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Sample records for cell responses static

  1. Static impedance behavior of programmable metallization cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, S.; Saremi, M.; Barnaby, H. J.; Edwards, A.; Kozicki, M. N.; Mitkova, M.; Mahalanabis, D.; Gonzalez-Velo, Y.; Mahmud, A.

    2015-04-01

    Programmable metallization cell (PMC) devices work by growing and dissolving a conducting metallic bridge across a chalcogenide glass (ChG) solid electrolyte, which changes the resistance of the cell. PMC operation relies on the incorporation of metal ions in the ChG films via photo-doping to lower the off-state resistance and stabilize resistive switching, and subsequent transport of these ions by electric fields induced from an externally applied bias. In this paper, the static on- and off-state resistance of a PMC device composed of a layered (Ag-rich/Ag-poor) Ge30Se70 ChG film with active Ag and inert Ni electrodes is characterized and modeled using three dimensional simulation code. Calibrating the model to experimental data enables the extraction of device parameters such as material bandgaps, workfunctions, density of states, carrier mobilities, dielectric constants, and affinities.

  2. Influence of a static magnetic field (250 mT) on the antioxidant response and DNA integrity in THP1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Salem; Douki, Thery; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Garrel, Catherine; Guiraud, Pascale; Favier, Alain; Sakly, Mohsen; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of static magnetic field (SMF) exposure in antioxidant enzyme activity, the labile zinc fraction and DNA damage in THP1 cells (monocyte line). Cell culture flasks were exposed to SMF (250 mT) during 1 h (group 1), 2 h (group 2) and 3 h (group 3). Our results showed that cell viability was slightly lower in SMF-exposed groups compared to a sham exposed group. However, SMF exposure failed to alter malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration (+6%, p > 0.05) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (-5%, p > 0.05), catalase (CAT) (-6%, p > 0.05) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities (+38%, p > 0.05) in group 3 compared to the sham exposed group. DNA analysis by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) revealed that SMF exposure did not exert any DNA damage in groups 1 and 2. However, it induced a low level of DNA single strand breaks in cells of group 3. To further explore the oxidative DNA damage, cellular DNA for group 3 was isolated, hydrolyzed and analysed by HPLC-EC. The level of 8-oxodGuo in this group remained unchanged compared to the sham exposed group (+6.5%, p > 0.05). Cells stained with zinc-specific fluorescent probes zinpyr-1 showed a decrease of labile zinc fraction in all groups exposed to SMF. Our data showed that SMF exposure (250 mT, during 3 h) did not cause oxidative stress and DNA damage in THP1 cells. However, SMF could alter the intracellular labile zinc fraction.

  3. Static response of elastic inflated wrinkled membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Riccardo; Ligarò, Salvatore S.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we present an effective numerical algorithm for determining the equilibrium shapes of inflated elastic membranes susceptible to wrinkling. The use of a two-state constitutive law and the introduction of a suitable criterion allow for accounting for wrinkling of the membrane, although in an approximated way. In the active state, the material is able to transmit only tensile stresses; vice versa, in the passive state it is stress-free and can contract freely. Equilibrium of the membrane in the current inflated configuration is enforced by recourse to the minimum total potential energy principle, whereas the Lagrange multipliers method is used to solve the minimum problem by accounting for the aforesaid nonlinear constitutive law. We use an expressly developed iterative-incremental numerical algorithm, consistent with the established governing set of equations, for accurately monitoring the evolution of the stress field in the membrane during the inflation process. Specifically, we suppose that the membrane reaches its final shape at the end of a four-stage loading process corresponding to the temporary enforcement and the subsequent removal of a fictitious antagonist plane traction acting uniformly along its entire boundary. By this way it is possible to solve with great accuracy the set of governing equilibrium equations by means of a numerical procedure in which the membrane's tangent stiffness is always kept different from zero. The soundness of the proposed algorithm is verified by comparing the results with well-known solutions available in the literature. In particular, for each specific value of pressure, the current configuration of the inflated membrane found by assuming that compressions are allowed is compared in details to the corresponding pseudo-deformed surface, obtained by assuming a tension-only response.

  4. Cardiovascular responses to voluntary and nonvoluntary static exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, D B; Peel, C; Mitchell, J H

    1992-11-01

    We have measured the cardiovascular responses during voluntary and nonvoluntary (electrically induced) one-leg static exercise in humans. Eight normal subjects were studied at rest and during 5 min of static leg extension at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction performed voluntarily and nonvoluntarily in random order. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac output (CO) were determined, and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) and stroke volume (SV) were calculated. HR increased from approximately 65 +/- 3 beats/min at rest to 80 +/- 4 and 78 +/- 6 beats/min (P voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. CO increased from 5.1 +/- 0.7 to 6.0 +/- 0.8 and 6.2 +/- 0.8 l/min (P voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. PVR and SV did not change significantly during voluntary or nonvoluntary contractions. Thus the cardiovascular responses were not different between voluntary and electrically induced contractions. These results suggest that the increases in CO, HR, SV, MAP, and PVR during 5 min of static contractions can be elicited without any contribution from a central neural mechanism (central command). However, central command could still have an important role during voluntary static exercise.

  5. The static response of a bowed inclined hot wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    The directional sensitivity of a bowed, inclined hot wire is investigated using a simple model for the convective heat transfer. The static response is analyzed for subsonic and supersonic flows. It is shown that the effects of both end conduction and wire bowing are greater in supersonic flow. Regardless of the Mach number, however, these two phenomena have distinctly different effects; end conduction appears to be responsible for reducing the nonlinearity of the response, whereas bowing increases the directional sensitivity. Comparison with the available data suggests that the analysis is useful for interpreting the experimental results.

  6. Quasi-static responses and variational principles in gradient plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc-Son

    2016-12-01

    Gradient models have been much discussed in the literature for the study of time-dependent or time-independent processes such as visco-plasticity, plasticity and damage. This paper is devoted to the theory of Standard Gradient Plasticity at small strain. A general and consistent mathematical description available for common time-independent behaviours is presented. Our attention is focussed on the derivation of general results such as the description of the governing equations for the global response and the derivation of related variational principles in terms of the energy and the dissipation potentials. It is shown that the quasi-static response under a loading path is a solution of an evolution variational inequality as in classical plasticity. The rate problem and the rate minimum principle are revisited. A time-discretization by the implicit scheme of the evolution equation leads to the increment problem. An increment of the response associated with a load increment is a solution of a variational inequality and satisfies also a minimum principle if the energy potential is convex. The increment minimum principle deals with stables solutions of the variational inequality. Some numerical methods are discussed in view of the numerical simulation of the quasi-static response.

  7. Test chambers for cell culture in static magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glinka, Marek, E-mail: mag@iq.pl [Research and Development Centre of Electrical Machines. 188 Rozdzienskiego Street, 40-203 Katowice (Poland); Gawron, Stanisław, E-mail: s.gawron@komel.katowice.pl [Research and Development Centre of Electrical Machines. 188 Rozdzienskiego Street, 40-203 Katowice (Poland); Sieroń, Aleksander, E-mail: sieron1@tlen.pl [Department of Internal Diseases, Angiology and Physical Medicine in Bytom. Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. 15 Batorego Street, 41-902 Bytom (Poland); Pawłowska–Góral, Katarzyna, E-mail: kgoral@sum.edu.pl [Department of Food and Nutrition in Sosnowiec. Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. 8 Jednosci Street, 41-200 Sosnowiec (Poland); Cieślar, Grzegorz, E-mail: cieslar1@tlen.pl [Department of Internal Diseases, Angiology and Physical Medicine in Bytom. Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. 15 Batorego Street, 41-902 Bytom (Poland); Sieroń–Stołtny, Karolina [Department of Internal Diseases, Angiology and Physical Medicine in Bytom. Medical University of Silesia in Katowice. 15 Batorego Street, 41-902 Bytom (Poland)

    2013-04-15

    Article presents a test chamber intended to be used for in vitro cell culture in homogenous constant magnetic field with parametrically variable magnitude. We constructed test chambers with constant parameters of control homeostasis of cell culture for the different parameters of static magnetic field. The next step was the computer calculation of 2D and 3D simulation of the static magnetic field distribution in the chamber. The analysis of 2D and 3D calculations of magnetic induction in the cells' exposition plane reveals, in comparison to the detection results, the greater accuracy of 2D calculations (Figs. 9 and 10). The divergence in 2D method was 2–4% and 8 to 10% in 3D method (reaching 10% only out of the cells′ cultures margins). -- Highlights: ► We present test chamber to be used for in vitro cell culture in static magnetic field. ► The technical data of the chamber construction was presented. ► 2D versus 3D simulation of static magnetic field distribution in chamber was reported. ► We report the accuracy of 2D calculation than 3D.

  8. Blood pressure response to low level static contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallentin, Nils; Jørgensen, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    The present study re-examines the 15% MVC concept, i.e. the existence of a circulatory steady-state in low intensity static contractions below 15% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Mean arterial blood pressure was studied during static endurance contractions of the elbow flexor and extensor...... 0.7) min for elbow extension]. Mean arterial blood pressure exhibited a continuous and progressive increase during the 10% MVC contractions indicating that the 15% MVC concept would not appear to be valid. The terminal blood pressure value recorded at the point of exhaustion in the 10% MVC elbow...... extension experiment was identical to the peak pressure attained in the 40% MVC contraction. For the elbow flexors the terminal pressor response was slightly but significantly lower at 10% MVC [122.3 (SD 10.1) mmHg, 16.3 (SD 1.4) kPa] in comparison with 40% MVC [130.4 (SD 7.4) mmHg, 17.4 (SD 1.0) kPa]. When...

  9. Static Magnetic Field Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Pulp Cells by Affecting Cell Membrane Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chih Hsieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the causes of dental pulpitis is lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced inflammatory response. Following pulp tissue inflammation, odontoblasts, dental pulp cells (DPCs, and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs will activate and repair damaged tissue to maintain homeostasis. However, when LPS infection is too serious, dental repair is impossible and disease may progress to irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether static magnetic field (SMF can attenuate inflammatory response of dental pulp cells challenged with LPS. In methodology, dental pulp cells were isolated from extracted teeth. The population of DPSCs in the cultured DPCs was identified by phenotypes and multilineage differentiation. The effects of 0.4 T SMF on DPCs were observed through MTT assay and fluorescent anisotropy assay. Our results showed that the SMF exposure had no effect on surface markers or multilineage differentiation capability. However, SMF exposure increases cell viability by 15%. In addition, SMF increased cell membrane rigidity which is directly related to higher fluorescent anisotropy. In the LPS-challenged condition, DPCs treated with SMF demonstrated a higher tolerance to LPS-induced inflammatory response when compared to untreated controls. According to these results, we suggest that 0.4 T SMF attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response to DPCs by changing cell membrane stability.

  10. Bone Response to Static Compressive Stress at Bone-Implant Interface: A Pilot Study of Critical Static Compressive Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikumi, Noriharu; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical imbalance caused by mechanical overload or poor bone quality around a dental implant can result in osseointegration failure. To avoid that, it is important to identify an appropriate safety stress margin (critical stress level). For this study, a novel device was developed to generate a quantitative amount of static compressive stress under an aseptic closed condition. The aim was to clarify the amount of critical stress produced on the cortical bone when static compression is applied to the osseointegrated bone-implant interface. Small parts for bone sustaining, load generation, and load transmittance were developed to generate quantitative static compressive stress at the bone-implant interface and implanted inside the tibial cortical bone in adult beagle dogs. Each tibia in two dogs received bone-sustaining parts, then after 2 months, the load-transmitting parts were placed into the bone-sustaining parts. After another 2 months, various magnitudes of static compressive stress (0-180 MPa) were generated by tightening the load-generating part to the osseointegrated bone-implant interface. After 7 days, the animals were euthanized, and dissected blocks were prepared for histomorphometric analyses. There were no obvious signs of bone resorption or loss of osseointegration in any of the dogs. The change in shape of osteon was not influenced by the amount of static compressive stress. However, periosteal reactions were observed under the cortical bone on the opposite side. These results indicate that osseointegrated bone-implant interfaces show minimal response based on the magnitude of static compressive stress, even when such stress is greater than 120 MPa.

  11. On the equivalent static loads approach for dynamic response structural optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolpe, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    as the original problem. The optimization theoretical foundation of the algorithm is mainly developed in Park and Kang (J Optim Theory Appl 118(1):191–200, 2003). In that article it is shown, for a certain class of problems, that if the equivalent static loads algorithm terminates then the KKT conditions......The equivalent static loads algorithm is an increasingly popular approach to solve dynamic response structural optimization problems. The algorithm is based on solving a sequence of related static response structural optimization problems with the same objective and constraint functions...

  12. A shear deformable theory of laminated composite shallow shell-type panels and their response analysis. II - Static response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdeir, A. A.; Librescu, L.; Frederick, D.

    1989-01-01

    In the second part of this paper, by using the static counterparts of the governing equations derived in Librescu (1989), the static response of shallow composite shell-type panels subjected to a sinusoidal transverse load is investigated. The numerical applications, encompassing a large number of boundary conditions and various lamination schemes, allow one to obtain some conclusions which are formulated in the paper.

  13. Static Behavior of Chalcogenide Based Programmable Metallization Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Saba

    Nonvolatile memory (NVM) technologies have been an integral part of electronic systems for the past 30 years. The ideal non-volatile memory have minimal physical size, energy usage, and cost while having maximal speed, capacity, retention time, and radiation hardness. A promising candidate for next-generation memory is ion-conducting bridging RAM which is referred to as programmable metallization cell (PMC), conductive bridge RAM (CBRAM), or electrochemical metallization memory (ECM), which is likely to surpass flash memory in all the ideal memory characteristics. A comprehensive physics-based model is needed to completely understand PMC operation and assist in design optimization. To advance the PMC modeling effort, this thesis presents a precise physical model parameterizing materials associated with both ion-rich and ion-poor layers of the PMC's solid electrolyte, so that captures the static electrical behavior of the PMC in both its low-resistance on-state (LRS) and high resistance off-state (HRS). The experimental data is measured from a chalcogenide glass PMC designed and manufactured at ASU. The static on- and off-state resistance of a PMC device composed of a layered (Ag-rich/Ag-poor) Ge30Se70 ChG film is characterized and modeled using three dimensional simulation code written in Silvaco Atlas finite element analysis software. Calibrating the model to experimental data enables the extraction of device parameters such as material bandgaps, workfunctions, density of states, carrier mobilities, dielectric constants, and affinities. The sensitivity of our modeled PMC to the variation of its prominent achieved material parameters is examined on the HRS and LRS impedance behavior. The obtained accurate set of material parameters for both Ag-rich and Ag-poor ChG systems and process variation verification on electrical characteristics enables greater fidelity in PMC device simulation, which significantly enhances our ability to understand the underlying physics of

  14. Linear and quadratic static response functions and structure functions in Yukawa liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Péter; Donkó, Zoltán; Kalman, Gabor J; Golden, Kenneth I

    2014-08-01

    We compute linear and quadratic static density response functions of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids by applying an external perturbation potential in molecular dynamics simulations. The response functions are also obtained from the equilibrium fluctuations (static structure factors) in the system via the fluctuation-dissipation theorems. The good agreement of the quadratic response functions, obtained in the two different ways, confirms the quadratic fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We also find that the three-point structure function may be factorizable into two-point structure functions, leading to a cluster representation of the equilibrium triplet correlation function.

  15. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on hamstrings' response times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Francisco; De Ste Croix, Mark; Sainz de Baranda, Pilar; Santonja, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The main purposes of this study were to (a) investigate acute effects of static and dynamic lower limb stretching routines on total response time, pre-motor time and motor time of the medial and lateral hamstrings during maximal eccentric isokinetic knee flexion; and (b) determine whether static and dynamic routines elicit similar responses. A total of 38 active adults completed the following intervention protocols in a randomised order on separate days: (a) non-stretching (control condition), (b) static stretching and (c) dynamic stretching. After the stretching or control intervention, total response time, pre-motor time and motor time of the medial and lateral hamstrings were assessed during eccentric knee flexion movements with participants prone. Measures were compared via a mixed-design factorial ANOVA. There were no main effects for total response time, pre-motor time and motor time. The results suggest that dynamic and static stretching has no influence on hamstrings response times (total response time, pre-motor time and motor time) and hence neither form of stretching reduces this primary risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  16. Asian carp behavior in response to static water gun firing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layhee, Megan J.; Gross, Jackson A.; Parsley, Michael J.; Romine, Jason G.; Glover, David C.; Suski, Cory D.; Wagner, Tristany L.; Sepulveda, Adam J.; Gresswell, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The potential for invasion of Asian carp into the Great Lakes has ecological and socio-economic implications. If they become established, Asian carp are predicted to alter lake ecosystems and impact commercial and recreational fisheries. The Chicago Sanitary and Shipping Canal is an important biological conduit between the Mississippi River Basin, where invasive Asian carp are abundant, and the Great Lakes. Millions of dollars have been spent to erect an electric barrier defense in the canal to prevent movement of Asian carp into the Great Lakes, but the need for additional fish deterrent technologies to supplement the existing barrier is warranted. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center are examining seismic water gun technology, formerly used in oceanic oil exploration, as a fish deterrent. The goal of the current study is to employ telemetry and sonar monitoring equipment to assess the behavioral response of Asian carp to seismic water guns and the sound energy it generates.

  17. The inelastic quasi-static response of sandwich structures to local loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koysin, V.; Shipsha, Andrey; Rizov, Victor

    2004-01-01

    The paper addresses the inelastic quasi-static response of sandwich beams and panels with foam core to localized loads. The plane and axisymmetric formulations for local indentation or local low-velocity impact by a rigid body are considered; no overall bending is assumed. The governing equations

  18. Cell contractility facilitates alignment of cells and tissues to static uniaxial stretch

    CERN Document Server

    Rens, Elisabeth G

    2016-01-01

    During animal development and homeostasis, the structure of tissues, including muscles, blood vessels and connective tissues adapts to mechanical strains in the extracellular matrix (ECM). These strains originate from the differential growth of tissues or forces due to muscle contraction or gravity. Here we show using a computational model that by amplifying local strain cues, active cell contractility can facilitate and accelerate the reorientation of single cells to static strains. At the collective cell level, the model simulations show that active cell contractility can facilitate the formation of strings along the orientation of stretch. The computational model is based on a hybrid cellular Potts and finite-element simulation framework describing a mechanical cell-substrate feedback, where: 1) cells apply forces on the ECM, such that 2) local strains are generated in the ECM, and 3) cells preferentially extend protrusions along the strain orientation. In accordance with experimental observations, simulat...

  19. Physiological Response to Static Muscle Contractions in Standing and Supine Positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Meldgaard; Andersen, T. Bull

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological responses to static muscle contractions in the standing position and the supine position. Eight subjects performed static contractions of the ankle extensors in both positions. Blood pressure (SBP and DBP), heart rate (HR......), electromyography (EMG), and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) were determined during the static contractions. The results of main interest were a significantly larger initial decline of muscle oxygen concentration and a steeper negative slope of the frequency content in the EMG signals in the supine position....... These results indicate that the fatigue development is more pronounced in a supine position, which is most likely due to changes in muscle blood flow....

  20. Mechanical response of a fibre reinforced earthen material under static and impact loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymerich, Francesco; Fenu, Luigi; Francesconi, Luca; Meloni, Paola

    2015-09-01

    This study examines the improvements provided by the insertion of hemp fibres with different weight fractions and lengths in an earthen material. The structural response of the materials was investigated by means of static and impact bending tests carried out on notched samples. The main focus of the analyses was in the characterization of the structural properties of the materials in terms of fracture resistance, post-cracking performance and energy absorption capability. The results of the study show that hemp fibres improve significantly the mechanical and fracture properties of the earthen material under both static and dynamic bending. It was also found that the structural properties of unreinforced and reinforced earthen materials are highly sensitive to the stress-rate, with higher strength and fracture resistance under impact loading than under static loading.

  1. Multiscale Static Analysis of Notched and Unnotched Laminates Using the Generalized Method of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghipour Ghezeljeh, Paria; Arnold, Steven M.; Pineda, Evan J.; Stier, Bertram; Hansen, Lucas; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    The generalized method of cells (GMC) is demonstrated to be a viable micromechanics tool for predicting the deformation and failure response of laminated composites, with and without notches, subjected to tensile and compressive static loading. Given the axial [0], transverse [90], and shear [+45/-45] response of a carbon/epoxy (IM7/977-3) system, the unnotched and notched behavior of three multidirectional layups (Layup 1: [0,45,90,-45](sub 2S), Layup 2: [0,60,0](sub 3S), and Layup 3: [30,60,90,-30, -60](sub 2S)) are predicted under both tensile and compressive static loading. Matrix nonlinearity is modeled in two ways. The first assumes all nonlinearity is due to anisotropic progressive damage of the matrix only, which is modeled, using the multiaxial mixed-mode continuum damage model (MMCDM) within GMC. The second utilizes matrix plasticity coupled with brittle final failure based on the maximum principle strain criteria to account for matrix nonlinearity and failure within the Finite Element Analysis--Micromechanics Analysis Code (FEAMAC) software multiscale framework. Both MMCDM and plasticity models incorporate brittle strain- and stress-based failure criteria for the fiber. Upon satisfaction of these criteria, the fiber properties are immediately reduced to a nominal value. The constitutive response for each constituent (fiber and matrix) is characterized using a combination of vendor data and the axial, transverse, and shear responses of unnotched laminates. Then, the capability of the multiscale methodology is assessed by performing blind predictions of the mentioned notched and unnotched composite laminates response under tensile and compressive loading. Tabulated data along with the detailed results (i.e., stress-strain curves as well as damage evolution states at various ratios of strain to failure) for all laminates are presented.

  2. Influence of the flexibility of beams and slabs in static response and dynamic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. BUENO

    Full Text Available Abstract This article examines numerically the flexibility influence of support beams in static response and dynamic properties of a symmetric plate formed by massive slabs of reinforced concrete in elastic linear regime, using the Finite Element Method. In the static response the variation of bending mo-ments and displacements are evaluated, which depend on the relationship between the flexibility of the slab and the beam. The evaluation of dynamic properties is held in undamped free vibration, through which the vibration modes and the values of the natural frequencies is obtained, which are compared with the limits of the Brazilian standard code for design of concrete structures. Results show that the response may show great variation due to the change in the relationship between bending stiffness of the slabs and the beams.

  3. Tendon vibration attenuates superficial venous vessel response of the resting limb during static arm exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooue Anna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The superficial vein of the resting limb constricts sympathetically during exercise. Central command is the one of the neural mechanisms that controls the cardiovascular response to exercise. However, it is not clear whether central command contributes to venous vessel response during exercise. Tendon vibration during static elbow flexion causes primary muscle spindle afferents, such that a lower central command is required to achieve a given force without altering muscle force. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate whether a reduction in central command during static exercise with tendon vibration influences the superficial venous vessel response in the resting limb. Methods Eleven subjects performed static elbow flexion at 35% of maximal voluntary contraction with (EX + VIB and without (EX vibration of the biceps brachii tendon. The heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE in overall and exercising muscle were measured. The cross-sectional area (CSAvein and blood velocity of the basilic vein in the resting upper arm were assessed by ultrasound, and blood flow (BFvein was calculated using both variables. Results Muscle tension during exercise was similar between EX and EX + VIB. However, RPEs at EX + VIB were lower than those at EX (P P vein in the resting limb at EX decreased during exercise from baseline (P vein at EX + VIB did not change during exercise. CSAvein during exercise at EX was smaller than that at EX + VIB (P vein did not change during the protocol under either condition. The decreases in circulatory response and RPEs during EX + VIB, despite identical muscle tension, showed that activation of central command was less during EX + VIB than during EX. Abolishment of the decrease in CSAvein during exercise at EX + VIB may thus have been caused by a lower level of central command at EX + VIB rather than EX. Conclusion Diminished central command induced by tendon

  4. Thermal correlation analysis of a long-span suspension bridge static responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Linren; Chen, Lan; Xia, Yong; Brownjohn, James M. W.

    2016-04-01

    Harsh service environment degenerates the performance of bridges even leads to catastrophic collapse. Structural temperature has been widely recognized as one of the most negative environmental effects on bridges. The structural responses are deeply affected by the variation and distribution of temperatures on bridges. Therefore, identifying the correlations between them is a significant issue for structural safety assessment. In this study, the relationships between the temperature induced static response and the surrounding weather factors are investigated based on the long-term field measurements of a long-span suspension bridge. The correlations of the meteorological parameters between the bridge filed and the nearby weather station, and the relations of structural static responses to the air temperature, are investigated. The results indicate that relationships of meteorological parameters between nearby weather station and the bridge field can be predicted. The correlation between the static responses and the air temperature and is remarkable with high correlation coefficient. The conclusions are expected to provide reference for the design and evaluation of longspan suspension bridges.

  5. 2D light scattering static cytometry for label-free single cell analysis with submicron resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Linyan; Yang, Yan; Sun, Xuming; Qiao, Xu; Liu, Qiao; Song, Kun; Kong, Beihua; Su, Xuantao

    2015-11-01

    Conventional optical cytometric techniques usually measure fluorescence or scattering signals at fixed angles from flowing cells in a liquid stream. Here we develop a novel cytometer that employs a scanning optical fiber to illuminate single static cells on a glass slide, which requires neither microfluidic fabrication nor flow control. This static cytometric technique measures two dimensional (2D) light scattering patterns via a small numerical aperture (0.25) microscope objective for label-free single cell analysis. Good agreement is obtained between the yeast cell experimental and Mie theory simulated patterns. It is demonstrated that the static cytometer with a microscope objective of a low resolution around 1.30 μm has the potential to perform high resolution analysis on yeast cells with distributed sizes. The capability of the static cytometer for size determination with submicron resolution is validated via measurements on standard microspheres with mean diameters of 3.87 and 4.19 μm. Our 2D light scattering static cytometric technique may provide an easy-to-use, label-free, and flow-free method for single cell diagnostics.

  6. Static response and stability of coated microbubbles—multiplicity of solutions and parameter estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytra, Alkmini; Pelekasis, Nikos, E-mail: pel@uth.gr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, Volos 38334 (Greece)

    2014-08-01

    The static response of a coated microbubble subject to an external pressure distribution is investigated, in order to identify different response patterns with varying viscoelastic properties of the shell. Theoretical and numerical analysis of the axisymmetric response of a microbubble is performed via the static force balance, in order to obtain the radial and tangential (polar) displacements of a shell subject to a uniform or point load. The stretching and bending stiffnesses of the shell, along with the compressibility of the internal gas, comprise the resistance to deformation of the microbubble. The finite element methodology, with B-splines as basis functions, is employed for the solution of the nonlinear static problem while Newton’s iterations provide the converged solution. The Jacobian matrix provides necessary information regarding stability of the emerging static configurations. The buckling instability of a uniformly loaded shell results in a subcritical bifurcation that is characterized by symmetric/asymmetric shapes for the parameter range pertaining to polymeric/phospholipid shells. As the relative importance of bending stiffness with respect to stretching decreases symmetric shapes determine the primary buckling instability. Strain softening shell behavior conforms to this pattern due to the increase of the effective area dilatation modulus during compression. Increasing the resistance to compression forces the asymmetric and symmetric solution families to terminate at larger bubble volumes. When a point load is considered the force deformation curve is characterized by a transition from a linear Reissner-type to a nonlinear Pogorelov-type response, followed by a regime where resistance to compression dominates. Identifying these regimes in atomic force microscopy measurements can be used for estimating the area dilatation and bending modulus of the shell. (paper)

  7. Muscle tissue oxygenation, pressure, electrical, and mechanical responses during dynamic and static voluntary contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Pernille; Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Søgaard, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic muscle contractions have been shown to cause greater energy turnover and fatigue than static contractions performed at a corresponding force level. Therefore, we hypothesized that: (1) electro- (EMG) and mechanomyography (MMG), intramuscular pressure (IMP), and reduction in muscle oxygen...... similar in spite of major differences in the MMG and EMG responses of the muscle during contraction periods. This may relate to the surprisingly lower IMP in DYN than IST....

  8. Growth plate cartilage shows different strain patterns in response to static versus dynamic mechanical modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Rosa; Londono, Irene; Parent, Stefan; Moldovan, Florina; Villemure, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Longitudinal growth of long bones and vertebrae occurs in growth plate cartilage. This process is partly regulated by mechanical forces, which are one of the underlying reasons for progression of growth deformities such as idiopathic adolescent scoliosis and early-onset scoliosis. This concept of mechanical modulation of bone growth is also exploited in the development of fusionless treatments of these deformities. However, the optimal loading condition for the mechanical modulation of growth plate remains to be identified. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of in vitro static versus dynamic modulation and of dynamic loading parameters, such as frequency and amplitude, on the mechanical responses and histomorphology of growth plate explants. Growth plate explants from distal ulnae of 4-week-old swines were extracted and randomly distributed among six experimental groups: baseline ([Formula: see text]), control ([Formula: see text]), static ([Formula: see text]) and dynamic ([Formula: see text]). For static and dynamic groups, mechanical modulation was performed in vitro using an Indexed CartiGen bioreactor. A stress relaxation test combined with confocal microscopy and digital image correlation was used to characterize the mechanical responses of each explant in terms of peak stress, equilibrium stress, equilibrium modulus of elasticity and strain pattern. Histomorphometrical measurements were performed on toluidine blue tissue sections using a semi-automatic custom-developed MATLAB toolbox. Results suggest that compared to dynamic modulation, static modulation changes the strain pattern of the tissue and thus is more detrimental for tissue biomechanics, while the histomorphological parameters are not affected by mechanical modulation. Also, under dynamic modulation, changing the frequency or amplitude does not affect the biomechanical response of the tissue. Results of this study will be useful in finding optimal and non-damaging parameters

  9. THERMAL VACUUM TEST OF ORBITAL STATIC MOISTURE-REMOVAL FUEL CELL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report presents the results of a thermal vacuum chamber test of an orbital fuel cell of advanced design. The fuel cell package used a static moisture-removal system. The fuel cell , tested in the thermal vacuum chamber at Wright-Patterson AFB, gave satisfactory results. This test constituted the second and final ground qualification of this orbital fuel cell prior to orbital test. (Author)

  10. Analysis of Static and Dynamic Properties of Micromirror with the Application of Response Surface Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Martowicz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of an application of response surface method to aid the analysis of variation of static and dynamic properties of micromirror. The multiphysics approach was taken into account to elaborate finite element model of electrostatically actuated microdevice and coupled analyses were carried out to yield the results. Used procedure of metamodel fitting is described and its quality is discussed. Elaborated approximations were used to perform the sensitivity analysis as well as to study the propagation of variation introduced by uncertain and control parameters. The input parameters deal with geometry, material properties and control voltage. As studied output characteristics there were chosen the resultant static vertical displacement of reflecting surfaces and the resonance frequency related to the first normal mode of vibration.

  11. Cell cytoskeletal changes effected by static compressive stress lead to changes in the contractile properties of tissue regenerative collagen membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gellynck

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Static compressive stress can influence the matrix, which subsequently affects cell behaviour and the cell’s ability to further transform the matrix. This study aimed to assess response to static compressive stress at different stages of osteoblast differentiation and assess the cell cytoskeleton’s role as a conduit of matrix-derived stimuli. Mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs (D1 ORL UVA, osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1 and post-osteoblast/pre-osteocyte-like cells (MLO-A5 were seeded in hydrated and compressed collagen gels. Contraction was quantified macroscopically, and cell morphology, survival, differentiation and mineralisation assessed using confocal microscopy, alamarBlue® assay, real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR and histological stains, respectively. Confocal microscopy demonstrated cell shape changes and favourable microfilament organisation with static compressive stress of the collagen matrix; furthermore, cell survival was greater compared to the hydrated gels. The stage of osteoblast differentiation determined the degree of matrix contraction, with MSCs demonstrating the greatest amount. Introduction of microfilament disrupting inhibitors confirmed that pre-stress and tensegrity forces were under the influence of gel density, and there was increased survival and differentiation of the cells within the compressed collagen compared to the hydrated collagen. There was also relative stiffening and differentiation with time of the compressed cell-seeded collagen, allowing for greater manipulation. In conclusion, the combined collagen chemistry and increased density of the microenvironment can promote upregulation of osteogenic genes and mineralisation; MSCs can facilitate matrix contraction to form an engineered membrane with the potential to serve as a ‘pseudo-periosteum’ in the regeneration of bone defects.

  12. Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells in the Periodontitis Microenvironment Are Sensitive to Static Mechanical Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During orthodontic treatment, periodontium remodeling of periodontitis patients under mechanical force was abnormal. We have previously confirmed the function impairment of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs in the periodontitis microenvironment which might be involved in this pathological process. However, the response of PDLSCs in periodontitis microenvironment to mechanical force remains unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we introduced a Flexcell tension apparatus and investigated the response of PDLSCs obtained from periodontal tissues of periodontitis patients (PPDLSCs and of those obtained from healthy periodontal tissues (HPDLSCs to different magnitudes of static mechanical strain (SMS. PPDLSCs showed increased proliferation, decreased osteogenic activity, activated osteoclastogenesis, and greater secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Different magnitudes of SMS exerted distinct effects on HPDLSCs and PPDLSCs. An SMS of 12% induced optimal effects in HPDLSCs, including the highest proliferation, the best osteogenic ability, the lowest osteoclastogenesis, and the lowest secretion of inflammatory cytokines, while the optimal SMS for PPDLSCs was 8%. Excessive SMS damaged PPDLSCs function, including decreased proliferation, an imbalance between osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, and an activated inflammatory response. Our data suggest that PPDLSCs are more sensitive and less tolerant to SMS, and this may explain why mechanical force results in undesirable effects in periodontitis patients.

  13. Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells in the Periodontitis Microenvironment Are Sensitive to Static Mechanical Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Shiyu; Gao, Jie; Qin, Wen; Song, Yang

    2017-01-01

    During orthodontic treatment, periodontium remodeling of periodontitis patients under mechanical force was abnormal. We have previously confirmed the function impairment of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) in the periodontitis microenvironment which might be involved in this pathological process. However, the response of PDLSCs in periodontitis microenvironment to mechanical force remains unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we introduced a Flexcell tension apparatus and investigated the response of PDLSCs obtained from periodontal tissues of periodontitis patients (PPDLSCs) and of those obtained from healthy periodontal tissues (HPDLSCs) to different magnitudes of static mechanical strain (SMS). PPDLSCs showed increased proliferation, decreased osteogenic activity, activated osteoclastogenesis, and greater secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Different magnitudes of SMS exerted distinct effects on HPDLSCs and PPDLSCs. An SMS of 12% induced optimal effects in HPDLSCs, including the highest proliferation, the best osteogenic ability, the lowest osteoclastogenesis, and the lowest secretion of inflammatory cytokines, while the optimal SMS for PPDLSCs was 8%. Excessive SMS damaged PPDLSCs function, including decreased proliferation, an imbalance between osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, and an activated inflammatory response. Our data suggest that PPDLSCs are more sensitive and less tolerant to SMS, and this may explain why mechanical force results in undesirable effects in periodontitis patients. PMID:28316629

  14. Influence of reaction piles on test pile response in a static load test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-qing ZHANG; Shu-cai LI; Zhong-miao ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new analytical method to analyze the influence of reaction piles on the test pile response in a static load test.In our method,the interactive effect between soil and pile is simulated using independent springs and the shear displacement method is adopted to analyze the influence of reaction piles on test pile response.Moreover,the influence of the sheltering effect between reaction piles and test pile on the test pile response is taken into account.Two cases are analyzed to verify the rationality and efficiency of the present method.This method can be easily extended to a nonlinear response of an influenced test pile embedded in a multilayered soil,and the validity is also demonstrated using centrifuge model tests and a computer program presented in the literature.The present analyses indicate that the proposed method will lead to an underestimation of the test pile settlement in a static load test if the influence of the presence of reaction piles on the test pile response is neglected.

  15. PARALLEL COMPUTING FOR STATIC RESPONSE ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES WITH UNCERTAIN-BUT-BOUNDED PARAMETERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiping Qiu; Xiaojun; Wang Xu Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The vertex solution for estimation on the static displacement bounds of structures with uncertain-but-bounded parameters is studied in this paper.For the linear static problem,when there are uncertain interval parameters in the stiffness matrix and the vector of applied forces,the static response may be an interval.Based on the interval operations,the interval solution obtained by the vertex solution is more accurate and more credible than other methods (such as the perturbation method).However,the vertex solution method by traditional serial computing usually needs large computational efforts,especially for large structures.In order to avoid its disadvantages of large calculation and much runtime,its parallel computing which can be used in large-scale computing is presented in this paper.Two kinds of parallel computing algorithms are proposed based on the vertex solution.The parallel computing will solve many interval problems which cannot be resolved by traditional interval analysis methods.

  16. Role of Sod Gene in Response to Static Magnetic Fields in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanini, Raouia; Chatti, Abdelwaheb; Ghorbel, Selma Ben; Landoulsi, Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    The protective role of superoxide dismutase (SOD) against non-ionizing radiation such as static electromagnetic field (200 mT) has been studied in wild-type and mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking cytosolic Mn-SOD (sodM), Fe-SOD (sodB), or both SODs (sodMB). Our results showed that inactivation of sodM and/or sodB genes increases the sensitivity of P. aeruginosa toward stress induced by the static magnetic field (200 mT). Furthermore, our results showed an enhancement of SOD, catalase, and peroxidases after exposure to the magnetic field. However, wild-type cells maintained significantly higher activities of antioxidant enzymes than mutant strains. The malondialdehyde produced by the oxidative degradation of unsaturated lipids and fatty acids showed significant increase in mutant strains compared to the wild-type. The overall results showed that the SOD has a protective role against a stress induced by static electromagnetic field in P. aeruginosa.

  17. A rat tail temporary static compression model reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration with decreased notochordal cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Yurube, Takashi; Kakutani, Kenichiro; Maeno, Koichiro; Takada, Toru; Yamamoto, Junya; Kurakawa, Takuto; Akisue, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Nishida, Kotaro

    2014-03-01

    The intervertebral disc nucleus pulposus (NP) has two phenotypically distinct cell types-notochordal cells (NCs) and non-notochordal chondrocyte-like cells. In human discs, NCs are lost during adolescence, which is also when discs begin to show degenerative signs. However, little evidence exists regarding the link between NC disappearance and the pathogenesis of disc degeneration. To clarify this, a rat tail disc degeneration model induced by static compression at 1.3 MPa for 0, 1, or 7 days was designed and assessed for up to 56 postoperative days. Radiography, MRI, and histomorphology showed degenerative disc findings in response to the compression period. Immunofluorescence displayed that the number of DAPI-positive NP cells decreased with compression; particularly, the decrease was notable in larger, vacuolated, cytokeratin-8- and galectin-3-co-positive cells, identified as NCs. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells, which predominantly comprised non-NCs, increased with compression. Quantitative PCR demonstrated isolated mRNA up-regulation of ADAMTS-5 in the 1-day loaded group and MMP-3 in the 7-day loaded group. Aggrecan-1 and collagen type 2α-1 mRNA levels were down-regulated in both groups. This rat tail temporary static compression model, which exhibits decreased NC phenotype, increased apoptotic cell death, and imbalanced catabolic and anabolic gene expression, reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  18. Static and Dynamic Structural Response of an Aircraft Wing with Damage Using Equivalent Plate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Tsai, Frank J.

    2008-01-01

    A process to generate an equivalent plate based on an optimization approach to predict the static and dynamic response of flight vehicle wing structures is proposed. Geometric-scale and frequency-scale factors are defined to construct an equivalent plate with any desired scale to use in simulation and wind tunnel experiments. It is shown that the stiffness and the displacements are scaled linearly with the geometric-scale factor, whereas the load is scaled as the square of the geometric-scale factor. The scaled stiffness of the reference flight vehicle is matched first to construct the equivalent plate. Then the frequency-scale factor is defined to scale the flight vehicle frequencies. The scaled flight vehicle frequencies are matched by placing arbitrary point masses along the equivalent plate geometry. Two simple stiffened-plate examples, one with damage and another without damage, were used to demonstrate the accuracy of the optimization procedure proposed. Geometric-scale factors ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 were used in the analyses. In both examples, the static and dynamic response of the reference stiffened-panel solution is matched accurately. The scaled equivalent plate predicted the first five frequencies of the stiffened panel very accurately. Finally, the proposed equivalent plate procedure was demonstrated in a more realistic typical aircraft wing structure. Two scale equivalent plate models were generated using the geometric-scale factors 1.0 and 0.2. Both equivalent plate models predicted the static response of the wing structure accurately. The equivalent plate models reproduced the first five frequencies of the wing structure accurately.

  19. Antioxidant capacity of parsley cells (Petroselinum crispum L.) in relation to iron-induced ferritin levels and static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabbeigi, Elham; Ghanati, Faezeh; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Payez, Atefeh

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate antioxidant response of parsley cells to 21 ppm iron and static magnetic field (SMF; 30 mT). The activity of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and the contents of malonyldialdehyde, iron and ferritin were measured at 6 and 12 h after treatments. Exposure to SMF increased the activity of CAT in treated cells, while combination of iron and SMF treatments as well as iron supply alone decreased CAT activity, compared to that of control cells. Combination of SMF with iron treatment reduced iron content of the cells and ameliorated mal effect of iron on CAT activity. All treatments reduced APX activity; however, the content of total ascorbate increased in response to iron and SMF+iron. The results showed that among the components of antioxidant system of parsley cells, enhanced activity of CAT in SMF-treated cells and increase of ascorbate in SMF+Fe-treated ones were responsible for the maintenance of membranes integrity. Ferritin contents of SMF- and SMF+Fe-treated cells also decreased significantly 12 h after treatments, compared to those of the control cells. These results cast doubt on the proposed functions of ferritin as a putative reactive oxygen species detoxifying molecule.

  20. Parameters of static response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) suspension cables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立彬; 吴勇

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of longer spans relies on the successful implementation of new high-strength light weight materials such as carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP). First, a dimensionless equilibrium equation and the corresponding compatibility equation are established to develop the cable force equation and cable displacement governing equation for suspension cables, respectively. Subsequently, the inextensible cable case is introduced. The formula of the Irvine parameter is considered and its physical interpretation as well as its relationship with the chord gravity stiffness is presented. The influences on the increment of cable force and displacement byλ2 and load ratiop′are analyzed, respectively. Based on these assumptions and the analytical formulations, a 2000 m span suspension cable is utilized as an example to verify the proposed formulation and the responses of the relative increment of cable force and cable displacement under symmetrical and asymmetrical loads are studied and presented. In each case, the deflections resulting from elastic elongation or solely due to geometrical displacement are analyzed for the lower elastic modulus CFRP. Finally, in comparison with steel cables, the influences on the cable force equation and the governing displacement equation by span and rise span ratio are analyzed. Moreover, the influences on the static performance of suspension bridge by span and sag ratios are also analyzed. The substantive characteristics of the static performance of super span CFRP suspension bridges are clarified and the superiority and the characteristics of CFRP cable structure are demonstrated analytically.

  1. Nonlinear static and dynamic responses of an electrically actuated viscoelastic microbeam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. M. Fu; J. Zhang

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the Euler-Bernoulli hypothesis,nonlinear static and dynamic responses of a viscoelastic microbeam under two kinds of electric forces [a purely direct current (DC) and a combined current composed of a DC and an alternating current] are studied. By using Taylor series expansion, a governing equation of nonlinear integro-differential type is derived, and numerical analyses are performed.When a purely DC is applied, there exist an instantaneous pull-in voltage and a durable pull-in voltage of which the physical meanings are also given, whereas under an applied combined current, the effect of the element relaxation coefficient on the dynamic pull-in phenomenon is observed where the largest Lyapunov exponent is taken as a criterion for the dynamic pull-in instability of viscoelastic microbeams.

  2. Calculation of static and dynamic linear magnetic response in approximate time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Autschbach, Jochen

    2007-01-14

    We report implementations and results of time-dependent density functional calculations (i) of the frequency-dependent magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole polarizability, (ii) of the (observable) translationally invariant linear magnetic response, and (iii) of a linear intensity differential (LID) which includes the dynamic dipole magnetizability. The density functional calculations utilized density fitting. For achieving gauge-origin independence we have employed time-periodic magnetic-field-dependent basis functions as well as the dipole velocity gauge, and have included explicit density-fit related derivatives of the Coulomb potential. We present the results of calculations of static and dynamic magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole polarizabilities for a set of small molecules, the LID for the SF6 molecule, and dispersion curves for M-hexahelicene of the origin invariant linear magnetic response as well as of three dynamic polarizabilities: magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole, electric dipole-electric dipole, and electric dipole-magnetic dipole. We have also performed comparison of the linear magnetic response and magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole polarizability over a wide range of frequencies for H2O and SF6.

  3. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  4. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Pingping; YIN Ruochun; CHEN Zhiyou; WU Lifang; YU Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation.The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0,1,3,5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1,3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla.The seeds were germinated at 23℃ after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field.The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method.The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN),chromosomal bridge,lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs.Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups,a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge,lagging chromosome,triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla,respectively.The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration,but no linear relationship was observed.Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  5. Static stretch affects neural stem cell differentiation in an extracellular matrix-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulmoli, Janahan; Pathak, Medha M.; McDonnell, Lisa P.; Nourse, Jamison L.; Tombola, Francesco; Earthman, James C.; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2015-02-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) fate is strongly influenced by mechanotransduction as modulation of substrate stiffness affects lineage choice. Other types of mechanical stimuli, such as stretch (tensile strain), occur during CNS development and trauma, but their consequences for NSPC differentiation have not been reported. We delivered a 10% static equibiaxial stretch to NSPCs and examined effects on differentiation. We found static stretch specifically impacts NSPC differentiation into oligodendrocytes, but not neurons or astrocytes, and this effect is dependent on particular extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin linkages. Generation of oligodendrocytes from NSPCs was reduced on laminin, an outcome likely mediated by the α6 laminin-binding integrin, whereas similar effects were not observed for NSPCs on fibronectin. Our data demonstrate a direct role for tensile strain in dictating the lineage choice of NSPCs and indicate the dependence of this phenomenon on specific substrate materials, which should be taken into account for the design of biomaterials for NSPC transplantation.

  6. Possible promotion of neuronal differentiation in fetal rat brain neural progenitor cells after sustained exposure to static magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Noritaka; Ishioka, Yukichi; Hirai, Takao; Ozawa, Shusuke; Tachibana, Masaki; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2009-08-15

    We have previously shown significant potentiation of Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, along with decreased microtubules-associated protein-2 (MAP2) expression, in hippocampal neurons cultured under static magnetism without cell death. In this study, we investigated the effects of static magnetism on the functionality of neural progenitor cells endowed to proliferate for self-replication and differentiate into neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendroglial lineages. Neural progenitor cells were isolated from embryonic rat neocortex and hippocampus, followed by culture under static magnetism at 100 mT and subsequent determination of the number of cells immunoreactive for a marker protein of particular progeny lineages. Static magnetism not only significantly decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells without affecting cell viability, but also promoted differentiation into cells immunoreactive for MAP2 with a concomitant decrease in that for an astroglial marker, irrespective of the presence of differentiation inducers. In neural progenitors cultured under static magnetism, a significant increase was seen in mRNA expression of several activator-type proneural genes, such as Mash1, Math1, and Math3, together with decreased mRNA expression of the repressor type Hes5. These results suggest that sustained static magnetism could suppress proliferation for self-renewal and facilitate differentiation into neurons through promoted expression of activator-type proneural genes by progenitor cells in fetal rat brain.

  7. Antioxidative responses of two marine microalgae during acclimation to static and fluctuating natural UV radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janknegt, Paul J.; de Graaff, C. Marco; van de Poll, Willem H.; Visser, Ronald J. W.; Walter Helbling, E.; Buma, Anita G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Photoacclimation properties were investigated in two marine microalgae exposed to four ambient irradiance conditions: static photosynthetically active radiation (PAR: 400-700 nm), static PAR + UVR (280-700 nm), dynamic PAR and dynamic PAR + UVR. High light acclimated cultures of Thalassiosira weissf

  8. Effects of static magnetic field on human umbilical vessel endothelial cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fei; XU Ke-wei; WANG Hai-chang; GUO Wen-yi; HAN Yong; LIU Bing; ZHANG Rong-qing

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of static magnetic field(SMF) on the viability,adhesion molecule expression of human umbilical vessel endothelial cell.Methods:Magnetic flux intensity was 0.1 mT,1 mT,10 mT.Cell viability and proliferation were measured with 3H-TdR and MTT methods; and apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) was studied by flow cytometry and transmission electric microscopy.ELISA was used to measure the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on endothelium.Results:0.1 mT SMF had no effects on the growth of HUVEC,however,SMF of 1 mT,10 mT attenuated growth of HUVEC.10 mT static magnetic field could induce apoptosis and necrosis of HUVEC.10 mT SMF enhanced the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on endothelium.Conclusion:The effect of SMF depends on the intensity of SMF.10 mT SMF has adverse effects on human umbilical vessel endothelial cell.

  9. Static compression regulates OPG expression in periodontal ligament cells via the CAMK II pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YI Jianru

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective This study aimed to investigate the potential role of CAMK II pathway in the compression-regulated OPG expression in periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs. Material and Methods The PDL tissue model was developed by 3-D culturing human PDLCs in a thin sheet of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA scaffolds, which was subjected to static compression of 25 g/cm2 for 3, 6 and 12 h, with or without treatment of KN-93. After that, the expression of OPG, RANKL and NFATC2 was investigated through real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Results After static compression, the NFATC2 and RANKL expression was significantly up-regulated, while partially suppressed by KN-93 for 6 and 12 h respectively. The OPG expression was significantly down-regulated by compression in 3 h, started to elevate in 6 h, and significantly up-regulated in 12 h. The up-regulation after 12 h was significantly suppressed by KN-93. Conclusions Long-term static compression increases OPG expression in PDLCs, at least partially, via the CAMK II pathway.

  10. Further results on the disturbance response of a double integrator controlled by a saturating linear static state feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xu; Saberi, Ali; Stoorvogel, Anton A.; Grip, H°avard Fjær

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the response to external disturbances of a double integrator with a saturating feedback. For a class of disturbances that have bounded integrals over all intervals, we show that a linear static feedback law can always be designed to ensure boundedness of the states. Moreover,

  11. Evaluation of the response of Clibanarius africanus (Decapoda: Paguridae to crude oil in static bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.J. Oribhabor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The acute toxicity of Nigeria Bonny light crude oil against hermit crab, Cliabanarius africanus of a tidal creek, Eastern Obolo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria was investigated in the laboratory under static bioassay. The test crude oil was found to be poorly toxic to the test organism, resulting in delayed mortality and consequent extension of the bioassay to 8 days. Based on the LC50, the toxicity of the test compound was more manifested on the 8 day than at 96 hour, with a toxicity factor showing that the test compound was approximately 12 times, more manifested against C. africanus on the 8 day than at 96 hour. Paired t-test showed that there was no significant difference between 96h LC50 (549.9 ml l-1 and 8d LC50 (45.2 ml l-1. The results of this study indicated that C. africanus is not a good early warning indicator for oil pollution but its response during spills could serve as a good indicator of adverse impact.

  12. Automated Static Culture System Cell Module Mixing Protocol and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Truong, Tuan; Goodwin, Thomas J,

    2004-01-01

    This report is a documentation of a fluid dynamic analysis of the proposed Automated Static Culture System (ASCS) cell module mixing protocol. The report consists of a review of some basic fluid dynamics principles appropriate for the mixing of a patch of high oxygen content media into the surrounding media which is initially depleted of oxygen, followed by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of this process for the proposed protocol over a range of the governing parameters. The time histories of oxygen concentration distributions and mechanical shear levels generated are used to characterize the mixing process for different parameter values.

  13. Effect of Static Magnetic Fields on the Peripheral Blood Mononuclear-like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godina-Nava, J. J.; García-Cantú, R.; Cañedo, L.; Rodríguez-Segura, M. A.; Serrano, G.; Alvarado-Alvarez, R.; Toledo-Ramos, F.

    2002-08-01

    In this article the role of static magnetic fields (SMF) in the generation of Ca2+ currents in peripheral blood mononuclear-like cells (PBMLC) is described. Using the sensitivity of Ca2+ channels and pumps to membrane potential and ion concentration we propose a method which uses the conductivity as a dynamical coefficient in the Onsager's reciprocity relations, and the dynamics of the calcium ions described by the electrodiffusion equation deduced by Pelce. The enhanced influx of calcium ion in PBMLC was studied parametrizing the static magnetic fields effects on the conductivity by the coefficients γ, ρ and κ. The parametrization was made according to the symmetry properties of Onsager's reciprocity relations using the most simple expressions. As an example we used available experimental data over chromaffin cell and employing physical considerations concerning to PBMLC, an order of magnitude for the value of ρ ≈ O(-10-5 mol/(Vm2s)), κ = 0, γ ≈ O(-10-3 mol/(VT2m2s) was obtained. The γ parameter was found graphically. With this parametrization, the time to induce calcium current in the cell was always less than the situation without magnetic field application.

  14. Static three-dimensional culture of human hepatocarcinoma cell with microcarriers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Traditional monolayer culture is still the common method used in hepatocarcinoma cell culture in vitro.For lack of the structure similar to that in vivo, it is disadvantageous in the research of the relation between structure and function. We established a three-dimensional (3-D) culture model of human hepatocarcinoma cell (BEL-7402) in vitro by using microcarrier cytodex-3 in static condition. The results of SEM, TEM, enzyme activity and flow cytometry indicated that the cells were polygonal-shaped and arranged in multilayers. Intercellular space was 0.5-2.0 μm wide where lots of microvilli could be seen. Adjacent cells were connected with desmosomes and localized membrane projects. More than 90% of the cells were viable and maintained the consumption of glucose and the expression of EGF receptor. The intracellular ALT, AST and LDH-L activities were higher in 3-D culture than those of monolayer culture.Compared with monolayer culture, this 3-D culture with the structure similar to trabecular hepatocarcinoma in vivo is much more suitable for the research of the interactions of cell-cell and cell-microenvironment, and might be useful in the investigation of the mechanisms of invasion, metastasis,and multicellular drug resistance of tumor cells.

  15. Molecularly engineered surfaces for cell biology: from static to dynamic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J Justin; Parker, Stephen G; Lu, Yong; Gaus, Katharina

    2014-04-01

    Surfaces with a well-defined presentation of ligands for receptors on the cell membrane can serve as models of the extracellular matrix for studying cell adhesion or as model cell surfaces for exploring cell-cell contacts. Because such surfaces can provide exquisite control over, for example, the density of these ligands or when the ligands are presented to the cell, they provide a very precise strategy for understanding the mechanisms by which cells respond to external adhesive cues. In the present feature article, we present an overview of the basic biology of cell adhesion before discussing surfaces that have a static presentation of immobile ligands. We outline the biological information that such surfaces have given us, before progressing to recently developed switchable surfaces and surfaces that mimic the lipid bilayer, having adhesive ligands that can move around the membrane and be remodeled by the cell. Finally, the feature article closes with some of the biological information that these new types of surfaces could provide.

  16. Influence of static magnetic fields up to 700 mT and dihydrochalcones on the antioxidant response in fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synowiec-Wojtarowicz, Agnieszka; Kimsa-Dudek, Magdalena; Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna; Kurzeja, Ewa; Glinka, Marek; Gawron, Stanisław

    2017-03-21

    The effects of a static magnetic field (SMF) and the dihydrochalcones phloretin and phloridzin on the redox homeostasis of fibroblasts were investigated. The aim of the present study was to determine the redox homeostasis of fibroblasts that were simultaneously exposed to a static magnetic field and the dihydrochalcones phloretin and phloridzin. The fibroblasts were cultured for 72 h in special magnetic test chambers at different moderate intensities (0.4, 0.55 and 0.7 T). In this report, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), glutathione transferase (GST); the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total antioxidant status were measured using commercially available kits. We did not observe any impairment in the redox balance in cells in fibroblasts that were only exposed to static magnetic fields of different intensities or In fibroblast cultured with dihydrochalcones and exposed to static magnetic field increase the SOD, GPx, GST activities and MDA concentration. Our investigations revealed that the activities of SOD, GPx, GST and the concentration of MDA that were determined for the fibroblasts that were cultured with dihydrochalcones were higher in the presence of a static magnetic field. Our results indicated that exposure to SMF (0.7 T) with dihydrochalcones induces oxidative stress in fibroblasts.

  17. Cell response to surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the profound alterations in host immunity that are produced by major surgery as demonstrated by experimental and clinical studies, and to evaluate the benefits of therapeutic strategies aimed at attenuating perioperative immune dysfunction. DATA SOURCES: A review of the English-language literature was conducted, incorporating searches of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases to identify laboratory and clinical studies investigating the cellular response to surgery. STUDY SELECTION: Original articles and case reports describing immune dysfunction secondary to surgical trauma were included. DATA EXTRACTION: The results were compiled to show outcomes of different studies and were compared. DATA SYNTHESIS: Current evidence indicates that the early systemic inflammatory response syndrome observed after major surgery that is characterized by proinflammatory cytokine release, microcirculatory disturbance, and cell-mediated immune dysfunction is followed by a compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome, which predisposes the patient to opportunistic infection, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and death. Because there are currently no effective treatment options for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, measures to prevent its onset should be initiated at an early stage. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that targeted therapeutic strategies involving immunomodulatory agents such as interferon gamma, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, the prostaglandin E(2) antagonist, indomethacin, and pentoxifylline may be used for the treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome to prevent the onset of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical trauma produces profound immunological dysfunction. Therapeutic strategies directed at restoring immune homeostasis should aim to redress the physiological proinflammatory-anti-inflammatory cell imbalance associated with major surgery.

  18. Quantitative in vitro assay to measure neutrophil adhesion to activated primary human microvascular endothelial cells under static conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Farrar, Katherine; Hellman, Judith

    2013-08-23

    The vascular endothelium plays an integral part in the inflammatory response. During the acute phase of inflammation, endothelial cells (ECs) are activated by host mediators or directly by conserved microbial components or host-derived danger molecules. Activated ECs express cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules that mobilize, activate and retain leukocytes at the site of infection or injury. Neutrophils are the first leukocytes to arrive, and adhere to the endothelium through a variety of adhesion molecules present on the surfaces of both cells. The main functions of neutrophils are to directly eliminate microbial threats, promote the recruitment of other leukocytes through the release of additional factors, and initiate wound repair. Therefore, their recruitment and attachment to the endothelium is a critical step in the initiation of the inflammatory response. In this report, we describe an in vitro neutrophil adhesion assay using calcein AM-labeled primary human neutrophils to quantitate the extent of microvascular endothelial cell activation under static conditions. This method has the additional advantage that the same samples quantitated by fluorescence spectrophotometry can also be visualized directly using fluorescence microscopy for a more qualitative assessment of neutrophil binding.

  19. False Operation of Static Random Access Memory Cells under Alternating Current Power Supply Voltage Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Takuya; Takata, Hidehiro; Nii, Koji; Nagata, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Static random access memory (SRAM) cores exhibit susceptibility against power supply voltage variation. False operation is investigated among SRAM cells under sinusoidal voltage variation on power lines introduced by direct RF power injection. A standard SRAM core of 16 kbyte in a 90 nm 1.5 V technology is diagnosed with built-in self test and on-die noise monitor techniques. The sensitivity of bit error rate is shown to be high against the frequency of injected voltage variation, while it is not greatly influenced by the difference in frequency and phase against SRAM clocking. It is also observed that the distribution of false bits is substantially random in a cell array.

  20. Direction-Dependent Effects of Combined Static and ELF Magnetic Fields on Cell Proliferation and Superoxide Radical Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naarala, Jonne; Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; McClure, Ian; Chavarriaga, Cristina; Juutilainen, Jukka; Martino, Carlos F

    2017-01-01

    Proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells was stimulated by a nearly vertical 60 or 120 μT static magnetic field (MF) in comparison to cells that were shielded against MFs. When the static field was combined with an extremely low frequency (ELF) MF (18 Hz, 30 μT), proliferation was suppressed by a horizontal but not by a vertical ELF field. As these results suggested that the effects of an ELF MF depend on its direction in relation to the static MF, independent experiments were carried out to confirm such dependence using 50 Hz MFs and a different experimental model. Cytosolic superoxide level in rat glioma C6 cells exposed in the presence of a nearly vertical 33 μT static MF was increased by a horizontal 50 Hz, 30 μT MF, but not affected by a vertical 50 Hz MF. The results suggest that a weak ELF MF may interact with the static geomagnetic field in producing biological effects, but the effect depends on the relative directions of the static and ELF MFs.

