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Sample records for cell repeat component

  1. IMHEX fuel cell repeat component manufacturing continuous improvement accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakaitis, L.A.; Petraglia, V.J.; Bryson, E.S. [M-C Power Corp., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power is taking a power generation technology that has been proven in the laboratory and is making it a commercially competitive product. There are many areas in which this technology required scale up and refinement to reach the market entry goals for the IMHEX{reg_sign} molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. One of the primary areas that needed to be addressed was the manufacturing of the fuel cell stack. Up to this point, the fuel cell stack and associated components were virtually hand made for each system to be tested. M-C Power has now continuously manufactured the repeat components for three 250 kW stacks. M-C Power`s manufacturing strategy integrated both evolutionary and revolutionary improvements into its comprehensive commercialization effort. M-C Power`s objectives were to analyze and continuously improve stack component manufacturing and assembly techniques consistent with established specifications and commercial scale production requirements. Evolutionary improvements are those which naturally occur as the production rates are increased and experience is gained. Examples of evolutionary (learning curve) improvements included reducing scrap rates and decreasing raw material costs by buying in large quantities. Revolutionary improvements result in significant design and process changes to meet cost and performance requirements of the market entry system. Revolutionary changes often involve identifying new methods and developing designs to accommodate the new process. Based upon our accomplishments, M-C Power was able to reduce the cost of continuously manufactured fuel cell repeat components from the first to third 250 kW stack by 63%. This paper documents the continuous improvement accomplishments realized by M-C Power during IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell repeat component manufacturing.

  2. The reaction of lymphatic component of hemopoiesis to fractionated irradiation and repeated bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice were repeatedly subjected to individual doses of 60Co-gamma rays at intervals of four days up to total doses of 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 Gy. Under these conditions, signs of partial adaptation of the lymphatic component of hemopoiesis to conditions of repeated irradiations were found in mice which were given transplants of 106 nuclear cells of syngenetic bone marrow after each irradiation. Systematic findings of statistically significant differences in the values of the lymphatic hemopoietic component parameters studied between bone marrow recipients and animals subjected only to repeated irradiations were recorded after 24th day of experiment in mice which received total doses of 21 and 24 Gy. A positive influence of repeated transplantations in bone marrow recipients became manifested in these experimental groups already upon withdrawals made on day 4 after the last irradiation. A quite pronounced increase in the values of the bone marrow recipients' lymphatic hemopoietic component studied was then recorded upon withdrawals made on day 9 after the last irradiation. (orig.)

  3. Repeated mild injury causes cumulative damage to hippocampal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Matser; C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); J.T. Weber (John)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAn interesting hypothesis in the study of neurotrauma is that repeated traumatic brain injury may result in cumulative damage to cells of the brain. However, post-injury sequelae are difficult to address at the cellular level in vivo. Therefore, it is necessary to compl

  4. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLESIA O. GRYGORIEVA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Grygorieva OO, Berezovsjka MA, Dacenko OI. 2015. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 38-42. Two cultures of Chlamydomonas actinochloris Deason et Bold in the lag-phase were exposed to the microwave irradiation. One of them (culture 1 was not treated beforehand, whereas the other (culture 2 was irradiated by microwaves 2 years earlier. The measurement of cell quantity as well as measurement of change of intensities and spectra of cultures photoluminescence (PL in the range of chlorophyll a emission was regularly conducted during the cell cultures development. Cell concentration of culture 1 exposed to the microwave irradiation for the first time has quickly restored while cell concentration of culture 2 which was irradiated repeatedly has fallen significantly. The following increasing of cell concentration of culture 2 is negligible. Cell concentration reaches the steady-state level that is about a half of the cell concentration of control culture. Initially the PL efficiency of cells of both cultures decreases noticeable as a result of irradiation. Then there is the monotonic increase to the values which are significantly higher than the corresponding values in the control cultures. The ratio of the intensities at the maxima of the main emission bands of chlorophyll for control samples of both cultures remained approximately at the same level. At the same time effect of irradiation on the cell PL spectrum appears as a temporary reduction of this magnitude.

  5. Reliability of PET/CT shape and heterogeneity features in functional and morphological components of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer tumors: a repeatability analysis in a prospective multi-center cohort

    CERN Document Server

    Desseroit, Marie-Charlotte; Weber, Wolfgang; Siegel, Barry A; Rest, Catherine Cheze Le; Visvikis, Dimitris; Hatt, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of shape and heterogeneity features in both Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and low-dose Computed Tomography (CT) components of PET/CT. A secondary objective was to investigate the impact of image quantization.Material and methods: A Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act -compliant secondary analysis of deidentified prospectively acquired PET/CT test-retest datasets of 74 patients from multi-center Merck and ACRIN trials was performed. Metabolically active volumes were automatically delineated on PET with Fuzzy Locally Adaptive Bayesian algorithm. 3DSlicerTM was used to semi-automatically delineate the anatomical volumes on low-dose CT components. Two quantization methods were considered: a quantization into a set number of bins (quantizationB) and an alternative quantization with bins of fixed width (quantizationW). Four shape descriptors, ten first-order metrics and 26 textural features were computed. Bland-Altman analysi...

  6. Repeatability of Spitzer/IRAC exoplanetary eclipses with Independent Component Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Morello, Giuseppe; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    The research of effective and reliable detrending methods for Spitzer data is of paramount importance for the characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres. To date, the totality of exoplanetary observations in the mid- and far-infrared, at wavelengths $>$3 $\\mu$m, have been taken with Spitzer. In some cases, in the past years, repeated observations and multiple reanalyses of the same datasets led to discrepant results, raising questions about the accuracy and reproducibility of such measurements. Morello et al. 2014, 2015 proposed a blind-source separation method based on the Independent Component Analysis of pixel time series (pixel-ICA) to analyze IRAC data, obtaining coherent results when applied to repeated transit observations previously debated in the literature. Here we introduce a variant to pixel-ICA through the use of wavelet transform, wavelet pixel-ICA, which extends its applicability to low-S/N cases. We describe the method and discuss the results obtained over twelve eclipses of the exoplanet XO...

  7. Trinucleotide repeat expansions catalyzed by human cell-free extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer R Stevens; Elaine E Lahue; Guo-Min Li; Robert S Lahue

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions cause 17 heritable human neurological disorders.In some diseases,somatic expansions occur in non-proliferating tissues such as brain where DNA replication is limited.This finding stimulated significant interest in replication-independent expansion mechanisms.Aberrant DNA repair is a likely source,based in part on mouse studies showing that somatic expansions are provoked by the DNA repair protein MutSβ (Msh2-Msh3complex).Biochemical studies to date used cell-free extracts or purified DNA repair proteins to yield partial reactions at triplet repeats.The findings included expansions on one strand but not the other,or processing of DNA hairpin structures thought to be important intermediates in the expansion process.However,it has been difficult to recapitulate complete expansions in vitro,and the biochemical role of MutSβ remains controversial.Here,we use a novel in vitro assay to show that human cell-free extracts catalyze expansions and contractions of trinucleotide repeats without the requirement for DNA replication.The extract promotes a size range of expansions that is similar to certain diseases,and triplet repeat length and sequence govern expansions in vitro as in vivo.MutSβ stimulates expansions in the extract,consistent with aberrant repair of endogenous DNA damage as a source of expansions.Overall,this biochemical system retains the key characteristics of somatic expansions in humans and mice,suggesting that this important mutagenic process can be restored in the test tube.

  8. Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

    2013-11-05

    An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

  9. Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) constitutes a nucleoprotein component of extracellular inflammatory exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Deng, Zhong; Dahmane, Nadia; Tsai, Kevin; Wang, Pu; Williams, Dewight R.; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Showe, Louise C.; Zhang, Rugang; Huang, Qihong; Conejo-Garcia, José R.; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) has been identified as a telomere-associated regulator of chromosome end protection. Here, we report that TERRA can also be found in extracellular fractions that stimulate innate immune signaling. We identified extracellular forms of TERRA in mouse tumor and embryonic brain tissue, as well as in human tissue culture cell lines using RNA in situ hybridization. RNA-seq analyses revealed TERRA to be among the most highly represented transcripts in extracellular fractions derived from both normal and cancer patient blood plasma. Cell-free TERRA (cfTERRA) could be isolated from the exosome fractions derived from human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) culture media. cfTERRA is a shorter form (∼200 nt) of cellular TERRA and copurifies with CD63- and CD83-positive exosome vesicles that could be visualized by cyro-electron microscopy. These fractions were also enriched for histone proteins that physically associate with TERRA in extracellular ChIP assays. Incubation of cfTERRA-containing exosomes with peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated transcription of several inflammatory cytokine genes, including TNFα, IL6, and C-X-C chemokine 10 (CXCL10) Exosomes engineered with elevated TERRA or liposomes with synthetic TERRA further stimulated inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that exosome-associated TERRA augments innate immune signaling. These findings imply a previously unidentified extrinsic function for TERRA and a mechanism of communication between telomeres and innate immune signals in tissue and tumor microenvironments. PMID:26578789

  10. Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) constitutes a nucleoprotein component of extracellular inflammatory exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Deng, Zhong; Dahmane, Nadia; Tsai, Kevin; Wang, Pu; Williams, Dewight R; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Showe, Louise C; Zhang, Rugang; Huang, Qihong; Conejo-Garcia, José R; Lieberman, Paul M

    2015-11-17

    Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) has been identified as a telomere-associated regulator of chromosome end protection. Here, we report that TERRA can also be found in extracellular fractions that stimulate innate immune signaling. We identified extracellular forms of TERRA in mouse tumor and embryonic brain tissue, as well as in human tissue culture cell lines using RNA in situ hybridization. RNA-seq analyses revealed TERRA to be among the most highly represented transcripts in extracellular fractions derived from both normal and cancer patient blood plasma. Cell-free TERRA (cfTERRA) could be isolated from the exosome fractions derived from human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) culture media. cfTERRA is a shorter form (∼200 nt) of cellular TERRA and copurifies with CD63- and CD83-positive exosome vesicles that could be visualized by cyro-electron microscopy. These fractions were also enriched for histone proteins that physically associate with TERRA in extracellular ChIP assays. Incubation of cfTERRA-containing exosomes with peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated transcription of several inflammatory cytokine genes, including TNFα, IL6, and C-X-C chemokine 10 (CXCL10) Exosomes engineered with elevated TERRA or liposomes with synthetic TERRA further stimulated inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that exosome-associated TERRA augments innate immune signaling. These findings imply a previously unidentified extrinsic function for TERRA and a mechanism of communication between telomeres and innate immune signals in tissue and tumor microenvironments.

  11. Repeatability of Spitzer/IRAC Exoplanetary Eclipses with Independent Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, G.; Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G.

    2016-04-01

    The research of effective and reliable detrending methods for Spitzer data is of paramount importance for the characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres. To date, the totality of exoplanetary observations in the mid- and far-infrared, at wavelengths >3 μm, have been taken with Spitzer. In some cases, in past years, repeated observations and multiple reanalyses of the same data sets led to discrepant results, raising questions about the accuracy and reproducibility of such measurements. Morello et al. (2014, 2015) proposed a blind-source separation method based on the Independent Component Analysis of pixel time series (pixel-ICA) to analyze InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) data, obtaining coherent results when applied to repeated transit observations previously debated in the literature. Here we introduce a variant to the pixel-ICA through the use of wavelet transform, wavelet pixel-ICA, which extends its applicability to low-signal-to-noise-ratio cases. We describe the method and discuss the results obtained over 12 eclipses of the exoplanet XO3b observed during the “Warm Spitzer” era in the 4.5 μm band. The final results are reported, in part, also in Ingalls et al. (2016), together with results obtained with other detrending methods, and over 10 synthetic eclipses that were analyzed for the “IRAC Data Challenge 2015.” Our results are consistent within 1σ with the ones reported in Wong et al. (2014) and with most of the results reported in Ingalls et al. (2016), which appeared on arXiv while this paper was under review. Based on many statistical tests discussed in Ingalls et al. (2016), the wavelet pixel-ICA method performs as well as or better than other state-of-art methods recently developed by other teams to analyze Spitzer/IRAC data, and, in particular, it appears to be the most repeatable and the most reliable, while reaching the photon noise limit, at least for the particular data set analyzed. Another strength of the ICA approach is its highest

  12. REPEATABILITY OF SPITZER/IRAC EXOPLANETARY ECLIPSES WITH INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morello, G.; Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G., E-mail: giuseppe.morello.11@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-01

    The research of effective and reliable detrending methods for Spitzer data is of paramount importance for the characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres. To date, the totality of exoplanetary observations in the mid- and far-infrared, at wavelengths >3 μm, have been taken with Spitzer. In some cases, in past years, repeated observations and multiple reanalyses of the same data sets led to discrepant results, raising questions about the accuracy and reproducibility of such measurements. Morello et al. (2014, 2015) proposed a blind-source separation method based on the Independent Component Analysis of pixel time series (pixel-ICA) to analyze InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) data, obtaining coherent results when applied to repeated transit observations previously debated in the literature. Here we introduce a variant to the pixel-ICA through the use of wavelet transform, wavelet pixel-ICA, which extends its applicability to low-signal-to-noise-ratio cases. We describe the method and discuss the results obtained over 12 eclipses of the exoplanet XO3b observed during the “Warm Spitzer” era in the 4.5 μm band. The final results are reported, in part, also in Ingalls et al. (2016), together with results obtained with other detrending methods, and over 10 synthetic eclipses that were analyzed for the “IRAC Data Challenge 2015.” Our results are consistent within 1σ with the ones reported in Wong et al. (2014) and with most of the results reported in Ingalls et al. (2016), which appeared on arXiv while this paper was under review. Based on many statistical tests discussed in Ingalls et al. (2016), the wavelet pixel-ICA method performs as well as or better than other state-of-art methods recently developed by other teams to analyze Spitzer/IRAC data, and, in particular, it appears to be the most repeatable and the most reliable, while reaching the photon noise limit, at least for the particular data set analyzed. Another strength of the ICA approach is its highest

  13. Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) and telomerase are components of telomeres during mammalian gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig-Viader, Rita; Vila-Cejudo, Marta; Vitelli, Valerio; Buscà, Rafael; Sabaté, Montserrat; Giulotto, Elena; Caldés, Montserrat Garcia; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2014-05-01

    Telomeres are ribonucleoprotein structures at the end of chromosomes composed of telomeric DNA, specific-binding proteins, and noncoding RNA (TERRA). Despite their importance in preventing chromosome instability, little is known about the cross talk between these three elements during the formation of the germ line. Here, we provide evidence that both TERRA and the telomerase enzymatic subunit (TERT) are components of telomeres in mammalian germ cells. We found that TERRA colocalizes with telomeres during mammalian meiosis and that its expression progressively increases during spermatogenesis until the beginning of spermiogenesis. While both TERRA levels and distribution would be regulated in a gender-specific manner, telomere-TERT colocalization appears to be regulated based on species-specific characteristics of the telomeric structure. Moreover, we found that TERT localization at telomeres is maintained throughout spermatogenesis as a structural component without affecting telomere elongation. Our results represent the first evidence of colocalization between telomerase and telomeres during mammalian gametogenesis.

