. Increased levels of phosphorylated Slt2p were also observed in wild type strains under these conditions. Conclusion Following this analysis of global mRNA expression in yeast myo1Δ strains, we conclude that 547 genes were differentially regulated in myo1Δ strains and that the stress response and protein biosynthesis gene categories were coordinately regulated in this mutant. The SLT2/MPK1 gene was confirmed to be essential for myo1Δ strain viability, supporting that the up

  5. Comprehensive Identification of Long Non-coding RNAs in Purified Cell Types from the Brain Reveals Functional LncRNA in OPC Fate Determination.

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    Xiaomin Dong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs (> 200 bp play crucial roles in transcriptional regulation during numerous biological processes. However, it is challenging to comprehensively identify lncRNAs, because they are often expressed at low levels and with more cell-type specificity than are protein-coding genes. In the present study, we performed ab initio transcriptome reconstruction using eight purified cell populations from mouse cortex and detected more than 5000 lncRNAs. Predicting the functions of lncRNAs using cell-type specific data revealed their potential functional roles in Central Nervous System (CNS development. We performed motif searches in ENCODE DNase I digital footprint data and Mouse ENCODE promoters to infer transcription factor (TF occupancy. By integrating TF binding and cell-type specific transcriptomic data, we constructed a novel framework that is useful for systematically identifying lncRNAs that are potentially essential for brain cell fate determination. Based on this integrative analysis, we identified lncRNAs that are regulated during Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell (OPC differentiation from Neural Stem Cells (NSCs and that are likely to be involved in oligodendrogenesis. The top candidate, lnc-OPC, shows highly specific expression in OPCs and remarkable sequence conservation among placental mammals. Interestingly, lnc-OPC is significantly up-regulated in glial progenitors from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE mouse models compared to wild-type mice. OLIG2-binding sites in the upstream regulatory region of lnc-OPC were identified by ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation-Sequencing and validated by luciferase assays. Loss-of-function experiments confirmed that lnc-OPC plays a functional role in OPC genesis. Overall, our results substantiated the role of lncRNA in OPC fate determination and provided an unprecedented data source for future functional investigations in CNS cell types. We present our datasets and

  6. Movement of regulatory RNA between animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Antony M

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that RNA can move from one cell to another and regulate genes through specific base-pairing. Mechanisms that modify or select RNA for secretion from a cell are unclear. Secreted RNA can be stable enough to be detected in the extracellular environment and can enter the cytosol of distant cells to regulate genes. Mechanisms that import RNA into the cytosol of an animal cell can enable uptake of RNA from many sources including other organisms. This role of RNA is akin to that of steroid hormones, which cross cell membranes to regulate genes. The potential diagnostic use of RNA in human extracellular fluids has ignited interest in understanding mechanisms that enable the movement of RNA between animal cells. Genetic model systems will be essential to gain more confidence in proposed mechanisms of RNA transport and to connect an extracellular RNA with a specific biological function. Studies in the worm C. elegans and in other animals have begun to reveal parts of this novel mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. Here, I summarize the current state of this nascent field, highlight the many unknowns, and suggest future directions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Study Reveals Cellular and Molecular Dynamics of the Hippocampal Neurogenic Niche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Artegiani, Benedetta; Lyubimova, Anna; Muraro, Mauro J.; van Es, Johan H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/096750766; van Oudenaarden, Alexander|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/166129275; Clevers, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07164282X

    2017-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the murine dentate gyrus occurs in a specialized microenvironment that sustains the generation of neurons during life. To fully understand adult neurogenesis, it is essential to determine the neural stem cell (NSC) and progenitor developmental stages, their molecular

  8. In vivo monitoring of mRNA movement in Drosophila body wall muscle cells reveals the presence of myofiber domains.

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    Alice M C van Gemert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In skeletal muscle each muscle cell, commonly called myofiber, is actually a large syncytium containing numerous nuclei. Experiments in fixed myofibers show that mRNAs remain localized around the nuclei in which they are produced. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we generated transgenic flies that allowed us to investigate the movement of mRNAs in body wall myofibers of living Drosophila embryos. We determined the dynamic properties of GFP-tagged mRNAs using in vivo confocal imaging and photobleaching techniques and found that the GFP-tagged mRNAs are not free to move throughout myofibers. The restricted movement indicated that body wall myofibers consist of three domains. The exchange of mRNAs between the domains is relatively slow, but the GFP-tagged mRNAs move rapidly within these domains. One domain is located at the centre of the cell and is surrounded by nuclei while the other two domains are located at either end of the fiber. To move between these domains mRNAs have to travel past centrally located nuclei. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that the domains made visible in our experiments result from prolonged interactions with as yet undefined structures close to the nuclei that prevent GFP-tagged mRNAs from rapidly moving between the domains. This could be of significant importance for the treatment of myopathies using regenerative cell-based therapies.

  9. In vivo monitoring of mRNA movement in Drosophila body wall muscle cells reveals the presence of myofiber domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Alice M C; van der Laan, Annelies M A; Pilgram, Gonneke S K; Fradkin, Lee G; Noordermeer, Jasprina N; Tanke, Hans J; Jost, Carolina R

    2009-08-17

    In skeletal muscle each muscle cell, commonly called myofiber, is actually a large syncytium containing numerous nuclei. Experiments in fixed myofibers show that mRNAs remain localized around the nuclei in which they are produced. In this study we generated transgenic flies that allowed us to investigate the movement of mRNAs in body wall myofibers of living Drosophila embryos. We determined the dynamic properties of GFP-tagged mRNAs using in vivo confocal imaging and photobleaching techniques and found that the GFP-tagged mRNAs are not free to move throughout myofibers. The restricted movement indicated that body wall myofibers consist of three domains. The exchange of mRNAs between the domains is relatively slow, but the GFP-tagged mRNAs move rapidly within these domains. One domain is located at the centre of the cell and is surrounded by nuclei while the other two domains are located at either end of the fiber. To move between these domains mRNAs have to travel past centrally located nuclei. These data suggest that the domains made visible in our experiments result from prolonged interactions with as yet undefined structures close to the nuclei that prevent GFP-tagged mRNAs from rapidly moving between the domains. This could be of significant importance for the treatment of myopathies using regenerative cell-based therapies.

  10. Comparative miRNA-Based Fingerprinting Reveals Biological Differences in Human Olfactory Mucosa- and Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

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    Susan Louise Lindsay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Previously we reported that nestin-positive human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs derived from the olfactory mucosa (OM enhanced CNS myelination in vitro to a greater extent than bone-marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs. miRNA-based fingerprinting revealed the two MSCs were 64% homologous, with 26 miRNAs differentially expressed. We focused on miR-146a-5p and miR-140-5p due to their reported role in the regulation of chemokine production and myelination. The lower expression of miR-140-5p in OM-MSCs correlated with higher secretion of CXCL12 compared with BM-MSCs. Addition of CXCL12 and its pharmacological inhibitors to neural co-cultures supported these data. Studies on related miR-146a-5p targets demonstrated that OM-MSCs had lower levels of Toll-like receptors and secreted less pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-8, and CCL2. OM-MSCs polarized microglia to an anti-inflammatory phenotype, illustrating potential differences in their inflammatory response. Nestin-positive OM-MSCs could therefore offer a cell transplantation alternative for CNS repair, should these biological behaviors be translated in vivo.

  11. Genome-wide mRNA and miRNA expression profiling reveal multiple regulatory networks in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vishnubalaji, R; Hamam, R; Abdulla, M-H

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in cancer management, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third most common cancer and a major health-care problem worldwide. MicroRNAs have recently emerged as key regulators of cancer development and progression by targeting multiple cancer-related genes; however......, such regulatory networks are not well characterized in CRC. Thus, the aim of this study was to perform global messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA expression profiling in the same CRC samples and adjacent normal tissues and to identify potential miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks. Our data revealed 1273 significantly...... in cell proliferation, and migration in vitro. Concordantly, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of EZH2 led to similar effects on CRC cell growth in vitro. Therefore, our data have revealed several hundred potential miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks in CRC and suggest targeting relevant networks...

  12. Depletion of human micro-RNA miR-125b reveals that it is critical for the proliferation of differentiated cells but not for the down-regulation of putative targets during differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sun; Kim, Hak Kyun; Chung, Sangmi; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Dutta, Anindya

    2005-04-29

    Micro-RNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate target gene expression post-transcriptionally through base pairing with the target messenger RNA. Functional characterization of micro-RNAs awaits robust experimental methods to knock-down a micro-RNA as well as to assay its function in vivo. In addition to the recently developed method to sequester micro-RNA with 2'-O-methyl antisense oligonucleotide, we report that small interfering RNA against the loop region of a micro-RNA precursor can be used to deplete the micro-RNA. The depletion of miR-125b by this method had a profound effect on the proliferation of adult differentiated cancer cells, and this proliferation defect was rescued by co-transfected mature micro-RNA. This technique has unique advantages over the 2'-O-methyl antisense oligonucleotide and can be used to determine micro-RNA function, assay micro-RNAs in vivo, and identify the contribution of a predicted micro-RNA precursor to the pool of mature micro-RNA in a given cell. miR-125b and let-7 micro-RNAs are induced, whereas their putative targets, lin-28 and lin-41, are decreased during in vitro differentiation of Tera-2 or embryonic stem cells. Experimental increase or decrease of micro-RNA concentrations did not, however, affect the levels of the targets, a finding that is explained by the fact that the down-regulation of the targets appears to be mostly at the transcriptional level in these in vitro differentiation systems. Collectively these results reveal the importance of micro-RNA depletion strategies for directly determining micro-RNA function in vivo.

  13. An integrative genomic analysis revealed the relevance of microRNA and gene expression for drug-resistance in human breast cancer cells

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    Yamamoto Yusuke

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acquisition of drug-resistance in cancer has led to treatment failure, however, their mechanisms have not been clarified yet. Recent observations indicated that aberrant expressed microRNA (miRNA caused by chromosomal alterations play a critical role in the initiation and progression of cancer. Here, we performed an integrated genomic analysis combined with array-based comparative hybridization, miRNA, and gene expression microarray to elucidate the mechanism of drug-resistance. Results Through genomic approaches in MCF7-ADR; a drug-resistant breast cancer cell line, our results reflect the unique features of drug-resistance, including MDR1 overexpression via genomic amplification and miRNA-mediated TP53INP1 down-regulation. Using a gain of function study with 12 miRNAs whose expressions were down-regulated and genome regions were deleted, we show that miR-505 is a novel tumor suppressive miRNA and inhibits cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. We also find that Akt3, correlate inversely with miR-505, modulates drug sensitivity in MCF7-ADR. Conclusion These findings indicate that various genes and miRNAs orchestrate to temper the drug-resistance in cancer cells, and thus acquisition of drug-resistance is intricately controlled by genomic status, gene and miRNA expression changes.

  14. Dual microRNA Screens Reveal That the Immune-Responsive miR-181 Promotes Henipavirus Entry and Cell-Cell Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Chwan Hong; Rootes, Christina L.; Marsh, Glenn A.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Klein, Reuben; Riddell, Sarah J.; Middleton, Deborah; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Bean, Andrew G. D.; Stewart, Cameron R.

    2016-01-01

    Hendra and Nipah viruses (family Paramyxoviridae, genus Henipavirus) are bat-borne viruses that cause fatal disease in humans and a range of other mammalian species. Gaining a deeper understanding of host pathways exploited by henipaviruses for infection may identify targets for new anti-viral therapies. Here we have performed genome-wide high-throughput agonist and antagonist screens at biosafety level 4 to identify host-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) impacting henipavirus infection in human cells. Members of the miR-181 and miR-17~93 families strongly promoted Hendra virus infection. miR-181 also promoted Nipah virus infection, but did not affect infection by paramyxoviruses from other genera, indicating specificity in the virus-host interaction. Infection promotion was primarily mediated via the ability of miR-181 to significantly enhance henipavirus-induced membrane fusion. Cell signalling receptors of ephrins, namely EphA5 and EphA7, were identified as novel negative regulators of henipavirus fusion. The expression of these receptors, as well as EphB4, were suppressed by miR-181 overexpression, suggesting that simultaneous inhibition of several Ephs by the miRNA contributes to enhanced infection and fusion. Immune-responsive miR-181 levels was also up-regulated in the biofluids of ferrets and horses infected with Hendra virus, suggesting that the host innate immune response may promote henipavirus spread and exacerbate disease severity. This study is the first genome-wide screen of miRNAs influencing infection by a clinically significant mononegavirus and nominates select miRNAs as targets for future anti-viral therapy development. PMID:27783670

  15. Dual microRNA Screens Reveal That the Immune-Responsive miR-181 Promotes Henipavirus Entry and Cell-Cell Fusion.

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    Chwan Hong Foo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hendra and Nipah viruses (family Paramyxoviridae, genus Henipavirus are bat-borne viruses that cause fatal disease in humans and a range of other mammalian species. Gaining a deeper understanding of host pathways exploited by henipaviruses for infection may identify targets for new anti-viral therapies. Here we have performed genome-wide high-throughput agonist and antagonist screens at biosafety level 4 to identify host-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs impacting henipavirus infection in human cells. Members of the miR-181 and miR-17~93 families strongly promoted Hendra virus infection. miR-181 also promoted Nipah virus infection, but did not affect infection by paramyxoviruses from other genera, indicating specificity in the virus-host interaction. Infection promotion was primarily mediated via the ability of miR-181 to significantly enhance henipavirus-induced membrane fusion. Cell signalling receptors of ephrins, namely EphA5 and EphA7, were identified as novel negative regulators of henipavirus fusion. The expression of these receptors, as well as EphB4, were suppressed by miR-181 overexpression, suggesting that simultaneous inhibition of several Ephs by the miRNA contributes to enhanced infection and fusion. Immune-responsive miR-181 levels was also up-regulated in the biofluids of ferrets and horses infected with Hendra virus, suggesting that the host innate immune response may promote henipavirus spread and exacerbate disease severity. This study is the first genome-wide screen of miRNAs influencing infection by a clinically significant mononegavirus and nominates select miRNAs as targets for future anti-viral therapy development.

  16. MicroRNA Transcriptome of Poly I:C-Stimulated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Reveals Evidence for MicroRNAs in Regulating Host Response to RNA Viruses in Pigs

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    Jiying Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are one family of small noncoding RNAs that function to modulate the activity of specific mRNA targets in animals. To understand the role of miRNAs in regulating genes involved in the host immune response to RNA viruses, we profiled and characterized the miRNAs of swine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC stimulated with poly I:C, a synthetic dsRNA analog, by miRNA-sequencing (miRNA-seq. We identified a total of 905 miRNAs, of which 503 miRNAs were firstly exploited herein with no annotation in the latest miRBase 21.0. Expression analysis demonstrated that poly I:C stimulation can elicit significantly differentially expressed (DE miRNAs in Dapulian (n = 20, one Chinese indigenous breed, as well as Landrace (n = 23. By integrating the mRNA expression profiles of the same sample with miRNA profiles, we carried out function analyses of the target genes of these DE miRNAs, with the results indicating that target genes were most enriched in some immune-related pathways and gene ontology (GO terms, suggesting that DE miRNAs play an important role in the regulation of host to poly I:C stimulation. Furthermore, we also detected 43 and 61 significantly DE miRNAs between the two breeds in the control sample groups and poly I:C stimulation groups, respectively, which may be involved in regulation of the different characteristics of the two breeds. This study describes for the first time the PBMC miRNA transcriptomic response to poly I:C stimulation in pigs, which not only contributes to a broad view of the pig miRNAome but improves our understanding of miRNA function in regulating host immune response to RNA viruses.

  17. Small RNA Profiling in Dengue Virus 2-Infected Aedes Mosquito Cells Reveals Viral piRNAs and Novel Host miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesen, Pascal; Ivens, Alasdair; Buck, Amy H; van Rij, Ronald P

    2016-02-01

    In Aedes mosquitoes, infections with arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) trigger or modulate the expression of various classes of viral and host-derived small RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI interacting RNAs (piRNAs), and microRNAs (miRNAs). Viral siRNAs are at the core of the antiviral RNA interference machinery, one of the key pathways that limit virus replication in invertebrates. Besides siRNAs, Aedes mosquitoes and cells derived from these insects produce arbovirus-derived piRNAs, the best studied examples being viruses from the Togaviridae or Bunyaviridae families. Host miRNAs modulate the expression of a large number of genes and their levels may change in response to viral infections. In addition, some viruses, mostly with a DNA genome, express their own miRNAs to regulate host and viral gene expression. Here, we perform a comprehensive analysis of both viral and host-derived small RNAs in Aedes aegypti Aag2 cells infected with dengue virus 2 (DENV), a member of the Flaviviridae family. Aag2 cells are competent in producing all three types of small RNAs and provide a powerful tool to explore the crosstalk between arboviral infection and the distinct RNA silencing pathways. Interestingly, besides the well-characterized DENV-derived siRNAs, a specific population of viral piRNAs was identified in infected Aag2 cells. Knockdown of Piwi5, Ago3 and, to a lesser extent, Piwi6 results in reduction of vpiRNA levels, providing the first genetic evidence that Aedes PIWI proteins produce DENV-derived small RNAs. In contrast, we do not find convincing evidence for the production of virus-derived miRNAs. Neither do we find that host miRNA expression is strongly changed upon DENV2 infection. Finally, our deep-sequencing analyses detect 30 novel Aedes miRNAs, complementing the repertoire of regulatory small RNAs in this important vector species.

  18. A cell-based assay for RNA synthesis by the HCV polymerase reveals new insights on mechanism of polymerase inhibitors and modulation by NS5A.

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    C T Ranjith-Kumar

    Full Text Available RNA synthesis by the genotype 1b hepatitis C virus (HCV polymerase (NS5B transiently expressed in Human embryonic kidney 293T cells or liver hepatocytes was found to robustly stimulate RIG-I-dependent luciferase production from the interferon β promoter in the absence of exogenously provided ligand. This cell-based assay, henceforth named the 5BR assay, could be used to examine HCV polymerase activity in the absence of other HCV proteins. Mutations that decreased de novo initiated RNA synthesis in biochemical assays decreased activation of RIG-I signaling. In addition, NS5B that lacks the C-terminal transmembrane helix but remains competent for RNA synthesis could activate RIG-I signaling. The addition of cyclosporine A to the cells reduced luciferase levels without affecting agonist-induced RIG-I signaling. Furthermore, non-nucleoside inhibitor benzothiadiazines (BTDs that bind within the template channel of the 1b NS5B were found to inhibit the readout from the 5BR assay. Mutation M414T in NS5B that rendered the HCV replicon resistant to BTD was also resistant to BTDs in the 5BR assay. Co-expression of the HCV NS5A protein along with NS5B and RIG-I was found to inhibit the readout from the 5BR assay. The inhibition by NS5A was decreased with the removal of the transmembrane helix in NS5B. Lastly, NS5B from all six major HCV genotypes showed robust activation of RIG-I in the 5BR assay. In summary, the 5BR assay could be used to validate inhibitors of the HCV polymerase as well as to elucidate requirements for HCV-dependent RNA synthesis.

  19. Targeted CRISPR disruption reveals a role for RNase MRP RNA in human preribosomal RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Katherine C; Cech, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    MRP RNA is an abundant, essential noncoding RNA whose functions have been proposed in yeast but are incompletely understood in humans. Mutations in the genomic locus for MRP RNA cause pleiotropic human diseases, including cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH). Here we applied CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to disrupt the endogenous human MRP RNA locus, thereby attaining what has eluded RNAi and RNase H experiments: elimination of MRP RNA in the majority of cells. The resulting accumulation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor-analyzed by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), Northern blots, and RNA sequencing-implicates MRP RNA in pre-rRNA processing. Amelioration of pre-rRNA imbalance is achieved through rescue of MRP RNA levels by ectopic expression. Furthermore, affinity-purified MRP ribonucleoprotein (RNP) from HeLa cells cleaves the human pre-rRNA in vitro at at least one site used in cells, while RNP isolated from cells with CRISPR-edited MRP loci loses this activity, and ectopic MRP RNA expression restores cleavage activity. Thus, a role for RNase MRP in human pre-rRNA processing is established. As demonstrated here, targeted CRISPR disruption is a valuable tool for functional studies of essential noncoding RNAs that are resistant to RNAi and RNase H-based degradation. © 2017 Goldfarb and Cech; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Multifaceted enrichment analysis of RNA-RNA crosstalk reveals cooperating micro-societies in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Tommaso; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Fusilli, Caterina; Capocefalo, Daniele; Panza, Anna; Biagini, Tommaso; Castellana, Stefano; Gentile, Annamaria; De Cata, Angelo; Palumbo, Orazio; Stallone, Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Carella, Massimo; Piepoli, Ada

    2016-05-19

    Alterations in the balance of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles contribute to the onset and development of colorectal cancer. The regulatory functions of individual miRNA-gene pairs are widely acknowledged, but group effects are largely unexplored. We performed an integrative analysis of mRNA-miRNA and miRNA-miRNA interactions using high-throughput mRNA and miRNA expression profiles obtained from matched specimens of human colorectal cancer tissue and adjacent non-tumorous mucosa. This investigation resulted in a hypernetwork-based model, whose functional backbone was fulfilled by tight micro-societies of miRNAs. These proved to modulate several genes that are known to control a set of significantly enriched cancer-enhancer and cancer-protection biological processes, and that an array of upstream regulatory analyses demonstrated to be dependent on miR-145, a cell cycle and MAPK signaling cascade master regulator. In conclusion, we reveal miRNA-gene clusters and gene families with close functional relationships and highlight the role of miR-145 as potent upstream regulator of a complex RNA-RNA crosstalk, which mechanistically modulates several signaling pathways and regulatory circuits that when deranged are relevant to the changes occurring in colorectal carcinogenesis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Small RNA deep sequencing reveals role for Arabidopsis thaliana RNA-dependent RNA polymerases in viral siRNA biogenesis.

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    Xiaopeng Qi

    Full Text Available RNA silencing functions as an important antiviral defense mechanism in a broad range of eukaryotes. In plants, biogenesis of several classes of endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs requires RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR activities. Members of the RDR family proteins, including RDR1and RDR6, have also been implicated in antiviral defense, although a direct role for RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis has yet to be demonstrated. Using a crucifer-infecting strain of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV-Cg and Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, we analyzed the viral small RNA profile in wild-type plants as well as rdr mutants by applying small RNA deep sequencing technology. Over 100,000 TMV-Cg-specific small RNA reads, mostly of 21- (78.4% and 22-nucleotide (12.9% in size and originating predominately (79.9% from the genomic sense RNA strand, were captured at an early infection stage, yielding the first high-resolution small RNA map for a plant virus. The TMV-Cg genome harbored multiple, highly reproducible small RNA-generating hot spots that corresponded to regions with no apparent local hairpin-forming capacity. Significantly, both the rdr1 and rdr6 mutants exhibited globally reduced levels of viral small RNA production as well as reduced strand bias in viral small RNA population, revealing an important role for these host RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis. In addition, an informatics analysis showed that a large set of host genes could be potentially targeted by TMV-Cg-derived siRNAs for posttranscriptional silencing. Two of such predicted host targets, which encode a cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30 and an unknown protein similar to translocon-associated protein alpha (TRAP alpha, respectively, yielded a positive result in cleavage validation by 5'RACE assays. Our data raised the interesting possibility for viral siRNA-mediated virus-host interactions that may contribute to viral pathogenicity and host specificity.

  2. Genome-wide mRNA and miRNA expression profiling reveal multiple regulatory networks in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vishnubalaji, R; Hamam, R; Abdulla, M-H

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in cancer management, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third most common cancer and a major health-care problem worldwide. MicroRNAs have recently emerged as key regulators of cancer development and progression by targeting multiple cancer-related genes; however......, such regulatory networks are not well characterized in CRC. Thus, the aim of this study was to perform global messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA expression profiling in the same CRC samples and adjacent normal tissues and to identify potential miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks. Our data revealed 1273 significantly......-β (using SB-431542) pathways led to dose- and time-dependent inhibition of CRC cell growth. Similarly, our data revealed up- (42) and downregulated (61) microRNAs in the same matched samples. Using target prediction and bioinformatics, ~77% of the upregulated genes were predicted to be targeted by microRNAs...

  3. Stem cell heterogeneity revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne S; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    The skin forms a protective, water-impermeable barrier consisting of heavily crosslinked epithelial cells. However, the specific role of stem cells in sustaining this barrier remains a contentious issue. A detailed analysis of the interfollicular epidermis now proposes a model for how a composite...... of cells with different properties are involved in its maintenance....

  4. RNA-Seq and microarrays analyses reveal global differential transcriptomes of Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R between bacteroids and free-living cells.

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    Jieli Peng

    Full Text Available Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R occurs either in nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with its host plant, Astragalus sinicus, or free-living in the soil. The M. huakuii 7653R genome has recently been sequenced. To better understand the complex biochemical and developmental changes that occur in 7653R during bacteroid development, RNA-Seq and Microarrays were used to investigate the differential transcriptomes of 7653R bacteroids and free-living cells. The two approaches identified several thousand differentially expressed genes. The most prominent up-regulation occurred in the symbiosis plasmids, meanwhile gene expression is concentrated to a set of genes (clusters in bacteroids to fulfill corresponding functional requirements. The results suggested that the main energy metabolism is active while fatty acid metabolism is inactive in bacteroid and that most of genes relevant to cell cycle are down-regulated accordingly. For a global analysis, we reconstructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI network for 7653R and integrated gene expression data into the network using Cytoscape. A highly inter-connected subnetwork, with function enrichment for nitrogen fixation, was found, and a set of hubs and previously uncharacterized genes participating in nitrogen fixation were identified. The results described here provide a broader biological landscape and novel insights that elucidate rhizobial bacteroid differentiation, nitrogen fixation and related novel gene functions.

  5. Meta-analysis of small RNA-sequencing errors reveals ubiquitous post-transcriptional RNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebhardt, H Alexander; Tsang, Herbert H; Dai, Denny C; Liu, Yifeng; Bostan, Babak; Fahlman, Richard P

    2009-05-01

    Recent advances in DNA-sequencing technology have made it possible to obtain large datasets of small RNA sequences. Here we demonstrate that not all non-perfectly matched small RNA sequences are simple technological sequencing errors, but many hold valuable biological information. Analysis of three small RNA datasets originating from Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana small RNA-sequencing projects demonstrates that many single nucleotide substitution errors overlap when aligning homologous non-identical small RNA sequences. Investigating the sites and identities of substitution errors reveal that many potentially originate as a result of post-transcriptional modifications or RNA editing. Modifications include N1-methyl modified purine nucleotides in tRNA, potential deamination or base substitutions in micro RNAs, 3' micro RNA uridine extensions and 5' micro RNA deletions. Additionally, further analysis of large sequencing datasets reveal that the combined effects of 5' deletions and 3' uridine extensions can alter the specificity by which micro RNAs associate with different Argonaute proteins. Hence, we demonstrate that not all sequencing errors in small RNA datasets are technical artifacts, but that these actually often reveal valuable biological insights to the sites of post-transcriptional RNA modifications.

  6. Dual RNA-seq transcriptional analysis of wheat roots colonized by Azospirillum brasilense reveals up-regulation of nutrient acquisition and cell cycle genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilios-Neto, Doumit; Bonato, Paloma; Wassem, Roseli; Tadra-Sfeir, Michelle Z; Brusamarello-Santos, Liziane C C; Valdameri, Glaucio; Donatti, Lucélia; Faoro, Helisson; Weiss, Vinicius A; Chubatsu, Leda S; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M

    2014-05-16

    The rapid growth of the world's population demands an increase in food production that no longer can be reached by increasing amounts of nitrogenous fertilizers. Plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) might be an alternative to increase nitrogenous use efficiency (NUE) in important crops such wheat. Azospirillum brasilense is one of the most promising PGPB and wheat roots colonized by A. brasilense is a good model to investigate the molecular basis of plant-PGPB interaction including improvement in plant-NUE promoted by PGPB. We performed a dual RNA-Seq transcriptional profiling of wheat roots colonized by A. brasilense strain FP2. cDNA libraries from biological replicates of colonized and non-inoculated wheat roots were sequenced and mapped to wheat and A. brasilense reference sequences. The unmapped reads were assembled de novo. Overall, we identified 23,215 wheat expressed ESTs and 702 A. brasilense expressed transcripts. Bacterial colonization caused changes in the expression of 776 wheat ESTs belonging to various functional categories, ranging from transport activity to biological regulation as well as defense mechanism, production of phytohormones and phytochemicals. In addition, genes encoding proteins related to bacterial chemotaxi, biofilm formation and nitrogen fixation were highly expressed in the sub-set of A. brasilense expressed genes. PGPB colonization enhanced the expression of plant genes related to nutrient up-take, nitrogen assimilation, DNA replication and regulation of cell division, which is consistent with a higher proportion of colonized root cells in the S-phase. Our data support the use of PGPB as an alternative to improve nutrient acquisition in important crops such as wheat, enhancing plant productivity and sustainability.

  7. Single-cell sequencing of the small-RNA transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridani, Omid R; Abdullayev, Ilgar; Hagemann-Jensen, Michael; Schell, John P; Lanner, Fredrik; Sandberg, Rickard

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the heterogeneity of small-RNA expression as small-RNA profiling has so far required large numbers of cells. Here we present a single-cell method for small-RNA sequencing and apply it to naive and primed human embryonic stem cells and cancer cells. Analysis of microRNAs and fragments of tRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) reveals the potential of microRNAs as markers for different cell types and states.