  1. Evaluation of static and dynamic MRI for assessing response of bone sarcomas to preoperative chemotherapy: Correlation with histological necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshi Amit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Preoperative chemotherapy plays a key role in management of bone sarcomas. Postoperative evaluation of histological necrosis has been the gold standard method of assessing response to preoperative chemotherapy. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of static and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for assessing response preoperatively. Materials and Methods: Our study included 14 patients (12 osteosarcomas and 2 malignant fibrous histiocytomas with mean age of 21.8 years, treated with preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery. They were evaluated with static and dynamic MRI twice, before starting chemotherapy and again prior to surgery. Change in tumor volume and slope of signal intensity - time curve were calculated and correlated with percentage of histological necrosis using Pearson correlation test. Results: The change in dynamic MRI slope was significant (P = 0.001. Also, ≥60% reduction in slope of the curve proved to be an indicator of good histological response [positive predictive value (PPV =80%]. Change in tumor volume failed to show significant correlation (P = 0.071. Although it showed high negative predictive value (NPV = 85.7%, PPV was too low (PPV = 57.14%. Conclusions: Dynamic MRI correctly predicts histological necrosis after administration of preoperative chemotherapy to bone sarcomas. Hence, it can be used as a preoperative indicator of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. On the other hand, volumetric assessment by static MRI is not an effective predictor of histological necrosis. This study proves the superiority of dynamic contrast-enhanced study over volumetric study by MRI.

  2. Static and dynamic responses of a microcantilever with a T-shaped tip mass to an electrostatic actuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B Firouzi; M Zamanian; S A A Hosseini

    2016-01-01

    In this study, nonlinear static and dynamic responses of a microcantilever with a T-shaped tip mass excited by electrostatic actuations are investigated. The elec-trostatic force is generated by applying an electric voltage between the horizontal part of T-shaped tip mass and an opposite electrode plate. The cantilever microbeam is mod-eled as an Euler–Bernoulli beam. The T-shaped tip mass is assumed to be a rigid body and the nonlinear effect of electrostatic force is considered. An equation of motion and its associated boundary conditions are derived by the aid of combining the Hamilton principle and Newton’s method. An exact solution is obtained for static deflection and mode shape of vibration around the static position. The differen-tial equation of nonlinear vibration around the static position is discretized using the Galerkin method. The system mode shapes are used as its related comparison functions. The dis-cretized equations are solved by the perturbation theory in the neighborhood of primary and subharmonic resonances. In addition, effects of mass inertia, mass moment of iner-tia as well as rotation of the T-shaped mass, which were ignored in previous works, are considered in the analysis. It is shown that by increasing the length of the horizontal part of the T-shaped mass, the amount of static deflection increases, natural frequency decreases and nonlinear shift of the res-onance frequency increases. It is concluded that attaching an electrode plate with a T-shaped configuration to the end of the cantilever microbeam results in a configuration with larger pull-in voltage and smaller nonlinear shift of the reso-nance frequency compared to the configuration in which the electrode plate is directly attached to it.

  3. Static and dynamic responses of a microcantilever with a T-shaped tip mass to an electrostatic actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzi, B.; Zamanian, M.; Hosseini, S. A. A.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, nonlinear static and dynamic responses of a microcantilever with a T-shaped tip mass excited by electrostatic actuations are investigated. The electrostatic force is generated by applying an electric voltage between the horizontal part of T-shaped tip mass and an opposite electrode plate. The cantilever microbeam is modeled as an Euler-Bernoulli beam. The T-shaped tip mass is assumed to be a rigid body and the nonlinear effect of electrostatic force is considered. An equation of motion and its associated boundary conditions are derived by the aid of combining the Hamilton principle and Newton's method. An exact solution is obtained for static deflection and mode shape of vibration around the static position. The differential equation of nonlinear vibration around the static position is discretized using the Galerkin method. The system mode shapes are used as its related comparison functions. The discretized equations are solved by the perturbation theory in the neighborhood of primary and subharmonic resonances. In addition, effects of mass inertia, mass moment of inertia as well as rotation of the T-shaped mass, which were ignored in previous works, are considered in the analysis. It is shown that by increasing the length of the horizontal part of the T-shaped mass, the amount of static deflection increases, natural frequency decreases and nonlinear shift of the resonance frequency increases. It is concluded that attaching an electrode plate with a T-shaped configuration to the end of the cantilever microbeam results in a configuration with larger pull-in voltage and smaller nonlinear shift of the resonance frequency compared to the configuration in which the electrode plate is directly attached to it.

  4. Effect of weak static magnetic fields on the development of cultured skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surma, Sergei V; Belostotskaya, Galina B; Shchegolev, Boris F; Stefanov, Vasily E

    2014-12-01

    We studied the effect produced on the development and functional activity of skeletal muscle cells from newborn Wistar rats in primary culture by weak static magnetic fields (WSMF; 60-400 µT) with a high capacity of penetrating the biological media. To reduce the impact of external magnetic fields, cells were cultured at 37 °C in a multilayered shielding chamber with the attenuation coefficient equal to 160. WSMF inside the chamber was created by a circular permanent magnet. We found that the application of WSMF with the magnetic field strength only a few times that of the geomagnetic field can accelerate the development of skeletal muscle cells, resulting in the formation of multinuclear hypertrophied myotubes. WSMF was shown to induce 1.5- to 3.5-fold rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)]i due to the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) through ryanodine receptors (RyR), which increases in the maturation of myotubes. We also found that fully differentiated myotubes at late stages of development were less sensitive to WSMF, manifesting a gradual decrease in the frequency of contractions. However, myotubes at the stage when electromechanical coupling was forming dramatically reduced the frequency of contractions during the first minutes of their exposure to WSMF.

  5. Piezoelectric responses of brittle rock mass containing quartz to static stress and exploding stress wave respectively

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Guo-xiang; LI Xi-bing; HONG Liang

    2008-01-01

    The electromagnetic emission (EME) induced from the rock containing piezoelectric materials was investigated under both static stress and exploding stress wave in the view of piezoelectric effect. The results show that the intensity of the EME induced from the rock under static stress increases with increasing stress level and loading rate; the relationship between the amplitude of theme from the rock under different modes of stress wave and elastic parameters and propagation distance was presented. The intensity of the EME relates not only to the strength and elastic moduli of rock masses, but also to the initial damage of the rock. The intensity of EME induced by stress wave reaches the highest at the explosion-center and attenuates with the propagation distance. The intensity of EME increases with increasing the elastic modulus and decreases with increasing initial damage. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Biologic response of inguinal hernia prosthetics: a comparative study of conventional static meshes versus 3D dynamic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Giuseppe; Romano, Giorgio; Agrusa, Antonino; Marasa, Salvatore; Cocorullo, Gianfranco; Gulotta, Gaspare; Goetze, Thorsten; Puleio, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in prosthetics and surgical techniques, the rate of complications following inguinal hernia repair remains high. Among these, discomfort and chronic pain have become a source of increasing concern among surgeons. Poor quality of tissue ingrowth, such as thin scar plates or shrinking scars-typical results with conventional static implants and plugs-may contribute to these adverse events. Recently, a new type of 3D dynamically responsive implant was introduced to the market. This device, designed to be placed fixation-free, seems to induce ingrowth of viable and structured tissue instead of regressive fibrotic scarring. To elucidate the differences in biologic response between the conventional static meshes and this 3D dynamically responsive implant, a histological comparison was planned. The aim of this study was to determine the quality of tissue incorporation in both types of implants excised after short, medium, and long periods post-implantation. The results showed large differences in the biologic responses between the two implant types. Histologically, the 3D dynamic implant showed development of tissue elements more similar to natural abdominal wall structures, such as the ingrowth of loose and well-hydrated connective tissue, well-formed vascular structures, elastic fibers, and mature nerves, with negligible or absent inflammatory response. All these characteristics were completely absent in the conventional static implants, where a persistent inflammatory reaction was associated with thin, hardened, and shrunken fibrotic scar formation. Consequently, as herniation is a degenerative process, the 3D dynamic implants, which induce regeneration of the typical groin components, seem to address its pathogenesis.

  7. Responsiveness of Static and Dynamic Postural Balance Measures in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Following Physiotherapy Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafaee, Neda; Yazdi, Mohammad J Shaterzadeh; Negahban, Hossein; Goharpey, Shahin; Mehravar, Mohammad; Pirayeh, Nahid

    2017-05-01

    The main goal of physiotherapy for patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) is to improve postural control and retain knee function. Therefore, clinicians need to use evaluative tools that assess postural changes during physiotherapy. To maximize the clinical utility of the results of these tools, the extracted measures should have appropriate psychometric properties of reliability, validity and responsiveness. No study has yet addressed responsiveness of postural measures in these patients. This study was designed to investigate the responsiveness and determine the minimal clinically important changes (MCIC) of static and dynamic postural measures in patients with (ACL-R) following physiotherapy. Static and dynamic postural measures were evaluated at first occasion and again after four weeks physiotherapy. The static measures consisted of center of pressure (COP) parameters while dynamic measures included the stability indices. Correlation analysis and ROC curve were applied for assessing the responsiveness. The meanand SD velocity of COP had acceptable responsiveness in both conditions of standing on injured leg with open-eyes and on uninjured leg with closed-eyes, both with nocognitive task. For dynamic measures, stability indices in double-leg standing with closed-eyes with cognitive task condition attained acceptable responsiveness. MCICs for mean and SD velocity in anteroposterior and mediolateral directions were 0.28cm/s, 0.008cm/s, 0.02cm/s, respectively in standing on injured leg with open-eyes; and 0.14cm/s, 0.07cm/s, 0.06cm/s, respectively in uninjured leg with closed-eyes condition. Also, MCICs for anteroposterior, mediolateral and total stability indices were 0.51°, 0.37°, 0.34°, respectively in DCT condition. Our findings provide evidence for selection of appropriate static and dynamic postural measures for assessment of changes in these patients. MCICs for these measures were determined, which provide practical information

  8. NKT Cell Responses to B Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxin Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a unique subset of CD1d-restricted T lymphocytes that express characteristics of both T cells and natural killer cells. NKT cells mediate tumor immune-surveillance; however, NKT cells are numerically reduced and functionally impaired in lymphoma patients. Many hematologic malignancies express CD1d molecules and co-stimulatory proteins needed to induce anti-tumor immunity by NKT cells, yet most tumors are poorly immunogenic. In this study, we sought to investigate NKT cell responses to B cell lymphoma. In the presence of exogenous antigen, both mouse and human NKT cell lines produce cytokines following stimulation by B cell lymphoma lines. NKT cell populations were examined ex vivo in mouse models of spontaneous B cell lymphoma, and it was found that during early stages, NKT cell responses were enhanced in lymphoma-bearing animals compared to disease-free animals. In contrast, in lymphoma-bearing animals with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, NKT cells were functionally impaired. In a mouse model of blastoid variant mantle cell lymphoma, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with a potent NKT cell agonist, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, resulted in a significant decrease in disease pathology. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that NKT cells from α-GalCer treated mice produced IFN-γ following α-GalCer restimulation, unlike NKT cells from vehicle-control treated mice. These data demonstrate an important role for NKT cells in the immune response to an aggressive hematologic malignancy like mantle cell lymphoma.

  9. Static pressure drives proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells via caveolin-1/ERK1/2 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Di-xian, E-mail: luodixian_2@163.com [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); The First People' s Hospital of Chenzhou City, Chenzhou, Hunan 421001 (China); Cheng, Jiming [Internal Medicine and SimmonsCooper Cancer Institute, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 911 N. Rutledge Street, Springfield, IL 62794-9626 (United States); Suzhou Health College of Technology, 20 Shuyuanxiang, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215002 (China); Xiong, Yan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Li, Junmo [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Xia, Chenglai [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); School of Pharmaceutics, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Xu, Canxin; Wang, Chun; Zhu, Bingyang [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Hu, Zhuowei [Institute of Materia Medical, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Liao, Duan-fang, E-mail: dfliao66@yahoo.com.cn [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China)

    2010-01-22

    Intimal hyperplasia plays an important role in various types of vascular remodeling. Mechanical forces derived from blood flow are associated with the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This contributes to many vascular disorders such as hypertension, atherosclerosis and restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). In this study, we show that static pressure induces the proliferation of VSMC and activates its related signal pathway. VSMC from a rat aorta were treated with different pressures (0, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 mm Hg) in a custom-made pressure incubator for 24 h. The most active proliferation of VSMC was detected at a pressure of 120 mm Hg. VSMC was also incubated under a static pressure of 120 mm Hg for different time intervals (0, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h). We found that static pressure significantly stimulates VSMC proliferation. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation showed a peak at the pressure of 120 mm Hg at 4-h time point. Moreover, caveolin-1 expression was significantly inhibited by rising static pressure. Downregulation of VSMC proliferation could be found after PD98059 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation inhibitor) treatment. Our data also showed that a siRNA-mediated caveolin-1 knock down increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and VSMC proliferation. These results demonstrate that static pressure promotes VSMC proliferation via the Caveolin-1/ERK1/2 pathway.

  10. Effect of static magnetic field on electricity production and wastewater treatment in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qinqin; Zhou, Shaoqi

    2014-12-01

    The effect of a magnetic field (MF) on electricity production and wastewater treatment in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been investigated. Electricity production capacity could be improved by the application of a low-intensity static MF. When a MF of 50 mT was applied to MFCs, the maximum voltage, total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency increased from 523 ± 2 to 553 ± 2 mV, ∼93 to ∼96 %, and ∼80 to >90 %, respectively, while the start-up time and coulombic efficiency decreased from 16 to 10 days and ∼50 to ∼43 %, respectively. The MF effects were immediate, reversible, and not long lasting, and negative effects on electricity generation and COD removal seemed to occur after the MF was removed. The start-up and voltage output were less affected by the MF direction. Nitrogen compounds in magnetic MFCs were nitrified more thoroughly; furthermore, a higher proportion of electrochemically inactive microorganisms were found in magnetic systems. TP was effectively removed by the co-effects of microbe absorption and chemical precipitation. Chemical precipitates were analyzed by a scanning electron microscope capable of energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) to be a mixture of phosphate, carbonate, and hydroxyl compounds.

  11. Parallel programmable nonvolatile memory using ordinary static random access memory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi; Saraya, Takuya; Shinohara, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    2017-04-01

    A technique of using an ordinary static random access memory (SRAM) array for a programmable nonvolatile (NV) memory is proposed. The parallel NV writing of the entire array is achieved by simply applying high-voltage stress to the power supply terminal, after storing inverted desired data in the static random access memory (SRAM) array. Successful 2 kbit NV writing is demonstrated using a device-matrix-array (DMA) test element group (TEG) fabricated by 0.18 µm technology.

  12. The optimization of essential oils supercritical CO2 extraction from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic steps procedure and semi-continuous technique using response surface method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Hossein; Aminimoghadamfarouj, Noushin; Golmakani, Ebrahim; Nematollahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine and evaluate crucial variables in essential oils extraction process from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic and semi-continuous techniques using response surface method. Essential oil components were extracted from Lavandula hybrida (Lavandin) flowers using supercritical carbon dioxide via static-dynamic steps (SDS) procedure, and semi-continuous (SC) technique. Using response surface method the optimum extraction yield (4.768%) was obtained via SDS at 108.7 bar, 48.5°C, 120 min (static: 8×15), 24 min (dynamic: 8×3 min) in contrast to the 4.620% extraction yield for the SC at 111.6 bar, 49.2°C, 14 min (static), 121.1 min (dynamic). The results indicated that a substantial reduction (81.56%) solvent usage (kg CO2/g oil) is observed in the SDS method versus the conventional SC method.

  13. Static response analysis of structures with interval parameters using the second-order Taylor series expansion and the DCA for QB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Qiu, Zhiping; Zhang, Xudong

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, based on the second-order Taylor series expansion and the difference of convex functions algorithm for quadratic problems with box constraints (the DCA for QB), a new method is proposed to solve the static response problem of structures with fairly large uncertainties in interval parameters. Although current methods are effective for solving the static response problem of structures with interval parameters with small uncertainties, these methods may fail to estimate the region of the static response of uncertain structures if the uncertainties in the parameters are fairly large. To resolve this problem, first, the general expression of the static response of structures in terms of structural parameters is derived based on the second-order Taylor series expansion. Then the problem of determining the bounds of the static response of uncertain structures is transformed into a series of quadratic problems with box constraints. These quadratic problems with box constraints can be solved using the DCA approach effectively. The numerical examples are given to illustrate the accuracy and the efficiency of the proposed method when comparing with other existing methods.

  14. Quasi-Static and High Strain Rate Compressive Response of Injection-Molded Cenosphere/HDPE Syntactic Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharath Kumar, B. R.; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Luong, Dung D.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-07-01

    High strain rate compressive properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) matrix syntactic foams containing cenosphere filler are investigated. Thermoplastic matrix syntactic foams have not been studied extensively for high strain rate deformation response despite interest in them for lightweight underwater vehicle structures and consumer products. Quasi-static compression tests are conducted at 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1 and 10-2 s-1 strain rates. Further, a split-Hopkinson pressure bar is utilized for characterizing syntactic foams for high strain rate compression. The compressive strength of syntactic foams is higher than that of HDPE resin at the same strain rate. Yield strength shows an increasing trend with strain rate. The average yield strength values at high strain rates are almost twice the values obtained at 10-4 s-1 for HDPE resin and syntactic foams. Theoretical models are used to estimate the effectiveness of cenospheres in reinforcing syntactic foams.

  15. Modeling subharmonic response from contrast microbubbles as a function of ambient static pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Amit; Sarkar, Kausik; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-04-01

    Variation of subharmonic response from contrast microbubbles with ambient pressure is numerically investigated for non-invasive monitoring of organ-level blood pressure. Previously, several contrast microbubbles both in vitro and in vivo registered approximately linear (5-15 dB) subharmonic response reduction with 188 mm Hg change in ambient pressure. In contrast, simulated subharmonic response from a single microbubble is seen here to either increase or decrease with ambient pressure. This is shown using the code BUBBLESIM for encapsulated microbubbles, and then the underlying dynamics is investigated using a free bubble model. The ratio of the excitation frequency to the natural frequency of the bubble is the determining parameter--increasing ambient pressure increases natural frequency thereby changing this ratio. For frequency ratio below a lower critical value, increasing ambient pressure monotonically decreases subharmonic response. Above an upper critical value of the same ratio, increasing ambient pressure increases subharmonic response; in between, the subharmonic variation is non-monotonic. The precise values of frequency ratio for these three different trends depend on bubble radius and excitation amplitude. The modeled increase or decrease of subharmonic with ambient pressure, when one happens, is approximately linear only for certain range of excitation levels. Possible reasons for discrepancies between model and previous experiments are discussed.

  16. The effect of low static magnetic field on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential of human adipose stromal/stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marędziak, Monika, E-mail: monika.maredziak@gmail.com [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław (Poland); Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wrocław (Poland); Śmieszek, Agnieszka, E-mail: smieszek.agnieszka@gmail.com [Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wrocław (Poland); Faculty of Biology, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław (Poland); Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A., E-mail: krtomaszewski@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow (Poland); Lewandowski, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.lewandowski@pwr.wroc.pl [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Mechanics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wroclaw (Poland); Marycz, Krzysztof, E-mail: krzysztofmarycz@interia.pl [Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wrocław (Poland); Faculty of Biology, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław (Poland)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of static magnetic field (SMF) on the osteogenic properties of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). In this study in seven days viability assay we examined the impact of SMF on cells proliferation rate, population doubling time, and ability to form single-cell derived colonies. We have also examined cells' morphology, ultrastructure and osteogenic properties on the protein as well as mRNA level. We established a complex approach, which enabled us to obtain information about SMF and hASCs potential in the context of differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. We demonstrated that SMF enhances both viability and osteogenic properties of hASCs through higher proliferation factor and shorter population doubling time. We have also observed asymmetrically positioned nuclei and organelles after SMF exposition. With regards to osteogenic properties we observed increased levels of osteogenic markers i.e. osteopontin, osteocalcin and increased ability to form osteonodules with positive reaction to Alizarin Red dye. We have also shown that SMF besides enhancing osteogenic properties of hASCs, simultaneously decreases their ability to differentiate into adipogenic lineage. Our results clearly show a direct influence of SMF on the osteogenic potential of hASCs. These results provide key insights into the role of SMF on their cellular fate and properties. - Graphical abstract: Influence of static magnetic field on viability and differentiation properties of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells. Abbreviations: SMF – static magnetic field; hASCs – human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells; PF – proliferation factor; PDT – population doubling time; CFU-E –> colony forming unit efficiency; OPN – osteopontin; OCL – osteocalcin; Col – collagen type I; BMP-2 – bone morphogenetic protein 2; Ca – calcium; P – phosphorus. - Highlights: • Effects of static

  17. Cell-mediated immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Sonja Izquierdo; Fuglsang, Katrine; Blaakaer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This clinical review aims to assess the efficacy of human papillomavirus 16/18 (HPV16/18) vaccination on the cell-mediated immune response in women with existing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer induced by HPV16 or HPV18. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: A focused...... and thorough literature search conducted in five different databases found 996 publications. Six relevant articles were chosen for further review. In total, 154 patients (>18 years of age) were enrolled in prospective study trials with 3-15 months of follow up. The vaccine applications were administered two...... triggered a detectable cell-mediated immune response, some of which were statistically significant. Correlations between immunological response and clinical outcome (histopathology) were not significant, so neoplasms may not be susceptible to vaccine-generated cytotoxic T cells (CD8(+)). CONCLUSIONS...

  18. Single cell functional analysis of multiple myeloma cell populations correlates with diffusion profiles in static microfluidic coculture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas A; Young, Edmond W K

    2016-07-01

    Microfluidic cell culture systems are becoming increasingly useful for studying biology questions, particularly those involving small cell populations that are cultured within microscale geometries mimicking the complex cellular microenvironment. Depending on the geometry and spatial organization of these cell populations, however, paracrine signaling between cell types can depend critically on spatial concentration profiles of soluble factors generated by diffusive transport. In scenarios where single cell data are acquired to study cell population heterogeneities in functional response, uncertainty associated with concentration profiles can lead to interpretation bias. To address this issue and provide important evidence on how diffusion develops within typical microfluidic cell culture systems, a combination of experimental and computational approaches were applied to measure and predict concentration patterns within microfluidic geometries, and characterize the functional response of culture cells based on single-cell resolution transcription factor activation. Using a model coculture system consisting of multiple myeloma cells (MMCs) and neighboring bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), we measured concentrations of three cytokines (IL-6, VEGF, and TNF-α) in conditioned media collected from separate culture compartments using a multiplex ELISA system. A 3D numerical model was developed to predict biomolecular diffusion and resulting concentration profiles within the tested microsystems and compared with experimental diffusion of 20 kDa FITC-Dextran. Finally, diffusion was further characterized by controlling exogenous IL-6 diffusion and the coculture spatial configuration of BMSCs to stimulate STAT3 nuclear translocation in MMCs. Results showed agreement between numerical and experimental results, provided evidence of a shallow concentration gradient across the center well of the microsystem that did not lead to a bias in results, and demonstrated that

  19. Orientational Polarizability and Stress Response of Biological Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.; de, R.; Zemel, A.

    We present a theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes random forces as well as forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix and those due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate both the static and high frequency limits of the orientational response in terms of the cellular polarizability. For systems in which the forces due to regulation and activity dominate the mechanical forces, we show that there is a non-linear dynamical response which, in the high frequency limit, causes the cell to orient nearly perpendicular to the direction of the applied stress.

  20. Effect of Static Magnetic Field on the Rate of Proliferation and Viability in HeLa Cancer Cells and Normal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shams

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The increasing use of the electromagnetic devices in daily life leads to higher electromagnetic filed effects. The effects on the organic systems are contradictory and controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different intensities and durations of the static magnetic fields on the living cells and their proliferation rate. Materials & Methods: In the applied study, two HeLa cancer cell lines and human fibroblast natural cells were studied. At first, the cells were cultured on DMEN medium. Three magnetic intensities (7, 14, and 21T and two durations (24 and 48h were used, and the cells were treated by static magnetic field. The living cell percentage and cell proliferation rate were assessed by MTT method. Trypan blue was used in staining. And an optical microscope was used in enumeration. Data was analyzed by Graphpad Prism 5 using one-way ANOVA. Findings: The higher the static magnetic field and the more the duration were, the lesser the percentage of living cells and cell proliferation, showing a significant reduction in the HeLa cancer cells, while it was insignificant in the fibroblast natural cells. The highest reduction in the living cell percentage and cell proliferation rate was in 48-hour 21T (p<0.05. Conclusion: The static magnetic field affects the HeLa cancer cells more than the fibroblast cells. The higher the field intensity and the more the duration are, the lesser the alive cell percentage and cell proliferation rate.

  1. A convolution model for obtaining the response of an ionization chamber in static non standard fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Castano, D. M.; Gonzalez, L. Brualla; Gago-Arias, M. A.; Pardo-Montero, J.; Gomez, F.; Luna-Vega, V.; Sanchez, M.; Lobato, R. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain) and Dpto de Fisica de Particulas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica ERESA, Consorcio Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, 46014 (Spain); Dpto de Fisica de Particulas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain); Radiation Physics Laboratory, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Spain and Dpto de Fisica de Particulas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela, 15782 (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: This work contains an alternative methodology for obtaining correction factors for ionization chamber (IC) dosimetry of small fields and composite fields such as IMRT. The method is based on the convolution/superposition (C/S) of an IC response function (RF) with the dose distribution in a certain plane which includes chamber position. This method is an alternative to the full Monte Carlo (MC) approach that has been used previously by many authors for the same objective. Methods: The readout of an IC at a point inside a phantom irradiated by a certain beam can be obtained as the convolution of the dose spatial distribution caused by the beam and the IC two-dimensional RF. The proposed methodology has been applied successfully to predict the response of a PTW 30013 IC when measuring different nonreference fields, namely: output factors of 6 MV small fields, beam profiles of cobalt 60 narrow fields and 6 MV radiosurgery segments. The two-dimensional RF of a PTW 30013 IC was obtained by MC simulation of the absorbed dose to cavity air when the IC was scanned by a 0.6 x 0.6 mm{sup 2} cross section parallel pencil beam at low depth in a water phantom. For each of the cases studied, the results of the IC direct measurement were compared with the corresponding obtained by the C/S method. Results: For all of the cases studied, the agreement between the IC direct measurement and the IC calculated response was excellent (better than 1.5%). Conclusions: This method could be implemented in TPS in order to calculate dosimetry correction factors when an experimental IMRT treatment verification with in-phantom ionization chamber is performed. The miss-response of the IC due to the nonreference conditions could be quickly corrected by this method rather than employing MC derived correction factors. This method can be considered as an alternative to the plan-class associated correction factors proposed recently as part of an IAEA work group on nonstandard field dosimetry.

  2. Quasi-static and dynamic responses of advanced high strength steels: Experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Akhtar; Baig, Muneer; Choi, Shi Hoon; Yang, Hoe Seok; Sun, Xin

    2012-03-01

    Measured responses of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and their tailor welded blanks (TWBs), over a wide range of strain-rates (10*4 to 103 s*1) are presented. The steels investigated include transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), dual phase (DP), and drawing quality (DQ) steels. The TWBs include DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds. A tensile split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was used for the dynamic experiments. AHSS and their TWB's were found to exhibit positive strain-rate sensitivity. The Khan-Huang-Liang (KHL) constitutive model is shown to correlate and predict the observed responses reasonably well. Micro-texture characterization of DQ steels, DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds were performed to investigate the effect of strain-rate on texture evolution of these materials. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique was used to analyze the micro-texture evolution and kernel average misorientation (KAM) map. Measurement of micro-hardness profile across the cross section of tensile samples was conducted to understand the effect of initial microstructure on ductility of laser weld samples.

  3. Static Response of Functionally Graded Material Plate under Transverse Load for Varying Aspect Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Functionally gradient materials (FGM are one of the most widely used materials in various applications because of their adaptability to different situations by changing the material constituents as per the requirement. Nowadays it is very easy to tailor the properties to serve specific purposes in functionally gradient material. Most structural components used in the field of engineering can be classified as beams, plates, or shells for analysis purposes. In the present study the power law, sigmoid law and exponential distribution, is considered for the volume fraction distributions of the functionally graded plates. The work includes parametric studies performed by varying volume fraction distributions and aspect ratio. The FGM plate is subjected to transverse UDL (uniformly distributed load and point load and the response is analysed.

  4. Quasi-static response and texture evolution of α- and γ-RDX: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josyula, Kartik; Rahul; De, Suvranu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we undertake a comparative study of the stress-strain response and slip activity of α- and γ-polymorph of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) under pressure loading using a rate-dependent single-crystal plasticity model. Texture evolution studies are performed to further understand the effects of the dominant slip systems. The simulations indicate that the difference in elastic moduli and lattice parameters for α- and γ-RDX lead to different elastic-plastic constitutive response in the two polymorphs. γ-RDX exhibits more plastic slip compared to α-RDX for loading on (1 1 1) plane and the two polymorphs have different sets of dominant slip systems. We observe that the high-pressure slip system (0 0 1)[0 1 0] that is determined using molecular dynamics simulations is the most dominant slip system for this orientation. Whereas, for loading on (2 1 0) plane, α-RDX has marginally higher plastic slip than γ-RDX, though the same slip system is dominant for both the polymorphs. The texture evolution for loading on (1 1 1) and (2 1 0) planes follow the path towards the most dominant slip systems for both the polymorphs. We predict that the larger plastic slip in γ-RDX for loading on (1 1 1) plane might play an important role in understanding the reduced sensitivity for shock loading on (1 1 1) plane, when compared to (2 1 0) for which γ-RDX has lesser plastic slip, and (1 0 0) which is purely elastic.

  5. [The effects of the microwaves on E. coli cells depend on oxygen concentration and static magnetic field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, V L; Alipov, E D; Shcheglov, V S; Beliaev, I Ia

    2006-01-01

    The effects of non-thermal microwaves (MW), 10(-4) and 10(-10) W/cm(2), on conformation of nucleoids in E. coli cells were analyzed by the method of anomalous viscosity time dependence (AVTD). MW exposure was performed at different values of static magnetic field and concentration of oxygen, 8-90 microT, and 2.3-7.8 mg/l, respectively. It was shown, that slight changes in both static magnetic field and oxygen concentration result in significant changes of MW effects up to their disappearance. It was established, that changes in static magnetic field affected significantly the time kinetics of the MW effects. The obtained data provide further evidence for strong dependence of the effects of non-thermal microwaves on physical parameters of exposure and physiological factors. These dependences should be taken into account in replication studies. The obtained results encourage further investigation of possible modulation of non-thermal MW effects by additional electromagnetic fields.

  6. Structural and static electric response properties of highly symmetric lithiated silicon cages: theoretical predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukaras, Emmanuel N; Zdetsis, Aristides D; Karamanis, Panaghiotis; Pouchan, Claude; Avramopoulos, Aggelos; Papadopoulos, Manthos G

    2012-04-15

    It is shown by density functional theory calculations that high symmetry silicon cages can be designed by coating with Li atoms. The resulting highly symmetric lithiated silicon cages (up to D(5d) symmetry) are low-lying true minima of the energy hypersurface with binding energies of the order of 4.6 eV per Si atom and moderate highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gaps. Moreover, relying on a systematic study of the electric response properties obtained by ab initio (Hartree-Fock, MP2, and configuration interaction singles (CIS)) and density functional (B3LYP, B2PLYP, and CAM-B3LYP) methods, it is shown that lithium coating has a large impact on the magnitude of their second hyperpolarizabilities resulting to highly hyperpolarizable species. Such hyperpolarizable character is directly connected to the increase in the density of the low-lying excited states triggered by the interaction between the Si cage and the surrounding Li atoms.

  7. Cantilever Beam Static and Dynamic Response Comparison with Mid-Point Bending for Thin MDF composite Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Hunt; Houjiang Zhang; Zhiren Guo; Feng Fu

    2013-01-01

    A new cantilever beam apparatus has been developed to measure static and vibrational properties of small and thin samples of wood or composite panels. The apparatus applies a known displacement to a cantilever beam, measures its static load, then releases it into its natural first mode of transverse vibration. Free vibrational tip displacements as a function of time...

  8. Responsive cell-material interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhowre, Hala S; Rajput, Sunil; Russell, Noah A; Zelzer, Mischa

    2015-01-01

    Major design aspects for novel biomaterials are driven by the desire to mimic more varied and complex properties of a natural cellular environment with man-made materials. The development of stimulus responsive materials makes considerable contributions to the effort to incorporate dynamic and reversible elements into a biomaterial. This is particularly challenging for cell-material interactions that occur at an interface (biointerfaces); however, the design of responsive biointerfaces also presents opportunities in a variety of applications in biomedical research and regenerative medicine. This review will identify the requirements imposed on a responsive biointerface and use recent examples to demonstrate how some of these requirements have been met. Finally, the next steps in the development of more complex biomaterial interfaces, including multiple stimuli-responsive surfaces, surfaces of 3D objects and interactive biointerfaces will be discussed.

  9. Differential response of planktonic primary, bacterial, and dimethylsulfide production rates to static vs. dynamic light exposure in upper mixed-layer summer sea waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galí, M.; Simó, R.; Pérez, G. L.; Ruiz-González, C.; Sarmento, H.; Royer, S.-J.; Fuentes-Lema, A.; Gasol, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial plankton experience short-term fluctuations in total solar irradiance and in its spectral composition as they are vertically moved by turbulence in the oceanic upper mixed layer (UML). The fact that the light exposure is not static but dynamic may have important consequences for biogeochemical processes and ocean-atmosphere fluxes. However, most biogeochemical processes other than primary production, like bacterial production or dimethylsulfide (DMS) production, are seldom measured in sunlight and even less often in dynamic light fields. We conducted four experiments in oligotrophic summer stratified Mediterranean waters, where a sample from the UML was incubated in ultraviolet (UV)-transparent bottles at three fixed depths within the UML and on a vertically moving basket across the same depth range. We assessed the response of the phyto- and bacterioplankton community with physiological indicators based on flow cytometry singe-cell measurements, fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRf), phytoplankton pigment concentrations and particulate light absorption. Dynamic light exposure caused a subtle disruption of the photoinhibition and photoacclimation processes associated with ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which slightly alleviated bacterial photoinhibition but did not favor primary production. Gross DMS production (GPDMS) decreased sharply with depth in parallel to shortwave UVR, and displayed a dose-dependent response that mixing did not significantly disrupt. To our knowledge, we provide the first measurements of GPDMS under in situ UV-inclusive optical conditions.

  10. Differential response of planktonic primary, bacterial, and dimethylsulfide production rates to vertically-moving and static incubations in upper mixed-layer summer sea waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Galí

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial plankton experience fluctuations in total solar irradiance and in its spectral composition as they are vertically moved by turbulence in the oceanic upper mixed layer (UML. The fact that the light exposure is not static but dynamic may have important consequences for biogeochemical processes and ocean-atmosphere fluxes. However, most biogeochemical processes other than primary production, like bacterial production or dimethylsulfide (DMS production, are seldom measured in sunlight and even less often in dynamic light fields. We conducted four experiments in oligotrophic summer stratified Mediterranean waters, where a sample from the UML was incubated in ultraviolet (UV-transparent bottles at three fixed depths within the UML and on a vertically-moving basket across the same depth range. We assessed the response of the phyto- and bacterioplankton community with physiological indicators based on flow cytometry singe-cell measurements, Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry (FRRf, phytoplankton pigment concentrations and particulate light absorption. Dynamic light exposure caused a disruption of the photoinhibition and photoacclimation processes associated to ultraviolet radiation (UVR, which slightly alleviated bacterial photoinhibition but did not favor primary production. Gross DMS production (GPDMS decreased sharply with depth in parallel to shortwave UVR, and displayed a dose-dependent response that mixing did not significantly disrupt. To our knowledge, we provide the first measurements of GPDMS under in situ UV-inclusive optical conditions.

  11. Differential response of planktonic primary, bacterial, and dimethylsulfide production rates to vertically-moving and static incubations in upper mixed-layer summer sea waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galí, M.; Simó, R.; Pérez, G. L.; Ruiz-González, C.; Sarmento, H.; Royer, S.-J.; Fuentes-Lema, A.; Gasol, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Microbial plankton experience fluctuations in total solar irradiance and in its spectral composition as they are vertically moved by turbulence in the oceanic upper mixed layer (UML). The fact that the light exposure is not static but dynamic may have important consequences for biogeochemical processes and ocean-atmosphere fluxes. However, most biogeochemical processes other than primary production, like bacterial production or dimethylsulfide (DMS) production, are seldom measured in sunlight and even less often in dynamic light fields. We conducted four experiments in oligotrophic summer stratified Mediterranean waters, where a sample from the UML was incubated in ultraviolet (UV)-transparent bottles at three fixed depths within the UML and on a vertically-moving basket across the same depth range. We assessed the response of the phyto- and bacterioplankton community with physiological indicators based on flow cytometry singe-cell measurements, Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry (FRRf), phytoplankton pigment concentrations and particulate light absorption. Dynamic light exposure caused a disruption of the photoinhibition and photoacclimation processes associated to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which slightly alleviated bacterial photoinhibition but did not favor primary production. Gross DMS production (GPDMS) decreased sharply with depth in parallel to shortwave UVR, and displayed a dose-dependent response that mixing did not significantly disrupt. To our knowledge, we provide the first measurements of GPDMS under in situ UV-inclusive optical conditions.

  12. Effect of co-contractions on the cardiovascular response to submaximal static handgrip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, J F; Favriou, F; Jouanin, J C; Grucza, R

    2000-12-01

    cortical irradiation). On the other hand, maintaining an isometric handgrip at 43% MVC reduced local muscle blood flow and metabolites known to stimulate type III and IV afferents then accumulated, which in turn induced a reflex-mediated elevation of blood pressure. However, the relative forces developed by the co-contracting muscles were of low intensity (less than 20% MVC) and short duration compared to those of the muscle group under study. These results suggest that the mass of the muscle groups recruited during a fatiguing submaximal handgrip contributes little to the cardiovascular response.

  13. Moderate strength (0.23–0.28 T static magnetic fields (SMF modulate signaling and differentiation in human embryonic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Pao-Lin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compelling evidence exists that magnetic fields modulate living systems. To date, however, rigorous studies have focused on identifying the molecular-level biosensor (e.g., radical ion pairs or membranes or on the behavior of whole animals leaving a gap in understanding how molecular effects are translated into tissue-wide and organism-level responses. This study begins to bridge this gulf by investigating static magnetic fields (SMF through global mRNA profiling in human embryonic cells coupled with software analysis to identify the affected signaling pathways. Results Software analysis of gene expression in cells exposed to 0.23–0.28 T SMF showed that nine signaling networks responded to SMF; of these, detailed biochemical validation was performed for the network linked to the inflammatory cytokine IL-6. We found the short-term ( Conclusion This study provides a framework describing how magnetic exposure is transduced from a plausible molecular biosensor (lipid membranes to cell-level responses that include differentiation toward neural lineages. In addition, SMF provided a stimulus that uncovered new relationships – that exist even in the absence of magnetic fields – between gangliosides, the time-dependent regulation of IL-6 signaling by these glycosphingolipids, and the fate of embryonic cells.

  14. Modelling static and dynamic behaviour of proton exchange membrane fuel cells on the basis of electro-chemical description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceraolo, M.; Miulli, C.; Pozio, A.

    A simplified dynamical model of a fuel cell of the proton exchange membrane (PEM) type, based on physical-chemical knowledge of the phenomena occurring inside the cell has been developed by the authors. The model has been implemented in the MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. Lab tests have been carried out at ENEA's laboratories; and a good agreement has been found between tests and simulations, both in static and dynamic conditions. In a previous study [M. Ceraolo, R. Giglioli, C. Miulli, A. Pozio, in: Proceedings of the 18th International Electric Fuel Cell and Hybrid Vehicle Symposium (EVS18), Berlin, 20-24 October 2001, p. 306] the basic ideas of the model, as well as its experimental validation have been published. In the present paper, the full implementation of the model is reported in detail. Moreover, a procedure for evaluating all the needed numerical parameters is presented.

  15. Acoustic properties of sintered FeCrAlY foams with open cells (Ⅰ): Static flow resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU TianJian; M.KEPETS; A.P.DOWLING

    2008-01-01

    Open celled metal foams fabricated through the route of metal sintering are a new class of material that offers novel mechanical and acoustic properties. The metal sintering approach offers a cost-effective means for the mass-production of open-cell foams from a range of materials, including high-temperature steel alloys. The mechanical properties of open-celled steel alloy (FeCrAIY) foams have been characterized in previous studies, with focus placed on the influence of processing defects on stiffness and strength. In this work, the low-Reynolds number fluid properties of FeCrAIY foams were investigated both theoretically and experimen-tally. Specifically, the static flow resistance of the sintered foams important for heat transfer, filtration and sound absorption was modeled based on a cylinder and a sphere arranged in a periodic lattice at general incidence to the flow. Experimental measurements were subsequently carried out to validate theoretical predictions, with good agreement achieved.

  16. Comparison and statistical analysis of four write stability metrics in bulk CMOS static random access memory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hao; Mizutani, Tomoko; Saraya, Takuya; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    2015-04-01

    The commonly used four metrics for write stability were measured and compared based on the same set of 2048 (2k) six-transistor (6T) static random access memory (SRAM) cells by the 65 nm bulk technology. The preferred one should be effective for yield estimation and help predict edge of stability. Results have demonstrated that all metrics share the same worst SRAM cell. On the other hand, compared to butterfly curve with non-normality and write N-curve where no cell state flip happens, bit-line and word-line margins have good normality as well as almost perfect correlation. As a result, both bit line method and word line method prove themselves preferred write stability metrics.

  17. Static versus vacuum cell seeding on high and low porosity ceramic scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buizer, Arina T.; Veldhuizen, Albert G.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Kuijer, Roelof

    2014-01-01

    An adequate cell seeding technique is essential for effective bone regeneration on cell seeded constructs of porous tricalcium phosphates. In previous studies, dynamic cell seeding, in which an external force is applied to seed cells on a biomaterial, resulted in more homogeneous cell seeding in low

  18. Influence of specimen-reconstituting method on the undrained response of loose granular soil under static loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noureddine Della; Ahmed Arab; Mostefa Belkhatir

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an experimental study on the undrained shear behaviour of loose sand collected from the location close to the epicenter of the recent Chlef (Algeria) Earthquake (October 10,1980).The study focuses on the effects of the mode of the soil deposition on the liquefaction resistance of the Chlef sand.For this purpose,the results of undrained monotonic triaxial compression tests performed on samples with initial density of 0.29 under initial confining pressures ranged from 50 kPa to 200 kPa are presented.The specimens were prepared by two depositional methods namely dry funnel pluviation and wet deposition.It was found that there was a marked difference in the undrained behaviour of sand in terms of maximal deviatoric stress,peak strength,residual strength and excess pore water pressure,even though the density and stress conditions were identical.The conclusion was that the soil fabric was responsible for this result.The results indicated also that at low confining pressures,the specimens reconstituted by the wet deposition method exhibited complete static liquefaction (zero effective confining pressure and zero stress difference).

  19. Using lunar observations to validate pointing accuracy and geolocation, detector sensitivity stability and static point response of the CERES instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Janet; Smith, G. Louis; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan

    2014-10-01

    Validation of in-orbit instrument performance is a function of stability in both instrument and calibration source. This paper describes a method using lunar observations scanning near full moon by the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. The Moon offers an external source whose signal variance is predictable and non-degrading. From 2006 to present, these in-orbit observations have become standardized and compiled for the Flight Models -1 and -2 aboard the Terra satellite, for Flight Models-3 and -4 aboard the Aqua satellite, and beginning 2012, for Flight Model-5 aboard Suomi-NPP. Instrument performance measurements studied are detector sensitivity stability, pointing accuracy and static detector point response function. This validation method also shows trends per CERES data channel of 0.8% per decade or less for Flight Models 1-4. Using instrument gimbal data and computed lunar position, the pointing error of each detector telescope, the accuracy and consistency of the alignment between the detectors can be determined. The maximum pointing error was 0.2o in azimuth and 0.17o in elevation which corresponds to an error in geolocation near nadir of 2.09 km. With the exception of one detector, all instruments were found to have consistent detector alignment from 2006 to present. All alignment error was within 0.1o with most detector telescopes showing a consistent alignment offset of less than 0.02o.

  20. [Mechanisms of changes in the human spinal column in response to static and dynamic axial mechanic loading].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseev, Yu B

    2014-01-01

    The study was concerned with the human spinal column reaction to axial static and dynamic loading. Fresh segments of the column from dorsal vertebra XI to lumber vertebra II were exposed to axial static (20 mm/min) and dynamic (200 and 500 mm/min) loading. Measured variables included load value, whole segment deformation, anterior surfaces of intervertebral disk Th(XI)-Th(XII) and dorsal vertebra XII, and acoustic emission signals indicative of spongy bone microdestruction. It was found that vertebral body deformation augmented less in comparison with the intervertebral disk and that central parts of the spinal end plates compress greater than peripheral. This difference was more considerable due to static loading rather than dynamic. To produce deformation of a spinal segment by dynamic loading same as by the static one, it is necessary to overcome a stronger resistance of a larger number of trabecular bones. Herefrom it follows that, first, to cause an equal segment compression the dynamic load must be heavier than static and, which is of paramount practical significance, dynamic strength of the column is markedly higher than static. Secondly, spinal stiffness during impact is higher as compared with the static condition. Thirdly, same degree of deformation due to dynamic loading should result in a larger volume of microdestructions comparing with static loading, which is testified by a reliable difference in the number of AE signals accumulated prior to fracture. The number of AE signals amounts to 444.2 ± 308.2 and 85.0 ± 36.6 in case of the dynamic and static loading, respectively (p < 0.05 according to Student's t-criterion).

  1. A virtual clinical trial comparing static versus dynamic PET imaging in measuring response to breast cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangerin, Kristen A.; Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; Linden, Hannah M.; Novakova, Alena; Mankoff, David A.; E Kinahan, Paul

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method to evaluate variations in the PET imaging process in order to characterize the relative ability of static and dynamic metrics to measure breast cancer response to therapy in a clinical trial setting. We performed a virtual clinical trial by generating 540 independent and identically distributed PET imaging study realizations for each of 22 original dynamic fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) breast cancer patient studies pre- and post-therapy. Each noise realization accounted for known sources of uncertainty in the imaging process, such as biological variability and SUV uptake time. Four definitions of SUV were analyzed, which were SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak, and SUV50%. We performed a ROC analysis on the resulting SUV and kinetic parameter uncertainty distributions to assess the impact of the variability on the measurement capabilities of each metric. The kinetic macro parameter, K i , showed more variability than SUV (mean CV K i   =  17%, SUV  =  13%), but K i pre- and post-therapy distributions also showed increased separation compared to the SUV pre- and post-therapy distributions (mean normalized difference K i   =  0.54, SUV  =  0.27). For the patients who did not show perfect separation between the pre- and post-therapy parameter uncertainty distributions (ROC AUC  <  1), dynamic imaging outperformed SUV in distinguishing metabolic change in response to therapy, ranging from 12 to 14 of 16 patients over all SUV definitions and uptake time scenarios (p  <  0.05). For the patient cohort in this study, which is comprised of non-high-grade ER+  tumors, K i outperformed SUV in an ROC analysis of the parameter uncertainty distributions pre- and post-therapy. This methodology can be applied to different scenarios with the ability to inform the design of clinical trials using PET imaging.

  2. Resonant response of a strong electromagnetic wave beam to a gravitational wave in a static magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Concrete forms of resonant response (ER) for a strongelectromagnetic (EM) wave beam (photon flux) propagating in a static magnetic field to a standing gravitational wave (gravitons) are given, and the corresponding perturbation solutions and resonant conditions are obtained. It is found that perturbed EM fields (PEMFs) contain three new components with frequencies |ωg±ωe| and ωg, respectively. In the case of ωeωg, the PEMFs are manifested as the EM wave beams with frequency ωe and a standing EM wave with ωg. The former and the background EM wave beam (BEMWB) have the same propagating direction, while in the case of ωgωe, all PEMFs are expressed as the standing EM waves with frequency ωg. The resonant response occurs in two cases of ωe=1/2ωg and ωe=ωg only. Then not only the first order perturbed energy fluxes (PEFs) propagating in the same and opposite directions of the BEMWB can be generated, but also radial and tangential PEFs which are perpendicular to the above directions can be produced. This effect might provide a new way for the EM detection of the gravitational waves (GWs). Moreover, the possible schemes of displaying perturbed effects induced by the standing GW with h=10-33-10-35 and λg=0.1 m at the level of the single photon avalanche and in a typicla laboratory dimension are reviewed.

  3. Static pressure accelerates ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation via SREBP-1-mediated caveolin-1 downregulation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Di-xian, E-mail: luodixian_2@163.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); First People' s Hospital of Chenzhou City, Chenzhou 423000, Hunan (China); Xia, Cheng-lai [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Third Affiliated Hospital Medical College of Guangzhou, Guangzhou 510150, Guangdong (China); Li, Jun-mu [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Xiong, Yan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Yuan, Hao-yu [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Lusong Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Zhuzhou 412000, Hunan (China); TANG, Zhen-Wang; Zeng, Yixin [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Liao, Duan-fang, E-mail: dfliao66@yahoo.com.cn [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Department of Traditional Chinese Diagnostics, School of Pharmacy, Hunan University of Chinese Medicine, Changsha 420108, Hunan (China)

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Vertical static pressure accelerates ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. {yields} Static pressure induces SREBP-1 activation. {yields} Static pressure downregulates the expressions of caveolin-1 by activating SREBP-1. {yields} Static pressure also downregulates the transcription of ABCA1 by activating SREBP-1. {yields} Static pressure increases ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation by SREBP-1-mediated caveolin-1 downregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate the effect of static pressure on cholesterol accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and its mechanism. Methods: Rat-derived VSMC cell line A10 treated with 50 mg/L ox-LDL and different static pressures (0, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 mm Hg) in a custom-made pressure incubator for 48 h. Intracellular lipid droplets and lipid levels were assayed by oil red O staining and HPLC; The mRNA levels of caveolin-1 and ABCA1, the protein levels of caveolin-1 SREBP-1 and mature SREBP-1 were respectively detected by RT-PCR or western blot. ALLN, an inhibitor of SREBP metabolism, was used to elevate SREBP-1 protein level in VSMCs treated with static pressure. Results: Static pressures significantly not only increase intracellular lipid droplets in VSMCs, but also elevate cellular lipid content in a pressure-dependent manner. Intracellular free cholesterol (FC), cholesterol ester (CE), total cholesterol (TC) were respectively increased from 60.5 {+-} 2.8 mg/g, 31.8 {+-} 0.7 mg/g, 92.3 {+-} 2.1 mg/g at atmosphere pressure (ATM, 0 mm Hg) to 150.8 {+-} 9.4 mg/g, 235.9 {+-} 3.0 mg/g, 386.7 {+-} 6.4 mg/g at 180 mm Hg. At the same time, static pressures decrease the mRNA and protein levels of caveolin-1, and induce the activation and nuclear translocation of SREBP-1. ALLN increases the protein level of mature SREBP-1 and decreases caveolin-1 expression, so that cellular lipid levels were

  4. The optimization of essential oils supercritical CO 2 extraction from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic steps procedure and semi-continuous technique using response surface method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Kamali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to examine and evaluate crucial variables in essential oils extraction process from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic and semi-continuous techniques using response surface method. Materials and Methods: Essential oil components were extracted from Lavandula hybrida (Lavandin flowers using supercritical carbon dioxide via static-dynamic steps (SDS procedure, and semi-continuous (SC technique. Results: Using response surface method the optimum extraction yield (4.768% was obtained via SDS at 108.7 bar, 48.5° C , 120 min (static: 8×15, 24 min (dynamic: 8×3 min in contrast to the 4.620% extraction yield for the SC at 111.6 bar, 49.2° C , 14 min (static, 121.1 min (dynamic. Conclusion: The results indicated that a substantial reduction (81.56% solvent usage (kg CO 2 /g oil is observed in the SDS method versus the conventional SC method.

  5. Response of Human Prostate Cancer Cells to Mitoxantrone Treatment in Simulated Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Edwards, Christopher; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the changes in growth of human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) and their response to the treatment of antineoplastic agent, mitoxantrone, under the simulated microgravity condition. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity and simulated microgravity have been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in various cultured cell models or animals. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on the responses of cells to drugs, especially chemotherapy drugs. To test the hypothesis that zero gravity would result in altered regulation of cells in response to antineoplastic agents, we cultured LNCaP cells for 96 hr either in a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactor at the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as a control. 24 hr after the culture started, mitoxantrone was introduced to the cells at a final concentration of 1 M. The mitoxantrone treatment lasted 72 hr and then the cells were collected for various measurements. Compared to static 1g controls, the cells cultured in the simulated microgravity environment did not show significant differences in cell viability, growth rate, or cell cycle distribution. However, in response to mitoxantrone (1uM), a significant proportion of bioreactor cultured cells (30%) was arrested at G2 phase and a significant number of these cells were apoptotic in comparison to their static controls. The expressions of 84 oxidative stress related genes were analyzed using Qiagen PCR array to identify the possible mechanism underlying the altered responses of bioreactor culture cells to mitoxantrone. Nine out of 84 genes showed higher expression at four hour post mitoxantrone treatment in cells cultured at rotating condition compared to those at static. Taken together, the results reported here indicate that simulated microgravity may alter the responses of LNCaP cells to mitoxantrone treatment. The alteration of oxidative stress pathways

  6. Zonation related function and ubiquitination regulation in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in dynamic vs. static culture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Shu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding hepatic zonation is important both for liver physiology and pathology. There is currently no effective systemic chemotherapy for human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and its pathogenesis is of special interest. Genomic and proteomic data of HCC cells in different culture models, coupled to pathway-based analysis, can help identify HCC-related gene and pathway dysfunctions. Results We identified zonation-related expression profiles contributing to selective phenotypes of HCC, by integrating relevant experimental observations through gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA. Analysis was based on gene and protein expression data measured on a human HCC cell line (HepG2/C3A in two culture conditions: dynamic microfluidic biochips and static Petri dishes. Metabolic activity (HCC-related cytochromes P450 and genetic information processing were dominant in the dynamic cultures, in contrast to kinase signaling and cancer-specific profiles in static cultures. That, together with analysis of the published literature, leads us to propose that biochips culture conditions induce a periportal-like hepatocyte phenotype while standard plates cultures are more representative of a perivenous-like phenotype. Both proteomic data and GSEA results further reveal distinct ubiquitin-mediated protein regulation in the two culture conditions. Conclusions Pathways analysis, using gene and protein expression data from two cell culture models, confirmed specific human HCC phenotypes with regard to CYPs and kinases, and revealed a zonation-related pattern of expression. Ubiquitin-mediated regulation mechanism gives plausible explanations of our findings. Altogether, our results suggest that strategies aimed at inhibiting activated kinases and signaling pathways may lead to enhanced metabolism-mediated drug resistance of treated tumors. If that were the case, mitigating inhibition or targeting inactive forms of kinases would be an alternative.

  7. Fe3O4/BSA particles induce osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells under static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pengfei; Zhang, Yixian; Zhu, Chaonan; Zhang, Wenjing; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou

    2016-12-01

    Differentiation of stem cells is influenced by many factors, yet uptake of the magnetic particles with or without magnetic field is rarely tackled. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles-loaded bovine serum albumin (BSA) (Fe3O4/BSA) particles were prepared, which showed a spherical morphology with a diameter below 200 nm, negatively charged surface, and tunable magnetic property. The particles could be internalized into bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and their release from the cells was significantly retarded under external magnetic field, resulting in almost twice intracellular amount of the particles within 21 d compared to that of the magnetic field free control. Uptake of the Fe3O4/BSA particles enhanced significantly the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs under a static magnetic field, as evidenced by elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and expressions of collagen type I and osteocalcin at both mRNA and protein levels. Therefore, uptake of the Fe3O4/BSA particles brings significant influence on the differentiation of MSCs under magnetic field, and thereby should be paid great attention for practical applications. Differentiation of stem cells is influenced by many factors, yet uptake of the magnetic particles with or without magnetic field is rarely tackled. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles-loaded bovine serum albumin (BSA) (Fe3O4/BSA) particles with a diameter below 200nm, negatively charged surface, tunable Fe3O4 content and subsequently adjustable magnetic property were prepared. The particles could be internalized into bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and their release from the cells was significantly retarded under external magnetic field. Uptake of the Fe3O4/BSA particles enhanced significantly the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs under a constant static magnetic field, while the magnetic particles and external magnetic field alone do not influence significantly the osteogenic differentiation

  8. Cardiovascular responses to passive static flexibility exercises are influenced by the stretched muscle mass and the Valsalva maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo T. V Farinatti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The respiratory pattern is often modified or even blocked during flexibility exercises, but little is known about the cardiovascular response to concomitant stretching and the Valsalva maneuver (VM in healthy subjects. OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the heart rate (HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP, and rate-pressure product (RPP during and after large and small muscle group flexibility exercises performed simultaneously with the VM. METHODS: Asymptomatic volunteers (N = 22 with the following characteristics were recruited: age, 22 ± 3 years; weight, 73 ± 6 kg; height, 175 ± 5 cm; HR at rest, 66 ± 9 BPM; and SBP at rest, 113 ± 10 mmHg. They performed two exercises: four sets of passive static stretching for 30 s of the dorsi-flexion (DF of the gastrocnemius and the hip flexion (HF of the ischio-tibialis. The exercises were performed with (V+ or without (V- the VM in a counterbalanced order. The SBP and HR were measured, and the RPP was calculated before the exercise session, at the end of each set, and during a 30-min post-exercise recovery period. RESULTS: The within-group comparisons showed that only the SBP and RPP increased throughout the sets (p<0.05, but no post-exercise hypotension was detected. The between-group comparisons showed that greater SBP increases were related to the VM and to a larger stretched muscle mass. Differences for a given set were identified for the HR (the HFV+ and HFV- values were higher than the DFV+ and DFV- values by approximately 12 BPM, SBP (the HFV+ value was higher than the DFV+ and DFV- values by approximately 12 to 15 mmHg, and RPP (the HFV+ value was higher than the HFV- value by approximately 2000 mmHGxBPM, and the HFV+ value was higher than the DFV+ and DFV- values by approximately 4000 mmHGxBPM. CONCLUSION: Both the stretched muscle mass and the VM influence acute cardiovascular responses to multiple-set passive stretching exercise sessions.