  14. GFP-based fluorescence assay for CAG repeat instability in cultured human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz A Santillan

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeats can be highly unstable, mutating far more frequently than point mutations. Repeats typically mutate by addition or loss of units of the repeat. CAG repeat expansions in humans trigger neurological diseases that include myotonic dystrophy, Huntington disease, and several spinocerebellar ataxias. In human cells, diverse mechanisms promote CAG repeat instability, and in mice, the mechanisms of instability are varied and tissue-dependent. Dissection of mechanistic complexity and discovery of potential therapeutics necessitates quantitative and scalable screens for repeat mutation. We describe a GFP-based assay for screening modifiers of CAG repeat instability in human cells. The assay exploits an engineered intronic CAG repeat tract that interferes with expression of an inducible GFP minigene. Like the phenotypes of many trinucleotide repeat disorders, we find that GFP function is impaired by repeat expansion, in a length-dependent manner. The intensity of fluorescence varies inversely with repeat length, allowing estimates of repeat tract changes in live cells. We validate the assay using transcription through the repeat and engineered CAG-specific nucleases, which have previously been reported to induce CAG repeat instability. The assay is relatively fast and should be adaptable to large-scale screens of chemical and shRNA libraries.

  15. Prospects for UK fuel cells component suppliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, C.; Tunnicliffe, M.

    2002-07-01

    This report examines the capabilities of the UK fuel cell industry in meeting the expected increase in demand, and aims to identify all UK suppliers of fuel cell components, evaluate their products and match them to fuel cell markets, and identify components where the UK is in a competitive position. Component areas are addressed along with the need to reduce costs and ensure efficient production. The well established supplier base in the UK is noted, and the car engine manufacturing base and fuel supply companies are considered. The different strengths of UK suppliers of the various types of fuel cells are listed. The future industry structure, the opportunities and dangers for business posed by fuel cells, the investment in cleaner technologies by the large fuel companies, opportunities for catalyst suppliers, and the residential combined heat and power and portable electronics battery markets are discussed.

  16. Comprehensive analysis of single-repeat R3 MYB proteins in epidermal cell patterning and their transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiefelbein John

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-repeat R3 MYB transcription factors are critical components of the lateral inhibition machinery that mediates epidermal cell patterning in plants. Sequence analysis of the Arabidopsis genome using the BLAST program reveals that there are a total of six genes, including TRIPTYCHON (TRY, CAPRICE (CPC, TRICHOMELESS1 (TCL1, and ENHANCER of TRY and CPC 1, 2, and 3 (ETC1, ETC2 and ETC3 encoding single-repeat R3 MYB transcription factors that are approximately 50% identical to one another at the amino acid level. Previous studies indicate that these single-repeat R3 MYBs regulate epidermal cell patterning. However, each of the previous studies of these single-repeat R3 MYBs has been limited to an analysis of only a subset of these six genes, and furthermore, they have limited their attention to epidermal development in only one or two of the organs. In addition, the transcriptional regulation of these single-repeat R3 MYB genes remains largely unknown. Results By analyzing multiple mutant lines, we report here that TCL1 functions redundantly with other single-repeat R3 MYB transcription factors to control both leaf trichome and root hair formation. On the other hand, ETC1 and ETC3 participate in controlling trichome formation on inflorescence stems and pedicles. Further, we discovered that single-repeat R3 MYBs suppress trichome formation on cotyledons and siliques, organs that normally do not bear any trichomes. By using Arabidopsis protoplast transfection assays, we found that all single-repeat R3 MYBs examined interact with GL3, and that GL1 or WER and GL3 or EGL3 are required and sufficient to activate the transcription of TRY, CPC, ETC1 and ETC3, but not TCL1 and ETC2. Furthermore, only ETC1's transcription was greatly reduced in the gl3 egl3 double mutants. Conclusion Our comprehensive analysis enables us to draw broader conclusions about the role of single-repeat R3 MYB gene family than were possible in the earlier

  17. Hsp90 modulates CAG repeat instability in human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mittelman, David; Sykoudis, Kristen; Hersh, Megan; Lin, Yunfu; Wilson, John H.

    2010-01-01

    The Hsp90 molecular chaperone has been implicated as a contributor to evolution in several organisms by revealing cryptic variation that can yield dramatic phenotypes when the chaperone is diverted from its normal functions by environmental stress. In addition, as a cancer drug target, Hsp90 inhibition has been documented to sensitize cells to DNA-damaging agents, suggesting a function for Hsp90 in DNA repair. Here we explore the potential role of Hsp90 in modulating the stability of nucleoti...

  18. NUC-2, a component of the phosphate-regulated signal transduction pathway in Neurospora crassa, is an ankyrin repeat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleg, Y; Aramayo, R; Kang, S; Hall, J G; Metzenberg, R L

    1996-10-28

    In response to phosphorus limitation, the fungus Neurospora crassa synthesizes a number of enzymes that function to bring more phosphate into the cell. The NUC-2 protein appears to sense the availability of phosphate and transmits the signal downstream to the regulatory pathway. The nuc-2+ gene has been cloned by its ability to restore growth of a nuc-2 mutant under restrictive conditions of high pH and low phosphate concentration. We mapped the cloned gene to the right arm of linkage group II, consistent with the chromosomal position of the nuc-2 mutation as determined by classical genetic mapping. The nuc-2' open reading frame is interrupted by five introns and codes for a protein of 1066 amino acid residues. Its predicted amino acid sequence has high similarity to that of its homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PHO81. Both proteins contain six ankyrin repeats, which have been implicated in the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory activity of PHO81. The phenotypes of a nuc-2 mutant generated by repeat-induced point mutation and of a strain harboring a UV-induced nuc-2 allele are indistinguishable. Both are unable to grow under the restrictive conditions, a phenotype which is to some degree temperature dependent. The nuc-2+ gene is transcriptionally regulated. A 15-fold increase in the level of the nuc-2+ transcript occurs in response to a decrease in exogenous phosphate concentration.

  19. Elimination of progressive mammary cancer by repeated administrations of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globerson-Levin, Anat; Waks, Tova; Eshhar, Zelig

    2014-05-01

    Continuous oncogenic processes that generate cancer require an on-going treatment approach to eliminate the transformed cells, and prevent their further development. Here, we studied the ability of T cells expressing a chimeric antibody-based receptor (CAR) to offer a therapeutic benefit for breast cancer induced by erbB-2. We tested CAR-modified T cells (T-bodies) specific to erbB-2 for their antitumor potential in a mouse model overexpressing a human erbB-2 transgene that develops mammary tumors. Comparing the antitumor reactivity of CAR-modified T cells under various therapeutic settings, either prophylactic, prior to tumor development, or therapeutically. We found that repeated administration of CAR-modified T cells is required to eliminate spontaneously developing mammary cancer. Systemic, as well as intratumoral administered CAR-modified T cells accumulated at tumor sites and eventually eliminated the malignant cells. Interestingly, within a few weeks after a single CAR T cells' administration, and rejection of primary lesion, tumors usually relapsed both in treated mammary gland and at remote sites; however, repeated injections of CAR-modified T cells were able to control the secondary tumors. Since spontaneous tumors can arise repeatedly, especially in the case of syndromes characterized by specific susceptibility to cancer, multiple administrations of CAR-modified T cells can serve to control relapsing disease.

  20. Repeated cisplatin treatment can lead to a multiresistant tumor cell population with stem cell features and sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate

    OpenAIRE

    Wintzell, My; Löfstedt, Lina; Johansson, Joel; Pedersen, Anne B.; Fuxe, Jonas; Shoshan, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is used in treatment of several types of cancer, including epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). In order to mimic clinical treatment and to investigate longterm effects of cisplatin in surviving cancer cells, two EOC cell lines were repeatedly treated with low doses. In the SKOV-3 cell line originating from malignant ascites, but not in A2780 cells from a primary tumor, this led to emergence of a stable population (SKOV-3-R) which in the absence of cisplatin showed increased motility...

  1. Variant repeats are interspersed throughout the telomeres and recruit nuclear receptors in ALT cells

    OpenAIRE

    Conomos, Dimitri; Stutz, Michael D.; Hills, Mark; Neumann, Axel A.; Bryan, Tracy M.; Reddel, Roger R; Hilda A Pickett

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres in cells that use the recombination-mediated alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway elicit a DNA damage response that is partly independent of telomere length. We therefore investigated whether ALT telomeres contain structural abnormalities that contribute to ALT activity. Here we used next generation sequencing to analyze the DNA content of ALT telomeres. We discovered that variant repeats were interspersed throughout the telomeres of ALT cells. We found that the C-type...

  2. Repeated Gene Transfection Impairs the Engraftment of Transplanted Porcine Neonatal Pancreatic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Koo Seo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPreviously, we reported that neonatal porcine pancreatic cells transfected with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF gene in an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-based plasmid (pEBVHGF showed improved proliferation and differentiation compared to those of the control. In this study, we examined if pancreatic cells transfected repeatedly with pEBVHGF can be successfully grafted to control blood glucose in a diabetes mouse model.MethodsNeonatal porcine pancreatic cells were cultured as a monolayer and were transfected with pEBVHGF every other day for a total of three transfections. The transfected pancreatic cells were re-aggregated and transplanted into kidney capsules of diabetic nude mice or normal nude mice. Blood glucose level and body weight were measured every other day after transplantation. The engraftment of the transplanted cells and differentiation into beta cells were assessed using immunohistochemistry.ResultsRe-aggregation of the pancreatic cells before transplantation improved engraftment of the cells and facilitated neovascularization of the graft. Right before transplantation, pancreatic cells that were transfected with pEBVHGF and then re-aggregated showed ductal cell marker expression. However, ductal cells disappeared and the cells underwent fibrosis in a diabetes mouse model two to five weeks after transplantation; these mice also did not show controlled blood glucose levels. Furthermore, pancreatic cells transplanted into nude mice with normal blood glucose showed poor graft survival regardless of the type of transfected plasmid (pCEP4, pHGF, or pEBVHGF.ConclusionFor clinical application of transfected neonatal porcine pancreatic cells, further studies are required to develop methods of overcoming the damage for the cells caused by repeated transfection and to re-aggregate them into islet-like structures.

  3. Modeling diseases of noncoding unstable repeat expansionsusing mutant pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations involving DNA repeat expansionsare responsible for over 20 different neuronal andneuromuscular diseases. All result from expanded tractsof repetitive DNA sequences (mostly microsatellites)that become unstable beyond a critical length when transmitted across generations. Nearly all are inheritedas autosomal dominant conditions and are typicallyassociated with anticipation. Pathologic unstablerepeat expansions can be classified according to theirlength, repeat sequence, gene location and underlyingpathologic mechanisms. This review summarizesthe current contribution of mutant pluripotent stemcells (diseased human embryonic stem cells andpatient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells) to theresearch of unstable repeat pathologies by focusingon particularly large unstable noncoding expansions.Among this class of disorders are Fragile X syndromeand Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome,myotonic dystrophy type 1 and myotonic dystrophytype 2, Friedreich ataxia and C9 related amyotrophiclateral sclerosis and/or frontotemporal dementia,Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy and potentiallymore. Common features that are typical to this subclassof conditions are RNA toxic gain-of-function, epigeneticloss-of-function, toxic repeat-associated non-ATGtranslation and somatic instability. For each mechanismwe summarize the currently available stem cell basedmodels, highlight how they contributed to betterunderstanding of the related mechanism, and discusshow they may be utilized in future investigations.

  4. Effective Alu repeat based RT-Qpcr normalization in cancer cell perturbation experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rihani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Measuring messenger RNA (mRNA levels using the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR is common practice in many laboratories. A specific set of mRNAs as internal control reference genes is considered as the preferred strategy to normalize RT-qPCR data. Proper selection of reference genes is a critical issue, especially in cancer cells that are subjected to different in vitro manipulations. These manipulations may result in dramatic alterations in gene expression levels, even of assumed reference genes. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of 11 commonly used reference genes as internal controls for normalization of 19 experiments that include neuroblastoma, T-ALL, melanoma, breast cancer, non small cell lung cancer (NSCL, acute myeloid leukemia (AML, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, and cervical cancer cell lines subjected to various perturbations. RESULTS: The geNorm algorithm in the software package qbase+ was used to rank the candidate reference genes according to their expression stability. We observed that the stability of most of the candidate reference genes varies greatly in perturbation experiments. Expressed Alu repeats show relatively stable expression regardless of experimental condition. These Alu repeats are ranked among the best reference assays in all perturbation experiments and display acceptable average expression stability values (M<0.5. CONCLUSIONS: We propose the use of Alu repeats as a reference assay when performing cancer cell perturbation experiments.