  8. Circular RNA profile in gliomas revealed by identification tool UROBORUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Naibo; Han, Ping; Moon, Byoung-San; Lai, Rose K.; Wang, Kai; Lu, Wange

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that many endogenous circular RNAs (circRNAs) may play roles in biological processes. However, the expression patterns and functions of circRNAs in human diseases are not well understood. Computationally identifying circRNAs from total RNA-seq data is a primary step in studying their expression pattern and biological roles. In this work, we have developed a computational pipeline named UROBORUS to detect circRNAs in total RNA-seq data. By applying UROBORUS to RNA-seq data from 46 gliomas and normal brain samples, we detected thousands of circRNAs supported by at least two read counts, followed by successful experimental validation on 24 circRNAs from the randomly selected 27 circRNAs. UROBORUS is an efficient tool that can detect circRNAs with low expression levels in total RNA-seq without RNase R treatment. The circRNAs expression profiling revealed more than 476 circular RNAs differentially expressed in control brain tissues and gliomas. Together with parental gene expression, we found that circRNA and its parental gene have diversified expression patterns in gliomas and control brain tissues. This study establishes an efficient and sensitive approach for predicting circRNAs using total RNA-seq data. The UROBORUS pipeline can be accessed freely for non-commercial purposes at http://uroborus.openbioinformatics.org/. PMID:26873924

  9. Mycobacterial RNA isolation optimized for non-coding RNA: high fidelity isolation of 5S rRNA from Mycobacterium bovis BCG reveals novel post-transcriptional processing and a complete spectrum of modified ribonucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hia, Fabian; Chionh, Yok Hian; Pang, Yan Ling Joy; DeMott, Michael S; McBee, Megan E; Dedon, Peter C

    2015-03-11

    A major challenge in the study of mycobacterial RNA biology is the lack of a comprehensive RNA isolation method that overcomes the unusual cell wall to faithfully yield the full spectrum of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) species. Here, we describe a simple and robust procedure optimized for the isolation of total ncRNA, including 5S, 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and tRNA, from mycobacteria, using Mycobacterium bovis BCG to illustrate the method. Based on a combination of mechanical disruption and liquid and solid-phase technologies, the method produces all major species of ncRNA in high yield and with high integrity, enabling direct chemical and sequence analysis of the ncRNA species. The reproducibility of the method with BCG was evident in bioanalyzer electrophoretic analysis of isolated RNA, which revealed quantitatively significant differences in the ncRNA profiles of exponentially growing and non-replicating hypoxic bacilli. The method also overcame an historical inconsistency in 5S rRNA isolation, with direct sequencing revealing a novel post-transcriptional processing of 5S rRNA to its functional form and with chemical analysis revealing seven post-transcriptional ribonucleoside modifications in the 5S rRNA. This optimized RNA isolation procedure thus provides a means to more rigorously explore the biology of ncRNA species in mycobacteria. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. RNA-Seq-based transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis reveal stress responses and programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yachen; Hu, Jingjin; Fan, Linlin; Chen, Qihe

    2017-01-01

    As a typical harmful inhibitor in cellulosic hydrolyzates, acetic acid not only hinders bioethanol production, but also induces cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Herein, we conducted both transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to investigate the global responses under acetic acid stress at different stages. There were 295 up-regulated and 427 down-regulated genes identified at more than two time points during acetic acid treatment (150 mM, pH 3.0). These differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were mainly involved in intracellular homeostasis, central metabolic pathway, transcription regulation, protein folding and stabilization, ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process, vesicle-mediated transport, protein synthesis, MAPK signaling pathways, cell cycle, programmed cell death, etc. The interaction network of all identified DEGs was constructed to speculate the potential regulatory genes and dominant pathways in response to acetic acid. The transcriptional changes were confirmed by metabolic profiles and phenotypic analysis. Acetic acid resulted in severe acidification in both cytosol and mitochondria, which was different from the effect of extracellular pH. Additionally, the imbalance of intracellular acetylation was shown to aggravate cell death under this stress. Overall, this work provides a novel and comprehensive understanding of stress responses and programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in yeast. PMID:28209995

  11. Cell to Cell Signalling via Exosomes Through esRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lotvall, Jan; Valadi, Hadi

    2007-01-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles of endosomal origin that can be released by many different cells to the microenvironment. Exosomes have been shown to participate in the immune system, by mediating antigen presentation. We have recently shown the presence of both mRNA and microRNA in exosomes, specifically in exosomes derived from mast cells. This RNA can be transferred between one mast cell to another, most likely through fusion of the exosome to the recipient cell membrane. The delivered RNA is ...

  12. Simultaneous RNA quantification of human and retroviral genomes reveals intact interferon signaling in HTLV-1-infected CD4+ T cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moens Britta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IFN-α contributes extensively to host immune response upon viral infection through antiviral, pro-apoptotic, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Although extensively documented in various types of human cancers and viral infections, controversy exists in the exact mechanism of action of IFN-α in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 retroviral infections. Results IFN-α displayed strong anti-HIV-1 effects in HIV-1/HTLV-1 co-infected MT-4 cells in vitro, demonstrated by the dose-dependent inhibition of the HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect (IC50 = 83.5 IU/ml, p 50 = 1.2 IU/ml, p  Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that both the absence of in vitro antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activity as well as the modest post-transcriptional antiviral activity of IFN-α against HTLV-1, were not due to a cell-intrinsic defect in IFN-α signalisation, but rather represents a retrovirus-specific phenomenon, considering the strong HIV-1 inhibition in co-infected cells.

  13. Small RNA Deep Sequencing Reveals Role for Arabidopsis thaliana RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases in Viral siRNA Biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Xiaopeng; Bao, Forrest Sheng; Xie, Zhixin

    2009-01-01

    RNA silencing functions as an important antiviral defense mechanism in a broad range of eukaryotes. In plants, biogenesis of several classes of endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) requires RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR) activities. Members of the RDR family proteins, including RDR1and RDR6, have also been implicated in antiviral defense, although a direct role for RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis has yet to be demonstrated. Using a crucifer-infecting strain of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (T...

  14. Re-inspection of small RNA sequence datasets reveals several novel human miRNA genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Birkballe Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: miRNAs are key players in gene expression regulation. To fully understand the complex nature of cellular differentiation or initiation and progression of disease, it is important to assess the expression patterns of as many miRNAs as possible. Thereby, identifying novel miRNAs is an essential prerequisite to make possible a comprehensive and coherent understanding of cellular biology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on two extensive, but previously published, small RNA sequence datasets from human embryonic stem cells and human embroid bodies, respectively [1], we identified 112 novel miRNA-like structures and were able to validate miRNA processing in 12 out of 17 investigated cases. Several miRNA candidates were furthermore substantiated by including additional available small RNA datasets, thereby demonstrating the power of combining datasets to identify miRNAs that otherwise may be assigned as experimental noise. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analysis highlights that existing datasets are not yet exhaustedly studied and continuous re-analysis of the available data is important to uncover all features of small RNA sequencing.

  15. Family level phylogenies reveal modes of macroevolution in RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Andrew; Shackelton, Laura A; Holmes, Edward C

    2011-01-04

    Despite advances in understanding the patterns and processes of microevolution in RNA viruses, little is known about the determinants of viral diversification at the macroevolutionary scale. In particular, the processes by which viral lineages assigned as different "species" are generated remain largely uncharacterized. To address this issue, we use a robust phylogenetic approach to analyze patterns of lineage diversification in five representative families of RNA viruses. We ask whether the process of lineage diversification primarily occurs when viruses infect new host species, either through cross-species transmission or codivergence, and which are defined here as analogous to allopatric speciation in animals, or by acquiring new niches within the same host species, analogous to sympatric speciation. By mapping probable primary host species onto family level viral phylogenies, we reveal a strong clustering among viral lineages that infect groups of closely related host species. Although this is consistent with lineage diversification within individual hosts, we argue that this pattern more likely represents strong biases in our knowledge of viral biodiversity, because we also find that better-sampled human viruses rarely cluster together. Hence, although closely related viruses tend to infect related host species, it is unlikely that they often infect the same host species, such that evolutionary constraints hinder lineage diversification within individual host species. We conclude that the colonization of new but related host species may represent the principle mode of macroevolution in RNA viruses.

  16. Structure of the Leanyer orthobunyavirus nucleoprotein-RNA complex reveals unique architecture for RNA encapsidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Fengfeng; Shaw, Neil; Wang, Yao E; Jiao, Lianying; Ding, Wei; Li, Xiaomin; Zhu, Ping; Upur, Halmurat; Ouyang, Songying; Cheng, Genhong; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2013-05-28

    Negative-stranded RNA viruses cover their genome with nucleoprotein (N) to protect it from the human innate immune system. Abrogation of the function of N offers a unique opportunity to combat the spread of the viruses. Here, we describe a unique fold of N from Leanyer virus (LEAV, Orthobunyavirus genus, Bunyaviridae family) in complex with single-stranded RNA refined to 2.78 Å resolution as well as a 2.68 Å resolution structure of LEAV N-ssDNA complex. LEAV N is made up of an N- and a C-terminal lobe, with the RNA binding site located at the junction of these lobes. The LEAV N tetramer binds a 44-nucleotide-long single-stranded RNA chain. Hence, oligomerization of N is essential for encapsidation of the entire genome and is accomplished by using extensions at the N and C terminus. Molecular details of the oligomerization of N are illustrated in the structure where a circular ring-like tertiary assembly of a tetramer of LEAV N is observed tethering the RNA in a positively charged cavity running along the inner edge. Hydrogen bonds between N and the C2 hydroxyl group of ribose sugar explain the specificity of LEAV N for RNA over DNA. In addition, base-specific hydrogen bonds suggest that some regions of RNA bind N more tightly than others. Hinge movements around F20 and V125 assist in the reversal of capsidation during transcription and replication of the virus. Electron microscopic images of the ribonucleoprotein complexes of LEAV N reveal a filamentous assembly similar to those found in phleboviruses.

  17. Integrative analysis of RNA, translation, and protein levels reveals distinct regulatory variation across humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenik, Can; Cenik, Elif Sarinay; Byeon, Gun W.; Grubert, Fabian; Candille, Sophie I.; Spacek, Damek; Alsallakh, Bilal; Tilgner, Hagen; Araya, Carlos L.; Tang, Hua; Ricci, Emiliano; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the consequences of genetic differences between humans is essential for understanding phenotypic diversity and personalized medicine. Although variation in RNA levels, transcription factor binding, and chromatin have been explored, little is known about global variation in translation and its genetic determinants. We used ribosome profiling, RNA sequencing, and mass spectrometry to perform an integrated analysis in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a diverse group of individuals. We find significant differences in RNA, translation, and protein levels suggesting diverse mechanisms of personalized gene expression control. Combined analysis of RNA expression and ribosome occupancy improves the identification of individual protein level differences. Finally, we identify genetic differences that specifically modulate ribosome occupancy—many of these differences lie close to start codons and upstream ORFs. Our results reveal a new level of gene expression variation among humans and indicate that genetic variants can cause changes in protein levels through effects on translation. PMID:26297486

  18. tRNA modification profiles of the fast-proliferating cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Chao; Niu, Leilei; Song, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xiong, Xin; Zhang, Xianhua [Departmentof Pharmacy, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Zhenxi; Yang, Yi; Yi, Fan [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhan, Jun; Zhang, Hongquan [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology and Tumor Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yang, Zhenjun; Zhang, Li-He [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhai, Suodi [Departmentof Pharmacy, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Hua, E-mail: huali88@sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Ye, Min, E-mail: yemin@bjmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Du, Quan, E-mail: quan.du@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Despite the recent progress in RNA modification study, a comprehensive modification profile is still lacking for mammalian cells. Using a quantitative HPLC/MS/MS assay, we present here a study where RNA modifications are examined in term of the major RNA species. With paired slow- and fast-proliferating cell lines, distinct RNA modification profiles are first revealed for diverse RNA species. Compared to mRNAs, increased ribose and nucleobase modifications are shown for the highly-structured tRNAs and rRNAs, lending support to their contribution to the formation of high-order structures. This study also reveals a dynamic tRNA modification profile in the fast-proliferating cells. In addition to cultured cells, this unique tRNA profile has been further confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. Taken together, the results indicate that tRNA is a actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells, and suggest that they may play a more active role in biological process than expected. -- Highlights: •RNA modifications were first examined in term of the major RNA species. •A dynamic tRNA modifications was characterized for the fast-proliferating cells. •The unique tRNA profile was confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. •tRNA was predicted as an actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells.

  19. 3'-5' RNA degradation pathways in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon

    RNA synthesis and degradation are key steps in the regulation of gene expression in all living organisms. During the course of his PhD studies, Michal Lubas centred his research on the nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA turnover of both noncoding and coding RNAs in human cells. His proteomic studies...... revealed the interaction network of the main 3'-5' RNA degradation machinery – the RNA exosome complex. One of the key findings was the identification and characterisation of the Nuclear Exosome Targeting (NEXT) complex, important for nuclear functions of the exosome. Michal Lubas also studied the role...... of the cytoplasmic 3'-5' exoribonuclease hDIS3L2. Using low throughout and high throughput techniques, both in vivo and in vitro, he characterised the nuclease and disclosed the role of hDIS3L2 in cytoplasmic mRNA metabolism....

  20. Global analysis of asymmetric RNA enrichment in oocytes reveals low conservation between closely related Xenopus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claußen, Maike; Lingner, Thomas; Pommerenke, Claudia; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas, Gabriela; Pieler, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    RNAs that localize to the vegetal cortex during Xenopus laevis oogenesis have been reported to function in germ layer patterning, axis determination, and development of the primordial germ cells. Here we report on the genome-wide, comparative analysis of differentially localizing RNAs in Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis oocytes, revealing a surprisingly weak degree of conservation in respect to the identity of animally as well as vegetally enriched transcripts in these closely related species. Heterologous RNA injections and protein binding studies indicate that the different RNA localization patterns in these two species are due to gain/loss of cis-acting localization signals rather than to differences in the RNA-localizing machinery. PMID:26337391

  1. Integrated analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression and association with HIF binding reveals the complexity of microRNA expression regulation under hypoxia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Camps, Carme; Saini, Harpreet K; Mole, David R; Choudhry, Hani; Reczko, Martin; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Tian, Ya-Min; Buffa, Francesca M; Harris, Adrian L; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G; Enright, Anton J; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2014-01-01

    .... Our aim is to investigate in depth the regulation of microRNA expression by hypoxia in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7, establish the relationship between microRNA expression and HIF binding sites...

  2. Sequence analysis of RNase MRP RNA reveals its origination from eukaryotic RNase P RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanglong; Stribinskis, Vilius; Ramos, Kenneth S.; Li, Yong

    2006-01-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryote-specific endoribonuclease that generates RNA primers for mitochondrial DNA replication and processes precursor rRNA. RNase P is a ubiquitous endoribonuclease that cleaves precursor tRNA transcripts to produce their mature 5′ termini. We found extensive sequence homology of catalytic domains and specificity domains between their RNA subunits in many organisms. In Candida glabrata, the internal loop of helix P3 is 100% conserved between MRP and P RNAs. The helix P8 of MRP RNA from microsporidia Encephalitozoon cuniculi is identical to that of P RNA. Sequence homology can be widely spread over the whole molecule of MRP RNA and P RNA, such as those from Dictyostelium discoideum. These conserved nucleotides between the MRP and P RNAs strongly support the hypothesis that the MRP RNA is derived from the P RNA molecule in early eukaryote evolution. PMID:16540690

  3. Deep small RNA sequencing from the nematode Ascaris reveals conservation, functional diversification, and novel developmental profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbin; Czech, Benjamin; Crunk, Amanda; Wallace, Adam; Mitreva, Makedonka; Hannon, Gregory J.; Davis, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells express several classes of small RNAs that regulate gene expression and ensure genome maintenance. Endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) mainly control gene and transposon expression in the germline, while microRNAs (miRNAs) generally function in post-transcriptional gene silencing in both somatic and germline cells. To provide an evolutionary and developmental perspective on small RNA pathways in nematodes, we identified and characterized known and novel small RNA classes through gametogenesis and embryo development in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum and compared them with known small RNAs of Caenorhabditis elegans. piRNAs, Piwi-clade Argonautes, and other proteins associated with the piRNA pathway have been lost in Ascaris. miRNAs are synthesized immediately after fertilization in utero, before pronuclear fusion, and before the first cleavage of the zygote. This is the earliest expression of small RNAs ever described at a developmental stage long thought to be transcriptionally quiescent. A comparison of the two classes of Ascaris endo-siRNAs, 22G-RNAs and 26G-RNAs, to those in C. elegans, suggests great diversification and plasticity in the use of small RNA pathways during spermatogenesis in different nematodes. Our data reveal conserved characteristics of nematode small RNAs as well as features unique to Ascaris that illustrate significant flexibility in the use of small RNAs pathways, some of which are likely an adaptation to Ascaris' life cycle and parasitism. PMID:21685128

  4. Comparative RNA sequencing reveals substantial genetic variation in endangered primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, George H.; Melsted, Páll; Marioni, John C.; Wang, Ying; Bainer, Russell; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Michelini, Katelyn; Zehr, Sarah; Yoder, Anne D.; Stephens, Matthew; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Gilad, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    Comparative genomic studies in primates have yielded important insights into the evolutionary forces that shape genetic diversity and revealed the likely genetic basis for certain species-specific adaptations. To date, however, these studies have focused on only a small number of species. For the majority of nonhuman primates, including some of the most critically endangered, genome-level data are not yet available. In this study, we have taken the first steps toward addressing this gap by sequencing RNA from the livers of multiple individuals from each of 16 mammalian species, including humans and 11 nonhuman primates. Of the nonhuman primate species, five are lemurs and two are lorisoids, for which little or no genomic data were previously available. To analyze these data, we developed a method for de novo assembly and alignment of orthologous gene sequences across species. We assembled an average of 5721 gene sequences per species and characterized diversity and divergence of both gene sequences and gene expression levels. We identified patterns of variation that are consistent with the action of positive or directional selection, including an 18-fold enrichment of peroxisomal genes among genes whose regulation likely evolved under directional selection in the ancestral primate lineage. Importantly, we found no relationship between genetic diversity and endangered status, with the two most endangered species in our study, the black and white ruffed lemur and the Coquerel's sifaka, having the highest genetic diversity among all primates. Our observations imply that many endangered lemur populations still harbor considerable genetic variation. Timely efforts to conserve these species alongside their habitats have, therefore, strong potential to achieve long-term success. PMID:22207615

  5. Comprehensive analysis of RNA-Seq data reveals extensive RNA editing in a human transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Zhiyu; Cheng, Yanbing; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional event that recodes hereditary information. Here we describe a comprehensive profile of the RNA editome of a male Han Chinese individual based on analysis of ∼767 million sequencing reads from poly(A)(+), poly(A)(-) and small RNA samples. We developed a comput......RNA editing is a post-transcriptional event that recodes hereditary information. Here we describe a comprehensive profile of the RNA editome of a male Han Chinese individual based on analysis of ∼767 million sequencing reads from poly(A)(+), poly(A)(-) and small RNA samples. We developed...

  6. Meta-analysis of small RNA-sequencing errors reveals ubiquitous post-transcriptional RNA modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Ebhardt, H. Alexander; Tsang, Herbert H.; Dai, Denny C.; Liu, Yifeng; Bostan, Babak; Fahlman, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in DNA-sequencing technology have made it possible to obtain large datasets of small RNA sequences. Here we demonstrate that not all non-perfectly matched small RNA sequences are simple technological sequencing errors, but many hold valuable biological information. Analysis of three small RNA datasets originating from Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana small RNA-sequencing projects demonstrates that many single nucleotide substitution errors overlap when aligning homologous...

  7. Comprehensive analysis of RNA-Seq data reveals extensive RNA editing in a human transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Zhiyu; Cheng, Yanbing; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional event that recodes hereditary information. Here we describe a comprehensive profile of the RNA editome of a male Han Chinese individual based on analysis of ∼767 million sequencing reads from poly(A)(+), poly(A)(-) and small RNA samples. We developed...

  8. Single-molecule FRET-Rosetta reveals RNA structural rearrangements during human telomerase catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Joseph W; Kappel, Kalli; Das, Rhiju; Stone, Michael D

    2017-02-01

    Maintenance of telomeres by telomerase permits continuous proliferation of rapidly dividing cells, including the majority of human cancers. Despite its direct biomedical significance, the architecture of the human telomerase complex remains unknown. Generating homogeneous telomerase samples has presented a significant barrier to developing improved structural models. Here we pair single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurements with Rosetta modeling to map the conformations of the essential telomerase RNA core domain within the active ribonucleoprotein. FRET-guided modeling places the essential pseudoknot fold distal to the active site on a protein surface comprising the C-terminal element, a domain that shares structural homology with canonical polymerase thumb domains. An independently solved medium-resolution structure of Tetrahymena telomerase provides a blind test of our modeling methodology and sheds light on the structural homology of this domain across diverse organisms. Our smFRET-Rosetta models reveal nanometer-scale rearrangements within the RNA core domain during catalysis. Taken together, our FRET data and pseudoatomic molecular models permit us to propose a possible mechanism for how RNA core domain rearrangement is coupled to template hybrid elongation. © 2017 Parks et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  9. Genome-Wide siRNA Screen Identifies Complementary Signaling Pathways Involved in Listeria Infection and Reveals Different Actin Nucleation Mechanisms during Listeria Cell Invasion and Actin Comet Tail Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühbacher, Andreas; Emmenlauer, Mario; Rämo, Pauli; Kafai, Natasha; Dehio, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes enters nonphagocytic cells by a receptor-mediated mechanism that is dependent on a clathrin-based molecular machinery and actin rearrangements. Bacterial intra- and intercellular movements are also actin dependent and rely on the actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex, which is activated by host-derived nucleation-promoting factors downstream of the cell receptor Met during entry and by the bacterial nucleation-promoting factor ActA during comet tail formation. By genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening for host factors involved in bacterial infection, we identified diverse cellular signaling networks and protein complexes that support or limit these processes. In addition, we could precise previously described molecular pathways involved in Listeria invasion. In particular our results show that the requirements for actin nucleators during Listeria entry and actin comet tail formation are different. Knockdown of several actin nucleators, including SPIRE2, reduced bacterial invasion while not affecting the generation of comet tails. Most interestingly, we observed that in contrast to our expectations, not all of the seven subunits of the Arp2/3 complex are required for Listeria entry into cells or actin tail formation and that the subunit requirements for each of these processes differ, highlighting a previously unsuspected versatility in Arp2/3 complex composition and function. PMID:25991686

  10. Nuclear retention of 18S ribosoma RNA by human myeloma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bynum, J.W. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale); Volkin, E.

    1979-01-01

    Normal quiescent lymphocytes regulate their ribosome content by selectively degrading newly synthesized 18S ribosomal RNA. Unlike actively dividing HeLa cells, lymphocytes retain 18S ribosomal RNA in the nucleus after synthesis instead of immediately transporting it to the cytoplasm. Subcellular fractionation of the highly differentiated human neoplastic lymphocyte RPMI-8226 reveals that this cell line also retains 18S ribosomal RNA in the nucleus, a trait not displayed by the less differentiated human lymphoblastoid cell line RPMI-4265. These observations suggest that neoplastic cells can be phenotypically characterized by their ribosomal RNA processing patterns.

  11. Application of Live-Cell RNA Imaging Techniques to the Study of Retroviral RNA Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses produce full-length RNA that serves both as a genomic RNA (gRNA, which is encapsidated into virus particles, and as an mRNA, which directs the synthesis of viral structural proteins. However, we are only beginning to understand the cellular and viral factors that influence trafficking of retroviral RNA and the selection of the RNA for encapsidation or translation. Live cell imaging studies of retroviral RNA trafficking have provided important insight into many aspects of the retrovirus life cycle including transcription dynamics, nuclear export of viral RNA, translational regulation, membrane targeting, and condensation of the gRNA during virion assembly. Here, we review cutting-edge techniques to visualize single RNA molecules in live cells and discuss the application of these systems to studying retroviral RNA trafficking.

  12. Simultaneous detection of mRNA and protein stem cell markers in live cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Gang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological studies and medical application of stem cells often require the isolation of stem cells from a mixed cell population, including the detection of cancer stem cells in tumor tissue, and isolation of induced pluripotent stem cells after eliciting the expression of specific genes in adult cells. Here we report the detection of Oct-4 mRNA and SSEA-1 protein in live carcinoma stem cells using respectively molecular beacon and dye-labeled antibody, aiming to establish a new method for stem cells detection and isolation. Results Quantification of Oct-4 mRNA and protein in P19 mouse carcinoma stem cells using respectively RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry confirmed that their levels drastically decreased after differentiation. To visualize Oct-4 mRNA in live stem cells, molecular beacons were designed, synthesized and validated, and the detection specificity was confirmed using control studies. We found that the fluorescence signal from Oct-4-targeting molecular beacons provides a clear discrimination between undifferentiated and retinoic acid-induced differentiated cells. Using deconvolution fluorescence microscopy, Oct-4 mRNAs were found to reside on one side of the cytosol. We demonstrated that, using a combination of Oct-4 mRNA-targeting molecular beacon with SSEA-1 antibody in flow cytometric analysis, undifferentiated stem cells can be clearly distinguished from differentiated cells. We revealed that Oct-4 targeting molecular beacons do not seem to affect stem cell biology. Conclusion Molecular beacons have the potential to provide a powerful tool for highly specific detection and isolation of stem cells, including cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells without disturbing cell physiology. It is advantageous to perform simultaneous detection of intracellular (mRNA and cell-surface (protein stem cell markers in flow cytometric analysis, which may lead to high detection sensitivity and efficiency.

  13. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra ePesko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wildtype gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense nonsegmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales have specific genome architecture: 3′ UTR – core protein genes – envelope protein genes – RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene – 5′ UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV variants with the nucleocapsid (N gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N-gene translocation towards the 5’ end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function, especially on PC3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective

  14. A Broad RNA Virus Survey Reveals Both miRNA Dependence and Functional Sequestration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Luna, Joseph M; Liniger, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    immunoprecipitation (CLIP) of the Argonaute (AGO) proteins to characterize strengths and specificities of miRNA interactions in the context of 15 different RNA virus infections, including several clinically relevant pathogens. Notably, replication of pestiviruses, a major threat to milk and meat industries...

  15. Infidelity of translation of encephalomyocarditis viral RNA with tRNA from human malignant trophoblastic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, O.K.; Kuchino, Y.

    1977-09-23

    We have investigated tRNA from the human malignant trophoblastic cells (BeWo cell) and human chorionic tissue for the translation of specific mRNAs, in a tRNA-dependent protein synthesizing system from Ehrlich ascites cells. BeWo cell tRNA and chorionic tRNA supported oviduct mRNA or encephalomyocarditis (EMC) viral RNA directed amino acid incorporation into polypeptides equally effectively. Polypeptides synthesized with oviduct mRNA and tRNA from both sources were identical upon sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. But the EMC RNA directed polypeptides synthesized with BeWo cell tRNA were different from those synthesized with chorionic tRNA. A polypeptide (molecular weight 58,000) was apparently not synthesized and the synthesis of a faster moving component (molecular weight, 14,000) was enhanced when BeWo cell tRNA was used. These results imply a functional difference in tRNA from human malignant cells compared to their normal counterpart.

  16. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Kyle E; Abbott, Timothy R; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-29

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure-function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA-RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA-RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. RNA editing of AZIN1 induces the malignant progression of non-small-cell lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xueda; Chen, Jingyi; Shi, Xiaoshun; Feng, Fenglan; Lau, King Wai; Chen, Yaoqi; Chen, Yusong; Jiang, Long; Cui, Fei; Zhang, Yalei; Xu, Xin; Li, Jin

    2017-08-01

    RNA editing is a widespread post-transcriptional mechanism that confers specific and reproducible nucleotide changes in selected RNA transcripts and plays a critical role in many human cancers. However, little is known about how RNA editing operates in non-small-cell lung cancers. Here, we measured the sequence and expression level of genes of antizyme inhibitor 1 and adenosine deaminase acting on RNA family in 30 non-small-cell lung cancer patient samples and 13 cell lines and revealed RNA editing S367G in antizyme inhibitor 1 is a high-frequent molecular events. We determined overexpression of antizyme inhibitor 1 with RNA editing, implying the oncogenic function of this alteration. We also detected the association of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA overexpression with RNA editing occurred in antizyme inhibitor 1. Furthermore, the RNA editing could cause a cytoplasmic-to-nuclear translocation of antizyme inhibitor 1 protein and conferred the malignant phenotype of non-small-cell lung cancer cells. The in vivo experiment confirmed that this RNA editing confers higher capacity of tumor migration as well. In conclusion, antizyme inhibitor 1 RNA editing and its involvement in tumorigenesis of non-small-cell lung cancer pave a new way for potential clinical management of non-small-cell lung cancer.

  18. Method for Imaging Live-Cell RNA Using an RNA Aptamer and a Fluorescent Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shin-Ichi; Yatsuzuka, Kenji; Katsuda, Yousuke; Uesugi, Motonari

    2018-01-01

    Live-cell imaging of mRNA dynamics is increasingly important to understanding spatially restricted gene expression. We recently developed a convenient and versatile method that uses a gene-specific RNA aptamer and a fluorescent probe to enable spatiotemporal imaging of endogenous mRNAs in living cells. The method was validated by live-cell imaging of the endogenous mRNA of β-actin. The new RNA-imaging technology might be useful for live-cell imaging of any RNA molecules.

  19. MicroRNA-218 inhibits cell invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer via regulating ROBO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hang; Hao, Si-Jie; Yao, Lie; Yang, Feng; Di, Yang; Li, Ji; Jiang, Yong-Jian; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2014-10-01

    miRNA-218 is a highlighted tumor suppressor and its underlying role in tumor progression is still unknown. Here, we restored the expression of miRNA-218 in pancreatic cancer to clarify the function and potent downstream pathway of miRNA-218. The expressions of both miRNA-218 and its potent target gene ROBO1 were revealed by RT-PCR and western blotting analysis. Transfection of miRNA-218 precursor mimics and luciferase assay were performed to elucidate the regulation mechanism between miRNA-218 and ROBO1. Cells, stably expressing miRNA-218 followed by forced expression of mutant ROBO1, were established through co-transfections of both lentivirus vector and plasmid vector. The cell migration and invasion abilities were evaluated by migration assay and invasion assay respectively. An increased expression of ROBO1 was revealed in cell BxPC-3-LN compared with cell BxPC-3. Elevated expression of miRNA-218 would suppress the expression of ROBO1 via complementary binding to a specific region within 3'UTR of ROBO1 mRNA (sites 971-978) in pancreatic cancer cells. Stably restoring the expression of miRNA-218 in pancreatic cancer significantly downregulated the expression of ROBO1 and effectively inhibited cell migration and invasion. Forced expression of mutant ROBO1 could reverse the repression effects of miRNA-218 on cell migration and invasion. Consequently, miRNA-218 acted as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer by inhibiting cell invasion and migration. ROBO1 was a functional target of miRNA-218's downstream pathway involving in cell invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer.