  9. Cardiovascular responses to passive static flexibility exercises are influenced by the stretched muscle mass and the Valsalva maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinatti, Paulo T V; Soares, Pedro P S; Monteiro, Walace D; Duarte, Antonio F A; Viveiros de Castro, Luis A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The respiratory pattern is often modified or even blocked during flexibility exercises, but little is known about the cardiovascular response to concomitant stretching and the Valsalva maneuver (VM) in healthy subjects. OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and rate-pressure product (RPP) during and after large and small muscle group flexibility exercises performed simultaneously with the VM. METHODS: Asymptomatic volunteers (N  =  22) with the following characteristics were recruited: age, 22 ± 3 years; weight, 73 ± 6 kg; height, 175 ± 5 cm; HR at rest, 66 ± 9 BPM; and SBP at rest, 113 ± 10 mmHg. They performed two exercises: four sets of passive static stretching for 30 s of the dorsi-flexion (DF) of the gastrocnemius and the hip flexion (HF) of the ischio-tibialis. The exercises were performed with (V+) or without (V-) the VM in a counterbalanced order. The SBP and HR were measured, and the RPP was calculated before the exercise session, at the end of each set, and during a 30-min post-exercise recovery period. RESULTS: The within-group comparisons showed that only the SBP and RPP increased throughout the sets (p<0.05), but no post-exercise hypotension was detected. The between-group comparisons showed that greater SBP increases were related to the VM and to a larger stretched muscle mass. Differences for a given set were identified for the HR (the HFV+ and HFV- values were higher than the DFV+ and DFV- values by approximately 12 BPM), SBP (the HFV+ value was higher than the DFV+ and DFV- values by approximately 12 to 15 mmHg), and RPP (the HFV+ value was higher than the HFV- value by approximately 2000 mmHGxBPM, and the HFV+ value was higher than the DFV+ and DFV- values by approximately 4000 mmHGxBPM). CONCLUSION: Both the stretched muscle mass and the VM influence acute cardiovascular responses to multiple-set passive stretching exercise sessions. PMID:21552673

  10. Resonant response of a strong electromagnetic wave beam to a gravitational wave in a static magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Fangyu

    2001-01-01

    [1]Gerlach, U. H., Cavity quantum-electrodynamical response to a gravitational wave, Phys. Rev. D, 1992, 46: 1 239.[2]Fortini, P., Gualdi, C., Ortolan, A., Interaction of a gravitational wave with electromagnetic currents, Nuovo Cimento B, 1991,106: 395.[3]Cuomo, D., Franceschetti, G., Panariello, G. et al., Proceeding of International Symposium on Experimental Gravitational Physics, Guangzhou, China (ed. Michelson, F. C.), Singapore: World Scientific, 1992, 262.[4]Logi, W. K., Mickelson, A. R., Electrogravitational conversion cross section in static electromagnetic fields, Phys. Rev. D, 1977, 16: 2 915.[5]Long, H. N., Soa, D. V., Tuan, T. A., The conversion of gravitons into photons in a periodic external electromagnetic field, Phys. Lett. A, 1994, 186: 382.[6]Boccaletti, D., Sabbata, V. D., Fortini, P., Conversion of photons into gravitons and vice versa in a static electromagnetic field, Nuovo Cimento B, 1970, 70: 129.[7]Grishchuk, L. P., Sazhin, M. V., Excitation and detection of standing gravitational waves, Sov. Phys. Jetp, 1975, 41: 787.[8]Gratta, G., Kim, K. J., Melissions, A. et al., Workshop on Beam-Beam and Beam-Radiation Interaction: High Intensity and Nonlinear Effects, Los Angeles, USA (ed. Pellegrini, C.), Singapore: World Scientific, 1992, 70.[9]Chen, P., Palazzi, G. D., Kim, K. J. et al., Workshop on Beam-Beam and Beam-Radiation Interaction: High Intensity and Nonlinear Effects, Los Angeles, USA (ed. Pellegrini, C.), Singapore: World Scientific, 1992, 84.[10]Grishchuk, L. P., Sazhin, M. V., Squeezed quantum states of a harmonic oscillator in the problem of gravitational wave detection. Sov. Phys. Jetp, 1983, 53: 1128.[11]Tang, M. X., Li, F. Y., Luo, J., High frequency gravitational wave of a composite toroidal electrodrynamical resonant system, Acta Physical Sinica, 1997, 6: 161.[12]Li, F. Y., Tang, M. X., Coherent resonant of a strong electromagnetic wave beam to a standing gravitational wave

  11. Influence of Different Three-Dimensional Open Porous Titanium Scaffold Designs on Human Osteoblasts Behavior in Static and Dynamic Cell Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Markhoff

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of osseous defects micro-structured three-dimensional materials for bone replacement serve as leading structure for cell migration, proliferation and bone formation. The scaffold design and culture conditions are crucial for the limited diffusion distance of nutrients and oxygen. In static culture, decreased cell activity and irregular distribution occur within the scaffold. Dynamic conditions entail physical stimulation and constant medium perfusion imitating physiological nutrient supply and metabolite disposal. Therefore, we investigated the influence of different scaffold configurations and cultivation methods on human osteoblasts. Cells were seeded on three-dimensional porous Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds manufactured with selective laser melting (SLM or electron beam melting (EBM varying in porosity, pore size and basic structure (cubic, diagonal, pyramidal and cultured under static and dynamic conditions. Cell viability, migration and matrix production were examined via mitochondrial activity assay, fluorescence staining and ELISA. All scaffolds showed an increasing cell activity and matrix production under static conditions over time. Expectations about the dynamic culture were only partially fulfilled, since it enabled proliferation alike the static one and enhanced cell migration. Overall, the SLM manufactured scaffold with the highest porosity, small pore size and pyramidal basic structure proved to be the most suitable structure for cell proliferation and migration.

  12. Influence of Different Three-Dimensional Open Porous Titanium Scaffold Designs on Human Osteoblasts Behavior in Static and Dynamic Cell Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markhoff, Jana; Wieding, Jan; Weissmann, Volker; Pasold, Juliane; Jonitz-Heincke, Anika; Bader, Rainer

    2015-08-24

    In the treatment of osseous defects micro-structured three-dimensional materials for bone replacement serve as leading structure for cell migration, proliferation and bone formation. The scaffold design and culture conditions are crucial for the limited diffusion distance of nutrients and oxygen. In static culture, decreased cell activity and irregular distribution occur within the scaffold. Dynamic conditions entail physical stimulation and constant medium perfusion imitating physiological nutrient supply and metabolite disposal. Therefore, we investigated the influence of different scaffold configurations and cultivation methods on human osteoblasts. Cells were seeded on three-dimensional porous Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds manufactured with selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM) varying in porosity, pore size and basic structure (cubic, diagonal, pyramidal) and cultured under static and dynamic conditions. Cell viability, migration and matrix production were examined via mitochondrial activity assay, fluorescence staining and ELISA. All scaffolds showed an increasing cell activity and matrix production under static conditions over time. Expectations about the dynamic culture were only partially fulfilled, since it enabled proliferation alike the static one and enhanced cell migration. Overall, the SLM manufactured scaffold with the highest porosity, small pore size and pyramidal basic structure proved to be the most suitable structure for cell proliferation and migration.

  13. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  14. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otabe, E S; Kuroki, S; Nikawa, J [Faculty of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 680-4 Kawazu Iizuka Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y [Fukuoka University, 8-19-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Ooba, T [Fukuoka Industrial Technology Center, 1465-5 Aikawa-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka 839-0861 (Japan); Kiso, K [Fukuoka Regional Taxation Bureau, 2-11-1 Hakataekihigashi, Hakata-ku Fukuoka, 812-8547 (Japan); Hayashi, H [Kyushu Power Electric, 2-1-47 Shiobaru Minami-ku Fukuoka 815-8520 (Japan)], E-mail: otabe@cse.kyutech.ac.jp

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 {+-}0.2 x 10{sup 6}/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, {rho}, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by {rho} = {rho}o exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  15. Propagation of Brazilian Zika virus strains in static and suspension cultures using Vero and BHK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolay, Alexander; Castilho, Leda R; Reichl, Udo; Genzel, Yvonne

    2017-03-23

    The recent spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas and the Pacific has reached alarming levels in more than 60 countries. However, relatively little is known about the disease on a virological and epidemiological level and its consequences for humans. Accordingly, a large demand for in vitro derived Brazilian ZIKV material to support in vitro and in vivo studies has arisen. However, a prompt supply of ZIKV and ZIKV antigens cannot be guaranteed as the production of this virus typically using Vero or C6/36 cell lines remains challenging. Here we present a production platform based on BHK-21 suspension (BHK-21SUS) cells to propagate Brazilian ZIKV at larger quantities in perfusion bioreactors. Scouting experiments performed in tissue culture flasks using adherent BHK-21 and Vero cells have demonstrated similar permissivity and virus yields for four different Brazilian ZIKV isolates. The cell-specific yield of infectious virus particles varied between respective virus strains (1-48PFU/cell), and the ZIKV isolate from the Brazilian state Pernambuco (ZIKV(PE)) showed to be a best performing isolate for both cell lines. However, infection studies of BHK-21SUS cells with ZIKV(PE) in shake flasks resulted in poor virus replication, with a maximum titer of 8.9×10(3)PFU/mL. Additional RT-qPCR measurements of intracellular and extracellular viral RNA levels revealed high viral copy numbers within the cell, but poor virus release. Subsequent cultivation in a perfusion bioreactor using an alternating tangential flow filtration system (ATF) under controlled process conditions enabled cell concentrations of about 1.2×10(7)cells/mL, and virus titers of 3.9×10(7)PFU/mL. However, while the total number of infectious virus particles was increased, the cell-specific yield (3.3PFU/cell) remained lower than determined in adherent cell lines. Nevertheless, the established perfusion process allows to provide large amounts of ZIKV material for research and is a first step towards

  16. Response of Human Prostate Cancer Cells to Mitoxantrone Treatment in Simulated Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu

    2012-07-01

    RESPONSE OF HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER CELLS TO MITOXANTRONE TREATMENT IN SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ENVIRONMENT Ye Zhang1,2, Christopher Edwards3, and Honglu Wu1 1 NASA-Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 2 Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group, Houston, TX 3 Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR This study explores the changes in growth of human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) and their response to the treatment of an antineoplastic agent, mitoxantrone, under the simulated microgravity condition. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity and simulated microgravity have been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in various cultured cell models or animals. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on the responses of cells to the treatment of drugs, especially chemotherapy drugs. To test the hypothesis that zero gravity would result in altered regulations of cells in response to antineoplastic agents, we cultured LNCaP cells in either a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactor at the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as control, and treated the cells with mitoxantrone. Cell growth, as well as expressions of oxidative stress related genes, were analyzed after the drug treatment. Compared to static 1g controls, the cells cultured in the simulated microgravity environment did not present significant differences in cell viability, growth rate, or cell cycle distribution. However, after mitoxantrone treatment, a significant proportion of bioreactor cultured cells became apoptotic or was arrested in G2. Several oxidative stress related genes also showed a higher expression level post mitoxantrone treatment. Our results indicate that simulated microgravity may alter the response of LNCaP cells to mitoxantrone treatment. Understanding the mechanisms by which cells respond to drugs differently in an altered gravity environment will be useful for the improvement of cancer treatment on

  17. Closed-Loop Pure Oxygen Static Feed Fuel Cell for Lunar Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In order to address the NASA lunar mission, DESC proposes to develop a proton exchange membrane (PEM) closed-loop pure oxygen fuel cell for application to lunar...

  18. Closed-Loop Pure Oxygen Static Feed Fuel Cell for Lunar Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In order to address the NASA lunar mission, DESC proposes to develop a proton exchange membrane (PEM) closed-loop pure oxygen fuel cell for application to lunar...

  19. Impact of inhomogeneous static magnetic field (31.7-232.0 mT) exposure on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells during cisplatin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergallo, Cristian; Ahmadi, Meysam; Mobasheri, Hamid; Dini, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Beneficial or adverse effects of Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) are a large concern for the scientific community. In particular, the effect of SMF exposure during anticancer therapies still needs to be fully elucidated. Here, we evaluate the effects of SMF at induction levels that cisPt-treated cancer patients experience during the imaging process conducted in Low field (200-500 mT), Open field (300-700 mT) and/or inhomogeneous High field (1.5-3 T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machines. Human adrenergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with 0.1 µM cisPt (i.e. the lowest concentration capable of inducing apoptosis) were exposed to SMF and their response was studied in vitro. Exposure of 0.1 µM cisPt-treated cells to SMF for 2 h decreased cell viability (30%) and caused overexpression of the apoptosis-related cleaved caspase-3 protein (46%). Furthermore, increase in ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) production (23%) and reduction in the number of mitochondria vs controls were seen. The sole exposure of SMF for up to 24 h had no effect on cell viability but increased ROS production and modified cellular shape. On the other hand, the toxicity of cisPt was significantly prevented during 24 h exposure to SMF as shown by the levels of cell viability, cleaved caspase-3 and ROS production. In conclusion, due to the cytoprotective effect of 31.7-232.0 mT SMF on low-cisPt-concentration-treated SH-SY5Y cells, our data suggest that exposure to various sources of SMF in cancer patients under a cisPt regimen should be strictly controlled.

  20. Acoustic properties of sintered FeCrAlY foams with open cells (Ⅰ): Static flow resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.; KEPETS; A.; P.; DOWLING

    2008-01-01

    Open celled metal foams fabricated through the route of metal sintering are a new class of material that offers novel mechanical and acoustic properties. The metal sintering approach offers a cost-effective means for the mass-production of open-cell foams from a range of materials, including high-temperature steel alloys. The mechanical properties of open-celled steel alloy (FeCrAlY) foams have been characterized in previous studies, with focus placed on the influence of processing defects on stiffness and strength. In this work, the low-Reynolds number fluid properties of FeCrAlY foams were investigated both theoretically and experimen- tally. Specifically, the static flow resistance of the sintered foams important for heat transfer, filtration and sound absorption was modeled based on a cylinder and a sphere arranged in a periodic lattice at general incidence to the flow. Experimental measurements were subsequently carried out to validate theoretical predictions, with good agreement achieved.

  1. Consistent static and small-signal physics-based modeling of dye-sensitized solar cells under different illumination conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, Federica; Ma, Shuai; Pugliese, Diego; Sacco, Adriano; Lamberti, Andrea; Ghione, Giovanni; Tresso, Elena

    2013-09-21

    A numerical device-level model of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is presented, which self-consistently couples a physics-based description of the photoactive layer with a compact circuit-level description of the passive parts of the cell. The opto-electronic model of the nanoporous dyed film includes a detailed description of photogeneration and trap-limited kinetics, and a phenomenological description of nonlinear recombination. Numerical simulations of the dynamic small-signal behavior of DSCs, accounting for trapping and nonlinear recombination mechanisms, are reported for the first time and validated against experiments. The model is applied to build a consistent picture of the static and dynamic small-signal performance of nanocrystalline TiO2-based DSCs under different incident illumination intensity and direction, analyzed in terms of current-voltage characteristic, Incident Photon to Current Efficiency, and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. This is achieved with a reliable extraction and validation of a unique set of model parameters against a large enough set of experimental data. Such a complete and validated description allows us to gain a detailed view of the cell collection efficiency dependence on different operating conditions. In particular, based on dynamic numerical simulations, we provide for the first time a sound support to the interpretation of the diffusion length, in the presence of nonlinear recombination and non-uniform electron density distribution, as derived from small-signal characterization techniques and clarify its correlation with different estimation methods based on spectral measurements.

  2. Impact of a static magnetic field on the electricity production of Shewanella-inoculated microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Liu, Xian-Wei; Cai, Pei-Jie; Sun, Min; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Yun-Kun; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Dong, Fang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-06-15

    The electricity production of Shewanella-inoculated microbial fuel cells (MFCs) under magnetic field (MF) exposure was investigated in different reactor systems. The persistency of the MF effect and the influences of MF intensity and direction on MFC performance were also studied. Application of a 100-mT static MF to the MFCs improved electricity production considerably, with an increase in the maximum voltage by 20-27% in both single- and two-chamber MFCs, while a more conspicuous improvement in the electricity generation was observed in a three-electrode cell. The MF effects were found to be immediate and reversible, and adverse effects seemed to occur when the MF was suddenly removed. The medium components analysis demonstrated that the application of MF led to an enhanced bioelectrochemical activity of Shewanella, and no significant promotion in mediator secretion was found. The improvement in the electricity production of MFCs under MF was mainly attributed to the enhanced bioelectrochemical activity, possibly through the oxidative stress mechanism. An accelerated cell growth under MF might also contribute to the enhanced substrate degradation and power generation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A stack-based flex-compressive piezoelectric energy harvesting cell for large quasi-static loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianfeng; Shi, Zhifei; Wang, Jianjun; Xiang, Hongjun

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a flex-compressive piezoelectric energy harvesting cell (F-C PEHC) is proposed. This cell has a large load capacity and adjustable force transmission coefficient assembled from replaceable individual components. A statically indeterminate mechanical model for the cell is established and the theoretical force transmission coefficient is derived based on structural mechanics. An inverse correlation between the force transmission coefficient and the relative stiffness of Element 1’s limbs is found. An experimental study is also conducted to verify the theoretical results. Both weakened and enhanced modes are achieved for this experiment. The maximum power output approaches 4.5 mW at 120 kΩ resistive load under a 4 Hz harmonic excitation with 600 N amplitude for the weakened mode, whereas the maximum power output approaches 17.8 mW at 120 kΩ under corresponding load for the enhanced mode. The experimental measurements of output voltages are compared with the theoretical ones in both weakened and enhanced modes. The experimental measurements of open-circuit voltages are slightly smaller for harmonic excitations with amplitudes that vary from 400 N to 800 N and the errors are within 14%. During the experiment, the maximum load approaches 2.8 kN which is quite large but not the ultimate bearing capacity of the present device. The mechanical model and theoretical transmission coefficient can be used in other flex-compressive mode energy transducers.

  4. Dynamic and static maintenance of epigenetic memory in pluripotent and somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipony, Zohar; Mukamel, Zohar; Cohen, Netta Mendelson; Landan, Gilad; Chomsky, Elad; Zeliger, Shlomit Reich; Fried, Yael Chagit; Ainbinder, Elena; Friedman, Nir; Tanay, Amos

    2014-09-04

    Stable maintenance of gene regulatory programs is essential for normal function in multicellular organisms. Epigenetic mechanisms, and DNA methylation in particular, are hypothesized to facilitate such maintenance by creating cellular memory that can be written during embryonic development and then guide cell-type-specific gene expression. Here we develop new methods for quantitative inference of DNA methylation turnover rates, and show that human embryonic stem cells preserve their epigenetic state by balancing antagonistic processes that add and remove methylation marks rather than by copying epigenetic information from mother to daughter cells. In contrast, somatic cells transmit considerable epigenetic information to progenies. Paradoxically, the persistence of the somatic epigenome makes it more vulnerable to noise, since random epimutations can accumulate to massively perturb the epigenomic ground state. The rate of epigenetic perturbation depends on the genomic context, and, in particular, DNA methylation loss is coupled to late DNA replication dynamics. Epigenetic perturbation is not observed in the pluripotent state, because the rapid turnover-based equilibrium continuously reinforces the canonical state. This dynamic epigenetic equilibrium also explains how the epigenome can be reprogrammed quickly and to near perfection after induced pluripotency.

  5. Modeling the Non-Linear Behavior of Library Cells for an Accurate Static Noise Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Forzan, Cristiano

    2011-01-01

    In signal integrity analysis, the joint effect of propagated noise through library cells, and of the noise injected on a quiet net by neighboring switching nets through coupling capacitances, must be considered in order to accurately estimate the overall noise impact on design functionality and performances. In this work the impact of the cell non-linearity on the noise glitch waveform is analyzed in detail, and a new macromodel that allows to accurately and efficiently modeling the non-linear effects of the victim driver in noise analysis is presented. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method, and confirm that existing noise analysis approaches based on linear superposition of the propagated and crosstalk-injected noise can be highly inaccurate, thus impairing the sign-off functional verification phase.

  6. Early detection of cataract and response to pantethine therapy with non-invasive static and dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; King, James F.; Seeberger, Teri; Clark, John I.

    2003-07-01

    Cataractogenesis is a risk factor for space travelers. Here on earth, half of all blindness is due to cataracts. At this time, the only known treatment is surgical removal of the lens. In this paper, we present static and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements of early onset of cataract before it has any effect on vision and to test the effectiveness of pantethine as an anticataract agent in reversing cataracts. In this preliminary study, experiments were conducted on 12 rodents. Static measurements were performed by scanning the animal eye (cornea to retina) at a laser power of 80 microwatts to collect photons or scattered intensity in steps of 10 microns. The rodents studied were control, selenite injected, and selenite plus pantethine injected. Selenite was used to induce cataracts. Static and dynamic changes (increase in light scatter and crystalline size) in the lenses are quantitatively measured as early as 1 day post selenite injections. Scattering intensity and DLS measurements from lenses of animals administered pantethine resembled controls. These subtle molecular changes are not noticeable when the animals are examined with conventional ophthalmic instruments because their lenses remain transparent. Acknowledgements: Technical support from C.Ganders, University of Washington, Seattle, NEI research grant EY04542 (JIC) and support under a NASA-NEI/NIH interagency agreement (RRA) are greatly appreciated. JFK works for QSS Inc. at NASA GRC.

  7. Osteoinduction and survival of osteoblasts and bone-marrow stromal cells in 3D biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds under static and dynamic culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Subha N; Strobel, Leonie A; Arkudas, Andreas; Beier, Justus P; Maier, Anne-Kathrin; Greil, Peter; Horch, Raymund E; Kneser, Ulrich

    2012-10-01

    In many tissue engineering approaches, the basic difference between in vitro and in vivo conditions for cells within three-dimensional (3D) constructs is the nutrition flow dynamics. To achieve comparable results in vitro, bioreactors are advised for improved cell survival, as they are able to provide a controlled flow through the scaffold. We hypothesize that a bioreactor would enhance long-term differentiation conditions of osteogenic cells in 3D scaffolds. To achieve this either primary rat osteoblasts or bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) were implanted on uniform-sized biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds produced by a 3D printing method. Three types of culture conditions were applied: static culture without osteoinduction (Group A); static culture with osteoinduction (Group B); dynamic culture with osteoinduction (Group C). After 3 and 6 weeks, the scaffolds were analysed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP), dsDNA amount, SEM, fluorescent labelled live-dead assay, and real-time RT-PCR in addition to weekly alamarBlue assays. With osteoinduction, increased ALP values and calcium deposition are observed; however, under static conditions, a significant decrease in the cell number on the biomaterial is observed. Interestingly, the bioreactor system not only reversed the decreased cell numbers but also increased their differentiation potential. We conclude from this study that a continuous flow bioreactor not only preserves the number of osteogenic cells but also keeps their differentiation ability in balance providing a suitable cell-seeded scaffold product for applications in regenerative medicine.

  8. Nanoscopic vibrations of bacteria with different cell-wall properties adhering to surfaces under flow and static conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei; Sjollema, Jelmer; Sharma, Prashant K; Kaper, Hans J; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2014-08-26

    Bacteria adhering to surfaces demonstrate random, nanoscopic vibrations around their equilibrium positions. This paper compares vibrational amplitudes of bacteria adhering to glass. Spring constants of the bond are derived from vibrational amplitudes and related to the electrophoretic softness of the cell surfaces and dissipation shifts measured upon bacterial adhesion in a quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM-D). Experiments were conducted with six bacterial strains with pairwise differences in cell surface characteristics. Vibrational amplitudes were highest in low ionic strength suspensions. Under fluid flow, vibrational amplitudes were lower in the direction of flow than perpendicular to it because stretching of cell surface polymers in the direction of flow causes stiffening of the polyelectrolyte network surrounding a bacterium. Under static conditions (0.57 mM), vibrational amplitudes of fibrillated Streptococcus salivarius HB7 (145 nm) were higher than that of a bald mutant HB-C12 (76 nm). Amplitudes of moderately extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) producing Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC35983 (47 nm) were more than twice the amplitudes of strongly EPS producing S. epidermidis ATCC35984 (21 nm). No differences were found between Staphylococcus aureus strains differing in membrane cross-linking. High vibrational amplitudes corresponded with low dissipation shifts in QCM-D. In streptococci, the polyelectrolyte network surrounding a bacterium is formed by fibrillar surface appendages and spring constants derived from vibrational amplitudes decreased with increasing fibrillar density. In staphylococci, EPS constitutes the main network component, and larger amounts of EPS yielded higher spring constants. Spring constants increased with increasing ionic strength and strains with smaller electrophoretically derived bacterial cell surface softnesses possessed the highest spring constants.

  9. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (TFH) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of TFH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on TFH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate TFH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing TFH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138(+) plasma and IgD(-)CD27(+) memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented TFH cell development. Added to TFH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on TFH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control TFH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the TFH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the TFH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation of parasitic resistance and capacitance effects in nanoscaled FinFETs and their impact on static random-access memory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo-Rong; Meng, Fan-Hsuan; King, Ya-Chin; Lin, Chrong Jung

    2017-04-01

    A thorough investigation of the parasitic resistance and capacitance (RC) effects of a single-fin FinFET on logic CMOS devices and circuits is presented. As parasitic RC effects become increasingly prominent in nanoscaled FinFET technologies, they are critical to the overall device and circuit performance. In addition, the effects of dummy patterns as well as multifin structures are analyzed and modeled in detailed. By incorporating parasitic resistance and capacitance extracted by both measurement and simulation, the static and dynamic performance characteristics of standard six transistor static random-access memory (6T-SRAM) cells are comprehensively evaluated as an example of parasitic RC effects in this investigation.

  11. Controlled surface chemistries and quantitative cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Anne L.

    2002-03-01

    Living cells experience a large number of signaling cues from their extracellular matrix. As a result of these inputs, a variety of intracellular signaling pathways are apparently initiated simultaneously. The vast array of alternative responses that result from the integration of these inputs suggests that it may be reasonable to look for cellular response not as an 'on' or 'off' condition but as a distribution of responses. A difficult challenge is to determine whether variations in responses from individual cells arise from the complexity of intracellular signals or are due to variations in the cell culture environment. By controlling surface chemistry so that every cell 'sees' the same chemical and physical environment, we can begin to assess how the distribution of cell response is affected strictly by changes in the chemistry of the cell culture surface. Using the gene for green fluorescent protein linked to the gene for the promoter of the extracellular matrix protein, tenascin, we can easily probe the end product in a signaling pathway that is purported to be linked to surface protein chemistry and to cell shape. Cell response to well-controlled, well-characterized, and highly reproducible surfaces prepared using soft lithography techniques are compared with more conventional ways of preparing extracellular matrix proteins for cell culture. Using fluorescence microscopy and image analysis of populations of cells on these surfaces, we probe quantitatively the relationship between surface chemistry, cell shape and variations in gene expression endpoint.

  12. Non-thermal radio frequency and static magnetic fields increase rate of hemoglobin deoxygenation in a cell-free preparation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Muehsam

    Full Text Available The growing body of clinical and experimental data regarding electromagnetic field (EMF bioeffects and their therapeutic applications has contributed to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of action. This study reports that two EMF modalities currently in clinical use, a pulse-modulated radiofrequency (PRF signal, and a static magnetic field (SMF, applied independently, increased the rate of deoxygenation of human hemoglobin (Hb in a cell-free assay. Deoxygenation of Hb was initiated using the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT in an assay that allowed the time for deoxygenation to be controlled (from several min to several hours by adjusting the relative concentrations of DTT and Hb. The time course of Hb deoxygenation was observed using visible light spectroscopy. Exposure for 10-30 min to either PRF or SMF increased the rate of deoxygenation occurring several min to several hours after the end of EMF exposure. The sensitivity and biochemical simplicity of the assay developed here suggest a new research tool that may help to further the understanding of basic biophysical EMF transduction mechanisms. If the results of this study were to be shown to occur at the cellular and tissue level, EMF-enhanced oxygen availability would be one of the mechanisms by which clinically relevant EMF-mediated enhancement of growth and repair processes could occur.

  13. The static response function in Kohn-Sham theory: an appropriate basis for its matrix representation in case of finite AO basis sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmar, Christian; Neese, Frank

    2014-10-07

    The role of the static Kohn-Sham (KS) response function describing the response of the electron density to a change of the local KS potential is discussed in both the theory of the optimized effective potential (OEP) and the so-called inverse Kohn-Sham problem involving the task to find the local KS potential for a given electron density. In a general discussion of the integral equation to be solved in both cases, it is argued that a unique solution of this equation can be found even in case of finite atomic orbital basis sets. It is shown how a matrix representation of the response function can be obtained if the exchange-correlation potential is expanded in terms of a Schmidt-orthogonalized basis comprising orbitals products of occupied and virtual orbitals. The viability of this approach in both OEP theory and the inverse KS problem is illustrated by numerical examples.

  14. The linear and nonlinear response of infinite periodic systems to static and/or dynamic electric fields. Implementation in CRYSTAL code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtman, Bernard; Springborg, Michael; Rérat, Michel; Ferrero, Mauro; Lacivita, Valentina; Orlando, Roberto; Dovesi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    An implementation of the vector potential approach (VPA) for treating the response of infinite periodic systems to static and dynamic electric fields has been initiated within the CRYSTAL code. The VPA method is based on the solution of a time-dependent Hartree-Fock or Kohn-Sham equation for the crystal orbitals wherein the usual scalar potential, that describes interaction with the field, is replaced by the vector potential. This equation may be solved either by perturbation theory or by finite field methods. With some modification all the computational procedures of molecular ab initio quantum chemistry can be adapted for periodic systems. Accessible properties include the linear and nonlinear responses of both the nuclei and the electrons. The programming of static field pure electronic (hyper)polarizabilities has been successfully tested. Dynamic electronic (hyper)polarizabilities, as well as infrared and Raman intensities, are in progress while the addition of finite fields for calculation of vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities, through nuclear relaxation procedures, will begin shortly.

  15. Responses of Cells to Flow in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The response of cells to a flow has been studied in vitro. The response of cells was examined in two types of flow channels: a circumnutating flow in a donut-shaped open channel in a culture dish, and a one-way flow in a parallelepiped rhombus flow channel. Variation was made on the material of the parallelepiped channel to study on adhesion of cells to the plates: glass and polydimethylsiloxane. Behavior of cells on the plate was observed under a flow of a medium with an inverted phase-contrast-microscope. The shear stress on the plate is calculated with an estimated parabolic distribution of the velocity between the parallel plates. The adhesion of cells was evaluated with the cumulated shear, which is a product of the shear stress and the exposure time. The experimental results show that cells are responsive to the flow, which governs orientation, exfoliation, and differentiation. The response depends on the kinds of cells: endothelial cells orient along the stream line, although myocytes orient perpendicular to the stream line. The adhesion depends on the combination between scaffold and cell: myocytes are more adhesive to glass than cartilage cells, and fibroblasts are more adhesive to oxygenated polydimethylsiloxane than glass.

  16. Effect of hydrophilic polymers on the wettability, static and dynamic, of solid substrate covered by confluent monolayer of air-damaged SIRC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftimov, Petar; Stefanova, Nadezhda; Lalchev, Zdravko; Georgiev, Georgi As

    2015-03-04

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible implementation of hydrophilic polymers as recovery agents in air-damaged corneal cells. The sessile bubble technique was implemented to measure the wetting properties of four selected polymers: hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC), sodium chondroitin sulphate (SCS), hydroxypropyl-methylcellulose (HPMC) and poloxamer F127 (PO12), at equilibrium conditions and in the case of advancing and receding contact angle. For testing the wetting properties of the polymers, glass slides covered with a confluent monolayer of Statens Seruminstitut rabbit cornea (SIRC) cells were used. HEC showed best properties for a broad concentration range, as the polymer showed capability to maintain low values of the static (equilibrium) contact angle (average static contact angle - 36.07˚, compared to average static compact angles of HPMC - 38.44˚, PO12 - 38.92˚ and SCS - 37.85˚), i.e. better wettability. Sessile bubble technique provides quick, relatively simple and reliable approach for testing surface properties of the listed polymers. The nature of the surface damage produced by the exposition of SIRC cells was used as a plausible model of evaporative dry eye syndrome, and thus the results may have clinical implementation.

  17. Response properties of AgCl and AgBr under an external static electric field: A density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, C. S.; Kokalj, A.; Rérat, M.; Valant, M.

    2012-10-01

    Density functional theory has been applied to investigate the effect of electric field on the electronic properties of AgCl and AgBr crystals using a static electric field perturbation. A reduction in the band gap value and widening of the band widths are observed with increase in the macroscopic field value indicating a considerable red shift in the absorption spectrum of AgCl and AgBr in the presence of an external electric field. Further, dielectric properties and lattice vibrations at the gamma point are calculated with three different functionals using the CPKS and the Berry phase approach as implemented in CRYSTAL09 code. Finally, the breakdown strength of AgCl and AgBr crystal is evaluated using Callen's equation. In contrast to the case of alkali halides, it is found that the inclusion of the numerically calculated effective mass ratio into the Callen's equation considerably improves the agreement between the calculated dielectric strength and the available experimental datum.

  18. DNA damage response in adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insinga, Alessandra; Cicalese, Angelo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    This review discusses the processes of DNA-damage-response and DNA-damage repair in stem and progenitor cells of several tissues. The long life-span of stem cells suggests that they may respond differently to DNA damage than their downstream progeny and, indeed, studies have begun to elucidate the unique stem cell response mechanisms to DNA damage. Because the DNA damage responses in stem cells and progenitor cells are distinctly different, stem and progenitor cells should be considered as two different entities from this point of view. Hematopoietic and mammary stem cells display a unique DNA-damage response, which involves active inhibition of apoptosis, entry into the cell-cycle, symmetric division, partial DNA repair and maintenance of self-renewal. Each of these biological events depends on the up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p21. Moreover, inhibition of apoptosis and symmetric stem cell division are the consequence of the down-regulation of the tumor suppressor p53, as a direct result of p21 up-regulation. A deeper understanding of these processes is required before these findings can be translated into human anti-aging and anti-cancer therapies. One needs to clarify and dissect the pathways that control p21 regulation in normal and cancer stem cells and define (a) how p21 blocks p53 functions in stem cells and (b) how p21 promotes DNA repair in stem cells. Is this effect dependent on p21s ability to inhibit p53? Such molecular knowledge may pave the way to methods for maintaining short-term tissue reconstitution while retaining long-term cellular and genomic integrity.

  19. Cell mechanics: integrating cell responses to mechanical stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmey, Paul A; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    Forces are increasingly recognized as major regulators of cell structure and function, and the mechanical properties of cells are essential to the mechanisms by which cells sense forces, transmit them to the cell interior or to other cells, and transduce them into chemical signals that impact a spectrum of cellular responses. Comparison of the mechanical properties of intact cells with those of the purified cytoskeletal biopolymers that are thought to dominate their elasticity reveal the extent to which the studies of purified systems can account for the mechanical properties of the much more heterogeneous and complex cell. This review summarizes selected aspects of current work on cell mechanics with an emphasis on the structures that are activated in cell-cell contacts, that regulate ion flow across the plasma membrane, and that may sense fluid flow that produces low levels of shear stress.

  20. Collective cell migration during inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Wound scratch healing assays of endothelial cell monolayers is a simple model to study collective cell migration as a function of biological signals. A signal of particular interest is the immune response, which after initial wounding in vivo causes the release of various inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an innate inflammatory cytokine that can induce cell growth, cell necrosis, and change cell morphology. We studied the effects of TNF-α on collective cell migration using the wound healing assays and measured several migration metrics, such as rate of scratch closure, velocities of leading edge and bulk cells, closure index, and velocity correlation functions between migrating cells. We observed that TNF-α alters all migratory metrics as a function of the size of the scratch and TNF-α content. The changes observed in migration correlate with actin reorganization upon TNF-α exposure.

  1. Heart-on-a-Chip: An Investigation of the Influence of Static and Perfusion Conditions on Cardiac (H9C2) Cell Proliferation, Morphology, and Alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobuszewska, Anna; Tomecka, Ewelina; Zukowski, Kamil; Jastrzebska, Elzbieta; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Renaud, Philippe; Brzozka, Zbigniew

    2017-10-01

    Lab-on-a-chip systems are increasingly used as tools for cultures and investigation of cardiac cells. In this article, we present how the geometry of microsystems and microenvironmental conditions (static and perfusion) influence the proliferation, morphology, and alignment of cardiac cells (rat cardiomyoblasts-H9C2). Additionally, studies of cell growth after incubation with verapamil hydrochloride were performed. For this purpose, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)/glass microfluidic systems with three different geometries of microchambers (a circular chamber, a longitudinal channel, and three parallel microchannels separated by two rows of micropillars) were prepared. It was found that static conditions did not enhance the growth of H9C2 cells in the microsystems. On the contrary, perfusion conditions had an influence on division, morphology, and the arrangement of the cells. The highest number of cells, their parallel orientation, and their elongated morphology were obtained in the longitudinal microchannel. It showed that this kind of microsystem can be used to understand processes in heart tissue in detail and to test newly developed compounds applied in the treatment of cardiac diseases.

  2. T-cell response in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Kemp, K; Ismail, A

    1999-01-01

    In the present communication we provide evidence for the existence of a Th1/Th2 dichotomy in the T-cell response to Leishmania antigens in human leishmaniasis. Our data suggest that the pattern of IL-4 and IFN-gamma response is polarised in these patients. Lymphocytes from individuals recovered......+. Furthermore, IL-10 plays an important role in the development of post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) from VL. The balance between the parasitic-specific T-cell response plays an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of Leishmania infections in humans....

  3. Metabolomic Responses of Guard Cells and Mesophyll Cells to Bicarbonate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswapriya B Misra

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic CO2 presently at 400 ppm is expected to reach 550 ppm in 2050, an increment expected to affect plant growth and productivity. Paired stomatal guard cells (GCs are the gate-way for water, CO2, and pathogen, while mesophyll cells (MCs represent the bulk cell-type of green leaves mainly for photosynthesis. We used the two different cell types, i.e., GCs and MCs from canola (Brassica napus to profile metabolomic changes upon increased CO2 through supplementation with bicarbonate (HCO3-. Two metabolomics platforms enabled quantification of 268 metabolites in a time-course study to reveal short-term responses. The HCO3- responsive metabolomes of the cell types differed in their responsiveness. The MCs demonstrated increased amino acids, phenylpropanoids, redox metabolites, auxins and cytokinins, all of which were decreased in GCs in response to HCO3-. In addition, the GCs showed differential increases of primary C-metabolites, N-metabolites (e.g., purines and amino acids, and defense-responsive pathways (e.g., alkaloids, phenolics, and flavonoids as compared to the MCs, indicating differential C/N homeostasis in the cell-types. The metabolomics results provide insights into plant responses and crop productivity under future climatic changes where elevated CO2 conditions are to take center-stage.

  4. Metabolomic Responses of Guard Cells and Mesophyll Cells to Bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Biswapriya B; de Armas, Evaldo; Tong, Zhaohui; Chen, Sixue

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 presently at 400 ppm is expected to reach 550 ppm in 2050, an increment expected to affect plant growth and productivity. Paired stomatal guard cells (GCs) are the gate-way for water, CO2, and pathogen, while mesophyll cells (MCs) represent the bulk cell-type of green leaves mainly for photosynthesis. We used the two different cell types, i.e., GCs and MCs from canola (Brassica napus) to profile metabolomic changes upon increased CO2 through supplementation with bicarbonate (HCO3-). Two metabolomics platforms enabled quantification of 268 metabolites in a time-course study to reveal short-term responses. The HCO3- responsive metabolomes of the cell types differed in their responsiveness. The MCs demonstrated increased amino acids, phenylpropanoids, redox metabolites, auxins and cytokinins, all of which were decreased in GCs in response to HCO3-. In addition, the GCs showed differential increases of primary C-metabolites, N-metabolites (e.g., purines and amino acids), and defense-responsive pathways (e.g., alkaloids, phenolics, and flavonoids) as compared to the MCs, indicating differential C/N homeostasis in the cell-types. The metabolomics results provide insights into plant responses and crop productivity under future climatic changes where elevated CO2 conditions are to take center-stage.

  5. Static magnetic field enhances the viability and proliferation rate of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells potentially through activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marędziak, Monika; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Polinceusz, Paulina; Lewandowski, Daniel; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of 0.5T static magnetic field (sMF) on the viability and proliferation rate of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells (hASCs) via activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) signaling pathway. In a 7-d culture we examined cell growth kinetic and population doubling time (PDT). We also examined cell morphology and the cellular senescence markers level. Exposure to sMF enhanced the viability of these cells. However, the effect was blocked by treating the cells with LY294002, a P13K inhibitor. We compared this effect by Western Blot analysis of Akt protein expression. We also examined whether the cell response on sMF stimulation is dependent on integrin engagement and we measured integrin gene expression. Our results suggest that stimulation using sMF is a viable method to improve hASC viability. sMF is involved in mechanisms associated with controlling cell proliferative potential signaling events.

  6. Cardiovascular responses to passive static flexibility exercises are influenced by the stretched muscle mass and the Valsalva maneuver

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo T. V. Farinatti; Pedro P. S Soares; Monteiro, Walace D.; Duarte,Antonio F. A; Viveiros de Castro, Luis A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The respiratory pattern is often modified or even blocked during flexibility exercises, but little is known about the cardiovascular response to concomitant stretching and the Valsalva maneuver (VM) in healthy subjects. OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and rate-pressure product (RPP) during and after large and small muscle group flexibility exercises performed simultaneously with the VM. METHODS: Asymptomatic volunteers (N  =  22...

  7. T cell responses and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip

    2006-01-01

    The enhancement of severe disease upon secondary infection makes dengue almost unique among infectious pathogens and presents a serious challenge to vaccine design. Several key observations have been made which shed light onto this phenomenon particularly that antibodies can enhance Fc receptor-dependent uptake of virus into macrophages thereby increasing virus replication. Furthermore there seems to be a relationship between the peak virus load and disease severity. However, a second key feature of dengue is that the life-threatening symptoms do not correlate with the period of high viraemia; instead they occur at a time when the virus load is in steep decline. The coincidence of severe disease manifestations with defervescence and virus control suggests that the symptoms may be a consequence of the immune response to the virus rather than virus induced cytopathology. One of the key elements in the immune response to viruses are T cells which can both secrete a host of inflammatory cytokines and also be directly cytotoxic to infected cells. There are a number of experimental models of T cell-induced immunopathology including in responses to viruses. Particularly interesting in this respect are models of RSV-induced immunopathology, which have direct relevance to vaccine design as a formalin-inactivated vaccine to RSV actually enhanced disease in children when they became naturally infected with RSV, an echo of the disease enhancement seen in dengue. We will present an analysis of CD8+ T cell responses to a number of novel T cell epitopes during dengue infection and also analyse the function and cytokine secretion of these cells. We suggest that an exaggerated and partially misdirected T cell response seen in secondary dengue infection may be part of the complex series of events leading to dengue haemorrhagic fever and shock.

  8. Beller Lectureship Talk: Active response of biological cells to mechanical stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. We present a simple and generic theoretical model for the active response of biological cells to mechanical stress. The theory includes cell activity and mechanical forces as well as random forces as factors that determine the polarizability that relates cell orientation to stress. This allows us to explain the puzzling observation of parallel (or sometimes random) alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency and compare the theory with recent experiments. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material distinguishes cells whose activity is controlled by stress from those controlled by strain. We have extended the theory to generalize the treatment of elastic inclusions in solids to ''living'' inclusions (cells) whose active polarizability, analogous to the polarizability of non-living matter, results in the feedback of cellular forces that develop in response to matrix stresses. We use this to explain recent observations of the non-monotonic dependence of stress-fiber polarization in stem cells on matrix rigidity. These findings provide a mechanical correlate for the existence of an optimal substrate elasticity for cell differentiation and function. [3pt] *In collaboration with R. De (Brown University), Y. Biton (Weizmann Institute), and A. Zemel (Hebrew University) and the experimental groups: Max Planck Institute, Stuttgart: S. Jungbauer, R. Kemkemer, J. Spatz; University of Pennsylvania: A. Brown, D. Discher, F. Rehfeldt.

  9. T-cell responses in malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Jakobsen, P H; Abu-Zeid, Y A

    1992-01-01

    Malaria is caused by infection with protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. It remains one of the most severe health problems in tropical regions of the world, and the rapid spread of resistance to drugs and insecticides has stimulated intensive research aimed at the development of a malaria...... vaccine. Despite this, no efficient operative vaccine is currently available. A large amount of information on T-cell responses to malaria antigens has been accumulated, concerning antigens derived from all stages of the parasite life cycle. The present review summarizes some of that information......, and discusses factors affecting the responses of T cells to malaria antigens....

  10. Microenvironment is involved in cellular response to hydrostatic pressures during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rui; Hao, Jin; Song, Jinlin; Zhao, Zhihe; Fang, Shanbao; Wang, Yating; Li, Juan

    2014-06-01

    Chondrocytes integrate numerous microenvironmental cues to mount physiologically relevant differentiation responses, and the regulation of mechanical signaling in chondrogenic differentiation is now coming into intensive focus. To facilitate tissue-engineered chondrogenesis by mechanical strategy, a thorough understanding about the interactional roles of chemical factors under mechanical stimuli in regulating chondrogenesis is in great need. Therefore, this study attempts to investigate the interaction of rat MSCs with their microenvironment by imposing dynamic and static hydrostatic pressure through modulating gaseous tension above the culture medium. Under dynamic pressure, chemical parameters (pH, pO2, and pCO2) were kept in homeostasis. In contrast, pH was remarkably reduced due to increased pCO2 under static pressure. MSCs under the dynamically pressured microenvironment exhibited a strong accumulation of GAG within and outside the alginate beads, while cells under the statically pressured environment lost newly synthesized GAG into the medium with a speed higher than its production. In addition, the synergic influence on expression of chondrogenic genes was more persistent under dynamic pressure than that under static pressure. This temporal contrast was similar to that of activation of endogenous TGF-β1. Taken altogether, it indicates that a loading strategy which can keep a homeostatic chemical microenvironment is preferred, since it might sustain the stimulatory effects of mechanical stimuli on chondrogenesis via activation of endogenous TGF-β1.

  11. 多层框架结构在地震作用下的静动响应分析%Multi-storeys and Multi Spans Frame Structure's under Earthquake Action the Static and Dynamic Response Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶庆东; 谭上俞; 肖盛燮

    2012-01-01

    主要研究多层多跨框架结构在地震作用下的响应。运用底部建立法研究框架结构在地震作用下的静态响应,运用ABAQUS软件研究这一多层多跨框架结构在地震作用下的动态响应。将动态响应与静态响应结果进行对比,得出按静态方法得到的响应具有较好的精度。进行结构设计时偏于安全。%Mainly study the multi-storeys and multi spans frame structure's response under the earthquake action. Use the established method to study of frame structure ~s static response under earthquake action, and use ABAQUS software to study the multi span frame structure's dynamic response under earthquake action. Compared the dynamic response results and static response results, which draw that static method' s response has a better precision. , according to the static methods for structural designing is more partial safety.

  12. Regulation of B Cell to Plasma Cell Transition within the Follicular B Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nera, K-P; Kyläniemi, M K; Lassila, O

    2015-09-01

    Persistent humoral immunity depends on the follicular B cell response and on the generation of somatically mutated high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. Upon activation by an antigen, cognately activated follicular B cells and follicular T helper (TFH ) cells initiate germinal centre (GC) reaction during which high-affinity effector cells are generated. The differentiation of activated follicular B cells into plasma cells and memory B cells is guided by complex selection events, both at the cellular and molecular level. The transition of B cell into a plasma cell during the GC response involves alterations in the microenvironment and developmental state of the cell, which are guided by cell-extrinsic signals. The developmental cell fate decisions in response to these signals are coordinated by cell-intrinsic gene regulatory network functioning at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  13. Probing cell structure responses through a shear and stretching mechanical stimulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Robert L; Cheng, Chao-Min; Wang, Danny L; LeDuc, Philip R

    2010-04-01

    Cells are complex, dynamic systems that respond to various in vivo stimuli including chemical, mechanical, and scaffolding alterations. The influence of mechanics on cells is especially important in physiological areas that dictate what modes of mechanics exist. Complex, multivariate physiological responses can result from multi-factorial, multi-mode mechanics, including tension, compression, or shear stresses. In this study, we present a novel device based on elastomeric materials that allowed us to stimulate NIH 3T3 fibroblasts through uniaxial strip stretching or shear fluid flow. Cell shape and structural response was observed using conventional approaches such as fluorescent microscopy. Cell orientation and actin cytoskeleton alignment along the direction of applied force were observed to occur after an initial 3 h time period for shear fluid flow and static uniaxial strip stretching experiments although these two directions of alignment were oriented orthogonal relative to each other. This response was then followed by an increasingly pronounced cell and actin cytoskeleton alignment parallel to the direction of force after 6, 12, and 24 h, with 85% of the cells aligned along the direction of force after 24 h. These results indicate that our novel device could be implemented to study the effects of multiple modes of mechanical stimulation on living cells while probing their structural response especially with respect to competing directions of alignment and orientation under these different modes of mechanical stimulation. We believe that this will be important in a diversity of fields including cell mechanotransduction, cell-material interactions, biophysics, and tissue engineering.

  14. Prediction and validation of buckling stress (σcrt of the ceramic honeycomb cell walls under quasi-static compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandu Ramavath

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alumina- and cordierite-based honeycombs with varying relative densities were extruded and sintered at the respective sintering temperatures. Solid samples are also prepared under identical conditions and flexural strength (σf was estimated by three-point bend measurements. Buckling stress of honeycombs are predicted based on σf using standard equations and validated with quasi-static compression test along the channels of honeycombs with varying relative densities. The discrepancy observed on calculated and measured values is correlated with the pre-existing flaws indicating the criticality in close control of processing parameters.

  15. Atypical radiation response of SCID cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawapun, Nisa

    Murine SCID (severe combined immune deficiency) cells are well known for their defect in DNA double-strand break repair and in variable(diversity)joining [V(D)J] recombination due to a mutation in a catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). As a consequence, scid cells are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation. The present study showed that asynchronous populations of scid cells were about two-fold more sensitive than Balb/c with respect to cell killing and the defect in scid cells was corrected by complementation with human chromosome 8. Analysis of the survival of synchronized populations as a function of the cell cycle revealed that while scid cells were hypersensitive in all cell cycle phases compared to wild-type cells, this hypersensitivity is even more pronounced in G1 phase. The hypersensitivity reduced as the cells progressed into S phase suggested that homologous recombination repair plays a role. The results imply that there are at least two pathways for the repair of DSB DNA, consistent with a model previously proposed by others. The scid cells were also more sensitive to UVC light (254 nm) killing as compared to wild type cells by clonogenic survival. Using a host cell reactivation (HCR) assay to study the nucleotide excision repair (NER) which is the major repair pathway for UV-photoproducts, the results showed that NER in scid cells was not as efficient as CB- 17. This suggests that DNA-PK is involved in NER as well as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DSB repair which is responsible for ionizing radiation sensitivity in scid cells. Repair in scid cells was not totally absent as shown by low dose rate sparing of cell killing after exposure to 137Cs γ-rays at dose rate of 0.6 cGy/h, 1.36 cGy/h, 6 cGy/h as compared to high dose rate at 171 cGy/min, although this phenomenon could be explained partly by proliferation. However, for radiation induced transformation, no significant dose rate effect was seen. A plot of transformation

  16. Cellular immune responses towards regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Stine Kiær

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the results from two published papers identifying spontaneous cellular immune responses against the transcription factors Foxp3 and Foxo3. The tumor microenvironment is infiltrated by cells that hinder effective tumor immunity from developing. Two of these cell types, which have been linked to a bad prognosis for patients, are regulatory T cells (Treg) and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC). Tregs inhibit effector T cells from attacking the tumor through various mechanisms, including secreted factors and cell-to-cell contact. Tregs express the transcription factor Foxp3, which is necessary for their development and suppressive activities. Tolerogenic DCs participate in creating an environment in the tumor where effector T cells become tolerant towards the tumor instead of attacking it. The transcription factor Foxo3 was recently described to be highly expressed by tolerogenic DCs and to programme their tolerogenic influence. This thesis describes for the first time the existence of spontaneous cellular immune responses against peptides derived from Foxp3 and Foxo3. We have detected the presence of cytotoxic T cells that recognise these peptides in an HLA-A2 restricted manner in cancer patients and for Foxp3 in healthy donors as well. In addition, we have demonstrated that the Foxp3- and Foxo3-specific CTLs recognize Foxp3- and Foxo3-expressing cancer cell lines and importantly, suppressive immune cells, namely Tregs and in vitro generated DCs. Cancer immunotherapy is recently emerging as an important treatment modality improving the survival of selected patients. The current progress is largely owing to targeting of the immune suppressive milieu that is dominating the tumor microenvironment. This is being done through immune checkpoint blockade with CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies and through lymphodepleting conditioning of patients and ex vivo activation of TILs in adoptive cell transfer. Several strategies are being explored for depletion of

  17. Statics of deformable solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bisplinghoff, Raymond L; Pian, Theodore HH

    2014-01-01

    Profusely illustrated exposition of fundamentals of solid mechanics and principles of mechanics, statics, and simple statically indeterminate systems. Covers strain and stress in three-dimensional solids, elementary elasticity, energy principles in solid continuum, and more. 1965 edition.

  18. Evaluation and optimization of the bandwidth of static converters: application to multi-cell converters; Evaluation et optimisation de la bande passante des convertisseurs statiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aime, M.

    2003-11-15

    Thanks to the technological progress achieved in the field of power electronics, the use of static converters has spread to new applications. In particular, some applications such as active filtering or the supply of special AC machines require power converters having good dynamic performances. The subject of this thesis is to evaluate systematically the dynamic performances of multi-cell converters, and then to optimize these performances. This document is organized in four chapters. The first one summarizes the main multilevel converter structures, and some control strategies dedicated to these structures. The second chapter presents the evaluation criteria chosen to quantify the dynamic performances of static converters. These criteria are then used to compare the performances obtained with two different PWM strategies. An optimized strategy which results from a trade-off between the two former strategies is then introduced. The third chapter shows a new control strategy of multi-cell voltage source converters. This new strategy enables to control the peak current at a fixed switching frequency. The operation of this controller is explained, and the results obtained by digital simulations are presented and discussed. The fourth chapter deals with the experimental achievement of the peak current control. In particular, the implementation of the control algorithm within a FPGA is demonstrated. Finally, the conclusion of this thesis presents some orientations for further developments, in order to improve the current control strategy and to widen its field of applications. (author)

  19. B-cell responses to HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, Susan; Fauci, Anthony S

    2017-01-01

    The induction of neutralizing antibodies directed against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has received considerable attention in recent years, in part driven by renewed interest and opportunities for antibody-based strategies for prevention such as passive transfer of antibodies and the development of preventive vaccines, as well as immune-based therapeutic interventions. Advances in the ability to screen, isolate, and characterize HIV-specific antibodies have led to the identification of a new generation of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). The majority of these antibodies have been isolated from B cells of chronically HIV-infected individuals with detectable viremia. In this review, we provide insight into the phenotypic and functional attributes of human B cells, with a focus on HIV-specific memory B cells and plasmablasts/cells that are responsible for sustaining humoral immune responses against HIV. We discuss the abnormalities in B cells that occur in HIV infection both in the peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues, especially in the setting of persisting viremia. Finally, we consider the opportunities and drawbacks of intensively interrogating antibodies isolated from HIV-infected individuals to guide strategies aimed at developing effective antibody-based vaccine and therapeutic interventions for HIV. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Strain and load thresholds for cervical muscle recruitment in response to quasi-static tensile stretch of the caprine C5-C6 facet joint capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Nadia R; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Chen, Chaoyang; Lu, Ying; Cavanaugh, John M

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the response of cervical muscles to physiologic tensile stretch of cervical facet joint capsule (FJC) at a quasi-static displacement rate of 0.5mm/s. In vivo caprine left C5-C6 FJC preparations were subjected to an incremental tensile displacement paradigm. EMG activity was recorded during FJC stretch from the right trapezius (TR) and multifidus (MF) muscle groups at the C5 and C6 levels and bilaterally from the sternomastoid (SM) and longus colli (LC) muscle groups at the C5-C6 level. Onset of muscular activity was later analyzed using visual and computer-based methods. Capsule load and strain at the time of onset were recorded and compared between the muscle groups. Results indicated capsule load was a better indicator of the tensile stretch thresholds for muscular recruitment than capsule strain. MF responded at significantly smaller capsule loads than TR and LC, while TR and LC activation loads were not significantly different. SM did not respond to physiologic FJC stretch. Muscle group recruitment order reflected the muscles' fiber type compositions and functional roles in the spine. This study provides the first evidence that the cervical ligamento-muscular reflex pathways are activated via tensile FJC stretch and extend to superficial and deep musculature on the anterior and posterior aspects of the neck, ipsilateral and contralateral to the side of FJC stretch.

  1. Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy for Early Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma: Is It Better Than the Conventional Static Beam Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Wing Cheung Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the performance of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT techniques: single arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA-VMAT and double arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (DA-VMAT with the static beam conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy (C-IMRT for non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Twelve stage I and II NSCLC patients were recruited and their planning CT with contoured planning target volume (PTV and organs at risk (OARs was used for planning. Using the same dose constraints and planning objectives, the C-IMRT, SA-VMAT, and DA-VMAT plans were optimized. C-IMRT consisted of 7 static beams, while SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT plans consisted of one and two full gantry rotations, respectively. No significant difference was found among the three techniques in target homogeneity and conformity. Mean lung dose in C-IMRT plan was significantly lower than that in DA-VMAT plan P=0.04. The ability of OAR sparing was similar among the three techniques, with no significant difference in V20, V10, or V5 of normal lungs, spinal cord, and heart. Less MUs were required in SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT. Besides, SA-VMAT required the shortest beam on time among the three techniques. In treatment of early stage NSCLC, no significant dosimetric superiority was shown by the VMAT techniques over C-IMRT and DA-VMAT over SA-VMAT.

  2. numerical and numerical and experimental modeling of the static ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    flange width on the static response of these type of structural elements under service load ... walled reinforced concrete box girder bridges under .... [15] carried out a static live-load test of a ... accurately predicts the exterior girder distribution.

  3. Frequency sweep rate dependence on the dielectrophoretic response of polystyrene beads and red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, T. N. G.; Leonard, K. M.; Minerick, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Alternating current (AC) dielectrophoresis (DEP) experiments for biological particles in microdevices are typically done at a fixed frequency. Reconstructing the DEP response curve from static frequency experiments is laborious, but essential to ascertain differences in dielectric properties of biological particles. Our lab explored the concept of sweeping the frequency as a function of time to rapidly determine the DEP response curve from fewer experiments. For the purpose of determining an ideal sweep rate, homogeneous 6.08 μm polystyrene (PS) beads were used as a model system. Translatability of the sweep rate approach to ∼7 μm red blood cells (RBC) was then verified. An Au/Ti quadrapole electrode microfluidic device was used to separately subject particles and cells to 10Vpp AC electric fields at frequencies ranging from 0.010 to 2.0 MHz over sweep rates from 0.00080 to 0.17 MHz/s. PS beads exhibited negative DEP assembly over the frequencies explored due to Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarizations. Results demonstrate that frequency sweep rates must be slower than particle polarization timescales to achieve reliable incremental polarizations; sweep rates near 0.00080 MHz/s yielded DEP behaviors very consistent with static frequency DEP responses for both PS beads and RBCs. PMID:24396548

  4. Unit Cell Analysis of the Superelastic Behavior of Open-Cell Tetrakaidecahedral Shape Memory Alloy Foam under Quasi-Static Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Maîtrejean

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular solid materials and, more specifically, foams are increasingly common in many industrial applications due to their attractive characteristics. The tetrakaidecahedral foam microstructure, which can be observed in many types of foams, is studied in the present work in association with shape memory alloys (SMA material. SMA foams are of particular interest as they associate both the shape memory effect and the superelasticity with the characteristics of foam. A Unit Cell Finite Element Method approach is used, an approach that allows accurate predicting of the macroscale response of the foam with a highly reduced numerical effort. The tetrakaidecahedral foam’s responses, both in the elastic and in the superelastic stages, are then extracted and compared with results from the literature. The tetrakaidecahedral geometry is found to be of particular interest when associated with SMA as it takes more advantage of the superelastic property of the material than foams with randomly distributed porosity.