  5. A repeatedly refuelable mediated biofuel cell based on a hierarchical porous carbon electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Shuji; Yamanoi, Shun; Murata, Kenichi; Mita, Hiroki; Samukawa, Tsunetoshi; Nakagawa, Takaaki; Sakai, Hideki; Tokita, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    Biofuel cells that generate electricity from renewable fuels, such as carbohydrates, must be reusable through repeated refuelling, should these devices be used in consumer electronics. We demonstrate the stable generation of electricity from a glucose-powered mediated biofuel cell through multiple refuelling cycles. This refuelability is achieved by immobilizing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), an electron-transfer mediator, and redox enzymes in high concentrations on porous carbon particles constituting an anode while maintaining their electrochemical and enzymatic activities after the immobilization. This bioanode can be refuelled continuously for more than 60 cycles at 1.5 mA cm-2 without significant potential drop. Cells assembled with these bioanodes and bilirubin-oxidase-based biocathodes can be repeatedly used to power a portable music player at 1 mW cm-3 through 10 refuelling cycles. This study suggests that the refuelability within consumer electronics should facilitate the development of long and repeated use of the mediated biofuel cells as well as of NAD-based biosensors, bioreactors, and clinical applications.

  6. Plastids: dynamic components of plant cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guikema, J. A.; Gallegos, G. L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The gravitropic bending of maize roots, as a response to reorientation of the root within a gravitational field, was examined for sensitivity to exogenous applications of the cytoskeletal inhibitor, cytochalasin D. Agar blocks were impregnated with this inhibitor, and were applied either to the root cap or to the zone of root cell elongation. Root growth was normal with either treatment, if the roots were not repositioned with respect to the gravitational vector. When untreated roots were placed in a horizontal position with respect to gravity, a 40 degree bending response was observed within one hour. This bending also occurred when cytochalasin D was applied at high concentrations to the zone of root cell elongation. However, when cytochalasin D above 40 micrograms/ml was applied to the root cap, roots lost the ability of directional reorientation within the gravitational field, causing a random bending.

  7. Repeated treatment with oxytocin promotes hippocampal cell proliferation, dendritic maturation and affects socio-emotional behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Vidaña, Dalinda Isabel; Chan, Ngai-Man Jackie; Chan, Alan H L; Hui, Katy K Y; Lee, Sylvia; Chan, Hoi-Yi; Law, Yuen Shan; Sze, Mei Yi; Tsui, Wai-Ching Sarah; Fung, Timothy K H; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Lai, Cynthia Y Y

    2016-10-01

    Rewarding social behaviors including positive social interactions and sexual behaviors are shown to regulate adult neurogenesis, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain elusive. Oxytocin, a neurohypophysial hormone secreted after exposure to social interaction or sexual behaviors, has a profound role in the formation of social bonding and regulation of emotional distress. While the acute effect of oxytocin was usually studied, relatively scarce evidence showed the behavioral consequence of repeated oxytocin treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of repeated oxytocin treatment on hippocampal cell proliferation, dendritic maturation of new born neurons and social/emotional behaviors. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received treatment with either vehicle or oxytocin (1mg/kg) daily for two weeks. Behavioral tests revealed that oxytocin increased social behaviors and reduced the anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. Cell proliferation, differentiation and the dendritic complexity of new born neurons in the hippocampus were promoted by oxytocin treatment. Depression- and anxiety-like behaviors were induced by repeated treatment of corticosterone (40mg/kg) for two weeks while oxytocin treatment reversed the behavioral disturbances. Suppression of cell proliferation caused by corticosterone was reverted by oxytocin treatment in which cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and dendritic complexity increased. The present findings reveal that oxytocin not only enhances cell proliferation, but also promotes the development of the new neurons which is associated with the induction of positive emotional and social behaviors. The results also suggest that oxytocin may be a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of emotional and social dysfunction. PMID:27418343

  8. Bovine proteins containing poly-glutamine repeats are often polymorphic and enriched for components of transcriptional regulatory complexes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whan, Vicki

    2010-11-23

    Abstract Background About forty human diseases are caused by repeat instability mutations. A distinct subset of these diseases is the result of extreme expansions of polymorphic trinucleotide repeats; typically CAG repeats encoding poly-glutamine (poly-Q) tracts in proteins. Polymorphic repeat length variation is also apparent in human poly-Q encoding genes from normal individuals. As these coding sequence repeats are subject to selection in mammals, it has been suggested that normal variations in some of these typically highly conserved genes are implicated in morphological differences between species and phenotypic variations within species. At present, poly-Q encoding genes in non-human mammalian species are poorly documented, as are their functions and propensities for polymorphic variation. Results The current investigation identified 178 bovine poly-Q encoding genes (Q ≥ 5) and within this group, 26 genes with orthologs in both human and mouse that did not contain poly-Q repeats. The bovine poly-Q encoding genes typically had ubiquitous expression patterns although there was bias towards expression in epithelia, brain and testes. They were also characterised by unusually large sizes. Analysis of gene ontology terms revealed that the encoded proteins were strongly enriched for functions associated with transcriptional regulation and many contributed to physical interaction networks in the nucleus where they presumably act cooperatively in transcriptional regulatory complexes. In addition, the coding sequence CAG repeats in some bovine genes impacted mRNA splicing thereby generating unusual transcriptional diversity, which in at least one instance was tissue-specific. The poly-Q encoding genes were prioritised using multiple criteria for their likelihood of being polymorphic and then the highest ranking group was experimentally tested for polymorphic variation within a cattle diversity panel. Extensive and meiotically stable variation was identified

  9. T cell responses to repeat and non-repeat regions of the circumsporozoite protein detected in volunteers immunized with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Nardin

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of malarial vaccine based on the circumsporozoite (CS protein, a majuor surface antigen of the sporozoite stage of the malaria parasite, requires the identification of T and B cell epitopes for inclusion in recombinant or synthetic vaccine candidates. We have investigated the specificity and function of a series of T cell clones, derived from volunteers immunized with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites in an effort to identify relevant epitopes in the immune response to the pre-erythrocytic stages of the parasite. CD4+ T cell clones were obtained wich specifically recognized a repetitive epitope located in the 5'repeat region of the CS protein. This epitope, when conjugated to the 3'repeat region in a synthetic MAPs construct, induced high titers of antisporozoite antibodies in C57B1 mice. A second T cell epitope, which mapped to aa 326-345 of the carboxy terminal, was recognized by lytic, as well as non-lytic, CD4+ T cells derived from the sporozoite-immunized volunteers. The demonstration of CD4+ CTL in the volunteers, and the recent studies inthe rodent model (Renia et al., 1991; Tsuji et al., 1990, suggested that CS-specific CD4+ T cells, in addition to their indirect role as helper cells in the induction of antibody and CD8 + effector cells, may also play a direct role in protection against sporozoite challenge by targeting EEF within the liver.

  10. A model of human nasal epithelial cells adapted for direct and repeated exposure to airborne pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Gaëlle; Achard, Sophie; Loret, Thomas; Desauziers, Valérie; Momas, Isabelle; Seta, Nathalie

    2014-08-17

    Airway epithelium lining the nasal cavity plays a pivotal role in respiratory tract defense and protection mechanisms. Air pollution induces alterations linked to airway diseases such as asthma. Only very few in vitro studies to date have succeeded in reproducing physiological conditions relevant to cellular type and chronic atmospheric pollution exposure. We therefore, set up an in vitro model of human Airway Epithelial Cells of Nasal origin (hAECN) close to real human cell functionality, specifically adapted to study the biological effects of exposure to indoor gaseous pollution at the environmental level. hAECN were exposed under air-liquid interface, one, two, or three-times at 24 h intervals for 1 h, to air or formaldehyde (200 μg/m(3)), an indoor air gaseous pollutant. All experiments were ended at day 4, when both cellular viability and cytokine production were assessed. Optimal adherence and confluence of cells were obtained 96 h after cell seeding onto collagen IV-precoated insert. Direct and repeated exposure to formaldehyde did not produce any cellular damage or IL-6 production change, although weak lower IL-8 production was observed only after the third exposure. Our model is significantly better than previous ones due to cell type and the repeated exposure protocol.

  11. Repeated Measurement of the Components of Attention with Young Children Using the Attention Network Test: Stability, Isolability, Robustness, and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigami, Yoko; Klein, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the robustness, stability, reliability, and isolability of the attention network scores (alerting, orienting, and executive control) when young children experienced repeated administrations of the child version of the Attention Network Test (ANT; Rueda et al., 2004). Ten test sessions of the ANT were administered to 12…

  12. Next-generation sequencing reveals differentially amplified tandem repeats as a major genome component of Northern Europe's oldest Camellia japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitkam, Tony; Petrasch, Stefan; Zakrzewski, Falk; Kögler, Anja; Wenke, Torsten; Wanke, Stefan; Schmidt, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Northern Europe's oldest and largest Camellia japonica growing at the Pillnitz Castle (Germany) for over 200 years is of botanical and cultural importance and is a reference for C. japonica molecular scale analysis. In order to provide a fundament for genome analysis of the genus Camellia, we characterize the C. japonica tandem repeat fraction, constituting 12.5 % of the Pillnitz camellia's genome. A genomic library of the Pillnitz C. japonica was produced and Illumina sequenced to generate 36 Gb of paired-end reads. We performed graph-based read clustering implemented in the RepeatExplorer pipeline to estimate the C. japonica repeat fraction of 73 %. This enabled us to identify and characterize the most prominent satellite DNAs, Camellia japonica satellite 1-4 (CajaSat1-CajaSat4), and the 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) by bioinformatics, fluorescent in situ and Southern hybridization. Within the Camellia genus, satellite spreading, array expansion and formation of higher-order structures highlight different modes of repeat evolution. The CajaSat satellites localize at prominent chromosomal sites, including (peri)centromeres and subtelomeres of all chromosomes, thus serving as chromosomal landmarks for their identification. This work provides an insight into the C. japonica chromosome organization and significantly expands the Camellia genomic knowledge, also with respect to the tea plant Camellia sinensis. PMID:26582634

  13. Response of T cells in vivo Induced by Repeated Superantigen Treatments at Different Time Intervals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang HUANG; Yanfang SUI; Xiumin ZHANG; Shaoyan SI; Wei GE; Peizhen HU; Xia LI; Bin MA

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the response of T cells to staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) injections in vivo. We found that a single injection of SEA with an optimal dose of 10 μg increased the expression of both CD4 and CD8 significantly. There was expansion of SEA-reactive T cells in vivo after SEA re-injection and the time interval between injections strongly influenced the responsiveness of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.Anergy of T cells was observed after three SEA treatments. The time interval between injections mainly affected the unresponsiveness of CD4+ T cells, not CD8+ T cells. Marked deletion followed by anergy of CD4+ T cells was induced at short intervals, and anergy without obvious deletion of CD4+ T cells was induced at long intervals. We also found that the anergic state was reversible in vivo. Repeated SEA stimulation led to down-regulation of interleukin (IL)-2, and high levels of IL-10. This study showed that both CD4+ and CD8+ SEA-primed T cells were responsive to SEA rechallenge in vivo, and a third injection was needed to induce the anergy of T cells.

  14. Exosome-bound WD repeat protein Monad inhibits breast cancer cell invasion by degrading amphiregulin mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makio Saeki

    Full Text Available Increased stabilization of mRNA coding for key cancer genes can contribute to invasiveness. This is achieved by down-regulation of exosome cofactors, which bind to 3'-UTR in cancer-related genes. Here, we identified amphiregulin, an EGFR ligand, as a target of WD repeat protein Monad, a component of R2TP/prefoldin-like complex, in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Monad specifically interacted with both the 3'-UTR of amphiregulin mRNA and the RNA degrading exosome, and enhanced decay of amphiregulin transcripts. Knockdown of Monad increased invasion and this effect was abolished with anti-amphiregulin neutralizing antibody. These results suggest that Monad could prevent amphiregulin-mediated invasion by degrading amphiregulin mRNA.

  15. The Role Of Nitric Oxide After Repeated Low Dose Photodynamic Treatments In Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Rapozzi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically approved treatment that causes a selective cytotoxic effect in cancer cells. In addition to the production of singlet oxygen and reactive oxygen species, PDT can induce the release of nitric oxide (NO by up-regulating nitric oxide synthases (NOS. Since non-optimal PDT often causes tumor recurrence, understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the photoprocess is a challenging task for scientists. The present study has examined the response of the PC3 human metastatic prostate cancer cell line, following repeated low-dose pheophorbide a treatments, mimicking non-optimal PDT treatment. The analysis was focused on the NF-kB/YY1/RKIP circuitry as it is (i dysregulated in cancer cells (ii modulated by NO and (iii correlated with the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. We hypothesized that a repeated treatment of non-optimal PDT induces low levels of NO that lead to cell growth and EMT via regulation of the above circuitry. The expressions of gene products involved in the circuitry and in EMT were analyzed by western blot. The findings demonstrate the cytoprotective role of NO following non-optimal PDT treatments that was corroborated by the use of l-NAME, an inhibitor of NOS.