  20. miRNA and Degradome Sequencing Reveal miRNA and Their Target Genes That May Mediate Shoot Growth in Spur Type Mutant “Yanfu 6”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunhui; Zhang, Dong; Zheng, Liwei; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Baojuan; Luo, Wenwen; Li, Youmei; Li, Guangfang; Ma, Juanjuan; Han, Mingyu

    2017-01-01

    The spur-type growth habit in apple trees is characterized by short internodes, increased number of fruiting spurs, and compact growth that promotes flowering and facilitates management practices, such as pruning. The molecular mechanisms responsible for regulating spur-type growth have not been elucidated. In the present study, miRNAs and the expression of their potential target genes were evaluated in shoot tips of “Nagafu 2” (CF) and spur-type bud mutation “Yanfu 6” (YF). A total of 700 mature miRNAs were identified, including 202 known apple miRNAs and 498 potential novel miRNA candidates. A comparison of miRNA expression in CF and YF revealed 135 differentially expressed genes, most of which were downregulated in YF. YF also had lower levels of GA, ZR, IAA, and ABA hormones, relative to CF. Exogenous applications of GA promoted YF shoot growth. Based on the obtained results, a regulatory network involving plant hormones, miRNA, and their potential target genes is proposed for the molecular mechanism regulating the growth of YF. miRNA164, miRNA166, miRNA171, and their potential targets, and associated plant hormones, appear to regulate shoot apical meristem (SAM) growth. miRNA159, miRNA167, miRNA396, and their potential targets, and associated plant hormones appear to regulate cell division and internode length. This study provides a foundation for further studies designed to elucidate the mechanism underlying spur-type apple architecture. PMID:28424721

  1. Comparative mRNA and microRNA expression profiling of three genitourinary cancers reveals common hallmarks and cancer-specific molecular events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianxin Li

    Full Text Available Genome-wide gene expression profile using deep sequencing technologies can drive the discovery of cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Such efforts are often limited to profiling the expression signature of either mRNA or microRNA (miRNA in a single type of cancer.Here we provided an integrated analysis of the genome-wide mRNA and miRNA expression profiles of three different genitourinary cancers: carcinomas of the bladder, kidney and testis.Our results highlight the general or cancer-specific roles of several genes and miRNAs that may serve as candidate oncogenes or suppressors of tumor development. Further comparative analyses at the systems level revealed that significant aberrations of the cell adhesion process, p53 signaling, calcium signaling, the ECM-receptor and cell cycle pathways, the DNA repair and replication processes and the immune and inflammatory response processes were the common hallmarks of human cancers. Gene sets showing testicular cancer-specific deregulation patterns were mainly implicated in processes related to male reproductive function, and general disruptions of multiple metabolic pathways and processes related to cell migration were the characteristic molecular events for renal and bladder cancer, respectively. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that tumors with the same histological origins and genes with similar functions tended to group together in a clustering analysis. By assessing the correlation between the expression of each miRNA and its targets, we determined that deregulation of 'key' miRNAs may result in the global aberration of one or more pathways or processes as a whole.This systematic analysis deciphered the molecular phenotypes of three genitourinary cancers and investigated their variations at the miRNA level simultaneously. Our results provided a valuable source for future studies and highlighted some promising genes, miRNAs, pathways and processes that may be useful for diagnostic or

  2. [Apoptosis of glioma cell line U251 induced by small interfering RNA targeting survivin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ru-xiang; Tu, Yan-yang; Jiang, Xiao-dan; Feng, Jiang-nan; Huang, Jun

    2006-04-01

    To construct recombinant expression vectors of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting survivin and investigate apoptosis of glioma cell line U251 mediated by the survivin-targeting siRNA. According to the sequence of the coding region of survivin gene, two strings of 19 nucleotides of inverted sequence flanking the loop sequence of two complementary 9-base oligonucleotides were designed and synthesized to form hairpin construct as the DNA templates for the target siRNA. The siRNA templates were cloned into siRNA expression vector pGenesil-1, and the resulted vector pGenesil-1/survivin was transfected into U251 cells using Metafectene following the standard protocols. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to evaluate survivin gene silencing induced by siRNA transfection at the RNA and protein levels, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis with Annexin-V/PI double staining was used to determine the cell apoptosis. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed significantly lowered survivin expression at both RNA and protein levels in transfected U251 cells, which exhibited a significantly higher apoptosis rate after transfection as shown by flow cytometry analysis. RNA interference mediated by the siRNA expression vector pGenesi-l/survivin can significantly reduce survivin expression and induce remarkable apoptosis in U251 cells.

  3. Host Pathways Important for Coxiella burnetii Infection Revealed by Genome-Wide RNA Interference Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Justin A.; Newton, Hayley J.; Klum, Scott; Swiss, Rachel; Agaisse, Hervé; Roy, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular pathogen that replicates within a lysosome-like vacuole. A Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system is used by C. burnetii to translocate effector proteins into the host cytosol that likely modulate host factor function. To identify host determinants required for C. burnetii intracellular growth, a genome-wide screen was performed using gene silencing by small interfering RNA (siRNA). Replication of C. burnetii was measured by immunofluorescence microscopy in siRNA-transfected HeLa cells. Newly identified host factors included components of the retromer complex, which mediates cargo cycling between the endocytic pathway and the Golgi apparatus. Reducing the levels of the retromer cargo-adapter VPS26-VPS29-VPS35 complex or retromer-associated sorting nexins abrogated C. burnetii replication. Several genes, when silenced, resulted in enlarged vacuoles or an increased number of vacuoles within C. burnetii-infected cells. Silencing of the STX17 gene encoding syntaxin-17 resulted in a striking defect in homotypic fusion of vacuoles containing C. burnetii, suggesting a role for syntaxin-17 in regulating this process. Lastly, silencing host genes needed for C. burnetii replication correlated with defects in the translocation of Dot/Icm effectors, whereas, silencing of genes that affected vacuole morphology, but did not impact replication, did not affect Dot/Icm translocation. These data demonstrate that C. burnetii vacuole maturation is important for creating a niche that permits Dot/Icm function. Thus, genome-wide screening has revealed host determinants involved in sequential events that occur during C. burnetii infection as defined by bacterial uptake, vacuole transport and acidification, activation of the Dot/Icm system, homotypic fusion of vacuoles, and intracellular replication. PMID:23362322

  4. Integration of miRNA and mRNA expression profiles reveals microRNA-regulated networks during muscle wasting in cardiac cachexia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moraes, Leonardo N; Fernandez, Geysson J; Vechetti-Júnior, Ivan J

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac cachexia (CC) is a common complication of heart failure (HF) associated with muscle wasting and poor patient prognosis. Although different mechanisms have been proposed to explain muscle wasting during CC, its pathogenesis is still not understood. Here, we described an integrative analysis...... between miRNA and mRNA expression profiles of muscle wasting during CC. Global gene expression profiling identified 1,281 genes and 19 miRNAs differentially expressed in muscle wasting during CC. Several of these deregulated genes are known or putative targets of the altered miRNAs, including miR-29a-3p......, miR-29b-3p, miR-210-5p, miR-214, and miR-489. Gene ontology analysis on integrative mRNA/miRNA expression profiling data revealed miRNA interactions affecting genes that regulate extra-cellular matrix (ECM) organization, proteasome protein degradation, citric acid cycle and respiratory electron...

  5. An RNA editing fingerprint of cancer stem cell reprogramming

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crews, Leslie A; Jiang, Qingfei; Zipeto, Maria A; Lazzari, Elisa; Court, Angela C; Ali, Shawn; Barrett, Christian L; Frazer, Kelly A; Jamieson, Catriona Hm

    2015-01-01

    .... The objectives of this study were to validate RNA editing of a subset of cancer stem cell-associated transcripts, and to develop a quantitative RNA editing fingerprint assay for rapid detection...

  6. Myosin-Va-dependent cell-to-cell transfer of RNA from Schwann cells to axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, José R; Canclini, Lucía; Kun, Alejandra; Sotelo-Silveira, José R; Xu, Lei; Wallrabe, Horst; Calliari, Aldo; Rosso, Gonzalo; Cal, Karina; Mercer, John A

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the role of protein synthesis in axons, we have identified the source of a portion of axonal RNA. We show that proximal segments of transected sciatic nerves accumulate newly-synthesized RNA in axons. This RNA is synthesized in Schwann cells because the RNA was labeled in the complete absence of neuronal cell bodies both in vitro and in vivo. We also demonstrate that the transfer is prevented by disruption of actin and that it fails to occur in the absence of myosin-Va. Our results demonstrate cell-to-cell transfer of RNA and identify part of the mechanism required for transfer. The induction of cell-to-cell RNA transfer by injury suggests that interventions following injury or degeneration, particularly gene therapy, may be accomplished by applying them to nearby glial cells (or implanted stem cells) at the site of injury to promote regeneration.

  7. PlncRNA-1 induces apoptosis through the Her-2 pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Cui, Zi-Lian; Wang, Qin; Jin, Xun-Bo; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Mu-Wen; Song, Wei; Qu, Hua-Wei; Kang, Wei-Ting

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether PlncRNA-1 induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells through the Her-2 pathway. The expression of PlncRNA-1, Her-2, and related cyclin proteins in 23 cases of prostate cancer and adjacent normal tissues was analyzed and compared. LNCaP cells were divided into a control group and an LNCaP-PlncRNA-1-siRNA experimental group. Normal prostate RWPE-1 cells were divided into an RWPE-1 control group and an RWPE-1-PlncRNA-1 experimental group. After PlncRNA-1 silencing and overexpression, changes in Her-2 and cyclinD1 expression levels were detected both in vivo and in vitro. In prostate cancer tissues, Her-2 and PlncRNA-1 were highly expressed and significantly correlated. In LNCaP cells, the expression of Her-2 and cyclinD1 decreased following the downregulation of PlncRNA-1 as assessed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. In RWPE-1 cells, the expression of Her-2 and cyclinD1 increased following PlncRNA-1 overexpression. Flow cytometry revealed that the proportion of LNCaP cells in G2/M phase was significantly increased after PlncRNA-1 silencing and that the proportion of RWPE-1 cells in G2/M phase was significantly decreased after PlncRNA-1 overexpression. Furthermore, animal experiments validated these results. In conclusion, in prostate cancer, PlncRNA-1 regulates the cell cycle and cyclinD1 levels and can also regulate proliferation and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells through the Her-2 pathway.

  8. RNA sequencing reveals a diverse and dynamic repertoire of the Xenopus tropicalis transcriptome over development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Meng How; Au, Kin Fai; Yablonovitch, Arielle L; Wills, Andrea E; Chuang, Jason; Baker, Julie C; Wong, Wing Hung; Li, Jin Billy

    2013-01-01

    The Xenopus embryo has provided key insights into fate specification, the cell cycle, and other fundamental developmental and cellular processes, yet a comprehensive understanding of its transcriptome is lacking. Here, we used paired end RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to explore the transcriptome of Xenopus tropicalis in 23 distinct developmental stages. We determined expression levels of all genes annotated in RefSeq and Ensembl and showed for the first time on a genome-wide scale that, despite a general state of transcriptional silence in the earliest stages of development, approximately 150 genes are transcribed prior to the midblastula transition. In addition, our splicing analysis uncovered more than 10,000 novel splice junctions at each stage and revealed that many known genes have additional unannotated isoforms. Furthermore, we used Cufflinks to reconstruct transcripts from our RNA-seq data and found that ∼13.5% of the final contigs are derived from novel transcribed regions, both within introns and in intergenic regions. We then developed a filtering pipeline to separate protein-coding transcripts from noncoding RNAs and identified a confident set of 6686 noncoding transcripts in 3859 genomic loci. Since the current reference genome, XenTro3, consists of hundreds of scaffolds instead of full chromosomes, we also performed de novo reconstruction of the transcriptome using Trinity and uncovered hundreds of transcripts that are missing from the genome. Collectively, our data will not only aid in completing the assembly of the Xenopus tropicalis genome but will also serve as a valuable resource for gene discovery and for unraveling the fundamental mechanisms of vertebrate embryogenesis.

  9. Synthetic RNA Controllers for Programming Mammalian Cell Fate and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-04

    Final report for “Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function” Principal Investigator: Christina D. Smolke...SUBTITLE Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18   2 Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function Task 1

  10. Induction of RNA interference in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mu; Qian, Hua; Ichim, Thomas E; Ge, Wei-Wen; Popov, Igor A; Rycerz, Katarzyna; Neu, John; White, David; Zhong, Robert; Min, Wei-Ping

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) reside at the center of the immunological universe, possessing the ability both to stimulate and inhibit various types of responses. Tolerogenic/regulatory DC with therapeutic properties can be generated through various means of manipulations in vitro and in vivo. Here we describe several attractive strategies for manipulation of DC using the novel technique of RNA interference (RNAi). Additionally, we overview some of our data regarding yet undescribed characteristics of RNAi in DC such as specific transfection strategies, persistence of gene silencing, and multi-gene silencing. The advantages of using RNAi for DC genetic manipulation gives rise to the promise of generating tailor-made DC that can be used effectively to treat a variety of immunologically mediated diseases.

  11. Detection of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippens, A S; Gruetter, C A

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate histamine synthesis capability of human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells by detecting histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA. HDC catalyzes exclusively the formation of histamine in mammalian cells. Experiments utilizing nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (nRT-PCR) were conducted to detect the presence of HDC mRNA. Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMC) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured and RNA was extracted and amplified using two sets of HDC-specific primers. Rat liver and kidney RNA were isolated and amplified to serve as positive and negative controls, respectively. Gel electrophoresis of HAoSMC, HAEC and liver mRNA revealed bands coinciding with an expected product size of 440 base pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that the observed bands were the appropriate HDC amplicons. These findings are the first to indicate the presence of HDC mRNA in vascular smooth muscle cells and confirm the presence of HDC mRNA in endothelial cells which is consistent with an ability of these cell types to synthesize histamine in the vascular wall.

  12. Integrative Analysis of MicroRNA and mRNA Data Reveals an Orchestrated Function of MicroRNAs in Skeletal Myocyte Differentiation in Response to TNF-α or IGF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Swanhild U.; Sass, Steffen; Mueller, Nikola S.; Krebs, Stefan; Bauersachs, Stefan; Kaiser, Sebastian; Blum, Helmut; Thirion, Christian; Krause, Sabine; Theis, Fabian J.; Pfaffl, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Skeletal muscle cell differentiation is impaired by elevated levels of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) with pathological significance in chronic diseases or inherited muscle disorders. Insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF1) positively regulates muscle cell differentiation. Both, TNF-α and IGF1 affect gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in this process. However, computational prediction of miRNA-mRNA relations is challenged by false positives and targets which might be irrelevant in the respective cellular transcriptome context. Thus, this study is focused on functional information about miRNA affected target transcripts by integrating miRNA and mRNA expression profiling data. Methodology/Principal Findings Murine skeletal myocytes PMI28 were differentiated for 24 hours with concomitant TNF-α or IGF1 treatment. Both, mRNA and miRNA expression profiling was performed. The data-driven integration of target prediction and paired mRNA/miRNA expression profiling data revealed that i) the quantity of predicted miRNA-mRNA relations was reduced, ii) miRNA targets with a function in cell cycle and axon guidance were enriched, iii) differential regulation of anti-differentiation miR-155-5p and miR-29b-3p as well as pro-differentiation miR-335-3p, miR-335-5p, miR-322-3p, and miR-322-5p seemed to be of primary importance during skeletal myoblast differentiation compared to the other miRNAs, iv) the abundance of targets and affected biological processes was miRNA specific, and v) subsets of miRNAs may collectively regulate gene expression. Conclusions Joint analysis of mRNA and miRNA profiling data increased the process-specificity and quality of predicted relations by statistically selecting miRNA-target interactions. Moreover, this study revealed miRNA-specific predominant biological implications in skeletal muscle cell differentiation and in response to TNF-α or IGF1 treatment. Furthermore, myoblast differentiation-associated mi

  13. RNA Exosome Complex-Mediated Control of Redox Status in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Skamagki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The RNA exosome complex targets AU-rich element (ARE-containing mRNAs in eukaryotic cells. We identified a transcription factor, ZSCAN10, which binds to the promoters of multiple RNA exosome complex subunits in pluripotent stem cells to maintain subunit gene expression. We discovered that induced pluripotent stem cell clones generated from aged tissue donors (A-iPSC show poor expression of ZSCAN10, leading to poor RNA exosome complex expression, and a subsequent elevation in ARE-containing RNAs, including glutathione peroxidase 2 (Gpx2. Excess GPX2 leads to excess glutathione-mediated reactive oxygen species scavenging activity that blunts the DNA damage response and apoptosis. Expression of ZSCAN10 in A-iPSC recovers RNA exosome gene expression, the DNA damage response, and apoptosis. These findings reveal the central role of ZSCAN10 and the RNA exosome complex in maintaining pluripotent stem cell redox status to support a normal DNA damage response.

  14. Analyses of Genomic tRNA Reveal Presence of Novel tRNAs in Oryza sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Tapan K.; Bae, Hanhong

    2017-01-01

    Transfer rRNAs are important molecules responsible for the translation event during protein synthesis. tRNAs are widespread found in unicellular to multi-cellular organisms. Analysis of tRNA gene family members in Oryza sativa revealed the presence of 750 tRNA genes distributed unevenly in different chromosomes. The length of O. sativa tRNAs genes were ranged from 66 to 91 nucleotides encoding 52 isoacceptor in total. tRNASer found in chromosome 8 of O. sativa encoded only 66 nucleotides which is the smallest tRNA of O. sativa and to our knowledge, this is the smallest gene of eukaryotic lineage reported so far. Analyses revealed the presence of several novel/pseudo tRNA genes in O. sativa which are reported for the first time. Multiple sequence alignment of tRNAs revealed the presence of family specific conserved consensus sequences. Functional study of these novel tRNA and family specific conserved consensus sequences will be crucial to decipher their importance in biological events. The rate of transition of O. sativa tRNA was found to be higher than the rate of transversion. Evolutionary study revealed, O. sativa tRNAs were evolved from the lineages of multiple common ancestors. Duplication and loss study of tRNAs genes revealed, majority of the O. sativa tRNA were duplicated and 17 of them were found to be undergone loss during the evolution. Orthology and paralogy study showed, the majority of O. sativa tRNA were paralogous and only a few of tRNASer were found to contain orthologous tRNAs. PMID:28713421

  15. Characterization of RNA interference in rat PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thonberg, Håkan; Schéele, Camilla C; Dahlgren, Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA can initiate post transcriptional gene silencing in mammalian cell cultures via a mechanism known as RNA interference (RNAi). The sequence-specific degradation of homologous mRNA is triggered by 21-nucleotide RNA-duplexes termed short interfering RNA (siRNA). The homologous...... strand of the siRNA guides a multi-protein complex, RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), to cleave target mRNA. Although the exact function and composition of RISC is still unclear, it has been shown to include several proteins of the Argonaute protein family. Here we report of a robust system...... to achieve RNAi in a cultured rat neuronal cell line, PC12. Targeting of neuropeptide Y mRNA by synthetic siRNA results in knock down of the mRNA levels with an IC50 of approximately 0.1 nM. The mRNA knockdown lasts for at least 96 h and is not dependent on protein synthesis. Further, PC12 cells were ablated...

  16. Degradation of nuclease-stabilized RNA oligonucleotides in Mycoplasma-contaminated cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Frank J; Stockdale, Katie R; Huang, Lingyan; Horswill, Alexander R; Behlke, Mark A; McNamara, James O

    2012-02-01

    Artificial RNA reagents such as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and aptamers often must be chemically modified for optimal effectiveness in environments that include ribonucleases. Mycoplasmas are common bacterial contaminants of mammalian cell cultures that are known to produce ribonucleases. Here we describe the rapid degradation of nuclease-stabilized RNA oligonucleotides in a human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK) cell culture contaminated with Mycoplasma fermentans, a common species of mycoplasma. RNA with 2'-fluoro- or 2'-O-methyl- modified pyrimidines was readily degraded in conditioned media from this culture, but was stable in conditioned media from uncontaminated HEK cells. RNA completely modified with 2'-O-methyls was not degraded in the mycoplasma-contaminated media. RNA zymogram analysis of conditioned culture media and material centrifuged from the media revealed several distinct protein bands (ranging from 30 to 68 kDa) capable of degrading RNA with 2'-fluoro- or 2'-O-methyl-modified pyrimidines. Finally, the mycoplasma-associated nuclease was detected in material centrifuged from the contaminated culture supernatants in as little as 15 minutes with an RNA oligo-containing 2'-O-methyl-modified pyrimidines and labeled with a 5'-fluorescein amidite (FAM) and 3'-quencher. These results suggest that mycoplasma contamination may be a critical confounding variable for cell culture experiments involving RNA-based reagents, with particular relevance for applications involving naked RNA (e.g., aptamer-siRNA chimeras).

  17. Dynamic transcriptome changes during adipose tissue energy expenditure reveal critical roles for long noncoding RNA regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Bai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing brown fat activity and promoting white fat browning are attractive therapeutic strategies for treating obesity and associated metabolic disorders. To provide a comprehensive picture of the gene regulatory network in these processes, we conducted a series of transcriptome studies by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and quantified the mRNA and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA changes during white fat browning (chronic cold exposure, beta-adrenergic agonist treatment, and intense exercise and brown fat activation or inactivation (acute cold exposure or thermoneutrality, respectively. mRNA-lncRNA coexpression networks revealed dynamically regulated lncRNAs to be largely embedded in nutrient and energy metabolism pathways. We identified a brown adipose tissue-enriched lncRNA, lncBATE10, that was governed by the cAMP-cAMP response element-binding protein (Creb axis and required for a full brown fat differentiation and white fat browning program. Mechanistically, lncBATE10 can decoy Celf1 from Pgc1α, thereby protecting Pgc1α mRNA from repression by Celf1. Together, these studies provide a comprehensive data framework to interrogate the transcriptomic changes accompanying energy homeostasis transition in adipose tissue.

  18. Uptake of synthetic naked RNA by skin-resident dendritic cells via macropinocytosis allows antigen expression and induction of T-cell responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Abderraouf; Vascotto, Fulvia; Kautz-Neu, Kordula; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur; von Stebut, Esther; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Intradermal administration of antigen-encoding RNA has entered clinical testing for cancer vaccination. However, insight into the underlying mechanism of RNA uptake, translation and antigen presentation is still limited. Utilizing pharmacologically optimized naked RNA, the dose-response kinetics revealed a rise in reporter signal with increasing RNA amounts and a prolonged RNA translation of reporter protein up to 30 days after intradermal injection. Dendritic cells (DCs) in the dermis were shown to engulf RNA, and the signal arising from the reporter RNA was significantly diminished after DC depletion. Macropinocytosis was relevant for intradermal RNA uptake and translation in vitro and in vivo. By combining intradermal RNA vaccination and inhibition of macropinocytosis, we show that effective priming of antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cells also relies on this uptake mechanism. This report demonstrates that direct antigen translation by dermal DCs after intradermal naked RNA vaccination is relevant for efficient priming of antigen-specific T-cells.

  19. Single-molecule RNA observation in vivo reveals dynamics of co-transcriptional splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, M. L.; Coulon, A.; de Turris, V.; Palangat, M.; Chow, C. C.; Singer, R. H.; Larson, D. R.

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of pre-mRNA and the splicing of that pre-mRNA to form completed transcripts requires coordination between two large multi-subunit complexes (the transcription elongation complex and the spliceosome). How this coordination occurs in vivo is unknown. Here we report the first experimental observation of transcription and splicing occurring at the same gene in living cells. By utilizing the PP7/MS2 fluorescent RNA reporter system, we can directly observe two distinct regions of the nascent RNA, allowing us to measure the rise and fall time of the intron and exon of a reporter gene stably integrated into a human cell line. The reporter gene consists of a beta globin gene where we have inserted a 24 RNA hairpin cassette into the intron/exon. Upon synthesis, the RNA hairpins are tightly bound by fluorescently-labeled PP7/MS2 bacteriophage coat proteins. After gene induction, a single locus of active transcription in the nucleus shows fluorescence intensity changes characteristic of the synthesis and excision of the intron/exon. Using fluctuation analysis, we determine the elongation rate to be 1.5 kb/min. From the temporal cross correlation function, we determine that splicing of this gene must be co-transcriptional with a splicing time of ~100 seconds before termination and a ~200 second pause at termination. We propose that dual-color RNA imaging may be extended to investigate other mechanisms of transcription, gene regulation, and RNA processing.

  20. The mitochondrial lncRNA ASncmtRNA-2 is induced in aging and replicative senescence in Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchessi, Valentina; Badi, Ileana; Bertolotti, Matteo; Nigro, Patrizia; D'Alessandra, Yuri; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Zanobini, Marco; Pompilio, Giulio; Raucci, Angela; Lauri, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Age-associated cardiovascular diseases are at least partially ascribable to vascular cell senescence. Replicative senescence (RS) and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) are provoked respectively by endogenous (telomere erosion) and exogenous (H2O2, UV) stimuli resulting in cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2 phases. In both scenarios, mitochondria-derived ROS are important players in senescence initiation. We aimed to define whether a mtDNA-transcribed long-non-coding-RNA (lncRNA), ASncmtRNA-2, has a role in vascular aging and senescence. Aortas of old mice, characterized by increased senescence, showed an increment in ASncmtRNA-2 expression. In vitro analysis of Endothelial Cells (EC) and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (VSMC) established that ASncmtRNA-2 is induced in EC, but not in VSMC, during RS. Surprisingly, ASncmtRNA-2 is not upregulated in two different EC SIPS scenarios, treated with H2O2 and UV. The p16 gene displayed similar ASncmtRNA-2 expression patterns, suggesting a possible co-regulation of the two genes. Interestingly, the expression of two miRNAs, hsa-miR-4485 and hsa-miR-1973, with perfect homology to the double strand region of ASncmtRNA-2 and originating at least in part from a mitochondrial transcript, was induced in RS, opening to the possibility that this lncRNA functions as a non-canonical precursor of these miRNAs. Cell cycle analysis of EC transiently over-expressing ASncmtRNA-2 revealed an accumulation of EC in the G2/M phase, but not in the G1 phase. We propose that ASncmtRNA-2 in EC might be involved in the RS establishment by participating in the cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, possibly through the production of hsa-miR-4485 and hsa-miR-1973. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of CLL exosomes reveals a distinct microRNA signature and enhanced secretion by activation of BCR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yuh-Ying; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Lehman, Amy M; Maddocks, Kami; Yu, Lianbo; Johnson, Amy J; Byrd, John C

    2015-05-21

    Multiple studies show that chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells are heavily dependent on their microenvironment for survival. Communication between CLL cells and the microenvironment is mediated through direct cell contact, soluble factors, and extracellular vesicles. Exosomes are small particles enclosed with lipids, proteins, and small RNAs that can convey biological materials to surrounding cells. Our data herein demonstrate that CLL cells release significant amounts of exosomes in plasma that exhibit abundant CD37, CD9, and CD63 expression. Our work also pinpoints the regulation of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in the release of CLL exosomes: BCR activation by α-immunoglobulin (Ig)M induces exosome secretion, whereas BCR inactivation via ibrutinib impedes α-IgM-stimulated exosome release. Moreover, analysis of serial plasma samples collected from CLL patients on an ibrutinib clinical trial revealed that exosome plasma concentration was significantly decreased following ibrutinib therapy. Furthermore, microRNA (miR) profiling of plasma-derived exosomes identified a distinct exosome microRNA signature, including miR-29 family, miR-150, miR-155, and miR-223 that have been associated with CLL disease. Interestingly, expression of exosome miR-150 and miR-155 increases with BCR activation. In all, this study successfully characterized CLL exosomes, demonstrated the control of BCR signaling in the release of CLL exosomes, and uncovered a disease-relevant exosome microRNA profile. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. Crystal structure analysis reveals functional flexibility in the selenocysteine-specific tRNA from mouse.

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    Oleg M Ganichkin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selenocysteine tRNAs (tRNA(Sec exhibit a number of unique identity elements that are recognized specifically by proteins of the selenocysteine biosynthetic pathways and decoding machineries. Presently, these identity elements and the mechanisms by which they are interpreted by tRNA(Sec-interacting factors are incompletely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied rational mutagenesis to obtain well diffracting crystals of murine tRNA(Sec. tRNA(Sec lacking the single-stranded 3'-acceptor end ((ΔGCCARNA(Sec yielded a crystal structure at 2.0 Å resolution. The global structure of (ΔGCCARNA(Sec resembles the structure of human tRNA(Sec determined at 3.1 Å resolution. Structural comparisons revealed flexible regions in tRNA(Sec used for induced fit binding to selenophosphate synthetase. Water molecules located in the present structure were involved in the stabilization of two alternative conformations of the anticodon stem-loop. Modeling of a 2'-O-methylated ribose at position U34 of the anticodon loop as found in a sub-population of tRNA(Secin vivo showed how this modification favors an anticodon loop conformation that is functional during decoding on the ribosome. Soaking of crystals in Mn(2+-containing buffer revealed eight potential divalent metal ion binding sites but the located metal ions did not significantly stabilize specific structural features of tRNA(Sec. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the most highly resolved structure of a tRNA(Sec molecule to date and assessed the influence of water molecules and metal ions on the molecule's conformation and dynamics. Our results suggest how conformational changes of tRNA(Sec support its interaction with proteins.

  3. RNA deep sequencing reveals differential microRNA expression during development of sea urchin and sea star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Sabah; Hinman, Veronica F; Benos, Panayiotis V

    2011-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20-23 nt), non-coding single stranded RNA molecules that act as post-transcriptional regulators of mRNA gene expression. They have been implicated in regulation of developmental processes in diverse organisms. The echinoderms, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (sea urchin) and Patiria miniata (sea star) are excellent model organisms for studying development with well-characterized transcriptional networks. However, to date, nothing is known about the role of miRNAs during development in these organisms, except that the genes that are involved in the miRNA biogenesis pathway are expressed during their developmental stages. In this paper, we used Illumina Genome Analyzer (Illumina, Inc.) to sequence small RNA libraries in mixed stage population of embryos from one to three days after fertilization of sea urchin and sea star (total of 22,670,000 reads). Analysis of these data revealed the miRNA populations in these two species. We found that 47 and 38 known miRNAs are expressed in sea urchin and sea star, respectively, during early development (32 in common). We also found 13 potentially novel miRNAs in the sea urchin embryonic library. miRNA expression is generally conserved between the two species during development, but 7 miRNAs are highly expressed in only one species. We expect that our two datasets will be a valuable resource for everyone working in the field of developmental biology and the regulatory networks that affect it. The computational pipeline to analyze Illumina reads is available at http://www.benoslab.pitt.edu/services.html. © 2011 Kadri et al.