  5. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  6. Evaluation of oxidative response and tissular damage in rat lungs exposed to silica-coated gold nanoparticles under static magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferchichi S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soumaya Ferchichi,1 Hamdi Trabelsi,1 Inès Azzouz,1 Amel Hanini,2 Ahmed Rejeb,3 Olfa Tebourbi,1 Mohsen Sakly,1 Hafedh Abdelmelek1 1Laboratory of Integrative Physiology, Faculty Of Sciences of Bizerte, 2Laboratory of Vascular Pathology, Carthage University, Carthage 3Laboratory of Pathological Anatomy, National School of Veterinary Medicine of Sidi Thabet, Manouba Univeristy, Manouba, Tunisia Abstract: The purpose of our study was the evaluation of toxicological effects of silica-coated gold nanoparticles (GNPs and static magnetic fields (SMFs; 128 mT exposure in rat lungs. Animals received a single injection of GNPs (1,100 µg/kg, 100 nm, intraperitoneally and were exposed to SMFs, over 14 days (1 h/day. Results showed that GNPs treatment induced a hyperplasia of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue. Fluorescence microscopy images showed that red fluorescence signal was detected in rat lungs after 2 weeks from the single injection of GNPs. Oxidative response study showed that GNPs exposure increased malondialdehyde level and decreased CuZn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities in rat lungs. Furthermore, the histopathological study showed that combined effects of GNPs and SMFs led to more tissular damages in rat lungs in comparison with GNPs-treated rats. Interestingly, intensity of red fluorescence signal was enhanced after exposure to SMFs indicating a higher accumulation of GNPs in rat lungs under magnetic environment. Moreover, rats coexposed to GNPs and SMFs showed an increased malondialdehyde level, a fall of CuZn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities in comparison with GNPs-treated group. Hence, SMFs exposure increased the accumulation of GNPs in rat lungs and led to more toxic effects of these nanocomplexes. Keywords: malondialdehyde, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue, nanotoxicity, histopathological study

  7. Experimental evaluation of a breadboard heat and product-water removal system for a space-power fuel cell designed with static water removal and evaporative cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Prokipius, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the design of a heat and product-water removal system to be used with fuel cell having static water removal and evaporative cooling. The program, which was conducted on a breadboard version of the system, provided a general assessment of the design in terms of operational integrity and transient stability. This assessment showed that, on the whole, the concept appears to be inherently sound but that in refining this design, several facets will require additional study. These involve interactions between pressure regulators in the pumping loop that occur when they are not correctly matched and the question of whether an ejector is necessary in the system.

  8. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells license dendritic cells to potentiate memory TH2 cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Timotheus Y F; Hwang, You Yi; Scanlon, Seth T; Zaghouani, Habib; Garbi, Natalio; Fallon, Padraic G; McKenzie, Andrew N J

    2016-01-01

    Rapid activation of memory CD4(+) T helper 2 (TH2) cells during allergic inflammation requires their recruitment into the affected tissue. Here we demonstrate that group 2 innate lymphoid (ILC2) cells have a crucial role in memory TH2 cell responses, with targeted depletion of ILC2 cells profoundly impairing TH2 cell localization to the lungs and skin of sensitized mice after allergen re-challenge. ILC2-derived interleukin 13 (IL-13) is critical for eliciting production of the TH2 cell-attracting chemokine CCL17 by IRF4(+)CD11b(+)CD103(-) dendritic cells (DCs). Consequently, the sentinel function of DCs is contingent on ILC2 cells for the generation of an efficient memory TH2 cell response. These results elucidate a key innate mechanism in the regulation of the immune memory response to allergens.

  9. Regulatory T cells in radiotherapeutic responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörthe eSchaue

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RT can extend its influence in cancer therapy beyond what can be attributed to in-field cytotoxicity by modulating the immune system. While complex, these systemic effects can help tip the therapeutic balance in favor of treatment success or failure. Engagement of the immune system is generally through recognition of damage-associated molecules expressed or released as a result of tumor and normal tissue radiation damage. This system has evolved to discriminate pathological from physiological forms of cell death by signaling danger. The multiple mechanisms that can be evoked include a shift towards a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant microenvironment that can promote maturation of dendritic cells and, in cancer treatment, the development of effector T cell responses to tumor-associated antigens. Control over these processes is exerted by regulatory T cells (Tregs, suppressor macrophages and immunosuppressive cytokines that act in consort to maintain tolerance to self, limit tissue damage, and re-establish tissue homeostasis. Unfortunately, by the time RT for cancer is initiated the tumor-host relationship has already been sculpted in favor of tumor growth and against immune-mediated mechanisms for tumor regression. Reversing this situation is a major challenge. However, recent data show that removal of Tregs can tip the balance in favor of the generation of radiation-induced anti-tumor immunity. The clinical challenge is to do so without excessive depletion that might precipitate serious autoimmune reactions and increase the likelihood of normal tissue complications. The selective modulation of Treg biology to maintain immune tolerance and control of normal tissue damage, while releasing the brakes on anti-tumor immune responses, is a worthy aim with promise for enhancing the therapeutic benefit of RT for cancer.

  10. Static electromagnetic frequency changers

    CERN Document Server

    Rozhanskii, L L

    1963-01-01

    Static Electromagnetic Frequency Changers is about the theory, design, construction, and applications of static electromagnetic frequency changers, devices that used for multiplication or division of alternating current frequency. It is originally published in the Russian language. This book is organized into five chapters. The first three chapters introduce the readers to the principles of operation, the construction, and the potential applications of static electromagnetic frequency changers and to the principles of their design. The two concluding chapters use some hitherto unpublished work

  11. Effects of Static Magnetic Field on Growth of Leptospire, Leptospira interrogans serovar canicola: Immunoreactivity and Cell Division

    CERN Document Server

    Triampo, W; Triampo, D; Wong-Ekkabut, J; Tang, I M; Triampo, Wannapong; Doungchawee, Galayanee; Triampo, Darapond; Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the exposure of the bacterium, Leptospira interrogans serovar canicola to a constant magnetic field with magnetic flux density from a permanent ferrite magnet = 140 mT were studied. Changes in Leptospira cells after their exposure to the field were determined on the basis of changes in their growth behavior and agglutination immunoreactivity with a homologous antiserum using darkfield microscopy together with visual imaging. The data showed that the exposed Leptospira cells have lower densities and lower agglutination immunoreactivity than the unexposed control group. Interestingly, some of the exposed Leptospira cells showed abnormal morphologies such as large lengths. We discussed some of the possible reasons for these observations.

  12. Relation of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound to the cell density of scaffold-free cartilage in a high-density static semi-open culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenaka, Kazuhiro; Imai, Shinji; Ando, Kosei; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2010-11-01

    A scaffold-free cartilage construct, analogous to those found during embryonic precartilage condensation, has received much attention as a novel modality for tissue-engineered cartilage. In the present study, we developed an uncomplicated culture system by which scaffold-free cartilage-like tissues are produced using cell-cell interactions. With this system, we attempted to prevent dedifferentiation and reverse the phenotypic modulations by adjusting the cell density. We investigated whether low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) enhances matrix synthesis of the scaffold-free cartilage construct. Rat articular chondrocytes multiplied in monolayers were seeded onto the synthetic porous membrane at stepwise cell densities (i.e., 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 × 10(7) cells/cm(2)) to allow formation of a scaffold-free cartilage construct via cell-cell interaction. The cartilage constructs were then stimulated by LIPUS for 20 min/day. To investigate the effect of LIPUS stimulation on matrix synthesis, expression of mRNA for cartilage matrix molecules was quantified by a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Synthesis of type II collagen, type I collagen, and proteoglycan was also assessed histologically. Only the chondrocytes cultured at high cell densities in the 2.0 × 10(7)cells/cm(2) group became concentrated and formed a plate-like construct similar to native articular cartilage by macroscopic and histological assessments. Statistical analysis on the matrix gene expression demonstrated that the levels of type II collagen and aggrecan mRNA of the 2.0 × 10(7)cells/cm(2) group were significantly higher than with the other two cell-density groups. Interestingly, the LIPUS application led to a statistically significant enhancement of aggrecan gene expression only in the 2.0 × 10(7) cells/cm(2) group. The current study presents a semi-open static culture system that facilitates production of the scaffold-free constructs from monolayer-cultured chondrocytes

  13. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  14. A dynamic real time in vivo and static ex vivo analysis of granulomonocytic cell migration in the collagen-induced arthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Byrne

    Full Text Available Neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes (granulomonocytic cells; GMC drive the inflammatory process at the earliest stages of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The migratory behavior and functional properties of GMC within the synovial tissue are, however, only incompletely characterized. Here we have analyzed GMC in the murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model of RA using multi-photon real time in vivo microscopy together with ex vivo analysis of GMC in tissue sections.GMC were abundant as soon as clinical arthritis was apparent. GMC were motile and migrated randomly through the synovial tissue. In addition, we observed the frequent formation of cell clusters consisting of both neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes that actively contributed to the inflammatory process of arthritis. Treatment of animals with a single dose of prednisolone reduced the mean velocity of cell migration and diminished the overall immigration of GMC.In summary, our study shows that the combined application of real time in vivo microscopy together with elaborate static post-mortem analysis of GMC enables the description of dynamic migratory characteristics of GMC together with their precise location in a complex anatomical environment. Moreover, this approach is sensitive enough to detect subtle therapeutic effects within a very short period of time.

  15. Plant Cell Adaptive Responses to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaev, Alexandr

    simulated microgravity and temperature elevation have different effects on the small HSP genes belonging to subfamilies with different subcellular localization: cytosol/nucleus - PsHSP17.1-СІІ and PsHSP18.1-СІ, cloroplasts - PsHSP26.2-Cl, endoplasmatic reticulum - PsHSP22.7-ER and mitochondria - PsHSP22.9-M: unlike high temperature, clinorotation does not cause denaturation of cell proteins, that confirms the sHSP chaperone function. Dynamics of investigated gene expression in pea seedlings growing 5 days after seed germination under clinorotation was similar to that in the stationary control. Similar patterns in dynamics of sHSP gene expression in the stationary control and under clinorotation may be one of mechanisms providing plant adaptation to simulated microgravity. It is pointed that plant cell responses in microgravity and under clinorotation vary according to growth phase, physiological state, and taxonomic position of the object. At the same time, the responses have, to some degree, a similar character reflecting the changes in cell organelle functional load. Thus, next certain changes in the structure and function of plant cells may be considered as adaptive: 1) an increase in the unsaturated fatty acid content in the plasmalemma, 2) rearrangements of organelle ultrastructure and an increase in their functional load, 3) an increase in cortical F-actin under destabilization of tubulin microtubules, 4) the level of gene expression and synthesis of heat shock proteins, 5) alterations of the enzyme and antioxidant system activity. The dynamics of these patterns demonstrated that the adaptation occurs on the principle of self-regulating systems in the limits of physiological norm reaction. The very importance of changed expression of genes involved in different cellular processes, especially HSP genes, in cell adaptation to altered gravity is discussed.

  16. Osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells on poly(L-lactide)/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanofibers with static magnetic field exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Qing [State Key Laboratory of Organic–inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Shi, Yuzhou; Shan, Dingying; Jia, Wenkai; Duan, Shun [Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Deng, Xuliang [Department of Geriatric Dentistry, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China); Yang, Xiaoping, E-mail: yangxp@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic–inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of bone-related cells are modulated by many factors such as scaffold design, growth factor, dynamic culture system, and physical simulation. Nanofibrous structure and moderate-intensity (1 mT–1 T) static magnetic field (SMF) have been identified as capable of stimulating proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Herein, magnetic nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning mixture solutions of poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and ferromagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs). The PLLA/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite nanofibers demonstrated homogeneous dispersion of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs, and their magnetism depended on the contents of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. SMF of 100 mT was applied in the culture of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts on pure PLLA and PLLA/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite nanofibers for the purpose of studying the effect of SMF on osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells on magnetic nanofibrous scaffolds. On non-magnetic PLLA nanofibers, the application of external SMF could enhance the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. In comparison with pure PLLA nanofibers, the incorporation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs could also promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells in the absence or presence of external SMF. The marriage of magnetic nanofibers and external SMF was found most effective in accelerating every aspect of biological behaviors of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. The findings demonstrated that the magnetic feature of substrate and microenvironment were applicable ways in regulating osteogenesis in bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanofibers containing well-dispersed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were produced. • Static magnetic field (SMF) was applied to perform the culture of osteoblasts. • Osteogenic differentiation was enhanced on magnetic substrate with exposure to SMF.

  17. Properties of the static NMR response of a confined thin nematic film of 5CB-d2 under crossed electric and magnetic fields: theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véron, A; Sugimura, A; Luckhurst, G R; Martins, A F

    2012-11-01

    This work describes an investigation of the static (or quasistatic) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response in a nematic liquid crystal confined between two planar conducting plates and subject to a magnetic field and an electric field produced by a difference of voltage applied on the plates. Deuterium NMR spectroscopy of 4-pentyl-d(2)-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB-d(2)) under these conditions has revealed a voltage dependent inhomogeneous director distribution for a particular narrow range of voltages and for a fixed magnetic field (that of the spectrometer). In the ideal setup the two plates are assumed to be rigorously parallel, so that a difference of voltage applied on the plates leads to a constant electric field normal to them. When the magnetic field is parallel to the plates (orthogonal geometry) there exists a threshold value of the electric field for which the effect of both fields exactly compensate; moreover, for stronger electric field the director aligns with the electric field while for weaker electric field the director aligns with the magnetic field. If there is a lack of parallelism between the two plates, the electric field becomes inhomogeneous so that it may be larger than the threshold value in some region of the sample and smaller in the remaining part of the sample. In that case the director will adopt essentially two orientations within the sample, namely, parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field, and the position of the frontier between the two domains depends on the voltage. This feature is clearly shown by deuterium NMR spectra that exhibit a transfer of intensity between two quadrupolar doublets with increase in the applied voltage. The coexistence of two director populations occurs for a range of voltages that depends on the degree of nonparallelism; accordingly, an estimation of this range by NMR yields an experimental estimation of the lack of parallelism. A tiny tilt of the magnetic field (nonorthogonal geometry) entrains a

  18. Metabolic features of the cell danger response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naviaux, Robert K

    2014-05-01

    The cell danger response (CDR) is the evolutionarily conserved metabolic response that protects cells and hosts from harm. It is triggered by encounters with chemical, physical, or biological threats that exceed the cellular capacity for homeostasis. The resulting metabolic mismatch between available resources and functional capacity produces a cascade of changes in cellular electron flow, oxygen consumption, redox, membrane fluidity, lipid dynamics, bioenergetics, carbon and sulfur resource allocation, protein folding and aggregation, vitamin availability, metal homeostasis, indole, pterin, 1-carbon and polyamine metabolism, and polymer formation. The first wave of danger signals consists of the release of metabolic intermediates like ATP and ADP, Krebs cycle intermediates, oxygen, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and is sustained by purinergic signaling. After the danger has been eliminated or neutralized, a choreographed sequence of anti-inflammatory and regenerative pathways is activated to reverse the CDR and to heal. When the CDR persists abnormally, whole body metabolism and the gut microbiome are disturbed, the collective performance of multiple organ systems is impaired, behavior is changed, and chronic disease results. Metabolic memory of past stress encounters is stored in the form of altered mitochondrial and cellular macromolecule content, resulting in an increase in functional reserve capacity through a process known as mitocellular hormesis. The systemic form of the CDR, and its magnified form, the purinergic life-threat response (PLTR), are under direct control by ancient pathways in the brain that are ultimately coordinated by centers in the brainstem. Chemosensory integration of whole body metabolism occurs in the brainstem and is a prerequisite for normal brain, motor, vestibular, sensory, social, and speech development. An understanding of the CDR permits us to reframe old concepts of pathogenesis for a broad array of chronic, developmental

  19. Rectifier cabinet static breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Jr, Roger A.; Gliebe, Ronald J.

    1992-09-01

    A rectifier cabinet static breaker replaces a blocking diode pair with an SCR and the installation of a power transistor in parallel with the latch contactor to commutate the SCR to the off state. The SCR serves as a static breaker with fast turnoff capability providing an alternative way of achieving reactor scram in addition to performing the function of the replaced blocking diodes. The control circuitry for the rectifier cabinet static breaker includes on-line test capability and an LED indicator light to denote successful test completion. Current limit circuitry provides high-speed protection in the event of overload.

  20. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella K Brown

    Full Text Available The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii, the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research.

  1. Muscarinic responses of gastric parietal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, J.M.; Kajimura, M.; Scott, D.R.; Hersey, S.J.; Sachs, G. (Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Isolated rabbit gastric glands were used to study the nature of the muscarinic cholinergic responses of parietal cells. Carbachol stimulation of acid secretion, as measured by the accumulation of aminopyrine, was inhibited by the M1 antagonist, pirenzepine, with an IC50 of 13 microM; by the M2 antagonist, 11,2-(diethylamino)methyl-1 piperidinyl acetyl-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido 2,3-b 1,4 benzodiazepin-6-one (AF-DX 116), with an IC50 of 110 microM; and by the M1/M3 antagonist, diphenyl-acetoxy-4-methylpiperidinemethiodide, with an IC50 of 35 nM. The three antagonists displayed equivalent IC50 values for the inhibition of carbachol-stimulated production of 14CO2 from radiolabeled glucose, which is a measure of the turnover of the H,K-ATPase, the final step of acid secretion. Intracellular calcium levels were measured in gastric glands loaded with FURA 2. Carbachol was shown to both release calcium from an intracellular pool and to promote calcium entry across the plasma membrane. The calcium entry was inhibitable by 20 microM La3+. The relative potency of the three muscarinic antagonists for inhibition of calcium entry was essentially the same as for inhibition of acid secretion or pump related glucose oxidation. Image analysis of the glands showed the effects of carbachol, and of the antagonists, on intracellular calcium were occurring largely in the parietal cell. The rise in cell calcium due to release of calcium from intracellular stores was inhibited by 4-DAMP with an IC50 of 1.7 nM, suggesting that the release pathway was regulated by a low affinity M3 muscarinic receptor or state; Ca entry and acid secretion are regulated by a high affinity M3 muscarinic receptor or state, inhibited by higher 4-DAMP concentrations, suggesting that it is the steady-state elevation of Ca that is related to parietal cell function rather than the (Ca)i transient.

  2. The architects of B and T cell immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Peter J L

    2008-08-15

    Published work links adult lymphoid tissue-inducer cells (LTi) with T cell-dependent antibody responses. In this issue of Immunity, Tsuji et al. (2008) associate LTi with T cell-independent IgA antibody responses in the gut.

  3. The physiological responses of the Caspian kutum (Rutilus frisii kutum) fry to the static magnetic fields with different intensities during acute and subacute exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loghmannia, Javad; Heidari, Behrooz; Rozati, Seyed Ali; Kazemi, Soodabeh

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the application of new technologies producing magnetic fields has widely increased in the aquatic environment. In this study, the effects of variable static magnetic fields on metabolic and immune parameters of the Caspian kutum fry were investigated. The Caspian kutum fry (n=220, body weight 1.78±0.11 g) was exposed to static magnetic fields with different intensities (2.5, 5.0, 7.5 mT) induced by electrical power supply during acute (one week) and subacute (3 weeks) periods. The results showed an increment in the quantity of ALT and AST enzymes (metabolic parameters) with increasing magnetic fields intensities in subacute and acute exposures (p<0.05). The lysozyme level, an immune parameter, showed a significant decrease, especially at intensities higher than 2.5 mT during subacute and acute exposures (p<0.05). It seems that low-intensity static magnetic fields can effect on the metabolism and immunity of the Caspian kutum fry as valuable commercial species.

  4. Einstein's static universe

    CERN Document Server

    Soares, Domingos Savio

    2012-01-01

    Einstein's static model is the first relativistic cosmological model. The model is static, finite and of spherical spatial symmetry. I use the solution of Einstein's field equations in a homogeneous and isotropic universe -- Friedmann's equation -- to calculate the radius of curvature of the model (also known as "Einstein's universe"). Furthermore, I show, using a Newtonian analogy, the model's mostly known feature, namely, its instability under small perturbations on the state of equilibrium.

  5. Static Analysis Numerical Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    STATIC ANALYSIS OF NUMERICAL ALGORITHMS KESTREL TECHNOLOGY, LLC APRIL 2016 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) NOV 2013 – NOV 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE STATIC ANALYSIS OF NUMERICAL ALGORITHMS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-14-C... algorithms , linear digital filters and integrating accumulators, modifying existing versions of Honeywell’s HiLiTE model-based development system and

  6. Cell-Cell Interactions Mediate the Response of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells to Substrate Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Olga V.; Lee, Kristen L.; Isenberg, Brett C.; Rich, Celeste B.; Nugent, Matthew A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2011-01-01

    The vessel wall experiences progressive stiffening with age and the development of cardiovascular disease, which alters the micromechanical environment experienced by resident vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In vitro studies have shown that VSMCs are sensitive to substrate stiffness, but the exact molecular mechanisms of their response to stiffness remains unknown. Studies have also shown that cell-cell interactions can affect mechanotransduction at the cell-substrate interface. Using flexible substrates, we show that the expression of proteins associated with cell-matrix adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is regulated by substrate stiffness, and that an increase in cell density selectively attenuates some of these effects. We also show that cell-cell interactions exert a strong effect on cell morphology in a substrate-stiffness dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that as VSMCs form cell-cell contacts, substrate stiffness becomes a less potent regulator of focal adhesion signaling. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which VSMCs respond to the mechanical environment of the blood vessel wall, and point to cell-cell interactions as critical mediators of VSMC response to vascular injury. PMID:21806930

  7. Cell cycle progression in response to oxygen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, Brian; Druker, Jimena; Rocha, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Hypoxia' or decreases in oxygen availability' results in the activation of a number of different responses at both the whole organism and the cellular level. These responses include drastic changes in gene expression, which allow the organism (or cell) to cope efficiently with the stresses associated with the hypoxic insult. A major breakthrough in the understanding of the cellular response to hypoxia was the discovery of a hypoxia sensitive family of transcription factors known as the hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). The hypoxia response mounted by the HIFs promotes cell survival and energy conservation. As such, this response has to deal with important cellular process such as cell division. In this review, the integration of oxygen sensing with the cell cycle will be discussed. HIFs, as well as other components of the hypoxia pathway, can influence cell cycle progression. The role of HIF and the cell molecular oxygen sensors in the control of the cell cycle will be reviewed.

  8. Adult stem cell responses to nanostimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Tsimbouri, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    Adult or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been found in different tissues in the body, residing in stem cell microenvironments called “stem cell niches”. They play different roles but their main activity is to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair throughout the lifetime of an organism. Their ability to differentiate into different cell types makes them an ideal tool to study tissue development and to use them in cell-based therapies. This differentiation process is subject to both interna...

  9. Normalization of cell responses in cat striate cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeger, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Simple cells in the striate cortex have been depicted as half-wave-rectified linear operators. Complex cells have been depicted as energy mechanisms, constructed from the squared sum of the outputs of quadrature pairs of linear operators. However, the linear/energy model falls short of a complete explanation of striate cell responses. In this paper, a modified version of the linear/energy model is presented in which striate cells mutually inhibit one another, effectively normalizing their responses with respect to stimulus contrast. This paper reviews experimental measurements of striate cell responses, and shows that the new model explains a significantly larger body of physiological data.

  10. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  11. Ultrasensitive Responses and Specificity in Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haney Seth

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interconnected cell signaling pathways are able to efficiently and accurately transmit a multitude of different signals, despite an inherent potential for undesirable levels of cross-talk. To ensure that an appropriate response is produced, biological systems have evolved network-level mechanisms that insulate pathways from crosstalk and prevent 'leaking' or 'spillover' between pathways. Many signaling pathways have been shown to respond in an ultrasensitive (switch-like fashion to graded input, and this behavior may influence specificity. The relationship of ultrasensitivity to signaling specificity has not been extensively explored. Results We studied the behavior of simple mathematical models of signaling networks composed of two interconnected pathways that share an intermediate component, asking if the two pathways in the network could exhibit both output specificity (preferentially activate their own output and input fidelity (preferentially respond to their own input. Previous results with weakly-activated pathways indicated that neither mutual specificity nor mutual fidelity were obtainable in the absence of an insulating mechanism, such as cross-pathway inhibition, combinatorial signaling or scaffolding/compartmentalization. Here we found that mutual specificity is obtainable for hyperbolic or ultrasensitive pathways, even in the absence of an insulating mechanism. However, mutual fidelity is impossible at steady-state, even if pathways are hyperbolic or ultrasensitive. Nevertheless, ultrasensitivity does provide advantages in attaining specificity and fidelity to networks that contain an insulating mechanism. For networks featuring cross-pathway inhibition or combinatorial signaling, ultrasensitive activation can increase specificity in a limited way, and can only be utilized by one of the two pathways. In contrast, for networks featuring scaffolding/compartmentalization, ultrasensitive activation of both pathways

  12. The effect of structural defects in SiC particles on the static & dynamic mechanical response of a 15 volume percent SiC/6061-Al matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, R.U.; Song, S.G.; Zurek, A.K.; Gray, G.T. III

    1995-09-01

    Static and Dynamic mechanical tests, and microstructural examinations performed on a SiC particle reinforced 6061-Al matrix composite indicated that particle cracking significantly affected the strength, strain hardening, and failure mechanism of the composite. Cracks were observed to nucleate and propagate on stacking faults and interfaces between the various phases within the reinforcing SiC particles. Planar defects were the predominant artifacts seen in the SiC particles. Partial dislocations were also observed bounding the stacking faults within the reinforcement phase.

  13. Fluoride inhibits the response of bone cells to mechanical loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, H.M.E.; van den Heuvel, E.G.H.M.; Castelein, S.; Keverling Buisman, J.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Bakker, A.D.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2011-01-01

    The response of bone cells to mechanical loading is mediated by the cytoskeleton. Since the bone anabolic agent fluoride disrupts the cytoskeleton, we investigated whether fluoride affects the response of bone cells to mechanical loading, and whether this is cytoskeleton mediated. The mechano-respon

  14. Fluoride inhibits the response of bone cells to mechanical loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, H.M.E.; van den Heuvel, E.G.H.M.; Castelein, S.; Keverling Buisman, J.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Bakker, A.D.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2011-01-01

    The response of bone cells to mechanical loading is mediated by the cytoskeleton. Since the bone anabolic agent fluoride disrupts the cytoskeleton, we investigated whether fluoride affects the response of bone cells to mechanical loading, and whether this is cytoskeleton mediated. The

  15. Static Transition Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Damian, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Starting from an operational specification of a translation from a structured to an unstructured imperative language, we point out how a compositional and context-insensitive translation gives rise to static chains of jumps. Taking an inspiration from the notion of continuation, we state a new...... compositional and context-sensitive specification that provably gives rise to no static chains of jumps, no redundant labels, and no unused labels. It is defined with one inference rule per syntactic construct and operates in linear time and space on the size of the source program (indeed it operates in one...

  16. Energy conversion statics

    CERN Document Server

    Messerle, H K; Declaris, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Energy Conversion Statics deals with equilibrium situations and processes linking equilibrium states. A development of the basic theory of energy conversion statics and its applications is presented. In the applications the emphasis is on processes involving electrical energy. The text commences by introducing the general concept of energy with a survey of primary and secondary energy forms, their availability, and use. The second chapter presents the basic laws of energy conversion. Four postulates defining the overall range of applicability of the general theory are set out, demonstrating th

  17. Nanomaterials for Engineering Stem Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerativitayanan, Punyavee; Carrow, James K; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2015-08-05

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Synergistic interactions between nanomaterials and stem cell engineering offer numerous possibilities to address some of the daunting challenges in regenerative medicine, such as controlling trigger differentiation, immune reactions, limited supply of stem cells, and engineering complex tissue structures. Specifically, the interactions between stem cells and their microenvironment play key roles in controlling stem cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. However, the interactions between nanomaterials and stem cells are not well understood, and the effects of the nanomaterials shape, surface morphology, and chemical functionality on cellular processes need critical evaluation. In this Review, focus is put on recent development in nanomaterial-stem cell interactions, with specific emphasis on their application in regenerative medicine. Further, the emerging technologies based on nanomaterials developed over the past decade for stem cell engineering are reviewed, as well as the potential applications of these nanomaterials in tissue regeneration, stem cell isolation, and drug/gene delivery. It is anticipated that the enhanced understanding of nanomaterial-stem cell interactions will facilitate improved biomaterial design for a range of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  18. Effect of the combined action of gamma radiation and static fields in human cells;Efeito da acao combinada de radiacao gama e campo eletrico estatico em celulas humanas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moron, Michelle Mendes

    2008-07-01

    Our goal is the study in human cells of the effect resulting from the association of irradiation with exposure to exogenous static electric fields. The T47D cell line of breast cancer cells was irradiated with gammas in the 0 8 Gy doses range. The viability of this T47D cells exposed to both gamma radiation and 1.250 V/cm static electric field (SEF) was about 12% lower than when only irradiated. The sole exposure of the cells to SEF by 24 and 72 hours did not induce toxicity. Immunofluorescence runs carried out in irradiated normal MRC5 cell line of human lung fibroblast have quantified the expression of the g-H2AX histone. The amount of phosphorylated histones was approximately 40% higher after irradiation with 2 Gy plus exposure to a SEF by 1 hour, showing that the electric field negatively interfered in the repairing process of the DNA double strand breaks. The flow cytometry analysis with FACS showed that in T47D cells treated with 1 and 2 Gy by 24 hours the SEF also negatively interfered in the DNA repairing process, as evidenced by the higher accumulation of cells in the S phase. (author)

  19. A representative-sandwich model for simultaneously coupled mechanical-electrical-thermal simulation of a lithium-ion cell under quasi-static indentation tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Sprague, Michael A.; Pesaran, Ahmad A.

    2015-12-01

    The safety behavior of lithium-ion batteries under external mechanical crush is a critical concern, especially during large-scale deployment. We previously presented a sequentially coupled mechanical-electrical-thermal modeling approach for studying mechanical-abuse-induced short circuit. In this work, we study different mechanical test conditions and examine the interaction between mechanical failure and electrical-thermal responses, by developing a simultaneously coupled mechanical-electrical-thermal model. The present work utilizes a single representative-sandwich (RS) to model the full pouch cell with explicit representations for each individual component such as the active material, current collector, separator, etc. Anisotropic constitutive material models are presented to describe the mechanical properties of active materials and separator. The model predicts accurately the force-strain response and fracture of battery structure, simulates the local failure of separator layer, and captures the onset of short circuit for lithium-ion battery cells under sphere indentation tests with three different diameters. Electrical-thermal responses to the three different indentation tests are elaborated and discussed. Numerical studies are presented to show the potential impact of test conditions on the electrical-thermal behavior of the cell after the occurrence of short circuit.

  20. Ptch2 mediates the Shh response in Ptch1-/- cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Astrid C; Roberts, Brock; Kwong, Lina; Bijlsma, Maarten F; Roelink, Henk

    2014-09-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling response is regulated by the interaction of three key components that include the sonic hedgehog (Shh) ligand, its receptor patched 1 (Ptch1) and the pathway activator smoothened (Smo). Under the prevailing model of Shh pathway activation, the binding of Shh to Ptch1 (the key Shh receptor) results in the release of Ptch1-mediated inhibition of Smo, leading to Smo activation and subsequent cell-autonomous activation of the Shh response. Consistent with this model, Ptch1(-/-) cells show a strong upregulation of the Shh response. Our finding that this response can be inhibited by the Shh-blocking antibody 5E1 indicates that the Shh response in Ptch1(-/-) cells remains ligand dependent. Furthermore, we find that Shh induces a strong response in Ptch1(-/-);Shh(-/-) cells, and that Ptch1(-/-) fibroblasts retain their ability to migrate towards Shh, demonstrating that Ptch1(-/-) cells remain sensitive to Shh. Expression of a dominant-negative Ptch1 mutant in the developing chick neural tube had no effect on Shh-mediated patterning, but expression of a dominant-negative form of patched 2 (Ptch2) caused an activation of the Shh response. This indicates that, at early developmental stages, Ptch2 functions to suppress Shh signaling. We found that Ptch1(-/-);Ptch2(-/-) cells cannot further activate the Shh response, demonstrating that Ptch2 mediates the response to Shh in the absence of Ptch1.

  1. Frequency- dependent cell responses to an electromagnetic stimulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2013-03-01

    External electric field (EF) acting on cells in the ionic environment can trigger a variety of mechanical and chemical cell responses that regulate cell functions, such as adhesion, migration and cell signaling; thus manipulation of EF can be used in therapeutic applications. To optimize this process, realistic studies of EF interaction with cells are essential. We have developed a combined theoretical-experimental approach to study cell response to the external EF in the native configuration. The cell is modeled as a membrane-enclosed hemisphere which is cultured on a substrate and is surrounded by electrolyte. Maxwell's equations are solved numerically (ANSYS-HFSS) to obtain 3D EF distribution inside and near the cell subjected to an external EF. Theoretical results indicate that the cell response is frequency dependent, where at low frequency EF is excluded from the cell interior while EF penetration into the cell increases for higher frequencies. In both regimes the spatial distribution and strength of induced EF in membrane varies with frequency. Experimental results are consistent with theoretical predictions and show frequency-dependent cell response, including both membrane-initiated and intracellular pathway activation and growth factor release. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the NSF (DMR-1206784 & DMR-0804199 to AK); the NIH (1R21 DK078814-01A1 to DN) and the University of Cincinnati (Interdisciplinary Faculty Research Support Grant to DN and AK).

  2. Stem Cells Matter in Response to Fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badi Sri Sailaja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The molecular processes underlying intestinal adaptation to fasting and re-feeding remain largely uncharacterized. In this issue of Cell Reports, Richmond et al. report that dormant intestinal stem cells are regulated by PTEN and nutritional status.

  3. T cell immune responses in psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Jadali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A central role for T cells and their cytokines in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been proposed; however, there are controversies over the details of this issue. The goal of this study is to summarise currently available data on the importance of T cells in psoriasis pathogenesis. A systematic review of the English medical literature was conducted by searching PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Iranian databases including Iranmedex, and SID for studies on associations between the involvement of T cell subsets and psoriasis. The results of the present study indicate that alterations in the number and function of different subsets of T-cells are associated with psoriasis. It appears that studies on T cell subsets contributed to understanding the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis. In addition, it may have provided novel therapeutic opportunities in ameliorating immunopathologies.

  4. Explosions and static electricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Niels M

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of electrostatic discharges as causes of ignition of vapor/gas and dust/gas mixtures. A series of examples of static-caused explosions will be discussed. The concepts of explosion limits, the incendiveness of various discharge types and safe voltages are explained...

  5. Why Static Clings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naab, Laurie; Henry, David

    2009-01-01

    Using Wiggins and McTighe's (1998) concept of Big Ideas, the authors planned and designed an electricity investigation to address common student misconceptions about static electricity. With Styrofoam plates and transparent tape, elementary students investigated many properties of electrically charged and uncharged objects in a 5E learning cycle…

  6. Static Gravitational Global Monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Liebling, S L

    2000-01-01

    Static solutions in spherical symmetry are found for gravitating global monopoles. Regular solutions lacking a horizon are found for $\\eta \\sqrt{3/8\\pi} \\approx 0.3455$ is consistent with findings that topological inflation begins at $\\eta \\approx 0.33$.

  7. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu [Univ. of Cincinnati Medical Center, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. System-wide Analysis of the T Cell Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Covacu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The T cell receptor (TCR controls the cellular adaptive immune response to antigens, but our understanding of TCR repertoire diversity and response to challenge is still incomplete. For example, TCR clones shared by different individuals with minimal alteration to germline gene sequences (public clones are detectable in all vertebrates, but their significance is unknown. Although small in size, the zebrafish TCR repertoire is controlled by processes similar to those operating in mammals. Thus, we studied the zebrafish TCR repertoire and its response to stimulation with self and foreign antigens. We found that cross-reactive public TCRs dominate the T cell response, endowing a limited TCR repertoire with the ability to cope with diverse antigenic challenges. These features of vertebrate public TCRs might provide a mechanism for the rapid generation of protective T cell immunity, allowing a short temporal window for the development of more specific private T cell responses.

  9. STATIC AEROELASTIC RESPONSES ANALYSIS BASED ON THREE-DIMENSIONAL AERODYNAMIC FORCES%基于三维气动力的静气动弹性响应分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张波成; 万志强; 杨超

    2011-01-01

    A method is provided to obtain static aeroelastic responses in the early and detailed design stages of aircrafts.Based on this approach,three-dimensional aerodynamic forces are calculated independently,and then coupled with the structure.The aerodynamic forces can be computed with Euler solver,Navier-Stokes solver or High-order panel method in the early stage and provided by wind-tunnel tests in the detailed stage.The method is applied to obtain static aeroelastic responses of a high-aspect-ratio wing in this study.The rigid aerodynamic forces of different flight conditions are calculated with CFD tools and transmitted to linear aerodynamic grids or structural grids.Finally,the rigid aerodynamic forces of equilibrium are flexibilized with a linear aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix.The results are compared with static aeroelastic reponses calculated based on linear aerodynamic forces generally used in early design stage.It could be concluded that there is great difference in aerodynamic forces distribution and aerodynamic coefficients,small difference in macroscopical distribution of shear and bending moment.The method of this study is intended to provide an assessment of static aeroelastic effects in early design process stage of the aircraft.%提出了一种适用于飞行器初步设计和详细设计阶段的静气动弹性响应分析方法。基于该方法进行静气动弹性响应分析时三维气动力单独求解,再与结构进行耦合计算。在初步设计阶段气动力可选取由Euler方程、N-S方程或高阶面元法计算,详细设计阶段气动力可选取风洞试验气动力。该文对一大展弦比机翼进行了静气动弹性响应分析,算例中使用CFD方法计算气动力,用以提供各种状态的刚性气动力;再将气动力通过插值分配到线性气动力网格或结构有限元模型上;并最终通过线性化方法对平衡状态附近的气动力进行弹性化处理。还将分析结果与适用于初步设计

  10. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R.; Marcec, Matthew J.; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-de...

  11. Emerging concepts in T follicular helper cell responses to malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Diana S; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Ly, Ann; Ioannidis, Lisa J; Crompton, Peter D

    2017-02-01

    Antibody responses to malaria and candidate malaria vaccines are short-lived in children, leaving them susceptible to repeated malaria episodes. Because T follicular helper (TFH) cells provide critical help to B cells to generate long-lived antibody responses, they have become the focus of recent studies of Plasmodium-infected mice and humans. The emerging data converge on common themes, namely, that malaria-induced TH1 cytokines are associated with the activation of (i) T-like memory TFH cells with impaired B cell helper function, and (ii) pre-TFH cells that acquire Th1-like features (T-bet expression, IFN-γ production), which impede their differentiation into fully functional TFH cells, thus resulting in germinal center dysfunction and suboptimal antibody responses. Deeper knowledge of TFH cells in malaria could illuminate strategies to improve vaccines through modulating TFH cell responses. This review summarizes emerging concepts in TFH cell responses to malaria. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Engineering Cellular Microenvironments with Photo- and Enzymatically Responsive Hydrogels: Toward Biomimetic 3D Cell Culture Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Roger Y; Smith, Laura J; Shoichet, Molly S

    2017-04-18

    Conventional cell culture techniques using 2D polystyrene or glass have provided great insight into key biochemical mechanisms responsible for cellular events such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and cell-cell interactions. However, the physical and chemical properties of 2D culture in vitro are dramatically different than those found in the native cellular microenvironment in vivo. Cells grown on 2D substrates differ significantly from those grown in vivo, and this explains, in part, why many promising drug candidates discovered through in vitro drug screening assays fail when they are translated to in vivo animal or human models. To overcome this obstacle, 3D cell culture using biomimetic hydrogels has emerged as an alternative strategy to recapitulate native cell growth in vitro. Hydrogels, which are water-swollen polymers, can be synthetic or naturally derived. Many methods have been developed to control the physical and chemical properties of the hydrogels to match those found in specific tissues. Compared to 2D culture, cells cultured in 3D gels with the appropriate physicochemical cues can behave more like they naturally do in vivo. While conventional hydrogels involve modifications to the bulk material to mimic the static aspects of the cellular microenvironment, recent progress has focused on using more dynamic hydrogels, the chemical and physical properties of which can be altered with external stimuli to better mimic the dynamics of the native cellular microenvironment found in vivo. In this Account, we describe our progress in designing stimuli-responsive, optically transparent hydrogels that can be used as biomimetic extracellular matrices (ECMs) to study cell differentiation and migration in the context of modeling the nervous system and cancer. Specifically, we developed photosensitive agarose and hyaluronic acid hydrogels that are activated by single or two-photon irradiation for biomolecule immobilization at specific volumes within the 3D

  13. Statics and rotational dynamics of composite beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ghorashi, Mehrdaad

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive study of the nonlinear statics and dynamics of composite beams and consists of solutions with and without active elements embedded in the beams. The static solution provides the initial conditions for the dynamic analysis. The dynamic problems considered include the analyses of clamped (hingeless) and articulated (hinged) accelerating rotating beams. Two independent numerical solutions for the steady state and the transient responses are presented. The author illustrates that the transient solution of the nonlinear formulation of accelerating rotating beam converges to the steady state solution obtained by the shooting method. Other key areas considered include calculation of the effect of perturbing the steady state solution, coupled nonlinear flap-lag dynamics of a rotating articulated beam with hinge offset and aerodynamic damping, and static and dynamic responses of nonlinear composite beams with embedded anisotropic piezo-composite actuators. The book is intended as a t...

  14. B-Cell Response during Protozoan Parasite Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María C. Amezcua Vesely

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss how protozoan parasites alter immature and mature B cell compartment. B1 and marginal zone (MZ B cells, considered innate like B cells, are activated during protozoan parasite infections, and they generate short lived plasma cells providing a prompt antibody source. In addition, protozoan infections induce massive B cell response with polyclonal activation that leads to hypergammaglobulnemia with serum antibodies specific for the parasites and self and/or non related antigens. To protect themselves, the parasites have evolved unique ways to evade B cell immune responses inducing apoptosis of MZ and conventional mature B cells. As a consequence of the parasite induced-apoptosis, the early IgM response and an already establish humoral immunity are affected during the protozoan parasite infection. Moreover, some trypanosomatides trigger bone marrow immature B cell apoptosis, influencing the generation of new mature B cells. Simultaneously with their ability to release antibodies, B cells produce cytokines/quemokines that influence the characteristic of cellular immune response and consequently the progression of parasite infections.

  15. Microarray analysis of human epithelial cell responses to bacterial interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Jeffrey J; Lamont, Richard J; Handfield, Martin

    2006-09-01

    Host-pathogen interactions are inherently complex and dynamic. The recent use of human microarrays has been invaluable to monitor the effects of various bacterial and viral pathogens upon host cell gene expression programs. This methodology has allowed the host response transcriptome of several cell lines to be studied on a global scale. To this point, the great majority of reports have focused on the response of immune cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells. These studies revealed that the immune response to microbial pathogens is tailored to different microbial challenges. Conversely, the paradigm for epithelial cells has--until recently--held that the epithelium mostly served as a relatively passive physical barrier to infection. It is now generally accepted that the epithelial barrier contributes more actively to signaling events in the immune response. In light of this shift, this review will compare transcriptional profiling data from studies that involved host-pathogen interactions occurring with epithelial cells. Experiments that defined both a common core response, as well as pathogen-specific host responses will be discussed. This review will also summarize the contributions that transcriptional profiling analysis has made to our understanding of bacterial physio-pathogensis of infection. This will include a discussion of how host transcriptional responses can be used to infer the function of virulence determinants from bacterial pathogens interacting with epithelial mucosa. In particular, we will expand upon the lessons that have been learned from gastro-intestinal and oral pathogens, as well as from members of the commensal flora.

  16. Dengue virus inhibits immune responses in Aedes aegypti cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhen Sim

    Full Text Available The ability of many viruses to manipulate the host antiviral immune response often results in complex host-pathogen interactions. In order to study the interaction of dengue virus (DENV with the Aedes aegypti immune response, we have characterized the DENV infection-responsive transcriptome of the immune-competent A. aegypti cell line Aag2. As in mosquitoes, DENV infection transcriptionally activated the cell line Toll pathway and a variety of cellular physiological systems. Most notably, however, DENV infection down-regulated the expression levels of numerous immune signaling molecules and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. Functional assays showed that transcriptional induction of AMPs from the Toll and IMD pathways in response to bacterial challenge is impaired in DENV-infected cells. In addition, Escherichia coli, a gram-negative bacteria species, grew better when co-cultured with DENV-infected cells than with uninfected cells, suggesting a decreased production of AMPs from the IMD pathway in virus-infected cells. Pre-stimulation of the cell line with gram-positive bacteria prior to DENV infection had no effect on DENV titers, while pre-stimulation with gram-negative bacteria resulted in an increase in DENV titers. These results indicate that DENV is capable of actively suppressing immune responses in the cells it infects, a phenomenon that may have important consequences for virus transmission and insect physiology.

  17. Microprocessor controlled static converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Szabo

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper wants to demonstrate a way of implementing a microcontroller into an DC motor speed control loop. The static power converter is a fully controlled rectifier bridge, using standard SCR's. The bridge's control signals are supplied by the microcontroller and are phase-angle or burst types. The automation loop contains a software PI-style regulator. All the experimental results shows that this aproach is flexibile enough to be used on a large scale.

  18. The Static Quantum Multiverse

    OpenAIRE

    Nomura, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    We consider the multiverse in the intrinsically quantum mechanical framework recently proposed in Refs. [1,2]. By requiring that the principles of quantum mechanics are universally valid and that physical predictions do not depend on the reference frame one chooses to describe the multiverse, we find that the multiverse state must be static---in particular, the multiverse does not have a beginning or end. We argue that, despite its naive appearance, this does not contradict observation, inclu...

  19. Open static Chaplygin universe

    CERN Document Server

    Khalatnikov, I M

    2003-01-01

    We apply the qualitative theory of dynamical systems to the study of the Chaplygin gas cosmological model. In difference to earlier works devoted to this model we give up sign restrictions on the choice of the sign of the energy density and on the parameters characterising initial conditions for a cosmological evolution. It appears that exists a static stable open universe filled with the Chaplygin gas. Besides exist universes where the acoustic waves have a velocity exceeding that of light in the vacuum.

  20. On the Potential Uses of Static Offsets Derived From Low-Cost Community Instruments and Crowd-Sourcing for Earthquake Monitoring and Rapid Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minson, S. E.; Brooks, B. A.; Murray, J. R.; Iannucci, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    We explore the efficacy of low-cost community instruments (LCCIs) and crowd-sourcing to produce rapid estimates of earthquake magnitude and rupture characteristics which can be used for earthquake loss reduction such as issuing tsunami warnings and guiding rapid response efforts. Real-time high-rate GPS data are just beginning to be incorporated into earthquake early warning (EEW) systems. These data are showing promising utility including producing moment magnitude estimates which do not saturate for the largest earthquakes and determining the geometry and slip distribution of the earthquake rupture in real-time. However, building a network of scientific-quality real-time high-rate GPS stations requires substantial infrastructure investment which is not practicable in many parts of the world. To expand the benefits of real-time geodetic monitoring globally, we consider the potential of pseudorange-based GPS locations such as the real-time positioning done onboard cell phones or on LCCIs that could be distributed in the same way accelerometers are distributed as part of the Quake Catcher Network (QCN). While location information from LCCIs often have large uncertainties, their low cost means that large numbers of instruments can be deployed. A monitoring network that includes smartphones could collect data from potentially millions of instruments. These observations could be averaged together to substantially decrease errors associated with estimated earthquake source parameters. While these data will be inferior to data recorded by scientific-grade seismometers and GPS instruments, there are features of community-based data collection (and possibly analysis) that are very attractive. This approach creates a system where every user can host an instrument or download an application to their smartphone that both provides them with earthquake and tsunami warnings while also providing the data on which the warning system operates. This symbiosis helps to encourage

  1. Investigation on the effect of static magnetic field up to 30 mT on viability percent, proliferation rate and IC50 of HeLa and fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafari, Jaber; Javani Jouni, Fatemeh; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Jalali, Amir; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the effects of static magnetic field (SMF) on the viability of the human cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line and fibroblast cells. The cells were cultured in DMEM medium and treated several times (24, 48,72 and 96 h) and at several intensities (5, 10, 20 and 30 mT) of magnetic field (MF). The cytotoxicity and cell viability percent in treated cells were performed using MTT assay by evaluating mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. The MF ability on inducing cell death or inhibiting biochemical function was reported as cell death percent. The results showed that the increase of MF intensity and the time that cells were exposed to this treatment increased sharply cell death percent and proliferation rate in HeLa cell compare to fibroblast cells. Our data suggest that SMF biological effects on cell death were different in our selected targets. Cell type and time of exposure have been therefore found to be significant factors. These findings could be used to improve new effective method using SMF in conjunction with the common therapeutic approaches.

  2. Cell-mediated responses of immunized vervet monkeys to defined Leishmania T-cell epitopes.

    OpenAIRE

    Curry, A J; Jardim, A; Olobo, J.O.; Olafson, R W

    1994-01-01

    A population of vervet monkeys was immunized with killed parasites and infected with Leishmania major promastigotes either by needle or by infected-fly bite. The responses of recovered monkeys to mitogens, killed parasites, and molecularly defined T-cell epitopes were then compared with those of control animals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both naive and recovered animals proliferated strongly in response to both B- and T-cell mitogens, although the responses of the recover...

  3. Antibody-Independent Function of Human B Cells Contributes to Antifungal T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Li, Hulun; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Prat, Alexandre; Bar-Or, Amit

    2017-03-08

    Fungal infections (e.g., Candida albicans) can manifest as serious medical illnesses, especially in the elderly and immune-compromised hosts. T cells are important for Candida control. Whether and how B cells are involved in antifungal immunity has been less clear. Although patients with agammaglobulinemia exhibit normal antifungal immunity, increased fungal infections are reported following B cell-depleting therapy, together pointing to Ab-independent roles of B cells in controlling such infections. To test how human B cells may contribute to fungal-associated human T cell responses, we developed a novel Ag-specific human T cell/B cell in vitro coculture system and found that human B cells could induce C. albicans-associated, MHC class II-restricted responses of naive T cells. Activated B cells significantly enhanced C. albicans-mediated Th1 and Th17 T cell responses, which were both strongly induced by CD80/CD86 costimulation. IL-6(+)GM-CSF(+) B cells were the major responding B cell subpopulation to C. albicans and provided efficient costimulatory signals to the T cells. In vivo B cell depletion in humans resulted in reduced C. albicans-associated T responses. Of note, the decreased Th17, but not Th1, responses could be reversed by soluble factors from B cells prior to depletion, in an IL-6-dependent manner. Taken together, our results implicate an Ab-independent cytokine-defined B cell role in human antifungal T cell responses. These findings may be particularly relevant given the prospects of chronic B cell depletion therapy use in lymphoma and autoimmune disease, as patients age and are exposed to serial combination therapies.

  4. The T Cell Response to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    disease (11). Other clinical features of the disease include deep pain on mastication, first molar mobility, distolabial migration of maxillary incisors...transformed into one shot chemically competent E. coli TOP -10 (InVitrogen). 40 .tl from each transformation was grown at 37°C overnight on LB plates...5. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) isolation The 13 ml vacutainer with SST Gel and Clot Activator, or "Tiger Top ," was centrifuged at 3800

  5. Circadian control of antigen-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobis CC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloé C Nobis,1–3 Nathalie Labrecque,2–4 Nicolas Cermakian1,5–8 1Douglas Mental Health University Institute, 2Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre, 3Department of Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and Immunology, 4Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, 5Department of Psychiatry, 6Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 7Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, 8Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: The immune system is composed of two arms, the innate and the adaptive immunity. While the innate response constitutes the first line of defense and is not specific for a particular pathogen, the adaptive response is highly specific and allows for long-term memory of the pathogen encounter. T lymphocytes (or T cells are central players in the adaptive immune response. Various aspects of T cell functions vary according to the time of day. Circadian clocks located in most tissues and cell types generate 24-hour rhythms of various physiological processes. These clocks are based on a set of clock genes, and this timing mechanism controls rhythmically the expression of numerous other genes. Clock genes are expressed in cells of the immune system, including T cells. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian control of the adaptive immune response, with emphasis on T cells, including their development, trafficking, response to antigen, and effector functions. Keywords: circadian clock, adaptive immune response, T lymphocyte, antigen, cytokine, proliferation

  6. Differential T helper cell response in tuberculous pleuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was conducted to understand the in vivo and in vitro immune responses and to find whether there exists any difference in the systemic and localized immune responses in tuberculous pleuritis. Methods: The in vivo levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 were compared in plasma (BL and pleural fluid (PF of 47 tuberculous (TB and 31 nontuberculous pleuritis (Non-TB patients. In vitro cytokine response to various mycobacterial antigens was studied in 19 TB patients by ELISA . Both ex vivo and in vitro cytokine responses were further ascertained by intracellular cytokine staining on purified CD4+ T cells from pleural fluid mononuclear cells (PFMC of 10 TB patients. Results: The ex vivo results showed a significant increase in IFN-γ levels and higher IFN-γ + T cells in PF. On the other hand, in vitro results showed simultaneous increase in both IFN-γ and IL-4 levels in the supernatants of antigen stimulated PFMC. Similarly antigen specific increase was observed in both IFN-γ + and IL-4+ T cells in all cultured conditions. However, the percentile increase was more in IL-4 secreting T cells, significant for PPD stimulation ( P < 0.05, indicating that in vitro cellular response was dominated by Th2 type. Conclusions: These results showed a differential T-helper response in TB pleuritis suggestive of predominant Th1 in vivo and mixed response (Th1 and Th2 under in vitro conditions.

  7. Role of Mast Cells in Regulation of T Cell Responses in Experimental and Clinical Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elieh Ali Komi, Daniel; Grauwet, Korneel

    2017-09-19

    Mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of stored or newly synthesized pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and/or immunosuppressive mediators and express several costimulatory and inhibitory surface molecules. Mast cells finely tune activities of T cells, B cells, and regulatory cells and effectively contribute to the development of different T cell-associated responses by influencing their recruitment, activation, proliferation, and differentiation. The interaction between mast cells and T cells, with regard to cellular functionality and immune responses, can be assessed in both activating and inhibitory regulations. While Th2 cytokines, including IL-5 and IL-9, stimulate stem cell factor (SCF)-dependent proliferation of mast cells, Th1 cytokine IFN-γ suppresses SCF-mediated differentiation of mast cell progenitors. Mast cell mediators such as CCL5 have a role in the recruitment of CD8+ T cells to viral infection sites where their ability in clearance of viral reservoirs is needed. The capacity of mast cells in presenting antigens by classes I and II MHC molecules to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells respectively is considered one of the main antigen-dependent interactions of mast cells with T cells. Interestingly, Tregs recruit mast cells to different sites through secretion of IL-9, while the OX40L (expressed on mast cell)-OX40(expressed on T cell) interaction inhibits the extent of the mast cell degranulation. Recently, the capability of exosomes to carry regulatory receptors of the mast cell surface and their role in T cell activation has been investigated. Functional interplay between mast cells and T cell subsets has been suggested primarily by investigating their co-localization in inflamed tissues and involvement of mast cells in autoimmune diseases. In this review, the interactions of mast cells with T cells are reviewed in cell-to-cell, cytokine, and exosome categories.

  8. Responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to nanostructured platinum surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, C. P.; Sevcencu, C.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Foss, M.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Zachar, V.; Besenbacher, F.; Yoshida, K.

    2009-09-01

    The chronic performance of implantable neural prostheses is affected by the growth of encapsulation tissue onto the stimulation electrodes. Encapsulation is associated with activation of connective tissue cells at the electrode's metallic contacts, usually made of platinum. Since surface nanotopography can modulate the cellular responses to materials, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the 'in vitro' responses of connective tissue cells to platinum strictly by modulating its surface nanoroughness. Using molecular beam epitaxy combined with sputtering, we produced platinum nanostructured substrates consisting of irregularly distributed nanopyramids and investigated their effect on the proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and cellular morphology of primary fibroblasts and transformed glial cells. Cells were cultured on these substrates and their responses to surface roughness were studied. After one day in culture, the fibroblasts were more elongated and their cytoskeleton less mature when cultured on rough substrates. This effect increased as the roughness of the surface increased and was associated with reduced cell proliferation throughout the observation period (4 days). Morphological changes also occurred in glial cells, but they were triggered by a different roughness scale and did not affect cellular proliferation. In conclusion, surface nanotopography modulates the responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to platinum, which may be an important factor in optimizing the tissue response to implanted neural electrodes.

  9. New insights into the unfolded protein response in stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanzhou; Cheung, Hoi Hung; Tu, JiaJie; Miu, Kai Kei; Chan, Wai Yee

    2016-08-16

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an evolutionarily conserved adaptive mechanism to increase cell survival under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress conditions. The UPR is critical for maintaining cell homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. The vital functions of the UPR in development, metabolism and immunity have been demonstrated in several cell types. UPR dysfunction activates a variety of pathologies, including cancer, inflammation, neurodegenerative disease, metabolic disease and immune disease. Stem cells with the special ability to self-renew and differentiate into various somatic cells have been demonstrated to be present in multiple tissues. These cells are involved in development, tissue renewal and certain disease processes. Although the role and regulation of the UPR in somatic cells has been widely reported, the function of the UPR in stem cells is not fully known, and the roles and functions of the UPR are dependent on the stem cell type. Therefore, in this article, the potential significances of the UPR in stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, tissue stem cells, cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells, are comprehensively reviewed. This review aims to provide novel insights regarding the mechanisms associated with stem cell differentiation and cancer pathology.

  10. Multiple control and dynamic response of the Xenopus melanotrope cell.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, S.M.; Kramer, B.M.; Cornelisse, L.N.; Scheenen, W.J.J.M.; Jenks, B.G.; Roubos, E.W.