  16. The Plasmodium falciparum-specific human memory B cell compartment expands gradually with repeated malaria infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta E Weiss

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunity to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf malaria is only acquired after years of repeated infections and wanes rapidly without ongoing parasite exposure. Antibodies are central to malaria immunity, yet little is known about the B-cell biology that underlies the inefficient acquisition of Pf-specific humoral immunity. This year-long prospective study in Mali of 185 individuals aged 2 to 25 years shows that Pf-specific memory B-cells and antibodies are acquired gradually in a stepwise fashion over years of repeated Pf exposure. Both Pf-specific memory B cells and antibody titers increased after acute malaria and then, after six months of decreased Pf exposure, contracted to a point slightly higher than pre-infection levels. This inefficient, stepwise expansion of both the Pf-specific memory B-cell and long-lived antibody compartments depends on Pf exposure rather than age, based on the comparator response to tetanus vaccination that was efficient and stable. These observations lend new insights into the cellular basis of the delayed acquisition of malaria immunity.

  17. One repeat of the cell wall binding domain is sufficient for anchoring the Lactobacillus acidophilus surface layer protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.; Pouwels, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    The N-terminal repeat (SAC1) of the S-protein of Lactobacillus acidophilus bound efficiently and specifically to cell wall fragments (CWFs) when fused to green fluorescent protein, whereas the C-terminal repeat (SAC2) did not. Treatment of CWFs with hydrofluoric acid, but not phenol, prevented bindi

  18. Behavioral impact of sickle cell disease in young children with repeated hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H Bakri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sickle cell disease (SCD in children with a history of repeated hospitalization is distressing for children as well as their parents leading to anxiety and has negative effects on the psychological state of children and their families. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the overall effect of SCD on the behavior of young children age 1½ to 5 years old who had repeated history of hospitalization, compared to a control group of healthy children attended a vaccination clinic. Patients and Methods: Thirty-five children of age 1½ to 5 years who have SCD and repeated history of hospitalization were recruited from pediatric clinic as the study group and matched with same number of healthy children who attended vaccination clinic, as a control group. Both groups were administered the child behavior checklist (CBCL 1½ to 5 years and diagnostic and statistical (DSM-oriented scale. Behavior data were collected through a semi-structured questionnaire. Results: Children who have SCD had statistically significant behavioral changes on CBCL compared to the control group: Anxiety/depression (65.2 vs. 55.1; P < 0.001, somatic complaint (66.7 vs. 54.4; P < 0.001 withdrawn (63.4 vs. 53.2; P < 0.001, aggressive behavior (60.4 vs. 56; P=0.04, and internalizing symptoms (64.7 vs. 51.5; P < 0.001, respectively. The DSM scale showed that children with SCD scored significantly higher in pervasive developmental disorder compared to the control group (60.9 vs. 53.9; P < 0.001 respectively. Conclusion: Children with SCD who had history of repeated hospitalization are at an increased risk of developing behavioral problems. Psychological counseling, social support, and proper pain management could minimize these behavioral consequences.

  19. Overexpression of MIP2, a novel WD-repeat protein, promotes proliferation of H9c2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WD40 repeat proteins have a wide range of diverse biological functions including signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, RNA splicing, and transcription. Myocardial ischemic preconditioning up-regulated protein 2 (MIP2) is a novel member of the WD40 repeat proteins superfamily that contains five WD40 repeats. Little is known about its biological role, and the purpose of this study was to determine the role of MIP2 in regulating cellular proliferation. Transfection and constitutive expression of MIP2 in the rat cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2 results in enhanced growth of those cells as measured by cell number and is proportional to the amount of MIP2 expressed. Overexpression of MIP2 results in a shorter cell cycle, as measured by flow cytometry. Collectively, these data suggest that MIP2 may participate in the progression of cell proliferation in H9c2 cells.

  20. Repeated cisplatin treatment can lead to a multiresistant tumor cell population with stem cell features and sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintzell, My; Löfstedt, Lina; Johansson, Joel; Pedersen, Anne B; Fuxe, Jonas; Shoshan, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Cisplatin is used in treatment of several types of cancer, including epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). In order to mimic clinical treatment and to investigate longterm effects of cisplatin in surviving cancer cells, two EOC cell lines were repeatedly treated with low doses. In the SKOV-3 cell line originating from malignant ascites, but not in A2780 cells from a primary tumor, this led to emergence of a stable population (SKOV-3-R) which in the absence of cisplatin showed increased motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expression of cancer stem cell markers CD117, CD44 and ALDH1. Accordingly, the cells formed self-renewing spheres in serum-free stem cell medium. Despite upregulation of mitochondrial mass and cytochrome c, and no upregulation of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, SKOV-3-R were multiresistant to antineoplastic drugs. Cancer stem cells, or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are highly chemoresistant and are believed to cause relapse into disseminated and resistant EOC. Our second aim was therefore to target resistance in these TIC-like cells. Resistance could be correlated with upregulation of hexokinase-II and VDAC, which are known to form a survival-promoting mitochondrial complex. The cells were thus sensitive to 3-bromopyruvate, which dissociates hexokinase-II from this complex, and were particularly sensitive to combination treatment with cisplatin at doses down to 0.1 x IC 50. 3-bromopyruvate might thus be of use in targeting the especially aggressive TIC populations. PMID:22954696

  1. Influence of Dietary Components on Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Teimer, Roman; Bockermann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Common dietary components including vitamins A and D, omega-3 and probiotics are now widely accepted to be essential to protect against many diseases with an inflammatory nature. On the other hand, high-fat diets are documented to exert multiple deleterious effects, including fatty liver diseases. Here we discuss the effect of dietary components on regulatory T cell (Treg) homeostasis, a central element of the immune system to prevent chronic tissue inflammation. Accordingly, evidence on the ...

  2. WD40-repeat proteins in plant cell wall formation: current evidence and research prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea eGuerriero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic complexity of living organisms relies on supramolecular protein structures which ensure vital processes, such as signal transduction, transcription, translation and cell wall synthesis. In eukaryotes WD40-repeat (WDR proteins often function as molecular hubs mediating supramolecular interactions. WDR proteins may display a variety of interacting partners and participate in the assembly of complexes involved in distinct cellular functions. In plants, the formation of lignocellulosic biomass involves extensive synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides, a process that requires the assembly of large transmembrane enzyme complexes, intensive vesicle trafficking, interactions with the cytoskeleton, and coordinated gene expression. Because of their function as supramolecular hubs, WDR proteins could participate in each or any of these steps, although to date only few WDR proteins have been linked to the cell wall by experimental evidence. Nevertheless, several potential cell wall-related WDR proteins were recently identified using in silico aproaches, such as analyses of co-expression, interactome and conserved gene neighbourhood. Notably, some WDR genes are frequently genomic neighbours of genes coding for GT2-family polysaccharide synthases in eukaryotes, and this WDR-GT2 collinear microsynteny is detected in diverse taxa. In angiosperms, two WDR genes are collinear to cellulose synthase genes, CESAs, whereas in ascomycetous fungi several WDR genes are adjacent to chitin synthase genes, chs. In this Perspective we summarize and discuss experimental and in silico studies on the possible involvement of WDR proteins in plant cell wall formation. The prospects of biotechnological engineering for enhanced biomass production are discussed.

  3. Thyroid Autoimmunity is Associated with Decreased Cytotoxicity T Cells in Women with Repeated Implantation Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI, which is defined as the presence of autoantibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPO and/or thyroglobulin (TG, is related to repeated implantation failure (RIF. It is reported that TAI was involved in reproductive failure not only through leading thyroid function abnormality, but it can also be accompanied with immune imbalance. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the association of thyroid function, immune status and TAI in women with RIF. Blood samples were drawn from 72 women with RIF to evaluate the prevalence of TAI, the thyroid function, the absolute numbers and percentages of lymphocytes. The prevalence of thyroid function abnormality in RIF women with TAI was not significantly different from that in RIF women without TAI (c2 = 0.484, p > 0.05. The absolute number and percentage of T cells, T helper (Th cells, B cells and natural killer (NK cells were not significantly different in RIF women with TAI compared to those without TAI (all p > 0.05. The percentage of T cytotoxicity (Tc cells was significantly decreased in RIF women with TAI compared to those without TAI (p < 0.05. Meanwhile, Th/Tc ratio was significantly increased (p < 0.05. These results indicated that the decreased Tc percentage and increased Th/Tc ratio may be another influential factor of adverse pregnancy outcomes in RIF women with TAI.

  4. Evidence for a Melanin Cell Wall Component in Pneumocystis carinii

    OpenAIRE

    Icenhour, Crystal R.; Kottom, Theodore J.; Limper, Andrew H.

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled monoclonal antibodies specific for fungal melanin were used in this study to visualize melanin-like components of the Pneumocystis carinii cell wall. A colorimetric enzyme assay confirmed these findings. This is the first report of melanin-like pigments in Pneumocystis.

  5. A Distinct Subpopulation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Muse Cells, Directly Commit to the Replacement of Liver Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, H; Kushida, Y; Nojima, M; Kuroda, Y; Wakao, S; Ishida, K; Endo, F; Kume, K; Takahara, T; Nitta, H; Tsuda, H; Dezawa, M; Nishizuka, S S

    2016-02-01

    Genotyping graft livers by short tandem repeats after human living-donor liver transplantation (n = 20) revealed the presence of recipient or chimeric genotype cases in hepatocytes (6 of 17, 35.3%), sinusoidal cells (18 of 18, 100%), cholangiocytes (15 of 17, 88.2%) and cells in the periportal areas (7 of 8, 87.5%), suggesting extrahepatic cell involvement in liver regeneration. Regarding extrahepatic origin, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have been suggested to contribute to liver regeneration but compose a heterogeneous population. We focused on a more specific subpopulation (1-2% of BM-MSCs), called multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells, for their ability to differentiate into liver-lineage cells and repair tissue. We generated a physical partial hepatectomy model in immunodeficient mice and injected green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled human BM-MSC Muse cells intravenously (n = 20). Immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization and species-specific polymerase chain reaction revealed that they integrated into regenerating areas and expressed liver progenitor markers during the early phase and then differentiated spontaneously into major liver components, including hepatocytes (≈74.3% of GFP-positive integrated Muse cells), cholangiocytes (≈17.7%), sinusoidal endothelial cells (≈2.0%), and Kupffer cells (≈6.0%). In contrast, the remaining cells in the BM-MSCs were not detected in the liver for up to 4 weeks. These results suggest that Muse cells are the predominant population of BM-MSCs that are capable of replacing major liver components during liver regeneration. PMID:26663569

  6. Visualization and quantitative analysis of extrachromosomal telomere-repeat DNA in individual human cells by Halo-FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komosa, Martin; Root, Heather; Meyn, M Stephen

    2015-02-27

    Current methods for characterizing extrachromosomal nuclear DNA in mammalian cells do not permit single-cell analysis, are often semi-quantitative and frequently biased toward the detection of circular species. To overcome these limitations, we developed Halo-FISH to visualize and quantitatively analyze extrachromosomal DNA in single cells. We demonstrate Halo-FISH by using it to analyze extrachromosomal telomere-repeat (ECTR) in human cells that use the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) pathway(s) to maintain telomere lengths. We find that GM847 and VA13 ALT cells average ∼80 detectable G/C-strand ECTR DNA molecules/nucleus, while U2OS ALT cells average ∼18 molecules/nucleus. In comparison, human primary and telomerase-positive cells contain 300), range widely in length (200 kb) and are composed of primarily G- or C-strand telomere-repeat DNA. Halo-FISH enables, for the first time, the simultaneous analysis of ECTR DNA and chromosomal telomeres in a single cell. We find that ECTR DNA comprises ∼15% of telomere-repeat DNA in GM847 and VA13 cells, but <4% in U2OS cells. In addition to its use in ALT cell analysis, Halo-FISH can facilitate the study of a wide variety of extrachromosomal DNA in mammalian cells. PMID:25662602

  7. Authentication of newly established human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (YM-1) using short tandem repeat (STR) profiling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyoob, Khosravi; Masoud, Khoshnia; Vahideh, Kazeminejad; Jahanbakhsh, Asadi

    2016-03-01

    Cross-contamination during or early after establishment of a new cell line could result in the worldwide spread of a misidentified cell line. Therefore, newly established cell lines need to be authenticated by a reference standard method. This study was conducted to investigate the authenticity of a newly established epithelial cell line of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) called YM-1 using short tandem repeat (STR) DNA profiling method. Primary human ESCC epithelial cells were cultured from the fresh tumor tissue of an adult female patient. Growth characteristics and epithelial originality of YM-1 cells were studied. Genomic DNA was isolated from YM-1 cells harvested at passage 22 and ESCC donor tumor sample on two different days to prevent probable DNA contamination. STR profiling was performed using AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® Plus PCR Amplification Kit. To address whether YM-1 cells undergo genetic alteration as the passage number increases, STR profiling was performed again on harvested cells at passage 51. YM-1 cells grew as a monolayer with a population doubling time of 40.66 h. Epithelial originality of YM-1 cells was confirmed using ICC/IF staining of cytokeratins AE1/AE3. The STR profile of the ESCC donor tumor sample was the same with YM-1 cells at passage 22. However, STR profile of the donor tumor sample showed an off-ladder (OL) allele in their D7S820 locus. Also, re-profiling of YM-1 cells at passage 51 showed a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at D18S51 locus. This suggests that long-term culture of cell lines may alter their DNA profile. Comparison of the DNA fingerprinting results in DSMZ, and ATCC STR profiling databases confirmed unique identity of YM-1 cell line. This study provides an easy, fast, and reliable procedure for authentication of newly established cell lines, which helps in preventing the spread of misidentified cells and improving the reproducibility and validity of experiments, consequently.

  8. Quantitation of telomerase components and hTERT mRNA splicing patterns in immortal human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Xiaoming; Jerry W Shay; Wright, Woodring E.

    2001-01-01

    Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that adds telomeric repeats to chromosomal ends. In most normal human somatic cells, telomerase is repressed and telomeres progressively shorten, leading to limited proliferative life-span. Telomerase reactivation is associated with cellular immortalization and is a frequent event during tumorigenesis. The telomerase ribonucleoprotein complex consists of two essential components, a catalytic protein subunit [human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)]...