  4. RNA deep sequencing reveals differential microRNA expression during development of sea urchin and sea star.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabah Kadri

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are small (20-23 nt, non-coding single stranded RNA molecules that act as post-transcriptional regulators of mRNA gene expression. They have been implicated in regulation of developmental processes in diverse organisms. The echinoderms, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (sea urchin and Patiria miniata (sea star are excellent model organisms for studying development with well-characterized transcriptional networks. However, to date, nothing is known about the role of miRNAs during development in these organisms, except that the genes that are involved in the miRNA biogenesis pathway are expressed during their developmental stages. In this paper, we used Illumina Genome Analyzer (Illumina, Inc. to sequence small RNA libraries in mixed stage population of embryos from one to three days after fertilization of sea urchin and sea star (total of 22,670,000 reads. Analysis of these data revealed the miRNA populations in these two species. We found that 47 and 38 known miRNAs are expressed in sea urchin and sea star, respectively, during early development (32 in common. We also found 13 potentially novel miRNAs in the sea urchin embryonic library. miRNA expression is generally conserved between the two species during development, but 7 miRNAs are highly expressed in only one species. We expect that our two datasets will be a valuable resource for everyone working in the field of developmental biology and the regulatory networks that affect it. The computational pipeline to analyze Illumina reads is available at http://www.benoslab.pitt.edu/services.html.

  5. RNA Deep Sequencing Reveals Differential MicroRNA Expression during Development of Sea Urchin and Sea Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Sabah; Hinman, Veronica F.; Benos, Panayiotis V.

    2011-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20–23 nt), non-coding single stranded RNA molecules that act as post-transcriptional regulators of mRNA gene expression. They have been implicated in regulation of developmental processes in diverse organisms. The echinoderms, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (sea urchin) and Patiria miniata (sea star) are excellent model organisms for studying development with well-characterized transcriptional networks. However, to date, nothing is known about the role of miRNAs during development in these organisms, except that the genes that are involved in the miRNA biogenesis pathway are expressed during their developmental stages. In this paper, we used Illumina Genome Analyzer (Illumina, Inc.) to sequence small RNA libraries in mixed stage population of embryos from one to three days after fertilization of sea urchin and sea star (total of 22,670,000 reads). Analysis of these data revealed the miRNA populations in these two species. We found that 47 and 38 known miRNAs are expressed in sea urchin and sea star, respectively, during early development (32 in common). We also found 13 potentially novel miRNAs in the sea urchin embryonic library. miRNA expression is generally conserved between the two species during development, but 7 miRNAs are highly expressed in only one species. We expect that our two datasets will be a valuable resource for everyone working in the field of developmental biology and the regulatory networks that affect it. The computational pipeline to analyze Illumina reads is available at http://www.benoslab.pitt.edu/services.html. PMID:22216218

  6. microRNA-10b Is Overexpressed and Critical for Cell Survival and Proliferation in Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rekha; Greene, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the effects of miRNA-10b on medulloblastoma proliferation through transcriptional induction of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2. Using a cancer specific miRNA-array, high expression of miRNA-10b in medulloblastoma cell lines compared to a normal cerebellar control was shown, and this was confirmed with real time PCR (RT-PCR). Two medulloblastoma cell lines (DAOY and UW228) were transiently transfected with control miRNA, miRNA-10b inhibitor or miRNA-10b mimic and subjected to RT-PCR, MTT, apoptosis, clonogenic assay and western blot analysis. Transfection of miRNA-10b inhibitor induced a significant down-regulation of miRNA-10b expression, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis, while miRNA-10b mimic exerted an opposite effect. Inhibition of miRNA-10b abrogated the colony-forming capability of medulloblastoma cells, and markedly down-regulated the expression of BCL2. Down-regulation of BCL2 by antisense oligonucleotides or siRNA also significantly down-regulated miRNA-10b, suggesting that BCL2 is a major mediator of the effects of miRNA-10b. ABT-737 and ABT-199, potent inhibitors of BCL2, downregulated the expression of miRNA-10b and increased apoptosis. Analysis of miRNA-10b levels in 13 primary medulloblastoma samples revealed that the 2 patients with the highest levels of miRNA-10b had multiple recurrences (4.5) and died within 8 years of diagnosis, compared with the 11 patients with low levels of miRNA-10b who had a mean of 1.2 recurrences and nearly 40% long-term survival. The data presented here indicate that miRNA-10b may act as an oncomir in medulloblastoma tumorigenesis, and reveal a previously unreported mechanism with Bcl-2 as a mediator of the effects of miRNA-10b upon medulloblastoma cell survival. PMID:26394044

  7. microRNA-10b Is Overexpressed and Critical for Cell Survival and Proliferation in Medulloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Pal

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the effects of miRNA-10b on medulloblastoma proliferation through transcriptional induction of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2. Using a cancer specific miRNA-array, high expression of miRNA-10b in medulloblastoma cell lines compared to a normal cerebellar control was shown, and this was confirmed with real time PCR (RT-PCR. Two medulloblastoma cell lines (DAOY and UW228 were transiently transfected with control miRNA, miRNA-10b inhibitor or miRNA-10b mimic and subjected to RT-PCR, MTT, apoptosis, clonogenic assay and western blot analysis. Transfection of miRNA-10b inhibitor induced a significant down-regulation of miRNA-10b expression, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis, while miRNA-10b mimic exerted an opposite effect. Inhibition of miRNA-10b abrogated the colony-forming capability of medulloblastoma cells, and markedly down-regulated the expression of BCL2. Down-regulation of BCL2 by antisense oligonucleotides or siRNA also significantly down-regulated miRNA-10b, suggesting that BCL2 is a major mediator of the effects of miRNA-10b. ABT-737 and ABT-199, potent inhibitors of BCL2, downregulated the expression of miRNA-10b and increased apoptosis. Analysis of miRNA-10b levels in 13 primary medulloblastoma samples revealed that the 2 patients with the highest levels of miRNA-10b had multiple recurrences (4.5 and died within 8 years of diagnosis, compared with the 11 patients with low levels of miRNA-10b who had a mean of 1.2 recurrences and nearly 40% long-term survival. The data presented here indicate that miRNA-10b may act as an oncomir in medulloblastoma tumorigenesis, and reveal a previously unreported mechanism with Bcl-2 as a mediator of the effects of miRNA-10b upon medulloblastoma cell survival.

  8. Mutational analysis of Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase reveals critical residues for tRNA-dependent cysteine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgadóttir, Sunna; Sinapah, Sylvie; Söll, Dieter; Ling, Jiqiang

    2012-01-02

    In methanogenic archaea, Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase (SepCysS) converts Sep-tRNA(Cys) to Cys-tRNA(Cys). The mechanism of tRNA-dependent cysteine formation remains unclear due to the lack of functional studies. In this work, we mutated 19 conserved residues in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii SepCysS, and employed an in vivo system to determine the activity of the resulting variants. Our results show that three active-site cysteines (Cys39, Cys42 and Cys247) are essential for SepCysS activity. In addition, combined with structural modeling, our mutational and functional analyses also reveal multiple residues that are important for the binding of PLP, Sep and tRNA. Our work thus represents the first systematic functional analysis of conserved residues in archaeal SepCysSs, providing insights into the catalytic and substrate binding mechanisms of this poorly characterized enzyme. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The RNA-methyltransferase Misu (NSun2 poises epidermal stem cells to differentiate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Blanco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of most adult tissues is maintained by balancing stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, but whether post-transcriptional mechanisms can regulate this process is unknown. Here, we identify that an RNA methyltransferase (Misu/Nsun2 is required to balance stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in skin. In the epidermis, this methyltransferase is found in a defined sub-population of hair follicle stem cells poised to undergo lineage commitment, and its depletion results in enhanced quiescence and aberrant stem cell differentiation. Our results reveal that post-transcriptional RNA methylation can play a previously unappreciated role in controlling stem cell fate.

  10. Noncoding RNA mediated traffic of foreign mRNA into chloroplasts reveals a novel signaling mechanism in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Gómez

    Full Text Available Communication between chloroplasts and the nucleus is one of the milestones of the evolution of plants on earth. Proteins encoded by ancestral chloroplast-endogenous genes were transferred to the nucleus during the endosymbiotic evolution and originated this communication, which is mainly dependent on specific transit-peptides. However, the identification of nuclear-encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast lacking these canonical signals suggests the existence of an alternative cellular pathway tuning this metabolic crosstalk. Non-coding RNAS (NcRNAs are increasingly recognized as regulators of gene expression as they play roles previously believed to correspond to proteins. Avsunviroidae family viroids are the only noncoding functional RNAs that have been reported to traffic inside the chloroplasts. Elucidating mechanisms used by these pathogens to enter this organelle will unearth novel transport pathways in plant cells. Here we show that a viroid-derived NcRNA acting as a 5'UTR-end mediates the functional import of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP mRNA into chloroplast. This claim is supported by the observation at confocal microscopy of a selective accumulation of GFP in the chloroplast of the leaves expressing the chimeric vd-5'UTR/GFP and by the detection of the GFP mRNA in chloroplasts isolated from cells expressing this construct. These results support the existence of an alternative signaling mechanism in plants between the host cell and chloroplasts, where an ncRNA functions as a key regulatory molecule to control the accumulation of nuclear-encoded proteins in this organelle. In addition, our findings provide a conceptual framework to develop new biotechnological tools in systems using plant chloroplast as bioreactors. Finally, viroids of the family Avsunviroidae have probably evolved to subvert this signaling mechanism to regulate their differential traffic into the chloroplast of infected cells.

  11. Characterization of RNA in exosomes secreted by human breast cancer cell lines using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Kremenska, Yuliya; Nair, Vrundha M; Kremenskoy, Maksym; Joseph, Baby; Kurochkin, Igor V

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nanosized (30-100 nm) membrane vesicles secreted by most cell types. Exosomes have been found to contain various RNA species including miRNA, mRNA and long non-protein coding RNAs. A number of cancer cells produce elevated levels of exosomes. Because exosomes have been isolated from most body fluids they may provide a source for non-invasive cancer diagnostics. Transcriptome profiling that uses deep-sequencing technologies (RNA-Seq) offers enormous amount of data that can be used for biomarkers discovery, however, in case of exosomes this approach was applied only for the analysis of small RNAs. In this study, we utilized RNA-Seq technology to analyze RNAs present in microvesicles secreted by human breast cancer cell lines. Exosomes were isolated from the media conditioned by two human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-436. Exosomal RNA was profiled using the Ion Torrent semiconductor chip-based technology. Exosomes were found to contain various classes of RNA with the major class represented by fragmented ribosomal RNA (rRNA), in particular 28S and 18S rRNA subunits. Analysis of exosomal RNA content revealed that it reflects RNA content of the donor cells. Although exosomes produced by the two cancer cell lines shared most of the RNA species, there was a number of non-coding transcripts unique to MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-436 cells. This suggests that RNA analysis might distinguish exosomes produced by low metastatic breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-436) from that produced by highly metastatic breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). The analysis of gene ontologies (GOs) associated with the most abundant transcripts present in exosomes revealed significant enrichment in genes encoding proteins involved in translation and rRNA and ncRNA processing. These GO terms indicate most expressed genes for both, cellular and exosomal RNA. For the first time, using RNA-seq, we examined the transcriptomes of exosomes secreted by human breast cancer cells. We

  12. Characterization of RNA in exosomes secreted by human breast cancer cell lines using next-generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piroon Jenjaroenpun

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are nanosized (30–100 nm membrane vesicles secreted by most cell types. Exosomes have been found to contain various RNA species including miRNA, mRNA and long non-protein coding RNAs. A number of cancer cells produce elevated levels of exosomes. Because exosomes have been isolated from most body fluids they may provide a source for non-invasive cancer diagnostics. Transcriptome profiling that uses deep-sequencing technologies (RNA-Seq offers enormous amount of data that can be used for biomarkers discovery, however, in case of exosomes this approach was applied only for the analysis of small RNAs. In this study, we utilized RNA-Seq technology to analyze RNAs present in microvesicles secreted by human breast cancer cell lines.Exosomes were isolated from the media conditioned by two human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-436. Exosomal RNA was profiled using the Ion Torrent semiconductor chip-based technology. Exosomes were found to contain various classes of RNA with the major class represented by fragmented ribosomal RNA (rRNA, in particular 28S and 18S rRNA subunits. Analysis of exosomal RNA content revealed that it reflects RNA content of the donor cells. Although exosomes produced by the two cancer cell lines shared most of the RNA species, there was a number of non-coding transcripts unique to MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-436 cells. This suggests that RNA analysis might distinguish exosomes produced by low metastatic breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-436 from that produced by highly metastatic breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231. The analysis of gene ontologies (GOs associated with the most abundant transcripts present in exosomes revealed significant enrichment in genes encoding proteins involved in translation and rRNA and ncRNA processing. These GO terms indicate most expressed genes for both, cellular and exosomal RNA.For the first time, using RNA-seq, we examined the transcriptomes of exosomes secreted by human breast

  13. Dynamic microRNA gene transcription and processing during T cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirigin, Francis F.; Lindstedt, Kenneth; Sellars, Maclean; Ciofani, Maria; Low, Siao Li; Jones, Lachlan; Bell, Fiona; Pauli, Florencia; Bonneau, Richard; Myers, Richard M.; Littman, Dan R.; Chong, Mark M.W.

    2014-01-01

    By disrupting microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, we previously showed that this pathway is critical for the differentiation and function of T cells. While various cloning studies have shown that many miRNAs are expressed during T cell development, and in a dynamic manner, it was unclear how comprehensive these earlier analyses were. We therefore decided to profile miRNA expression by means of Next Generation Sequencing. Furthermore, we profiled miRNA expression starting from the hematopoietic stem cell. This analysis revealed that miRNA expression during T cell development is extremely dynamic, with 645 miRNAs sequenced, and the expression of some varying by as much as 3 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, changes in precursor processing led to altered mature miRNA sequences. We also analyzed the structures of the primary miRNA transcripts expressed in T cells, and found that many were extremely long. The longest was pri-mir-29b-1/29a at ~168kb. All the long pri-miRNAs also displayed extensive splicing. Our findings indicate that miRNA expression during T cell development is both a highly dynamic and a highly regulated process. PMID:22379031

  14. Signatures of Nucleotide Analog Incorporation by an RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Revealed Using High-Throughput Magnetic Tweezers

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    David Dulin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses pose a threat to public health that is exacerbated by the dearth of antiviral therapeutics. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp holds promise as a broad-spectrum, therapeutic target because of the conserved nature of the nucleotide-substrate-binding and catalytic sites. Conventional, quantitative, kinetic analysis of antiviral ribonucleotides monitors one or a few incorporation events. Here, we use a high-throughput magnetic tweezers platform to monitor the elongation dynamics of a prototypical RdRp over thousands of nucleotide-addition cycles in the absence and presence of a suite of nucleotide analog inhibitors. We observe multiple RdRp-RNA elongation complexes; only a subset of which are competent for analog utilization. Incorporation of a pyrazine-carboxamide nucleotide analog, T-1106, leads to RdRp backtracking. This analysis reveals a mechanism of action for this antiviral ribonucleotide that is corroborated by cellular studies. We propose that induced backtracking represents a distinct mechanistic class of antiviral ribonucleotides.

  15. Transcriptional profiling of cells sorted by RNA abundance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemm, Sandy; Semrau, Stefan; Wiebrands, Kay; Mooijman, Dylan; Faddah, Dina A; Jaenisch, Rudolf; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    We have developed a quantitative technique for sorting cells on the basis of endogenous RNA abundance, with a molecular resolution of 10-20 transcripts. We demonstrate efficient and unbiased RNA extraction from transcriptionally sorted cells and report a high-fidelity transcriptome measurement of

  16. RNA Sequencing and Bioinformatics Analysis Implicate the Regulatory Role of a Long Noncoding RNA-mRNA Network in Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can-Jie Guo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To analyze the long noncoding (lncRNA-mRNA expression network and potential roles in rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs during activation. Methods: LncRNA expression was analyzed in quiescent and culture-activated HSCs by RNA sequencing, and differentially expressed lncRNAs verified by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR were subjected to bioinformatics analysis. In vivo analyses of differential lncRNA-mRNA expression were performed on a rat model of liver fibrosis. Results: We identified upregulation of 12 lncRNAs and 155 mRNAs and downregulation of 12 lncRNAs and 374 mRNAs in activated HSCs. Additionally, we identified the differential expression of upregulated lncRNAs (NONRATT012636.2, NONRATT016788.2, and NONRATT021402.2 and downregulated lncRNAs (NONRATT007863.2, NONRATT019720.2, and NONRATT024061.2 in activated HSCs relative to levels observed in quiescent HSCs, and Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses showed that changes in lncRNAs associated with HSC activation revealed 11 significantly enriched pathways according to their predicted targets. Moreover, based on the predicted co-expression network, the relative dynamic levels of NONRATT013819.2 and lysyl oxidase (Lox were compared during HSC activation both in vitro and in vivo. Our results confirmed the upregulation of lncRNA NONRATT013819.2 and Lox mRNA associated with the extracellular matrix (ECM-related signaling pathway in HSCs and fibrotic livers. Conclusion: Our results detailing a dysregulated lncRNA-mRNA network might provide new treatment strategies for hepatic fibrosis based on findings indicating potentially critical roles for NONRATT013819.2 and Lox in ECM remodeling during HSC activation.

  17. Tracking the Dynamic Folding and Unfolding of RNA G-Quadruplexes in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiu-Cai; Chen, Shuo-Bin; Dai, Jing; Yuan, Jia-Hao; Ou, Tian-Miao; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Tan, Jia-Heng

    2018-02-17

    Due to the absence of methods for tracking RNA G-quadruplex dynamics, especially the folding and unfolding of this attractive structure in live cells, understanding of the biological roles of RNA G-quadruplexes is so far limited. Here we reported a new red-emitting fluorescent probe, QUMA-1, for a selective, continuous and real-time visualization of RNA G-quadruplexes in live cells. The applications of QUMA-1 in several previously intractable applications, including live-cell imaging of the dynamic folding, unfolding and movement of RNA G-quadruplexes and visualizing the unwinding of RNA G-quadruplexes by RNA helicase have been demonstrated. Notably, our real-time results revealed the complexity of the dynamics of RNA G-quadruplexes in live cells. We anticipate that the further application of QUMA-1 in combination with appropriate biological and imaging methods to explore the dynamics of RNA G-quadruplexes will uncover more information about the biological roles of RNA G-quadruplexes. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Integrative miRNA and mRNA analysis in penile carcinomas reveals markers and pathways with potential clinical impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuasne, Hellen; Barros-Filho, Mateus Camargo; Busso-Lopes, Ariane F

    2017-01-01

    and PPARG and hsa-miR-31-5p, hsa-miR-224-5p, and hsa-miR-223-3p were able to distinguish tumors from NPT with high sensitivity and specificity. Higher MMP1 expression was detected as a better predictor of lymph node metastasis than the clinical-pathological data. In addition, PPARG and EGFR were highlighted...... as potential pathways for targeted therapy in PeCa. The analysis based on HPV positivity (7 of 23 cases) revealed five miRNA and 13 mRNA differentially expressed. Although in a limited number of cases, HPV positive PeCa presented less aggressive phenotype in comparison with negative cases. Overall...

  19. 3′ terminal diversity of MRP RNA and other human noncoding RNAs revealed by deep sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Post-transcriptional 3′ end processing is a key component of RNA regulation. The abundant and essential RNA subunit of RNase MRP has been proposed to function in three distinct cellular compartments and therefore may utilize this mode of regulation. Here we employ 3′ RACE coupled with high-throughput sequencing to characterize the 3′ terminal sequences of human MRP RNA and other noncoding RNAs that form RNP complexes. Results The 3′ terminal sequence of MRP RNA from HEK293T cells has a distinctive distribution of genomically encoded termini (including an assortment of U residues) with a portion of these selectively tagged by oligo(A) tails. This profile contrasts with the relatively homogenous 3′ terminus of an in vitro transcribed MRP RNA control and the differing 3′ terminal profiles of U3 snoRNA, RNase P RNA, and telomerase RNA (hTR). Conclusions 3′ RACE coupled with deep sequencing provides a valuable framework for the functional characterization of 3′ terminal sequences of noncoding RNAs. PMID:24053768

  20. 3' terminal diversity of MRP RNA and other human noncoding RNAs revealed by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Katherine C; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-09-21

    Post-transcriptional 3' end processing is a key component of RNA regulation. The abundant and essential RNA subunit of RNase MRP has been proposed to function in three distinct cellular compartments and therefore may utilize this mode of regulation. Here we employ 3' RACE coupled with high-throughput sequencing to characterize the 3' terminal sequences of human MRP RNA and other noncoding RNAs that form RNP complexes. The 3' terminal sequence of MRP RNA from HEK293T cells has a distinctive distribution of genomically encoded termini (including an assortment of U residues) with a portion of these selectively tagged by oligo(A) tails. This profile contrasts with the relatively homogenous 3' terminus of an in vitro transcribed MRP RNA control and the differing 3' terminal profiles of U3 snoRNA, RNase P RNA, and telomerase RNA (hTR). 3' RACE coupled with deep sequencing provides a valuable framework for the functional characterization of 3' terminal sequences of noncoding RNAs.

  1. The RNA degradation pathway regulates the function of GAS5 a non-coding RNA in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Tani

    Full Text Available Studies of various mRNAs have revealed that changes in the abundance of transcripts, through mRNA degradation, act as a critical step in the control of various biological pathways. Similarly, the regulation of non-coding RNA (ncRNA levels is also considered to be important for their biological functions; however, far less is known about the mechanisms and biological importance of ncRNA turnover for the regulation of ncRNA functions. The growth arrest-specific 5 (GAS5 ncRNA accumulates during growth arrest induced by serum starvation and its transcript is degraded by the well characterized nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD pathway. Historically, NMD was discovered as a RNA quality control system to eliminate aberrant transcripts; however, accumulating evidence shows that NMD also regulates the abundance of physiological transcripts. Interestingly, the GAS5 transcript has the ability to bind the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, resulting in the inhibition of its ligand-dependent association with DNA. The GR binds the promoters of various glucocorticoid-responsive genes, including apoptosis-related genes. In this study, we examined whether the RNA degradation pathway can regulate this function of GAS5. We measured the steady-state abundance and the decay rate of GAS5 in UPF1-depleted human cells using the 5'-bromo-uridine immunoprecipitation chase (BRIC method, an inhibitor-free method for directly measuring RNA stability. We found that levels of the GAS5 transcript were elevated owing to prolonged decay rates in response to UPF1 depletion, and consequently the apoptosis-related genes, cIAP2 and SGK1, were down-regulated. In addition, serum starvation also increased the transcript levels of GAS5 because of prolonged decay rates, and conversely decreased levels of cIAP2 and SGK1 mRNA. Taken together, we found that the RNA degradation pathway can regulate the function of the GAS5 ncRNA in mammalian cells.

  2. Phenotype classification of single cells using SRS microscopy, RNA sequencing, and microfluidics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streets, Aaron M.; Cao, Chen; Zhang, Xiannian; Huang, Yanyi

    2016-03-01

    Phenotype classification of single cells reveals biological variation that is masked in ensemble measurement. This heterogeneity is found in gene and protein expression as well as in cell morphology. Many techniques are available to probe phenotypic heterogeneity at the single cell level, for example quantitative imaging and single-cell RNA sequencing, but it is difficult to perform multiple assays on the same single cell. In order to directly track correlation between morphology and gene expression at the single cell level, we developed a microfluidic platform for quantitative coherent Raman imaging and immediate RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of single cells. With this device we actively sort and trap cells for analysis with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (SRS). The cells are then processed in parallel pipelines for lysis, and preparation of cDNA for high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. SRS microscopy offers three-dimensional imaging with chemical specificity for quantitative analysis of protein and lipid distribution in single cells. Meanwhile, the microfluidic platform facilitates single-cell manipulation, minimizes contamination, and furthermore, provides improved RNA-Seq detection sensitivity and measurement precision, which is necessary for differentiating biological variability from technical noise. By combining coherent Raman microscopy with RNA sequencing, we can better understand the relationship between cellular morphology and gene expression at the single-cell level.

  3. 13C-detection in RNA bases: revealing structure-chemical shift relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farès, Christophe; Amata, Irene; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2007-12-26

    The chemical shifts of the unprotonated carbons in the proton-deficient nucleobases of RNA are rarely reported, despite the valuable information that they contain about base-pairing and base-stacking. We have developed 13C-detected 2D-experiments to identify the unprotonated 13C in the RNA bases and have assigned all the base nuclei of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled HIV-2 TAR-RNA. The 13C chemical shift distributions revealed perturbations correlated with the base-pairing and base-stacking properties of all four base-types. From this work, we conclude that the information contained in the chemical shift perturbations within the base rings can provide valuable restraint information for solving RNA structures, especially in conformational averaged regions, where NOE-based information is not available.

  4. Metagenomics reshapes the concepts of RNA virus evolution by revealing extensive horizontal virus transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolja, Valerian V; Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-11-08

    Virus metagenomics is a young research filed but it has already transformed our understanding of virus diversity and evolution, and illuminated at a new level the connections between virus evolution and the evolution and ecology of the hosts. In this review article, we examine the new picture of the evolution of RNA viruses, the dominant component of the eukaryotic virome, that is emerging from metagenomic data analysis. The major expansion of many groups of RNA viruses through metagenomics allowed the construction of substantially improved phylogenetic trees for the conserved virus genes, primarily, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp). In particular, a new superfamily of widespread, small positive-strand RNA viruses was delineated that unites tombus-like and noda-like viruses. Comparison of the genome architectures of RNA viruses discovered by metagenomics and by traditional methods reveals an extent of gene module shuffling among diverse virus genomes that far exceeds the previous appreciation of this evolutionary phenomenon. Most dramatically, inclusion of the metagenomic data in phylogenetic analyses of the RdRp resulted in the identification of numerous, strongly supported groups that encompass RNA viruses from diverse hosts including different groups of protists, animals and plants. Notwithstanding potential caveats, in particular, incomplete and uneven sampling of eukaryotic taxa, these highly unexpected findings reveal horizontal virus transfer (HVT) between diverse hosts as the central aspect of RNA virus evolution. The vast and diverse virome of invertebrates, particularly nematodes and arthropods, appears to be the reservoir, from which the viromes of plants and vertebrates evolved via multiple HVT events. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative Analysis of mRNA Isoform Expression in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Development Reveals Multiple Post-Transcriptional Regulatory Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Li, Wencheng; Zheng, Dinghai; Zhai, Peiyong; Zhao, Yun; Matsuda, Takahisa; Vatner, Stephen F.; Sadoshima, Junichi; Tian, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is enlargement of the heart in response to physiological or pathological stimuli, chiefly involving growth of myocytes in size rather than in number. Previous studies have shown that the expression pattern of a group of genes in hypertrophied heart induced by pressure overload resembles that at the embryonic stage of heart development, a phenomenon known as activation of the “fetal gene program”. Here, using a genome-wide approach we systematically defined genes and pathways regulated in short- and long-term cardiac hypertrophy conditions using mice with transverse aortic constriction (TAC), and compared them with those regulated at different stages of embryonic and postnatal development. In addition, exon-level analysis revealed widespread mRNA isoform changes during cardiac hypertrophy resulting from alternative usage of terminal or internal exons, some of which are also developmentally regulated and may be attributable to decreased expression of Fox-1 protein in cardiac hypertrophy. Genes with functions in certain pathways, such as cell adhesion and cell morphology, are more likely to be regulated by alternative splicing. Moreover, we found 3′UTRs of mRNAs were generally shortened through alternative cleavage and polyadenylation in hypertrophy, and microRNA target genes were generally de-repressed, suggesting coordinated mechanisms to increase mRNA stability and protein production during hypertrophy. Taken together, our results comprehensively delineated gene and mRNA isoform regulation events in cardiac hypertrophy and revealed their relations to those in development, and suggested that modulation of mRNA isoform expression plays an importance role in heart remodeling under pressure overload. PMID:21799842

  6. Comparative Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Coding and Noncoding RNA Differences in NSCLC from African Americans and European Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Khadijah A; Zingone, Adriana; Toulabi, Leila; Boeckelman, Jacob; Ryan, Bríd M

    2017-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether racial differences in gene and miRNA expression translates to differences in lung tumor biology with clinical relevance in African Americans (AAs) and European Americans (EAs). Experimental Design: The NCI-Maryland Case Control Study includes seven Baltimore City hospitals and is overrepresented with AA patients (∼40%). Patients that underwent curative NSCLC surgery between 1998 and 2014 were enrolled. Comparative molecular profiling used mRNA ( n = 22 AAs and 19 EAs) and miRNA ( n = 42 AAs and 55 EAs) expression arrays to track differences in paired fresh frozen normal tissues and lung tumor specimens from AAs and EAs. Pathway enrichment, predicted drug response, tumor microenvironment infiltration, cancer immunotherapy antigen profiling, and miRNA target enrichment were assessed. Results: AA-enriched differential gene expression was characterized by stem cell and invasion pathways. Differential gene expression in lung tumors from EAs was primarily characterized by cell proliferation pathways. Population-specific gene expression was partly driven by population-specific miRNA expression profiles. Drug susceptibility predictions revealed a strong inverse correlation between AA resistance and EA sensitivity to the same panel of drugs. Statistically significant differences in M1 and M2 macrophage infiltration were observed in AAs ( P profiling revealed clear differences in lung tumor biology between AAs and EAs. Increased participation by AAs in lung cancer clinical trials are needed to integrate, and leverage, transcriptomic differences with other clinical information to maximize therapeutic benefit in both AAs and EAs. Clin Cancer Res; 23(23); 7412-25. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. The structure of the box C/D enzyme reveals regulation of RNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinaite, Audrone; Simon, Bernd; Skjaerven, Lars; Rakwalska-Bange, Magdalena; Gabel, Frank; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2013-10-24

    Post-transcriptional modifications are essential to the cell life cycle, as they affect both pre-ribosomal RNA processing and ribosome assembly. The box C/D ribonucleoprotein enzyme that methylates ribosomal RNA at the 2'-O-ribose uses a multitude of guide RNAs as templates for the recognition of rRNA target sites. Two methylation guide sequences are combined on each guide RNA, the significance of which has remained unclear. Here we use a powerful combination of NMR spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering to solve the structure of the 390 kDa archaeal RNP enzyme bound to substrate RNA. We show that the two methylation guide sequences are located in different environments in the complex and that the methylation of physiological substrates targeted by the same guide RNA occurs sequentially. This structure provides a means for differential control of methylation levels at the two sites and at the same time offers an unexpected regulatory mechanism for rRNA folding.