    2002-01-01

    Some amphibian brain-melanotrope cell systems are used to study how neuronal and (neuro)endocrine mechanisms convert environmental signals into physiological responses. Pituitary melanotropes release alpha-melanophore-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), which controls skin color in response to backgrou

  11. Distinct metabolic responses of an ovarian cancer stem cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Kathleen A; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John F; Styczynski, Mark P

    2014-12-18

    Cancer metabolism is emerging as an important focus area in cancer research. However, the in vitro cell culture conditions under which much cellular metabolism research is performed differ drastically from in vivo tumor conditions, which are characterized by variations in the levels of oxygen, nutrients like glucose, and other molecules like chemotherapeutics. Moreover, it is important to know how the diverse cell types in a tumor, including cancer stem cells that are believed to be a major cause of cancer recurrence, respond to these variations. Here, in vitro environmental perturbations designed to mimic different aspects of the in vivo environment were used to characterize how an ovarian cancer cell line and its derived, isogenic cancer stem cells metabolically respond to environmental cues. Mass spectrometry was used to profile metabolite levels in response to in vitro environmental perturbations. Docetaxel, the chemotherapeutic used for this experiment, caused significant metabolic changes in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism in ovarian cancer cells, but had virtually no metabolic effect on isogenic ovarian cancer stem cells. Glucose deprivation, hypoxia, and the combination thereof altered ovarian cancer cell and cancer stem cell metabolism to varying extents for the two cell types. Hypoxia had a much larger effect on ovarian cancer cell metabolism, while glucose deprivation had a greater effect on ovarian cancer stem cell metabolism. Core metabolites and pathways affected by these perturbations were identified, along with pathways that were unique to cell types or perturbations. The metabolic responses of an ovarian cancer cell line and its derived isogenic cancer stem cells differ greatly under most conditions, suggesting that these two cell types may behave quite differently in an in vivo tumor microenvironment. While cancer metabolism and cancer stem cells are each promising potential therapeutic targets, such varied behaviors in vivo would need to

  12. T Cell Responses: Naive to Memory and Everything in Between

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennock, Nathan D.; White, Jason T.; Cross, Eric W.; Cheney, Elizabeth E.; Tamburini, Beth A.; Kedl, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the actions that take place in T cells because of their amazing capacity to proliferate and adopt functional roles aimed at clearing a host of an infectious agent. There is a drastic decline in the T cell population once the primary response is over and the infection is terminated. What remains afterward is a population of T…

  13. T Cell Responses: Naive to Memory and Everything in Between

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennock, Nathan D.; White, Jason T.; Cross, Eric W.; Cheney, Elizabeth E.; Tamburini, Beth A.; Kedl, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the actions that take place in T cells because of their amazing capacity to proliferate and adopt functional roles aimed at clearing a host of an infectious agent. There is a drastic decline in the T cell population once the primary response is over and the infection is terminated. What remains afterward is a population of T…

  14. Study of the combined action of gamma radiation and static electric fields in human cells; Estudo da acao combinada de radiacao gama e campo eletrico estatico em celulas humanas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moron, Michelle Mendes

    2008-07-01

    The basic principle of radiotherapy is the one of maximizing damage to the tumor, while minimizing it in neighboring health tissues. Several strategies have been worked out aiming at increasing cellular radiosensitivity, and among them is the use of exogenous fields. Our goal in this work is the study in human cells of the effect resulting from the association of irradiation with exposure to exogenous static electric fields. The T47D cell line of breast cancer cells was irradiated with gammas in the 0 - 8 Gy doses range. The corresponding survival curve provided information on the radiosensitivity of this cell line. The rate of cell deaths per Gray in the 0 - 8 Gy range exhibited a maximum at 2 Gy, which corresponds to the most efficient irradiation dose. The viability of this T47D cells exposed to both gamma radiation and 1.250 V/cm static electric field (SEF) was about 12% lower than when only irradiated. The sole exposure of the cells to SEF by 24 and 72 hours didn't induce toxicity. Immunofluorescence runs carried out in irradiated normal MRC5 cell line of human lung fibroblast, without and with exposition to a SEF, have quantified the expression of the y- H2AX histone. The amount of phosphorylated histones was approximately 40% higher after irradiation with 2 Gy plus exposure to a SEF by 1 hour, showing that the electric field negatively interfered in the repairing process of the DNA double strand breaks. The flow cytometry analysis with FACS allowed the investigation of a possible interference of radiation and SEF in the cell distributions among the cellular cycle phases. It was found that in T47D cells treated with 1 and 2 Gy by 24 hours the SEF also negatively interfered in the DNA repairing process, as evidenced by the higher accumulation of cells in the S phase. Therefore, it would be possible to conclude that static and exogenous electric fields are able of negatively interfering in the cellular repair and, presumably, in DNA repair. (author)

  15. Assessing T-cell responses in anticancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escors, David; Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Schwarze, Julia; Dufait, Ines; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Lanna, Alessio; Arce, Frederick; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Kochan, Grazyna; Guerrero-Setas, David; Breckpot, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Since dendritic cells operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and hence are capable of jumpstarting the immune system, they have been exploited to develop a variety of immunotherapeutic regimens against cancer. In the few past years, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been shown to mediate robust immunosuppressive functions, thereby inhibiting tumor-targeting immune responses. Thus, we propose that the immunomodulatory activity of MDSCs should be carefully considered for the development of efficient anticancer immunotherapies. PMID:24244902

  16. Tissue specific heterogeneity in effector immune cell response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba eTufail

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Post pathogen invasion, migration of effector T-cell subsets to specific tissue locations is of prime importance for generation of robust immune response. Effector T cells are imprinted with distinct ‘homing codes’ (adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors during activation which regulate their targeted trafficking to specific tissues. Internal cues in the lymph node microenvironment along with external stimuli from food (vitamin A and sunlight (vitamin D3 prime dendritic cells, imprinting them to play centrestage in the induction of tissue tropism in effector T cells. B cells as well, in a manner similar to effector T cells, exhibit tissue tropic migration. In this review, we have focused on the factors regulating the generation and migration of effector T cells to various tissues alongwith giving an overview of tissue tropism in B cells.

  17. The STATs in cell stress-type responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Best James

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the early 1990's, a new cell signaling pathway was described. This new paradigm, now known as the JAK/STAT pathway, has been extensively investigated in immune-type cells in response to interferons and interleukins. However, recent evidence suggests that the JAK/STAT pathway also mediates diverse cellular responses to various forms of biological stress including hypoxia/reperfusion, endotoxin, ultraviolet light, and hyperosmolarity. The current literature describing the JAK/STAT pathway's role in cellular stress responses has been reviewed herein, but it is clear that our knowledge in this area is far from complete.

  18. CD4+ T cell responses in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasser Semmo; Paul Klenerman

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver damage, with virus-induced end-stage disease such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma resulting in a high rate of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Evidence that CD4+ T cell responses to HCV play an important role in the outcome of acute infection has been shown in several studies. However, the mechanisms behind viral persistence and the failure of CD4+ T cell responses to contain virus are poorly understood. During chronic HCV infection, HCV-specific CD4+ T cell responses are relatively weak or absent whereas in resolved infection these responses are vigorous and multispecific. Persons with a T-helper type Ⅰ profile, which promotes cellular effector mechanisms are thought to be more likely to experience viral clearance, but the overall role of these cells in the immunopathogenesis of chronic liver disease is not known. To define this, much more data is required on the function and specificity of virus-specific CD4+ T cells,especially in the early phases of acute disease and in the liver during chronic infection. The role and possible mechanisms of action of CD4+ T cell responses in determining the outcome of acute and chronic HCV infection will be discussed in this review.

  19. Incretin effect potentiates beta-cell responsivity to glucose as well as to its rate of change: OGTT and matched intravenous study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campioni, Marco; Toffolo, Gianna; Shuster, Lynne T; Service, F John; Rizza, Robert A; Cobelli, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to gain greater insight into the mechanism whereby "incretins" (greater insulinemia after oral than intravenous glucose) enhance insulin secretion. To do so, we use a model of C-peptide secretion to reanalyze data from a previously published study in which glycemic profiles observed following glucose ingestion were matched in the same 10 subjects by means of an intravenous glucose infusion. We report that incretins increase insulin secretion by enhancing both the dynamic (to the rate of increase of glucose) and static (to given glucose concentration) response with an increase of 58% for the static (Phi(s) = 16.4 +/- 1.8 vs. 24.6 +/- 2.0 10(-9) min(-1), P = 0.01) and 63% for the dynamic (Phi(d) = 278 +/- 32 vs. 463 +/- 86 10(-9), P = 0.02) indexes. Since increases in the dynamic response to glucose are believed to be due to an increase in the rate of docking, and exocytosis of insulin containing granules and increases in the static response to glucose are believed to be caused by a shift in the sensitivity of the beta-cell to glucose, these results suggest that incretins may modulate more than one step in the beta-cell insulin secretory cascade.

  20. Static analysis for blinding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer Rosenkilde; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2006-01-01

    operation blinding. In this paper we study the theoretical foundations for one of the successful approaches to validating cryptographic protocols and we extend it to handle the blinding primitive. Our static analysis approach is based on Flow Logic; this gives us a clean separation between the specification...... of the analysis and its realisation in an automatic tool. We concentrate on the former in the present paper and provide the semantic foundation for our analysis of protocols using blinding - also in the presence of malicious attackers....

  1. Static and dynamic stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tishin, A.M.; Spichkin, Yu.I.; Bohr, Jakob

    1999-01-01

    In this chapter we shall consider the properties of lanthanide metals, their alloys and compounds which can be studied using static and alternating mechanical stresses. The main attention will be paid to the effects related to magnetoelastic interactions. These interactions in magnetic materials...... to the appearance of anomalies in elastic constants, as well as to additional damping of sound oscillations in the lanthanide materials. The importance of understanding the nature of magnetoelastic interactions and related effects arises from the scientific desire to gather a better knowledge of magnetism, as well...

  2. Model Checking as Static Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Fuyuan

    Both model checking and static analysis are prominent approaches to detecting software errors. Model Checking is a successful formal method for verifying properties specified in temporal logics with respect to transition systems. Static analysis is also a powerful method for validating program...... properties which can predict safe approximations to program behaviors. In this thesis, we have developed several static analysis based techniques to solve model checking problems, aiming at showing the link between static analysis and model checking. We focus on logical approaches to static analysis......-calculus can be encoded as the intended model of SFP. Our research results have strengthened the link between model checking and static analysis. This provides a theoretical foundation for developing a unied tool for both model checking and static analysis techniques....

  3. Natural killer cells promote early CD8 T cell responses against cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott H Robbins

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms that help promote protective immune responses to pathogens is a major challenge in biomedical research and an important goal for the design of innovative therapeutic or vaccination strategies. While natural killer (NK cells can directly contribute to the control of viral replication, whether, and how, they may help orchestrate global antiviral defense is largely unknown. To address this question, we took advantage of the well-defined molecular interactions involved in the recognition of mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV by NK cells. By using congenic or mutant mice and wild-type versus genetically engineered viruses, we examined the consequences on antiviral CD8 T cell responses of specific defects in the ability of the NK cells to control MCMV. This system allowed us to demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that NK cells accelerate CD8 T cell responses against a viral infection in vivo. Moreover, we identify the underlying mechanism as the ability of NK cells to limit IFN-alpha/beta production to levels not immunosuppressive to the host. This is achieved through the early control of cytomegalovirus, which dramatically reduces the activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs for cytokine production, preserves the conventional dendritic cell (cDC compartment, and accelerates antiviral CD8 T cell responses. Conversely, exogenous IFN-alpha administration in resistant animals ablates cDCs and delays CD8 T cell activation in the face of NK cell control of viral replication. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the ability of NK cells to respond very early to cytomegalovirus infection critically contributes to balance the intensity of other innate immune responses, which dampens early immunopathology and promotes optimal initiation of antiviral CD8 T cell responses. Thus, the extent to which NK cell responses benefit the host goes beyond their direct antiviral effects and extends to the prevention of innate

  4. Prostate progenitor cells proliferate in response to castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Shi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Androgen-deprivation is a mainstay of therapy for advanced prostate cancer but tumor regression is usually incomplete and temporary because of androgen-independent cells in the tumor. It has been speculated that these tumor cells resemble the stem/progenitor cells of the normal prostate. The purpose of this study was to examine the response of slow-cycling progenitor cells in the adult mouse prostate to castration. Proliferating cells in the E16 urogenital sinus were pulse labeled by BrdU administration or by doxycycline-controlled labeling of the histone-H2B GFP mouse. A small population of labeled epithelial cells in the adult prostate localized at the junction of the prostatic ducts and urethra. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS showed that GFP label-retaining cells were enriched for cells co-expressing stem cell markers Sca-1, CD133, CD44 and CD117 (4- marker cells; 60-fold enrichment. FACS showed, additionally, that 4-marker cells were androgen receptor positive. Castration induced proliferation and dispersal of E16 labeled cells into more distal ductal segments. When naïve adult mice were administered BrdU daily for 2 weeks after castration, 16% of 4-marker cells exhibited BrdU label in contrast to only 6% of all epithelial cells (P < 0.01. In sham-castrated controls less than 4% of 4-marker cells were BrdU labeled (P < 0.01. The unexpected and admittedly counter-intuitive finding that castration induced progenitor cell proliferation suggests that androgen deprivation therapy in men with advanced prostate cancer could not only exert pleiotrophic effects on tumor sub-populations but may induce inadvertent expansion of tumor stem cells.

  5. Nanosecond electric pulses trigger actin responses in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghöfer, Thomas; Eing, Christian; Flickinger, Bianca; Hohenberger, Petra; Wegner, Lars H; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2009-09-25

    We have analyzed the cellular effects of nanosecond pulsed electrical fields on plant cells using fluorescently tagged marker lines in the tobacco cell line BY-2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy. We observe a disintegration of the cytoskeleton in the cell cortex, followed by contraction of actin filaments towards the nucleus, and disintegration of the nuclear envelope. These responses are accompanied by irreversible permeabilization of the plasma membrane manifest as uptake of Trypan Blue. By pretreatment with the actin-stabilizing drug phalloidin, the detachment of transvacuolar actin from the cell periphery can be suppressed, and this treatment can also suppress the irreversible perforation of the plasma membrane. We discuss these findings in terms of a model, where nanosecond pulsed electric fields trigger actin responses that are key events in the plant-specific form of programmed cell death.

  6. Mast cells and basophils in cutaneous immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, A; Kabashima, K

    2015-02-01

    Mast cells and basophils share some functions in common and are generally associated with T helper 2 (Th2) immune responses, but taking basophils as surrogate cells for mast cell research or vice versa for several decades is problematic. Thus far, their in vitro functions have been well studied, but their in vivo functions remained poorly understood. New research tools for their functional analysis in vivo have revealed previously unrecognized roles for mast cells and basophils in several skin disorders. Newly developed mast cell-deficient mice provided evidence that mast cells initiate contact hypersensitivity via activating dendritic cells. In addition, studies using basophil-deficient mice have revealed that basophils were responsible for cutaneous Th2 skewing to haptens and peptide antigens but not to protein antigens. Moreover, human basophils infiltrate different skin lesions and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of skin diseases ranging from atopic dermatitis to autoimmune diseases. In this review, we will discuss the recent advances related to mast cells and basophils in human and murine cutaneous immune responses.

  7. Radiation response of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and human pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Mohammad S; Stemig, Melissa E.; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hui, Susanta K.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human pluripotent stem cells are comparable with bone marrow-derived MSCs in their function and immunophenotype. The purpose of this exploratory study was comparative evaluation of the radiation responses of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow- (BMMSCs) and from human embryonic stem cells (hESMSCs). BMMSCs and hESMSCs were irradiated at 0 Gy (control) to 16 Gy using a linear accelerator commonly used for cancer treatment. Cells were harv...

  8. BRITER: a BMP responsive osteoblast reporter cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Swaroop Yadav

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BMP signaling pathway is critical for vertebrate development and tissue homeostasis. High-throughput molecular genetic screening may reveal novel players regulating BMP signaling response while chemical genetic screening of BMP signaling modifiers may have clinical significance. It is therefore important to generate a cell-based tool to execute such screens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have established a BMP responsive reporter cell line by stably integrating a BMP responsive dual luciferase reporter construct in the immortalized calvarial osteoblast cells isolated from tamoxifen inducible Bmp2; Bmp4 double conditional knockout mouse strain. This cell line, named BRITER (BMP Responsive Immortalized Reporter cell line, responds robustly, promptly and specifically to exogenously added BMP2 protein. The sensitivity to added BMP may be further increased by depleting the endogenous BMP2 and BMP4 proteins. CONCLUSION: As the dynamic range of the assay (for BMP responsiveness is very high for BRITER and as it responds specifically and promptly to exogenously added BMP2 protein, BRITER may be used effectively for chemical or molecular genetic screening for BMP signaling modifiers. Identification of novel molecular players capable of influencing BMP signaling pathway may have clinical significance.

  9. Proteome analysis of proliferative response of bystander cells adjacent to cells exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerashchenko, Bogdan I; Yamagata, Akira; Oofusa, Ken; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; de Toledo, Sonia M; Howell, Roger W

    2007-06-01

    Recently (Cytometry 2003, 56A, 71-80), we reported that direct cell-to-cell contact is required for stimulating proliferation of bystander rat liver cells (WB-F344) cocultured with irradiated cells, and neither functional gap junction intercellular communication nor long-range extracellular factors appear to be involved in this proliferative bystander response (PBR). The molecular basis for this response is unknown. Confluent monolayers of WB-F344 cells were exposed to 5-Gray (Gy) of gamma-rays. Irradiated cells were mixed with unirradiated cells and co-cultured for 24 h. Cells were harvested and protein expression was examined using 2-DE. Protein expression was also determined in cultures of unirradiated and 5-Gy irradiated cells. Proteins were identified by MS. Nucleophosmin (NPM)-1, a multifunctional nucleolar protein, was more highly expressed in bystander cells than in either unirradiated or 5-Gy irradiated cells. Enolase-alpha, a glycolytic enzyme, was present in acidic and basic variants in unirradiated cells. In bystander and 5-Gy irradiated cells, the basic variant was weakly expressed, whereas the acidic variant was overwhelmingly present. These data indicate that the presence of irradiated cells can affect NPM-1 and enolase-alpha in adjacent bystander cells. These proteins appear to participate in molecular events related to the PBR and suggest that this response may involve cellular defense, proliferation, and metabolism.

  10. Immunotherapeutic strategies targeting natural killer T cell responses in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shissler, Susannah C; Bollino, Dominique R; Tiper, Irina V; Bates, Joshua P; Derakhshandeh, Roshanak; Webb, Tonya J

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune system. NKT cells possess a classic αβ T cell receptor (TCR) that is able to recognize self and foreign glycolipid antigens presented by the nonclassical class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, CD1d. Type I NKT cells (referred to as invariant NKT cells) express a semi-invariant Vα14Jα18 TCR in mice and Vα24Jα18 TCR in humans. Type II NKT cells are CD1d-restricted T cells that express a more diverse set of TCR α chains. The two types of NKT cells often exert opposing effects especially in tumor immunity, where type II cells generally suppress tumor immunity while type I NKT cells can enhance anti-tumor immune responses. In this review, we focus on the role of NKT cells in cancer. We discuss their effector and suppressive functions, as well as describe preclinical and clinical studies utilizing therapeutic strategies focused on harnessing their potent anti-tumor effector functions, and conclude with a discussion on potential next steps for the utilization of NKT cell-targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer.

  11. Immunotherapeutic strategies targeting Natural killer T cell responses in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shissler, Susannah C.; Bollino, Dominique R.; Tiper, Irina V.; Bates, Joshua; Derakhshandeh, Roshanak; Webb, Tonya J.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune system. NKT cells possess a classic αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) that is able to recognize self and foreign glycolipid antigens presented by the nonclassical class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, CD1d. Type I NKT cells (referred to as invariant NKT cells) express a semi-invariant Vα14Jα18 TCR in mice and Vα24Jα18 TCR in humans. Type II NKT cells are CD1d-restricted T cells that express a more diverse set of TCR α chains. The two types of NKT cells often exert opposing effects especially in tumor immunity, where Type II cells generally suppress tumor immunity while Type I NKT cells can enhance antitumor immune responses. In this review, we focus on the role of NKT cells in cancer. We discuss their effector and suppressive functions, as well as describe preclinical and clinical studies utilizing therapeutic strategies focused on harnessing their potent anti-tumor effector functions, and conclude with a discussion on potential next steps for the utilization of NKT cell targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer. PMID:27393665

  12. Responsiveness of genes to manipulation of transcription factors in ES cells is associated with histone modifications and tissue specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In addition to determining static states of gene expression (high vs. low), it is important to characterize their dynamic status. For example, genes with H3K27me3 chromatin marks are not only suppressed but also poised for activation. However, the responsiveness of genes to perturbations has never been studied systematically. To distinguish gene responses to specific factors from responsiveness in general, it is necessary to analyze gene expression profiles of cells responding to a large variety of disturbances, and such databases did not exist before. Results We estimated the responsiveness of all genes in mouse ES cells using our recently published database on expression change after controlled induction of 53 transcription factors (TFs) and other genes. Responsive genes (N = 4746), which were readily upregulated or downregulated depending on the kind of perturbation, mostly have regulatory functions and a propensity to become tissue-specific upon differentiation. Tissue-specific expression was evaluated on the basis of published (GNF) and our new data for 15 organs and tissues. Non-responsive genes (N = 9562), which did not change their expression much following any perturbation, were enriched in housekeeping functions. We found that TF-responsiveness in ES cells is the best predictor known for tissue-specificity in gene expression. Among genes with CpG islands, high responsiveness is associated with H3K27me3 chromatin marks, and low responsiveness is associated with H3K36me3 chromatin, stronger tri-methylation of H3K4, binding of E2F1, and GABP binding motifs in promoters. Conclusions We thus propose the responsiveness of expression to perturbations as a new way to define the dynamic status of genes, which brings new insights into mechanisms of regulation of gene expression and tissue specificity. PMID:21306619

  13. Responsiveness of genes to manipulation of transcription factors in ES cells is associated with histone modifications and tissue specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Marshall

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to determining static states of gene expression (high vs. low, it is important to characterize their dynamic status. For example, genes with H3K27me3 chromatin marks are not only suppressed but also poised for activation. However, the responsiveness of genes to perturbations has never been studied systematically. To distinguish gene responses to specific factors from responsiveness in general, it is necessary to analyze gene expression profiles of cells responding to a large variety of disturbances, and such databases did not exist before. Results We estimated the responsiveness of all genes in mouse ES cells using our recently published database on expression change after controlled induction of 53 transcription factors (TFs and other genes. Responsive genes (N = 4746, which were readily upregulated or downregulated depending on the kind of perturbation, mostly have regulatory functions and a propensity to become tissue-specific upon differentiation. Tissue-specific expression was evaluated on the basis of published (GNF and our new data for 15 organs and tissues. Non-responsive genes (N = 9562, which did not change their expression much following any perturbation, were enriched in housekeeping functions. We found that TF-responsiveness in ES cells is the best predictor known for tissue-specificity in gene expression. Among genes with CpG islands, high responsiveness is associated with H3K27me3 chromatin marks, and low responsiveness is associated with H3K36me3 chromatin, stronger tri-methylation of H3K4, binding of E2F1, and GABP binding motifs in promoters. Conclusions We thus propose the responsiveness of expression to perturbations as a new way to define the dynamic status of genes, which brings new insights into mechanisms of regulation of gene expression and tissue specificity.

  14. Mineralization and Osteoblast Cells Response of Nanograde Pearl Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Chih Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to characterize the thermal, mineralization, and osteoblast cells response of pearl nanocrystallites. The results obtained from X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectra demonstrate that the pearl nano-crystallites can induce the formation of an HA layer on their surface in SBF, even after only short soaking periods. The in vitro cell response to nano-grade pearl powders is assessed by evaluating the cytotoxicity against a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line and by characterizing the attachment ability and alkaline phosphatase activity of mouse bone cells (MC3T3-E1, abbreviated to E1 and bone marrow stromal precursor (D1 cells. The cytotoxicities of pearls were tested by the filtration and culture of NIH-3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. The viability of the cultured cells in media containing pearl crystallites for 24 and 72 h is greater than 90%. The bone cells seen in these micrographs are elongated and align predominately along the pearl specimen. The cells observed in these images also appeared well attached and cover the surface almost completely after 1 h. The pearl nanocrystallites had a positive effect on the osteogenic ability of ALP activity, and this promoted the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs significantly at explanations.

  15. Stem cell responses to plasma surface modified electrospun polyurethane scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandén, Carl; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Padel, Thomas; Wittgenstein, Julia; Liu, Johan; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-07-01

    The topographical effects from functional materials on stem cell behavior are currently of interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here we investigate the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses. The plasma gases were found to induce three combinations of fiber surface functionalities and roughness textures. On randomly oriented fibers, plasma treatments lead to substantially increased hESC attachment and proliferation as compared to native fibers. Argon plasma was found to induce the most optimal combination of surface functionality and roughness for cell expansion. Contact guided migration of cells and alignment of cell processes were observed on aligned fibers. Neuronal differentiation around 5% was found for all samples and was not significantly affected by the induced variations of surface functional group distribution or individual fiber topography. In this study the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses is studied with the goal of clarifying the potential effects of functional materials on stem cell behavior, a topic of substantial interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomedical Applications of the Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. Depending on the configuration the cold plasma sources can be used in the following areas: wound healing, skin diseases, hospital hygiene, sterilization, antifungal treatments, dental care, cosmetics targeted cell/tissue removal, and cancer treatments. This dissertation is focused on the studies of biomedical applications of cold atmospheric plasma jet based on helium flow and resultant cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. The studies were carried out on extra-cellular and intra-cellular levels in vitro. The main practical applications are wound healing and alternative to existing cancer therapy methods, areas of great interest and significant challenges. The CAP jet was built in the Micropropulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory of Dr. Michael Keidar, as a part of multidisciplinary collaboration with the GW Medical School (Dr. M.A. Stepp) concerned with plasma medicine and bioengineering studies. Normal and cancer cells have two fundamental behavioral properties, proliferation and motility, which can be evaluated through cell migration rates and cell cycle progression. Various microscopic, spectroscopic and flow cytometry techniques were used to characterize cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. It was found that CAP effect on the cells is localized within the area of the treatment (of around ˜ 5mm in diameter). The migration rates of the normal skin cells can be reduced up to ˜ 40%. However, depending on the cell type the required treatment time is different, thus differential treatment of various cells presented in tissue is possible. The CAP effect on the migration was explained through the changes of the cell surface proteins/integrins. It was also found that normal and cancer cells respond differently to the CAP treatment under the same

  17. Metabolic monosaccharides altered cell responses to anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F

    2012-06-01

    Metabolic glycoengineering has been used to manipulate the glycochemistry of cell surfaces and thus the cell/cell interaction, cell adhesion, and cell migration. However, potential application of glycoengineering in pharmaceutical sciences has not been studied until recently. Here, we reported that Ac(4)ManNAc, an analog of N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc), could affect cell responses to anticancer drugs. Although cells from different tissues and organs responded to Ac(4)ManNAc treatment differently, treated cells with increased sialic acid contents showed dramatically reduced sensitivity (up to 130 times) to anti-cancer drugs as tested on various drugs with distinct chemical structures and acting mechanisms. Neither increased P-glycoprotein activity nor decreased drug uptake was observed during the course of Ac(4)ManNAc treatment. However, greatly altered intracellular drug distributions were observed. Most intracellular daunorubicin was found in the perinuclear region, but not the expected nuclei in the Ac(4)ManNAc treated cells. Since sialoglycoproteins and gangliosides were synthesized in the Golgi, intracellular glycans affected intracellular signal transduction and drug distributions seem to be the main reason for Ac(4)ManNAc affected cell sensitivity to anticancer drugs. It was interesting to find that although Ac(4)ManNAc treated breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) maintained the same sensitivity to 5-Fluorouracil, the IC(50) value of 5-Fluorouracil to the same Ac(4)ManNAc treated normal cells (MCF-10A) was increased by more than 20 times. Thus, this Ac(4)ManNAc treatment enlarged drug response difference between normal and tumor cells provides a unique opportunity to further improve the selectivity and therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs.

  18. T-cell responses to dengue virus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurane, Ichiro; Matsutani, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A

    2011-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Dengue virus infection induces specific CD4+CD8- and CD8+CD4- T cells in humans. In primary infection, T-cell responses to DENV are serotype cross-reactive, but the highest response is to the serotype that caused the infection. The epitopes recognized by DENV-specific T cells are located in most of the structural and non-structural proteins, but NS3 is the protein that is most dominantly recognized. In patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) caused by secondary DENV infection, T cells are highly activated in vivo. These highly activated T cells are DENV-specific and oligoclonal. Multiple kinds of lymphokines are produced by the activated T cells, and it has been hypothesized that these lymphokines are responsible for induction of plasma leakage, one of the most characteristic features of DHF. Thus, T-cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of DHF and in the recovery from DENV infection.

  19. Leptin Suppresses Mouse Taste Cell Responses to Sweet Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Kenshi; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ichiro; Margolskee, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is known to selectively suppress neural and behavioral responses to sweet-tasting compounds. However, the molecular basis for the effect of leptin on sweet taste is not known. Here, we report that leptin suppresses sweet taste via leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) and KATP channels expressed selectively in sweet-sensitive taste cells. Ob-Rb was more often expressed in taste cells that expressed T1R3 (a sweet receptor component) than in those that expressed glutamate-aspartate transporter (a marker for Type I taste cells) or GAD67 (a marker for Type III taste cells). Systemically administered leptin suppressed taste cell responses to sweet but not to bitter or sour compounds. This effect was blocked by a leptin antagonist and was absent in leptin receptor–deficient db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity. Blocking the KATP channel subunit sulfonylurea receptor 1, which was frequently coexpressed with Ob-Rb in T1R3-expressing taste cells, eliminated the effect of leptin on sweet taste. In contrast, activating the KATP channel with diazoxide mimicked the sweet-suppressing effect of leptin. These results indicate that leptin acts via Ob-Rb and KATP channels that are present in T1R3-expressing taste cells to selectively suppress their responses to sweet compounds. PMID:26116698

  20. Measuring T cell receptor and T cell gene expression diversity in antigen-responsive human CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Anne; Lindner, Annett; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; Wilhelm, Carmen; Dietz, Sevina; Catani, Mara; Ziegler, Anette-G; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2013-12-31

    T cells have diversity in TCR, epitope recognition, and cytokine production, and can be used for immune monitoring. Furthermore, clonal expansion of TCR families in disease may provide opportunities for TCR-directed therapies. We developed methodology for sequencing expressed genes of TCR alpha and beta chains from single cells and applied this to vaccine (tetanus-toxoid)-responsive CD4(+) T cells. TCR alpha and beta chains were both successfully sequenced in 1309 (43%) of 3038 CD4(+) T cells yielding 677 different receptors. TRAV and TRBV gene usage differed between tetanus-toxoid-responsive and non-responsive cells (p=0.004 and 0.0002), and there was extensive TCR diversity in tetanus-toxoid-responsive cells within individuals. Identical TCRs could be recovered in different samples from the same subject: TCRs identified after booster vaccination were frequent in pre-booster memory T cells (31% of pre-booster TCR), and also identified in pre-booster vaccination naïve cells (6.5%). No TCR was shared between subjects, but tetanus toxoid-responsive cells sharing one of their TCR chains were observed within and between subjects. Coupling single-cell gene expression profiling to TCR sequencing revealed examples of distinct cytokine profiles in cells bearing identical TCR. Novel molecular methodology demonstrates extensive diversity of Ag-responsive CD4(+) T cells within and between individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. B cells regulate CD4+ T cell responses to papain following B cell receptor-independent papain uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Daniel F; Woodruff, Matthew C; Carroll, Michael C; Austen, K Frank; Gurish, Michael F

    2014-07-15

    Papain, a cysteine protease allergen with inherent adjuvant activity, induces potent IL-4 expression by T cells in the popliteal lymph nodes of mice following footpad immunization. In this study, we identify a novel, non-BCR-mediated capacity for B cells to rapidly bind and internalize papain. B cells subsequently regulate the adaptive immune response by enhancing ICOS expression on CD4(+) T cells and amplifying Th2 and follicular helper T cell induction. Ab blockade of ICOS ligand, expressed by popliteal lymph node B cells, but not dendritic cells, at the peak of the response inhibits IL-4 responses in wild-type mice but not B cell-deficient mice. Thus, B cells play a critical role in amplifying adjuvant-dependent Th2 polarization following noncanonical acquisition and internalization of the cysteine protease papain.

  2. Quantum singularities in static and conformally static space-times

    CERN Document Server

    Konkowski, D A; 10.1142/S0217751X11054334

    2011-01-01

    The definition of quantum singularity is extended from static space-times to conformally static space-times. After the usual definitions of classical and quantum singularities are reviewed, examples of quantum singularities in static space-times are given. These include asymptotically power-law space-times, space-times with diverging higher-order differential invariants, and a space-time with a 2-sphere singularity. The theory behind quantum singularities in conformally static space-times is followed by an example, a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space-time with cosmic string. The paper concludes by discussing areas of future research.

  3. Studies on responsiveness of hepatoma cells to catecholamines. VI. Characteristics of adrenoceptors and adenylate cyclase response in rat ascites hepatoma cells and human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanae, F; Kohei, K; Nomura, M; Miyamoto, K

    1992-06-01

    Alpha 1, alpha 2- and beta-Adrenoceptor densities and catecholamine responsiveness in established hepatoma cells, rat ascites hepatoma AH13, AH66, AH66F, AH109A, AH130 and AH7974 cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma HLF and HepG2 cells, were compared with those in normal rat hepatocytes and Chang liver cells. Alpha 1-Adrenoceptor densities measured by [3H]prazosin bindings were not detected in all hepatoma cell lines. Alpha 2-Adrenoceptor densities measured by [3H]clonidine bindings were also barely detected in hepatoma cell lines except for AH130 cells and HepG2 cells. Regarding beta-adrenoceptor, AH109A, AH130 and AH7974 cells had much more [125I]iodocyanopindolol binding sites than normal rat hepatocytes, although we could not detect the binding in HepG2 cells. Adenylate cyclase of normal rat hepatocyte and Chang liver cells were stimulated by beta 2-adrenergic agonist salbutamol, while the cyclase in hepatoma cells had no beta 2-adrenergic response but a beta 1-type response. These findings indicate that the characteristics of adrenergic response in hepatoma cell lines is very different from that in normal hepatocytes, suggesting a participation in the hepatocarcinogenesis and/or the autonomous proliferation of hepatoma cells.

  4. Th17 effector cells support B cell responses outside of germinal centres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agapitos Patakas

    Full Text Available Th17 cells are pro-inflammatory CD4⁺T cells, which are important in immune responses against fungal pathogens and extracellular bacteria and have also been implicated in various autoimmune syndromes. However, their role in supporting B cell responses in these scenarios remains unclear, representing a significant lapse in our understanding of the role Th17 play in vaccine responses and the regulation of autoimmunity. We employed T cell and B cell receptor transgenic mice specific for model antigens, and adoptive transfer approaches that allowed the tracking of cognate B and T cells in situ and ex vivo using immunological methods. We have found that T cells activated under Th17 polarising conditions have a greater capacity to provide cognate B cell help compared with Th1 polarised populations, supporting higher expansion of antigen specific B cells and enhanced antibody titres. This advantage is associated with the increased persistence of Th17 polarised cells in areas of the lymph nodes where they can provide help (i.e. the B cell follicles. Also the Th17 cells are characterised by their higher expression of ICOS, a costimulatory molecule important for B cell help. Surprisingly, contrary to published reports, Th17 cells were not detected inside germinal centres, although they were found in close proximity to cognate B cells in the follicle early in the genesis of the humoral immune response. These data indicate that, Th17 cells have a more significant role earlier in the initiation/development of the germinal centre response and/or germinal centre-independent events, consistent with their early effector status.

  5. Increased proinflammatory responses from asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells in response to rhinovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Nicholas JC

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exacerbations of asthma are associated with viral respiratory tract infections, of which rhinoviruses (RV are the predominant virus type. Airway smooth muscle is important in asthma pathogenesis, however little is known about the potential interaction of RV and human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM. We hypothesised that rhinovirus induction of inflammatory cytokine release from airway smooth muscle is augmented and differentially regulated in asthmatic compared to normal HASM cells. Methods HASM cells, isolated from either asthmatic or non-asthmatic subjects, were infected with rhinovirus. Cytokine production was assayed by ELISA, ICAM-1 cell surface expression was assessed by FACS, and the transcription regulation of IL-6 was measured by luciferase activity. Results RV-induced IL-6 release was significantly greater in HASM cells derived from asthmatic subjects compared to non-asthmatic subjects. This response was RV specific, as 5% serum- induced IL-6 release was not different in the two cell types. Whilst serum stimulated IL-8 production in cells from both subject groups, RV induced IL-8 production in only asthmatic derived HASM cells. The transcriptional induction of IL-6 was differentially regulated via C/EBP in the asthmatic and NF-κB + AP-1 in the non-asthmatic HASM cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates augmentation and differential transcriptional regulation of RV specific innate immune response in HASM cells derived from asthmatic and non-asthmatics, and may give valuable insight into the mechanisms of RV-induced asthma exacerbations.

  6. Static intervortex forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speight, J. M.

    1997-03-01

    A point particle approximation to the classical dynamics of well-separated vortices of the Abelian Higgs model is developed. A static vortex is asymptotically identical to a solution of the linearized field theory (a Klein-Gordon-Proca theory) in the presence of a singular point source at the vortex center. It is shown that this source is a composite scalar monopole and magnetic dipole, and the respective charges are determined numerically for various values of the coupling constant. The interaction potential of two well-separated vortices is computed by calculating the interaction Lagrangian of two such point sources in the linear theory. The potential is used to model type II vortex scattering.

  7. Macrophages in cardiac homeostasis, injury responses and progenitor cell mobilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Pinto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an immune cell type found in every organ of the body. Classically, macrophages are recognised as housekeeping cells involved in the detection of foreign antigens and danger signatures, and the clearance of tissue debris. However, macrophages are increasingly recognised as a highly versatile cell type with a diverse range of functions that are important for tissue homeostasis and injury responses. Recent research findings suggest that macrophages contribute to tissue regeneration and may play a role in the activation and mobilisation of stem cells. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the role played by macrophages in cardiac tissue maintenance and repair following injury. We examine the involvement of exogenous and resident tissue macrophages in cardiac inflammatory responses and their potential activity in regulating cardiac regeneration.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide is essential for Schwann cell responses to peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byung Sun; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Rhyu, Im Joo; Park, Chan; Yeo, Seung Geun; Huh, Youngbuhm; Jeong, Na Young; Jung, Junyang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) functions as a physiological gas transmitter in both normal and pathophysiological cellular events. H2 S is produced from substances by three enzymes: cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MST). In human tissues, these enzymes are involved in tissue-specific biochemical pathways for H2 S production. For example, CBS and cysteine aminotransferase/MST are present in the brain, but CSE is not. Thus, we examined the expression of H2 S production-related enzymes in peripheral nerves. Here, we found that CSE and MST/cysteine aminotransferase, but not CBS, were present in normal peripheral nerves. In addition, injured sciatic nerves in vivo up-regulated CSE in Schwann cells during Wallerian degeneration (WD); however, CSE was not up-regulated in peripheral axons. Using an ex vivo sciatic nerve explant culture, we found that the inhibition of H2 S production broadly prevented the process of nerve degeneration, including myelin fragmentation, axonal degradation, Schwann cell dedifferentiation, and Schwann cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Thus, these results indicate that H2 S signaling is essential for Schwann cell responses to peripheral nerve injury. Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) functions as a physiological gas transmitter in both normal and pathophysiological cellular events. H2 S is produced from cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfur transferase (MST). Here, we found that CSE and MST/CAT were present in normal peripheral nerves. Injured static nerves in vivo up-regulated CSE in Schwann cells during Wallerian degeneration, but CSE was not up-regulated in peripheral axons.

  9. Ultraviolet responses of a heterojunction Si quantum dot solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Hyun; Kwak, Gyea Young; Hong, Songwoung; Kim, Chanhong; Kim, Sung; Kim, Ansoon; Kim, Kyung Joong

    2017-01-20

    We investigated the ultraviolet (UV) responses of a heterojunction Si quantum dot (QD) solar cell consisting of p-type Si-QDs fabricated on a n-type crystalline Si (p-Si-QD/n-c-Si HJSC). The UV responses were compared with a conventional n-type crystalline Si solar cell (n-c-Si SC). The external and internal quantum efficiency results of the p-Si-QD/n-c-Si HJSC exhibited a clear enhancement in the UV responses (300-400 nm), which was not observed in the n-c-Si SC. Based on the results of the cell reflectance and bias-dependent responses, we expect that almost all UV responses occur in the p-Si-QD layer, and the generated carriers can be transported via the Si-QD layer due to the formation of a sufficient electric filed. As a result, a high power conversion efficiency of 14.5% was achieved from the p-Si-QD/n-c-Si HJSC. By reducing the thickness of the n-Si substrate from 650 μm to 300 μm, more enhanced power conversion efficiency of 14.8% was obtained which is the highest value among the reported Si-QD based solar cells to date.

  10. Ultraviolet responses of a heterojunction Si quantum dot solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Hyun; Kwak, Gyea Young; Hong, Songwoung; Kim, Chanhong; Kim, Sung; Kim, Ansoon; Kim, Kyung Joong

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the ultraviolet (UV) responses of a heterojunction Si quantum dot (QD) solar cell consisting of p-type Si-QDs fabricated on a n-type crystalline Si (p-Si-QD/n-c-Si HJSC). The UV responses were compared with a conventional n-type crystalline Si solar cell (n-c-Si SC). The external and internal quantum efficiency results of the p-Si-QD/n-c-Si HJSC exhibited a clear enhancement in the UV responses (300–400 nm), which was not observed in the n-c-Si SC. Based on the results of the cell reflectance and bias-dependent responses, we expect that almost all UV responses occur in the p-Si-QD layer, and the generated carriers can be transported via the Si-QD layer due to the formation of a sufficient electric filed. As a result, a high power conversion efficiency of 14.5% was achieved from the p-Si-QD/n-c-Si HJSC. By reducing the thickness of the n-Si substrate from 650 μm to 300 μm, more enhanced power conversion efficiency of 14.8% was obtained which is the highest value among the reported Si-QD based solar cells to date.

  11. The Inflammation Response to DEHP through PPARγ in Endometrial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiansheng Huang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown the possible link between phthalates and endometrium-related gynecological diseases, however the molecular mechanism(s behind this is/are still unclear. In the study, both primary cultured endometrial cells and an endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line (Ishikawa were recruited to investigate the effects of di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP at human-relevant concentrations. The results showed that DEHP did not affect the viability of either type of cell, which showed different responses to inflammation. Primary cultured cells showed stronger inflammatory reactions than the Ishikawa cell line. The expression of inflammatory factors was induced both at the mRNA and protein levels, however the inflammation did not induce the progress of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT as the protein levels of EMT markers were not affected after exposure to either cell type. Further study showed that the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ wereup-regulated after exposure. In all, our study showed that human-relevant concentrations of DEHP could elicit the inflammatory response in primary cultured endometrial cells rather than in Ishikawa cell line. PPARγ may act as the mediating receptor in the inflammation reaction.

  12. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in

  13. Bystander T cells in human immune responses to dengue antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwannasaen Duangchan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of T cell activation in dengue infection have focused on restriction of specific T cell receptors (TCRs and classical MHC molecules. However, bystander T cell activation, which is TCR independent, occurs via cytokines in other viral infections, both in vitro and in vivo, and enables T cells to bypass certain control checkpoints. Moreover, clinical and pathological evidence has pointed to cytokines as the mediators of dengue disease severity. Therefore, we investigated bystander T cell induction by dengue viral antigen. Results Whole blood samples from 55 Thai schoolchildren aged 13-14 years were assayed for in vitro interferon-gamma (IFN-γ induction in response to inactivated dengue serotype 2 antigen (Den2. The contribution of TCR-dependent and independent pathways was tested by treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA, which inhibits TCR-dependent activation of T cells. ELISA results revealed that approximately 72% of IFN-γ production occurred via the TCR-dependent pathway. The major IFN-γ sources were natural killer (NK (mean ± SE = 55.2 ± 3.3, CD4+T (24.5 ± 3.3 and CD8+T cells (17.9 ± 1.5, respectively, as demonstrated by four-color flow cytometry. Interestingly, in addition to these cells, we found CsA-resistant IFN-γ producing T cells (CD4+T = 26.9 ± 3.6% and CD8+T = 20.3 ± 2.1% implying the existence of activated bystander T cells in response to dengue antigen in vitro. These bystander CD4+ and CD8+T cells had similar kinetics to NK cells, appeared after 12 h and were inhibited by anti-IL-12 neutralization indicating cytokine involvement. Conclusions This study described immune cell profiles and highlighted bystander T cell activation in response to dengue viral antigens of healthy people in an endemic area. Further studies on bystander T cell activation in dengue viral infection may reveal the immune mechanisms that protect or enhance pathogenesis of secondary dengue infection.

  14. Cell response of anodized nanotubes on titanium and titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagar, Sepideh; Wang, James; Berndt, Christopher C; Ivanova, Elena P; Wen, Cuie

    2013-09-01

    Titanium and titanium alloy implants that have been demonstrated to be more biocompatible than other metallic implant materials, such as Co-Cr alloys and stainless steels, must also be accepted by bone cells, bonding with and growing on them to prevent loosening. Highly ordered nanoporous arrays of titanium dioxide that form on titanium surface by anodic oxidation are receiving increasing research interest due to their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. The response of bone cells to implant materials depends on the topography, physicochemistry, mechanics, and electronics of the implant surface and this influences cell behavior, such as adhesion, proliferation, shape, migration, survival, and differentiation; for example the existing anions on the surface of a titanium implant make it negative and this affects the interaction with negative fibronectin (FN). Although optimal nanosize of reproducible titania nanotubes has not been reported due to different protocols used in studies, cell response was more sensitive to titania nanotubes with nanometer diameter and interspace. By annealing, amorphous TiO2 nanotubes change to a crystalline form and become more hydrophilic, resulting in an encouraging effect on cell behavior. The crystalline size and thickness of the bone-like apatite that forms on the titania nanotubes after implantation are also affected by the diameter and shape. This review describes how changes in nanotube morphologies, such as the tube diameter, the thickness of the nanotube layer, and the crystalline structure, influence the response of cells.

  15. Mechanistic insights into aging, cell cycle progression, and stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Anthony Alan Harkness

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The longevity of an organism depends on the health of its cells. Throughout life cells are exposed to numerous intrinsic and extrinsic stresses, such as free radicals, generated through mitochondrial electron transport, and ultraviolet irradiation. The cell has evolved numerous mechanisms to scavenge free radicals and repair damage induced by these insults. One mechanism employed by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to combat stress utilizes the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC, an essential multi-subunit ubiquitin-protein ligase structurally and functionally conserved from yeast to humans that controls progression through mitosis and G1. We have observed that yeast cells expressing compromised APC subunits are sensitive to multiple stresses and have shorter replicative and chronological lifespans. In a pathway that runs parallel to that regulated by the APC, members of the Forkhead box (Fox transcription factor family also regulate stress responses. The yeast Fox orthologues Fkh1 and Fkh2 appear to drive the transcription of stress response factors and slow early G1 progression, while the APC seems to regulate chromatin structure, chromosome segregation, and resetting of the transcriptome in early G1. In contrast, under non-stress conditions, the Fkhs play a complex role in cell cycle progression, partially through activation of the APC. Direct and indirect interactions between the APC and the yeast Fkhs appear to be pivotal for lifespan determination. Here we explore the potential for these interactions to be evolutionarily conserved as a mechanism to balance cell cycle regulation with stress responses.

  16. Simulation of the mechanical response of cells on micropost substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, William; Pathak, Amit; Deshpande, Vikram S; McMeeking, Robert M; McGarry, J Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Experimental studies where cells are seeded on micropost arrays in order to quantify their contractile behavior are becoming increasingly common. Interpretation of the data generated by this experimental technique is difficult, due to the complexity of the processes underlying cellular contractility and mechanotransduction. In the current study, a coupled framework that considers strain rate dependent contractility and remodeling of the cytoskeleton is used in tandem with a thermodynamic model of tension dependent focal adhesion formation to investigate the biomechanical response of cells adhered to micropost arrays. Computational investigations of the following experimental studies are presented: cell behavior on different sized arrays with a range of post stiffness; stress fiber and focal adhesion formation in irregularly shaped cells; the response of cells to deformations applied locally to individual posts; and the response of cells to equibiaxial stretching of micropost arrays. The predicted stress fiber and focal adhesion distributions; in addition to the predicted post tractions are quantitatively and qualitatively supported by previously published experimental data. The computational models presented in this study thus provide a framework for the design and interpretation of experimental micropost studies.

  17. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyacinthe Le Gall

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic, transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  18. Innate lymphoid cells regulate CD4+ T-cell responses to intestinal commensal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Matthew R; Monticelli, Laurel A; Fung, Thomas C; Ziegler, Carly G K; Grunberg, Stephanie; Sinha, Rohini; Mantegazza, Adriana R; Ma, Hak-Ling; Crawford, Alison; Angelosanto, Jill M; Wherry, E John; Koni, Pandelakis A; Bushman, Frederic D; Elson, Charles O; Eberl, Gérard; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2013-06-06

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently characterized family of immune cells that have critical roles in cytokine-mediated regulation of intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity. Alterations in ILC responses are associated with multiple chronic human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, implicating a role for ILCs in disease pathogenesis. Owing to an inability to target ILCs selectively, experimental studies assessing ILC function have predominantly used mice lacking adaptive immune cells. However, in lymphocyte-sufficient hosts ILCs are vastly outnumbered by CD4(+) T cells, which express similar profiles of effector cytokines. Therefore, the function of ILCs in the presence of adaptive immunity and their potential to influence adaptive immune cell responses remain unknown. To test this, we used genetic or antibody-mediated depletion strategies to target murine ILCs in the presence of an adaptive immune system. We show that loss of retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptor-γt-positive (RORγt(+)) ILCs was associated with dysregulated adaptive immune cell responses against commensal bacteria and low-grade systemic inflammation. Remarkably, ILC-mediated regulation of adaptive immune cells occurred independently of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22 or IL-23. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and functional analyses revealed that RORγt(+) ILCs express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and can process and present antigen. However, rather than inducing T-cell proliferation, ILCs acted to limit commensal bacteria-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses. Consistent with this, selective deletion of MHCII in murine RORγt(+) ILCs resulted in dysregulated commensal bacteria-dependent CD4(+) T-cell responses that promoted spontaneous intestinal inflammation. These data identify that ILCs maintain intestinal homeostasis through MHCII-dependent interactions with CD4(+) T cells that limit pathological adaptive immune cell responses to commensal

  19. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLESIA O. GRYGORIEVA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Grygorieva OO, Berezovsjka MA, Dacenko OI. 2015. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 38-42. Two cultures of Chlamydomonas actinochloris Deason et Bold in the lag-phase were exposed to the microwave irradiation. One of them (culture 1 was not treated beforehand, whereas the other (culture 2 was irradiated by microwaves 2 years earlier. The measurement of cell quantity as well as measurement of change of intensities and spectra of cultures photoluminescence (PL in the range of chlorophyll a emission was regularly conducted during the cell cultures development. Cell concentration of culture 1 exposed to the microwave irradiation for the first time has quickly restored while cell concentration of culture 2 which was irradiated repeatedly has fallen significantly. The following increasing of cell concentration of culture 2 is negligible. Cell concentration reaches the steady-state level that is about a half of the cell concentration of control culture. Initially the PL efficiency of cells of both cultures decreases noticeable as a result of irradiation. Then there is the monotonic increase to the values which are significantly higher than the corresponding values in the control cultures. The ratio of the intensities at the maxima of the main emission bands of chlorophyll for control samples of both cultures remained approximately at the same level. At the same time effect of irradiation on the cell PL spectrum appears as a temporary reduction of this magnitude.

  20. Biomechanical changes in endothelial cells result from an inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkus, Janina; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    During periods of infection and disease, the immune system induces the release of TNF-α, an inflammatory cytokine, from a variety of cell types, such as macrophages. TNF-α, while circulating in the vasculature, binds to the apical surface of endothelial cells and causes a wide range of biological and mechanical changes to the endothelium. While the biological changes have been widely studied, the biomechanical aspects have been largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the biomechanical changes of the endothelium as a function of TNF-α treatment. First, we studied the traction forces applied by the endothelium, an effect that is much less studied than others. Through the use of traction force microscopy, we found that TNF-α causes an increase in traction forces applied by the endothelial cells as compared to non-treated cells. Then, we investigated cell morphology, cell mechanics, migration, and cytoskeletal dynamics. We found that in addition to increasing applied traction forces, TNF-α causes an increase in cell area and aspect ratio on average, as well as a shift in the organization of F-actin filaments within the cell. Combining these findings together, our results show that an inflammatory response heavily impacts the morphology, cell mechanics, migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, and applied traction forces of endothelial cells.

  1. The roles of titanium surface micro/nanotopography and wettability on the differential response of human osteoblast lineage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittens, Rolando A; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Cheng, Alice; Anderson, David M; McLachlan, Taylor; Stephan, Ingrid; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen; Sandhage, Kenneth H; Fedorov, Andrei G; Rupp, Frank; Boyan, Barbara D; Tannenbaum, Rina; Schwartz, Zvi

    2013-04-01

    Surface micro- and nanostructural modifications of dental and orthopedic implants have shown promising in vitro, in vivo and clinical results. Surface wettability has also been suggested to play an important role in osteoblast differentiation and osseointegration. However, the available techniques to measure surface wettability are not reliable on clinically relevant, rough surfaces. Furthermore, how the differentiation state of osteoblast lineage cells impacts their response to micro/nanostructured surfaces, and the role of wettability on this response, remain unclear. In the current study, surface wettability analyses (optical sessile drop analysis, environmental scanning electron microscopic analysis and the Wilhelmy technique) indicated hydrophobic static responses for deposited water droplets on microrough and micro/nanostructured specimens, while hydrophilic responses were observed with dynamic analyses of micro/nanostructured specimens. The maturation and local factor production of human immature osteoblast-like MG63 cells was synergistically influenced by nanostructures superimposed onto microrough titanium (Ti) surfaces. In contrast, human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on micro/nanostructured surfaces in the absence of exogenous soluble factors exhibited less robust osteoblastic differentiation and local factor production compared to cultures on unmodified microroughened Ti. Our results support previous observations using Ti6Al4V surfaces showing that recognition of surface nanostructures and subsequent cell response is dependent on the differentiation state of osteoblast lineage cells. The results also indicate that this effect may be partly modulated by surface wettability. These findings support the conclusion that the successful osseointegration of an implant depends on contributions from osteoblast lineage cells at different stages of osteoblast commitment.

  2. An Arabidopsis kinase cascade influences auxin-responsive cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Tara A; Frick, Elizabeth M; Strader, Lucia C

    2017-10-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades are conserved mechanisms of signal transduction across eukaryotes. Despite the importance of MPK proteins in signaling events, specific roles for many Arabidopsis MPK proteins remain unknown. Multiple studies have suggested roles for MPK signaling in a variety of auxin-related processes. To identify MPK proteins with roles in auxin response, we screened mpk insertional alleles and identified mpk1-1 as a mutant that displays hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays. Further, mutants defective in the upstream MAP kinase kinase MKK3 also display hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays, suggesting that this MPK cascade affects auxin-influenced cell expansion. We found that MPK1 interacts with and phosphorylates ROP BINDING PROTEIN KINASE 1 (RBK1), a protein kinase that interacts with members of the Rho-like GTPases from Plants (ROP) small GTPase family. Similar to mpk1-1 and mkk3-1 mutants, rbk1 insertional mutants display auxin hypersensitivity, consistent with a possible role for RBK1 downstream of MPK1 in influencing auxin-responsive cell expansion. We found that RBK1 directly phosphorylates ROP4 and ROP6, supporting the possibility that RBK1 effects on auxin-responsive cell expansion are mediated through phosphorylation-dependent modulation of ROP activity. Our data suggest a MKK3 • MPK1 • RBK1 phosphorylation cascade that may provide a dynamic module for altering cell expansion. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Responses of cells in plasma-activated medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma consists of electrons, ions, radicals, and lights, and produces various reactive species in gas and liquid phase. Cells receive various inputs from their circumstances, and induce several physiological outputs. Our goal is to clarify the relationships between plasma inputs and physiological outputs. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) is a circumstance that plasma provides cells and our previous studies suggest that PAM is a promising tool for cancer therapy. However, the mode of actions remains to be elucidated. We propose survival and proliferation signaling networks as well as redox signaling networks are key factors to understand cellular responses of PAM-treated glioblastoma cells.

  4. Sialosyl-fucosyl Poly-LacNAc without the sialosyl-Lex epitope as the physiological myeloid cell ligand in E-selectin-dependent adhesion: studies under static and dynamic flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, K; Stroud, M R; Hakomori, S

    1997-10-14

    The majority of E- and P-selectin ligands in leukocytes and myelocytic or monocytic leukemia cells are carried by transmembrane glycoproteins having a tandem repeat mucin-like domain through which O-linked carbohydrate ligands are carried. However, determination of structure and adhesive function of carbohydrates in glycoproteins is extremely difficult because of the extensive structural heterogeneity and the scarcity of material for functional analysis. We have overcome this difficulty through use of poly-LacNAc gangliosides isolated from a large quantity of ( approximately 1.2 L packed) HL60 cells [Stroud, M. R., Handa, K., Salyan, M. E. K., Ito, K., Levery, S. B., Hakomori, S., Reinhold, B. B., & Reinhold, V. N. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 758-769, 770-778]. We identified two major types of poly-LacNAc gangliosides without the sialosyl-Lex epitope as being capable of binding to E-selectin: (i) those having a single alpha1-->3 fucosylation at internal GlcNAcs but not at the penultimate GlcNAc and (ii) those having double alpha1-->3 fucosylation at internal GlcNAcs, excluding the penultimate GlcNAc. Gangliosides from group i above did not show any adhesion under static conditions, but showed strong adhesion under dynamic flow conditions. Gangliosides from group ii above showed adhesion under both static and dynamic conditions, as did sialosyl-Lex (SLex)-containing structures in previous studies. However, SLex-containing poly-LacNAc gangliosides are virtually absent or present in only trace quantities in leukocytes and HL60 cells. Poly-LacNAc gangliosides from groups i and ii above, lacking SLex structure, are the major membrane components of leukocytes and HL60 cells. These carbohydrates, bound to lipid or to protein, may therefore be the physiological epitope for E-selectin-dependent binding of these cells, particularly under dynamic flow conditions.

  5. Model of cell response to {\\alpha}-particle radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Longjian

    2012-01-01

    Starting from a general equation for organism (or cell system) growth and attributing additional cell death rate (besides the natural rate) to therapy, we derive an equation for cell response to {\\alpha} radiation. Different from previous models that are based on statistical theory, the present model connects the consequence of radiation with the growth process of a biosystem and each variable or parameter has meaning regarding the cell evolving process. We apply this equation to model the dose response for {\\alpha}-particle radiation. It interprets the results of both high and low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. When LET is high, the additional death rate is a constant, which implies that the localized cells are damaged immediately and the additional death rate is proportional to the number of cells present. While at low LET, the additional death rate includes a constant term and a linear term of radiation dose, implying that the damage to some cell nuclei has a time accumulating effect. This model ...

  6. Inferring Toxicological Responses of HepG2 Cells from ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the dynamic perturbation of cell states by chemicals can aid in for predicting their adverse effects. High-content imaging (HCI) was used to measure the state of HepG2 cells over three time points (1, 24, and 72 h) in response to 976 ToxCast chemicals for 10 different concentrations (0.39-200µM). Cell state was characterized by p53 activation (p53), c-Jun activation (SK), phospho-Histone H2A.x (OS), phospho-Histone H3 (MA), alpha tubulin (Mt), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), mitochondrial mass (MM), cell cycle arrest (CCA), nuclear size (NS) and cell number (CN). Dynamic cell state perturbations due to each chemical concentration were utilized to infer coarse-grained dependencies between cellular functions as Boolean networks (BNs). BNs were inferred from data in two steps. First, the data for each state variable were discretized into changed/active (> 1 standard deviation), and unchanged/inactive values. Second, the discretized data were used to learn Boolean relationships between variables. In our case, a BN is a wiring diagram between nodes that represent 10 previously described observable phenotypes. Functional relationships between nodes were represented as Boolean functions. We found that inferred BN show that HepG2 cell response is chemical and concentration specific. We observed presence of both point and cycle BN attractors. In addition, there are instances where Boolean functions were not found. We believe that this may be either

  7. Regulation of germinal center responses, memory B cells and plasma cell formation-an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Lynn M; Tarlinton, David M

    2016-04-01

    Progress in understanding humoral immunity has been accelerated by the powerful experimental approaches of genetics, genomics and imaging. Excellent reviews of these advances appeared in 2015 in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the discovery of B cell and T cell lineages in the chicken. Here we provide a contemporary model of B cell differentiation, highlighting recent publications illuminating germinal center (GC), memory B cell and antibody-secreting plasma cell biology. The important contributions of CD4T cells to antibody responses have been thoroughly reviewed elsewhere.

  8. Investigation on the Cyclic Response of Superelastic Shape Memory Alloy (SMA Slit Damper Devices Simulated by Quasi-Static Finite Element (FE Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Wan Hu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA slit damper system as an alternative design approach for steel structures is intended to be evaluated with respect to inelastic behavior simulated by refined finite element (FE analyses. Although the steel slit dampers conventionally used for aseismic design are able to dissipate a considerable amount of energy generated by the plastic yielding of the base materials, large permanent deformation may occur in the entire structure. After strong seismic events, extra damage repair costs are required to restore the original configuration and to replace defective devices with new ones. Innovative slit dampers fabricated by superelastic SMAs that automatically recover their initial conditions only by the removal of stresses without heat treatment are introduced with a view toward mitigating the problem of permanent deformation. The cyclically tested FE models are calibrated to experimental results for the purpose of predicting accurate behavior. This study also focuses on the material constitutive model that is able to reproduce the inherent behavior of superelastic SMA materials by taking phase transformation between austenite and martensite into consideration. The responses of SMA slit dampers are compared to those of steel slit dampers. Axial stress and strain components are also investigated on the FE models under cyclic loading in an effort to validate the adequacy of FE modeling and then to compare between two slit damper systems. It can be shown that SMA slit dampers exhibit many structural advantages in terms of ultimate strength, moderate energy dissipation and recentering capability.