  9. Basic studies of 3-5 high efficiency cell components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Pierret, R.F.; Carpenter, M.S.; Chuang, H.L.; Dodd, P.E.; Keshavarzi, A.; Klausmeier-Brown, M.E.; Lush, G.B.; Stellwag, T.B. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    This project's objective is to improve our understanding of the generation, recombination, and transport of carriers within III-V homo- and heterostructures. The research itself consists of fabricating and characterizing solar cell building blocks'' such as junctions and heterojunctions as well as basic measurements of material parameters. A significant effort is also being directed at characterizing loss mechanisms in high-quality, III-V solar cells fabricated in industrial research laboratories throughout the United States. The project's goal is to use our understanding of the device physics of high-efficiency cell components to maximize cell efficiency. A related goal is the demonstration of new cell structures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The development of measurement techniques and characterization methodologies is also a project objective. This report describes our progress during the fifth and final year of the project. During the past five years, we've teamed a great deal about heavy doping effects in p[sup +] and n[sup +] GaAs and have explored their implications for solar cells. We have developed an understanding of the dominant recombination losses in present-day, high-efficiency cells. We've learned to appreciated the importance of recombination at the perimeter of the cell and have developed techniques for chemically passivating such edges. Finally, we've demonstrated that films grown by molecular beam epitaxy are suitable for high-efficiency cell research.

  10. Autologous adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells are involved in rat liver regeneration following repeat partial hepatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tao; MU, HONG; Shen, Zhongyang; SONG, ZHUOLUN; Chen, Xiaobo; Wang, Yuliang

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) have been considered to be attractive and readily available adult mesenchymal stem cells, and they are becoming increasingly popular for use in regenerative cell therapy, as they are readily accessible through minimally invasive techniques. The present study investigated whether autologous ADSC transplantation promoted liver regeneration following a repeat partial hepatectomy in rats. The rats were divided into three groups as follows: 70%...

  11. Influence of Dietary Components on Regulatory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Teimer, Roman; Bockermann, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Common dietary components including vitamins A and D, omega-3 and probiotics are now widely accepted to be essential to protect against many diseases with an inflammatory nature. On the other hand, high-fat diets are documented to exert multiple deleterious effects, including fatty liver diseases. Here we discuss the effect of dietary components on regulatory T cell (Treg) homeostasis, a central element of the immune system to prevent chronic tissue inflammation. Accordingly, evidence on the impact of dietary components on diseases in which Tregs play an influential role will be discussed. We will review chronic tissue-specific autoimmune and inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and allergies among chronic diseases where dietary factors could have a direct influence via modulation of Tregs homeostasis and functions. PMID:22113499

  12. Autophagic components contribute to hypersensitive cell death in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Schultz-Larsen, Torsten; Joensen, Jan;

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy has been implicated as a prosurvival mechanism to restrict programmed cell death (PCD) associated with the pathogen-triggered hypersensitive response (HR) during plant innate immunity. This model is based on the observation that HR lesions spread in plants with reduced autophagy gene...... expression. Here, we examined receptor-mediated HR PCD responses in autophagy-deficient Arabidopsis knockout mutants (atg), and show that infection-induced lesions are contained in atg mutants. We also provide evidence that HR cell death initiated via Toll/Interleukin-1 (TIR)-type immune receptors through...... the defense regulator EDS1 is suppressed in atg mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PCD triggered by coiled-coil (CC)-type immune receptors via NDR1 is either autophagy-independent or engages autophagic components with cathepsins and other unidentified cell death mediators. Thus, autophagic cell death...

  13. Merging Mixture Components for Cell Population Identification in Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Finak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a framework for the identification of cell subpopulations in flow cytometry data based on merging mixture components using the flowClust methodology. We show that the cluster merging algorithm under our framework improves model fit and provides a better estimate of the number of distinct cell subpopulations than either Gaussian mixture models or flowClust, especially for complicated flow cytometry data distributions. Our framework allows the automated selection of the number of distinct cell subpopulations and we are able to identify cases where the algorithm fails, thus making it suitable for application in a high throughput FCM analysis pipeline. Furthermore, we demonstrate a method for summarizing complex merged cell subpopulations in a simple manner that integrates with the existing flowClust framework and enables downstream data analysis. We demonstrate the performance of our framework on simulated and real FCM data. The software is available in the flowMerge package through the Bioconductor project.

  14. Single cell analysis reveals gametic and tissue-specific instability of the SCA1 CAG repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, S.S.; McCall, A.E.; Cota, J. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat within the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p22-23. We performed a comparative analysis of the SCA1 CAG repeat from blood and sperm of an affected male. Genomic amplification revealed a broader smear of the SCA1 allele product from sperm compared to that from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). To resolve this observed difference, we analyzed single sperm directly and demonstrate that the SCA1 allele in PBL is also heterogeneous, although the range of variability in allele sizes is much less than that observed in sperm. Limited genome analysis was also performed on PBL DNA from an unaffected individual with an upper normal allele of 36 repeats in parallel with an affected individual with an expanded allele of 40 repeats. The 36 repeat normal allele, which contains a CAT interruption, was completely stable compared to the uninterrupted repeat of the SCA1 allele, demonstrating a direct correlation between absence of a CAT interruption and somatic instability of the repeat. We also analyzed the size of the CAG repeat in tissues derived from various brain regions from a patient with juvenile-onset disease to determine if the size of the expansion correlated with the site of neuropathology. The results clearly show tissue-specific differences in mosaicism of repeat length. More importantly, the pattern of tissue-specific differences in repeat-length mosaicism in SCA1 within the brain parallels those seen in Huntington disease. In both disorders the expanded alleles are smaller in cerebellar tissue. These results suggest that the observed tissue-specific differences in instability of the SCA1 CAG repeat, either within the brain or between blood and sperm, are a function of the intracellular milieu or the intrinsic replicative potential of the various celltypes.

  15. Repeated observation of immune gene sets enrichment in women with non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Jhajaira M.; Prado, Alexandra; Cardenas, Nadezhda K.; Zaharia, Mayer; Dyer, Richard; Doimi, Franco; Bravo, Leny; Pinillos, Luis; Morante, Zaida; Aguilar, Alfredo; Mas, Luis A.; Gomez, Henry L.; Vallejos, Carlos S.; Rolfo, Christian; Pinto, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    There are different biological and clinical patterns of lung cancer between genders indicating intrinsic differences leading to increased sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced DNA damage, mutational patterns of KRAS and better clinical outcomes in women while differences between genders at gene-expression levels was not previously reported. Here we show an enrichment of immune genes in NSCLC in women compared to men. We found in a GSEA analysis (by biological processes annotated from Gene Ontology) of six public datasets a repeated observation of immune gene sets enrichment in women. “Immune system process”, “immune response”, “defense response”, “cellular defense response” and “regulation of immune system process” were the gene sets most over-represented while APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, LAT, CD1D and CCL5 represented the top-five core genes. Characterization of immune cell composition with the platform CIBERSORT showed no differences between genders; however, there were differences when tumor tissues were compared to normal tissues. Our results suggest different immune responses in NSCLC between genders that could be related with the different clinical outcome. PMID:26958810

  16. Repeatability of differential goat bulk milk culture and associations with somatic cell count, total bacterial count, and standard plate count

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, G.; Dik, N.; Nielen, M.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how different bacterial groups in bulk milk are related to bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), bulk milk total bacterial count (TBC), and bulk milk standard plate count (SPC) and to measure the repeatability of bulk milk culturing. On 53 Dutch dairy goat farms,

  17. The αRep artificial repeat protein scaffold: a new tool for crystallization and live cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Urvoas, Agathe; Chevrel, Anne; Guellouz, Asma; Ferrandez, Yann; Mesneau, Agnès; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    We have designed a new family of artificial proteins, named αRep, based on HEAT (acronym for Huntingtin, elongation factor 3 (EF3), protein pphosphatase 2A (PP2A), yeast kinase Tor1) repeat proteins containing an α-helical repeated motif. The sequence of the repeated motifs, first identified in a thermostable archae protein was optimized using a consensus design strategy and used for the construction of a library of artificial proteins. All proteins from this library share the same general fold but differ both in the number of repeats and in five highly randomized amino acid positions within each repeat. The randomized side chains altogether provide a hypervariable surface on αRep variants. Sequences from this library are efficiently expressed as soluble, folded and very stable proteins. αRep binders with high affinity for various protein targets were selected by phage display. Low micromolar to nanomolar dissociation constants between partners were measured and the structures of several complexes (specific αRep/protein target) were solved by X-ray crystallography. Using GFP as a model target, it was demonstrated that αReps can be used as bait in pull-down experiments. αReps can be expressed in eukaryotic cells and specifically interact with their target addressed to different cell compartments.

  18. The αRep artificial repeat protein scaffold: a new tool for crystallization and live cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Urvoas, Agathe; Chevrel, Anne; Guellouz, Asma; Ferrandez, Yann; Mesneau, Agnès; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    We have designed a new family of artificial proteins, named αRep, based on HEAT (acronym for Huntingtin, elongation factor 3 (EF3), protein pphosphatase 2A (PP2A), yeast kinase Tor1) repeat proteins containing an α-helical repeated motif. The sequence of the repeated motifs, first identified in a thermostable archae protein was optimized using a consensus design strategy and used for the construction of a library of artificial proteins. All proteins from this library share the same general fold but differ both in the number of repeats and in five highly randomized amino acid positions within each repeat. The randomized side chains altogether provide a hypervariable surface on αRep variants. Sequences from this library are efficiently expressed as soluble, folded and very stable proteins. αRep binders with high affinity for various protein targets were selected by phage display. Low micromolar to nanomolar dissociation constants between partners were measured and the structures of several complexes (specific αRep/protein target) were solved by X-ray crystallography. Using GFP as a model target, it was demonstrated that αReps can be used as bait in pull-down experiments. αReps can be expressed in eukaryotic cells and specifically interact with their target addressed to different cell compartments. PMID:26517888

  19. A Gaijin-like miniature inverted repeat transposable element is mobilized in rice during cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hai-Tao

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Miniature inverted repeat transposable element (MITE is one type of transposable element (TE, which is largely found in eukaryotic genomes and involved in a wide variety of biological events. However, only few MITEs were proved to be currently active and their physiological function remains largely unknown. Results We found that the amplicon discrepancy of a gene locus LOC_Os01g0420 in different rice cultivar genomes was resulted from the existence of a member of Gaijin-like MITEs (mGing. This result indicated that mGing transposition was occurred at this gene locus. By using a modified transposon display (TD analysis, the active transpositions of mGing were detected in rice Jiahua No. 1 genome under three conditions: in seedlings germinated from the seeds received a high dose γ-ray irradiation, in plantlets regenerated from anther-derived calli and from scutellum-derived calli, and were confirmed by PCR validation and sequencing. Sequence analysis revealed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs or short additional DNA sequences at transposition sites post mGing transposition. It suggested that sequence modification was possibly taken place during mGing transposition. Furthermore, cell re-differentiation experiment showed that active transpositions of both mGing and mPing (another well studied MITE were identified only in regenerated plantlets. Conclusions It is for the first time that mGing active transposition was demonstrated under γ-ray irradiation or in cell re-differentiation process in rice. This newly identified active MITE will provide a foundation for further analysis of the roles of MITEs in biological process.

  20. Snake venoms components with antitumor activity in murine melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the constant advances in the treatment of cancer, this disease remains one of the main causes of mortality worldwide. So, the development of new treatment modalities is imperative. Snake venom causes a variety of biological effects because they constitute a complex mixture of substances as disintegrins, proteases (serine and metalo), phospholipases A2, L-amino acid oxidases and others. The goal of the present work is to evaluate a anti-tumor activity of some snake venoms fractions. There are several studies of components derived from snake venoms with this kind of activity. After fractionation of snake venoms of the families Viperidae and Elapidae, the fractions were assayed towards murine melanoma cell line B16-F10 and fibroblasts L929. The results showed that the fractions of venom of the snake Notechis ater niger had higher specificity and potential antitumor activity on B16-F10 cell line than the other studied venoms. Since the components of this venom are not explored yet coupled with the potential activity showed in this work, we decided to choose this venom to develop further studies. The cytotoxic fractions were evaluated to identify and characterize the components that showed antitumoral activity. Western blot assays and zymography suggests that these proteins do not belong to the class of metallo and serine proteinases. (author)

  1. Antibodies against analogous heptad repeat peptide HR212 of Newcastle Disease Virus inhibit virus-cell membrane fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying; TIEN Po

    2007-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a key step in enveloped virus entry. Highly conserved heptad repeat regions (HR1 and HR2) of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) fusion protein (F) are critical functional domains for viral membrane fusion. They display different conformations in the membrane fusion states and are viewed as candidate targets for neutralizing antibody responses. We previously reported that an analog of heptad repeat peptides HR2-HR1-HR2(HR212) and HR2 could inhibit NDV induced cell-cell membrane fusion. Here, we show that HR212 can induce the production of highly potent antibody in immunized rabbits, which could recognize full length peptides of both HR1 and HR2, and inhibit NDV hemagglutination and NDV entry. These suggest that either HR212 or its antibody could be an inhibitor of virus-induced cell-cell membrane fusion.