  8. Finding Order in Randomness: Single-Molecule Studies Reveal Stochastic RNA Processing | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Producing a functional eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA) requires the coordinated activity of several large protein complexes to initiate transcription, elongate nascent transcripts, splice together exons, and cleave and polyadenylate the 3’ end. Kinetic competition between these various processes has been proposed to regulate mRNA maturation, but this model could lead to multiple, randomly determined, or stochastic, pathways or outcomes. Regulatory checkpoints have been suggested as a means of ensuring quality control. However, current methods have been unable to tease apart the contributions of these processes at a single gene or on a time scale that could provide mechanistic insight. To begin to investigate the kinetic relationship between transcription and splicing, Daniel Larson, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, and his colleagues employed a single-molecule RNA imaging approach to monitor production and processing of a human β-globin reporter gene in living cells.

  9. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Monroy-Contreras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular functions. Molecular beacons (MBs are stem-loop hairpin-structured oligonucleotides equipped with a fluorescence quencher at one end and a fluorescent dye (also called reporter or fluorophore at the opposite end. This structure permits that MB in the absence of their target complementary sequence do not fluoresce. Upon binding to targets, MBs emit fluorescence, due to the spatial separation of the quencher and the reporter. Molecular beacons are promising probes for the development of RNA imaging techniques; nevertheless much work remains to be done in order to obtain a robust technology for imaging various RNA molecules together in real time and in living cells. The present work concentrates on the different requirements needed to use successfully MB for cellular studies, summarizing recent advances in this area.

  10. Genome-wide modeling of transcription kinetics reveals patterns of RNA production delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkela, Antti; Peltonen, Jaakko; Topa, Hande; Charapitsa, Iryna; Matarese, Filomena; Grote, Korbinian; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Reid, George; Lawrence, Neil D; Rattray, Magnus

    2015-10-20

    Genes with similar transcriptional activation kinetics can display very different temporal mRNA profiles because of differences in transcription time, degradation rate, and RNA-processing kinetics. Recent studies have shown that a splicing-associated RNA production delay can be significant. To investigate this issue more generally, it is useful to develop methods applicable to genome-wide datasets. We introduce a joint model of transcriptional activation and mRNA accumulation that can be used for inference of transcription rate, RNA production delay, and degradation rate given data from high-throughput sequencing time course experiments. We combine a mechanistic differential equation model with a nonparametric statistical modeling approach allowing us to capture a broad range of activation kinetics, and we use Bayesian parameter estimation to quantify the uncertainty in estimates of the kinetic parameters. We apply the model to data from estrogen receptor α activation in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. We use RNA polymerase II ChIP-Seq time course data to characterize transcriptional activation and mRNA-Seq time course data to quantify mature transcripts. We find that 11% of genes with a good signal in the data display a delay of more than 20 min between completing transcription and mature mRNA production. The genes displaying these long delays are significantly more likely to be short. We also find a statistical association between high delay and late intron retention in pre-mRNA data, indicating significant splicing-associated production delays in many genes.

  11. A role for Drosophila Cyclin J in oogenesis revealed by genetic interactions with the piRNA pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atikukke, Govindaraja; Albosta, Paul; Zhang, Huamei; Finley, Russell L

    2014-08-01

    Cyclin J (CycJ) is a poorly characterized member of the Cyclin superfamily of cyclin-dependent kinase regulators, many of which regulate the cell cycle or transcription. Although CycJ is conserved in metazoans its cellular function has not been identified and no mutant defects have been described. In Drosophila, CycJ transcript is present primarily in ovaries and very early embryos, suggesting a role in one or both of these tissues. The CycJ gene (CycJ) lies immediately downstream of armitage (armi), a gene involved in the Piwi-associated RNA (piRNA) pathways that are required for silencing transposons in the germline and adjacent somatic cells. Mutations in armi result in oogenesis defects but a role for CycJ in oogenesis has not been defined. Here we assessed oogenesis in CycJ mutants in the presence or absence of mutations in armi or other piRNA pathway genes. CycJ null ovaries appeared normal, indicating that CycJ is not essential for oogenesis under normal conditions. In contrast, armi null ovaries produced only two egg chambers per ovariole and the eggs had severe axis specification defects, as observed previously for armi and other piRNA pathway mutants. Surprisingly, the CycJ armi double mutant failed to produce any mature eggs. The double null ovaries generally had only one egg chamber per ovariole and the egg chambers frequently contained an overabundance of differentiated germline cells. Production of these compound egg chambers could be suppressed with CycJ transgenes but not with mutations in the checkpoint gene mnk, which suppress oogenesis defects in armi mutants. The CycJ null showed similar genetic interactions with the germline and somatic piRNA pathway gene piwi, and to a lesser extent with aubergine (aub), a member of the germline-specific piRNA pathway. The strong genetic interactions between CycJ and piRNA pathway genes reveal a role for CycJ in early oogenesis. Our results suggest that CycJ is required to regulate egg chamber production or

  12. Simultaneous Multiplexed Measurement of RNA and Proteins in Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros Darmanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances have been made in methods to analyze genomes and transcriptomes of single cells, but to fully define cell states, proteins must also be accessed as central actors defining a cell’s phenotype. Methods currently used to analyze endogenous protein expression in single cells are limited in specificity, throughput, or multiplex capability. Here, we present an approach to simultaneously and specifically interrogate large sets of protein and RNA targets in lysates from individual cells, enabling investigations of cell functions and responses. We applied our method to investigate the effects of BMP4, an experimental therapeutic agent, on early-passage glioblastoma cell cultures. We uncovered significant heterogeneity in responses to treatment at levels of RNA and protein, with a subset of cells reacting in a distinct manner to BMP4. Moreover, we found overall poor correlation between protein and RNA at the level of single cells, with proteins more accurately defining responses to treatment.

  13. Fetuin and fetuin messenger RNA in granulosa cells of the rat ovary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Poul Erik; Terkelsen, O B; Grete Byskov, A

    2001-01-01

    during maturation of the oocyte. We demonstrated fetuin mRNA in the rat ovary by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and localized it by in situ hybridization. Fetuin mRNA was present in all granulosa cells of growing and large follicles. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the fetuin...... function in a paracrine manner to maintain the zona pellucida in a penetrable state for fertilization....

  14. DNA computation in mammalian cells: microRNA logic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, James; Deiters, Alexander

    2013-07-17

    DNA computation can utilize logic gates as modules to create molecular computers with biological inputs. Modular circuits that recognize nucleic acid inputs through strand hybridization activate computation cascades to produce controlled outputs. This allows for the construction of synthetic circuits that can be interfaced with cellular environments. We have engineered oligonucleotide AND gates to respond to specific microRNA (miRNA) inputs in live mammalian cells. Both single and dual-sensing miRNA-based computation devices were synthesized for the cell-specific identification of endogenous miR-21 and miR-122. A logic gate response was observed with miRNA expression regulators, exhibiting molecular recognition of miRNA profile changes. Nucleic acid logic gates that are functional in a cellular environment and recognize endogenous inputs significantly expand the potential of DNA computation to monitor, image, and respond to cell-specific markers.

  15. RNA-Seq reveals leaf cuticular wax-related genes in Welsh onion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianchun; Wen, Changlong; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Liying; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yongqin

    2014-01-01

    The waxy cuticle plays a very important role in plant resistance to various biotic and abiotic stresses and is an important characteristic of Welsh onions. Two different types of biangan Welsh onions (BG) were selected for this study: BG, a wild-type covered by wax, which forms a continuous lipid membrane on its epidermal cells, and GLBG, a glossy mutant of BG whose epidermal cells are not covered by wax. To elucidate the waxy cuticle-related gene expression changes, we used RNA-Seq to compare these two Welsh onion varieties with distinct differences in cuticular wax. The de novo assembly yielded 42,881 putative unigenes, 25.41% of which are longer than 1,000 bp. Among the high-quality unique sequences, 22,289 (52.0%) had at least one significant match to an existing gene model. A total of 798 genes, representing 1.86% of the total putative unigenes, were differentially expressed between these two Welsh onion varieties. The expression patterns of four important unigenes that are related to waxy cuticle biosynthesis were confirmed by RT-qPCR and COG class annotation, which demonstrated that these genes play an important role in defense mechanisms and lipid transport and metabolism. To our knowledge, this study is the first exploration of the Welsh onion waxy cuticle. These results may help to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the waxy cuticle and will be useful for waxy gene cloning, genetics and breeding as well as phylogenetic and evolutionary studies of the Welsh onion.

  16. A Pitx2-MicroRNA Pathway Modulates Cell Proliferation in Myoblasts and Skeletal-Muscle Satellite Cells and Promotes Their Commitment to a Myogenic Cell Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Velasco, Estefanía; Vallejo, Daniel; Esteban, Francisco J.; Doherty, Chris; Hernández-Torres, Francisco; Franco, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of a proliferating-cell status from a quiescent state as well as the shift between proliferation and differentiation are key developmental steps in skeletal-muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to provide proper muscle regeneration. However, how satellite cell proliferation is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we report that the c-isoform of the transcription factor Pitx2 increases cell proliferation in myoblasts by downregulating microRNA 15b (miR-15b), miR-23b, miR-106b, and miR-503. This Pitx2c-microRNA (miRNA) pathway also regulates cell proliferation in early-activated satellite cells, enhancing Myf5+ satellite cells and thereby promoting their commitment to a myogenic cell fate. This study reveals unknown functions of several miRNAs in myoblast and satellite cell behavior and thus may have future applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:26055324

  17. HCV RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdel Fatah Fahmy Hanno

    2013-06-27

    Jun 27, 2013 ... Objectives: To study hepatitis virus C (HCV) RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. (PBMCs) of patients with chronic HCV infection, and explore the relationship between the HCV. RNA in the PBMCs and response to interferon (IFN) therapy. Methods: Twenty-five patients with chronic viral hepatitis C ...

  18. Deep sequencing of subseafloor eukaryotic rRNA reveals active Fungi across marine subsurface provinces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Orsi

    Full Text Available The deep marine subsurface is a vast habitat for microbial life where cells may live on geologic timescales. Because DNA in sediments may be preserved on long timescales, ribosomal RNA (rRNA is suggested to be a proxy for the active fraction of a microbial community in the subsurface. During an investigation of eukaryotic 18S rRNA by amplicon pyrosequencing, unique profiles of Fungi were found across a range of marine subsurface provinces including ridge flanks, continental margins, and abyssal plains. Subseafloor fungal populations exhibit statistically significant correlations with total organic carbon (TOC, nitrate, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC. These correlations are supported by terminal restriction length polymorphism (TRFLP analyses of fungal rRNA. Geochemical correlations with fungal pyrosequencing and TRFLP data from this geographically broad sample set suggests environmental selection of active Fungi in the marine subsurface. Within the same dataset, ancient rRNA signatures were recovered from plants and diatoms in marine sediments ranging from 0.03 to 2.7 million years old, suggesting that rRNA from some eukaryotic taxa may be much more stable than previously considered in the marine subsurface.

  19. RNA profiles of porcine embryos during genome activation reveal complex metabolic switch sensitive to in vitro conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Østrup

    Full Text Available Fertilization is followed by complex changes in cytoplasmic composition and extensive chromatin reprogramming which results in the abundant activation of totipotent embryonic genome at embryonic genome activation (EGA. While chromatin reprogramming has been widely studied in several species, only a handful of reports characterize changing transcriptome profiles and resulting metabolic changes in cleavage stage embryos. The aims of the current study were to investigate RNA profiles of in vivo developed (ivv and in vitro produced (ivt porcine embryos before (2-cell stage and after (late 4-cell stage EGA and determine major metabolic changes that regulate totipotency. The period before EGA was dominated by transcripts responsible for cell cycle regulation, mitosis, RNA translation and processing (including ribosomal machinery, protein catabolism, and chromatin remodelling. Following EGA an increase in the abundance of transcripts involved in transcription, translation, DNA metabolism, histone and chromatin modification, as well as protein catabolism was detected. The further analysis of members of overlapping GO terms revealed that despite that comparable cellular processes are taking place before and after EGA (RNA splicing, protein catabolism, different metabolic pathways are involved. This strongly suggests that a complex metabolic switch accompanies EGA. In vitro conditions significantly altered RNA profiles before EGA, and the character of these changes indicates that they originate from oocyte and are imposed either before oocyte aspiration or during in vitro maturation. IVT embryos have altered content of apoptotic factors, cell cycle regulation factors and spindle components, and transcription factors, which all may contribute to reduced developmental competence of embryos produced in vitro. Overall, our data are in good accordance with previously published, genome-wide profiling data in other species. Moreover, comparison with mouse and

  20. Selective microRNA-Offset RNA expression in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Asikainen

    Full Text Available Small RNA molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs, play critical roles in regulating pluripotency, proliferation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. miRNA-offset RNAs (moRNAs are similar in length to miRNAs, align to miRNA precursor (pre-miRNA loci and are therefore believed to derive from processing of the pre-miRNA hairpin sequence. Recent next generation sequencing (NGS studies have reported the presence of moRNAs in human neurons and cancer cells and in several tissues in mouse, including pluripotent stem cells. In order to gain additional knowledge about human moRNAs and their putative development-related expression, we applied NGS of small RNAs in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and fibroblasts. We found that certain moRNA isoforms are notably expressed in hESCs from loci coding for stem cell-selective or cancer-related miRNA clusters. In contrast, we observed only sparse moRNAs in fibroblasts. Consistent with earlier findings, most of the observed moRNAs derived from conserved loci and their expression did not appear to correlate with the expression of the adjacent miRNAs. We provide here the first report of moRNAs in hESCs, and their expression profile in comparison to fibroblasts. Moreover, we expand the repertoire of hESC miRNAs. These findings provide an expansion on the known repertoire of small non-coding RNA contents in hESCs.

  1. Targeting RNA with peptidomimetic oligomers in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamilarasu, N; Huq, I; Rana, T M

    2001-02-26

    Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires specific interactions of Tat protein with the transactivation responsive region (TAR) RNA, a 59-base stem-loop structure located at the 5'-end of all HIV mRNAs. Here we report that two TAR RNA-binding peptidomimetics, oligourea and oligocarbamate, inhibit transcriptional activation by Tat protein in human cells with an IC50 of approximately 0.5 and 1 microM, respectively. Peptidomimetics that can target specific RNA structures provide novel molecules that can be used to control cellular processes involving protein-RNA interactions in vivo.

  2. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Analysis of Infiltrating Neoplastic Cells at the Migrating Front of Human Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros Darmanis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common primary brain cancer in adults and is notoriously difficult to treat because of its diffuse nature. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq on 3,589 cells in a cohort of four patients. We obtained cells from the tumor core as well as surrounding peripheral tissue. Our analysis revealed cellular variation in the tumor’s genome and transcriptome. We were also able to identify infiltrating neoplastic cells in regions peripheral to the core lesions. Despite the existence of significant heterogeneity among neoplastic cells, we found that infiltrating GBM cells share a consistent gene signature between patients, suggesting a common mechanism of infiltration. Additionally, in investigating the immunological response to the tumors, we found transcriptionally distinct myeloid cell populations residing in the tumor core and the surrounding peritumoral space. Our data provide a detailed dissection of GBM cell types, revealing an abundance of information about tumor formation and migration. : Darmanis et al. perform single-cell transcriptomic analyses of neoplastic and stromal cells within and proximal to primary glioblastomas. The authors describe a population of neoplastic-infiltrating glioblastoma cells as well as a putative role of tumor-infiltrating immune cells in supporting tumor growth. Keywords: single cell, RNA-seq, glioma, glioblastoma, GBM, brain, heterogeneity, infiltrating, diffuse, checkpoint

  3. Metformin Induces Growth Inhibition and Cell Cycle Arrest by Upregulating MicroRNA34a in Renal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Wang, Lei; Sheng, Halei; Qiu, Jing; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Le; Yang, Fan; Tang, Dahai; Zhang, Kebin

    2017-01-03

    BACKGROUND Metformin is a widely used biguanide drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has been revaluated as a potential anti-cancer drug with promising activity in various tumors. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the suppression of cancer cells by metformin remain not well understood. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this study, human renal cell carcinoma cell line ACHN was used to investigate the anti-proliferation effect of metformin. A cell counting kit-8 assay was used to detect the cell viability. The cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of cyclin D1 and p27KIP1 was detected by Western blot. The underlying mechanism involving miRNA34a was further investigated by quantitative RT-PCR and transfection with miRNA inhibitor specific for miRNA34a in ACHN, 769-P, and A498 cells. RESULTS Metformin could significantly inhibit the proliferation of ACHN cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the results showed that metformin induced G0/G1 phase arrest and delayed entry into S phase in ACHN cells. It was shown that metformin downregulates the expression of cyclin D1 and increases the p27KIP1 level. Furthermore, metformin increased ACHN cell death. Lastly, miRNA34a was found to be upregulated by metformin in ACHN, 769-P, and A498 cells. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that inhibition of miRNA34a could partially attenuate the suppressive effect of metformin on renal cancer cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS The study data revealed that metformin induced cell growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest partially by upregulating miRNA34a in renal cancer cells.

  4. Deep Sequence Analysis of AgoshRNA Processing Reveals 3’ A Addition and Trimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Harwig

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The RNA interference (RNAi pathway, in which microprocessor and Dicer collaborate to process microRNAs (miRNA, was recently expanded by the description of alternative processing routes. In one of these noncanonical pathways, Dicer action is replaced by the Argonaute2 (Ago2 slicer function. It was recently shown that the stem-length of precursor-miRNA or short hairpin RNA (shRNA molecules is a major determinant for Dicer versus Ago2 processing. Here we present the results of a deep sequence study on the processing of shRNAs with different stem length and a top G·U wobble base pair (bp. This analysis revealed some unexpected properties of these so-called AgoshRNA molecules that are processed by Ago2 instead of Dicer. First, we confirmed the gradual shift from Dicer to Ago2 processing upon shortening of the hairpin length. Second, hairpins with a stem larger than 19 base pair are inefficiently cleaved by Ago2 and we noticed a shift in the cleavage site. Third, the introduction of a top G·U bp in a regular shRNA can promote Ago2-cleavage, which coincides with a loss of Ago2-loading of the Dicer-cleaved 3’ strand. Fourth, the Ago2-processed AgoshRNAs acquire a short 3’ tail of 1–3 A-nucleotides (nt and we present evidence that this product is subsequently trimmed by the poly(A-specific ribonuclease (PARN.

  5. Detection of RNA-Protein Interactions in Living Cells with SHAPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smola, Matthew J; Calabrese, J Mauro; Weeks, Kevin M

    2015-11-24

    SHAPE-MaP is unique among RNA structure probing strategies in that it both measures flexibility at single-nucleotide resolution and quantifies the uncertainties in these measurements. We report a straightforward analytical framework that incorporates these uncertainties to allow detection of RNA structural differences between any two states, and we use it here to detect RNA-protein interactions in healthy mouse trophoblast stem cells. We validate this approach by analysis of three model cytoplasmic and nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes, in 2 min in-cell probing experiments. In contrast, data produced by alternative in-cell SHAPE probing methods correlate poorly (r = 0.2) with those generated by SHAPE-MaP and do not yield accurate signals for RNA-protein interactions. We then examine RNA-protein and RNA-substrate interactions in the RNase MRP complex and, by comparing in-cell interaction sites with disease-associated mutations, characterize these noncoding mutations in terms of molecular phenotype. Together, these results reveal that SHAPE-MaP can define true interaction sites and infer RNA functions under native cellular conditions with limited preexisting knowledge of the proteins or RNAs involved.

  6. Small molecule alteration of RNA sequence in cells and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Lirui; Luo, Yiling; Ja, William W; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-10-18

    RNA regulation and maintenance are critical for proper cell function. Small molecules that specifically alter RNA sequence would be exceptionally useful as probes of RNA structure and function or as potential therapeutics. Here, we demonstrate a photochemical approach for altering the trinucleotide expanded repeat causative of myotonic muscular dystrophy type 1 (DM1), r(CUG)exp. The small molecule, 2H-4-Ru, binds to r(CUG)exp and converts guanosine residues to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine upon photochemical irradiation. We demonstrate targeted modification upon irradiation in cell culture and in Drosophila larvae provided a diet containing 2H-4-Ru. Our results highlight a general chemical biology approach for altering RNA sequence in vivo by using small molecules and photochemistry. Furthermore, these studies show that addition of 8-oxo-G lesions into RNA 3' untranslated regions does not affect its steady state levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Replication competent HIV-1 viruses that express intragenomic microRNA reveal discrete RNA-interference mechanisms that affect viral replication

    OpenAIRE

    Klase Zachary; Houzet Laurent; Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background It remains unclear whether retroviruses can encode and express an intragenomic microRNA (miRNA). Some have suggested that processing by the Drosha and Dicer enzymes might preclude the viability of a replicating retroviral RNA genome that contains a cis-embedded miRNA. To date, while many studies have shown that lentiviral vectors containing miRNAs can transduce mammalian cells and express the inserted miRNA efficiently, no study has examined the impact on the replication o...

  8. Structure of Hepatitis E Virion-Sized Particle Reveals an RNA-Dependent Viral Assembly Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, L.; Wall, J.; Li, T.-C.; Mayazaki, N.; Simon, M. N.; Moore, M.; Wang, C.-Y.; Takeda, N.; Wakita, T.; Miyamura, T.; Cheng, R. H.

    2010-10-22

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) induces acute hepatitis in humans with a high fatality rate in pregnant women. There is a need for anti-HEV research to understand the assembly process of HEV native capsid. Here, we produced a large virion-sized and a small T=1 capsid by expressing the HEV capsid protein in insect cells with and without the N-terminal 111 residues, respectively, for comparative structural analysis. The virion-sized capsid demonstrates a T=3 icosahedral lattice and contains RNA fragment in contrast to the RNA-free T=1 capsid. However, both capsids shared common decameric organization. The in vitro assembly further demonstrated that HEV capsid protein had the intrinsic ability to form decameric intermediate. Our data suggest that RNA binding is the extrinsic factor essential for the assembly of HEV native capsids.

  9. Combined small RNA and degradome sequencing reveals complex microRNA regulation of catechin biosynthesis in tea (Camellia sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Sun

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are endogenous non-coding small RNAs playing crucial regulatory roles in plants. Tea, a globally popular non-alcoholic drink, is rich in health-enhancing catechins. In this study, 69 conserved and 47 novel miRNAs targeting 644 genes were identified by high-throughout sequencing. Predicted target genes of miRNAs were mainly involved in plant growth, signal transduction, morphogenesis and defense. To further identify targets of tea miRNAs, degradome sequencing and RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5'cDNA ends (RLM-RACE were applied. Using degradome sequencing, 26 genes mainly involved in transcription factor, resistance protein and signal transduction protein synthesis were identified as potential miRNA targets, with 5 genes subsequently verified. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR revealed that the expression patterns of novel-miR1, novel-miR2, csn-miR160a, csn-miR162a, csn-miR394 and csn-miR396a were negatively correlated with catechin content. The expression of six miRNAs (csn-miRNA167a, csn-miR2593e, csn-miR4380a, csn-miR3444b, csn-miR5251 and csn-miR7777-5p.1 and their target genes involved in catechin biosynthesis were also analyzed by qRT-PCR. Negative and positive correlations were found between these miRNAs and catechin contents, while positive correlations were found between their target genes and catechin content. This result suggests that these miRNAs may negatively regulate catechin biosynthesis by down-regulating their biosynthesis-related target genes. Taken together, our results indicate that miRNAs are crucial regulators in tea, with the results of 5'-RLM-RACE and expression analyses revealing the important role of miRNAs in catechin anabolism. Our findings should facilitate future research to elucidate the function of miRNAs in catechin biosynthesis.

  10. Immune monitoring using mRNA-transfected dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by m......RNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate...... and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA....

  11. Dissection of Dom34-Hbs1 reveals independent functions in two RNA quality control pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Elzen, Antonia M G; Henri, Julien; Lazar, Noureddine; Gas, María Eugenia; Durand, Dominique; Lacroute, François; Nicaise, Magali; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Séraphin, Bertrand; Graille, Marc

    2010-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells have several quality control pathways that rely on translation to detect and degrade defective RNAs. Dom34 and Hbs1 are two proteins that are related to translation termination factors and are involved in no-go decay (NGD) and nonfunctional 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) decay (18S NRD) pathways that eliminate RNAs that cause strong ribosomal stalls. Here we present the structure of Hbs1 with and without GDP and a low-resolution model of the Dom34-Hbs1 complex. This complex mimics complexes of the elongation factor and transfer RNA or of the translation termination factors eRF1 and eRF3, supporting the idea that it binds to the ribosomal A-site. We show that nucleotide binding by Hbs1 is essential for NGD and 18S NRD. Mutations in Hbs1 that disrupted the interaction between Dom34 and Hbs1 strongly impaired NGD but had almost no effect on 18S NRD. Hence, NGD and 18S NRD could be genetically uncoupled, suggesting that mRNA and rRNA in a stalled translation complex may not always be degraded simultaneously.

  12. Engineered ribosomal RNA operon copy-number variants of E. coli reveal the evolutionary trade-offs shaping rRNA operon number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyorfy, Zsuzsanna; Draskovits, Gabor; Vernyik, Viktor; Blattner, Frederick F; Gaal, Tamas; Posfai, Gyorgy

    2015-02-18

    Ribosomal RNA (rrn) operons, characteristically present in several copies in bacterial genomes (7 in E. coli), play a central role in cellular physiology. We investigated the factors determining the optimal number of rrn operons in E. coli by constructing isogenic variants with 5-10 operons. We found that the total RNA and protein content, as well as the size of the cells reflected the number of rrn operons. While growth parameters showed only minor differences, competition experiments revealed a clear pattern: 7-8 copies were optimal under conditions of fluctuating, occasionally rich nutrient influx and lower numbers were favored in stable, nutrient-limited environments. We found that the advantages of quick adjustment to nutrient availability, rapid growth and economic regulation of ribosome number all contribute to the selection of the optimal rrn operon number. Our results suggest that the wt rrn operon number of E. coli reflects the natural, 'feast and famine' life-style of the bacterium, however, different copy numbers might be beneficial under different environmental conditions. Understanding the impact of the copy number of rrn operons on the fitness of the cell is an important step towards the creation of functional and robust genomes, the ultimate goal of synthetic biology. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Replication competent HIV-1 viruses that express intragenomic microRNA reveal discrete RNA-interference mechanisms that affect viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klase, Zachary; Houzet, Laurent; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2011-11-23

    It remains unclear whether retroviruses can encode and express an intragenomic microRNA (miRNA). Some have suggested that processing by the Drosha and Dicer enzymes might preclude the viability of a replicating retroviral RNA genome that contains a cis-embedded miRNA. To date, while many studies have shown that lentiviral vectors containing miRNAs can transduce mammalian cells and express the inserted miRNA efficiently, no study has examined the impact on the replication of a lentivirus such as HIV-1 after the deliberate intragenomic insertion of a bona fide miRNA. We have constructed several HIV-1 molecular clones, each containing a discrete cellular miRNA positioned in Nef. These retroviral genomes express the inserted miRNA and are generally replication competent in T-cells. The inserted intragenomic miRNA was observed to elicit two different consequences for HIV-1 replication. First, the expression of miRNAs with predicted target sequences in the HIV-1 genome was found to reduce viral replication. Second, in one case, where an inserted miRNA was unusually well-processed by Drosha, this processing event inhibited viral replication. This is the first study to examine in detail the replication competence of HIV-1 genomes that express cis-embedded miRNAs. The results indicate that a replication competent retroviral genome is not precluded from encoding and expressing a viral miRNA.

  14. RNA Contaminates Glycosaminoglycans Extracted from Cells and Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper J van Gemst

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are linear negatively charged polysaccharides and important components of extracellular matrices and cell surface glycan layers such as the endothelial glycocalyx. The GAG family includes sulfated heparin, heparan sulfate (HS, dermatan sulfate (DS, chondroitin sulfate (CS, keratan sulfate, and non-sulfated hyaluronan. Because relative expression of GAGs is dependent on cell-type and niche, isolating GAGs from cell cultures and tissues may provide insight into cell- and tissue-specific GAG structure and functions. In our objective to obtain structural information about the GAGs expressed on a specialized mouse glomerular endothelial cell culture (mGEnC-1 we adapted a recently published GAG isolation protocol, based on cell lysis, proteinase K and DNase I digestion. Analysis of the GAGs contributing to the mGEnC-1 glycocalyx indicated a large HS and a minor CS content on barium acetate gel. However, isolated GAGs appeared resistant to enzymatic digestion by heparinases. We found that these GAG extracts were heavily contaminated with RNA, which co-migrated with HS in barium acetate gel electrophoresis and interfered with 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB assays, resulting in an overestimation of GAG yields. We hypothesized that RNA may be contaminating GAG extracts from other cell cultures and possibly tissue, and therefore investigated potential RNA contaminations in GAG extracts from two additional cell lines, human umbilical vein endothelial cells and retinal pigmental epithelial cells, and mouse kidney, liver, spleen and heart tissue. GAG extracts from all examined cell lines and tissues contained varying amounts of contaminating RNA, which interfered with GAG quantification using DMMB assays and characterization of GAGs by barium acetate gel electrophoresis. We therefore recommend routinely evaluating the RNA content of GAG extracts and propose a robust protocol for GAG isolation that includes an RNA digestion step.

  15. RNA Contaminates Glycosaminoglycans Extracted from Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemst, Jasper J; Loeven, Markus A; de Graaf, Mark J J; Berden, Jo H M; Rabelink, Ton J; Smit, Cornelis H; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear negatively charged polysaccharides and important components of extracellular matrices and cell surface glycan layers such as the endothelial glycocalyx. The GAG family includes sulfated heparin, heparan sulfate (HS), dermatan sulfate (DS), chondroitin sulfate (CS), keratan sulfate, and non-sulfated hyaluronan. Because relative expression of GAGs is dependent on cell-type and niche, isolating GAGs from cell cultures and tissues may provide insight into cell- and tissue-specific GAG structure and functions. In our objective to obtain structural information about the GAGs expressed on a specialized mouse glomerular endothelial cell culture (mGEnC-1) we adapted a recently published GAG isolation protocol, based on cell lysis, proteinase K and DNase I digestion. Analysis of the GAGs contributing to the mGEnC-1 glycocalyx indicated a large HS and a minor CS content on barium acetate gel. However, isolated GAGs appeared resistant to enzymatic digestion by heparinases. We found that these GAG extracts were heavily contaminated with RNA, which co-migrated with HS in barium acetate gel electrophoresis and interfered with 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assays, resulting in an overestimation of GAG yields. We hypothesized that RNA may be contaminating GAG extracts from other cell cultures and possibly tissue, and therefore investigated potential RNA contaminations in GAG extracts from two additional cell lines, human umbilical vein endothelial cells and retinal pigmental epithelial cells, and mouse kidney, liver, spleen and heart tissue. GAG extracts from all examined cell lines and tissues contained varying amounts of contaminating RNA, which interfered with GAG quantification using DMMB assays and characterization of GAGs by barium acetate gel electrophoresis. We therefore recommend routinely evaluating the RNA content of GAG extracts and propose a robust protocol for GAG isolation that includes an RNA digestion step.