  9. Nuclear responses to depletion of mitochondrial DNA in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K; Neufer, P D; Williams, R S

    1995-11-01

    The derivation of human cell lines devoid of mitochondrial (mt) DNA (rho 0) provides an opportunity to study nuclear responses to a chronic impairment of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Expression of several nuclear genes is induced in human rho 0 cells, including those encoding integral proteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane, intermediate filaments, and ribosomes. In contrast to conditions in which mitochondrial respiration is altered acutely, expression of heat shock proteins and immediate early genes is not induced. Mitochondria from rho 0 cells maintain a transmembrane electrochemical potential and are distributed within the cytoplasm of these cells in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells. We conclude that a chronic deficiency of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation produced by elimination of mtDNA is associated with a different pattern of gene induction than that provoked by other acute or subacute conditions that impair mitochondrial respiration or create energy demands in excess of mitochondrial respiratory capacity.

  10. Biomaterial nanotopography-mediated cell responses: experiment and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of fabrication and processing technologies in the past two decades has enabled researchers to introduce nanoscale features into materials which, interestingly, have been shown to greatly regulate the behavior and fate of biological cells. In particular, important cell responses (such as adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and filopodial growth have all been correlated with material nanotopography. Given its great potential, intensive efforts have been made, both experimentally and theoretically, to understand why and how cells respond to nanoscale surface features, and this article reviews recent progress in this field. Specifically, a brief overview on the fabrication and modification techniques to create nanotopography on different materials is given first. After that, a summary of important experimental findings on the mediation of nanoscale surface topography on the behavior of various cells, as well as the underlying mechanism, is provided. Finally, both classical and recently developed approaches for modeling nanotopography-mediated cell adhesion and filopodial growth are reviewed.

  11. Responses of Cancer Cells Induced by Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Kushibiki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT involves the administration of a photosensitizer, followed by local irradiation of tumor tissues using a laser of an appropriate wavelength to activate the photosensitizer. Since multiple cellular signaling cascades are concomitantly activated in cancer cells exposed to the photodynamic effect, understanding the responses of cancer cells to PDT will aid in the development of new interventions. This review describes the possible cell-death signaling pathways initiated by PDT. In addition, we describe our latest findings regarding the induction of expression of miRNAs specific to apoptosis in cancer cells and the induction of antitumor immunity following PDT against cancer cells. A more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms related to PDT will potentially improve long-term survival of PDT treated patients.

  12. Directional Cell Migration in Response to Repeated Substratum Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okimura, Chika; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Crawling migration plays an essential role in a variety of biological phenomena, including development, wound healing, and immune system function. Migration properties such as anterior-posterior polarity, directionality, and velocity are regulated not only by the reception of a chemoattractant but also by sensing mechanical inputs from the external environment. In this review, we describe the mechanical response of migrating cells, particularly under repeated stretching of the elastic substratum, highlighting the fact that there appear to be two independent mechanosensing systems that generate the polarity needed for migration. Cells that have no stress fibers, such as Dictyostelium cells and neutrophil-like differentiated HL-60 cells, migrate perpendicular to the stretching direction via myosin II localization. Cells that do possess stress fibers, however, such as fish keratocytes, migrate parallel to the stretching via a stress-fiber-dependent process.

  13. Mechanical Response of Single Plant Cells to Cell Poking: A Numerical Simulation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Wang; Qun-Ying Jiao; De-Qiang Wei

    2006-01-01

    Cell poking is an experimental technique that is widely used to study the mechanical properties of plant cells. A full understanding of the mechanical responses of plant cells to poking force is helpful for experimental work. The aim of this study was to numerically investigate the stress distribution of the cell wall,cell turgor, and deformation of plant cells in response to applied poking force. Furthermore, the locations damaged during poking were analyzed. The model simulates cell poking, with the cell treated as a spherical,homogeneous, isotropic elastic membrane, filled with incompressible, highly viscous liquid. Equilibrium equations for the contact region and the non-contact regions were determined by using membrane theory.The boundary conditions and continuity conditions for the solution of the problem were found. The forcedeformation curve, turgor pressure and tension of the cell wall under cell poking conditions were obtained.The tension of the cell wall circumference was larger than that of the meridian. In general, maximal stress occurred at the equator around. When cell deformation increased to a certain level, the tension at the poker tip exceeded that of the equator. Breakage of the cell wall may start from the equator or the poker tip,depending on the deformation. A nonlinear model is suitable for estimating turgor, stress, and stiffness,and numerical simulation is a powerful method for determining plant cell mechanical properties.

  14. Exposure to static magnetic fields increases insulin secretion in rat INS-1 cells by activating the transcription of the insulin gene and up-regulating the expression of vesicle-secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Libin; Wang, Huiqin; Ma, Fenghui; Guo, Zhixia; He, Hongpeng; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nan

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of static magnetic fields (SMFs) on insulin secretion and explore the mechanisms underlying exposure to SMF-induced insulin secretion in rat insulinoma INS-1 cells. INS-1 cells were exposed to a 400 mT SMF for 72 h, and the proliferation of INS-1 cells was detected by (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The secretion of insulin was measured with an enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), the expression of genes was detected by real-time PCR, and the expression of proteins was measured by Western blotting. Exposure to an SMF increased the expression and secretion of insulin by INS-1 cells but did not affect cell proliferation. Moreover, SMF exposure up-regulated the expression of several pancreas-specific transcriptional factors. Specifically, the activity of the rat insulin promoter was enhanced in INS-1 cells exposed to an SMF, and the expression levels of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) and syntaxin-1A were up-regulated after exposure to an SMF. SMF exposure can promote insulin secretion in rat INS-1 cells by activating the transcription of the insulin gene and up-regulating the expression of vesicle-secreted proteins.

  15. Pellino-1 Selectively Regulates Epithelial Cell Responses to Rhinovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, Julie A; Prince, Lynne R; Parker, Lisa C; Stokes, Clare A; de Bruin, Harold G; van den Berge, Maarten; Heijink, Irene H; Whyte, Moira K; Sabroe, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Pellino-1 has recently been identified as a regulator of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling, but its roles in regulation of responses of human cells to human pathogens are unknown. We investigated the potential roles of Pellino-1 in the airways. We show for the first time that Pellino-1 regulates respon

  16. Pellino-1 selectively regulates epithelial cell responses to rhinovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, Julie A; Prince, Lynne R; Parker, Lisa C; Stokes, Clare A; de Bruin, Harold G; van den Berge, Maarten; Heijink, Irene H; Whyte, Moira K; Sabroe, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Pellino-1 has recently been identified as a regulator of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling, but its roles in regulation of responses of human cells to human pathogens are unknown. We investigated the potential roles of Pellino-1 in the airways. We show for the first time that Pellino-1 regulates respon

  17. Primary antitumor immune response mediated by CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corthay, Alexandre; Skovseth, Dag K; Lundin, Katrin U; Røsjø, Egil; Omholt, Hilde; Hofgaard, Peter O; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Bogen, Bjarne

    2005-03-01

    Gene-targeted mice have recently revealed a role for lymphocytes and interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) in conferring protection against cancer, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we have characterized a successful primary antitumor immune response initiated by naive CD4+ T cells. Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-negative myeloma cells injected subcutaneously into syngeneic mice were surrounded within 3 days by macrophages that captured tumor antigens. Within 6 days, naive myeloma-specific CD4+ T cells became activated in draining lymph nodes and subsequently migrated to the incipient tumor site. Upon recognition of tumor-derived antigenic peptides presented on MHC-II by macrophages, the myeloma-specific CD4+ T cells were reactivated and started to secrete cytokines. T cell-derived IFNgamma activated macrophages in close proximity to the tumor cells. Tumor cell growth was completely inhibited by such locally activated macrophages. These data indicate a mechanism for immunosurveillance of MHC-II-negative cancer cells by tumor-specific CD4+ T cells through collaboration with macrophages.

  18. Homeostatic responses by surviving cortical pyramidal cells in neurodegenerative tauopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimins, Johanna L; Rocher, Anne B; Peters, Alan; Shultz, Penny; Lewis, Jada; Luebke, Jennifer I

    2011-11-01

    Cortical neuron death is prevalent by 9 months in rTg(tau(P301L))4510 tau mutant mice (TG) and surviving pyramidal cells exhibit dendritic regression and spine loss. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to investigate the impact of these marked structural changes on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) of layer 3 pyramidal cells in frontal cortical slices from behaviorally characterized TG and non-transgenic (NT) mice at this age. Frontal lobe function of TG mice was intact following a short delay interval but impaired following a long delay interval in an object recognition test, and cortical atrophy and cell loss were pronounced. Surviving TG cells had significantly reduced dendritic diameters, total spine density, and mushroom spines, yet sEPSCs were increased and sIPSCs were unchanged in frequency. Thus, despite significant regressive structural changes, synaptic responses were not reduced in TG cells, indicating that homeostatic compensatory mechanisms occur during progressive tauopathy. Consistent with this idea, surviving TG cells were more intrinsically excitable than NT cells, and exhibited sprouting of filopodia and axonal boutons. Moreover, the neuropil in TG mice showed an increased density of asymmetric synapses, although their mean size was reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that during progressive tauopathy, cortical pyramidal cells compensate for loss of afferent input by increased excitability and establishment of new synapses. These compensatory homeostatic mechanisms may play an important role in slowing the progression of neuronal network dysfunction during neurodegenerative tauopathies.

  19. Innate immune response to pulmonary contusion: identification of cell type-specific inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, J Jason; Wells, Jonathan D; Yoza, Barbara K; McCall, Charles E

    2012-04-01

    Lung injury from pulmonary contusion is a common traumatic injury, predominantly seen after blunt chest trauma, such as in vehicular accidents. The local and systemic inflammatory response to injury includes activation of innate immune receptors, elaboration of a variety of inflammatory mediators, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injured lung. Using a mouse model of pulmonary contusion, we had previously shown that innate immune Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) mediate the inflammatory response to lung injury. In this study, we used chimeric mice generated by adoptive bone marrow transfer between TLR2 or TLR4 and wild-type mice. We found that, in the lung, both bone marrow-derived and nonmyeloid cells contribute to TLR-dependent inflammatory responses after injury in a cell type-specific manner. We also show a novel TLR2-dependent injury mechanism that is associated with enhanced airway epithelial cell apoptosis and increased pulmonary FasL and Fas expression in the lungs from injured mice. Thus, in addition to cardiopulmonary physiological dysfunction, cell type-specific TLR and their differential response to injury may provide novel specific targets for management of patients with pulmonary contusion.

  20. Fibroblast nemosis induces angiogenic responses of endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enzerink, Anna, E-mail: anna.enzerink@helsinki.fi [Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, P.O. BOX 21, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Rantanen, Ville, E-mail: ville.rantanen@helsinki.fi [Computational Systems Biology Laboratory, Institute of Biomedicine and Genome-Scale Biology Research Program, University of Helsinki, P.O. BOX 63, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Vaheri, Antti, E-mail: antti.vaheri@helsinki.fi [Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, P.O. BOX 21, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-03-10

    Increasing evidence points to a central link between inflammation and activation of the stroma, especially of fibroblasts therein. However, the mechanisms leading to such activation mostly remain undescribed. We have previously characterized a novel type of fibroblast activation (nemosis) where clustered fibroblasts upregulated the production of cyclooxygenase-2, secretion of prostaglandins, proteinases, chemotactic cytokines, and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and displayed activated nuclear factor-{kappa}B. Now we show that nemosis drives angiogenic responses of endothelial cells. In addition to HGF, nemotic fibroblasts secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and conditioned medium from spheroids promoted sprouting and networking of human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVEC). The response was partly inhibited by function-blocking antibodies against HGF and VEGF. Conditioned nemotic fibroblast medium promoted closure of HUVEC and human dermal microvascular endothelial cell monolayer wounds, by increasing the motility of the endothelial cells. Wound closure in HUVEC cells was partly inhibited by the antibodies against HGF. The stromal microenvironment regulates wound healing responses and often promotes tumorigenesis. Nemosis offers clues to the activation process of stromal fibroblasts and provides a model to study the part they play in angiogenesis-related conditions, as well as possibilities for therapeutical approaches desiring angiogenesis in tissue.

  1. The Role of the Immune Response in Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triozzi, Pierre L., E-mail: triozzp@ccf.org [Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Fernandez, Anthony P. [Departments of Dermatology and Anatomic Pathology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2013-02-28

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is implicated in its pathogenesis. Immune mechanisms are also implicated. Patients who are immunosuppressed have an increased risk. There is evidence that high intratumoral T-cell counts and immune transcripts are associated with favorable survival. Spontaneous regressions implicate immune effector mechanisms. Immunogenicity is also supported by observation of autoimmune paraneoplastic syndromes. Case reports suggest that immune modulation, including reduction of immune suppression, can result in tumor regression. The relationships between MCPyV infection, the immune response, and clinical outcome, however, remain poorly understood. Circulating antibodies against MCPyV antigens are present in most individuals. MCPyV-reactive T cells have been detected in both MCC patients and control subjects. High intratumoral T-cell counts are also associated with favorable survival in MCPyV-negative MCC. That the immune system plays a central role in preventing and controlling MCC is supported by several observations. MCCs often develop, however, despite the presence of humoral and cellular immune responses. A better understanding on how MCPyV and MCC evade the immune response will be necessary to develop effective immunotherapies.

  2. New aspects of gravity responses in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Soga, Kouichi

    2003-01-01

    Plants show two distinct responses to gravity: gravity-dependent morphogenesis (gravimorphogenesis) and gravity resistance. In gravitropism, a typical mechanism of gravimorphogenesis, gravity is utilized as a signal to establish an appropriate form. The response has been studied in a gravity-free environment, where plant seedlings were found to perform spontaneous morphogenesis, termed automorphogenesis. Automorphogenesis consists of a change in growth direction and spontaneous curvature in dorsiventral directions. The spontaneous curvature is caused by a difference in the capacity of the cell wall to expand between the dorsal and the ventral sides of organs, which originates from the inherent structural anisotropy. Gravity resistance is a response that enables the plant to develop against the gravitational force. To resist the force, the plant constructs a tough body by increasing the cell wall rigidity that suppresses growth. The mechanical properties of the cell wall are changed by modification of the cell wall metabolism and cell wall environment, especially pH. In gravitropism, gravity is perceived by amyloplasts in statocytes, whereas gravity resistance may be mediated by mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane.

  3. Research of activity decay of red blood cells in static magnetic field with optical tweezers%用光镊研究稳恒磁场对血红细胞的活性影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雷

    2013-01-01

    为了研究稳恒磁场对离体血红细胞的活性衰变产生的影响,采用非接触、无损伤的光镊技术进行了实验与分析。光镊中的高斯激光光束作用使红细胞发生形变,待细胞稳定后切断光路,得到形变血红细胞的相对形变量值,该量值大小与红细胞活性相关;对比了正常离体血液与静置于稳恒磁场中的红细胞活性衰变规律。结果表明,0.20 T稳恒磁场可以提高红细胞的变形能力,增强红细胞的活性;同时加速了细胞体内能量的消耗,因离体环境没有能量的补充,能量的消耗加速了红细胞的衰老。这一结果为磁场对细胞的活性影响和动力学分析提供了一些参考。%Optical tweezers was used to study the changing rule of the activity of the red blood cells in static magnetic field.Red blood cells irradiated by Gaussian laser beam were deformed .When the laser was cut off , the relative deformation value of blood cells was obtained , which was associated with the cells ’ activity.After comparing the decay process of cells activity between static red blood cells and red blood cells in magnetic field , the results showed the activity of the red blood cells increased by 0.20T magnetic field, meanwhile the cells’ energy consumption increased.The death of cells has accelerated because of energy consumption .The research can provide valuable reference for the study of cells viability and dynamic analysis .

  4. B cell activating factor (BAFF) selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qilin; Wang, Zhiding; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Gaizhi; Yu, Dandan; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Wang, Tianxiao; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Xiao, He; Wang, Renxi

    2017-02-12

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) regulates B cell maturation, survival, function, and plays a critical pathogenic role in autoimmune diseases. It remains unclear how BAFF affects IL-10(-)B cells versus regulatory B cells (Bregs) in inflammatory responses. In this study, we found that IL-10-expressing Bregs decreased in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. On blockade of the effects of BAFF with TACI-IgG, IL-10(+) Bregs were upregulated in MRL/lpr and EAE mice. In addition, BAFF expanded IL-10(+)B cells over IL-10(-)B cells under noninflammatory conditions in vitro, whereas it expanded IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses, such as stimulation with autoantigen and LPS. Finally, the selection of IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells by BAFF was dependent on BAFF receptors (BAFFR, TACI, and BCMA) that were upregulated by inflammatory responses. This study suggests that BAFF selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+) regulatory B cells via BAFF receptors in inflammatory responses.

  5. The stringent response and cell cycle arrest in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Ferullo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes upon arrest. Nucleoids of these cells are decondensed; in the absence of the ability to synthesize ppGpp, nucleoids become highly condensed, similar to that seen after treatment with the translational inhibitor chloramphenicol. After induction of the stringent response, while regions corresponding to the origins of replication segregate, the termini remain colocalized in wild-type cells. In contrast, cells arrested by rifampicin and cephalexin do not show colocalized termini, suggesting that the stringent response arrests chromosome segregation at a specific point. Release from starvation causes rapid nucleoid reorganization, chromosome segregation, and resumption of replication. Arrest of replication and inhibition of colony formation by ppGpp accumulation is relieved in seqA and dam mutants, although other aspects of the stringent response appear to be intact. We propose that DNA methylation and SeqA binding to non-origin loci is necessary to enforce a full stringent arrest, affecting both initiation of replication and chromosome segregation. This is the first indication that bacterial chromosome segregation, whose mechanism is not understood, is a step that may be regulated in response to environmental conditions.

  6. Statics and Mechanics of Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    The statics and mechanics of structures form a core aspect of civil engineering. This book provides an introduction to the subject, starting from classic hand-calculation types of analysis and gradually advancing to a systematic form suitable for computer implementation. It starts with statically...

  7. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chansavath Phetsouphanh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  8. Neural progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells generated less autogenous immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Liu, PengFei; Li, Xiang; Chen, ShuBin; Wang, LiHui; Qin, Li; Su, ZhengHui; Huang, WenHao; Liu, Juli; Jia, Bei; Liu, Jie; Cai, JingLei; Pei, DuanQing; Pan, GuangJin

    2014-02-01

    The breakthrough development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) raises the prospect of patient-specific treatment for many diseases through the replacement of affected cells. However, whether iPSC-derived functional cell lineages generate a deleterious immune response upon auto-transplantation remains unclear. In this study, we differentiated five human iPSC lines from skin fibroblasts and urine cells into neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and analyzed their immunogenicity. Through co-culture with autogenous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), we showed that both somatic cells and iPSC-derived NPCs do not stimulate significant autogenous PBMC proliferation. However, a significant immune reaction was detected when these cells were co-cultured with allogenous PBMCs. Furthermore, no significant expression of perforin or granzyme B was detected following stimulation of autogenous immune effector cells (CD3(+)CD8(-) T cells, CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells or CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells) by NPCs in both PBMC and T cell co-culture systems. These results suggest that human iPSC-derived NPCs may not initiate an immune response in autogenous transplants, and thus set a base for further preclinical evaluation of human iPSCs.

  9. IDO2 Modulates T Cell-Dependent Autoimmune Responses through a B Cell-Intrinsic Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Lauren M F; DuHadaway, James B; Grabler, Samantha; Prendergast, George C; Muller, Alexander J; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Mechanistic insight into how adaptive immune responses are modified along the self-nonself continuum may offer more effective opportunities to treat autoimmune disease, cancer, and other sterile inflammatory disorders. Recent genetic studies in the KRN mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate that the immunomodulatory molecule IDO2 modifies responses to self-antigens; however, the mechanisms involved are obscure. In this study, we show that IDO2 exerts a critical function in B cells to support the generation of autoimmunity. In experiments with IDO2-deficient mice, adoptive transplant experiments demonstrated that IDO2 expression in B cells was both necessary and sufficient to support robust arthritis development. IDO2 function in B cells was contingent on a cognate, Ag-specific interaction to exert its immunomodulatory effects on arthritis development. We confirmed a similar requirement in an established model of contact hypersensitivity, in which IDO2-expressing B cells are required for a robust inflammatory response. Mechanistic investigations showed that IDO2-deficient B cells lacked the ability to upregulate the costimulatory marker CD40, suggesting IDO2 acts at the T-B cell interface to modulate the potency of T cell help needed to promote autoantibody production. Overall, our findings revealed that IDO2 expression by B cells modulates autoimmune responses by supporting the cross talk between autoreactive T and B cells.

  10. Comparison of dendritic cell-mediated immune responses among canine malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Kyoichi; Arai, Hiroyoshi; Ueno, Emi; Saito, Chie; Yagihara, Hiroko; Isotani, Mayu; Ono, Kenichiro; Washizu, Tsukimi; Bonkobara, Makoto

    2007-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination is one of the most attractive immunotherapies for malignancies in dogs. To examine the differences in DC-mediated immune responses from different types of malignancies in dogs, we vaccinated dogs using autologous DCs pulsed with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and cell lysate prepared from squamous cell carcinoma SCC2/88 (SCC-KLH-DC), histiocytic sarcoma CHS-5 (CHS-KLH-DC), or B cell leukemia GL-1 (GL-KLH-DC) in vitro. In vivo inductions of immune responses against these tumor cells were compared by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test. The DTH response against SCC2/88 cells were observed in dogs vaccinated with autologous SCC-KLH-DC, while the response was undetectable against CHS-5 and GL-1 cells in dogs vaccinated with autologous CHS-KLH-DC and GL-KLH-DC. Skin biopsies taken from DTH challenge sites were then examined for immunohistochemistry, and recruitment of CD8 and CD4 T cells was detected at the site where SCC2/88 cells were inoculated in dogs vaccinated with SCC-KLH-DC. By contrast, neither CD8 nor CD4 T cell infiltration was found at the DTH challenge site in the dogs vaccinated with CHS-KLH-DC or GL-KLH-DC. These findings may reflect that the efficacy of immune induction by DC vaccination varies among tumor types and that immune responses could be inducible in squamous cell carcinoma. Our results encouraged further investigation of therapeutic vaccination for dogs with advanced squamous cell carcinoma in clinical trials.

  11. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  12. Cell response to quasi-monochromatic light with different coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budagovsky, A. V.; Solovykh, N. V.; Budagovskaya, O. N.; Budagovsky, I. A.

    2015-04-01

    The problem of the light coherence effect on the magnitude of the photoinduced cell response is discussed. The origins of ambiguous interpretation of the known experimental results are considered. Using the biological models, essentially differing in anatomy, morphology and biological functions (acrospires of radish, blackberry microsprouts cultivated in vitro, plum pollen), the effect of statistical properties of quasi-monochromatic light (λmax = 633 nm) on the magnitude of the photoinduced cell response is shown. It is found that for relatively low spatial coherence, the cell functional activity changes insignificantly. The maximal enhancement of growing processes (stimulating effect) is observed when the coherence length Lcoh and the correlation radius rcor are greater than the cell size, i.e., the entire cell fits into the field coherence volume. In this case, the representative indicators (germination of seeds and pollen, the spears length) exceeds those of non-irradiated objects by 1.7 - 3.9 times. For more correct assessment of the effect of light statistical properties on photocontrol processes, it is proposed to replace the qualitative description (coherent - incoherent) with the quantitative one, using the determination of spatial and temporal correlation functions and comparing them with the characteristic dimensions of the biological structures, e.g., the cell size.

  13. Cell response to quasi-monochromatic light with different coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budagovsky, A V; Solovykh, N V [I.V.Michurin All-Russian Recearch Institute of Fruit Crops Genetics and Breeding (Russian Federation); Budagovskaya, O N [I.V.Michurin All-Russia Research and Development Institute of Gardening, Michurinsk, Tambov region (Russian Federation); Budagovsky, I A [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-30

    The problem of the light coherence effect on the magnitude of the photoinduced cell response is discussed. The origins of ambiguous interpretation of the known experimental results are considered. Using the biological models, essentially differing in anatomy, morphology and biological functions (acrospires of radish, blackberry microsprouts cultivated in vitro, plum pollen), the effect of statistical properties of quasi-monochromatic light (λ{sub max} = 633 nm) on the magnitude of the photoinduced cell response is shown. It is found that for relatively low spatial coherence, the cell functional activity changes insignificantly. The maximal enhancement of growing processes (stimulating effect) is observed when the coherence length L{sub coh} and the correlation radius r{sub cor} are greater than the cell size, i.e., the entire cell fits into the field coherence volume. In this case, the representative indicators (germination of seeds and pollen, the spears length) exceeds those of non-irradiated objects by 1.7 – 3.9 times. For more correct assessment of the effect of light statistical properties on photocontrol processes, it is proposed to replace the qualitative description (coherent – incoherent) with the quantitative one, using the determination of spatial and temporal correlation functions and comparing them with the characteristic dimensions of the biological structures, e.g., the cell size. (biophotonics)

  14. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klier Ulrike

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. Methods We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. Results The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4+, activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested could be observed. Conclusion Cellular fusions of MSI+ carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These

  15. Monitoring the cytoskeletal EGF response in live gastric carcinoma cells.

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    Marco Felkl

    Full Text Available Altered cell motility is considered to be a key factor in determining tumor invasion and metastasis. Epidermal growth factor (EGF signaling has been implicated in this process by affecting cytoskeletal organization and dynamics in multiple ways. To sort the temporal and spatial regulation of EGF-dependent cytoskeletal re-organization in relation to a cell's motile behavior time-lapse microscopy was performed on EGF-responsive gastric carcinoma-derived MKN1 cells co-expressing different fluorescently labeled cytoskeletal filaments and focal adhesion components in various combinations. The experiments showed that EGF almost instantaneously induces a considerable increase in membrane ruffling and lamellipodial activity that can be inhibited by Cetuximab EGF receptor antibodies and is not elicited in non-responsive gastric carcinoma Hs746T cells. The transient cell extensions are rich in actin but lack microtubules and keratin intermediate filaments. We show that this EGF-induced increase in membrane motility can be measured by a simple image processing routine. Microtubule plus-ends subsequently invade growing cell extensions, which start to accumulate focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum junction. Such paxillin-positive complexes mature into focal adhesions by tyrosine phosphorylation and recruitment of zyxin. These adhesions then serve as nucleation sites for keratin filaments which are used to enlarge the neighboring peripheral keratin network. Focal adhesions are either disassembled or give rise to stable zyxin-rich fibrillar adhesions which disassemble in the presence of EGF to support formation of new focal adhesion sites in the cell periphery. Taken together the results serve as a basis for modeling the early cytoskeletal EGF response as a tightly coordinated and step-wise process which is relevant for the prediction of the effectiveness of anti-EGF receptor-based tumor therapy.

  16. Human neuronal cell protein responses to Nipah virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Sharifah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV, a recently discovered zoonotic virus infects and replicates in several human cell types. Its replication in human neuronal cells, however, is less efficient in comparison to other fully susceptible cells. In the present study, the SK-N-MC human neuronal cell protein response to NiV infection is examined using proteomic approaches. Results Method for separation of the NiV-infected human neuronal cell proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE was established. At least 800 protein spots were resolved of which seven were unique, six were significantly up-regulated and eight were significantly down-regulated. Six of these altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS and confirmed using MS/MS. The heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F, guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 and cytochrome bc1 were present in abundance in the NiV-infected SK-N-MC cells in contrast to hnRNPs H and H2 that were significantly down-regulated. Conclusion Several human neuronal cell proteins that are differentially expressed following NiV infection are identified. The proteins are associated with various cellular functions and their abundance reflects their significance in the cytopathologic responses to the infection and the regulation of NiV replication. The potential importance of the ratio of hnRNP F, and hnRNPs H and H2 in regulation of NiV replication, the association of the mitochondrial protein with the cytopathologic responses to the infection and induction of apoptosis are highlighted.

  17. Inhibition of Viability, Proliferation, Cytokines Secretion, Surface Antigen Expression, and Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Seven-Day Exposure to 0.5 T Static Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After seven-day exposure to 0.5-Tesla Static Magnetic Field (SMF, Adipose-derived Stem Cells (ASCs and those labeled by superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles were examined for viability by methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT assay, proliferation by cell counting and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation, DNA integrity by single cell gel electrophoresis, surface antigen by flow cytometry analysis, and the expression of cytokines and genetic markers by reverse transcription-PCR and underwent adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation assessed by quantifying related specific genes expression. The SMF slightly reduced cell viability and proliferation and inhibited the expression of CD49d, CD54, and CD73 but did not damage DNA integrity. The SMF slightly downregulated the expression of cytokines including Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF, Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1, Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 (TGF-β1, genetic markers comprising Stem Cell Antigen-1 (Sca1, Octamer-4 (Oct-4, ATP-binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1 (ABCB1, adipogenic marker genes containing Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPAR-γ, and osteogenic marker genes including Secreted Phosphor-protein 1 (SPP1 and Osterix (OSX. Exposure to 0.5 T SMF for seven days inhibited viability, proliferation, surface antigen expression, cytokine secretion, stem cell genetic marker expression, and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation but did not affect the DNA integrity in ASCs with or without SPIO labeling.

  18. Marrow fat cell: response to x-ray induced aplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathija, A.; Ohanian, M.; Davis, S.; Trubowitz, S.

    1979-09-11

    Adipose tissue is an integral structural component of normal rabbit marrow and is believed to behave primarily as a cushion in response to hemopoietic proliferation, accommodating to changes in hemopoiesis by change in either size or number or both of the fat cells in order to maintain constancy of the marrow volume. To test this hypothesis, aplasia of the right femur of New Zealand white rabbits was induced by x irradiation with 8000 rads; the left unirradiated limb served as control. Twenty-four hours before sacrifice 50 ..mu..Ci of palmitate-114C was administered intravenously and the marrow of both femurs removed. Samples of perinephric fat were taken for comparison. Fat cell volume, C14 palmitate turnover and fatty acid composition were determined. The total number of fat cells in the entire marrow of both femurs was calculated. The measurements showed no difference in size or fatty acid turnover of the fat cells in the irradiated aplastic marrow from the cells of the control marrow. The number of fat cells in both the irradiated and the unirradiated control femurs was essentially the same. These findings do not support the view that marrow fat cells respond to diminished hematopoiesis by either increase in their volume or number. In addition, the findings suggest that both marrow and subcutaneous fat cells are fairly resistant to high doses of x-ray irradiation.

  19. Helper role of NK cells during the induction of anticancer responses by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinski, Pawel; Giermasz, Adam; Nakamura, Yutaro; Basse, Per; Storkus, Walter J; Kirkwood, John M; Mailliard, Robbie B

    2005-02-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DC) support each other's activity in a positive feedback. We observed that activated NK cells induce the maturation of DCs into stable type-1 polarized DCs (DC1), characterized by up to 100-fold enhanced ability to produce IL-12p70 in response to subsequent interaction with Th cells. DC1 induction depends on NK cell-produced IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, with a possible involvement of additional factors. DC1, induced by NK cells or by NK cell-related soluble factors, are stable, resistant to tumor-related suppressive factors, and show strongly enhanced ability to induce Th1 and CTL responses. In analogy to resting T cells, the induction of "helper" function of NK cells relies on a two-signal activation paradigm. While NKG2D-dependent tumor cell recognition is sufficient to induce the cytotoxic "effector" function of NK cells, the induction of "NK cell help" requires additional signals from type-1 IFNs, products of virally-infected cells, or from IL-2. Compared to non-polarized DCs currently-used in clinical trials, DC1s act as superior inducers of anti-cancer CTL responses during in vitro sensitization. The current data provides rationale for the clinical use of DC1s in cancer and chronic infections (such as HIV), as a new generation DC-based vaccines, uniquely combining fully mature DC status with an elevated, rather than "exhausted" ability to produce bioactive IL-12p70. We are currently implementing stage I/II clinical trials, testing the effectiveness of DC1s induced by NK cells or by NK cell-related factors, as therapeutic vaccines against melanoma.

  20. Arginine methylation regulates antibody responses through modulating cell division and isotype switching in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kikumi; Mizuguchi, Junichiro

    2013-03-01

    Protein arginine methylation plays crucial roles, including signal transduction, transcriptional control, cell proliferation and/or differentiation. B cells undergo clonal division, isotype switching and differentiate into antibody forming cells following stimulation with Toll-like receptor-ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and T cell-derived signals, including CD40-ligand (CD40-L) and interleukin 4 (IL-4). Whether protein arginine methylation affects B cell division and/or isotype switching to IgG1 in response to LPS, IL-4, and CD40-L was examined using the arginine methyl transferase inhibitor adenosine-2',3'-dialdehyde (AdOx). Addition of AdOx substantially reduced the number of division cycles of stimulated B cells, whereas cell viability remained intact. Upon stimulation with LPS/IL-4/CD40-L, the proportion of surface IgG1 positive cells in each division cycle was slightly diminished by AdOx. However, the degree of expression of γ1 germ line transcript and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in response to LPS/IL-4/CD40-L were unaffected by addition of AdOx, suggesting that AdOx influences class switch recombination independent of AID expression through transcriptional control. Taken together, arginine methylation appears to be involved in B cell isotype switching, as well as in clonal expansion of B cells in response to LPS/IL-4/CD40-L. © 2012 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Responses to recipient and donor B cells by genetically donor T cells from human haploidentical chimeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiff, S.; Sampson, H.; Buckley, R.

    1986-03-01

    Following administration of haploidentical stem cells to infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), mature T cells of donor karyotype appear later in the recipient without causing graft-versus-host disease. To investigate the effect of the host environment on the responsiveness of these genetically donor T cells, blood B and T lymphocytes from 6 SCID recipients, their parental donors and unrelated controls were purified by double SRBC rosetting. T cells were stimulated by irradiated B cells at a 1:1 ratio in 6 day cultures. Engrafted T cells of donor karyotype gave much smaller responses to irradiated genetically recipient B cells than did fresh donor T cells. Moreover, engrafted T cells of donor karyotype from two of the three SCIDs who are longest post-transplantation responded more vigorously (14,685 and 31,623 cpm) than fresh donor T cells (5141 and 22,709 cpm) to donor B cells. These data indicate that T lymphocytes which have matured from donor stem cells in the recipient microenvironment behave differently from those that have matured in the donor.

  2. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  3. Dendritic cells a double-edge sword in autoimmune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada eAmodio

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are antigen-presenting cells that play a pivotal role in regulating innate and adaptive immune responses. In autoimmunity, DC act as a double-edged sword since on one hand they initiate adaptive self-reactive responses and on the other they play a pivotal role in promoting and maintaining tolerance. Thus, DC are the most important cells in either triggering self-specific responses or in negatively regulating auto-reactive responses. DC in the steady state or specialized subsets of DC, named tolerogenic DC, are involved in the latter function. Clinical and experimental evidence indicate that prolonged presentation of self-antigens by DC is crucial for the development of destructive autoimmune diseases, and defects in tolerogenic DC functions contribute to eradication of self-tolerance. In recent years, DC have emerged as therapeutic targets for limiting their immunogenicity against self-antigens, while tolerogenic DC have been conceived as therapeutic tools to restore tolerance. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current knowledge on the pathogenic role of DC in patients affected by autoimmune diseases. In addition, the protective role of tolerogenic DC will be addressed. The currently applied strategies to block immune activation or to exploit the tolerogenic potential of DC will be discussed.

  4. Stress responses and replication of plasmids in bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegrzyn Alicja

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plasmids, DNA (or rarely RNA molecules which replicate in cells autonomously (independently of chromosomes as non-essential genetic elements, play important roles for microbes grown under specific environmental conditions as well as in scientific laboratories and in biotechnology. For example, bacterial plasmids are excellent models in studies on regulation of DNA replication, and their derivatives are the most commonly used vectors in genetic engineering. Detailed mechanisms of replication initiation, which is the crucial process for efficient maintenance of plasmids in cells, have been elucidated for several plasmids. However, to understand plasmid biology, it is necessary to understand regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to different environmental conditions in which host cells exist. Knowledge of such regulatory processes is also very important for those who use plasmids as expression vectors to produce large amounts of recombinant proteins. Variable conditions in large-scale fermentations must influence replication of plasmid DNA in cells, thus affecting the efficiency of recombinant gene expression significantly. Contrary to extensively investigated biochemistry of plasmid replication, molecular mechanisms of regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to various environmental stress conditions are relatively poorly understood. There are, however, recently published studies that add significant data to our knowledge on relations between cellular stress responses and control of plasmid DNA replication. In this review we focus on plasmids derived from bacteriophage λ that are among the best investigated replicons. Nevertheless, recent results of studies on other plasmids are also discussed shortly.

  5. Understanding the T cell immune response in SARS coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice Oh, Hsueh-Ling; Ken-En Gan, Samuel; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2012-09-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic started in late 2002 and swiftly spread across 5 continents with a mortality rate of around 10%. Although the epidemic was eventually controlled through the implementation of strict quarantine measures, there continues a need to investigate the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and develop interventions should it re-emerge. Numerous studies have shown that neutralizing antibodies against the virus can be found in patients infected with SARS-CoV within days upon the onset of illness and lasting up to several months. In contrast, there is little data on the kinetics of T cell responses during SARS-CoV infection and little is known about their role in the recovery process. However, recent studies in mice suggest the importance of T cells in viral clearance during SARS-CoV infection. Moreover, a growing number of studies have investigated the memory T cell responses in recovered SARS patients. This review covers the available literature on the emerging importance of T cell responses in SARS-CoV infection, particularly on the mapping of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, longevity, polyfunctionality and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association as well as their potential implications on treatment and vaccine development.

  6. Dynamics of cell orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel A.

    2007-09-01

    Many physiological processes depend on the response of biological cells to mechanical forces generated by the contractile activity of the cell or by external stresses. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitivity of cells and the elasticity of the matrix, we predict the dynamics and orientation of cells in both the absence and presence of applied stresses. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the cellular forces in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency.

  7. Responsiveness of fetal rat brain cells to glia maturation factor during neoplastic transformation in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, A; Laerum, O D; Bock, E

    1981-01-01

    The effect of partially purified extracts from adult pig brains containing a glia maturation protein factor (BE) has been investigated on neural cells during carcinogenesis. Pregnant BD IX-rats were given a single transplacental dose of the carcinogen ethylnitrosourea (EtNU) on the 18th day of ge...... on GFA-content was seen any longer, although some few weakly GFA positive cells could be observed in all permanent cell lines. Fetal rat brain cells therefore seem to become less responsive to this differentiation inducer during neoplastic transformation in cell culture....

  8. Blockade of Glutamine Synthetase Enhances Inflammatory Response in Microglial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Erika M.; Menga, Alessio; Lebrun, Aurore; Hooper, Douglas C.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Microglial cells are brain-resident macrophages engaged in surveillance and maintained in a constant state of relative inactivity. However, their involvement in autoimmune diseases indicates that in pathological conditions microglia gain an inflammatory phenotype. The mechanisms underlying this change in the microglial phenotype are still unclear. Since metabolism is an important modulator of immune cell function, we focused our attention on glutamine synthetase (GS), a modulator of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation in other cell types, which is expressed by microglia. Results: GS inhibition enhances release of inflammatory mediators of LPS-activated microglia in vitro, leading to perturbation of the redox balance and decreased viability of cocultured neurons. GS inhibition also decreases insulin-mediated glucose uptake in microglia. In vivo, microglia-specific GS ablation enhances expression of inflammatory markers upon LPS treatment. In the spinal cords from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), GS expression levels and glutamine/glutamate ratios are reduced. Innovation: Recently, metabolism has been highlighted as mediator of immune cell function through the discovery of mechanisms that (behind these metabolic changes) modulate the inflammatory response. The present study shows for the first time a metabolic mechanism mediating microglial response to a proinflammatory stimulus, pointing to GS activity as a master modulator of immune cell function and thus unraveling a potential therapeutic target. Conclusions: Our study highlights a new role of GS in modulating immune response in microglia, providing insights into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with inflammation and new strategies of therapeutic intervention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 351–363. PMID:27758118

  9. Oral microbial biofilm stimulation of epithelial cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S; Novak, Karen F; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2012-04-01

    Oral bacterial biofilms trigger chronic inflammatory responses in the host that can result in the tissue destructive events of periodontitis. However, the characteristics of the capacity of specific host cell types to respond to these biofilms remain ill-defined. This report describes the use of a novel model of bacterial biofilms to stimulate oral epithelial cells and profile select cytokines and chemokines that contribute to the local inflammatory environment in the periodontium. Monoinfection biofilms were developed with Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses. Biofilms, as well as planktonic cultures of these same bacterial species, were incubated under anaerobic conditions with a human oral epithelial cell line, OKF4, for up to 24h. Gro-1α, IL1α, IL-6, IL-8, TGFα, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, and IP-10 were shown to be produced in response to a range of the planktonic or biofilm forms of these species. P. gingivalis biofilms significantly inhibited the production of all of these cytokines and chemokines, except MIP-1α. Generally, the biofilms of all species inhibited Gro-1α, TGFα, and Fractalkine production, while F. nucleatum biofilms stimulated significant increases in IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and IP-10. A. naeslundii biofilms induced elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IP-10. The oral streptococcal species in biofilms or planktonic forms were poor stimulants for any of these mediators from the epithelial cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that oral bacteria in biofilms elicit a substantially different profile of responses compared to planktonic bacteria of the same species. Moreover, certain oral species are highly stimulatory when in biofilms and interact with host cell receptors to trigger pathways of responses that appear quite divergent from individual bacteria.

  10. The Directional Response of Chemotactic Cells Depends on a Balance between Cytoskeletal Architecture and the External Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jie Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Polarized migrating cells display signal transduction events, such as activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K and Scar/Wave, and respond more readily to chemotactic stimuli at the leading edge. We sought to determine the basis of this polarized sensitivity. Inhibiting actin polymerization leads to uniform sensitivity. However, when human neutrophils were “stalled” by simultaneously blocking actin and myosin dynamics, they maintained the gradient of responsiveness to chemoattractant and also displayed noise-driven PIP3 flashes on the basal membrane, localized toward the front. Thus, polarized sensitivity does not require migration or cytoskeletal dynamics. The threshold for response is correlated with the static F-actin distribution, but not cell shape or volume changes, membrane fluidity, or the preexisting distribution of PI3K. The kinetics of responses to temporal and spatial stimuli were consistent with the local excitation global inhibition model, but the overall direction of the response was biased by the internal axis of polarity.

  11. Dendritic cell-derived IL-15 controls the induction of CD8 T cell immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückert, René; Brandt, Katja; Bulanova, Elena; Mirghomizadeh, Farhad; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-12-01

    The development and the differentiation of CD8(+) T cells are dependent on IL-15. Here, we have studied the source and mechanism of how IL-15 modulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated Th1 immune responses by employing two delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) models. IL-15-deficient (IL-15(-/-)) mice or mice treated with soluble IL-15Ralpha as an IL-15 antagonist showed significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent DTH responses, while activation of CD4(+) T cell and B cell functions remained unaffected. Injection of antigen-labeled dendritic cells (DC) from IL-15(+/+), IL-15(-/-) or IL-15Ralpha(-/-) mice revealed that DC-derived IL-15 is an absolute requirement for the initiation of DTH response. The re-establishment of the interaction of IL-15 with the IL-15Ralpha by incubating IL-15(-/-) DC with IL-15 completely restored the capacity to prime T cells for DTH induction in vivo. Moreover, IL-15 also enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by DC and triggered in vitro CD8(+) T cell proliferation and IL-2 release. Taken together, the data suggest that an autocrine IL-15/IL-15Ralpha signaling loop in DC is essential for inducing CD8(+)-dependent Th1 immune responses in mice. Therefore, targeted manipulation of this loop promises to be an effective, novel strategy for therapeutic modulation of clinically relevant DTH reactions.

  12. Vaccinia Virus Inhibits T Cell Receptor–Dependent Responses by Human γδ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haishan; Deetz, Carl O.; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Cairo, Cristiana; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Propp, Nadia; Salvato, Maria S.; Shao, Yiming; Pauza, C. David

    2008-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an effective vaccine and vector but has evolved multiple mechanisms for evading host immunity. We characterized the interactions of VV (TianTan and New York City Board of Health strains) with human γδ T cells because of the role they play in immune control of this virus. Exposure to VV failed to trigger proliferative responses in γδ T cells from unprimed individuals, but it was an unexpected finding that VV blocked responses to model antigens by the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell subset. Infectious or ultraviolet light–inactivated VV inhibited proliferative Vγ2Vδ2 T cell responses to phosphoantigens and tumor cells, prevented cytolysis of Daudi B cells, and reduced cytokine production. Inhibiting Vγ2Vδ2 T cells may be a mechanism for evading host immunity and increasing VV virulence. Increased VV replication or expression in the absence of γδ T cell responses might contribute to its potency as a vaccine against poxvirus and recombinant antigens. PMID:17152007

  13. Vaccinia virus inhibits T cell receptor-dependent responses by human gammadelta T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haishan; Deetz, Carl O; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Cairo, Cristiana; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Propp, Nadia; Salvato, Maria S; Shao, Yiming; Pauza, C David

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an effective vaccine and vector but has evolved multiple mechanisms for evading host immunity. We characterized the interactions of VV (TianTan and New York City Board of Health strains) with human gammadelta T cells because of the role they play in immune control of this virus. Exposure to VV failed to trigger proliferative responses in gammadelta T cells from unprimed individuals, but it was an unexpected finding that VV blocked responses to model antigens by the Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell subset. Infectious or ultraviolet light-inactivated VV inhibited proliferative Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell responses to phosphoantigens and tumor cells, prevented cytolysis of Daudi B cells, and reduced cytokine production. Inhibiting Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells may be a mechanism for evading host immunity and increasing VV virulence. Increased VV replication or expression in the absence of gammadelta T cell responses might contribute to its potency as a vaccine against poxvirus and recombinant antigens.

  14. The responses of immune cells to iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer A; Lackey, Kimberly H; Qin, Ying; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    Immune cells play an important role in recognizing and removing foreign objects, such as nanoparticles. Among various parameters, surface coatings of nanoparticles are the first contact with biological system, which critically affect nanoparticle interactions. Here, surface coating effects on nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and ability to trigger immune response were evaluated on a human monocyte cell line using iron oxide nanoparticles. The cells were treated with nanoparticles of three types of coatings (negatively charged polyacrylic acid, positively charged polyethylenimine and neutral polyethylene glycol). The cells were treated at various nanoparticle concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 50 μg ml(-1) or 2, 4, 8, 12, 20 μg cm(-2)) with 6 h incubation or treated at a nanoparticle concentration of 50 μg ml(-1) (20 μg cm(-2)) at different incubation times (6, 12, 24, 48 or 72 h). Cell viability over 80% was observed for all nanoparticle treatment experiments, regardless of surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. The much lower cell viability for cells treated with free ligands (e.g. ~10% for polyethylenimine) suggested that the surface coatings were tightly attached to the nanoparticle surfaces. The immune responses of cells to nanoparticles were evaluated by quantifying the expression of toll-like receptor 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and toll-like receptor 2 were not significant in any case of the surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. These results provide useful information to select nanoparticle surface coatings for biological and biomedical applications.

  15. A focus on parietal cells as a renewing cell population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sherif; M; Karam

    2010-01-01

    The fact that the acidsecreting parietal cells undergo continuous renewal has been ignored by many gastroenterologists and cell biologists. In the past, it was thought that these cells were static. However, by using 3Hthymidine radioautography in combination with electron microscopy, it was possible to demonstrate that parietal cells belong to a continuously renewing epithelial cell lineage. In the gastric glands, stem cells anchored in the isthmus region are responsible for the production of parietal cells...

  16. Respiratory epithelial cell responses to cigarette smoke: the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G

    2012-12-01

    Cigarette smoking exposes the respiratory epithelium to highly toxic, reactive oxygen nitrogen species which damage lung proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the cell organelle in which all secreted and membrane proteins are processed. Accumulation of damaged or misfolded proteins in the ER, a condition termed ER stress, activates a complex cellular process termed the unfolded protein responses (UPR). The UPR acts to restore cellular protein homeostasis by regulating all aspects of protein metabolism including: protein translation and syntheses; protein folding; and protein degradation. However, activation of the UPR may also induce signaling pathways which induce inflammation and cell apoptosis. This review discusses the role of UPR in the respiratory epithelial cell response to cigarette smoke and the pathogenesis of lung diseases like COPD.

  17. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R.; Marcec, Matthew J.; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-derived elicitors in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also assessed the defense response against a variety of potato pathogens, such as protists (Phytophthora infestans and Spongospora subterranea) and fungi (Verticillium dahliae and Colletotrichum coccodes). Our results show that extracellular pH increases within 30 min in proportion to the number of pathogen spores added. Consistently with the alkalinization effect, the higher transcription level of several defense-related genes and production of reactive oxygen species was observed. Our results demonstrate that the alkalinization response is an effective marker to study early stages of defense response in potatoes. PMID:28174578

  18. Bifidobacterium infantis attenuates colitis by regulating T cell subset responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Li; Yuan, Kai-Tao; Yu, Li; Meng, Qing-Hong; Chung, Peter Chee-Keung; Yang, Ding-Hua

    2014-01-01

    AIM: to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium infantis (B. infantis) on the T cell subsets and in attenuating the severity of experimental colitis in mice. METHODS: Normal BALB/c mice were fed different doses of B. infantis for 3 wk, and T cell subsets and related cytokine profiles in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were detected by flow cytometry and real-time RT-PCR. Colitis was induced by administration of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in mice. Before colitis induction, mice were fed high dose B. infantis for 3 wk. Cytokine profiles in MLNs and histological changes of colonic tissue were examined 6 d after colitis induction. RESULTS: No significant change in cytokine profiles was observed in normal mice fed low dose B. infantis. However, Th1-related cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-12p40), Th17-related transcription factor and cytokines (RORγt, IL-21, IL-23), regulatory T cell (Treg)-related transcription factor and cytokines (Foxp3, IL-10) were increased in normal mice fed high dose B. infantis. Furthermore, flow cytometry assay showed B. infantis increased the numbers of CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs and Th17 cells in MLNs. Colitis was successfully induced by TNBS in mice, characterized by colonic inflammation and aberrant Th1 and Th17 responses. Feeding high dose B. infantis for 3 wk before colitis induction decreased the inflammatory cell infiltration and goblet cell depletion and restored the intestinal epithelium. In addition, B. infantis feeding reduced Th1-related cytokines (T-bet, IL-2 and IFN-γ) and Th17-related cytokines (IL-12p40, RORγt, IL-17A, IL-21 and IL-23), and increased Treg-related molecules (Foxp3, IL-10 and TGF-β) in colitis mice. CONCLUSION: B. infantis effectively attenuates TNBS-induced colitis by decreasing Th1 and Th17 responses and increasing Foxp3+ Treg response in the colonic mucosa. PMID:25561798

  19. Nitric Oxide And Hypoxia Response In Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Caballano Infantes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of pluripotent cells (ESCs and iPSCs under conditions that maintain their pluripotency is necessary to implement a cell therapy program. Previously, we have described that low nitric oxide (NO donor diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide adduct (DETA-NO added to the culture medium, promote the expansion of these cell types. The molecular mechanisms are not yet known. We present evidences that ESC and iPSCs in normoxia in presence of low NO triggers a similar response to hypoxia, thus maintaining the pluripotency. We have studied the stability of HIF-1α (Hypoxia Inducible Factor in presence of low NO. Because of the close relationship between hypoxia, metabolism, mitochondrial function and pluripotency we have analyzed by q RT-PCR the expression of genes involved in the glucose metabolism such as: HK2, LDHA and PDK1; besides other HIF-1α target gene. We further analyzed the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis such as PGC1α, TFAM and NRF1 and we have observed that low NO maintains the same pattern of expression that in hypoxia. The study of the mitochondrial membrane potential using Mito-Tracker dye showed that NO decrease the mitochondrial function. We will analyze other metabolic parameters, to determinate if low NO regulates mitochondrial function and mimics Hypoxia Response. The knowledge of the role of NO in the Hypoxia Response and the mechanism that helps to maintain self-renewal in pluripotent cells in normoxia, can help to the design of culture media where NO could be optimal for stem cell expansion in the performance of future cell therapies.

  20. Dissecting the Transcriptional Response to Elicitors in Vitis vinifera Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Bru, Roque; Martínez-Zapater, José M.; Lijavetzky, Diego; Pedreño, María A.

    2014-01-01

    The high effectiveness of cyclic oligosaccharides like cyclodextrins in the production of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera cell cultures is enhanced in the presence of methyl jasmonate. In order to dissect the basis of the interactions among the elicitation responses triggered by these two compounds, a transcriptional analysis of grapevine cell cultures treated with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate separately or in combination was carried out. The results showed that the activation of genes encoding enzymes from phenylpropanoid and stilbene biosynthesis induced by cyclodextrins alone was partially enhanced in the presence of methyl jasmonate, which correlated with their effects on trans-resveratrol production. In addition, protein translation and cell cycle regulation were more highly repressed in cells treated with cyclodextrins than in those treated with methyl jasmonate, and this response was enhanced in the combined treatment. Ethylene signalling was activated by all treatments, while jasmonate signalling and salicylic acid conjugation were activated only in the presence of methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins, respectively. Moreover, the combined treatment resulted in a crosstalk between the signalling cascades activated by cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate, which, in turn, provoked the activation of additional regulatory pathways involving the up-regulation of MYB15, NAC and WRKY transcription factors, protein kinases and calcium signal transducers. All these results suggest that both elicitors cause an activation of the secondary metabolism in detriment of basic cell processes like the primary metabolism or cell division. Crosstalk between cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate-induced signalling provokes an intensification of these responses resulting in a greater trans-resveratrol production. PMID:25314001

  1. Chemical engineering of mesenchymal stem cells to induce a cell rolling response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Debanjan; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Teo, Grace S L; Spelke, Dawn; Karnik, Rohit; Wee, Le Y; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2008-11-19

    Covalently conjugated sialyl Lewis X (SLeX) on the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) surface through a biotin-streptavidin bridge imparts leukocyte-like rolling characteristics without altering the cell phenotype and the multilineage differentiation potential. We demonstrate that the conjugation of SLeX on the MSC surface is stable, versatile, and induces a robust rolling response on P-selectin coated substrates. These results indicate the potential to increase the targeting efficiency of any cell type to specific tissue.

  2. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  3. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tangliang Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal and progenitor progenies (differentiation, which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  4. The acquisition of cytokine responsiveness by murine B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    chains and mRNA to levels comparable to those seen in activated T cells. Anti-mu-stimulated B cells responded to IL-2 by incorporation of [3H]thymidine and high rate immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion. Both IL-5 (at optimal concentration) and suboptimal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 20 ng/ml) induced surface...... expression of IL-2R alpha. The level of expression induced by IL-5 was equivalent to that on anti-Ig-activated B cells. Neither stimulus induced detectable expression of IL-2R beta, and neither induced B cells to respond to IL-2. IL-2R alpha expression was strongly enhanced, and low levels of IL-2R beta...... staining and mRNA were induced by the combination of LPS plus IL-5. LPS+IL-5-treated B cells responded to IL-2 by Ig secretion. This indicates that B cells regulate their responsiveness to IL-2 similarly to T cells, via the combined level of expression of IL-2R beta and IL-2R alpha. The synergy between IL...

  5. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tangliang Li; Zhong-Wei Zhou; Zhenyu Ju; Zhao-Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employ-ing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically reg-ulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  6. Interleukin-21 triggers effector cell responses in the gut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniela; De; Nitto; Massimiliano; Sarra; Francesco; Pallone; Giovanni; Monteleone

    2010-01-01

    In the gut of patients with Crohn's disease and patients with ulcerative colitis,the major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases(IBD) in humans,the tissue-damaging immune response is mediated by an active cross-talk between immune and non-immune cells.Accumulating evidence indicates also that cytokines produced by these cells play a major role in initiating and shaping this pathologic process.One such cytokine seems to be interleukin(IL)-21,a member of the common γ-chainreceptor family.IL-21 is produced in e...

  7. Adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells: in vitro responses and in vivo immune responses after cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Treacy

    Full Text Available Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are non-hematopoietic cells with multi-lineage potential which makes them attractive targets for regenerative medicine applications. However, to date, therapeutic success of MSC-therapy is limited and the genetic modification of MSCs using viral vectors is one option to improve their therapeutic potential. Ex-vivo genetic modification of MSCs using recombinant adenovirus (Ad could be promising to reduce undesired immune responses as Ad will be removed before cell/tissue transplantation. In this regard, we investigated whether Ad-modification of MSCs alters their immunological properties in vitro and in vivo. We found that Ad-transduction of MSCs does not lead to up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class I and II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. Moreover, Ad-transduction caused no significant changes in terms of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, chemokine and chemokine receptor and Toll-like receptor expression. In addition, Ad-modification of MSCs had no affect on their ability to suppress T cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo injection of Ad-transduced MSCs did not change the frequency of various immune cell populations (antigen presenting cells, T helper and cytotoxic T cells, natural killer and natural killer T cells neither in the blood nor in tissues. Our results indicate that Ad-modification has no major influence on the immunological properties of MSCs and therefore can be considered as a suitable gene vector for therapeutic applications of MSCs.

  8. Cell wall modification in grapevine cells in response to UV stress investigated by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesniewska, E.; Adrian, M.; Klinguer, A.; Pugin, A

    2004-08-15

    Despite cell wall reinforcement being a well-known defence mechanism of plants, it remains poorly characterized from a physical point of view. The objective of this work was to further describe this mechanism. Vitis vinifera cv Gamay cells were treated with UV-light (254 nm), a well-known elicitor of defence mechanisms in grapevines, and physical cell wall modifications were observed using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) under native conditions. The grapevine cell suspensions were continuously observed in their culture medium from 30 min to 24 h after elicitation. In the beginning, cellulose fibrils covered by a matrix surrounded the control and treated cells. After 3 h, the elicited cells displayed sprouted expansions around the cell wall that correspond to pectin chains. These expansions were not observed on untreated grapevine cells. The AFM tip was used to determine the average surface elastic modulus of cell wall that account for cell wall mechanical properties. The elasticity is diminished in UV-treated cells. In a comparative study, grapevine cells showed the same decrease in cell wall elasticity when treated with a fungal biotic elicitor of defence response. These results demonstrate cell wall strengthening by UV stress.

  9. Modeling of Cancer Stem Cell State Transitions Predicts Therapeutic Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Sehl

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs possess capacity to both self-renew and generate all cells within a tumor, and are thought to drive tumor recurrence. Targeting the stem cell niche to eradicate CSCs represents an important area of therapeutic development. The complex nature of many interacting elements of the stem cell niche, including both intracellular signals and microenvironmental growth factors and cytokines, creates a challenge in choosing which elements to target, alone or in combination. Stochastic stimulation techniques allow for the careful study of complex systems in biology and medicine and are ideal for the investigation of strategies aimed at CSC eradication. We present a mathematical model of the breast cancer stem cell (BCSC niche to predict population dynamics during carcinogenesis and in response to treatment. Using data from cell line and mouse xenograft experiments, we estimate rates of interconversion between mesenchymal and epithelial states in BCSCs and find that EMT/MET transitions occur frequently. We examine bulk tumor growth dynamics in response to alterations in the rate of symmetric self-renewal of BCSCs and find that small changes in BCSC behavior can give rise to the Gompertzian growth pattern observed in breast tumors. Finally, we examine stochastic reaction kinetic simulations in which elements of the breast cancer stem cell niche are inhibited individually and in combination. We find that slowing self-renewal and disrupting the positive feedback loop between IL-6, Stat3 activation, and NF-κB signaling by simultaneous inhibition of IL-6 and HER2 is the most effective combination to eliminate both mesenchymal and epithelial populations of BCSCs. Predictions from our model and simulations show excellent agreement with experimental data showing the efficacy of combined HER2 and Il-6 blockade in reducing BCSC populations. Our findings will be directly examined in a planned clinical trial of combined HER2 and IL-6 targeted

  10. Study of morphological changes in rats maxillofacial skeletal muscle cells after exposed in static magnetic fields%静磁场作用下骨骼肌细胞形态学变化的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽艳; 许艳华; 林珠

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究静磁场对大鼠面颌骨骼肌细胞生长形态的影响以及细胞数量的变化.方法 将传代培养的SD大鼠面颌骨骼肌细胞分别加磁,强度为180、280、360 mT,作用时间为12、36、60 h,照相记录观察细胞形态的变化.结果 180 mT和280 mT磁场强度对细胞有明显的促增值作用,细胞形态正常;360 mT的磁场强度在36 h之内对细胞的增殖作用较明显,作用至60 h时,部分细胞发生坏死,细胞形态由梭形变成无规则的悬浮细胞.结论 静磁场对大鼠面颌骨骼肌细胞具有明显的促进增殖作用,且细胞的损伤程度与磁场强度和作用时间成正相关关系.%Objective To observe the morphological and numerary changes of skeletal muscle cells after exposed different density SMFCstatic magnetic fields). Methods The cultured skeletal muscle cells were exposed in the static magnetic fields for 12,36,60 h respectively. The skeletal muscle cell morphological changes were observed by taking photo. Results In 180mT group and 280mT group,cells significantly increased;In 360 mT group,cells grown a good condition before 36 h,but in 60 h,cells apoptosis was obviously observed. Conclusion Static magnetic fields intensity can promote cell proliferation in certain range, but high-intensity magnetic field (>360 mT) maybe is harmful to tissue health.