  2. Repeated Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion Induced PC-12 Cell Death through the Involvement of FOXO Transcription Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na; Kim, You Jeong; Park, Su Min; Kim, Seung Man; Lee, Ji Suk; Jung, Hye Sook; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Tae Kyoon; Kim, Tae Nyun; Kwon, Min Jeong; Lee, Soon Hee; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment and brain damage in diabetes is suggested to be associated with hypoglycemia. The mechanisms of hypoglycemia-induced neural death and apoptosis are not clear and reperfusion injury may be involved. Recent studies show that glucose deprivation/reperfusion induced more neuronal cell death than glucose deprivation itself. The forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors are implicated in the regulation of cell apoptosis and survival, but their role in neuronal cells remains unclear. We examined the role of FOXO transcription factors and the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and apoptosis-related signaling pathways in PC-12 cells exposed to repeated glucose deprivation/reperfusion. Methods PC-12 cells were exposed to control (Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium [DMEM] containing 25 mM glucose) or glucose deprivation/reperfusion (DMEM with 0 mM glucose for 6 hours and then DMEM with 25 mM glucose for 18 hours) for 5 days. MTT assay and Western blot analysis were performed for cell viability, apoptosis, and the expression of survival signaling pathways. FOXO3/4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining was done to ascertain the involvement of FOXO transcription factors in glucose deprivation/reperfusion conditions. Results Compared to PC-12 cells not exposed to hypoglycemia, cells exposed to glucose deprivation/reperfusion showed a reduction of cell viability, decreased expression of phosphorylated Akt and Bcl-2, and an increase of cleaved caspase-3 expression. Of note, FOXO3 protein was localized in the nuclei of glucose deprivation/reperfusion cells but not in the control cells. Conclusion Repeated glucose deprivation/reperfusion caused the neuronal cell death. Activated FOXO3 via the PI3K/Akt pathway in repeated glucose deprivation/reperfusion was involved in genes related to apoptosis.

  3. Basic studies of 3-V high efficiency cell components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Pierret, R.F.; Carpenter, M.S.; Chuang, H.L.; Keshavarzi, A.; Klausmeier-Brown, M.E.; Lush, G.B.; Morgan, J.M.; Stellwag, T.B. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA). School of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-07-01

    This project's objective is to improve our fundamental understanding of the generation, recombination, and transport of carriers within III-V homo- and heterostructures. The research consists of fabricating and characterizing solar cell building blocks'' such as junctions and heterojunctions as well as basic measurements of material parameters. A significant effort is also being directed at characterizing loss mechanisms in high-quality, III-V solar cells fabricated in industrial research laboratories throughout the United States. The project's goal is to use our understanding of the device physics of high-efficiency cell components to maximize cell efficiency. A related goal is the demonstration of new cell structures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The development of measurement techniques and characterization methodologies is also a project objective. We expect that the insight into III-V device physics occurring during the course of this work will help to identify paths toward higher efficiency III-V cells. This report describes our progress during the fourth year of the project. The past year's efforts centered on completing studies of heavy doping effects in p{sup +}-GaAs and assessing the importance of similar effects in n{sup +}-GaAs, and at continuing research on characterizing, controlling, and passivating perimeter recombination currents. We also initiated work to identify the dominant loss mechanism in Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8} As solar cells and brought on-line a new MBE growth facility and demonstrated the high-quality of the films by fabricating, with assistance from Spire Corporation, 23.8% 1-sun solar cells.

  4. Effect of repeated intracoronary injection of bone marrow cells in patients with ischaemic heart failure the Danish stem cell study - congestive heart failure trial (DanCell-CHF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, A.C.; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Thayssen, P.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that myocardial regeneration may be achieved by a single intracoronary bone marrow derived stem cell infusion in selected patients with ischaemic heart disease. The effect is uncertain in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure and it is not known whether...... repeated infusions would have additional positive effects. AIMS: To assess whether two treatments of intracoronary infusion of bone marrow stem cells, administered 4 months apart, could improve left ventricular (LV) systolic function in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure. METHODS: The study......, NYHA class improved (pstem cell treatment in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  5. Rapid isolation of antibody from a synthetic human antibody library by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Sun Yim

    Full Text Available Antibodies and their derivatives are the most important agents in therapeutics and diagnostics. Even after the significant progress in the technology for antibody screening from huge libraries, it takes a long time to isolate an antibody, which prevents a prompt action against the spread of a disease. Here, we report a new strategy for isolating desired antibodies from a combinatorial library in one day by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. First, we constructed a library of synthetic human antibody in which single-chain variable fragment (scFv was expressed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. After labeling the cells with fluorescent antigen probes, the highly fluorescent cells were sorted by using a high-speed cell sorter, and these cells were reused without regeneration in the next round of sorting. After repeating this sorting, the positive clones were completely enriched in several hours. Thus, we screened the library against three viral antigens, including the H1N1 influenza virus, Hepatitis B virus, and Foot-and-mouth disease virus. Finally, the potential antibody candidates, which show K(D values between 10 and 100 nM against the target antigens, could be successfully isolated even though the library was relatively small (∼ 10(6. These results show that repeated FACS screening without regeneration of the sorted cells can be a powerful method when a rapid response to a spreading disease is required.

  6. Novel High Pressure Multi-Component Diffusion Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Muthia Elma; Paul Massarotto; Victor Rudolph

    2012-01-01

    A novel high pressure multi-component diffusion cell (HPMCDC) apparatus has been designed and built to measure single and binary gas diffusion, including co-current and counter-diffusion, from low to high pressures. The apparatus incorporates capability to investigate scale effects in solid coal specimens, up to 25 mm in diameter and 25 mm in thickness. Future experiments will be conducted to measure diffusion and counter-diffusion of CH4 and CO2 gases in solid coal, at various temperatures, ...

  7. Repeated-batch production of kojic acid in a cell-retention fermenter using Aspergillus oryzae M3B9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, H M; Chen, C C; Giridhar, R; Chang, T S; Wu, W T

    2005-06-01

    A cell-retention fermenter was used for the pilot-scale production of kojic acid using an improved strain of Aspergillus oryzae in repeated-batch fermentations. Among the various carbon and nitrogen sources used, sucrose and yeast extract promoted pellet morphology of fungi and higher kojic acid production. Repeated-batch culture using a medium replacement ratio of 75% gave a productivity of 5.3 gL(-1)day(-1) after 11.5 days of cultivation. While batch culture in shake-flasks resulted in a productivity of 5.1 gL(-1)day(-1), a productivity of 5 gL(-1)day(-1) was obtained in a pilot-scale fermenter. By converting the batch culture into repeated batches, the non-productive downtime of cleaning, filling and sterilizing the fermenter between each batch were eliminated, thereby increasing the kojic acid productivity. PMID:15895266

  8. Mechanical properties of regular porous biomaterials made from truncated cube repeating unit cells: Analytical solutions and computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has enabled fabrication of open-cell porous biomaterials based on repeating unit cells. The micro-architecture of the porous biomaterials and, thus, their physical properties could then be precisely controlled. Due to their many favorable properties, porous biomaterials manufactured using AM are considered as promising candidates for bone substitution as well as for several other applications in orthopedic surgery. The mechanical properties of such porous structures including static and fatigue properties are shown to be strongly dependent on the type of the repeating unit cell based on which the porous biomaterial is built. In this paper, we study the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials made from a relatively new unit cell, namely truncated cube. We present analytical solutions that relate the dimensions of the repeating unit cell to the elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, yield stress, and buckling load of those porous structures. We also performed finite element modeling to predict the mechanical properties of the porous structures. The analytical solution and computational results were found to be in agreement with each other. The mechanical properties estimated using both the analytical and computational techniques were somewhat higher than the experimental data reported in one of our recent studies on selective laser melted Ti-6Al-4V porous biomaterials. In addition to porosity, the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of the porous structures were found to be strongly dependent on the ratio of the length of the inclined struts to that of the uninclined (i.e. vertical or horizontal) struts, α, in the truncated cube unit cell. The geometry of the truncated cube unit cell approaches the octahedral and cube unit cells when α respectively approaches zero and infinity. Consistent with those geometrical observations, the analytical solutions presented in this study approached those of the octahedral and cube unit cells when

  9. Novel High Pressure Multi-Component Diffusion Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthia Elma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel high pressure multi-component diffusion cell (HPMCDC apparatus has been designed and built to measure single and binary gas diffusion, including co-current and counter-diffusion, from low to high pressures. The apparatus incorporates capability to investigate scale effects in solid coal specimens, up to 25 mm in diameter and 25 mm in thickness. Future experiments will be conducted to measure diffusion and counter-diffusion of CH4 and CO2 gases in solid coal, at various temperatures, pressures and for three distinct ranks of coal. The experiments will also address the frequent and controversial literature conclusions that the apparent-diffusion of CH4, inconsistent with gas diffusion theory.

  10. A Novel Terminal-Repeat Retrotransposon in Miniature (TRIM) Is Massively Expressed in Echinococcus multilocularis Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Uriel; Radio, Santiago; Smircich, Pablo; Zarowiecki, Magdalena; Fernández, Cecilia; Brehm, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Taeniid cestodes (including the human parasites Echinococcus spp. and Taenia solium) have very few mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in their genome, despite lacking a canonical PIWI pathway. The MGEs of these parasites are virtually unexplored, and nothing is known about their expression and silencing. In this work, we report the discovery of a novel family of small nonautonomous long terminal repeat retrotransposons (also known as terminal-repeat retrotransposons in miniature, TRIMs) which we have named ta-TRIM (taeniid TRIM). ta-TRIMs are only the second family of TRIM elements discovered in animals, and are likely the result of convergent reductive evolution in different taxonomic groups. These elements originated at the base of the taeniid tree and have expanded during taeniid diversification, including after the divergence of closely related species such as Echinococcus multilocularis and Echinococcus granulosus. They are massively expressed in larval stages, from a small proportion of full-length copies and from isolated terminal repeats that show transcriptional read-through into downstream regions, generating novel noncoding RNAs and transcriptional fusions to coding genes. In E. multilocularis, ta-TRIMs are specifically expressed in the germinative cells (the somatic stem cells) during asexual reproduction of metacestode larvae. This would provide a developmental mechanism for insertion of ta-TRIMs into cells that will eventually generate the adult germ line. Future studies of active and inactive ta-TRIM elements could give the first clues on MGE silencing mechanisms in cestodes. PMID:26133390

  11. Design and analysis of effects of triplet repeat oligonucleotides in cell models for myotonic dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Barriga, A.; Mulders, S.A.M.; Giessen, J. van der; Hooijer, J.D.; Bijl, S.; Kessel, I.D.G. van; Beers, J. van; Deutekom, J.C. van; Fransen, J.A.M.; Wieringa, B.; Wansink, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by DM protein kinase (DMPK) transcripts containing an expanded (CUG)n repeat. Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated suppression of these mutant RNAs is considered a promising therapeutic strategy for this severe disorder. Earlier, we identified a 2'-O-met

  12. Repeated Miscarriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ100 PREGNANCY Repeated Miscarriages • What is recurrent pregnancy loss? • What is the likelihood of having repeated miscarriages? • What is the most common cause of miscarriage? • ...

  13. Repeated exposure of the developing rat brain to magnetic resonance imaging did not affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Changlian [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Jianfeng [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Department of Physiology, Henan Traditional Medical University (China); Li, Qian; Huang, Zhiheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Hongfu [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Kuhn, Hans-Georg [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Blomgren, Klas, E-mail: klas.blomgren@neuro.gu.se [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The effect of MRI on the developing brain is a matter of debate. {yields} Repeated exposure to MRI did not affect neurogenesis. {yields} Memory function was not affected by repeated MRI during development. {yields} Neither late gestation nor young postnatal brains were affected by MRI. {yields} Repeated MRI did not cause cell death in the neurogenic region of the hippocampus. -- Abstract: The effect of magnetic fields on the brain is a matter of debate. The objective of this study was to investigate whether repeated exposure to strong magnetic fields, such as during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could elicit changes in the developing rat brain. Embryonic day 15 (E15) and postnatal day 14 (P14) rats were exposed to MRI using a 7.05 T MR system. The animals were anesthetized and exposed for 35 min per day for 4 successive days. Control animals were anesthetized but no MRI was performed. Body temperature was maintained at 37 {sup o}C. BrdU was injected after each session (50 mg/kg). One month later, cell proliferation, neurogenesis and astrogenesis in the dentate gyrus were evaluated, revealing no effects of MRI, neither in the E15, nor in the P14 group. DNA damage in the dentate gyrus in the P14 group was evaluated on P18, 1 day after the last session, using TUNEL staining. There was no difference in the number of TUNEL-positive cells after MRI compared with controls, neither in mature neurons, nor in newborn progenitors (BrdU/TUNEL double-labeled cells). Novel object recognition was performed to assess memory function 1 month after MRI. There was no difference in the recognition index observed after MRI compared with the control rats, neither for the E15, nor for the P14 group. In conclusion, repeated exposure to MRI did not appear to affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function in rats, neither in late gestation (E15-E18) nor in young postnatal (P14-P17) rats.

  14. In vitro kinetics of amiodarone and its major metabolite in two human liver cell models after acute and repeated treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomponio, Giuliana; Savary, Camille C; Parmentier, Céline; Bois, Frederic; Guillouzo, André; Romanelli, Luca; Richert, Lysiane; Di Consiglio, Emma; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-12-25

    The limited value of in vitro toxicity data for the in vivo extrapolation has been often attributed to the lack of kinetic data. Here the in vitro kinetics of amiodarone (AMI) and its mono-N-desethyl (MDEA) metabolite was determined and modelled in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and HepaRG cells, after single and repeated administration of clinically relevant concentrations. AMI bioavailability was influenced by adsorption to the plastic and the presence of protein in the medium (e.g. 10% serum protein reduced the uptake by half in HepaRG cells). The cell uptake was quick (within 3h), AMI metabolism was efficient and a dynamic equilibrium was reached in about a week after multiple dosing. In HepaRG cells the metabolic clearance was higher than in PHH and increased over time, as well as CYP3A4. The interindividual variability in MDEA production in PHHs was not proportional to the differences in CYP3A4 activities, suggesting the involvement of other CYPs and/or AMI-related CYP inhibition. After repeated treatment AMI showed a slight potential for bioaccumulation, whereas much higher intracellular MDEA levels accumulated over time, especially in the HepaRG cells, associated with occurrence of phospholipidosis. The knowledge of in vitro biokinetics is important to transform an actual in vitro concentration-effect into an in vivo dose-effect relationship by using appropriate modelling, thus improving the in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation.