  16. Illumina microRNA profiles reveal the involvement of miR397a in Citrus adaptation to long-term boron toxicity via modulating secondary cell-wall biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Hao; Qi, Yi-Ping; Wen, Shou-Xing; Guo, Peng; Chen, Xiao-Min; Chen, Li-Song

    2016-03-10

    The mechanisms underlying tolerance to B-toxicity in plants are still controversial. Our previous studies indicated that B-toxicity is mainly limited to leaves in Citrus and that alternations of cell-wall structure in vascular bundles are involved in tolerance to B-toxicity. Here, miRNAs and their expression patterns were first identified in B-treated Citrus sinensis (tolerant) and C. grandis (intolerant) leaves via high-throughput sequencing. Candidate miRNAs were then verified with molecular and anatomical approaches. The results showed that 51 miRNAs in C. grandis and 20 miRNAs in C. sinensis were differentially expressed after B-toxic treatment. MiR395a and miR397a were the most significantly up-regulated miRNAs in B-toxic C. grandis leaves, but both were down-regulated in B-toxic C. sinensis leaves. Four auxin response factor genes and two laccase (LAC) genes were confirmed through 5'-RACE to be real targets of miR160a and miR397a, respectively. Up-regulation of LAC4 resulted in secondary deposition of cell-wall polysaccharides in vessel elements of C. sinensis, whereas down-regulation of both LAC17 and LAC4, led to poorly developed vessel elements in C. grandis. Our findings demonstrated that miR397a plays a pivotal role in woody Citrus tolerance to B-toxicity by targeting LAC17 and LAC4, both of which are responsible for secondary cell-wall synthesis.

  17. Nuclear RNA sequencing of the mouse erythroid cell transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Mitchell

    Full Text Available In addition to protein coding genes a substantial proportion of mammalian genomes are transcribed. However, most transcriptome studies investigate steady-state mRNA levels, ignoring a considerable fraction of the transcribed genome. In addition, steady-state mRNA levels are influenced by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, and thus do not provide a clear picture of transcriptional output. Here, using deep sequencing of nuclear RNAs (nucRNA-Seq in parallel with chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq of active RNA polymerase II, we compared the nuclear transcriptome of mouse anemic spleen erythroid cells with polymerase occupancy on a genome-wide scale. We demonstrate that unspliced transcripts quantified by nucRNA-seq correlate with primary transcript frequencies measured by RNA FISH, but differ from steady-state mRNA levels measured by poly(A-enriched RNA-seq. Highly expressed protein coding genes showed good correlation between RNAPII occupancy and transcriptional output; however, genome-wide we observed a poor correlation between transcriptional output and RNAPII association. This poor correlation is due to intergenic regions associated with RNAPII which correspond with transcription factor bound regulatory regions and a group of stable, nuclear-retained long non-coding transcripts. In conclusion, sequencing the nuclear transcriptome provides an opportunity to investigate the transcriptional landscape in a given cell type through quantification of unspliced primary transcripts and the identification of nuclear-retained long non-coding RNAs.

  18. m6A RNA Methylation Regulates the Self-Renewal and Tumorigenesis of Glioblastoma Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Cui

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA modifications play critical roles in important biological processes. However, the functions of N6-methyladenosine (m6A mRNA modification in cancer biology and cancer stem cells remain largely unknown. Here, we show that m6A mRNA modification is critical for glioblastoma stem cell (GSC self-renewal and tumorigenesis. Knockdown of METTL3 or METTL14, key components of the RNA methyltransferase complex, dramatically promotes human GSC growth, self-renewal, and tumorigenesis. In contrast, overexpression of METTL3 or inhibition of the RNA demethylase FTO suppresses GSC growth and self-renewal. Moreover, inhibition of FTO suppresses tumor progression and prolongs lifespan of GSC-grafted mice substantially. m6A sequencing reveals that knockdown of METTL3 or METTL14 induced changes in mRNA m6A enrichment and altered mRNA expression of genes (e.g., ADAM19 with critical biological functions in GSCs. In summary, this study identifies the m6A mRNA methylation machinery as promising therapeutic targets for glioblastoma.

  19. m6A RNA Methylation Regulates the Self-Renewal and Tumorigenesis of Glioblastoma Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qi; Shi, Hailing; Ye, Peng; Li, Li; Qu, Qiuhao; Sun, Guoqiang; Sun, Guihua; Lu, Zhike; Huang, Yue; Yang, Cai-Guang; Riggs, Arthur D; He, Chuan; Shi, Yanhong

    2017-03-14

    RNA modifications play critical roles in important biological processes. However, the functions of N6-methyladenosine (m6A) mRNA modification in cancer biology and cancer stem cells remain largely unknown. Here, we show that m6A mRNA modification is critical for glioblastoma stem cell (GSC) self-renewal and tumorigenesis. Knockdown of METTL3 or METTL14, key components of the RNA methyltransferase complex, dramatically promotes human GSC growth, self-renewal, and tumorigenesis. In contrast, overexpression of METTL3 or inhibition of the RNA demethylase FTO suppresses GSC growth and self-renewal. Moreover, inhibition of FTO suppresses tumor progression and prolongs lifespan of GSC-grafted mice substantially. m6A sequencing reveals that knockdown of METTL3 or METTL14 induced changes in mRNA m6A enrichment and altered mRNA expression of genes (e.g., ADAM19) with critical biological functions in GSCs. In summary, this study identifies the m6A mRNA methylation machinery as promising therapeutic targets for glioblastoma. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiaofei [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036 (China); Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); Wang, Aiming, E-mail: aiming.wang@agr.gc.ca [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  1. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirando, Adam C; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K; Ebert, Alicia M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S

    2015-08-14

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans.

  2. Rapid identification of cell-specific, internalizing RNA aptamers with bioinformatics analyses of a cell-based aptamer selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Thiel

    Full Text Available The broad applicability of RNA aptamers as cell-specific delivery tools for therapeutic reagents depends on the ability to identify aptamer sequences that selectively access the cytoplasm of distinct cell types. Towards this end, we have developed a novel approach that combines a cell-based selection method (cell-internalization SELEX with high-throughput sequencing (HTS and bioinformatics analyses to rapidly identify cell-specific, internalization-competent RNA aptamers.We demonstrate the utility of this approach by enriching for RNA aptamers capable of selective internalization into vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. Several rounds of positive (VSMCs and negative (endothelial cells; ECs selection were performed to enrich for aptamer sequences that preferentially internalize into VSMCs. To identify candidate RNA aptamer sequences, HTS data from each round of selection were analyzed using bioinformatics methods: (1 metrics of selection enrichment; and (2 pairwise comparisons of sequence and structural similarity, termed edit and tree distance, respectively. Correlation analyses of experimentally validated aptamers or rounds revealed that the best cell-specific, internalizing aptamers are enriched as a result of the negative selection step performed against ECs.We describe a novel approach that combines cell-internalization SELEX with HTS and bioinformatics analysis to identify cell-specific, cell-internalizing RNA aptamers. Our data highlight the importance of performing a pre-clear step against a non-target cell in order to select for cell-specific aptamers. We expect the extended use of this approach to enable the identification of aptamers to a multitude of different cell types, thereby facilitating the broad development of targeted cell therapies.

  3. Rapid identification of cell-specific, internalizing RNA aptamers with bioinformatics analyses of a cell-based aptamer selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, William H; Bair, Thomas; Peek, Andrew S; Liu, Xiuying; Dassie, Justin; Stockdale, Katie R; Behlke, Mark A; Miller, Francis J; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2012-01-01

    The broad applicability of RNA aptamers as cell-specific delivery tools for therapeutic reagents depends on the ability to identify aptamer sequences that selectively access the cytoplasm of distinct cell types. Towards this end, we have developed a novel approach that combines a cell-based selection method (cell-internalization SELEX) with high-throughput sequencing (HTS) and bioinformatics analyses to rapidly identify cell-specific, internalization-competent RNA aptamers. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by enriching for RNA aptamers capable of selective internalization into vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Several rounds of positive (VSMCs) and negative (endothelial cells; ECs) selection were performed to enrich for aptamer sequences that preferentially internalize into VSMCs. To identify candidate RNA aptamer sequences, HTS data from each round of selection were analyzed using bioinformatics methods: (1) metrics of selection enrichment; and (2) pairwise comparisons of sequence and structural similarity, termed edit and tree distance, respectively. Correlation analyses of experimentally validated aptamers or rounds revealed that the best cell-specific, internalizing aptamers are enriched as a result of the negative selection step performed against ECs. We describe a novel approach that combines cell-internalization SELEX with HTS and bioinformatics analysis to identify cell-specific, cell-internalizing RNA aptamers. Our data highlight the importance of performing a pre-clear step against a non-target cell in order to select for cell-specific aptamers. We expect the extended use of this approach to enable the identification of aptamers to a multitude of different cell types, thereby facilitating the broad development of targeted cell therapies.

  4. RNA-Seq and molecular docking reveal multi-level pesticide resistance in the bed bug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamidala Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius are hematophagous nocturnal parasites of humans that have attained high impact status due to their worldwide resurgence. The sudden and rampant resurgence of C. lectularius has been attributed to numerous factors including frequent international travel, narrower pest management practices, and insecticide resistance. Results We performed a next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq experiment to find differentially expressed genes between pesticide-resistant (PR and pesticide-susceptible (PS strains of C. lectularius. A reference transcriptome database of 51,492 expressed sequence tags (ESTs was created by combining the databases derived from de novo assembled mRNA-Seq tags (30,404 ESTs and our previous 454 pyrosequenced database (21,088 ESTs. The two-way GLMseq analysis revealed ~15,000 highly significant differentially expressed ESTs between the PR and PS strains. Among the top 5,000 differentially expressed ESTs, 109 putative defense genes (cuticular proteins, cytochrome P450s, antioxidant genes, ABC transporters, glutathione S-transferases, carboxylesterases and acetyl cholinesterase involved in penetration resistance and metabolic resistance were identified. Tissue and development-specific expression of P450 CYP3 clan members showed high mRNA levels in the cuticle, Malpighian tubules, and midgut; and in early instar nymphs, respectively. Lastly, molecular modeling and docking of a candidate cytochrome P450 (CYP397A1V2 revealed the flexibility of the deduced protein to metabolize a broad range of insecticide substrates including DDT, deltamethrin, permethrin, and imidacloprid. Conclusions We developed significant molecular resources for C. lectularius putatively involved in metabolic resistance as well as those participating in other modes of insecticide resistance. RNA-Seq profiles of PR strains combined with tissue-specific profiles and molecular docking revealed multi-level insecticide

  5. m6A RNA Modification Determines Cell Fate by Regulating mRNA Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Minjun; Liu, Xinhui; Zheng, Xiaotong; Huang, Yinghui; Chen, Xuechai

    2017-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that epitranscriptional modifications influence multiple cellular processes. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), as the most abundant reversible methylation of mRNA, has also been reported to play critical roles in modulating embryonic stem cell differentiation and somatic cell reprogramming by regulating gene expression. This review examined the characteristics of m6A, including the distribution profile and currently discovered "writer," "eraser," and "reader" proteins. Moreover, the hypothesis is proposed that m6A could influence cell fate determination, and the underlying mechanisms are due to the related mRNA degradation, causing weakening of previous cell characteristics and eventually leading them to develop into the reverse direction (pluripotency or differentiation state). Accordingly, m6A modifications presented its potential role in cell fate determination, which provides new insights into understanding the mechanisms of various diseases.

  6. Comprehensive Analysis of mRNA Methylation Reveals Enrichment in 3' UTRs and Near Stop Codons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kate D.; Saletore, Yogesh; Zumbo, Paul; Elemento, Olivier; Mason, Christopher E.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Methylation of the N6 position of adenosine (m6A) is a post-transcriptional modification of RNA whose prevalence and physiological relevance is poorly understood. The recent discovery that FTO, an obesity risk gene, encodes an m6A demethylase implicates m6A as an important regulator of physiological processes. Here we present a method for transcriptome-wide m6A localization, which combines m6A-specific methylated RNA immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing (MeRIP-Seq). We use this method to identify mRNAs of 7,676 mammalian genes that contain m6A, indicating that m6A is a common base modification of mRNA. The m6A modification exhibits tissue-specific regulation and is markedly increased throughout brain development. We find that m6A sites are enriched near stop codons and in 3' UTRs, and we uncover an association between m6A residues and microRNA binding sites within 3' UTRs. These findings provide a resource for identifying transcripts that are substrates for adenosine methylation and reveal insights into the epigenetic regulation of the mammalian transcriptome. PMID:22608085

  7. Signatures of Nucleotide Analog Incorporation by an RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Revealed Using High-Throughput Magnetic Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulin, D.; Arnold, Jamie J.; van Laar, T.; Oh, Hyung Suk; Lee, Cheri; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Depken, S.M.; Cameron, Craig E.; Dekker, N.H.

    2017-01-01

    RNA viruses pose a threat to public health that is exacerbated by the dearth of antiviral therapeutics. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) holds promise as a broad-spectrum, therapeutic target because of the conserved nature of the nucleotide-substrate-binding and catalytic sites.

  8. Live Cell Imaging of Endogenous mRNA Using RNA-Based Fluorescence "Turn-On" Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wei Qiang; Citron, Y Rose; Sekine, Sayaka; Huang, Bo

    2017-01-20

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) plays a critical role in cellular growth and development. However, there have been limited methods available to visualize endogenous mRNA in living cells with ease. We have designed RNA-based fluorescence "turn-on" probes that target mRNA by fusing an unstable form of Spinach with target-complementary sequences. These probes have been demonstrated to be selective, stable, and capable of targeting various mRNAs for live E. coli imaging.

  9. Comparative RNA-Seq analysis reveals pervasive tissue-specific alternative polyadenylation in Caenorhabditis elegans intestine and muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazie, Stephen M; Babb, Cody; Wilky, Henry; Rawls, Alan; Park, Jin G; Mangone, Marco

    2015-01-20

    Tissue-specific RNA plasticity broadly impacts the development, tissue identity and adaptability of all organisms, but changes in composition, expression levels and its impact on gene regulation in different somatic tissues are largely unknown. Here we developed a new method, polyA-tagging and sequencing (PAT-Seq) to isolate high-quality tissue-specific mRNA from Caenorhabditis elegans intestine, pharynx and body muscle tissues and study changes in their tissue-specific transcriptomes and 3'UTRomes. We have identified thousands of novel genes and isoforms differentially expressed between these three tissues. The intestine transcriptome is expansive, expressing over 30% of C. elegans mRNAs, while muscle transcriptomes are smaller but contain characteristic unique gene signatures. Active promoter regions in all three tissues reveal both known and novel enriched tissue-specific elements, along with putative transcription factors, suggesting novel tissue-specific modes of transcription initiation. We have precisely mapped approximately 20,000 tissue-specific polyadenylation sites and discovered that about 30% of transcripts in somatic cells use alternative polyadenylation in a tissue-specific manner, with their 3'UTR isoforms significantly enriched with microRNA targets. For the first time, PAT-Seq allowed us to directly study tissue specific gene expression changes in an in vivo setting and compare these changes between three somatic tissues from the same organism at single-base resolution within the same experiment. We pinpoint precise tissue-specific transcriptome rearrangements and for the first time link tissue-specific alternative polyadenylation to miRNA regulation, suggesting novel and unexplored tissue-specific post-transcriptional regulatory networks in somatic cells.

  10. Normalizing single-cell RNA sequencing data: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejos, Catalina A; Risso, Davide; Scialdone, Antonio; Dudoit, Sandrine; Marioni, John C

    2017-06-01

    Single-cell transcriptomics is becoming an important component of the molecular biologist's toolkit. A critical step when analyzing data generated using this technology is normalization. However, normalization is typically performed using methods developed for bulk RNA sequencing or even microarray data, and the suitability of these methods for single-cell transcriptomics has not been assessed. We here discuss commonly used normalization approaches and illustrate how these can produce misleading results. Finally, we present alternative approaches and provide recommendations for single-cell RNA sequencing users.

  11. HCV RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdel Fatah Fahmy Hanno

    2013-06-27

    Jun 27, 2013 ... Abstract Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been found to infect peripheral blood mono- nuclear cells (PBMCs), using them as a reservoir, which might contribute to the development of resistance to treatment. Objectives: To study hepatitis virus C (HCV) RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  12. HCV RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been found to infect peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), using them as a reservoir, which might contribute to the development of resistance to treatment. Objectives: To study hepatitis virus C (HCV) RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with ...

  13. Transient Gene and miRNA Expression Profile Changes of Confluent Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity or an altered gravity environment from the static 1 gravitational constant has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of the cells. Whether non-dividing cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted on the International Space Station, confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days for investigations of gene and miRNA (microRNA) expression profile changes in these cells. A fibroblast is a type of cell that synthesizes the extracellular matrix and collagen, the structural framework for tissues, and plays a critical role in wound healing and other functions. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly even though they were confluent, as measured by the expression of the protein Ki-67 positive cells, and the cells in space grew slightly faster. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NF(sub kappa)B (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) and other growth related pathways involving HGF and VEGF in the flown cells. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-dividing, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples in respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeleton changes by immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for alpha-tubulin showed no difference between the flight and ground samples. Results of our study suggest that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells, microgravity in

  14. Single cell RNA sequencing to dissect the molecular heterogeneity in lupus nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der, Evan; Ranabothu, Saritha; Suryawanshi, Hemant; Akat, Kemal M.; Clancy, Robert; Kustagi, Manjunath; Czuppa, Mareike; Izmirly, Peter; Belmont, H. Michael; Wang, Tao; Jordan, Nicole; Bornkamp, Nicole; Nwaukoni, Janet; Martinez, July; Buyon, Jill P.; Tuschl, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is a leading cause of mortality among systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, and its heterogeneous nature poses a significant challenge to the development of effective diagnostics and treatments. Single cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) offers a potential solution to dissect the heterogeneity of the disease and enables the study of similar cell types distant from the site of renal injury to identify novel biomarkers. We applied scRNA-seq to human renal and skin biopsy tissues and demonstrated that scRNA-seq can be performed on samples obtained during routine care. Chronicity index, IgG deposition, and quantity of proteinuria correlated with a transcriptomic-based score composed of IFN-inducible genes in renal tubular cells. Furthermore, analysis of cumulative expression profiles of single cell keratinocytes dissociated from nonlesional, non–sun-exposed skin of patients with lupus nephritis also revealed upregulation of IFN-inducible genes compared with keratinocytes isolated from healthy controls. This indicates the possible use of scRNA-seq analysis of skin biopsies as a biomarker of renal disease. These data support the potential utility of scRNA-seq to provide new insights into the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis and pave the way for exploiting a readily accessible tissue to reflect injury in the kidney. PMID:28469080

  15. Transcriptome analysis reveals non-identical microRNA profiles between arterial and venous plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoheng; Geng, Bin; Cui, Qinghua

    2017-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs presented in venous plasma have been demonstrated as powerful biomarkers for the complex diseases like cancer. Nevertheless, those presented in arterial plasma remained largely unexplored. Here, using microarray technique, we compared microRNA expression profiles of the matched arterial and venous plasma samples from the same male rats. Though the microRNA profiles were largely similar, we identified 24 differentially expressed microRNAs, including 10 arterial highly expressed microRNAs and 14 venous highly expressed microRNAs. The differentially expressed microRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Computational analysis of these microRNAs and their targets indicated that arterial highly expressed microRNAs were overrepresented for functional terms like hematopoiesis and diseases like Crohn's Disease and leukemia; while venous highly expressed microRNAs were enriched for cell differentiation function, and diseases like distal myopathies and heart failure. Our analysis also suggested significant correlations between plasma microRNA expression and tissue microRNA expression. Four arterial highly expressed microRNAs also showed enriched expression in specific tissues and would be novel biomarker candidates. PMID:28212530

  16. Quantitative interaction screen of telomeric repeat-containing RNA reveals novel TERRA regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Marion; Arnoult, Nausica; Kappei, Dennis; Buchholz, Frank; Decottignies, Anabelle; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Telomeres are actively transcribed into telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), which has been implicated in the regulation of telomere length and heterochromatin formation. Here, we applied quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to obtain a high-confidence interactome of TERRA. Using SILAC-labeled nuclear cell lysates in an RNA pull-down experiment and two different salt conditions, we distinguished 115 proteins binding specifically to TERRA out of a large set of background binders. While TERRA binders identified in two previous studies showed little overlap, using quantitative mass spectrometry we obtained many candidates reported in these two studies. To test whether novel candidates found here are involved in TERRA regulation, we performed an esiRNA-based interference analysis for 15 of them. Knockdown of 10 genes encoding candidate proteins significantly affected total cellular levels of TERRA, and RNAi of five candidates perturbed TERRA recruitment to telomeres. Notably, depletion of SRRT/ARS2, involved in miRNA processing, up-regulated both total and telomere-bound TERRA. Conversely, knockdown of MORF4L2, a component of the NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex, reduced TERRA levels both globally and for telomere-bound TERRA. We thus identified new proteins involved in the homeostasis and telomeric abundance of TERRA, extending our knowledge of TERRA regulation.

  17. Long Noncoding RNA MALAT-1 Enhances Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jiao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs play a vital role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, chemoresistance, and recurrence. The mechanisms that maintain the stemness of these cells remain largely unknown. Our previous study indicated that MALAT-1 may serve as an oncogenic long noncoding RNA in pancreatic cancer by promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and regulating CSCs markers expression. More significantly, there is emerging evidence that the EMT process may give rise to CSCs, or at least cells with stem cell-like properties. Therefore, we hypothesized that MALAT-1 might enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, our data showed that MALAT-1 could increase the proportion of pancreatic CSCs, maintain self-renewing capacity, decrease the chemosensitivity to anticancer drugs, and accelerate tumor angiogenesis in vitro. In addition, subcutaneous nude mouse xenografts revealed that MALAT-1 could promote tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. The underlying mechanisms may involve in increased expression of self-renewal related factors Sox2. Collectively, we for the first time found the potential effects of MALAT-1 on the stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells, suggesting a novel role of MALAT-1 in tumor stemness, which remains to be fully elucidated.

  18. Maize (Zea mays L. genome diversity as revealed by RNA-sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice N Hansey

    Full Text Available Maize is rich in genetic and phenotypic diversity. Understanding the sequence, structural, and expression variation that contributes to phenotypic diversity would facilitate more efficient varietal improvement. RNA based sequencing (RNA-seq is a powerful approach for transcriptional analysis, assessing sequence variation, and identifying novel transcript sequences, particularly in large, complex, repetitive genomes such as maize. In this study, we sequenced RNA from whole seedlings of 21 maize inbred lines representing diverse North American and exotic germplasm. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP detection identified 351,710 polymorphic loci distributed throughout the genome covering 22,830 annotated genes. Tight clustering of two distinct heterotic groups and exotic lines was evident using these SNPs as genetic markers. Transcript abundance analysis revealed minimal variation in the total number of genes expressed across these 21 lines (57.1% to 66.0%. However, the transcribed gene set among the 21 lines varied, with 48.7% expressed in all of the lines, 27.9% expressed in one to 20 lines, and 23.4% expressed in none of the lines. De novo assembly of RNA-seq reads that did not map to the reference B73 genome sequence revealed 1,321 high confidence novel transcripts, of which, 564 loci were present in all 21 lines, including B73, and 757 loci were restricted to a subset of the lines. RT-PCR validation demonstrated 87.5% concordance with the computational prediction of these expressed novel transcripts. Intriguingly, 145 of the novel de novo assembled loci were present in lines from only one of the two heterotic groups consistent with the hypothesis that, in addition to sequence polymorphisms and transcript abundance, transcript presence/absence variation is present and, thereby, may be a mechanism contributing to the genetic basis of heterosis.

  19. MicroRNA Profiling Reveals Marker of Motor Neuron Disease in ALS Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoye, Mariah L; Koval, Erica D; Wegener, Amy J; Hyman, Theodore S; Yang, Chengran; O'Brien, David R; Miller, Rebecca L; Cole, Tracy; Schoch, Kathleen M; Shen, Tao; Kunikata, Tomonori; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Gutmann, David H; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; Dougherty, Joseph D; Miller, Timothy M

    2017-05-31

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder marked by the loss of motor neurons (MNs) in the brain and spinal cord, leading to fatally debilitating weakness. Because this disease predominantly affects MNs, we aimed to characterize the distinct expression profile of that cell type to elucidate underlying disease mechanisms and to identify novel targets that inform on MN health during ALS disease time course. microRNAs (miRNAs) are short, noncoding RNAs that can shape the expression profile of a cell and thus often exhibit cell-type-enriched expression. To determine MN-enriched miRNA expression, we used Cre recombinase-dependent miRNA tagging and affinity purification in mice. By defining the in vivo miRNA expression of MNs, all neurons, astrocytes, and microglia, we then focused on MN-enriched miRNAs via a comparative analysis and found that they may functionally distinguish MNs postnatally from other spinal neurons. Characterizing the levels of the MN-enriched miRNAs in CSF harvested from ALS models of MN disease demonstrated that one miRNA (miR-218) tracked with MN loss and was responsive to an ALS therapy in rodent models. Therefore, we have used cellular expression profiling tools to define the distinct miRNA expression of MNs, which is likely to enrich future studies of MN disease. This approach enabled the development of a novel, drug-responsive marker of MN disease in ALS rodents.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease in which motor neurons (MNs) in the brain and spinal cord are selectively lost. To develop tools to aid in our understanding of the distinct expression profiles of MNs and, ultimately, to monitor MN disease progression, we identified small regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) that were highly enriched or exclusive in MNs. The signal for one of these MN-enriched miRNAs is detectable in spinal tap biofluid from an ALS rat model, where its levels change as disease

  20. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma: micro-RNA expression profiling and comparison with clear cell renal cell carcinoma and papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Enrico; Marchionni, Luigi; Chitre, Apurva; Hayashi, Masamichi; Martignoni, Guido; Brunelli, Matteo; Gobbo, Stefano; Argani, Pedram; Allaf, Mohamad; Hoque, Mohammad O; Netto, George J

    2014-06-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) is a low-grade renal neoplasm with morphological characteristics mimicking both clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) and papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC). However, despite some overlapping features, their morphological, immunohistochemical, and molecular profiles are distinct. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression and are involved in various biological processes, including cancer development. To better understand the biology of this tumor, we aimed to analyze the miRNA expression profile of a set of CCPRCC using microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A total of 15 cases diagnosed as CCPRCC were used in this study. Among the most differentially expressed miRNA in CCPRCC, we found miR-210, miR-122, miR-34a, miR-21, miR-34b*, and miR-489 to be up-regulated, whereas miR-4284, miR-1202, miR-135a, miR-1973, and miR-204 were down-regulated compared with normal renal parenchyma. To identify consensus of differentially regulated miRNA between CCPRCC, CCRCC, and PRCC, we additionally determined differential miRNA expression using 2 publically available microarray data sets from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database (GSE41282 and GSE3798). This comparison revealed that the miRNA expression profile of CCPRCC shows some overlapping characteristics between CCRCC and PRCC. Moreover, CCPRCC lacks dysregulation of important miRNAs typically associated with aggressive behavior. In summary, we describe the miRNA expression profile of a relatively infrequent type of renal cancer. Our results may help in understanding the molecular underpinning of this newly recognized entity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Integrated analysis of microRNA and gene expression profiles reveals a functional regulatory module associated with liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhao, Wenshan; Yang, Aiting; Xu, Anjian; Wang, Huan; Cong, Min; Liu, Tianhui; Wang, Ping; You, Hong

    2017-12-15

    Liver fibrosis, characterized with the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, represents the final common pathway of chronic liver inflammation. Ever-increasing evidence indicates microRNAs (miRNAs) dysregulation has important implications in the different stages of liver fibrosis. However, our knowledge of miRNA-gene regulation details pertaining to such disease remains unclear. The publicly available Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets of patients suffered from cirrhosis were extracted for integrated analysis. Differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs) and genes (DEGs) were identified using GEO2R web tool. Putative target gene prediction of DEMs was carried out using the intersection of five major algorithms: DIANA-microT, TargetScan, miRanda, PICTAR5 and miRWalk. Functional miRNA-gene regulatory network (FMGRN) was constructed based on the computational target predictions at the sequence level and the inverse expression relationships between DEMs and DEGs. DAVID web server was selected to perform KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. Functional miRNA-gene regulatory module was generated based on the biological interpretation. Internal connections among genes in liver fibrosis-related module were determined using String database. MiRNA-gene regulatory modules related to liver fibrosis were experimentally verified in recombinant human TGFβ1 stimulated and specific miRNA inhibitor treated LX-2 cells. We totally identified 85 and 923 dysregulated miRNAs and genes in liver cirrhosis biopsy samples compared to their normal controls. All evident miRNA-gene pairs were identified and assembled into FMGRN which consisted of 990 regulations between 51 miRNAs and 275 genes, forming two big sub-networks that were defined as down-network and up-network, respectively. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that up-network was prominently involved in several KEGG pathways, in which "Focal adhesion", "PI3K-Akt signaling pathway" and "ECM

  2. Decomposition of RNA methylome reveals co-methylation patterns induced by latent enzymatic regulators of the epitranscriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lian; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zhang, Yu-Chen; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Runsheng; Huang, Yufei; Meng, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical modifications to mRNA, especially N6-methyladenosine (m6A) and 5-methylcytosine (m5C), have been recently shown to be associated with crucial biological functions. Despite the intriguing advancements, little is known so far about the dynamic landscape of RNA methylome across different cell types and how the epitranscriptome is regulated at the system level by enzymes, i.e., RNA methyltransferases and demethylases. To investigate this issue, a meta-analysis of m6A MeRIP-Seq datasets collected from 10 different experimental conditions (cell type/tissue or treatment) is performed, and the combinatorial epitranscriptome, which consists of 42 758 m6A sites, is extracted and divided into 3 clusters, in which the methylation sites are likely to be hyper- or hypo-methylated simultaneously (or co-methylated), indicating the sharing of a common methylation regulator. Four different clustering approaches are used, including K-means, hierarchical clustering (HC), Bayesian factor regression model (BFRM) and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to unveil the co-methylation patterns. To validate whether the patterns are corresponding to enzymatic regulators, i.e., RNA methyltransferases or demethylases, the target sites of a known m6A regulator, fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO), are identified from an independent mouse MeRIP-Seq dataset and lifted to human. Our study shows that 3 out of the 4 clustering approaches used can successfully identify a group of methylation sites overlapping with FTO target sites at a significance level of 0.05 (after multiple hypothesis adjustment), among which, the result of NMF is the most significant (p-value 2.81×10(-06)). We defined a new approach evaluating the consistency between two clustering results which shows that clustering results of different methods are highly correlated strongly indicating the existence of co-methylation patterns. Consistent with recent studies, a number of cancer and neuronal disease

  3. Variation of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell RNA Quality in Archived Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlakidis, Zisis; Mant, Christine; Abdinur, Fartun; Cope, Andrew; Steiner, Szabi; Peakman, Mark; Hayday, Adrian; Cason, John

    2011-09-01

    The Infectious Diseases BioBank (IDB) has consistently archived peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMNC) RNA for transcriptome analyses. RNA is particularly labile, and hence, these samples provide a sensitive indicator for assessing the IDB's quality-assurance measures. Independent analyses of 104 PBMNC RNA specimens from 26 volunteers revealed that the mean RNA integrity number (RIN) was high (9.02), although RIN ranged between scores of 7 and 10. This variation of RIN values was not associated with ischemic time, PBMNC quality, number of samples processed per day, self-medication after immunization, freezer location, donor characteristics, differential white blood cell counts, or daily variation in RNA extractions (all P>0.05). RIN values were related to the date of collection, with those processed during mid-summer having highest RIN scores (P=0.0001). Amongst specimens with the lowest RIN scores, no common feature could be identified. Thus, no technical explanation for the variation in RNA quality could be ascertained and these may represent normal physiological variations. These data provide strong evidence that current IDB protocols for the isolation and preservation PBMNC RNA are robust.