  11. MYSM1-dependent checkpoints in B cell lineage differentiation and B cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Michael; Farrington, Kyo; Petrov, Jessica C; Belle, Jad I; Mindt, Barbara C; Witalis, Mariko; Duerr, Claudia U; Fritz, Jörg H; Nijnik, Anastasia

    2017-03-01

    MYSM1 is a chromatin-binding histone deubiquitinase. MYSM1 mutations in humans result in lymphopenia whereas loss of Mysm1 in mice causes severe hematopoietic abnormalities, including an early arrest in B cell development. However, it remains unknown whether MYSM1 is required at later checkpoints in B cell development or for B cell-mediated immune responses. We analyzed conditional mouse models Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre, Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre, and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre with inactivation of Mysm1 at prepro-B, pre-B, and follicular B cell stages of development. We show that loss of Mysm1 at the prepro-B cell stage in Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre mice results in impaired B cell differentiation, with an ∼2-fold reduction in B cell numbers in the lymphoid organs. Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre B cells also showed increased expression of activation markers and impaired survival and proliferation. In contrast, Mysm1 was largely dispensable from the pre-B cell stage onward, with Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre mice showing no alterations in B cell numbers and largely normal responses to stimulation. MYSM1, therefore, has an essential role in B cell lineage specification but is dispensable at later stages of development. Importantly, MYSM1 activity at the prepro-B cell stage of development is important for the normal programming of B cell responses to stimulation once they complete their maturation process.

  12. Thyroid hormone responsiveness in N-Tera-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S; McCabe, C J; Visser, T J; Franklyn, J A; Kilby, M D

    2003-07-01

    N-TERA-2 cl/D1 (NT2) cells, a human embryonal cell line with characteristics of central nervous system precursor cells, were utilised to study thyroid hormone action during early neuronal growth and differentiation. Undifferentiated NT2 cells expressed mRNAs encoding thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) alpha1, alpha2 and beta1, iodothyronine deiodinases types 2 (D2) and 3 (D3) (which act as the pre-receptor regulators), and the thyroid hormone-responsive genes myelin basic protein (MBP) and neuroendocrine specific protein A (NSP-A). When terminally differentiated into post-mitotic neurons (hNT), TRalpha1 and TRbeta1 mRNA expression was decreased by 74% (P=0.05) and 95% (P<0.0001) respectively, while NSP-A mRNA increased 7-fold (P<0.05). However, mRNAs encoding TRalpha2, D2, D3 and MBP did not alter significantly upon neuronal differentiation and neither did activities of D2 and D3. With increasing 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T(3)) concentrations, TRbeta1 mRNA expression in cultured NT2 cells increased 2-fold at 10 nM T(3) and 1.3-fold at 100 nM T(3) (P<0.05) compared with that in T(3)-free media but no change was seen with T(3) treatment of hNT cells. D3 mRNA expression in NT2 cells also increased 3-fold at 10 nM T(3) (P=0.01) and 2.4-fold at 100 nM T(3) (P<0.05) compared with control, but there was no change in D3 enzyme activity. In contrast there was a 20% reduction in D3 mRNA expression in hNT cells at 10 nM T(3) (P<0.05) compared with control, with accompanying reductions in D3 activity with increasing T(3) concentrations (P<0.05). There was no significant change in the expression of the TRalpha isoforms, D2, MBP and NSP-A with increasing T(3) concentrations in either NT2 or hNT cells. Undifferentiated NT2 and differentiated hNT cells show differing patterns of T(3)-responsiveness, suggesting that there are different regulatory factors operating within these cell types.

  13. Bioreporters: gfp versus lux revisited and single-cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmeier, Stefanie; Mancuso, Matthew; Tecon, Robin; Harms, Hauke; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; Wells, Mona

    2007-03-15

    Genetically engineered organisms expressing spectroscopically active reporter molecules in response to chemical effectors display great potential as living transducers in sensing applications. Green fluorescent protein (gfp gene) bioreporters have distinct advantages over luminescent couterparts (lux gene), including applicability at the single-cell level, but are typically less sensitive. Here we describe a gfp-bearing bioreporter that is sensitive to naphthalene (a poorly water soluble pollutant behaving like a large class of hydrophobic compounds), is suitable for use in chemical assays and bioavailability studies, and has detection limits comparable to lux-bearing bioreporters for higher efficiency detection strategies. Simultaneously, we find that the exploitation of population response data from single-cell analysis is not an algorithmic conduit to enhanced signal detection and hence lower effector detection limits, as normally assumed. The assay reported functions to equal effect with or without biocide.

  14. Oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, R; Kirakodu, S S; Novak, K F; Ebersole, J L

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the use of a novel model of multispecies biofilms to stimulate profiles of cytokines/chemokines from oral epithelial cells that contribute to local inflammation in the periodontium. Streptococcus gordonii (Sg)/S. oralis (So)/S. sanguinis (Ss) and Sg/Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn)/Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) biofilms elicited significantly elevated levels of IL-1α and showed synergistic stimulatory activity compared with an additive effect of the 3 individual bacteria. Only the Sg/Actinomyces naeslundii (An)/Fn multispecies biofilms elicited IL-6 levels above those of control. IL-8 was a primary response to the Sg/An/Fn biofilms, albeit the level was not enhanced compared with a predicted composite level from the monospecies challenges. These results represent some of the first data documenting alterations in profiles of oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies biofilms.

  15. Role of cell-to-cell variability in activating a positive feedback antiviral response in human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Hu

    Full Text Available In the first few hours following Newcastle disease viral infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, the induction of IFNB1 is extremely low and the secreted type I interferon response is below the limits of ELISA assay. However, many interferon-induced genes are activated at this time, for example DDX58 (RIGI, which in response to viral RNA induces IFNB1. We investigated whether the early induction of IFNBI in only a small percentage of infected cells leads to low level IFN secretion that then induces IFN-responsive genes in all cells. We developed an agent-based mathematical model to explore the IFNBI and DDX58 temporal dynamics. Simulations showed that a small number of early responder cells provide a mechanism for efficient and controlled activation of the DDX58-IFNBI positive feedback loop. The model predicted distributions of single cell responses that were confirmed by single cell mRNA measurements. The results suggest that large cell-to-cell variation plays an important role in the early innate immune response, and that the variability is essential for the efficient activation of the IFNB1 based feedback loop.

  16. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and suppression of inflammatory response by cell stretching in rabbit synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunanusornchai, Wanlop; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2016-12-01

    Joint mobilization is known to be beneficial in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of stretching on adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and its role in modulating inflammation in rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretching of isolated rabbit synovial fibroblasts for ten min was performed. Stretching-induced AMPK activation, its underlying mechanism, and its anti-inflammatory effect were investigated using Western blot. Static stretching at 20 % of initial length resulted in AMPK activation characterized by expression of phosphorylated AMPK and phosphorylated acetyl-Co A carboxylase. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation peaked 1 h after stretching and declined toward resting activity. Using cell viability assays, static stretching did not appear to cause cellular damage. Activation of AMPK involves Ca(2+) influx via a mechanosensitive L-type Ca(2+) channel, which subsequently raises intracellular Ca(2+) and activates AMPK via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ). Interestingly, stretching suppressed TNFα-induced expression of COX-2, iNOS, and phosphorylated NF-κB. These effects were prevented by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. These results suggest that mechanical stretching suppressed inflammatory responses in synovial fibroblasts via a L-type Ca(2+)-channel-CaMKKβ-AMPK-dependent pathway which may underlie joint mobilization's ability to alleviate OA symptoms.

  17. The fractional viscoelastic response of human breast tissue cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, B.; Babahosseini, H.; Mahmoodi, S. N.; Agah, M.

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical response of a living cell is notoriously complicated. The complex, heterogeneous characteristics of cellular structure introduce difficulties that simple linear models of viscoelasticity cannot overcome, particularly at deep indentation depths. Herein, a nano-scale stress-relaxation analysis performed with an atomic force microscope reveals that isolated human breast cells do not exhibit simple exponential relaxation capable of being modeled by the standard linear solid (SLS) model. Therefore, this work proposes the application of the fractional Zener (FZ) model of viscoelasticity to extract mechanical parameters from the entire relaxation response, improving upon existing physical techniques to probe isolated cells. The FZ model introduces a new parameter that describes the fractional time-derivative dependence of the response. The results show an exceptional increase in conformance to the experimental data compared to that predicted by the SLS model, and the order of the fractional derivative (α) is remarkably homogeneous across the populations, with a median value of 0.48 ± 0.06 for the malignant population and 0.51 ± 0.07 for the benign. The cells’ responses exhibit power-law behavior and complexity not associated with simple relaxation (SLS, α = 1) that supports the application of a fractional model. The distributions of some of the FZ parameters also preserve the distinction between the malignant and benign sample populations seen from the linear model and previous results while including the contribution of fast-relaxation behavior. The resulting viscosity, measured by a composite relaxation time, exhibits considerably less dispersion due to residual error than the distribution generated by the linear model and therefore serves as a more powerful marker for cell differentiation.

  18. Enhancement of radiation response in human hepatocarcinoma cells by Metformin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Joon; Jung, Won Gyun [Division of heavy ion clinical research, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Hoon; Jeong, Youn Kyoung; Kim, Mi Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Metformin (1, 1-dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride), the most widely used drug to treat type 2 diabetic patients under benefit good tolerability profile and low cost, has sparked keen interest as potential anticancer agent. Preclinical studies showed that the primary mechanism of action of metformin is through its ability to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin inhibits complex 1 in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to an increase in the AMP-to-ATP ratio, then, phospholylated AMPK increase energy generation or suppress energy consumption and then, inhibits cell growth. However, important caveat in direct action theory of metformin is that millimorlar range, effective dose for inhibition tumor cell growth in vitro, cannot be achieved in patients. This is probably because metformin enter cells through the organic cation transporters OCT1 and OCT2, which is lowly expressed in human cells except liver and adipose cells. dependent pathway rather than through direct effects of the tumor cells. We analyzed combination effect of metformin and radiation focusing to HCC cell lines, which theoretically express high organic cation transporters, producing high centration of metformin in tumor cells. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether metformin had anti-tumor effects when combined with radiation as radiosensitizer in HCC. The results showed that metformin increased radiosensitizing efficacy in HCC cells , as well as in Huh7 xenograft mouse models. Interestingly, metformin effectively sensitizes IR-induced apoptosis in HCC through upregulation of cleaved PARP and caspase3 and increase synergically on DNA damage response with combined treatment.HCC, suggesting potential usefulness of combined therapy of metformin together with radiation for HCC cancer therapy.

  19. Mechanotransductional basis of endothelial cell response to intravascular bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Alexandra L; Pichette, Benjamin; Sobolewski, Peter; Eckmann, David M

    2011-10-01

    Vascular air embolism resulting from too rapid decompression is a well-known risk in deep-sea diving, aviation and space travel. It is also a common complication during surgery or other medical procedures when air or other endogenously administered gas is entrained in the circulation. Preventive and post-event treatment options are extremely limited for this dangerous condition, and none of them address the poorly understood pathophysiology of endothelial response to intravascular bubble presence. Using a novel apparatus allowing precise manipulation of microbubbles in real time fluorescence microscopy studies, we directly measure human umbilical vein endothelial cell responses to bubble contact. Strong intracellular calcium transients requiring extracellular calcium are observed upon cell-bubble interaction. The transient is eliminated both by the presence of the stretch activated channel inhibitor, gadolinium, and the transient receptor potential vanilliod family inhibitor, ruthenium red. No bubble induced calcium upsurge occurs if the cells are pretreated with an inhibitor of actin polymerization, cytochalasin-D. This study explores the biomechanical mechanisms at play in bubble interfacial interactions with endothelial surface layer (ESL) macromolecules, reassessing cell response after selective digestion of glycocalyx glycosoaminoglycans, hyaluran (HA) and heparin sulfate (HS). HA digestion causes reduction of cell-bubble adherence and a more rapid induction of calcium influx after contact. HS depletion significantly decreases calcium transient amplitudes, as does pharmacologically induced sydencan ectodomain shedding. The surfactant perfluorocarbon Oxycyte abolishes any bubble induced calcium transient, presumably through direct competition with ESL macromolecules for interfacial occupancy, thus attenuating the interactions that trigger potentially deleterious biochemical pathways.

  20. DNA damage responses in human induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Momcilovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells have the capability to undergo self-renewal and differentiation into all somatic cell types. Since they can be produced through somatic cell reprogramming, which uses a defined set of transcription factors, iPS cells represent important sources of patient-specific cells for clinical applications. However, before these cells can be used in therapeutic designs, it is essential to understand their genetic stability. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe DNA damage responses in human iPS cells. We observe hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents resulting in rapid induction of apoptosis after γ-irradiation. Expression of pluripotency factors does not appear to be diminished after irradiation in iPS cells. Following irradiation, iPS cells activate checkpoint signaling, evidenced by phosphorylation of ATM, NBS1, CHEK2, and TP53, localization of ATM to the double strand breaks (DSB, and localization of TP53 to the nucleus of NANOG-positive cells. We demonstrate that iPS cells temporary arrest cell cycle progression in the G(2 phase of the cell cycle, displaying a lack of the G(1/S cell cycle arrest similar to human embryonic stem (ES cells. Furthermore, both cell types remove DSB within six hours of γ-irradiation, form RAD51 foci and exhibit sister chromatid exchanges suggesting homologous recombination repair. Finally, we report elevated expression of genes involved in DNA damage signaling, checkpoint function, and repair of various types of DNA lesions in ES and iPS cells relative to their differentiated counterparts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: High degrees of similarity in DNA damage responses between ES and iPS cells were found. Even though reprogramming did not alter checkpoint signaling following DNA damage, dramatic changes in cell cycle structure, including a high percentage of cells in the S phase, increased radiosensitivity and loss of DNA damage-induced G(1/S cell cycle arrest, were

  1. Modulation of T cell response by Phellinus linteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Jung; Lien, Hsiu-Man; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Huang, Chao-Lu; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Wang, Chien-Kuo; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Yin-Kuang; Wu, Hua-Shan; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Phellinus linteus, a species of mushroom, has been shown to contribute to health benefits, such as anti-inflammatory activity and immunomodulatory efficacy. The aim of this study was to analyze the most effective constituents of P. linteus fermented broths, polysaccharides, and to evaluate their immunoregulatory effects on T cells. Four fermented broths (PL1-4) and the dialyzate medium (MD) were prepared from P. linteus mycelia, and the polysaccharide contents of each were analyzed. The P. linteus samples were tested for biological activity in the regulation of T cell activation. In T cells, the production of mitogen-induced interleukin (IL)-2 and cell cycle progression were dose-responsively inhibited by PL3 and MD, primarily through cell-cycle arrest in S phase. PL3 broth, which contained large quantities of polysaccharides, significantly decreased the ratio of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) to interleukin 4 (IL-4) in T cells. Thus, P. linteus fermented broths produced additive effects on the regulation of the Th1/Th2 balance and show promise for the development of immunomodulatory therapeutics.

  2. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations.

  3. Cell mediated immune response in human antirabies revaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Regina Veiga

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of secondary cell mediated immune response (CMI in human antirabies immunization was studied. The Puenzalida & Palácios vaccine was used because it is routinely used in Brazil. CMI was evaluated by lymphoblastic transformation indices obtained in whole blood culture in the presence of rabies and control (nervous tissue antigens. Eleven volunteers submitted to revaccination constituted the group under study, while three other volunteers submitted primo vaccination were utilized as control group. A clear secondary CMI to rabies antigen was detected in all the revaccinated volunteers who showed earlier and more intense response than the control group. Response to the control antigen, however, present in all the components of the first group was not detectable in two out of the three primovaccinated and very low in the third one.

  4. Gene expression in epithelial cells in response to pneumovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg Helene F

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM are viruses of the family Paramyxoviridae, subfamily pneumovirus, which cause clinically important respiratory infections in humans and rodents, respectively. The respiratory epithelial target cells respond to viral infection with specific alterations in gene expression, including production of chemoattractant cytokines, adhesion molecules, elements that are related to the apoptosis response, and others that remain incompletely understood. Here we review our current understanding of these mucosal responses and discuss several genomic approaches, including differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR and gene array strategies, that will permit us to unravel the nature of these responses in a more complete and systematic manner.

  5. Antigen-Specific B Cells Reactivate an Effective Cytotoxic T Cell Response against Phagocytosed Salmonella through Cross-Presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, J.; Souwer, Y.; Jorritsma, T.; Bos, H.; ten Brinke, A.; Neefjes, J.; Ham, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The eradication of facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens, like Salmonella typhi, requires the concerted action of both the humoral immune response and the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to orchestrate the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response vi

  6. Cell geometry dictates TNFα-induced genome response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Aninda; Venkatachalapathy, Saradha; Ratna, Prasuna; Wang, Yejun; Jokhun, Doorgesh Sharma; Shivashankar, G V

    2017-05-16

    Cells in physiology integrate local soluble and mechanical signals to regulate genomic programs. Whereas the individual roles of these signals are well studied, the cellular responses to the combined chemical and physical signals are less explored. Here, we investigated the cross-talk between cellular geometry and TNFα signaling. We stabilized NIH 3T3 fibroblasts into rectangular anisotropic or circular isotropic geometries and stimulated them with TNFα and analyzed nuclear translocation of transcription regulators -NFκB (p65) and MKL and downstream gene-expression patterns. We found that TNFα induces geometry-dependent actin depolymerization, which enhances IκB degradation, p65 nuclear translocation, nuclear exit of MKL, and sequestration of p65 at the RNA-polymerase-II foci. Further, global transcription profile of cells under matrix-TNFα interplay reveals a geometry-dependent gene-expression pattern. At a functional level, we find cell geometry affects TNFα-induced cell proliferation. Our results provide compelling evidence that fibroblasts, depending on their geometries, elicit distinct cellular responses for the same cytokine.

  7. Glycoarray Technologies: Deciphering Interactions from Proteins to Live Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania M. Puvirajesinghe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technologies inspired the development of carbohydrate arrays. Initially, carbohydrate array technology was hindered by the complex structures of glycans and their structural variability. The first designs of glycoarrays focused on the HTP (high throughput study of protein–glycan binding events, and subsequently more in-depth kinetic analysis of carbohydrate–protein interactions. However, the applications have rapidly expanded and now achieve successful discrimination of selective interactions between carbohydrates and, not only proteins, but also viruses, bacteria and eukaryotic cells, and most recently even live cell responses to immobilized glycans. Combining array technology with other HTP technologies such as mass spectrometry is expected to allow even more accurate and sensitive analysis. This review provides a broad overview of established glycoarray technologies (with a special focus on glycosaminoglycan applications and their emerging applications to the study of complex interactions between glycans and whole living cells.

  8. Static Validation of XSL Transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders; Olesen, Mads Østerby; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2007-01-01

    no static guarantees that, under the assumption that the input is valid relative to the input schema, the output of the transformation is valid relative to the output schema. We present a validation technique for XSLT based on the XML graph formalism introduced in the static analysis of JWIG Web services...... and XACT XML transformations. Being able to provide static guarantees, we can detect a large class of errors in an XSLT stylesheet at the time it is written instead of later when it has been deployed, and thereby provide benefits similar to those of static type checkers for modern programming languages....... Our analysis takes a pragmatic approach that focuses its precision on the essential language features but still handles the entire XSLT language. We evaluate the analysis precision on a range of real stylesheets and demonstrate how it may be useful in practice....

  9. Statics and mechanics of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Krenk, Steen

    2013-01-01

    The statics and mechanics of structures form a core aspect of civil engineering. This book provides an introduction to the subject, starting from classic hand-calculation types of analysis and gradually advancing to a systematic form suitable for computer implementation. It starts with statically determinate structures in the form of trusses, beams and frames. Instability is discussed in the form of the column problem - both the ideal column and the imperfect column used in actual column design. The theory of statically indeterminate structures is then introduced, and the force and deformation methods are explained and illustrated. An important aspect of the book’s approach is the systematic development of the theory in a form suitable for computer implementation using finite elements. This development is supported by two small computer programs, MiniTruss and MiniFrame, which permit static analysis of trusses and frames, as well as linearized stability analysis. The book’s final section presents related ...

  10. The statics of cervical traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio, A; Rendina, M; Benazzo, F; Castelli, C; Paparella, F

    1994-08-01

    The statics of a sliding body was used to study the distribution of forces during the application of cervical traction in supine patients. This theoretical analysis was completed using a dynamometer to determine the static friction between bed surface and patient head. Therefore, we measured the head weight in 12 inpatients and the minimum force that causes impending motion of the head on the bed surface. The static friction coefficient was calculated from the ratio of the two quantities. The forces acting on the cervical spine were determined by inserting the former data into a specifically designed algorithm that forecasted a progressively increasing traction angle. The coefficient of static friction was 0.62, whereas the maximum available force acting on the cervical spine was obtained with a 35 degrees traction inclination. In contrast, the forces dissipated by the plane progressively decreased with larger angles.

  11. Statics of Historic Masonry Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments in its architectural heritage. Given the age of much of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant. This book aims to help fill this demand presenting a comprehensive new statics of masonry constructions. The book, result of thirty years of research and professional experience, gives the fundamentals of statics of the masonry solid, then applied to the study of statics of arches, piers and vaults. Further, combining engineering and architecture and through an interdisciplinary approach, the book investigates the statical behaviour of many historic monuments, as the Pantheon, the Colosseum,  the domes of S. Maria del Fiore in Florence and of St. Peter in Rome, the Tower of Pisa, the Gothic Cathedrals and the Masonry Buildings under seismic actions.

  12. Smooth muscle cell phenotype alters cocultured endothelial cell response to biomaterial-pretreated leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Stacey L; Babensee, Julia E

    2008-03-01

    Model in vitro culturing systems were developed to analyze roles of biomaterial-induced leukocyte activation on endothelial cell (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype, and their crosstalk. Isolated monocytes or neutrophils were pretreated with model biomaterial beads and applied directly to "more secretory" (cultured in media containing 5% fetal bovine serum) or forced contractile (serum and growth factor starved) human aortic SMCs (HASMCs), or to the human aortic EC (HAEC) surface of HAEC/HASMC cocultures (HASMC phenotype varied to be "more or less secretory") for 5 or 24 h of static culture. Surface expression of proinflammatory [ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin], procoagulant (tissue factor), and anticoagulant (thrombomodulin) markers, as well as HAEC proliferation, were assessed by flow cytometry. Incubation of HAEC with biomaterial-pretreated monocytes (and neutrophils to lesser degree) suppressed HAEC proliferation and induced a proinflammatory/procoagulant HAEC phenotype. This HAEC phenotype was amplified in coculture with "more secretory" HASMCs and subdued in coculture with "less secretory" HASMCs. Direct incubation of biomaterial-pretreated monocytes or neutrophils with "more secretory" HASMCs further increased HASMC ICAM-1 and tissue factor expression. Direct incubation of biomaterial-pretreated monocytes or neutrophils with forced contractile HASMCs upregulated ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and tissue factor expression above the presence of serum-containing media alone.

  13. Static and Dynamic Traversable Wormholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamiak, Jaroslaw P.

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this work is to discuss the effects found in static and dynamic wormholes that occur as a solution of Einstein equations in general relativity. The ground is prepared by presentation of faster than light effects, then the focus is narrowed to Morris-Thorne framework for a static spherically symmetric wormhole. Two types of dynamic worm-holes, evolving and rotating, are considered.

  14. Static Decoupling in fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    An algebraic approach is given for a design of a static residual weighting factor in connection with fault detection. A complete parameterization is given of the weighting factor which will minimize a given performance index......An algebraic approach is given for a design of a static residual weighting factor in connection with fault detection. A complete parameterization is given of the weighting factor which will minimize a given performance index...

  15. Cell-cycle radiation response: Role of intracellular factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E.; Chang, P.; Lommel, L.; Bjornstad, K.; Dixon, M.; Tobias, C.; Kumar, K.; Blakely, W. F.

    We have been studying variations of radiosensitivity and endogenous cellular factors during the course of progression through the human and hamster cell cycle. After exposure to low-LET radiations, the most radiosensitive cell stages are mitosis and the G1/S interface. The increased activity of a specific antioxidant enzyme such as superoxide dismutase in G1-phase, and the variations of endogenous thiols during cell division are thought to be intracellular factors of importance to the radiation survival response. These factors may contribute to modifying the age-dependent yield of lesions or more likely, to the efficiency of the repair processes. These molecular factors have been implicated in our cellular measurements of the larger values for the radiobiological oxygen effect late in the cycle compared to earlier cell ages. Low-LET radiation also delays progression through S phase which may allow more time for repair and hence contribute to radioresistance in late-S-phase. The cytoplasmic and intranuclear milieu of the cell appears to have less significant effects on lesions produced by high-LET radiation compared to those made by low-LET radiation. High-LET radiation fails to slow progression through S phase, and there is much less repair of lesions evident at all cell ages; however, high-LET particles cause a more profound block in G2 phase than that observed after low-LET radiation. Hazards posed by the interaction of damage from sequential doses of radiations of different qualities have been evaluated and are shown to lead to a cell-cycle-dependent enhancement of radiobiological effects. A summary comparison of various cell-cycle-dependent endpoints measured with low-or high-LET radiations is given and includes a discussion of the possible additional effects introduced by microgravity.

  16. Monosaccharide-responsive phenylboronate-polyol cell scaffolds for cell sheet and tissue engineering applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachamalla Maheedhar Reddy

    Full Text Available Analyte-responsive smart polymeric materials are of great interest and have been actively investigated in the field of regenerative medicine. Phenylboronate containing copolymers form gels with polyols under alkaline conditions. Monosaccharides, by virtue of their higher affinity towards boronate, can displace polyols and solubilize such gels. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of utilizing phenylboronate-polyol interactions at physiological pH in order to develop monosaccharide-responsive degradable scaffold materials for systems dealing with cells and tissues. Amine assisted phenylboronate-polyol interactions were employed to develop novel hydrogel and cryogel scaffolds at neutral pH. The scaffolds displayed monosaccharide inducible gel-sol phase transformability. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated the ability of scaffolds to support cell adhesion, viability and proliferation. Fructose induced gel degradation is used to recover cells cultured on the hydrogels. The cryogels displayed open macroporous structure and superior mechanical properties. These novel phase transformable phenylboronate-polyol based scaffolds displayed a great potential for various cell sheet and tissue engineering applications. Their monosaccharide responsiveness at physiological pH is very useful and can be utilized in the fields of cell immobilization, spheroid culture, saccharide recognition and analyte-responsive drug delivery.

  17. Human NK cells positively regulate gammadelta T cells in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruijun; Zheng, Xiaodong; Li, Baiqing; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2006-02-15

    The decrease in NK cell activity and the loss of gammadelta T cells in active pulmonary tuberculosis patients have been reported. In this study, we observed that the proliferating response of gammadelta T cells to the heat-treated Ags of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from different individuals was noted to be dependent on the content or function of NK cells in PBMC in a population study. We also found that NK cells were directly rapidly activated by the heat-treated Ags from M. tuberculosis (H37Ra) in vitro; in turn, the activated NK cells improved gammadelta T cell proliferation both by CD54-mediated cell-cell contact through the forming immune synapse and by soluble factors TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, and IL-12, but not IFN-gamma. Our results demonstrated that an interaction between NK cells and gammadelta T cells existed in antituberculosis immunity. Up-regulating the function of NK cells might be beneficial to the prevention and control of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  18. A Myc-dependent division timer complements a cell-death timer to regulate T cell and B cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzel, Susanne; Binh Giang, Tran; Kan, Andrey; Marchingo, Julia M; Lye, Bryan K; Corcoran, Lynn M; Hodgkin, Philip D

    2017-01-01

    T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes integrate activating signals to control the size of their proliferative response. Here we report that such control was achieved by timed changes in the production rate of cell-cycle-regulating proto-oncoprotein Myc, with division cessation occurring when Myc levels fell below a critical threshold. The changing pattern of the level of Myc was not affected by cell division, which identified the regulating mechanism as a cell-intrinsic, heritable temporal controller. Overexpression of Myc in stimulated T cells and B cells did not sustain cell proliferation indefinitely, as a separate 'time-to-die' mechanism, also heritable, was programmed after lymphocyte activation and led to eventual cell loss. Together the two competing cell-intrinsic timed fates created the canonical T cell and B cell immune-response pattern of rapid growth followed by loss of most cells. Furthermore, small changes in these timed processes by regulatory signals, or by oncogenic transformation, acted in synergy to greatly enhance cell numbers over time.

  19. Application of a Static Fluorescence-based Cytometer (the CellScan in Basic Cytometric Studies, Clinical Pharmacology, Oncology and Clinical Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Harel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The CellScan apparatus is a laser scanning cytometer enabling repetitive fluorescence intensity (FI and polarization (FP measurements in living cells, as a means of monitoring lymphocyte activation. The CellScan may serve as a tool for diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE as well as other autoimmune diseases by monitoring FP changes in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs following exposure to autoantigenic stimuli. Changes in FI and FP in atherosclerotic patients' PBLs following exposure to various stimuli have established the role of the immune system in atherosclerotic disease. The CellScan has been evaluated as a diagnostic tool for drug-allergy, based on FP reduction in PBLs following incubation with allergenic drugs. FI and FP changes in cancer cells have been found to be well correlated with the cytotoxic effect of anti-neoplastic drugs. In conclusion, the CellScan has a variety of applications in cell biology, immunology, cancer research and clinical pharmacology.

  20. Static micro-array isolation, dynamic time series classification, capture and enumeration of spiked breast cancer cells in blood: the nanotube-CTC chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick J.; Lambert, Christopher; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Rai, Shesh N.; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in blood using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. 76-element single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (anti-EpCAM), Anti-human epithelial growth factor receptor 2 (anti-Her2) and non-specific IgG antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester. Following device functionalization, blood spiked with SKBR3, MCF7 and MCF10A cells (100/1000 cells per 5 μl per device, 170 elements totaling 0.85 ml of whole blood) were adsorbed on to the nanotube device arrays. Electrical signatures were recorded from each device to screen the samples for differences in interaction (specific or non-specific) between samples and devices. A zone classification scheme enabled the classification of all 170 elements in a single map. A kernel-based statistical classifier for the ‘liquid biopsy’ was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping series to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain blood (control) or SKBR3 spiked blood (case) on anti-Her2 functionalized devices with ˜90% sensitivity, and 90% specificity in capture of 1000 SKBR3 breast cancer cells in blood using anti-Her2 functionalized devices. Screened devices that gave positive electrical signatures were confirmed using optical/confocal microscopy to hold spiked cancer cells. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified to hold spiked blood based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells through staining for DAPI (nuclei), cytokeratin (cancer cells) and CD45 (hematologic cells) with single cell sensitivity. We report 55%-100% cancer cell capture yield depending on the active device area for blood adsorption with mean of 62% (˜12 500 captured off 20 000 spiked cells in 0.1 ml

  1. Hemopoietic cell precursor responses to erythropoietin in plasma clot cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependence of the response of mouse bone marrow cells to erythropoietin (Ep) in vitro was studied. Experiments include studies on the Ep response of marrow cells from normal, plethoric, or bled mice. Results with normal marrow reveal: (1) Not all erythroid precursors (CFU-E) are alike in their response to Ep. A significant number of the precursors develop to a mature erythroid colony after very short Ep exposures, but they account for only approx. 13% of the total colonies generated when Ep is active for 48 hrs. If Ep is active more than 6 hrs, a second population of erythroid colonies emerges at a nearly constant rate until the end of the culture. Full erythroid colony production requires prolonged exposure to erythropoietin. (2) The longer erythropoietin is actively present, the larger the number of erythroid colonies that reach 17 cells or more. Two distinct populations of immediate erythroid precursors are also present in marrow from plethoric mice. In these mice, total colony numbers are equal to or below those obtained from normal mice. However, the population of fast-responding CFU-E is consistently decreased to 10 to 20% of that found in normal marrow. The remaining colonies are formed from plethoric marrow at a rate equal to normal marrow. With increasing Ep exposures, the number of large colonies produced increases. From the marrow of bled mice, total erythroid colony production is equal to or above that of normal marrow. Two populations of colony-forming cells are again evident, with the fast-responding CFU-E being below normal levels. The lack of colonies from this group was compensated in bled mice by rapid colony production in the second population. A real increase in numbers of precursors present in this pool increased the rate of colony production in culture to twice that of normal marrow. The number of large colonies obtained from bled mice was again increased as the Ep exposure was lengthened. (ERB)

  2. PKC activation induces inflammatory response and cell death in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunhee Kim

    Full Text Available A variety of airborne pathogens can induce inflammatory responses in airway epithelial cells, which is a crucial component of host defence. However, excessive inflammatory responses and chronic inflammation also contribute to different diseases of the respiratory system. We hypothesized that the activation of protein kinase C (PKC is one of the essential mechanisms of inflammatory response in airway epithelial cells. In the present study, we stimulated human bronchial lung epithelial (BEAS-2B cells with the phorbol ester Phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu, and examined gene expression profile using microarrays. Microarray analysis suggests that PKC activation induced dramatic changes in gene expression related to multiple cellular functions. The top two interaction networks generated from these changes were centered on NFκB and TNF-α, which are two commonly known pathways for cell death and inflammation. Subsequent tests confirmed the decrease in cell viability and an increase in the production of various cytokines. Interestingly, each of the increased cytokines was differentially regulated at mRNA and/or protein levels by different sub-classes of PKC isozymes. We conclude that pathological cell death and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells in various situations may be mediated through PKC related signaling pathways. These findings suggest that PKCs can be new targets for treatment of lung diseases.

  3. Cells involved in the immune response. XXIX Establishment of optimal conditions for the primary and secondary immune responses by rabbit lymphoid cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Behelak, Y

    1975-01-01

    Attempts were made to initiate the primary and secondary humoral immune responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in vitro as determined by the hemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) response, with cell suspensions prepared from a variety of lymphoid organs of the rabbit- thymus, bone marrow, spleen, appendix, sacculus rotundus, Peyer's patches, popliteal lymph node and circulating leukocytes. A number of different media and gaseous phases were utilized in order to establish the optimal conditions for the immune response in vitro. The induction of a secondary PFC response was consistently obtained with 'memory' spleen cells obtained from rabbits 3-6 months following intravenous immunization with SRBC but not with cells of any of the other lymphoid organs, and this response probably represents the activity of memory cells which reside in the rabbit spleen. A primary response was observed only with 'normal' spleen cells, and the medium which faciliated the response was different from that which facilitated the induction of the secondary response in vitro. It was also observed, using a medium in which normal spleen cells were incapable of generating PFC', that mixed cultures of normal spleen and normal appendix or bone marrow cells could give a marked PFC reponse in vitro. Whether the PFC response to SRBCs obtained with the lymphoid cells of normal, unimmunized rabbits represent a true primary response, a secondary response, or a response of a different nature as a consequence of continuous subthreshold immunization of the rabbit with enteric microorganisms which cross-react with the antigen, remains to be determined. However, out initial successes with cultures consisting of cells of at least two distinct lymphoid organs in cases where the cells of any one of these organs could not respond, suggest that interaction of at least two functionally distinct cells is required and that the repsonse observed in vitro is probably a primary immune response.

  4. Effects of chrysotherapy on cell mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, A; Jackson, W H; Simon, T M

    1982-01-01

    Auranofin (AF) differs significantly from gold sodium thiomalate (GSTM) in formulation, i.e., aurous gold is stabilized by dual sulfur and phosphorus ligands, hydrophobic rather than hydrophilic characteristics, and lack of ionic charge. These attributes facilitate: oral absorption of AF, plasma membrane penetration, increase in intracellular lymphocyte gold concentration; and perhaps thereby influence lymphocyte function. AF treated subjects recorded prompt and sharp declines in mitogen-induced lymphoproliferative response (LMR) greater than 80%; suppressed response to skin testing with dinitrochlorobenezene (DNCB) in 11 of 14 subjects; and blebbing of lymphocyte membranes by scanning electron microscopy. In contrast, lymphocytes from a matched group of GSTM treated subjects recorded later onset and less suppression of LMR; normal response to DNCB skin testing; and did not manifest membrane blebbing. Accordingly, the therapeutic action of AF on immune response was observed in the 16 subjects receiving 6 mg/d of an average of 45 weeks to effect primarily cell mediated rather than humoral immune response when compared with a matched group of GSTM treated patients.

  5. Innate immune response to pulmonary contusion: Identification of cell-type specific inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Hoth, J. Jason; Wells, Jonathan D.; Yoza, Barbara K.; McCall, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lung injury from pulmonary contusion is a common traumatic injury, predominantly seen after blunt chest trauma such as in vehicular accidents. The local and systemic inflammatory response to injury includes activation of innate immune receptors, elaboration of a variety inflammatory mediators, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injured lung. Using a mouse model of pulmonary contusion, we had previously shown that innate immune Toll like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) mediate the ...

  6. Multivalent proteoglycan modulation of FGF mitogenic responses in perivascular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaruzza, Sabrina; Ozerdem, Ugur; Denzel, Martin; Ranscht, Barbara; Bulian, Pietro; Cavallaro, Ugo; Zanocco, Daniela; Colombatti, Alfonso; Stallcup, William B; Perris, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    Sprouting of angiogenic perivascular cells is thought to be highly dependent upon autocrine and paracrine growth factor stimulation. Accordingly, we report that corneal angiogenesis induced by ectopic FGF implantation is strongly impaired in NG2/CSPG4 proteoglycan (PG) null mice known to harbour a putative deficit in pericyte proliferation/mobilization. Conversely, no significant differences were seen between wild type and knockout corneas when VEGF was used as an angiocrine factor. Perturbed responsiveness of NG2-deficient pericytes to paracrine and autocrine stimulation by several FGFs could be confirmed in cells isolated from NG2 null mice, while proliferation induced by other growth factors was equivalent in wild type and knockout cells. Identical results were obtained after siRNA-mediated knock-down of NG2 in human smooth muscle-like cell lines, as also demonstrated by the decreased levels of FGF receptor phosphorylation detected in these NG2 deprived cells. Binding assays with recombinant proteins and molecular interactions examined on live cells asserted that FGF-2 bound to NG2 in a glycosaminoglycan-independent, core protein-mediated manner and that the PG was alone capable of retaining FGF-2 on the cell membrane for subsequent receptor presentation. The use of dominant-negative mutant cells, engineered by combined transduction of NG2 deletion constructs and siRNA knock-down of the endogenous PG, allowed us to establish that the FGF co-receptor activity of NG2 is entirely mediated by its extracellular portion. In fact, forced overexpression of the NG2 ectodomain in human smooth muscle-like cells increased their FGF-2-induced mitosis and compensated for low levels of FGF receptor surface expression, in a manner equivalent to that produced by overexpression of the full-length NG2. Upon FGF binding, the cytoplasmic domain of NG2 is phosphorylated, but there is no evidence that this event elicits signal transductions that could bypass the FGFR-mediated ones

  7. The circadian response of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Zele

    Full Text Available Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC signal environmental light level to the central circadian clock and contribute to the pupil light reflex. It is unknown if ipRGC activity is subject to extrinsic (central or intrinsic (retinal network-mediated circadian modulation during light entrainment and phase shifting. Eleven younger persons (18-30 years with no ophthalmological, medical or sleep disorders participated. The activity of the inner (ipRGC and outer retina (cone photoreceptors was assessed hourly using the pupil light reflex during a 24 h period of constant environmental illumination (10 lux. Exogenous circadian cues of activity, sleep, posture, caffeine, ambient temperature, caloric intake and ambient illumination were controlled. Dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO was determined from salivary melatonin assay at hourly intervals, and participant melatonin onset values were set to 14 h to adjust clock time to circadian time. Here we demonstrate in humans that the ipRGC controlled post-illumination pupil response has a circadian rhythm independent of external light cues. This circadian variation precedes melatonin onset and the minimum ipRGC driven pupil response occurs post melatonin onset. Outer retinal photoreceptor contributions to the inner retinal ipRGC driven post-illumination pupil response also show circadian variation whereas direct outer retinal cone inputs to the pupil light reflex do not, indicating that intrinsically photosensitive (melanopsin retinal ganglion cells mediate this circadian variation.

  8. How B cells shape the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J; Chan, John

    2009-03-01

    Extensive work illustrating the importance of cellular immune mechanisms for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has largely relegated B-cell biology to an afterthought within the tuberculosis (TB) field. However, recent studies have illustrated that B lymphocytes, through a variety of interactions with the cellular immune response, play previously underappreciated roles in shaping host defense against non-viral intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. Work in our laboratory has recently shown that, by considering these lymphocytes more broadly within their variety of interactions with cellular immunity, B cells have a significant impact on the outcome of airborne challenge with M. tuberculosis as well as the resultant inflammatory response. In this review, we advocate for a revised view of TB immunology in which roles of cellular and humoral immunity are not mutually exclusive. In the context of our current understanding of host defense against non-viral intracellular infections, we review recent data supporting a more significant role of B cells during M. tuberculosis infection than previously thought.

  9. Comparison between the effect of static contraction and tendon stretch on the discharge of group III and IV muscle afferents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shawn G. Hayes; Angela E. Kindig; Marc P. Kaufman

    2005-01-01

    ... afferents as does static contraction. We have tested the veracity of this assumption in decerebrated cats by comparing the responses of group III and IV muscle afferents to tendon stretch with those to static contraction...

  10. ROPS performance during field upset and static testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J R; McKenzie, E A; Etherton, J R; Cantis, D M; Ronaghi, M

    2010-01-01

    Agriculture remains one of the most hazardous occupations in the U.S. By conservative estimates, tractor overturns alone claim 120 lives annually. A rollover protective structure (ROPS) and a seatbelt are a highly effective engineering safety control that can prevent many of these fatalities and reduce the severity of injuries associated with tractor overturn. SAE J2194 is a consensus performance standard established for agricultural ROPS. According to this standard, satisfactory ROPS performance can be demonstrated through static testing, field upset testing, or impact testing. A previous modeling study suggested that static testing may underpredict the strain induced in a ROPS during afield upset. In the current study, field upset testing and laboratory static testing results were compared. Field upset testing included six rear and six side upset tests performed according to SAE J2194 guidelines. Additionally, static testing was performed on a ROPS of the same model. The results support findings from the modeling study. Near the lowest sections of the ROPS, the plastic strain resulting from rear upset testing exceeded the plastic strain from static testing for 18 of 24 data points. Conversely, the ROPS plastic strain from side upset testing was typically less than plastic strain from laboratory static testing. However, data indicate that the side upset test may not be very repeatable. This study suggests that the longitudinal loading energy criterion for static testing might not be a conservative predictor of rear upset ROPS response.

  11. Effects of static magnetic field on mutagenesis in in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikehata, M; Yoshie, S; Hayakawa, T [Railway Technical Research Institute, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan); Hirota, N [Nano Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 277-8561 (Japan)], E-mail: ikehata@rtri.or.jp

    2009-03-01

    Effects of static magnetic field up to 13 T were estimated in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We observed that exposure to a 5 T static magnetic field resulted in a slight but significant increase in gene recombination frequency while frequency of reverse point mutation was not altered in S. cerevisiae. This mutagenic effect showed a dose response relationship as J-shape. To investigate an involvement of reactive oxygen species in possible mutagenic effect of static magnetic field, SOD deficient E. coli QC774 was used in thymine synthesis-based mutation assay. The result shows that static magnetic field up to 13 T did not indicate mutagenicity. Thus, it is suggested that frequency of point mutation does not changed under static magnetic field regardless of its susceptibility to superoxide. These results suggest that strong static magnetic field would have small but detectable mutagenic potential. Although mechanism of the mutagenic effect of static magnetic field has not been elucidated yet, the extent of this effect is estimated extremely small by comparison with other mutagens such as ultraviolet irradiation.

  12. Transient Treg-cell depletion in adult mice results in persistent self-reactive CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Sofia N; Bourges, Dorothée; Garry, Sarah; Ross, Ellen M; van Driel, Ian R; Gleeson, Paul A

    2014-12-01

    Depletion of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in adults results in chronic inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, the impact of transient Treg-cell depletion on self-reactive responses is poorly defined. Here, we studied the effect of transient depletion of Treg cells on CD4(+) T-cell responses to endogenous self-antigens. Short-term ablation of Treg cells in mice resulted in rapid activation of CD4(+) T cells, increased percentage of IFN-γ(+) and Th17 cells in lymphoid organs, and development of autoimmune gastritis. To track self-reactive responses, we analyzed the activation of naïve gastric-specific CD4(+) T cells. There was a dramatic increase in proliferation and acquisition of effector function of gastric-specific T cells in the stomach draining LNs of Treg-cell-depleted mice, compared with untreated mice, either during Treg-cell depletion or after Treg-cell reconstitution. Moreover, the hyperproliferation of gastric-specific T cells in the Treg-cell-ablated mice was predominantly antigen-dependent. Transient depletion of Treg cells resulted in a shift in the ratio of peripheral:thymic Treg cells in the reemerged Treg-cell population, indicating an altered composition of Treg cells. These findings indicate that transient Treg-cell depletion results in ongoing antigen-driven self-reactive T-cell responses and emphasize the continual requirement for an intact Treg-cell population.

  13. In vitro antitumor immune response induced by fusion of dendritic cells and colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xu; Ying-Jiang Ye; Shan Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The prevention of recurrence of colon cancer (CC)after operation is very important for improvement of the prognosis of CC patients, especially those with micrometastasis. The generation of fused cells between dendritic cells (DCs) and tumor cells maybe an effective approach for tumor antigen presentation in immunotherapy. In this study,we fused human colon caner SW480 cells and human peripheral blood - derived DCs to induce an antitumor activity against human CC.METHODS: CC SW480 cells and human peripheral blood derived DCs were fused with 500 mL/L polyethylene glycol (PEG).RESULTS: The specific T cell responses activated by fusion cells (FCs), were observed. About 100 mL/L to 160 mL/L of the PEG-treated non-adherent cells with fluorescences were considered to be dendritomas that highly expressed the key molecules for antigen presentation in our five cases. In vitro studies showed that fusions effectively activated CD8+ T lymphocytes to secrete interferon-γ. The early apoptotic ratio of the colon cancer SW480 cells was higher than that of controls, which was affected by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) stimulated by dendritomas.CONCLUSION: The data indicate that fusion of tumor cells with DCs is an attractive strategy to induce tumor rejection.

  14. Tracking the elusive cytotoxic T cell response in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersen, Gregers; Nielsen, Morten; Overgaard, Nana Haahr;

    Quantitative and qualitative assessment of antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses in pigs is not a straightforward process. Through the years we have developed a series of reagents, tools and protocols to characterize peptide-specific CTL responses in pigs. The most common recombinant ...... SLA heavy chains were produced and peptide binding motifs were determined by assays measuring the affinity and stability of the peptide-SLA complex (pSLA) interaction. These results have been used to train neural networks to predict the binding of any pSLA (http......://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/). Recombinant SLA molecules complexed with verified binding peptides can be assembled to SLA multimers for staining of peptide-specific CTLs, and measured by flow cytometry, as we have shown with FMDV and influenza. This, however, requires SLA-matched pigs for which we have developed two methods: a sequence...

  15. Identification of genes responsive to apoptosis in HL-60 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei JIN; Le-feng QU; Ping MIN; Shan CHEN; Hong LI; He LU; Yong-tai HOU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To identify genes responsive to apoptosis in HL-60 cells treated by homoharringtonine. METHODS: cDNA microarray technology was used to detect gene expression and the result of microarrays for genes (TIEG and VDUP1) was confirmed by Northern analysis. RESULTS: Seventy-five individual mRNAs whose mass changed significantly were identified. Among these genes (25 were up-regulated and 50 were down-regulated), most are known related to oncogenes and tumor suppressor. Some genes were involved in apoptosis signaling pathways.CONCLUSION: TGFβ and TNF apoptosis signaling pathways were initiated during apoptosis in HL-60 cells.TIEG and VDUP1 play important roles in mediating apoptosis.

  16. Host Cell Autophagy in Immune Response to Zoonotic Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Skendros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a fundamental homeostatic process in which cytoplasmic targets are sequestered within double-membraned autophagosomes and subsequently delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Accumulating evidence supports the pivotal role of autophagy in host defense against intracellular pathogens implicating both innate and adaptive immunity. Many of these pathogens cause common zoonotic infections worldwide. The induction of the autophagic machinery by innate immune receptors signaling, such as TLRs, NOD1/2, and p62/SQSTM1 in antigen-presenting cells results in inhibition of survival and elimination of invading pathogens. Furthermore, Th1 cytokines induce the autophagic process, whereas autophagy also contributes to antigen processing and MHC class II presentation, linking innate to adaptive immunity. However, several pathogens have developed strategies to avoid autophagy or exploit autophagic machinery to their advantage. This paper focuses on the role of host cell autophagy in the regulation of immune response against intracellular pathogens, emphasizing on selected bacterial and protozoan zoonoses.

  17. Dynamic culture induces a cell type-dependent response impacting on the thickness of engineered connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Guillaume Marceau; Gauvin, Robert; Proulx, Maryse; Vallée, Maud; Fradette, Julie

    2013-04-01

    Mesenchymal cells are central to connective tissue homeostasis and are widely used for tissue-engineering applications. Dermal fibroblasts and adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) allow successful tissue reconstruction by the self-assembly approach of tissue engineering. This method leads to the production of multilayered tissues, devoid of exogenous biomaterials, that can be used as stromal compartments for skin or vesical reconstruction. These tissues are formed by combining cell sheets, generated through cell stimulation with ascorbic acid, which favours the cell-derived production/organization of matrix components. Since media motion can impact on cell behaviour, we investigated the effect of dynamic culture on mesenchymal cells during tissue reconstruction, using the self-assembly method. Tissues produced using ASCs in the presence of a wave-like movement were nearly twice thicker than under standard conditions, while no difference was observed for tissues produced from dermal fibroblasts. The increased matrix deposition was not correlated with an increased proliferation of ASCs, or by higher transcript levels of fibronectin or collagens I and III. A 30% increase of type V collagen mRNA was observed. Interestingly, tissues engineered from dermal fibroblasts featured a four-fold higher level of MMP-1 transcripts under dynamic conditions. Mechanical properties were similar for tissues reconstructed using dynamic or static conditions. Finally, cell sheets produced using ASCs under dynamic conditions could readily be manipulated, resulting in a 2 week reduction of the production time (from 5 to 3 weeks). Our results describe a distinctive property of ASCs' response to media motion, indicating that their culture under dynamic conditions leads to optimized tissue engineering.

  18. Static-static-light-light tetraquarks in lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Marc

    2011-01-01

    I report on a lattice computation of the energy of a system of two light quarks and two static antiquarks as a function of the separation of the static antiquarks. In terms of hadrons such a system corresponds to a pair of B mesons and its energy to the hadronic potential. I present selected results for different isospin, spin and parity combinations of the individual B mesons mainly focusing on those channels relevant to determine, whether two B mesons may form a bound tetraquark state.

  19. Response of a direct methanol fuel cell to fuel change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leo, T.J. [Dpto de Sistemas Oceanicos y Navales- ETSI Navales, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Avda Arco de la Victoria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Raso, M.A.; de la Blanca, E. Sanchez [Dpto de Quimica Fisica I- Fac. CC. Quimicas, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, Avda Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Navarro, E.; Villanueva, M. [Dpto de Motopropulsion y Termofluidodinamica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Pza Cardenal Cisneros 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Moreno, B. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C/Kelsen 5, Campus de la UAM, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    Methanol and ethanol have recently received much attention as liquid fuels particularly as alternative 'energy-vectors' for the future. In this sense, to find a direct alcohol fuel cell that able to interchange the fuel without losing performances in an appreciable way would represent an evident advantage in the field of portable applications. In this work, the response of a in-house direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) to the change of fuel from methanol to ethanol and its behaviour at different ambient temperature values have been investigated. A corrosion study on materials suitable to fabricate the bipolar plates has been carried out and either 316- or 2205-duplex stainless steels have proved to be adequate for using in direct alcohol fuel cells. Polarization curves have been measured at different ambient temperature values, controlled by an experimental setup devised for this purpose. Data have been fitted to a model taking into account the temperature effect. For both fuels, methanol and ethanol, a linear dependence of adjustable parameters with temperature is obtained. Fuel cell performance comparison in terms of open circuit voltage, kinetic and resistance is established. (author)

  20. On the spectral response measurement of multijunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, J.; Socolovsky, H.; Plá, J.

    2017-05-01

    This work presents particular aspects dealing with the measurement of the spectral response (SR) on multijunction solar cells, a tricky and somewhat complex issue. Here, we demonstrate the development of a facility to measure SR between 300 nm and 1900 nm on III-V solar cells for space applications, particularly oriented to measure large area triple junction (3J) InGaP/GaAs/Ge cells, although it can be utilized to measure other types of devices. The equipment is based on narrowband interference filters and a novel and low cost approach of two dichroic lamps as bias light source, used to select the subcell to be measured using suitable bandpass filters, whereas a simple incandescent halogen lamp is used to generate the monochromatic light beam. The signal is measured on an appropriate resistance inserted in a serial circuit using a lock-in amplifier. Measurement is fully automated, which allows operator independent results. Detailed studies performed on bias spectrum conditions and voltage biasing for these types of cell are showed, as well as a thorough treatment of the uncertainty and measurement error sources. Preliminary SR measurement results demonstrate the good performance of this setup. As an example, the results of the application of this setup to analyze radiation damage induced by 10 MeV protons are shown.

  1. Interleukin-21 triggers effector cell responses in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nitto, Daniela; Sarra, Massimiliano; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2010-08-07

    In the gut of patients with Crohn's disease and patients with ulcerative colitis, the major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in humans, the tissue-damaging immune response is mediated by an active cross-talk between immune and non-immune cells. Accumulating evidence indicates also that cytokines produced by these cells play a major role in initiating and shaping this pathologic process. One such cytokine seems to be interleukin (IL)-21, a member of the common gamma-chain-receptor family. IL-21 is produced in excess in the inflamed intestine of patients with IBD mostly by activated CD4+ T helper cells co-expressing interferon-gamma and follicular T helper cells. Moreover, both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that excessive IL-21 production leads to the activation of multiple signaling pathways that expand and sustain the ongoing mucosal inflammation. In this article, we review the available data supporting the pathogenic role of IL-21 in IBD.

  2. Static Filtered Sky Color Constancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alkhalifah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In Computer Vision, the sky color is used for lighting correction, image color enhancement, horizon alignment, image indexing, and outdoor image classification and in many other applications. In this article, for robust color based sky segmentation and detection, usage of lighting correction for sky color detection is investigated. As such, the impact of color constancy on sky color detection algorithms is evaluated and investigated. The color correction (constancy algorithms used includes Gray-Edge (GE, Gray-World (GW, Max-RGB (MRGB and Shades-of-Gray (SG. The algorithms GE, GW, MRGB, and SG, are tested on the static filtered sky modeling. The static filter is developed in the LAB color space. This evaluation and analysis is essential for detection scenarios, especially, color based object detection in outdoor scenes. From the results, it is concluded that the color constancy before sky color detection using LAB static filters has the potential of improving sky color detection performance. However, the application of the color constancy can impart adverse effects on the detection results. For images, the color constancy algorithms depict a compact and stable representative of the sky chroma loci, however, the sky color locus might have a shifting and deviation in a particular color representation. Since the sky static filters are using the static chromatic values, different results can be obtained by applying color constancy algorithms on various datasets.

  3. Influence of cell cycle on responses of MCF-7 cells to benzo[a]pyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giddings Ian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP is a widespread environmental genotoxic carcinogen that damages DNA by forming adducts. This damage along with activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR induces complex transcriptional responses in cells. To investigate whether human cells are more susceptible to BaP in a particular phase of the cell cycle, synchronised breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were exposed to BaP. Cell cycle progression was analysed by flow cytometry, DNA adduct formation was assessed by 32P-postlabeling analysis, microarrays of 44K human genome-wide oligos and RT-PCR were used to detect gene expression (mRNA changes and Western blotting was performed to determine the expression of some proteins, including cytochrome P450 (CYP 1A1 and CYP1B1, which are involved in BaP metabolism. Results Following BaP exposure, cells evaded G1 arrest and accumulated in S-phase. Higher levels of DNA damage occurred in S- and G2/M- compared with G0/G1-enriched cultures. Genes that were found to have altered expression included those involved in xenobiotic metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and DNA repair. Gene ontology and pathway analysis showed the involvement of various signalling pathways in response to BaP exposure, such as the Catenin/Wnt pathway in G1, the ERK pathway in G1 and S, the Nrf2 pathway in S and G2/M and the Akt pathway in G2/M. An important finding was that higher levels of DNA damage in S- and G2/M-enriched cultures correlated with higher levels of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA and proteins. Moreover, exposure of synchronised MCF-7 cells to BaP-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE, the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of BaP, did not result in significant changes in DNA adduct levels at different phases of the cell cycle. Conclusions This study characterised the complex gene response to BaP in MCF-7 cells and revealed a strong correlation between the varying efficiency of BaP metabolism and DNA damage in different phases of the cell

  4. Autophagy in response to photodynamic therapy: cell survival vs. cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Nancy L.; Xue, Liang-yan; Chiu, Song-mao; Joseph, Sheeba

    2009-02-01

    Autophagy (or more properly, macroautophagy) is a pathway whereby damaged organelles or other cell components are encased in a double membrane, the autophagosome, which fuses with lysosomes for digestion by lysosomal hydrolases. This process can promote cell survival by removing damaged organelles, but when damage is extensive, it can also be a mechanism of cell death. Similar to the Kessel and Agostinis laboratories, we have reported the vigorous induction of autophagy by PDT; this was found in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells whether or not they were able to efficiently induce apoptosis. One way to evaluate the role of autophagy in PDT-treated cells is to silence one of the essential genes in the pathway. Kessel and Reiners silenced the Atg7 gene of murine leukemia L1210 cells using inhibitory RNA and found sensitization to PDT-induced cell death at a low dose of PDT, implying that autophagy is protective when PDT damage is modest. We have examined the role of autophagy in an epithelium-derived cancer cell by comparing parental and Atg7-silenced MCF-7 cells to varying doses of PDT with the phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4. In contrast to L1210 cells, autophagy-deficient MCF-7 cells were more resistant to the lethal effects of PDT, as judged by clonogenic assays. A possible explanation for the difference in outcome for L1210 vs. MCF-7 cells is the greatly reduced ability of the latter to undergo apoptosis, a deficiency that may convert autophagy into a cell-death process even at low PDT doses. Experiments to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible are in process.