  15. Elicitation of silymarin in cell cultures of Silybum marianum: effect of subculture and repeated addition of methyl jasmonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Maria Angeles; Fernández-Tárrago, Jorge; Corchete, Purificación

    2009-10-01

    Production of silymarin and the effect of the elicitor, methyl jasmonate (MeJA), was monitored in cell cultures of Silybum marianum over 4 years. Silymarin concentrations gradually declined after prolonged subculture, making the success of elicitor strategy limited in long-term cultures. The continuous presence of MeJA in cultures for an extended period was necessary for induction of silymarin accumulation. A repeated elicitor strategy was not a good option for improving silymarin productivity in batch cultures. Removal of medium from elicited cultures and addition of fresh medium avoided the toxic effects of elicitor accumulation, allowing the system to respond to a repeated MeJA treatment without loss of productivity.

  16. Estimation of (covariance components of nematode parasites resistance and somatic cell count in dairy sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Casu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nematode parasites and mastitis are the major animal health constraints in sheep. The aim of this study was estimating the genetic (covariances of nematode parasites resistance and somatic cell count in dairy sheep. From 2000 to 2008, Somatic Cell Score (SCS and Faecal Egg Count (FEC records were available on an experimental population consisting of 949 backcross ewes and 806 their daughters. Data were processed independently for each subpopulation in order to adjust for specific environmental effects and to obtain lactation records for both traits to be used in the genetic analysis. Variance components estimation was performed by using the REML method applied to a bi-trait repeatability animal model. Heritabilities of lactation SCS (LSCS and FEC were 0.19 and 0.16. Genetic correlation was 0.21, whereas phenotypic correlation was 0.01. The estimated heritabilities confirm that both traits could be selected by the classical quantitative approach. The genetic correlation estimate between LSCS and FEC suggests that selection for one of the two traits would not have any detrimental effect on the other one.

  17. Sets of RNA repeated tags and hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probes for distinct images of RNA in a living cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kubota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Imaging the behavior of RNA in a living cell is a powerful means for understanding RNA functions and acquiring spatiotemporal information in a single cell. For more distinct RNA imaging in a living cell, a more effective chemical method to fluorescently label RNA is now required. In addition, development of the technology labeling with different colors for different RNA would make it easier to analyze plural RNA strands expressing in a cell. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tag technology for RNA imaging in a living cell has been developed based on the unique chemical functions of exciton-controlled hybridization-sensitive oligonucleotide (ECHO probes. Repetitions of selected 18-nucleotide RNA tags were incorporated into the mRNA 3'-UTR. Pairs with complementary ECHO probes exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission for the mRNA expressed in a living cell. The mRNA in a nucleus was detected clearly as fluorescent puncta, and the images of the expression of two mRNAs were obtained independently and simultaneously with two orthogonal tag-probe pairs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A compact and repeated label has been developed for RNA imaging in a living cell, based on the photochemistry of ECHO probes. The pairs of an 18-nt RNA tag and the complementary ECHO probes are highly thermostable, sequence-specifically emissive, and orthogonal to each other. The nucleotide length necessary for one tag sequence is much shorter compared with conventional tag technologies, resulting in easy preparation of the tag sequences with a larger number of repeats for more distinct RNA imaging.

  18. Mouse endometrial stromal cells produce basement-membrane components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Damjanov, A; Weiss, J;

    1986-01-01

    During mouse pregnancy, uterine stromal cells transform into morphologically distinct decidual cells under the influence of the implanting embryo and a proper hormonal environment. Mechanical stimulation of hormonally primed uterine stromal cells leads to the same morphologic alterations. The dec...

  19. Relevance of MUC1 mucin variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism in H pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natália R Costa; Nuno Mendes; Nuno T Marcos; Celso A Reis; Thomas Caffrey; Michael A Hollingsworth; Filipe Santos-Silva

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the influence of MUC1 mucin variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) variability on H pylori adhesion to gastric cells.METHODS:Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based adhesion assays were performed to measure the adhesion of different H pylori strains (HP26695 and HPTx30a) to gastric carcinoma cell lines (GP202 and MKN45) and GP202 clones expressing recombinant MUC1 with different VNTR lengths.RESULTS:Evaluation of adhesion results shows that H pylori pathogenic strain HP26695 has a significantly higher (P<0.05) adhesion to all the cell lines and clones tested,when compared to the non-pathogenic strain HPTx30a.Bacteria showed a significantly higher (P<0.05)adhesion to the GP202 cell line,when compared to the MKN45 cell line.Furthermore,both strains showed a significantly higher (P<0.05) adhesion to GP202 clones with larger MUC1 VNTR domains.CONCLUSION:This work shows that MUC1 mucin variability conditions H pylori binding to gastric cells.The extent of bacterial adhesion depends on the size of the MUC1 VNTR domain.The adhesion is further dependent on bacterial pathogenicity and the gastric cell line.MUC1 mucin variability may contribute to determine H pylori colonization of the gastric mucosa.

  20. Suppression of lymphocyte proliferation by marijuana components is related to cell number and cell source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, T.; Pross, S.; Newton, C.; Friedman, H.

    1986-03-05

    Conflicting reports have appeared concerning the effect of marijuana components on immune responsiveness. The authors have observed that the effect of cannabinoids on lymphocyte proliferation varied with both the concentration of the drug and the mitogen used. They now report that at a constant concentration of drug, the cannabinoid effect varied from no effect to suppression depending upon the number of cells in culture and the organ source of the cells. Dispersed cell suspensions of mouse lymph node, spleen, and thymus were prepared and cultured at varying cell numbers with either delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol or 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and various mitogens. Lymphocyte proliferation was analyzed by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation. T-lymphocyte mitogen responses in cultures containing high cell numbers were unaffected by the cannabinoids but as cell numbers were reduced a suppression of the response was observed. Furthermore, thymus cells were considerably more susceptible to cannabinoid suppression than cells from either lymph node or spleen. These results suggest that certain lymphocyte subpopulations are more sensitive to cannabinoid suppression and that in addition to drug concentration other variables such as cell number and cell source must be considered when analyzing cannabinoid effects.

  1. Suppression of lymphocyte proliferation by marijuana components is related to cell number and cell source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conflicting reports have appeared concerning the effect of marijuana components on immune responsiveness. The authors have observed that the effect of cannabinoids on lymphocyte proliferation varied with both the concentration of the drug and the mitogen used. They now report that at a constant concentration of drug, the cannabinoid effect varied from no effect to suppression depending upon the number of cells in culture and the organ source of the cells. Dispersed cell suspensions of mouse lymph node, spleen, and thymus were prepared and cultured at varying cell numbers with either delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol or 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and various mitogens. Lymphocyte proliferation was analyzed by 3H-thymidine incorporation. T-lymphocyte mitogen responses in cultures containing high cell numbers were unaffected by the cannabinoids but as cell numbers were reduced a suppression of the response was observed. Furthermore, thymus cells were considerably more susceptible to cannabinoid suppression than cells from either lymph node or spleen. These results suggest that certain lymphocyte subpopulations are more sensitive to cannabinoid suppression and that in addition to drug concentration other variables such as cell number and cell source must be considered when analyzing cannabinoid effects

  2. HEK293 cell culture media study towards bioprocess optimization: Animal derived component free and animal derived component containing platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liste-Calleja, Leticia; Lecina, Martí; Cairó, Jordi Joan

    2014-04-01

    The increasing demand for biopharmaceuticals produced in mammalian cells has lead industries to enhance bioprocess volumetric productivity through different strategies. Among those strategies, cell culture media development is of major interest. In the present work, several commercially available culture media for Human Embryonic Kidney cells (HEK293) were evaluated in terms of maximal specific growth rate and maximal viable cell concentration supported. The main objective was to provide different cell culture platforms which are suitable for a wide range of applications depending on the type and the final use of the product obtained. Performing simple media supplementations with and without animal derived components, an enhancement of cell concentration from 2 × 10(6) cell/mL to 17 × 10(6) cell/mL was achieved in batch mode operation. Additionally, the media were evaluated for adenovirus production as a specific application case of HEK293 cells. None of the supplements interfered significantly with the adenovirus infection although some differences were encountered in viral productivity. To the best of our knowledge, the high cell density achieved in the work presented has never been reported before in HEK293 batch cell cultures and thus, our results are greatly promising to further study cell culture strategies in bioreactor towards bioprocess optimization.

  3. A serial micropipette microfluidic device with applications to cancer cell repeated deformation studies†

    OpenAIRE

    Mak, Michael; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    Cells are complex viscoelastic materials that are frequently in deformed morphological states, particularly during the cancer invasion process. The ability to study cell mechanical deformability in an accessible way can be enabling in many areas of research where biomechanics is important, from cancer metastasis to immune response to stem cell differentiation. Furthermore, phenomena in biology are frequently exhibited in high multiplicity. For instance, during metastasis, ce...

  4. Understanding the biokinetics of ibuprofen after single and repeated treatments in rat and human in vitro liver cell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truisi, Germaine L; Consiglio, Emma Di; Parmentier, Céline; Savary, Camille C; Pomponio, Giuliana; Bois, Frederic; Lauer, Birthe; Jossé, Rozenn; Hewitt, Philip G; Mueller, Stefan O; Richert, Lysiane; Guillouzo, André; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-03-01

    Common in vitro toxicity testing often neglects the fate and intracellular concentration of tested compounds, potentially limiting the predictability of in vitro results for in vivo extrapolation. We used in vitro long-term cultures of primary rat (PRH) and human hepatocytes (PHH) and HepaRG cells to characterise and model the biokinetic profile of ibuprofen (IBU) after single and daily repeated exposure (14 days) to two concentrations. A cross-model comparison was carried out at 100μM, roughly corresponding to the human therapeutic plasma concentration. Our results showed that IBU uptake was rapid and a dynamic equilibrium was reached within 1 or 2 days. All three cell systems efficiently metabolised IBU. In terms of species-differences, our data mirrored known in vivo results. Although no bioaccumulation was observed, IBU intracellular concentration was higher in PRH due to a 10-fold lower metabolic clearance compared to the human-derived cells. In HepaRG cells, IBU metabolism increased over time, but was not related to the treatment. In PHH, a low CYP2C9 activity, the major IBU-metabolising CYP, led to an increased cytotoxicity. A high inter-individual variability was seen in PHH, whereas HepaRG cells and PRH were more reproducible models. Although the concentrations of IBU in PRH over time differed from the concentrations found in human cells under similar exposure conditions.

  5. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  6. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilschut, Karlijn J. [Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Haagsman, Henk P. [Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, 3584 CL, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roelen, Bernard A.J., E-mail: b.a.j.roelen@uu.nl [Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus host cell invasion and virulence in sepsis is facilitated by the multiple repeats within FnBPA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Edwards

    Full Text Available Entry of Staphylococcus aureus into the bloodstream can lead to metastatic abscess formation and infective endocarditis. Crucial to the development of both these conditions is the interaction of S. aureus with endothelial cells. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that the staphylococcal invasin FnBPA triggers bacterial invasion of endothelial cells via a process that involves fibronectin (Fn bridging to alpha(5beta(1 integrins. The Fn-binding region of FnBPA usually contains 11 non-identical repeats (FnBRs with differing affinities for Fn, which facilitate the binding of multiple Fn molecules and may promote integrin clustering. We thus hypothesized that multiple repeats are necessary to trigger the invasion of endothelial cells by S. aureus. To test this we constructed variants of fnbA containing various combinations of FnBRs. In vitro assays revealed that endothelial cell invasion can be facilitated by a single high-affinity, but not low-affinity FnBR. Studies using a nisin-inducible system that controlled surface expression of FnBPA revealed that variants encoding fewer FnBRs required higher levels of surface expression to mediate invasion. High expression levels of FnBPA bearing a single low affinity FnBR bound Fn but did not invade, suggesting that FnBPA affinity for Fn is crucial for triggering internalization. In addition, multiple FnBRs increased the speed of internalization, as did higher expression levels of FnBPA, without altering the uptake mechanism. The relevance of these findings to pathogenesis was demonstrated using a murine sepsis model, which showed that multiple FnBRs were required for virulence. In conclusion, multiple FnBRs within FnBPA facilitate efficient Fn adhesion, trigger rapid bacterial uptake and are required for pathogenesis.

  8. Autologous adipose tissue‑derived mesenchymal stem cells are involved in rat liver regeneration following repeat partial hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Mu, Hong; Shen, Zhongyang; Song, Zhuolun; Chen, Xiaobo; Wang, Yuliang

    2016-03-01

    Adipose tissue‑derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) have been considered to be attractive and readily available adult mesenchymal stem cells, and they are becoming increasingly popular for use in regenerative cell therapy, as they are readily accessible through minimally invasive techniques. The present study investigated whether autologous ADSC transplantation promoted liver regeneration following a repeat partial hepatectomy in rats. The rats were divided into three groups as follows: 70% partial hepatectomy (PH) group; repeat PH (R‑PH) group and R‑PH/ADSC group, subjected to R‑PH and treated with autologous ADSCs via portal vein injection. In each group, the rats were sacrificed at different time points postoperatively in order to evaluate the changes in liver function and to estimate the liver regenerative response. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling index in the liver was measured using immunohistochemistry. The expression levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) mRNA were measured using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that regeneration of the remaining liver following R‑PH was significantly promoted by ADSC transplantation, as shown by a significant increase in liver to body weight ratio and the PCNA labeling index at 24 h post‑hepatectomy. Additionally, ADSC transplantation markedly inhibited the elevation of serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and total bilirubin, increased HGF content and also attenuated hepatic vacuolar degeneration 24 h postoperatively. Furthermore, the liver was found to almost fully recover from hepatocellular damage due to hepatectomy among the three groups at 168 h postoperatively. These results indicated that autologous ADSC transplantation enhanced the regenerative capacity of the remnant liver tissues in the early phase following R‑PH. PMID:26783183

  9. Repeated Bouts of Aerobic Exercise Enhance Regulatory T Cell Responses in a Murine Asthma Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lowder, Thomas; Dugger, Kari; Deshane, Jessy; Estell, Kim; Schwiebert, Lisa M

    2009-01-01

    We have reported previously that moderate intensity aerobic exercise training attenuates airway inflammation in a murine asthma model. Recent studies implicate regulatory T (Treg) cells in decreasing asthma-related airway inflammation; as such, the current study examined the effect of exercise on Treg cell function in a murine asthma model. Mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) prior to the start of exercise training at a moderate intensity 3× / week for 4 wks; exercise was performed as t...