  4. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  5. Dynamics of picornavirus RNA replication within infected cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Normann, Preben

    2008-01-01

    Replication of many picornaviruses is inhibited by low concentrations of guanidine. Guanidine-resistant mutants are readily isolated and the mutations map to the coding region for the 2C protein. Using in vitro replication assays it has been determined previously that guanidine blocks the initiat...... replication. Thus, the guanidine-sensitive step in RNA synthesis is important throughout the virus life cycle in cells....... the initiation of negative-strand synthesis. We have now examined the dynamics of RNA replication, measured by quantitative RT-PCR, within cells infected with either swine vesicular disease virus (an enterovirus) or foot-and-mouth disease virus as regulated by the presence or absence of guanidine. Following...... the removal of guanidine from the infected cells, RNA replication occurs after a significant lag phase. This restoration of RNA synthesis requires de novo protein synthesis. Viral RNA can be maintained for at least 72 h within cells in the absence of apparent replication but guanidine-resistant virus can...

  6. Detection of cellular retinol-binding protein messenger RNA in the somatic cells of the rat seminiferous tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, M; Faraonio, R; Colantuoni, V

    1988-08-15

    A cDNA clone coding for Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein (CRBP) was used as a probe to study the expression of the gene in the somatic cells of the seminiferous tubules (Sertoli and peritubular cells). In this paper we demonstrate that these cells are actively involved in the synthesis of the specific mRNA. In Sertoli cells the gene is modulated by the hormones effective in spermatogenesis, such as FSH and testosterone. Moreover, peritubular cells revealed an approximately two times higher concentration of CRBP steady-state mRNA levels when compared with Sertoli cells.

  7. Construction and analysis of cardiac hypertrophy-associated lncRNA-mRNA network based on competitive endogenous RNA reveal functional lncRNAs in cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chao; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Yan; Pan, Hao; Qi, Han-Ping; Cao, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Jian-Mei; Li, Shang; Guo, Jing; Sun, Hong-Li; Li, Chun-Quan

    2016-03-08

    Cardiac hypertrophy (CH) could increase cardiac after-load and lead to heart failure. Recent studies have suggested that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) played a crucial role in the process of the cardiac hypertrophy, such as Mhrt, TERMINATOR. Some studies have further found a new interacting mechanism, competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA), of which lncRNA could interact with micro-RNAs (miRNA) and indirectly interact with mRNAs through competing interactions. However, the mechanism of ceRNA regulated by lncRNA in the CH remained unclear. In our study, we generated a global triple network containing mRNA, miRNA and lncRNA, and extracted a CH related lncRNA-mRNA network (CHLMN) through integrating the data from starbase, miRanda database and gene expression profile. Based on the ceRNA mechanism, we analyzed the characters of CHLMN and found that 3 lncRNAs (SLC26A4-AS1, RP11-344E13.3 and MAGI1-IT1) were high related to CH. We further performed cluster module analysis and random walk with restart for the CHLMN, finally 14 lncRNAs had been discovered as the potential CH related disease genes. Our results showed that lncRNA played an important role in the CH and could shed new light to the understanding underlying mechanisms of the CH.

  8. MicroRNA regulation of natural killer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eSullivan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are innate immune lymphocytes critical for host defense against viral infection and surveillance against malignant transformation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a family of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. Recent advances have highlighted the importance of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation in NK cell development, maturation, and function. This review focuses on several facets of this regulatory mechanism in NK cells: 1 the expressed NK cell miRNA transcriptome; 2 the impact of total miRNA deficiency on NK cells; 3 the role of specific miRNAs regulating NK cell development, survival, and maturation; 4 the intrinsic role of miRNAs regulating NK cell function, including cytokine production, proliferation, and cytotoxicity; and 5 the role of NK cell miRNAs in disease. Currently our knowledge of how miRNAs regulate NK cell biology is limited, and thus we also explore key open questions in the field, as well as approaches and techniques to ascertain the role of individual miRNAs as important molecular regulators.

  9. Reanalysis of RNA-sequencing data reveals several additional fusion genes with multiple isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaspeska, Sara; Hultsch, Susanne; Edgren, Henrik; Nicorici, Daniel; Murumägi, Astrid; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2012-01-01

    RNA-sequencing and tailored bioinformatic methodologies have paved the way for identification of expressed fusion genes from the chaotic genomes of solid tumors. We have recently successfully exploited RNA-sequencing for the discovery of 24 novel fusion genes in breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate the importance of continuous optimization of the bioinformatic methodology for this purpose, and report the discovery and experimental validation of 13 additional fusion genes from the same samples. Integration of copy number profiling with the RNA-sequencing results revealed that the majority of the gene fusions were promoter-donating events that occurred at copy number transition points or involved high-level DNA-amplifications. Sequencing of genomic fusion break points confirmed that DNA-level rearrangements underlie selected fusion transcripts. Furthermore, a significant portion (>60%) of the fusion genes were alternatively spliced. This illustrates the importance of reanalyzing sequencing data as gene definitions change and bioinformatic methods improve, and highlights the previously unforeseen isoform diversity among fusion transcripts.

  10. MicroRNA Expression in Alzheimer Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman M. Schipper

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Various coding genes representing multiple functional categories are downregulated in blood mononuclear cells (BMC of patients with sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD. Noncoding microRNAs (miRNA regulate gene expression by degrading messages or inhibiting translation. Using BMC as a paradigm for the study of systemic alterations in AD, we investigated whether peripheral miRNA expression is altered in this condition. MicroRNA levels were assessed using the microRNA microarray (MMChip containing 462 human miRNA, and the results validated by real time PCR. Sixteen AD patients and sixteen normal elderly controls (NEC were matched for ethnicity, age, gender and education. The expression of several BMC miRNAs was found to increase in AD relative to NEC levels, and may differ between AD subjects bearing one or two APOE4 alleles. As compared to NEC, miRNAs signifi cantly upregulated in AD subjects and confi rmed by qPCR were miR-34a and 181b. Predicted target genes downregulated in Alzheimer BMC that correlated with the upregulated miRNAs were largely represented in the functional categories of Transcription/Translation and Synaptic Activity. Several miRNAs targeting the same genes were within the functional category of Injury response/Redox homeostasis. Taken together, induction of microRNA expression in BMC may contribute to the aberrant systemic decline in mRNA levels in sporadic AD.

  11. MicroRNA expression profiling reveals miRNA families regulating specific biological pathways in mouse frontal cortex and hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juuso Juhila

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small regulatory molecules that cause post-transcriptional gene silencing. Although some miRNAs are known to have region-specific expression patterns in the adult brain, the functional consequences of the region-specificity to the gene regulatory networks of the brain nuclei are not clear. Therefore, we studied miRNA expression patterns by miRNA-Seq and microarrays in two brain regions, frontal cortex (FCx and hippocampus (HP, which have separate biological functions. We identified 354 miRNAs from FCx and 408 from HP using miRNA-Seq, and 245 from FCx and 238 from HP with microarrays. Several miRNA families and clusters were differentially expressed between FCx and HP, including the miR-8 family, miR-182|miR-96|miR-183 cluster, and miR-212|miR-312 cluster overexpressed in FCx and miR-34 family overexpressed in HP. To visualize the clusters, we developed support for viewing genomic alignments of miRNA-Seq reads in the Chipster genome browser. We carried out pathway analysis of the predicted target genes of differentially expressed miRNA families and clusters to assess their putative biological functions. Interestingly, several miRNAs from the same family/cluster were predicted to regulate specific biological pathways. We have developed a miRNA-Seq approach with a bioinformatic analysis workflow that is suitable for studying miRNA expression patterns from specific brain nuclei. FCx and HP were shown to have distinct miRNA expression patterns which were reflected in the predicted gene regulatory pathways. This methodology can be applied for the identification of brain region-specific and phenotype-specific miRNA-mRNA-regulatory networks from the adult and developing rodent brain.

  12. Characterization of a Novel Megabirnavirus from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Reveals Horizontal Gene Transfer from Single-Stranded RNA Virus to Double-Stranded RNA Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghong; Wang, Yong; Sun, Xiangzhong; Cheng, Jiasen; Fu, Yanping; Liu, Huiquan; Jiang, Daohong; Ghabrial, Said A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycoviruses have been detected in all major groups of filamentous fungi, and their study represents an important branch of virology. Here, we characterized a novel double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycovirus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum megabirnavirus 1 (SsMBV1), in an apparently hypovirulent strain (SX466) of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Two similarly sized dsRNA segments (L1- and L2-dsRNA), the genome of SsMBV1, are packaged in rigid spherical particles purified from strain SX466. The full-length cDNA sequence of L1-dsRNA/SsMBV1 comprises two large open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2), which encode a putative coat protein and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp domain clearly indicates that SsMBV1 is related to Rosellinia necatrix megabirnavirus 1 (RnMBV1). L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1 comprises two nonoverlapping ORFs (ORFA and ORFB) encoding two hypothetical proteins with unknown functions. The 5′-terminal regions of L1- and L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1 share strictly conserved sequences and form stable stem-loop structures. Although L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1 is dispensable for replication, genome packaging, and pathogenicity of SsMBV1, it enhances transcript accumulation of L1-dsRNA/SsMBV1 and stability of virus-like particles (VLPs). Interestingly, a conserved papain-like protease domain similar to a multifunctional protein (p29) of Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 was detected in the ORFA-encoded protein of L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1. Phylogenetic analysis based on the protease domain suggests that horizontal gene transfer may have occurred from a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus (hypovirus) to a dsRNA virus, SsMBV1. Our results reveal that SsMBV1 has a slight impact on the fundamental biological characteristics of its host regardless of the presence or absence of L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1. IMPORTANCE Mycoviruses are widespread in all major fungal groups, and they possess diverse genomes of mostly ssRNA and dsRNA and, recently, circular ssDNA. Here, we have characterized

  13. Characterization of a Novel Megabirnavirus from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Reveals Horizontal Gene Transfer from Single-Stranded RNA Virus to Double-Stranded RNA Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghong; Wang, Yong; Sun, Xiangzhong; Cheng, Jiasen; Fu, Yanping; Liu, Huiquan; Jiang, Daohong; Ghabrial, Said A; Xie, Jiatao

    2015-08-01

    Mycoviruses have been detected in all major groups of filamentous fungi, and their study represents an important branch of virology. Here, we characterized a novel double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycovirus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum megabirnavirus 1 (SsMBV1), in an apparently hypovirulent strain (SX466) of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Two similarly sized dsRNA segments (L1- and L2-dsRNA), the genome of SsMBV1, are packaged in rigid spherical particles purified from strain SX466. The full-length cDNA sequence of L1-dsRNA/SsMBV1 comprises two large open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2), which encode a putative coat protein and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp domain clearly indicates that SsMBV1 is related to Rosellinia necatrix megabirnavirus 1 (RnMBV1). L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1 comprises two nonoverlapping ORFs (ORFA and ORFB) encoding two hypothetical proteins with unknown functions. The 5'-terminal regions of L1- and L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1 share strictly conserved sequences and form stable stem-loop structures. Although L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1 is dispensable for replication, genome packaging, and pathogenicity of SsMBV1, it enhances transcript accumulation of L1-dsRNA/SsMBV1 and stability of virus-like particles (VLPs). Interestingly, a conserved papain-like protease domain similar to a multifunctional protein (p29) of Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 was detected in the ORFA-encoded protein of L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1. Phylogenetic analysis based on the protease domain suggests that horizontal gene transfer may have occurred from a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus (hypovirus) to a dsRNA virus, SsMBV1. Our results reveal that SsMBV1 has a slight impact on the fundamental biological characteristics of its host regardless of the presence or absence of L2-dsRNA/SsMBV1. Mycoviruses are widespread in all major fungal groups, and they possess diverse genomes of mostly ssRNA and dsRNA and, recently, circular ssDNA. Here, we have characterized a novel dsRNA virus

  14. A negative regulation loop of long noncoding RNA HOTAIR and p53 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhai N

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nailiang Zhai,1 Yongfu Xia,1 Rui Yin,2 Jinping Liu,3 Fuquan Gao1 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical University, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, People’s Hospital of Binzhou City, 3Department of Pharmacology, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide, and the 5-year survival rate is still low despite advances in diagnosis and therapeutics. A long noncoding RNA (lncRNA HOX antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR has been revealed to play important roles in NSCLC carcinogenesis but the detailed mechanisms are still unclear. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the regulation between the lncRNA HOTAIR and p53 in the NSCLC patient samples and cell lines. Our results showed that HOTAIR expression was significantly higher in the cancer tissues than that in the adjacent normal tissue, and was negatively correlated with p53 functionality rather than expression. When p53 was overexpressed in A549 cells, the lncRNA HOTAIR expression was downregulated, and the cell proliferation rate and cell invasion capacity decreased as a consequence. We identified two binding sites of p53 on the promoter region of HOTAIR, where the p53 protein would bind to and suppress the HOTAIR mRNA transcription. Inversely, overexpression of lncRNA HOTAIR inhibited the expression of p53 in A549 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that HOTAIR modified the promoter of p53 and enhanced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3. These studies identified a specific negative regulation loop of lncRNA HOTAIR and p53 in NSCLC cells, which revealed a new understanding of tumorigenesis in p53 dysfunction NSCLC cells. Keywords: NSCLC, LncRNA HOTAIR, p53, negative loop

  15. miRNA-target chimeras reveal miRNA 3'-end pairing as a major determinant of Argonaute target specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Michael J; Scheel, Troels K H; Luna, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    analysis define expanded pairing rules for over 200 mammalian miRNAs. Most interactions combine seed-based pairing with distinct, miRNA-specific patterns of auxiliary pairing. At some regulatory sites, this specificity confers distinct silencing functions to miRNA family members with shared seed sequences...

  16. Transcriptome landscape of Lactococcus lactis reveals many novel RNAs including a small regulatory RNA involved in carbon uptake and metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, Sjoerd B; de Jong, Anne; Kok, Jan

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing has revolutionized genome-wide transcriptome analyses, and the identification of non-coding regulatory RNAs in bacteria has thus increased concurrently. Here we reveal the transcriptome map of the lactic acid bacterial paradigm Lactococcus lactis MG1363 by employing differential RNA

  17. RNA sequencing of creatine transporter (SLC6A8) deficient fibroblasts reveals impairment of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nota, Benjamin; Ndika, Joseph D T; van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; Kanhai, Warsha A; van Dooren, Silvy J M; van de Wiel, Mark A; Pals, Gerard; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-09-01

    Creatine transporter (SLC6A8) deficiency is the most common cause of cerebral creatine syndromes, and is characterized by depletion of creatine in the brain. Manifestations of this X-linked disorder include intellectual disability, speech/language impairment, behavior abnormalities, and seizures. At the moment, no effective treatment is available. In order to investigate the molecular pathophysiology of this disorder, we performed RNA sequencing on fibroblasts derived from patients. The transcriptomes of fibroblast cells from eight unrelated individuals with SLC6A8 deficiency and three wild-type controls were sequenced. SLC6A8 mutations with different effects on the protein product resulted in different gene expression profiles. Differential gene expression analysis followed by gene ontology term enrichment analysis revealed that especially the expression of genes encoding components of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton are altered in SLC6A8 deficiency, such as collagens, keratins, integrins, and cadherins. This suggests an important novel role for creatine in the structural development and maintenance of cells. It is likely that the (extracellular) structure of brain cells is also impaired in SLC6A8-deficient patients, and future studies are necessary to confirm this and to reveal the true functions of creatine in the brain. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  18. RNA sequencing reveals pronounced changes in the noncoding transcriptome of aging synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bei Jun; Ueberham, Uwe; Mills, James D; Kirazov, Ludmil; Kirazov, Evgeni; Knobloch, Mara; Bochmann, Jana; Jendrek, Renate; Takenaka, Konii; Bliim, Nicola; Arendt, Thomas; Janitz, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Normal aging is associated with impairments in cognitive functions. These alterations are caused by diminutive changes in the biology of synapses, and ineffective neurotransmission, rather than loss of neurons. Hitherto, only a few studies, exploring molecular mechanisms of healthy brain aging in higher vertebrates, utilized synaptosomal fractions to survey local changes in aging-related transcriptome dynamics. Here we present, for the first time, a comparative analysis of the synaptosomes transcriptome in the aging mouse brain using RNA sequencing. Our results show changes in the expression of genes contributing to biological pathways related to neurite guidance, synaptosomal physiology, and RNA splicing. More intriguingly, we also discovered alterations in the expression of thousands of novel, unannotated lincRNAs during aging. Further, detailed characterization of the cleavage and polyadenylation factor I subunit 1 (Clp1) mRNA and protein expression indicates its increased expression in neuronal processes of hippocampal stratum radiatum in aging mice. Together, our study uncovers a new layer of transcriptional regulation which is targeted by aging within the local environment of interconnecting neuronal cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cancer-Related Triplets of mRNA-lncRNA-miRNA Revealed by Integrative Network in Uterine Corpus Endometrial Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of transcriptome expression level is a complex process involving multiple-level interactions among molecules such as protein coding RNA (mRNA, long noncoding RNA (lncRNA, and microRNA (miRNA, which are essential for the transcriptome stability and maintenance and regulation of body homeostasis. The availability of multilevel expression data enables a comprehensive view of the regulatory network. In this study, we analyzed the coding and noncoding gene expression profiles of 301 patients with uterine corpus endometrial carcinoma (UCEC. A new method was proposed to construct a genome-wide integrative network based on variance inflation factor (VIF regression method. The cross-regulation relations of mRNA, lncRNA, and miRNA were then selected based on clique-searching algorithm from the network, when any two molecules of the three were shown as interacting according to the integrative network. Such relation, which we call the mRNA-lncRNA-miRNA triplet, demonstrated the complexity in transcriptome regulation process. Finally, six UCEC-related triplets were selected in which the mRNA participates in endometrial carcinoma pathway, such as CDH1 and TP53. The multi-type RNAs are proved to be cross-regulated as to each of the six triplets according to literature. All the triplets demonstrated the association with the initiation and progression of UCEC. Our method provides a comprehensive strategy for the investigation of transcriptome regulation mechanism.

  20. tmRNA-mediated trans-translation as the major ribosome rescue system in a bacterial cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyouta eHimeno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available tmRNA (transfer messenger RNA; also known as 10Sa RNA or SsrA RNA is a small RNA molecule that is conserved among bacteria. It has structural and functional similarities to tRNA: it has an upper half of the tRNA-like structure, its 5’ end is processed by RNase P, it has typical tRNA-specific base modifications, it is aminoacylated with alanine, it binds to EF-Tu after aminoacylation and it enters the ribosome with EF-Tu and GTP. However, tmRNA lacks an anticodon, and instead it has a coding sequence for a short peptide called tag-peptide. An elaborate interplay of actions of tmRNA as both tRNA and mRNA with the help of a tmRNA-binding protein, SmpB, facilitates trans-translation, which produces a single polypeptide from two mRNA molecules. Initially alanyl-tmRNA in complex with EF-Tu and SmpB enters the vacant A-site of the stalled ribosome like aminoacyl-tRNA but without a codon-anticodon interaction, and subsequently truncated mRNA is replaced with the tag-encoding region of tmRNA. During these processes, not only tmRNA but also SmpB structurally and functionally mimics both tRNA and mRNA. Thus trans-translation rescues the stalled ribosome, thereby allowing recycling of the ribosome. Since the tag-peptide serves as a target of AAA+ proteases, the trans-translation products are preferentially degraded so that they do not accumulate in the cell. Although alternative rescue systems have recently been revealed, trans-translation is the only system that universally exists in bacteria. Furthermore, it is unique in that it employs a small RNA and that it prevents accumulation of nonfunctional proteins from truncated mRNA in the cell. It might play the major role in rescuing the stalled translation in the bacterial cell.

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  5. Sets of RNA repeated tags and hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probes for distinct images of RNA in a living cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kubota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Imaging the behavior of RNA in a living cell is a powerful means for understanding RNA functions and acquiring spatiotemporal information in a single cell. For more distinct RNA imaging in a living cell, a more effective chemical method to fluorescently label RNA is now required. In addition, development of the technology labeling with different colors for different RNA would make it easier to analyze plural RNA strands expressing in a cell. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tag technology for RNA imaging in a living cell has been developed based on the unique chemical functions of exciton-controlled hybridization-sensitive oligonucleotide (ECHO probes. Repetitions of selected 18-nucleotide RNA tags were incorporated into the mRNA 3'-UTR. Pairs with complementary ECHO probes exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission for the mRNA expressed in a living cell. The mRNA in a nucleus was detected clearly as fluorescent puncta, and the images of the expression of two mRNAs were obtained independently and simultaneously with two orthogonal tag-probe pairs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A compact and repeated label has been developed for RNA imaging in a living cell, based on the photochemistry of ECHO probes. The pairs of an 18-nt RNA tag and the complementary ECHO probes are highly thermostable, sequence-specifically emissive, and orthogonal to each other. The nucleotide length necessary for one tag sequence is much shorter compared with conventional tag technologies, resulting in easy preparation of the tag sequences with a larger number of repeats for more distinct RNA imaging.

  6. Long Noncoding RNA PANDA Positively Regulates Proliferation of Osteosarcoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yojiro; Goto, Taiki; Naemura, Madoka; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna; Tahara, Keiichiro

    2017-01-01

    A long noncoding RNA, p21-associated ncRNA DNA damage-activated (PANDA), associates with nuclear transcription factor Y subunit alpha (NF-YA) and inhibits its binding to promoters of apoptosis-related genes, thereby repressing apoptosis in normal human fibroblasts. Here, we show that PANDA is involved in regulating proliferation in the U2OS human osteosarcoma cell line. U2OS cells were transfected with siRNAs against PANDA 72 h later and they were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative RT-PCR and cell-cycle analysis. PANDA was highly expressed in U2OS cells, and its expression was induced by DNA damage. Silencing PANDA caused arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle, leading to inhibition of cell proliferation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that silencing PANDA increased mRNA levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p18, which caused G1 phase arrest. These results suggest that PANDA promotes G1-S transition by repressing p18 transcription, and thus promotes U2OS cell proliferation. Copyright© 2017 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Reconstructed cell fate–regulatory programs in stem cells reveal hierarchies and key factors of neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Parra, Marco-Antonio; Malysheva, Valeriya; Mohamed Saleem, Mohamed Ashick; Lieb, Michele; Godel, Aurelie; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Cell lineages, which shape the body architecture and specify cell functions, derive from the integration of a plethora of cell intrinsic and extrinsic signals. These signals trigger a multiplicity of decisions at several levels to modulate the activity of dynamic gene regulatory networks (GRNs), which ensure both general and cell-specific functions within a given lineage, thereby establishing cell fates. Significant knowledge about these events and the involved key drivers comes from homogeneous cell differentiation models. Even a single chemical trigger, such as the morphogen all-trans retinoic acid (RA), can induce the complex network of gene-regulatory decisions that matures a stem/precursor cell to a particular step within a given lineage. Here we have dissected the GRNs involved in the RA-induced neuronal or endodermal cell fate specification by integrating dynamic RXRA binding, chromatin accessibility, epigenetic promoter epigenetic status, and the transcriptional activity inferred from RNA polymerase II mapping and transcription profiling. Our data reveal how RA induces a network of transcription factors (TFs), which direct the temporal organization of cognate GRNs, thereby driving neuronal/endodermal cell fate specification. Modeling signal transduction propagation using the reconstructed GRNs indicated critical TFs for neuronal cell fate specification, which were confirmed by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. Overall, this study demonstrates that a systems view of cell fate specification combined with computational signal transduction models provides the necessary insight in cellular plasticity for cell fate engineering. The present integrated approach can be used to monitor the in vitro capacity of (engineered) cells/tissues to establish cell lineages for regenerative medicine. PMID:27650846

  8. Precise localization of m6A in Rous sarcoma virus RNA reveals clustering of methylation sites: implications for RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, S E; Beemon, K

    1985-09-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) residues are present as internal base modifications in most higher eucaryotic mRNAs; however, the biological function of this modification is not known. We describe a method for localizing and quantitating m6A within a large RNA molecule, the genomic RNA of Rous sarcoma virus. Specific fragments of 32P-labeled Rous sarcoma virus RNA were isolated by hybridization with complementary DNA restriction fragments spanning nucleotides 6185 to 8050. RNA was digested with RNase and finger-printed, and individual oligonucleotides were analyzed for the presence of m6A by paper electrophoresis and thin-layer chromatography. With this technique, seven sites of methylation in this region of the Rous sarcoma virus genome were localized at nucleotides 6394, 6447, 6507, 6718, 7414, 7424, and 8014. Further, m6A was observed at two additional sites whose nucleotide assignments remain ambiguous. A clustering of two or more m6A residues was seen at three positions within the RNA analyzed. Modification at certain sites was found to be heterogeneous, in that different molecules of RNA appeared to be methylated differently. Previous studies have determined that methylation occurs only in the sequences Gm6AC and Am6AC. We observed a high frequency of methylation at PuGm6ACU sequences. The possible involvement of m6A in RNA splicing events is discussed.

  9. Unprecedented high-resolution view of bacterial operon architecture revealed by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Tyrrell; Creecy, James P; Maddox, Scott M; Grissom, Joe E; Conkle, Trevor L; Shadid, Tyler M; Teramoto, Jun; San Miguel, Phillip; Shimada, Tomohiro; Ishihama, Akira; Mori, Hirotada; Wanner, Barry L

    2014-07-08

    We analyzed the transcriptome of Escherichia coli K-12 by strand-specific RNA sequencing at single-nucleotide resolution during steady-state (logarithmic-phase) growth and upon entry into stationary phase in glucose minimal medium. To generate high-resolution transcriptome maps, we developed an organizational schema which showed that in practice only three features are required to define operon architecture: the promoter, terminator, and deep RNA sequence read coverage. We precisely annotated 2,122 promoters and 1,774 terminators, defining 1,510 operons with an average of 1.98 genes per operon. Our analyses revealed an unprecedented view of E. coli operon architecture. A large proportion (36%) of operons are complex with internal promoters or terminators that generate multiple transcription units. For 43% of operons, we observed differential expression of polycistronic genes, despite being in the same operons, indicating that E. coli operon architecture allows fine-tuning of gene expression. We found that 276 of 370 convergent operons terminate inefficiently, generating complementary 3' transcript ends which overlap on average by 286 nucleotides, and 136 of 388 divergent operons have promoters arranged such that their 5' ends overlap on average by 168 nucleotides. We found 89 antisense transcripts of 397-nucleotide average length, 7 unannotated transcripts within intergenic regions, and 18 sense transcripts that completely overlap operons on the opposite strand. Of 519 overlapping transcripts, 75% correspond to sequences that are highly conserved in E. coli (>50 genomes). Our data extend recent studies showing unexpected transcriptome complexity in several bacteria and suggest that antisense RNA regulation is widespread. Importance: We precisely mapped the 5' and 3' ends of RNA transcripts across the E. coli K-12 genome by using a single-nucleotide analytical approach. Our resulting high-resolution transcriptome maps show that ca. one-third of E. coli operons are

  10. Deep sequencing of mRNA in CD24− and CD24+ mammary carcinoma Mvt1 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Rostoker

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available CD24 is an anchored cell surface marker that is highly expressed in cancer cells (Lee et al., 2009 and its expression is associated with poorer outcome of cancer patients (Kristiansen et al., 2003. Phenotype comparison between two subpopulations derived from the Mvt1 cell line, CD24− cells (with no CD24 cell surface expression and the CD24+ cells, identified high tumorigenic capacity for the CD24+ cells. In order to reveal the transcripts that support the CD24+ aggressive and invasive phenotype we compared the gene profiles of these two subpopulations. mRNA profiles of CD24− and CD24+ cells were generated by deep sequencing, in triplicate, using an Illumina HiSeq 2500. Here we provide a detailed description of the mRNA-seq analysis from our recent study (Rostoker et al., 2015. The mRNA-seq data have been deposited in the NCBI GEO database (accession number GSE68746.