  5. The Importance of the Nurse Cells and Regulatory Cells in the Control of T Lymphocyte Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Guadalupe Reyes García

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes from the immune system are bone marrow-derived cells whose development and activities are carefully supervised by two sets of accessory cells. In the thymus, the immature young T lymphocytes are engulfed by epithelial “nurse cells” and retained in vacuoles, where most of them (95% are negatively selected and removed when they have an incomplete development or express high affinity autoreactive receptors. The mature T lymphocytes that survive to this selection process leave the thymus and are controlled in the periphery by another subpopulation of accessory cells called “regulatory cells,” which reduce any excessive immune response and the risk of collateral injuries to healthy tissues. By different times and procedures, nurse cells and regulatory cells control both the development and the functions of T lymphocyte subpopulations. Disorders in the T lymphocytes development and migration have been observed in some parasitic diseases, which disrupt the thymic microenvironment of nurse cells. In other cases, parasites stimulate rather than depress the functions of regulatory T cells decreasing T-mediated host damages. This paper is a short review regarding some features of these accessory cells and their main interactions with T immature and mature lymphocytes. The modulatory role that neurotransmitters and hormones play in these interactions is also revised.

  6. Statics of historic masonry constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments of its architectural heritage. Given the age of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant; still within the broad studies in the subject it is not yet recognised, in particular within the seismic area, a unitary approach to deal with Masonry structures. This successful book contributes to clarify the issues with a rigorous approach offering a comprehensive new Statics of Masonry Constructions. This third edition has been driven by some recent developments of the research in the field, and it gives the fundamentals of Statics with an original and rigorous mathematical formulation, further in-depth inquired in this new version. With many refinements and improvements, the book investigates the static behaviour of many historic monuments, such as the Gothic Cathedrals, the Mycenaean Tholoi, the Pantheon, the Colosseum, the dome...

  7. Static Correctness of Hierarchical Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    1990-01-01

    A system of hierarchical, fully recursive types in a truly imperative language allows program fragments written for small types to be reused for all larger types. To exploit this property to enable type-safe hierarchical procedures, it is necessary to impose a static requirement on procedure calls....... We introduce an example language and prove the existence of a sound requirement which preserves static correctness while allowing hierarchical procedures. This requirement is further shown to be optimal, in the sense that it imposes as few restrictions as possible. This establishes the theoretical...... basis for a general type hierarchy with static type checking, which enables first-order polymorphism combined with multiple inheritance and specialization in a language with assignments. We extend the results to include opaque types. An opaque version of a type is different from the original but has...

  8. Effect of hydrophilic polymers on the wettability, static and dynamic, of solid substrate covered by confluent monolayer of air-damaged SIRC cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eftimov, Petar; Stefanova, Nadezhda; Lalchev, Zdravko; Georgiev, Georgi As.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible implementation of hydrophilic polymers as recovery agents in air-damaged corneal cells. The sessile bubble technique was implemented to measure the wetting properties of four selected polymers: hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC), sodium chondroitin sulphate (SCS), hydroxypropyl-methylcellulose (HPMC) and poloxamer F127 (PO12), at equilibrium conditions and in the case of advancing and receding contact angle. For testing the wetting properties of th...

  9. Cell wide responses to low oxygen exposure in Desulfovibriovulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, A.; Redding, A.; Joachimiak, M.; Arkin, A.; Borglin, S.; Dehal, P.; Chakraborty, R.; Geller, J.; Hazen, T.; He, Q.; Joyner, D.; Martin, V.; Wall, J.; Yang, Z.; Zhou, J.; Keasling, J.

    2007-03-11

    The responses of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to low oxygen exposure (0.1% O{sub 2}) were monitored via transcriptomics and proteomics. Exposure to 0.1% O{sub 2} caused a decrease in growth rate without affecting viability. A concerted up regulation in the predicted peroxide stress response regulon (PerR) genes was observed in response to the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure. Several of these candidates also showed increases in protein abundance. Among the remaining small number of transcript changes was the up regulation of the predicted transmembrane tetraheme cytochrome c3 complex. Other known oxidative stress response candidates remained unchanged during this low O{sub 2} exposure. To fully understand the results of the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure, transcriptomics and proteomics data were collected for exposure to air using a similar experimental protocol. In contrast to the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure, air exposure was detrimental to both the growth rate and viability and caused dramatic changes at both the transcriptome and proteome levels. Interestingly, the transcripts of the predicted PerR regulon genes were down regulated during air exposure. Our results highlight the differences in the cell wide response to low and high O{sub 2} levels of in D. vulgaris and suggest that while exposure to air is highly detrimental to D. vulgaris, this bacterium can successfully cope with periodic exposure to low O{sub 2} levels in its environment.

  10. Dental pulp response to bacterial cell wall material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfvinge, J; Dahlén, G; Bergenholtz, G

    1985-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Bacteroides oralis and Veillonella parvula and cell wall material from Lactobacillus casei were studied for their capacity to induce leukocyte migration in the dental pulp and in an implanted wound chamber. Three adult monkeys were challenged using lyophilized material sealed into buccal Class V cavities prepared in dentin. Pulp tissue responses were observed histologically eight and 72 hours after initiation of the experiment. Subjacent to cut dentinal tubules, bacterial materials induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN's) infiltration in the pulp tissue of the majority of test teeth examined. Responses were similar for the three bacterial test materials at both time periods. Topical applications of bovine serum albumin (BSA), used as a control, induced significantly less accumulation of PMN's. Assessments of induced exudate volumes and leukocyte densities in chambers implanted in rats showed comparable rankings with pulpal experiment between test (i.e., bacterial) and control (BSA) materials. Analysis of the data indicates that high-molecular-weight complexes of bacterial cell walls may adversely affect pulpal tissue across freshly exposed dentin.

  11. Mammalian stem cells reprogramming in response to terahertz radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Bock

    Full Text Available We report that extended exposure to broad-spectrum terahertz radiation results in specific changes in cellular functions that are closely related to DNA-directed gene transcription. Our gene chip survey of gene expression shows that whereas 89% of the protein coding genes in mouse stem cells do not respond to the applied terahertz radiation, certain genes are activated, while other are repressed. RT-PCR experiments with selected gene probes corresponding to transcripts in the three groups of genes detail the gene specific effect. The response was not only gene specific but also irradiation conditions dependent. Our findings suggest that the applied terahertz irradiation accelerates cell differentiation toward adipose phenotype by activating the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG. Finally, our molecular dynamics computer simulations indicate that the local breathing dynamics of the PPARG promoter DNA coincides with the gene specific response to the THz radiation. We propose that THz radiation is a potential tool for cellular reprogramming.

  12. Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell Response to Heavy Particle Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill

    2012-07-01

    A battery of non-oncogenically immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) are being used to examine the molecular changes that lead to lung carcinogenesis after exposure to heavy particles found in the free space environment. The goal is to ultimately identify biomarkers of radioresponse that can be used for prediction of carcinogenic risk for fatal lung cancer. Our initial studies have focused on the cell line HBEC3 KT and the isogenic variant HBEC3 KTR53, which overexpresses the RASv12 mutant and where p53 has been knocked down by shRNA, and is considered to be a more oncogenically progressed variant. We have previously described the response of HBEC3 KT at the cellular and molecular level, however, the focus here is on the rate of cellular transformation after HZE radiation exposure and the molecular changes in transformed cells. When comparing the two cell lines we find that there is a maximum rate of cellular transformation at 0.25 Gy when cells are exposed to 1 GeV Fe particles, and, for the HBEC3 KTR53 there are multiple pathways upregulated that promote anchorage independent growth including the mTOR pathway, the TGF-1 pathway, RhoA signaling and the ERK/MAPK pathway as early as 2 weeks after radiation. This does not occur in the HBEC3 KT cell line. Transformed HBEC3 KT cells do not show any morphologic or phenotypic changes when grown as cell cultures. HBEC3 KTR53 cells on the other hand show substantial changes in morphology from a cobblestone epithelial appearance to a mesenchymal appearance with a lack of contact inhibition. This epithelial to mesenchymal change in morphology is accompanied by the expression of vimentin and a reduction in the expression of E-cadherin, which are hallmarks of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Interestingly, for HBEC3 KT transformed cells there are no mutations in the p53 gene, 2 of 15 clones were found to be heterozygous for the RASV12 mutation, and 3 of 15 clones expressed high levels of BigH3, a TGFB-responsive

  13. Effects of meal size and composition on incretin, alpha-cell, and beta-cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M; McQuarrie, Kelly; Girman, Cynthia J

    2009-01-01

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate postprandial insulin release from the beta-cells. We investigated the effects of 3 standardized meals with different caloric and nutritional content in terms of postprandial glucose...... of beta-cell function and incremental areas under the curve of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP were calculated. Mixed models and Friedman tests were used to test for differences in meal responses. The large CH-rich meal and fat-rich meal resulted in a slightly larger insulin response...... GLP-1 secretion. Differences in meal size and composition led to differences in insulin and incretin responses but not to differences in postprandial glucose levels of the well-controlled patients with diabetes....

  14. Static-Fluid Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Inyong

    2016-01-01

    We investigate black holes formed by static perfect fluid with $p=-\\rho/3$. These represent the black holes in $S_3$ and $H_3$ spatial geometries. There are three classes of black-hole solutions, two $S_3$ types and one $H_3$ type. The interesting solution is the one of $S_3$ type which possesses two singularities. The one is at the north pole behind the horizon, and the other is naked at the south pole. The observers, however, are free from falling to the naked singularity. There are also nonstatic cosmological solutions in $S_3$ and $H_3$, and a singular static solution in $H_3$.

  15. Static Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, Michael; Murr, Patrik J; Rauscher, Markus S; Tremmel, Anton J; Wiesent, Benjamin R; Koch, Alexander W

    2016-04-01

    Fourier transform spectroscopy has established itself as the standard method for spectral analysis of infrared light. Here we present a robust and compact novel static Fourier transform spectrometer design without any moving parts. The design is well suited for measurements in the infrared as it works with extended light sources independent of their size. The design is experimentally evaluated in the mid-infrared wavelength region between 7.2 μm and 16 μm. Due to its large etendue, its low internal light loss, and its static design it enables high speed spectral analysis in the mid-infrared.

  16. Voltage Sensors Monitor Harmful Static

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A tiny sensor, small enough to be worn on clothing, now monitors voltage changes near sensitive instruments after being created to alert Agency workers to dangerous static buildup near fuel operations and avionics. San Diego s Quasar Federal Systems received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center to develop its remote voltage sensor (RVS), a dime-sized electrometer designed to measure triboelectric changes in the environment. One of the unique qualities of the RVS is that it can detect static at greater distances than previous devices, measuring voltage changes from a few centimeters to a few meters away, due to its much-improved sensitivity.

  17. Enhancement of Spectral Response of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shuai

    Dye-Sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a class of third-generation solar devices. A notable feature of DSSC is that it can be manufactured by solution-based approach; this non-vacuum processing renders significant reduction in manufacturing costs. Different from conventional solar cells, in a DSSC, mesoporous semiconductor film with large surface areas is utilized for anchoring dye molecules, serving as light absorbing layer. Dye sensitizers play an important role in determining the final performance in DSSCs. Since the first highly-efficient DSSC was reported in 1991 sensitized by a ruthenium-based dye, numerous researchers have been focused on the development and characterization of various kinds of dyes for the applications in DSSCs. These include mainly metal complexes dyes, organic dyes, porphyrins and phthalocyanines dyes. The first part of my thesis work is to develop and test new dyes for DSSCs and a series of phenothiazine-based organic dyes and new porphyrin dyes are reported during the process. It has been realized that extending the response of dye sensitizers to a wider range of the solar spectrum is a key step in further improving the device efficiency. Typically, there are two ways for expanding the strong spectral response of DSSCs from visible to far red/NIR region. One approach is called co-sensitization. Herein, we demonstrate a new co-sensitization concept where small molecules is used to insert the interstitial site of between the pre-adsorbed large molecules. In this case, the co-adsorbed small ones is found to improve the light response and impede the back recombination, finally leading to the power conversion efficiency over 10% in conventional DSSC devices and a record-equaling efficiency of 9.2% in quasi-solid-state devices. I also implemented graphene sheets in the anode films for better charge transfer efficiency and break the energy conversion limit of co-sensitization in DSSCs. The optimal configuration between porphyrin dyes and

  18. Assessing Mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Fiona; Hoogenraad, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria serve a key role in the supply of energy to cells in the form of ATP, the supply of essential cellular components such as phospholipids and heme, in apoptosis and as a mediator of cellular signaling pathways. Mitochondria have their own DNA, consisting of a small number of genes, but the majority of the total protein complement is encoded in the nucleus, synthesized in the cytosol, and is imported into the mitochondria in a largely, if not completely unfolded form. These proteins need to be folded into their functional form within the organelle with the concomitant requirement that the organelle has its own suite of molecular chaperones and complexes to degrade damaged proteins to avoid stress arising from accumulation of unfolded proteins. This mitochondrial unfolded protein response can also be induced in cells and protein regulation can be determined using western blot, luciferase reporter assay, and sensitive mass spectrometry techniques. In this chapter, we describe a method to induce mtUPR in mammalian cells and the three methods to analyze components involved in it.

  19. High-throughput screening of cell responses to biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yliperttula, Marjo; Chung, Bong Geun; Navaladi, Akshay; Manbachi, Amir; Urtti, Arto

    2008-10-02

    Biomaterials have emerged as powerful regulators of the cellular microenvironment for drug discovery, tissue engineering research and chemical testing. Although biomaterial-based matrices control the cellular behavior, these matrices are still far from being optimal. In principle, efficacy of biomaterial development for the cell cultures can be improved by using high-throughput techniques that allow screening of a large number of materials and manipulate microenvironments in a controlled manner. Several cell responses such as toxicity, proliferation, and differentiation have been used to evaluate the biomaterials thus providing basis for further selection of the lead biomimetic materials or microenvironments. Although high-throughput techniques provide an initial screening of the desired properties, more detailed follow-up studies of the selected materials are required to understand the true value of a 'positive hit'. High-throughput methods may become important tools in the future development of biomaterials-based cell cultures that will enable more realistic pre-clinical prediction of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and toxicity. This is highly important, because predictive pre-clinical methods are needed to improve the high attrition rate of drug candidates during clinical testing.

  20. Does Acute Static Stretching Reduce Muscle Power?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis M. Kozub

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Stretching is commonly used as a technique for injury prevention in the training and clinical setting. Recently, stretching in the warm-up has been shown to decrease several muscular performance variables, but the dose-response of this effect is unknown and moreover these stretching bouts are not representative of athletes during warm up procedures, as they are usually time consuming. Our findings may improve the understanding of the neuromuscular responses to stretching and help sportsmen, coaches, physiotherapist and clinicians make decisions for integrating stretching as a part of warm up or rehabilitation treatment plan.Purpose: The aim of the present study was to examine whether acute static stretching is responsible for losses in isokinetic peak torque production and if it does, than which time of stretching effect muscle peak torque?Design: Randomized, counterbalanced, within-subjects experimental design.Setting: A university human project laboratory.Methods: Twenty (n=20 light to moderate young exercisers, male and female, from University of Limerick community, with an average age of 22.1±3.6 years, height of 175.6±5 cm, and weight of 73.1±9.9 kg, were randomly selected to take part in the study. Prior to the main study, volunteers attended the lab on two occasions to be familiarized with the knee extension protocol on the Con - trex isokinetic system and with the static stretching protocol. All participants than performed five additional static stretching protocols randomly, in non-consecutive training session. The stretching protocols were 0, 60,120, 180 and 180 with alternative pattern.Results: The results of the statistical analysis (P > 0.05 indicated that peak torque remained unchanged following the static stretching for 0-180 sec at 60 & 180° s−1 angular velocities.Conclusion: The findings suggest that an athletic stretching (shorter duration ranging from 0-180 sec does not produce decreases in peak torque. Athletes

  1. mTOR Promotes Antiviral Humoral Immunity by Differentially Regulating CD4 Helper T Cell and B Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lilin; Lee, Junghwa; Xu, Lifan; Mohammed, Ata-Ur-Rasheed; Li, Weiyan; Hale, J Scott; Tan, Wendy G; Wu, Tuoqi; Davis, Carl W; Ahmed, Rafi; Araki, Koichi

    2017-02-15

    mTOR has important roles in regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity, but whether and how mTOR modulates humoral immune responses have yet to be fully understood. To address this issue, we examined the effects of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, on B cell and CD4 T cell responses during acute infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Rapamycin treatment resulted in suppression of virus-specific B cell responses by inhibiting proliferation of germinal center (GC) B cells. In contrast, the number of memory CD4 T cells was increased in rapamycin-treated mice. However, the drug treatment caused a striking bias of CD4 T cell differentiation into Th1 cells and substantially impaired formation of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, which are essential for humoral immunity. Further experiments in which mTOR signaling was modulated by RNA interference (RNAi) revealed that B cells were the primary target cells of rapamycin for the impaired humoral immunity and that reduced Tfh formation in rapamycin-treated mice was due to lower GC B cell responses that are essential for Tfh generation. Additionally, we found that rapamycin had minimal effects on B cell responses activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which stimulates B cells in an antigen-independent manner, suggesting that rapamycin specifically inhibits B cell responses induced by B cell receptor stimulation with antigen. Together, these findings demonstrate that mTOR signals play an essential role in antigen-specific humoral immune responses by differentially regulating B cell and CD4 T cell responses during acute viral infection and that rapamycin treatment alters the interplay of immune cell subsets involved in antiviral humoral immunity. mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase involved in a variety of cellular activities. Although its specific inhibitor, rapamycin, is currently used as an immunosuppressive drug in transplant patients, it has been reported that rapamycin can also stimulate pathogen

  2. Bioluminescence Microscopy as a Method to Measure Single Cell Androgen Receptor Activity Heterogeneous Responses to Antiandrogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pallavi; Neveu, Bertrand; Velot, Lauriane; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is well-documented. Therefore, techniques to monitor single cell heterogeneous responses to treatment are needed. We developed a highly translational and quantitative bioluminescence microscopy method to measure single cell androgen receptor (AR) activity modulation by antiandrogens from fluid biopsies. We showed that this assay can detect heterogeneous cellular response to drug treatment and that the sum of single cell AR activity can mirror the response in the whole cell population. This method may thus be used to monitor heterogeneous dynamic treatment responses in cancer cells. PMID:27678181

  3. Volume adaptation in chronic liver disease: on the static and dynamic location of water, salt, protein and red cells in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2004-01-01

    in haemodynamic and homoeostatic mechanisms in patients with cirrhosis. Infusion of oncotic material (preferably albumin) may prevent circulatory dysfunction during certain types of stress. Volume expansion in advanced cirrhosis is qualitatively and quantitively different from that of healthy subjects and those......Adequate size and distribution of the circulating medium are important for cardiovascular function, tissue oxygenation and fluid homoeostasis. Patients with cirrhosis have an abnormal distribution of increased blood volume, increased total vascular compliance and increased arterial compliance....... The pattern and temporal relations of plasma and blood volume expansion are important for pathophysiological, diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and depend highly on the type of load (water, saline, oncotic material, red blood cells). In some aspects patients with cirrhosis respond differently from healthy...

  4. Clinical adjuvant combinations stimulate potent B-cell responses in vitro by activating dermal dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Matthews

    Full Text Available CD14(+ dermal DCs (CD14(+ DDCs have a natural capacity to activate naïve B-cells. Targeting CD14(+ DDCs is therefore a rational approach for vaccination strategies aimed at improving humoral responses towards poorly immunogenic antigens, for example, HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env. Here, we show that two clinically relevant TLR ligand combinations, Hiltonol plus Resiquimod and Glucopyranosyl lipid A plus Resiquimod, potently activate CD14(+ DDCs, as shown by enhanced expression of multiple cytokines (IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40 and TNF-α. Furthermore, the responses of CD14(+ DDCs to these TLR ligands were not compromised by the presence of HIV-1 gp120, which can drive immunosuppressive effects in vitro and in vivo. The above TLR ligand pairs were better than the individual agents at boosting the inherent capacity of CD14(+ DDCs to induce naïve B-cells to proliferate and differentiate into CD27(+ CD38(+ B-cells that secrete high levels of immunoglobulins. CD14(+ DDCs stimulated by these TLR ligand combinations also promoted the differentiation of Th1 (IFN-γ-secreting, but not Th17, CD4(+ T-cells. These observations may help to identify adjuvant strategies aimed at inducing better antibody responses to vaccine antigens, including, but not limited to HIV-1 Env.

  5. Static Analysis for Systems Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Rosa, D. Schuch da

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows how static analysis techniques can help understanding biological systems. Based on a simple example we illustrate the outcome of performing three different analyses extracting information of increasing precision. We conclude by reporting on the potential impact and exploitation o...... of these techniques in systems biology....

  6. Influence of mesenchymal stem cells on the response of endothelial cells to laminar flow and shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Minsung; Jo, Hansu; Ankeny, Randell F; Holliday-Ankeny, Casey J; Kim, Hyengseok; Khang, Gilson; Nerem, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in a complex hemodynamic environment play an important role in the control of blood vessel function. Since autologous SMCs are not readily available for the tissue engineering of a blood vessel substitute, a substitute for SMCs, such as human adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), is needed. The objective of this study was to use a three-dimensional coculture model of the blood vessel wall, comprised of ECs and MSCs, to determine how the presence of MSCs affects EC function. Two vascular coculture models with an EC monolayer were created using type I collagen. All models were exposed to steady laminar flow with a shear stress of 15 dyn/cm(2) for up to 48 h. ECs in both the MSC and SMC coculture models expressed up-regulated EC-specific markers compared to the EC-only control model. The most dramatic difference observed between the two coculture models was in the experiments assessing monocyte adhesion. Here, fewer monocytes bound after laminar shear compared to static conditions; however, the number of bound monocytes was much lower for the EC-MSC coculture model than the EC-SMC coculture model for both static and shear conditions. These results suggest the feasibility of developing a tissue-engineered blood vessel substitute using MSCs as a substitute for SMCs.

  7. Thyroiditis in T cell-depleted rats: suppression of the autoallergic response by reconstitution with normal lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penhale, W J; Irvine, W J; Inglis, J R; Farmer, A

    1976-07-01

    Qualititive, quantitative and functional differences were found in lymphoid cells of female thymectomized and irradiated (Tx-X) PVG/c strain rats as compared to normal females of the same strain. Tx-X rats were lymphopenic and had reduced numbers of cells within spleen and cervical lymph nodes, depressed transformation responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes to PHA and lower percentage killing of their spleen cells by anti-T-cell serum and complement. There was an increased percentage of immunoglobulin-bearing cells in the lymph nodes. Reconstitution of Tx-X rats by the intravenous route using syngeneic lymph node cells, spleen cells or thymocytes abrogated the autoimmune responses to thyroid components generally observed in this state. Lymph node and spleen cells, but not thymocytes, also prevented thyroid changes when given intraperitoneally. In contrast, bone marrow cells appeared to give enhanced responses. Quntitative studies showed that the relative proportions of the suppressor or autoregulatory cells in various lymphoid tissues were lymph node greater than spleen greater than thymus. Complete abrogation of the autoimmune responses was possible only when cells were administered within a short time of final dose of irradiation and moderate thyroid change was again seen if transfer was delayed for 14 days post-irradiation. At 28 days reconstitution had no influence on the development of the autoimmune responses. Preliminary characterization studies using an anti-T-cell serum and fractionation of lymph node cells on a linear Ficoll gradient suggested that autoregulatory cell is a large T cell.

  8. Injectable, Biomolecule-Responsive Polypeptide Hydrogels for Cell Encapsulation and Facile Cell Recovery through Triggered Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinghua; He, Chaoliang; Zhang, Zhen; Ren, Kaixuan; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-11-16

    Injectable hydrogels have been widely investigated in biomedical applications, and increasing demand has been proposed to achieve dynamic regulation of physiological properties of hydrogels. Herein, a new type of injectable and biomolecule-responsive hydrogel based on poly(l-glutamic acid) (PLG) grafted with disulfide bond-modified phloretic acid (denoted as PLG-g-CPA) was developed. The hydrogels formed in situ via enzymatic cross-linking under physiological conditions in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide. The physiochemical properties of the hydrogels, including gelation time and the rheological property, were measured. Particularly, the triggered degradation of the hydrogel in response to a reductive biomolecule, glutathione (GSH), was investigated in detail. The mechanical strength and inner porous structure of the hydrogel were influenced by the addition of GSH. The polypeptide hydrogel was used as a three-dimensional (3D) platform for cell encapsulation, which could release the cells through triggered disruption of the hydrogel in response to the addition of GSH. The cells released from the hydrogel were found to maintain high viability. Moreover, after subcutaneous injection into rats, the PLG-g-CPA hydrogels with disulfide-containing cross-links exhibited a markedly faster degradation behavior in vivo compared to that of the PLG hydrogels without disulfide cross-links, implying an interesting accelerated degradation process of the disulfide-containing polypeptide hydrogels in the physiological environment in vivo. Overall, the injectable and biomolecule-responsive polypeptide hydrogels may serve as a potential platform for 3D cell culture and easy cell collection.

  9. Necdin modulates proliferative cell survival of human cells in response to radiation-induced genotoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafontaine Julie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The finite replicative lifespan of cells, termed cellular senescence, has been proposed as a protective mechanism against the proliferation of oncogenically damaged cells, that fuel cancer. This concept is further supported by the induction of premature senescence, a process which is activated when an oncogene is expressed in normal primary cells as well as following intense genotoxic stresses. Thus, deregulation of genes that control this process, like the tumor suppressor p53, may contribute to promoting cancer by allowing cells to bypass senescence. A better understanding of the genes that contribute to the establishment of senescence is therefore warranted. Necdin interacts with p53 and is also a p53 target gene, although the importance of Necdin in the p53 response is not clearly understood. Methods In this study, we first investigated Necdin protein expression during replicative senescence and premature senescence induced by gamma irradiation and by the overexpression of oncogenic RasV12. Gain and loss of function experiments were used to evaluate the contribution of Necdin during the senescence process. Results Necdin expression declined during replicative aging of IMR90 primary human fibroblasts or following induction of premature senescence. Decrease in Necdin expression seemed to be a consequence of the establishment of senescence since the depletion of Necdin in human cells did not induce a senescence-like growth arrest nor a flat morphology or SA-β-galactosidase activity normally associated with senescence. Similarly, overexpression of Necdin did not affect the life span of IMR90 cells. However, we demonstrate that in normal human cells, Necdin expression mimicked the effect of p53 inactivation by increasing radioresistance. Conclusion This result suggests that Necdin potentially attenuate p53 signaling in response to genotoxic stress in human cells and supports similar results describing an inhibitory function

  10. Stress responses in flavivirus-infected cells: activation of unfolded protein response and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Belén eBlázquez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Flavivirus is a genus of RNA viruses that includes multiple long known human, animal and zoonotic pathogens such as Dengue virus, yellow fever virus, West Nile virus or Japanese encephalitis virus, as well as other less known viruses that represent potential threats for human and animal health such as Usutu or Zika viruses. Flavivirus replication is based on endoplasmic reticulum-derived structures. Membrane remodeling and accumulation of viral factors induce endoplasmic reticulum stress that results in activation of a cellular signaling response termed unfolded protein response (UPR, which can be modulated by the viruses for their own benefit. Concomitant with the activation of the UPR, an upregulation of the autophagic pathway in cells infected with different flaviviruses has also been described. This review addresses the current knowledge of the relationship between endoplasmic reticulum stress, UPR and autophagy in flavivirus-infected cells and the growing evidences for an involvement of these cellular pathways in the replication and pathogenesis of these viruses.

  11. Antigen-Specific B Cells Reactivate an Effective Cytotoxic T Cell Response against Phagocytosed Salmonella through Cross-Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jelle de Wit; Yuri Souwer; Tineke Jorritsma; Hanny Klaasse Bos; Anja ten Brinke; Jacques Neefjes; S Marieke van Ham

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The eradication of facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens, like Salmonella typhi, requires the concerted action of both the humoral immune response and the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to orchestrate the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response via cross-presentation of bacterial antigens onto MHC class I molecules. Cross-presentation of Salmonella by DCs however, is accompanied by the induction of apoptosis in the DCs. Besides antibody pro...

  12. Functional specialization of skin dendritic cell subsets in regulating T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn E. Clausen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are a heterogeneous family of professional antigen presenting cells (APC classically recognized as most potent inducers of adaptive immune responses. In this respect, Langerhans cells (LC have long been considered to be prototypic immunogenic DC in the skin. More recently this view has considerably changed. The generation of in vivo cell ablation and lineage tracing models revealed the complexity of the skin DC network and, in particular, established the existence of a number of phenotypically distinct Langerin+ and negative DC populations in the dermis. Moreover, by now we appreciate that DC also exert important regulatory functions and are required for the maintenance of tolerance towards harmless foreign and self-antigens. This review summarizes our current understanding of the skin-resident DC system in the mouse and discusses emerging concepts on the functional specialization of the different skin DC subsets in regulating T cell responses. Special consideration is given to antigen cross-presentation as well as immune reactions towards contact sensitizers, cutaneous pathogens and tumors. These studies form the basis for the manipulation of the human counterparts of the murine DC subsets to promote immunity or tolerance for the treatment of human disease.

  13. Nanoscale Properties of Neural Cell Prosthetic and Astrocyte Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, D. A.; Ayres, V. M.; Delgado-Rivera, R.; Ahmed, I.; Meiners, S. A.

    2009-03-01

    Preliminary data from in-vivo investigations (rat model) suggest that a nanofiber prosthetic device of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-modified nanofibers can correctly guide regenerating axons across an injury gap with aligned functional recovery. Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy (SPRM) with auto-tracking of individual nanofibers is used for investigation of the key nanoscale properties of the nanofiber prosthetic device for central nervous system tissue engineering and repair. The key properties under SPRM investigation include nanofiber stiffness and surface roughness, nanofiber curvature, nanofiber mesh density and porosity, and growth factor presentation and distribution. Each of these factors has been demonstrated to have global effects on cell morphology, function, proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, and differentiation. The effect of FGF-2 modification on the key nanoscale properties is investigated. Results from the nanofiber prosthetic properties investigations are correlated with astrocyte response to unmodified and FGF-2 modified scaffolds, using 2D planar substrates as a control.

  14. [Conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma: paradoxical response to interferon eyedrops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, E; Conesa, E; Castro, M; Martínez, L; de Pablo, C; González, M L

    2014-07-01

    A 67 year-old male seen for a longstanding corneal-conjunctival tumor. topical interferon α2b (IFN-α2b) 10 U/ml. A significant increase in lesion size was observed after 8 weeks. A surgical excision with cryotherapy was then performed. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. At this time the patient was found to have a positive HIV serology. Conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is a pre-cancerous lesion of the ocular surface. Medical treatment of CIN is essentially with IFN-α2b due to its antiviral/antitumor properties. In patients with HIV, treatment response could be paradoxical. We recommend serology for HIV before treatment with topical IFN-α2b. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Nickel elicits a fast antioxidant response in Coffea arabica cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Junior, R A; Moldes, C A; Delite, F S; Gratão, P L; Mazzafera, P; Lea, P J; Azevedo, R A

    2006-01-01

    The antioxidant responses of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) cell suspension cultures to nickel (Ni) were investigated. Ni was very rapidly accumulated in the cells and the accumulation could be directly correlated with the increase of NiCl(2) concentration in the medium. At 0.05 mM NiCl(2) growth was stimulated, but at 0.5 mM NiCl(2), the growth rate was reduced. An indication of alterations in the presence of reactive oxygen species was detected by an increase in lipid peroxidation at 0.5 mM NiCl(2). Catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6), glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2), ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11), guaiacol peroxidase (GOPX; EC 1.11.1.7) and superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1) activities were increased, particularly at earlier NiCl(2) exposure times and the activities were higher at 0.5 mM NiCl(2) for most of exposure times tested. Non-denaturing PAGE revealed one CAT isoenzyme, nine SOD isoenzymes and four GR isoenzymes. The SOD isoenzymes were differentially affected by NiCl(2) treatment and one GR isoenzyme was increased by NiCl(2). NiCl(2) at 0.05 mM did not induce lipid peroxidation and the main response appeared to be via the induction of SOD, CAT, GOPX and APX activities for the removal of the reactive oxygen species and through the induction of GR to ensure the availability of reduced glutathione.

  16. Improving alkenone paleothermometry by incorporating cell response to environmental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl, F. G.; Wolfe, G. V.; Mix, A. C.; Sparrow, M. A.

    2003-04-01

    A linear, global coretop calibration now exists for the alkenone unsaturation index Uk’37 and mean annual SST (maSST). The calibration equation is statistically the same as that for a subarctic Pacific strain of Emiliania huxleyi (Ehux) grown exponentially under isothermal conditions in batch culture. Although the calibration has been applied widely for paleoSST reconstruction, uncertainty still exists, stemming from two key factors: genetic variability among strains, and physiologic response to stress and growth state. We will discuss in this talk the extent that Uk’37 and other aspects of cellular alkenone composition vary in response to nutrient depletion and light deprivation in isothermal (15^oC) batch cultures of Ehux isolated from three different ocean locations - a Norwegian fjord (CCMP370); the subarctic Pacific (CCMP1742) and the Sargasso Sea (CCMP 372). We will also present results from detailed alkenone compositional analysis in thirty surface sediments collected between ˜50^oS and 10^oS along the Chile-Peru margin in the SE Pacific Ocean. The Uk’37 - maSST relationship derived from this dataset is statistically indistinguishable from the global coretop calibration. But, comparison of other compositional properties shows that the alkenone signature preserved in the Chile-Peru margin sediments is also not consistent with that expressed by exponentially growing cells of any of the three cultured Ehux strains. Alkenone signatures preserved in sediments appear more like that in algal cells that have experienced some level of non-thermal, physiological stress such as nutrient and light limitation. Given our observations as a precedent, improved confidence in paleotemperature estimates derived from Uk’37 measurements may require interpretation of unsaturation patterns in full context with the overall alkenone composition preserved in the sediment.

  17. Stream biofilm responses to flow intermittency: from cells to ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi eSabater

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Temporary streams are characterized by the alternation of dry and wet hydrological phases, creating both a harsh environment for the biota as well as a high diversity of opportunities for adaptation. These systems are eminently microbial-based during several of these hydrological phases, and those growing on all solid substrata (biofilms accordingly change their physical structure and community composition. Biofilms experience large decreases on cell densities and biomass, both of bacteria and algae, during dryness. Algal and bacterial communities show remarkable decreases in their diversity, at least locally (at the habitat scale. Biofilms also respond with significant physiological plasticity to each of the hydrological changes. The decreasing humidity of the substrata through the drying process, and the changing quantity and quality of organic matter and nutrients available in the stream during that process, causes unequal responses on the biofilm bacteria and algae. Biofilm algae are affected faster than bacteria by the hydric stress, and as a result the ecosystem respiration resists longer than gross primary production to the increasing duration of flow intermittency. This response implies enhancing ecosystem heterotrophy, a pattern that can be exacerbated in temporary streams suffering of longer dry periods under global change.

  18. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

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    Andoh Y

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Andoh,1,2 Naohiko Makino,2 Mitsunori Yamakawa11Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanBackground: It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs among dendritic cells (DCs fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines.Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated.Results: The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1 was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs

  19. Helicobacter pylori impairs murine dendritic cell responses to infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Hui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori, a human pathogen associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric malignancies, is generally viewed as an extracellular microorganism. Here, we show that H. pylori replicates in murine bone marrow derived-dendritic cells (BMDCs within autophagosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A 10-fold increase of CFU is found between 2 h and 6 h p.i. in H. pylori-infected BMDCs. Autophagy is induced around the bacterium and participates at late time points of infection for the clearance of intracellular H. pylori. As a consequence of infection, LC3, LAMP1 and MHC class II molecules are retained within the H. pylori-containing vacuoles and export of MHC class II molecules to cell surface is blocked. However, formalin-fixed H. pylori still maintain this inhibitory activity in BMDC derived from wild type mice, but not in from either TLR4 or TLR2-deficient mice, suggesting the involvement of H. pylori-LPS in this process. TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 expression was also modulated upon infection showing a TLR2-specific dependent IL-10 secretion. No IL-12 was detected favoring the hypothesis of a down modulation of DC functions during H. pylori infection. Furthermore, antigen-specific T cells proliferation was also impaired upon infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H. pylori can infect and replicate in BMDCs and thereby affects DC-mediated immune responses. The implication of this new finding is discussed for the biological life cycle of H. pylori in the host.

  20. Cell type-specific responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, C; Diendorf, J; Gessmann, J; Simon, T; Habijan, T; Eggeler, G; Schildhauer, T A; Epple, M; Köller, M

    2011-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are increasingly used in biomedical applications because of their remarkable antimicrobial activity. In biomedicine, Ag-NP are coated onto or embedded in wound dressings, surgical instruments and bone substitute biomaterials, such as silver-containing calcium phosphate cements. Free Ag-NP and silver ions are released from these coatings or after the degradation of a biomaterial, and may come into close contact with blood cells. Despite the widespread use of Ag-NP as an antimicrobial agent, there is a serious lack of information on the biological effects of Ag-NP on human blood cells. In this study, the uptake of Ag-NP by peripheral monocytes and lymphocytes (T-cells) was analyzed, and the influence of nanosilver on cell biological functions (proliferation, the expression of adhesion molecules, cytokine release and the generation of reactive oxygen species) was studied. After cell culture in the presence of monodispersed Ag-NP (5-30μgml(-1) silver concentration), agglomerates of nanoparticles were detected within monocytes (CD14+) but not in T-cells (CD3+) by light microscopy, flow cytometry and combined focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy. The uptake rate of nanoparticles was concentration dependent, and the silver agglomerates were typically found in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, a concentration-dependent activation (e.g. an increased expression of adhesion molecule CD54) of monocytes at Ag-NP concentrations of 10-15μgml(-1) was observed, and cytotoxicity of Ag-NP-treated monocytes was observed at Ag-NP levels of 25μgml(-1) and higher. However, no modulation of T-cell proliferation was observed in the presence of Ag-NP. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence for a cell-type-specific uptake of Ag-NP by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the resultant cellular responses after exposure.

  1. Inactivation of PTEN is responsible for the survival of Hep G2 cells in response to etoposide-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Ananda; Samanta, Saheli; Karmakar, Parimal

    2011-10-01

    The chemo-resistance character of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells is well known but the anomalies associated with such resistance character are not completely understood. In this study, etoposide-induced signaling events in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, Hep G2 has been compared with Chang Liver cells, a normal human liver cell line. Hep G2 cells are resistant to etoposide when compared with Chang Liver cells. Etoposide-induced γH2AX foci in Hep G2 cells are persisted for a longer time without affecting cell cycle, indicating that Hep G2 cells are able to maintain its growth with damaged DNA. Further, Akt signaling pathway is deregulated in Hep G2 cells. The upstream negative regulator of Akt, PTEN remains inactive, as it is hyperphosphorylated in Hep G2 cells. Inhibition of PI-3K pathway by wortmannin partially reverses the etoposide-resistance character of Hep G2 cells. Either Hep G2 or Chang Liver cells when transfected with plasmid carrying active Akt (myr-Akt) become resistance towards etoposide compared to the cells transfected with empty vectors or kinase defective Akt. Transient transfection of wild type PTEN in Hep G2 cells does not change its response towards etoposide whereas Chang Liver cells become sensitive after transfection with same plasmid. These results suggest that inactivation of PTEN, which renders activation of Akt, may contribute largely for the etoposide-resistance character of Hep G2 cells. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Lipoproteins are Major Targets of the Polyclonal Human T-cell Response to M. tuberculosis1

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Most vaccines and basic studies of T cell epitopes in M. tuberculosis emphasize water soluble proteins that are secreted into the extracellular space and presented in the context of MHC Class II. Much less is known about the role of antigens retained within the cell wall. We used polyclonal T cells from infected humans to probe for responses to immunodominant antigens in the M. tuberculosis cell wall. We found that the magnitude of response to secreted or cell wall intrinsic compounds was sim...

  3. Mathematical modeling of the specific T cell response to a viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bidot, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    T cell is one of the most important cells in specific immunity. In order to devise a tool for understanding and predicting some mechanisms of the immune system, a model for T cell response is proposed. The T lymphocyte activation by the recognition of a peptide carried by an antigen presenting cell is an essential step of this immune response. T cell activation was modelled by a system of ordinary differential equations of chemical kinetics type, representing the temporal evolution of the con...

  4. A Minimum Leakage Quasi-Static RAM Bitcell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Teman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available As SRAMs continue to grow and comprise larger percentages of the area and power consumption in advanced systems, the need to minimize static currents becomes essential. This brief presents a novel 9T Quasi-Static RAM Bitcell that provides aggressive leakage reduction and high write margins. The quasi-static operation method of this cell, based on internal feedback and leakage ratios, minimizes static power while maintaining sufficient, albeit depleted, noise margins. This paper presents the concept of the novel cell, and discusses the stability of the cell under hold, read and write operations. The cell was implemented in a low-power 40 nm TSMC process, showing as much as a 12× reduction in leakage current at typical conditions, as compared to a standard 6T or 8T bitcell at the same supply voltage. The implemented cell showed full functionality under global and local process variations at nominal and low voltages, as low as 300 mV.

  5. Phenotypic differences of CD4(+) T cells in response to red blood cell immunization in transfused sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingert, Benoît; Tamagne, Marie; Habibi, Anoosha; Pakdaman, Sadaf; Ripa, Julie; Elayeb, Rahma; Galacteros, Frédéric; Bierling, Philippe; Ansart-Pirenne, Hélène; Bartolucci, Pablo; Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2015-06-01

    Alloimmunization against red blood cells (RBCs) is the main immunological risk associated with transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, about 50-70% of SCD patients never get immunized despite frequent transfusion. In murine models, CD4(+) T cells play a key role in RBC alloimmunization. We therefore explored and compared the CD4(+) T-cell phenotypes and functions between a group of SCD patients (n = 11) who never became immunized despite a high transfusion regimen and a group of SCD patients (n = 10) who had become immunized (at least against Kidd antigen b) after a low transfusion regimen. We studied markers of CD4(+) T-cell function, including TLR, that directly control lymphocyte function, and their spontaneous cytokine production. We also tested responders for the cytokine profile in response to Kidd antigen b peptides. Low TLR2/TLR3 expression and, unexpectedly, strong expression of CD40 on CD4(+) T cells were associated with the nonresponder status, whereas spontaneous expression of IL-10 by CD4(+) T cells and weak Tbet expression were associated with the responder status. A Th17 profile was predominant in responders when stimulated by Jb(k) . These findings implicate CD4(+) T cells in alloimmunization in humans and suggest that they may be exploited to differentiate responders from nonresponders.

  6. Effects of meal size and composition on incretin, alpha-cell, and beta-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M; McQuarrie, Kelly; Girman, Cynthia J; Stein, Peter P; Mari, Andrea; Holst, Jens J; Nijpels, Giel; Dekker, Jacqueline M

    2010-04-01

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate postprandial insulin release from the beta-cells. We investigated the effects of 3 standardized meals with different caloric and nutritional content in terms of postprandial glucose, insulin, glucagon, and incretin responses. In a randomized crossover study, 18 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 6 healthy volunteers underwent three 4-hour meal tolerance tests (small carbohydrate [CH]-rich meal, large CH-rich meal, and fat-rich meal). Non-model-based and model-based estimates of beta-cell function and incremental areas under the curve of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP were calculated. Mixed models and Friedman tests were used to test for differences in meal responses. The large CH-rich meal and fat-rich meal resulted in a slightly larger insulin response as compared with the small CH-rich meal and led to a slightly shorter period of hyperglycemia, but only in healthy subjects. Model-based insulin secretion estimates did not show pronounced differences between meals. Both in healthy individuals and in those with diabetes, more CH resulted in higher GLP-1 release. In contrast with the other meals, GIP release was still rising 2 hours after the fat-rich meal. The initial glucagon response was stimulated by the large CH-rich meal, whereas the fat-rich meal induced a late glucagon response. Fat preferentially stimulates GIP secretion, whereas CH stimulates GLP-1 secretion. Differences in meal size and composition led to differences in insulin and incretin responses but not to differences in postprandial glucose levels of the well-controlled patients with diabetes.

  7. Visual response properties of cells in the ventral and dorsal parts of the macaque inferotemporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, H; Tanaka, K

    2001-05-01

    We recorded from cells in the anterio-ventral (TEav) and anterio- dorsal (TEad) parts of area TE of the inferotemporal cortex and examined their responses to a set of 100 visual stimuli in awake, fixating monkeys. In both TEav and TEad we found that, depending on the stimulus, the time course of responses varied considerably within individual cells and that there were three main factors in the variation. One factor is variance in the balance between the initial transient part of responses around 130 ms after stimulus onset and the later part after 240 ms from stimulus onset. The later parts of responses were more stimulus selective. The second factor is variance in the latency of response onset and peak and the third is variance in the speed of decay from the peak within the initial part of the responses. Stronger responses had shorter onset and peak latencies and longer decay times. The results suggest that stimulus images can be discriminated very rapidly in TEav and TEad by detecting differences in response onset. TEav cells differed from TEad cells in that they were more difficult to activate than TEad cells: the proportion of responsive TEav cells was smaller, the maximal responses of individual cells were smaller than in TEad and the number of stimuli that evoked significant responses in individual responsive cells was also smaller than in TEad. Moreover, TEav cells, overall, responded more strongly to more colorful object images than less colorful ones, while TEad cells did not show such a tendency. However, the minimum onset latency of individual cells and the sharpness of stimulus selectivity did not differ significantly between TEav and TEad. Responses of TEav cells are as selective as those of TEad cells, although there remains a possibility that the domain of selectivity differs between the two areas. These results support an earlier anatomical finding that TEav and TEad are located at the same hierarchical level of separate serial pathways rather than

  8. To investigate the necessity of STRA6 upregulation in T cells during T cell immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik Terra

    Full Text Available Our earlier study revealed that STRA6 (stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6 was up-regulated within 3 h of TCR stimulation. STRA6 is the high-affinity receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. We generated STRA6 knockout (KO mice to assess whether such up-regulation was critical for T-cell activation, differentiation and function. STRA6 KO mice under vitamin A sufficient conditions were fertile without apparent anomalies upon visual inspection. The size, cellularity and lymphocyte subpopulations of STRA6 KO thymus and spleen were comparable to those of their wild type (WT controls. KO and WT T cells were similar in terms of TCR-stimulated proliferation in vitro and homeostatic expansion in vivo. Naive KO CD4 cells differentiated in vitro into Th1, Th2, Th17 as well as regulatory T cells in an analogous manner as their WT counterparts. In vivo experiments revealed that anti-viral immune responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in KO mice were comparable to those of WT controls. We also demonstrated that STRA6 KO and WT mice had similar glucose tolerance. Total vitamin A levels are dramatically lower in the eyes of KO mice as compared to those of WT mice, but the levels in other organs were not significantly affected after STRA6 deletion under vitamin A sufficient conditions, indicating that the eye is the mouse organ most sensitive to the loss of STRA6. Our results demonstrate that 1 in vitamin A sufficiency, the deletion of STRA6 in T cells does no affect the T-cell immune responses so-far tested, including those depend on STAT5 signaling; 2 STRA6-independent vitamin A uptake compensated the lack of STRA6 in lymphoid organs under vitamin A sufficient conditions in mice; 3 STRA6 is critical for vitamin A uptake in the eyes even in vitamin A sufficiency.

  9. Studies of cell-mediated immune responses to influenza vaccination in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holvast, Albert; Van Assen, Sander; De Haan, Aalzen; Huckriede, Anke; Benne, Cornelis A.; Westra, Johanna; Palache, Abraham; Wilschut, Jan; Kallenberg, Cornelis; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Both antibody and cell-mediated responses are involved in the defense against influenza. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a decreased antibody response to subunit influenza vaccine has been demonstrated, but cell-mediated responses have not yet been assessed. This stud

  10. Static Analysis of Dynamic Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Magnus

    on the behaviour of these languages. A common theme is the reliance on static program analysis to over-approximate the behaviour of programs written in these languages. Specifically, the use of whole-program dataflow analysis. The research challenge of this line of work is the adaption of existing- and invention......Dynamic programming languages are highly popular and widely used. Java- Script is often called the lingua franca of the web and it is the de facto standard for client-side web programming. On the server-side the PHP, Python and Ruby languages are prevalent. What these languages have in common...... is an expressive power which is not easily captured by any static type system. These, and similar dynamic languages, are often praised for their ease-of-use and flexibility. Unfortunately, this dynamism comes at a great cost: The lack of a type system implies that most errors are not discovered until run...

  11. Static Behaviour of Bucket Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim André

    . The monopod concept is investigated in this thesis, regarding the static behaviour from loads relevant to offshore wind turbines. The main issue in this concept is the rotational stiffness of the foundation and the combined capacity dominated by moments. The vertical bearing capacity of bucket foundations...... theory is proposed. The proposed expression applies to plane strain as well as axis-symmetric stress conditions for foundations with smooth or rough bases. A thorough experimental investigation of the static behaviour of bucket foundations subjected to combined loading is carried out. Laboratory tests...... as well as large-scale tests on bucket foundations subjected to low vertical load are performed during this work. Numerical simulations of the tests performed are carried out using the Mohr Coulomb material model and the commercial finite element code ABAQUS. Based on the present work, the finite element...

  12. Static behaviour of induced seismicity

    CERN Document Server

    Mignan, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The standard paradigm to describe seismicity induced by fluid injection is to apply nonlinear diffusion dynamics in a poroelastic medium. I show that the spatiotemporal behaviour and rate evolution of induced seismicity can, instead, be expressed by geometric operations on a static stress field produced by volume change at depth. I obtain laws similar in form to the ones derived from poroelasticity while requiring a lower description length. Although fluid flow is known to occur in the ground, it is not pertinent to the behaviour of induced seismicity. The proposed model is equivalent to the static stress model for tectonic foreshocks generated by the Non- Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory. This study hence verifies the explanatory power of this theory outside of its original scope.

  13. Static Behaviour of Bucket Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim André

    . The monopod concept is investigated in this thesis, regarding the static behaviour from loads relevant to offshore wind turbines. The main issue in this concept is the rotational stiffness of the foundation and the combined capacity dominated by moments. The vertical bearing capacity of bucket foundations...... theory is proposed. The proposed expression applies to plane strain as well as axis-symmetric stress conditions for foundations with smooth or rough bases. A thorough experimental investigation of the static behaviour of bucket foundations subjected to combined loading is carried out. Laboratory tests...... method is concluded to be a superior method in estimating the post peak behaviour as well as the combined capacity of bucket foundations in relation to the offshore wind turbine problem....

  14. Statics of historic masonry constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2016-01-01

    This successful book, which is now appearing in its second edition, presents a comprehensive new Statics of Masonry Constructions. Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments in its architectural heritage. Given the age of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant. The book you hold in hands contributes to fill this demand. The second edition integrates the original text of the first edition with new developments, widening and revisions, due to recent research studies achievements. The result is a book that gives a complete picture of the behaviour of the Masonry Constructions. First of all, it gives the fundamentals of its Statics, based on the no-tension assumption, and then it develops the Limit Analysis for the Masonry Constructions. In this framework, through an interdisciplinary approach combining Engineering and Architecture, the book also investigates the sta...

  15. 闭孔泡沫Zn-22Al在单轴准静态加载下的压缩行为%Compressive behavior of Zn-22Al closed-cell foams under uniaxial quasi-static loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. HEYDARI ASTARAIE; H. R. SHAHVERDI; S. H. ELAHI

    2015-01-01

    通过使用氢化物发泡剂,采用熔体发泡法制备闭孔泡沫Zn−Al合金,在准静态条件下研究其压缩性能。在压缩试样过程中,分析发泡材料的结构,并研究其形态和压缩性能之间的关系。结果表明,应力−应变行为具有典型的闭孔泡沫金属和脆性泡沫金属的特征;在平稳阶段的控制变形机制是脆性破碎;泡沫Zn−22Al合金的抗压强度得到了显著提高,其压缩性能符合Gibson−Ashby模型。%Zn−22Al alloy closed-cell foams were fabricated by melt foaming process using hydride foaming agent. The compressive properties were investigated under quasi-static condition. The structure of the foamed material was analyzed during compression test to reveal the relationship between morphology and compressive behavior. The results show that the stress−strain behavior is typical of closed-cell metal foams and mostly of brittle type. Governing deformation mechanism at plateau stage is identified to be brittle crushing. A substantial increase in compressive strength of Zn−22Al foams was obtained. The agreement between compressive properties and Gibson−Ashby model was also detected.

  16. Static Analysis of Mobile Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air...and then use static analysis to verify them. In the end we pursued this idea successfully for several differnet properties and developed novel...difficult to develop with enough precision. In [3], we establish a connection between compositional analyses and modular lattices, which require

  17. Intracellular Biopotentials During Static Extracellular Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Two properties of the intracellular potentials and electric fields resulting from static extracellular stimulation are obtained for arbitrarily shaped cells. First, the values of intracellular potential are shown to be bounded by the maximum and minimum values of extracellular potential on the surface of the cell. Second, the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field is shown to have an upper bound given by the ratio of the magnitude of the largest extracellular potential difference on the surface of the cell to a generalized length constant λ = [σintraVcell/(σmemb Acell)]1/2, where Vcell and Acell are the volume and surface area of the cell, σintra is the intracellular conductivity (reciprocal ohms per centimeter), and σmemb is the membrane conductivity (reciprocal ohms per square centimeter). The use of the upper bound on the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field as an estimate for intracellular isopotentiality is discussed and the use of the generalized length constant for electrically describing arbitrary cells is illustrated for cylindrical- and spheroidal-shaped cells. PMID:4726882

  18. Regulatory T Cells in Tumor-Associated Tertiary Lymphoid Structures Suppress Anti-tumor T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nikhil S; Akama-Garren, Elliot H; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R; Farago, Anna F; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M; Bronson, Roderick T; Jacks, Tyler

    2015-09-15

    Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma and found that Treg cells suppressed anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLSs). TA-TLSs have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLSs in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLSs upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose that Treg cells in TA-TLSs can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells might provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients.

  19. Convolutional Sparse Coding for Static and Dynamic Images Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Knyazev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to improve performance of static and dynamic objects recognition. For this purpose a new image representation model and a transformation algorithm are proposed. It is examined and illustrated that limitations of previous methods make it difficult to achieve this objective. Static images, specifically handwritten digits of the widely used MNIST dataset, are the primary focus of this work. Nevertheless, preliminary qualitative results of image sequences analysis based on the suggested model are presented.A general analytical form of the Gabor function, often employed to generate filters, is described and discussed. In this research, this description is required for computing parameters of responses returned by our algorithm. The recursive convolution operator is introduced, which allows extracting free shape features of visual objects. The developed parametric representation model is compared with sparse coding based on energy function minimization.In the experimental part of this work, errors of estimating the parameters of responses are determined. Also, parameters statistics and their correlation coefficients for more than 106 responses extracted from the MNIST dataset are calculated. It is demonstrated that these data correspond well with previous research studies on Gabor filters as well as with works on visual cortex primary cells of mammals, in which similar responses were observed. A comparative test of the developed model with three other approaches is conducted; speed and accuracy scores of handwritten digits classification are presented. A support vector machine with a linear or radial basic function is used for classification of images and their representations while principal component analysis is used in some cases to prepare data beforehand. High accuracy is not attained due to the specific difficulties of combining our model with a support vector machine (a 3.99% error rate. However, another method is

  20. Direct activation of the Mauthner cell by electric field pulses drives ultrarapid escape responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Kathryn M.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Horstick, Eric J.; Jordan, Diana C.; Aho, Vilma; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Haspel, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Rapid escape swims in fish are initiated by the Mauthner cells, giant reticulospinal neurons with unique specializations for swift responses. The Mauthner cells directly activate motoneurons and facilitate predator detection by integrating acoustic, mechanosensory, and visual stimuli. In addition, larval fish show well-coordinated escape responses when exposed to electric field pulses (EFPs). Sensitization of the Mauthner cell by genetic overexpression of the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN5 increased EFP responsiveness, whereas Mauthner ablation with an engineered variant of nitroreductase with increased activity (epNTR) eliminated the response. The reaction time to EFPs is extremely short, with many responses initiated within 2 ms of the EFP. Large neurons, such as Mauthner cells, show heightened sensitivity to extracellular voltage gradients. We therefore tested whether the rapid response to EFPs was due to direct activation of the Mauthner cells, bypassing delays imposed by stimulus detection and transmission by sensory cells. Consistent with this, calcium imaging indicated that EFPs robustly activated the Mauthner cell but only rarely fired other reticulospinal neurons. Further supporting this idea, pharmacological blockade of synaptic transmission in zebrafish did not affect Mauthner cell activity in response to EFPs. Moreover, Mauthner cells transgenically expressing a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel retained responses to EFPs despite TTX suppression of action potentials in the rest of the brain. We propose that EFPs directly activate Mauthner cells because of their large size, thereby driving ultrarapid escape responses in fish. PMID:24848468

  1. Glacial isostatic adjustment in the static gravity field of Fennoscandia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Root, B.C.; Van der Wal, W.; Novak, P.; Ebbing, J.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2015-01-01

    In the central part of Fennoscandia, the crust is currently rising, because of the delayed response of the viscous mantle to melting of the Late Pleistocene ice sheet. This process, called Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA), causes a negative anomaly in the present-day static gravity field as isosta

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Metastasis of Lung Cancer Cells by Downregulating Systemic Antitumor Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Gazdic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since majority of systemically administered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs become entrapped within the lungs, we used metastatic model of lung cancer, induced by intravenous injection of Lewis lung cancer 1 (LLC1 cells, to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in MSC-mediated modulation of metastasis. MSCs significantly augmented lung cancer metastasis, attenuate concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-17, and increase levels of immunosuppressive IL-10, nitric oxide, and kynurenine in sera of LLC1-treated mice. MSCs profoundly reduced infiltration of macrophages, TNF-α-producing dendritic cells (DCs, TNF-α-, and IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells but increased IL-10-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes in the lungs of tumor-bearing animals. The total number of lung-infiltrated, cytotoxic FasL, perforin-expressing, TNF-α-, and IL-17-producing CD8+ T lymphocytes, and NKG2D-expressing natural killer (NK cells was significantly reduced in LLC1 + MSC-treated mice. Cytotoxicity of NK cells was suppressed by MSC-conditioned medium. This phenomenon was abrogated by the inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, suggesting the importance of iNOS and IDO for MSC-mediated suppression of antitumor cytotoxicity of NK cells. This study provides the evidence that MSCs promote lung cancer metastasis by suppressing antitumor immune response raising concerns regarding safety of MSC-based therapy in patients who have genetic susceptibility for malignant diseases.

  3. A Pedagogical Model of Static Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Pickett, Galen T

    2015-01-01

    While dry Coulombic friction is an elementary topic in any standard introductory course in mechanics, the critical distinction between the kinetic and static friction forces is something that is both hard to teach and to learn. In this paper, I describe a geometric model of static friction that may help introductory students to both understand and apply the Coulomb static friction approximation.

  4. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  5. In-Flight Pitot-Static Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John V. (Inventor); Cunningham, Kevin (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A GPS-based pitot-static calibration system uses global output-error optimization. High data rate measurements of static and total pressure, ambient air conditions, and GPS-based ground speed measurements are used to compute pitot-static pressure errors over a range of airspeed. System identification methods rapidly compute optimal pressure error models with defined confidence intervals.

  6. Static Analysis Alert Audits: Lexicon and Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-04

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A] This material has been approved for public release and unlimited distribution. REV-03.18.2016.0 Static Analysis Alert Audits...unlimited distribution. Background: Automatic Alert Classification Static Analysis Tool(s) Alerts Alert Consolidation (SCALe) Potential Rule...Automatic Alert Classification Static Analysis Tool(s) Alerts Alert Consolidation (SCALe) Potential Rule Violations Auditing Determinations ML

  7. Erythrophore cell response to food-associated pathogenic bacteria: implications for detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Janine R; Dukovcic, Stephanie R; Dierksen, Karen P; Carlyle, Calvin A; Caldwell, Bruce A; Trempy, Janine E

    2008-09-01

    Cell-based biosensors have been proposed for use as function-based detectors of toxic agents. We report the use of Betta splendens chromatophore cells, specifically erythrophore cells, for detection of food-associated pathogenic bacteria. Evaluation of erythrophore cell response, using Bacillus spp., has revealed that this response can distinguish pathogenic Bacillus cereus from a non-pathogenic B. cereus ΔplcR deletion mutant and a non-pathogenic Bacillus subtilis. Erythrophore <