  11. P-Body Purification Reveals the Condensation of Repressed mRNA Regulons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubstenberger, Arnaud; Courel, Maïté; Bénard, Marianne; Souquere, Sylvie; Ernoult-Lange, Michèle; Chouaib, Racha; Yi, Zhou; Morlot, Jean-Baptiste; Munier, Annie; Fradet, Magali; Daunesse, Maëlle; Bertrand, Edouard; Pierron, Gérard; Mozziconacci, Julien; Kress, Michel; Weil, Dominique

    2017-10-05

    Within cells, soluble RNPs can switch states to coassemble and condense into liquid or solid bodies. Although these phase transitions have been reconstituted in vitro, for endogenous bodies the diversity of the components, the specificity of the interaction networks, and the function of the coassemblies remain to be characterized. Here, by developing a fluorescence-activated particle sorting (FAPS) method to purify cytosolic processing bodies (P-bodies) from human epithelial cells, we identified hundreds of proteins and thousands of mRNAs that structure a dense network of interactions, separating P-body from non-P-body RNPs. mRNAs segregating into P-bodies are translationally repressed, but not decayed, and this repression explains part of the poor genome-wide correlation between RNA and protein abundance. P-bodies condense thousands of mRNAs that strikingly encode regulatory processes. Thus, we uncovered how P-bodies, by condensing and segregating repressed mRNAs, provide a physical substrate for the coordinated regulation of posttranscriptional mRNA regulons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Human DMBT1-Derived Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Intracellular siRNA Delivery

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    Martina Tuttolomondo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNA (siRNA is a promising molecule for gene therapy, but its therapeutic administration remains problematic. Among the recently proposed vectors, cell-penetrating peptides show great promise in in vivo trials for siRNA delivery. Human protein DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumor 1 is a pattern recognition molecule that interacts with polyanions and recognizes and aggregates bacteria. Taking advantage of these properties, we investigated whether specific synthetic DMBT1-derived peptides could be used to formulate nanoparticles for siRNA administration. Using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and UV spectra, we identified two DMBT1 peptides that could encapsulate the siRNA with a self- and co-assembly mechanism. The complexes were stable for at least 2 hr in the presence of either fetal bovine serum (FBS or RNase A, with peptide-dependent time span protection. ζ-potential, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy revealed negatively charged nanoparticles with an average diameter of 10–800 nm, depending on the reaction conditions, and a spherical or rice-shaped morphology, depending on the peptide and β-helix conformation. We successfully transfected human MCF7 cells with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-DMBT1-peptide-Cy3-siRNA complexes. Finally, DMBT1 peptides encapsulating an siRNA targeting a fluorescent reporter gene showed efficient gene silencing in MCF7-recombinant cells. These results lay the foundation for a new research line to exploit DMBT1-peptide nanocomplexes for therapeutic siRNA delivery.

  13. HumanViCe: Host ceRNA network in virus infected cells in human

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    Suman eGhosal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Host-virus interaction via host cellular components has been an important field of research in recent times. RNA interference mediated by short interfering RNAs and microRNAs (miRNA, is a widespread anti-viral defence strategy. Importantly, viruses also encode their own miRNAs. In recent times miRNAs were identified as key players in host-virus interaction. Furthermore, viruses were shown to exploit the host miRNA networks to suite their own need. The complex cross-talk between host and viral miRNAs and their cellular and viral targets forms the environment for viral pathogenesis. Apart from protein-coding mRNAs, non-coding RNAs may also be targeted by host or viral miRNAs in virus infected cells, and viruses can exploit the host miRNA mediated gene regulatory network via the competing endogenous RNA effect. A recent report showed that viral U-rich non-coding RNAs called HSUR, expressed in primate virus herpesvirus saimiri (HVS infected T cells, were able to bind to three host miRNAs, causing significant alteration in cellular level for one of the miRNAs. We have predicted protein coding and non protein-coding targets for viral and human miRNAs in virus infected cells. We identified viral miRNA targets within host non-coding RNA loci from AGO interacting regions in three different virus infected cells. Gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the genes comprising the ceRNA networks in the virus infected cells revealed enrichment of key cellular signalling pathways related to cell fate decisions and gene transcription, like Notch and Wnt signalling pathways, as well as pathways related to viral entry, replication and virulence. We identified a vast number of non-coding transcripts playing as potential ceRNAs to the immune response associated genes; e.g. APOBEC family genes, in some virus infected cells. All these information are compiled in HumanViCe, a comprehensive database that provides the potential ceRNA networks in virus

  14. Single-cell RNA-seq highlights intratumoral heterogeneity in primary glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anoop P; Tirosh, Itay; Trombetta, John J; Shalek, Alex K; Gillespie, Shawn M; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Cahill, Daniel P; Nahed, Brian V; Curry, William T; Martuza, Robert L; Louis, David N; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Suvà, Mario L; Regev, Aviv; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2014-06-20

    Human cancers are complex ecosystems composed of cells with distinct phenotypes, genotypes, and epigenetic states, but current models do not adequately reflect tumor composition in patients. We used single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to profile 430 cells from five primary glioblastomas, which we found to be inherently variable in their expression of diverse transcriptional programs related to oncogenic signaling, proliferation, complement/immune response, and hypoxia. We also observed a continuum of stemness-related expression states that enabled us to identify putative regulators of stemness in vivo. Finally, we show that established glioblastoma subtype classifiers are variably expressed across individual cells within a tumor and demonstrate the potential prognostic implications of such intratumoral heterogeneity. Thus, we reveal previously unappreciated heterogeneity in diverse regulatory programs central to glioblastoma biology, prognosis, and therapy. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Ontogeny of hepatic energy metabolism genes in mice as revealed by RNA-sequencing.

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    Helen J Renaud

    Full Text Available The liver plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis by coordinating synthesis, storage, breakdown, and redistribution of nutrients. Hepatic energy metabolism is dynamically regulated throughout different life stages due to different demands for energy during growth and development. However, changes in gene expression patterns throughout ontogeny for factors important in hepatic energy metabolism are not well understood. We performed detailed transcript analysis of energy metabolism genes during various stages of liver development in mice. Livers from male C57BL/6J mice were collected at twelve ages, including perinatal and postnatal time points (n = 3/age. The mRNA was quantified by RNA-Sequencing, with transcript abundance estimated by Cufflinks. One thousand sixty energy metabolism genes were examined; 794 were above detection, of which 627 were significantly changed during at least one developmental age compared to adult liver. Two-way hierarchical clustering revealed three major clusters dependent on age: GD17.5-Day 5 (perinatal-enriched, Day 10-Day 20 (pre-weaning-enriched, and Day 25-Day 60 (adolescence/adulthood-enriched. Clustering analysis of cumulative mRNA expression values for individual pathways of energy metabolism revealed three patterns of enrichment: glycolysis, ketogenesis, and glycogenesis were all perinatally-enriched; glycogenolysis was the only pathway enriched during pre-weaning ages; whereas lipid droplet metabolism, cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and lipid metabolism were all enriched in adolescence/adulthood. This study reveals novel findings such as the divergent expression of the fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes Acyl-CoA oxidase 1 and Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a, indicating a switch from mitochondrial to peroxisomal β-oxidation after weaning; as well as the dynamic ontogeny of genes implicated in obesity such as Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 and Elongation of very long chain fatty

  16. Partial methylation at Am100 in 18S rRNA of baker's yeast reveals ribosome heterogeneity on the level of eukaryotic rRNA modification.

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    Markus Buchhaupt

    Full Text Available Ribosome heterogeneity is of increasing biological significance and several examples have been described for multicellular and single cells organisms. In here we show for the first time a variation in ribose methylation within the 18S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using RNA-cleaving DNAzymes, we could specifically demonstrate that a significant amount of S. cerevisiae ribosomes are not methylated at 2'-O-ribose of A100 residue in the 18S rRNA. Furthermore, using LC-UV-MS/MS of a respective 18S rRNA fragment, we could not only corroborate the partial methylation at A100, but could also quantify the methylated versus non-methylated A100 residue. Here, we exhibit that only 68% of A100 in the 18S rRNA of S.cerevisiae are methylated at 2'-O ribose sugar. Polysomes also contain a similar heterogeneity for methylated Am100, which shows that 40S ribosome subunits with and without Am100 participate in translation. Introduction of a multicopy plasmid containing the corresponding methylation guide snoRNA gene SNR51 led to an increased A100 methylation, suggesting the cellular snR51 level to limit the extent of this modification. Partial rRNA modification demonstrates a new level of ribosome heterogeneity in eukaryotic cells that might have substantial impact on regulation and fine-tuning of the translation process.

  17. RNA of Enterococcus faecalis Strain EC-12 Is a Major Component Inducing Interleukin-12 Production from Human Monocytic Cells.

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    Ryoichiro Nishibayashi

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 (IL-12 is an important cytokine for the immunomodulatory effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB. Using murine immune cells, we previously reported that the RNA of Enterococcus faecalis EC-12, a LAB strain exerting probiotic-like beneficial effects, is the major IL-12-inducing immunogenic component. However, it was recently revealed that bacterial RNA can be a ligand for Toll-like receptor (TLR 13, which is only expressed in mice. Because TLR13 is not expressed in humans, the immuno-stimulatory and -modulatory effects of LAB RNA in human cells should be augmented excluding TLR13 contribution. In experiment 1 of this study, the role of LAB RNA in IL-12 induction in human immune cells was studied using three LAB strains, E.faecalis EC-12, Lactobacillus gasseri JCM5344, and Bifidobacterium breve JCM1192. RNase A treatment of heat-killed LAB significantly decreased the IL-12 production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells on stimulation, while RNase III treatment revealed virtually no effects. Further, IL-12 production against heat-killed E. faecalis EC-12 was abolished by depleting monocytes. These results demonstrated that single stranded RNA (ssRNA of LAB is a strong inducer of IL-12 production from human monocytes. In experiment 2, major receptor for ssRNA of E. faecalis EC-12 was identified using THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line. The type of RNA molecules of E. faecalis EC-12 responsible for IL-12 induction was also identified. IL-12 production induced by the total RNA of E. faecalis EC-12 was significantly reduced by the treatment of siRNA for TLR8 but not for TLR7. Furthermore, both 23S and 16S rRNA, but not mRNA, of E. faecalis EC-12 markedly induced IL-12 production from THP-1 cells. These results suggested that the recognition of ssRNA of E. faecalis EC-12 was mediated by TLR8 and that rRNA was the RNA molecule that exhibited IL-12-inducing ability in human cells.

  18. Role of G3BP1 in glucocorticoid receptor-mediated microRNA-15b and microRNA-23a biogenesis in endothelial cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kwok, Hoi-Hin

    2017-05-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of non-coding RNAs that play crucial roles in regulating various normal cellular responses. Recent studies revealed that the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway is subject to sophisticated regulation. Hormonal control of miRNA biogenesis by androgen and estrogen has been demonstrated, but the direct effects of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) on miRNA biogenesis are unknown. This study revealed the role of GR in miRNA maturation. We showed that two GR agonists, dexamethasone and ginsenoside-Rg1 rapidly suppressed the expression of mature miR-15b, miR-23a, and miR-214 in human endothelial cells. RNA pulldown coupled with proteomic analysis identified GTPase-activating protein (SH3 domain) binding protein 1 (G3BP1) as one of the RNA-binding proteins mediating GR-regulated miRNA maturation. Activated GR induced phosphorylation of v-AKT Murine Thymoma Viral Oncogene Homologue (AKT) kinase, which in turn phosphorylated and promoted nuclear translocation of G3BP1. The nuclear G3BP1 bound to the G3BP1 consensus sequence located on primary miR-15b~16-2 and miR-23a~27a~24-2 to inhibit their maturation. The findings from this study have advanced our understanding of the non-genomic effects of GR in the vascular system.

  19. Deep sequencing reveals unique small RNA repertoire that is regulated during head regeneration in Hydra magnipapillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Srikar; Nair, Aparna; Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Poduval, Deepak; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Ghanekar, Yashoda

    2013-01-07

    Small non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs, piRNAs and endo-siRNAs fine-tune gene expression through post-transcriptional regulation, modulating important processes in development, differentiation, homeostasis and regeneration. Using deep sequencing, we have profiled small non-coding RNAs in Hydra magnipapillata and investigated changes in small RNA expression pattern during head regeneration. Our results reveal a unique repertoire of small RNAs in hydra. We have identified 126 miRNA loci; 123 of these miRNAs are unique to hydra. Less than 50% are conserved across two different strains of Hydra vulgaris tested in this study, indicating a highly diverse nature of hydra miRNAs in contrast to bilaterian miRNAs. We also identified siRNAs derived from precursors with perfect stem-loop structure and that arise from inverted repeats. piRNAs were the most abundant small RNAs in hydra, mapping to transposable elements, the annotated transcriptome and unique non-coding regions on the genome. piRNAs that map to transposable elements and the annotated transcriptome display a ping-pong signature. Further, we have identified several miRNAs and piRNAs whose expression is regulated during hydra head regeneration. Our study defines different classes of small RNAs in this cnidarian model system, which may play a role in orchestrating gene expression essential for hydra regeneration.

  20. A new algorithm for integrated analysis of miRNA-mRNA interactions based on individual classification reveals insights into bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Nikolai; Stephan, Carsten; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Jung, Klaus; Preissner, Robert; Meyer, Hellmuth-A

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. It has been proposed that miRNAs play an important role in cancer development and progression. Their ability to affect multiple gene pathways by targeting various mRNAs makes them an interesting class of regulators. We have developed an algorithm, Classification based Analysis of Paired Expression data of RNA (CAPE RNA), which is capable of identifying altered miRNA-mRNA regulation between tissues samples that assigns interaction states to each sample without preexisting stratification of groups. The distribution of the assigned interaction states compared to given experimental groups is used to assess the quality of a predicted interaction. We demonstrate the applicability of our approach by analyzing urothelial carcinoma and normal bladder tissue samples derived from 24 patients. Using our approach, normal and tumor tissue samples as well as different stages of tumor progression were successfully stratified. Also, our results suggest interesting differentially regulated miRNA-mRNA interactions associated with bladder tumor progression. The need for tools that allow an integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression data has been addressed. With this study, we provide an algorithm that emphasizes on the distribution of samples to rank differentially regulated miRNA-mRNA interactions. This is a new point of view compared to current approaches. From bootstrapping analysis, our ranking yields features that build strong classifiers. Further analysis reveals genes identified as differentially regulated by miRNAs to be enriched in cancer pathways, thus suggesting biologically interesting interactions.

  1. Deep RNA sequencing at single base-pair resolution reveals high complexity of the rice transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guojie; Guo, Guangwu; Hu, Xueda

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of eukaryotic transcriptome is essential for studying the complexity of transcriptional regulation and its impact on phenotype. However, comprehensive studies of transcriptomes at single base resolution are rare, even for modern organisms, and lacking for rice. Here, we...... present the first transcriptome atlas for eight organs of cultivated rice. Using high-throughput paired-end RNA-seq, we unambiguously detected transcripts expressing at an extremely low level, as well as a substantial number of novel transcripts, exons, and untranslated regions. An analysis of alternative...... splicing in the rice transcriptome revealed that alternative cis-splicing occurred in approximately 33% of all rice genes. This is far more than previously reported. In addition, we also identified 234 putative chimeric transcripts that seem to be produced by trans-splicing, indicating that transcript...

  2. Neuronal subtypes and diversity revealed by single-nucleus RNA sequencing of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Blue B; Ai, Rizi; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E; Salathia, Neeraj S; Yung, Yun C; Liu, Rui; Wildberg, Andre; Gao, Derek; Fung, Ho-Lim; Chen, Song; Vijayaraghavan, Raakhee; Wong, Julian; Chen, Allison; Sheng, Xiaoyan; Kaper, Fiona; Shen, Richard; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Wei; Chun, Jerold; Zhang, Kun

    2016-06-24

    The human brain has enormously complex cellular diversity and connectivities fundamental to our neural functions, yet difficulties in interrogating individual neurons has impeded understanding of the underlying transcriptional landscape. We developed a scalable approach to sequence and quantify RNA molecules in isolated neuronal nuclei from a postmortem brain, generating 3227 sets of single-neuron data from six distinct regions of the cerebral cortex. Using an iterative clustering and classification approach, we identified 16 neuronal subtypes that were further annotated on the basis of known markers and cortical cytoarchitecture. These data demonstrate a robust and scalable method for identifying and categorizing single nuclear transcriptomes, revealing shared genes sufficient to distinguish previously unknown and orthologous neuronal subtypes as well as regional identity and transcriptomic heterogeneity within the human brain. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Identification of the HIV-1 NC binding interface in Alix Bro1 reveals a role for RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sette, Paola; Dussupt, Vincent; Bouamr, Fadila

    2012-11-01

    HIV-1 recruits members of ESCRT, the cell membrane fission machinery that promotes virus exit. HIV-1 Gag protein gains access to ESCRT directly by binding Alix, an ESCRT-associated protein that promotes budding. The Alix Bro1 and V domains bind Gag NC and p6 regions, respectively. Whereas V-p6 binding and function are well characterized, residues in Bro1 that interact with NC and their functional contribution to Alix-mediated HIV-1 budding are unknown. We mapped Bro1 residues that constitute the NC binding interface and found that they are critical for function. Intriguingly, residues involved in interactions on both sides of the Bro1-NC interface are positively charged, suggesting the involvement of a negatively charged cellular factor serving as a bridge. Nuclease treatment eliminated Bro1-NC interactions, revealing the involvement of RNA. These findings establish a direct role for NC in mediating interactions with ESCRT necessary for virus release and report the first evidence of RNA involvement in such recruitments.

  4. MicroRNA-181a* Targets Nanog in a Subpopulation of CD34+ Cells Isolated From Peripheral Blood

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    Paul J Mintz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exploiting the properties of stem cells by microRNA (miRNA profiling offers an attractive approach to identify new regulators of stem cell fate. Although numerous miRNA have been screened from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC, the targets corresponding to many of these miRNA have not yet been fully elucidated. By miRNA profiling in a subpopulation of CD34+ cells isolated from peripheral blood, we have identified eight clusters of miRNA that were differentially expressed. Further analysis of one of the clusters by bioinformatics revealed that a miRNA, miR-181a*, which is highly expressed in the adherent CD34+ cells, affects the expression levels of Nanog, a stem cell surrogate marker. We show specifically by reporter assay and mutational analysis that miR-181a* targets a seedless 3′ compensatory site in the 3′UTR of Nanog and affects gene expression. We demonstrate that inhibiting miR-181a* upregulates the Nanog expression level, in addition to an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity. Our studies suggest that miR-181a* may be important in controlling the expression level of Nanog in a subpopulation of CD34+ cells.

  5. Establishment and characterization of Prnp knockdown neuroblastoma cells using dual microRNA-mediated RNA interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Agnes; Westaway, David; McKenzie, Debbie; Aiken, Judd; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2011-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal transmissible neurodegenerative disorders. In the pathogenesis of the disease, the cellular prion protein (PrPC) is required for replication of abnormal prion (PrPSc), which results in accumulation of PrPSc. Although there have been extensive studies using Prnp knockout systems, the normal function of PrPC remains ambiguous. Compared with conventional germline knockout technologies and transient naked siRNA-dependent knockdown systems, newly constructed durable chained-miRNA could provide a cell culture model that is closer to the disease status and easier to achieve with no detrimental sequelae. The selective silencing of a target gene by RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach to investigate the unknown function of genes in vitro and in vivo. To reduce PrPC expression, a novel dual targeting-microRNA (miRdual) was constructed. The miRdual, which targets N- and C-termini of Prnp simultaneously, more effectively suppressed PrPC expression compared with conventional single site targeting. Furthermore, to investigate the cellular change following PrPC depletion, gene expression analysis of PrPC interacting and/or associating genes and several assays including proliferation, viability and apoptosis were performed. The transcripts 670460F02Rik and Plk3, Ppp2r2b and Csnk2a1 increase in abundance and are reported to be involved in cell proliferation and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Dual-targeting RNAi with miRdual against Prnp will be useful for analyzing the physiological function of PrPC in neuronal cell lines and may provide a potential therapeutic intervention for prion diseases in the future. PMID:21494092

  6. Crystal structure of the Lassa virus nucleoprotein-RNA complex reveals a gating mechanism for RNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Kathryn M; Liu, Tong; Li, Sheng; King, Liam B; Ngo, Nhi; Zandonatti, Michelle A; Woods, Virgil L; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2011-11-29

    Arenaviruses cause disease in industrialized and developing nations alike. Among them, the hemorrhagic fever virus Lassa is responsible for ~300,000-500,000 infections/y in Western Africa. The arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) forms the protein scaffold of the genomic ribonucleoprotein complexes and is critical for transcription and replication of the viral genome. Here, we present crystal structures of the RNA-binding domain of Lassa virus NP in complex with ssRNA. This structure shows, in contrast to the predicted model, that RNA binds in a deep, basic crevice located entirely within the N-terminal domain. Furthermore, the NP-ssRNA structures presented here, combined with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/MS and functional studies, suggest a gating mechanism by which NP opens to accept RNA. Directed mutagenesis and functional studies provide a unique look into how the arenavirus NPs bind to and protect the viral genome and also suggest the likely assembly by which viral ribonucleoprotein complexes are organized.

  7. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Zhang, Qing [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biological Cancer Therapy, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou 221002 (China); Yang, Yu [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Wu, Chuanfang, E-mail: wuchuanfangsichuan@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition.

  8. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 RNA Crystal Structures Reveal Heterogeneous 1 × 1 Nucleotide UU Internal Loop Conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit; Park, HaJeung; Fang, Pengfei; Parkesh, Raman; Guo, Min; Nettles, Kendall W.; Disney, Matthew D. (Scripps)

    2012-03-27

    RNA internal loops often display a variety of conformations in solution. Herein, we visualize conformational heterogeneity in the context of the 5'CUG/3'GUC repeat motif present in the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Specifically, two crystal structures of a model DM1 triplet repeating construct, 5'r[{und UU}GGGC(C{und U}G){sub 3}GUCC]{sub 2}, refined to 2.20 and 1.52 {angstrom} resolution are disclosed. Here, differences in the orientation of the 5' dangling UU end between the two structures induce changes in the backbone groove width, which reveals that noncanonical 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops can display an ensemble of pairing conformations. In the 2.20 {angstrom} structure, CUGa, the 5' UU forms a one hydrogen-bonded pair with a 5' UU of a neighboring helix in the unit cell to form a pseudoinfinite helix. The central 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loop has no hydrogen bonds, while the terminal 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops each form a one-hydrogen bond pair. In the 1.52 {angstrom} structure, CUGb, the 5' UU dangling end is tucked into the major groove of the duplex. While the canonically paired bases show no change in base pairing, in CUGb the terminal 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops now form two hydrogen-bonded pairs. Thus, the shift in the major groove induced by the 5' UU dangling end alters noncanonical base patterns. Collectively, these structures indicate that 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops in DM1 may sample multiple conformations in vivo. This observation has implications for the recognition of this RNA, and other repeating transcripts, by protein and small molecule ligands.

  9. RNA Helicase DDX5 Regulates MicroRNA Expression and Contributes to Cytoskeletal Reorganization in Basal Breast Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daojing; Huang, Jing; Hu, Zhi

    2011-11-15

    RNA helicase DDX5 (also p68) is involved in all aspects of RNA metabolism and serves as a transcriptional co-regulator, but its functional role in breast cancer remains elusive. Here, we report an integrative biology study of DDX5 in breast cancer, encompassing quantitative proteomics, global MicroRNA profiling, and detailed biochemical characterization of cell lines and human tissues. We showed that protein expression of DDX5 increased progressively from the luminal to basal breast cancer cell lines, and correlated positively with that of CD44 in the basal subtypes. Through immunohistochemistry analyses of tissue microarrays containing over 200 invasive human ductal carcinomas, we observed that DDX5 was upregulated in the majority of malignant tissues, and its expression correlated strongly with those of Ki67 and EGFR in the triple-negative tumors. We demonstrated that DDX5 regulated a subset of MicroRNAs including miR-21 and miR-182 in basal breast cancer cells. Knockdown of DDX5 resulted in reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and reduction of cellular proliferation. The effects were accompanied by upregulation of tumor suppressor PDCD4 (a known miR-21 target); as well as upregulation of cofilin and profilin, two key proteins involved in actin polymerization and cytoskeleton maintenance, as a consequence of miR-182 downregulation. Treatment with miR-182 inhibitors resulted in morphologic phenotypes resembling those induced by DDX5 knockdown. Using bioinformatics tools for pathway and network analyses, we confirmed that the network for regulation of actin cytoskeleton was predominantly enriched for the predicted downstream targets of miR-182. Our results reveal a new functional role of DDX5 in breast cancer via the DDX5→miR-182→actin cytoskeleton pathway, and suggest the potential clinical utility of DDX5 and its downstream MicroRNAs in the theranostics of breast cancer.

  10. MicroRNA-125b transforms myeloid cell lines by repressing multiple mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Marina; Nguyen, Diu; Chen, Cynthia; Shields, Lauren; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-11-01

    We previously described a t(2;11)(p21;q23) chromosomal translocation found in patients with myelodysplasia or acute myeloid leukemia that leads to over-expression of the microRNA miR-125b, and we showed that transplantation of mice with murine stem/progenitor cells overexpressing miR-125b is able to induce leukemia. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of myeloid transformation by miR-125b. To investigate the consequences of miR-125b over-expression on myeloid differentiation, apoptosis and proliferation, we used the NB4 and HL60 human promyelocytic cell lines and the 32Dclone3 murine promyelocytic cell line. To test whether miR-125b is able to transform myeloid cells, we used the non-tumorigenic and interleukin-3-dependent 32Dclone3 cell line over-expressing miR-125b, in xenograft experiments in nude mice and in conditions of interleukin-3 deprivation. To identify new miR-125b targets, we compared, by RNA-sequencing, the transcriptome of cell lines that do or do not over-express miR-125b. We showed that miR-125b over-expression blocks apoptosis and myeloid differentiation and enhances proliferation in both species. More importantly, we demonstrated that miR-125b is able to transform the 32Dclone3 cell line by conferring growth independence from interleukin-3; xenograft experiments showed that these cells form tumors in nude mice. Using RNA-sequencing and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction experiments, we identified multiple miR-125b targets. We demonstrated that ABTB1, an anti-proliferative factor, is a new direct target of miR-125b and we confirmed that CBFB, a transcription factor involved in hematopoiesis, is also targeted by miR-125b. MiR-125b controls apoptosis by down-regulating genes involved in the p53 pathway including BAK1 and TP53INP1. This study demonstrates that in a myeloid context, miR-125b is an oncomiR able to transform cell lines. miR-125b blocks myeloid differentiation in part by targeting CBFB, blocks apoptosis through

  11. Killing of leukemic cells with a BCR/ABL fusion gene by RNA interference (RNAi)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilda, Monika; Fuchs, Uta; Wössmann, Wilhelm; Borkhardt, Arndt

    2002-01-01

    .... We used dsRNA targeting the M-BCR/ABL fusion site to kill leukemic cells with such a rearrangement. Transfection of dsRNA specific for the M-BCR/ABL fusion mRNA into K562 cells depleted the corresponding mRNA and the M-BCR/ABL oncoprotein...

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  12. File list: Pol.Neu.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.YSt.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  19. File list: Pol.Liv.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. File list: Pol.Lng.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Utr.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Pup.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Plc.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Dig.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Adp.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Pan.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Lng.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Epd.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.YSt.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Spl.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Spl.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Pan.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Myo.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.PSC.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Gonad ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Gon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Gonad h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cardiova...,SRX346933,SRX346936,SRX367018,SRX367016 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Liv.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Lung S...RX016555,SRX150101,SRX150102 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Bon.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Bone SRX...,SRX351408 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bon.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Pan.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Pancre...as http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Larvae... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Adl.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Lar.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Gonad ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Gon.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Gonad ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassi...fied http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Lung SRX... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Utr.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Utr.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Larvae... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Bon.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bon.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Oth.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Oth.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Dig.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Digest...ive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Dig.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.CDV.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Adp.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Pan.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Pancre...as http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Adp.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Bld.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Blood ...SRX017006,SRX015143,SRX150560,SRX018610,SRX150396,SRX015144 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Larvae SR...SRX661503,SRX026743,SRX013070,SRX013072,SRX182775,SRX013113,SRX013082,SRX151961 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III All ce...,SRX018606,SRX150396,SRX015144,SRX017002 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Adl.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adult ...SRX395531,SRX331268,SRX331270,SRX395532 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Adl.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Kidney... SRX016996 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Neu.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Blood ...SRX017006,SRX150560,SRX015143,SRX018610,SRX150396,SRX015144 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Lung S...RX016555,SRX150102,SRX150101 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo SR...7582,SRX050604,SRX050605,SRX013077 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Epider...mis SRX016997 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.CDV.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III All ce...,SRX017001,SRX018606,SRX150396,SRX015144 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Gon.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Gonad ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.YSt.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.YSt.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Yeast... strain http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.YSt.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Neural S...1,SRX099887,SRX099886,SRX743834,SRX743832 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III All ce...,SRX150396,SRX015144,SRX150101,SRX150102 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Adp.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Adipocyt...e SRX682084,SRX682086,SRX682085,SRX682083 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Kidney S...SRX1206066,SRX1206067,SRX003882,SRX003883,SRX1206065,SRX367323,SRX326416 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Dig.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Digestiv...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Dig.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Pan.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Pancre...as http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Lar.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Larvae... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Lar.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Kidney... SRX016996 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Bon.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Bld.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Oth.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Oth.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.Unc.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Plc.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Placent...a http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Plc.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Dig.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Prs.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Myo.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Utr.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Brs.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Pan.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Neu.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Epd.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Epidermis... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Epd.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Plc.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Placent...a http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Plc.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Oth.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Bon.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Lar.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Kid.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Gon.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Gonad h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Brs.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Breast ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Plc.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Placent...a http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Plc.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Adipocy...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Unclassif...ied SRX254629 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Kid.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Kidney SR...X661587,SRX062964,SRX143850,SRX236087,SRX020250 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Kid.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Kid.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Kidney SR...X661587,SRX062964,SRX143850,SRX236087,SRX020250 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Kid.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Liv.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Liv.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Liver SRX...1,SRX020172,SRX020181,SRX020178,SRX193438,SRX193437,SRX020174,ERX204060,ERX204064 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Liv.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Unclassi...fied http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Lar.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Larvae h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Lar.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Dig.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Digestive... tract SRX112957,SRX143802 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Dig.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Embryo ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Prs.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Prostat...e http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Prs.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Emb.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Embryo ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Adp.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Adipocy...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Bon.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Bone SRX1...035115,SRX731126 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bon.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Lar.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Larvae h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Lar.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Myo.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Muscle ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Utr.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Uterus SR...X508008,SRX129063,SRX314629,SRX508009,SRX129064,SRX314630 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Utr.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Neu.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Neural ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Spl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Spl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Spleen SR...X062981,SRX143838,SRX020253 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Spl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Spl.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Spl.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Spleen SR...X062981,SRX143838,SRX020253 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Spl.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Adl.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adult ...SRX331268,SRX331270,SRX395531 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Adl.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Prostate...363,SRX173198,SRX173197 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Oth.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Others S...RX1027436,SRX1027435,SRX1027434,SRX1027433,SRX668218,SRX099880,SRX099879 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Oth.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Prostate...866,SRX173198,SRX173197 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...