  10. A Genome-wide CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) Screen Identifies NEK7 as an Essential Component of NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Chauhan, Dhruv; Schmidt, Tobias; Ebert, Thomas S; Reinhardt, Julia; Endl, Elmar; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are high molecular weight protein complexes that assemble in the cytosol upon pathogen encounter. This results in caspase-1-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine maturation, as well as a special type of cell death, known as pyroptosis. The Nlrp3 inflammasome plays a pivotal role in pathogen defense, but at the same time, its activity has also been implicated in many common sterile inflammatory conditions. To this effect, several studies have identified Nlrp3 inflammasome engagement in a number of common human diseases such as atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer disease, or gout. Although it has been shown that known Nlrp3 stimuli converge on potassium ion efflux upstream of Nlrp3 activation, the exact molecular mechanism of Nlrp3 activation remains elusive. Here, we describe a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 screen in immortalized mouse macrophages aiming at the unbiased identification of gene products involved in Nlrp3 inflammasome activation. We employed a FACS-based screen for Nlrp3-dependent cell death, using the ionophoric compound nigericin as a potassium efflux-inducing stimulus. Using a genome-wide guide RNA (gRNA) library, we found that targeting Nek7 rescued macrophages from nigericin-induced lethality. Subsequent studies revealed that murine macrophages deficient in Nek7 displayed a largely blunted Nlrp3 inflammasome response, whereas Aim2-mediated inflammasome activation proved to be fully intact. Although the mechanism of Nek7 functioning upstream of Nlrp3 yet remains elusive, these studies provide a first genetic handle of a component that specifically functions upstream of Nlrp3.

  11. The WD40 repeat protein NEDD1 functions in microtubule organization during cell division in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C J Tracy; Lee, Y-R Julie; Liu, Bo

    2009-04-01

    Although cells of flowering plants lack a structurally defined microtubule-organizing center like the centrosome, organization of the spindles and phragmoplasts in mitosis is known to involve the evolutionarily conserved gamma-tubulin complex. We have investigated the function of Arabidopsis thaliana NEDD1, a WD40 repeat protein related to the animal NEDD1/GCP-WD protein, which interacts with the gamma-tubulin complex. The NEDD1 protein decorates spindle microtubules (MTs) preferentially toward spindle poles and phragmoplast MTs toward their minus ends. A T-DNA insertional allele of the single NEDD1 gene was isolated and maintained in heterozygous sporophytes, and NEDD1's function in cell division was analyzed in haploid microspores produced by the heterozygote. In approximately half of the dividing microspores exhibiting aberrant MT organization, spindles were no longer restricted to the cell periphery and became abnormally elongated. After mitosis, MTs aggregated between reforming nuclei but failed to appear in a bipolar configuration. Consequently, defective microspores did not form a continuous cell plate, and two identical nuclei were produced with no differentiation into generative and vegetative cells. Our results support the notion that the plant NEDD1 homolog plays a critical role in MT organization during mitosis, and its function is likely linked to that of the gamma-tubulin complex. PMID:19383896

  12. Cell-type specific four-component hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Timo; Franke, Katrin; Rist, Elke; Benz, Karin; Schlosshauer, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin) to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel), an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering. PMID:24475174

  13. Cell-type specific four-component hydrogel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Aberle

    Full Text Available In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel, an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appropriate for general cell adhesion, and restricted diffusion. Cell proliferation of endothelial cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts was essentially unaffected. In contrast, on quattroGels neither endothelial cells formed vascular tubes nor did primary neurons extend neurites in significant amounts. Only chondrocytes differentiated properly as judged by collagen isoform expression. The biophysical quattroGel characteristics appeared to leave distinct cell processes such as mitosis unaffected and favored differentiation of sessile cells, but hampered differentiation of migratory cells. This cell-type selectivity is of interest e.g. during articular cartilage or invertebral disc repair, where pathological innervation and angiogenesis represent adverse events in tissue engineering.

  14. Development of inducible leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) cell lines for therapeutics development in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Shimoji, Mika; Wang, Juan; Shah, Salim; Kamila, Sukanta; Biehl, Edward R; Lim, Seung; Chang, Allison; Maguire-Zeiss, Kathleen A; Su, Xiaomin; Federoff, Howard J

    2013-10-01

    The pathogenic mechanism(s) contributing to loss of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) remain obscure. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) mutations are linked, as a causative gene, to PD. LRRK2 mutations are estimated to account for 10% of familial and between 1 % and 3 % of sporadic PD. LRRK2 proximate single nucleotide polymorphisms have also been significantly associated with idiopathic/sporadic PD by genome-wide association studies. LRRK2 is a multidomain-containing protein and belongs to the protein kinase super-family. We constructed two inducible dopaminergic cell lines expressing either human-LRRK2-wild-type or human-LRRK2-mutant (G2019S). Phenotypes of these LRRK2 cell lines were examined with respect to cell viability, morphology, and protein function with or without induction of LRRK2 gene expression. The overexpression of G2019S gene promoted (1) low cellular metabolic activity without affecting cell viability, (2) blunted neurite extension, and (3) increased phosphorylation at S910 and S935. Our observations are consistent with reported general phenotypes in LRRK2 cell lines by other investigators. We used these cell lines to interrogate the biological function of LRRK2, to evaluate their potential as a drug-screening tool, and to investigate screening for small hairpin RNA-mediated LRRK2 G2019S gene knockdown as a potential therapeutic strategy. A proposed LRRK2 kinase inhibitor (i.e., IN-1) decreased LRRK2 S910 and S935 phosphorylation in our MN9DLRRK2 cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Lentivirus-mediated transfer of LRRK2 G2019S allele-specific small hairpin RNA reversed the blunting of neurite extension caused by LRRK2 G2019S overexpression. Taken together, these inducible LRRK2 cell lines are suitable reagents for LRRK2 functional studies, and the screening of potential LRRK2 therapeutics.

  15. Design principles of cell circuits with paradoxical components

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Yuval; Yaron E Antebi; Mayo, Avraham E.; Friedman, Nir; Alon, Uri

    2012-01-01

    Biological systems display complex networks of interactions both at the level of molecules inside the cell and at the level of interactions between cells. Networks of interacting molecules, such as transcription networks, have been shown to be composed of recurring circuits called network motifs, each with specific dynamical functions. Much less is known about the possibility of such circuit analysis in networks made of communicating cells. Here, we study models of circuits in which a few cel...

  16. Cell-Type Specific Four-Component Hydrogel

    OpenAIRE

    Timo Aberle; Katrin Franke; Elke Rist; Karin Benz; Burkhard Schlosshauer

    2014-01-01

    In the field of regenerative medicine we aim to develop implant matrices for specific tissue needs. By combining two per se, cell-permissive gel systems with enzymatic crosslinkers (gelatin/transglutaminase and fibrinogen/thrombin) to generate a blend (technical term: quattroGel), an unexpected cell-selectivity evolved. QuattroGels were porous and formed cavities in the cell diameter range, possessed gelation kinetics in the minute range, viscoelastic properties and a mechanical strength appr...

  17. Comparison of the transcriptional activity of the long terminal repeats of simian immunodeficiency viruses SIVmac251 and SIVmac239 in T-cell lines and macrophage cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, M G; Clements, J E

    1991-01-01

    The U3 regions of the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of simian immunodeficiency viruses SIVmac251 and SIVmac239 were analyzed for basal transcriptional activity and for interaction with cellular factors in the T-cell line HUT-78 and the monocyte/macrophage cell line U937. A number of 5' deletions and mutations were made in the U3 regions of the two LTRs, and these constructs were placed upstream of a plasmid containing the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. The nucleotid...

  18. An extracellular matrix, calmodulin-binding protein from Dictyostelium with EGF-like repeats that enhance cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Andres; Huber, Robert J; Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2011-07-01

    CyrA is a novel cysteine-rich protein with four EGFL repeats that was isolated using the calmodulin (CaM) binding overlay technique (CaMBOT), suggesting it is a CaM-binding protein (CaMBP). The full-length 63kDa cyrA is cleaved into two major C-terminal fragments, cyrA-C45 and cyrA-C40. A putative CaM-binding domain was detected and both CaM-agarose binding and CaM immunoprecipitation verified that cyrA-C45 and cyrA-C40 each bind to CaM in both a Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent manner. cyrA-C45 was present continuously throughout growth and development but was secreted at high levels during the multicellular slug stage of Dictyostelium development. At this time, cyrA localizes to the extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM purification verified the presence of cyrA-C45. An 18 amino acid peptide (DdEGFL1) from the first EGFL repeat sequence of cyrA (EGFL1) that is present in both cyrA-C45 and -C40 enhances both random cell motility and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis. Here we reveal that the dose-dependent enhancement of motility by DdEGFL1 is related to the time of cell starvation. Addition of DdEGFL1 also inhibits cyrA proteolysis. The status of cyrA as an extracellular CaMBP was further clarified by the demonstration that CaM is secreted during development. Antagonism of CaM with W7 resulted in enhanced cyrA proteolysis suggesting a functional role for extracellular CaM in protecting CaMBPs from proteolysis. cyrA is the first extracellular CaMBP identified in Dictyostelium and since it is an ECM protein with EGF-like repeats that enhance cell motility and it likely also represents the first matricellular protein identified in a lower eukaryote. PMID:21402150

  19. Intrauterine insemination of cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells prior to embryo transfer improves clinical outcome for patients with repeated implantation failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkour, Aicha; Bouamoud, Nouzha; Louanjli, Noureddine; Kaarouch, Ismail; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Sefrioui, Omar

    2016-02-01

    Implantation failure is a major limiting factor in assisted reproduction improvement. Dysfunction of embryo-maternal immuno-tolerance pathways may be responsible for repeated implantation failures. This fact is supported by immunotropic theory stipulating that maternal immune cells, essentially uterine CD56+ natural killer cells, are determinants of implantation success. In order to test this hypothesis, we applied endometrium immuno-modulation prior to fresh embryo transfer for patients with repeated implantation failures. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from repeated implantation failure patients undergoing assisted reproductive technology cycles. On the day of ovulation induction, cells were isolated and then cultured for 3 days and transferred into the endometrium cavity prior to fresh embryo transfer. This immunotherapy was performed on 27 patients with repeated implantation failures and compared with another 27 patients who served as controls. Implantation and clinical pregnancy were increased significantly in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell test versus control (21.54, 44.44 vs. 8.62, 14.81%). This finding suggests a clear role for endometrium immuno-modulation and the inflammation process in implantation success. Our study showed the feasibility of intrauterine administration of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells as an effective therapy to improve clinical outcomes for patients with repeated implantation failures and who are undergoing in vitro fertilization cycles. PMID:25613318

  20. Tyms double (2R) and triple repeat (3R) confers risk for human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Alexandre Medeiros; Sant'Ana, Thalita Araújo; Gomes, Adriana Vieira; de Lacerda Vidal, Aurora Karla; Muniz, Maria Tereza Cartaxo

    2014-12-01

    The oral cancer is responsible for approximately 3 % of cases of cancer in Brazil. Epidemiological studies have associated low folate intake with an increased risk of epithelial cancers, including oral cancer. Folic acid has a key role in DNA synthesis, repair, methylation and this is the basis of explanations for a putative role for folic acid in cancer prevention. The role of folic acid in carcinogenesis may be modulated by polymorphism C677T in MTHFR and tandem repeats 2R/3R in the promoter site of TYMS gene that are related to decreased enzymatic activity and quantity and availability of the enzyme, respectively. These events cause a decrease in the synthesis, repair and DNA methylation, which can lead to a disruption in the expression of tumor suppressor genes as TP53. The objective of this study was investigate the distribution of polymorphisms C677T and tandem repeats 2R/3R associated with the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). 53 paraffin-embedded samples from patients who underwent surgery but are no longer at the institution and 43 samples collected by method of oral exfoliation by cytobrush were selected. 132 healthy subjects were selected by specialists at the dental clinics of the Faculdade de Odontologia de Pernambuco-FOP. The MTHFR genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP, and the TYMS genotyping was performed by conventional PCR. Fisher's Exact test at significant level of 5 %. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used to measure the strength of association between genotype frequency and OSCC development. The results were statistically significant for the tandem repeats of the TYMS gene (p = 0.015). The TYMS 2R3R genotype was significantly associated with the development of OSCC (OR = 3.582; 95 % CI 1.240-10.348; p = 0.0262) and also the genotype 3R3R (OR = 3.553; 95 % CI 1.293-9.760; p = 0.0345). When analyzed together, the TYMS 2R3R + 3R3R genotypes also showed association (OR = 3.518; 95 % CI 11.188-10.348; p

  1. Influence of dietary components on regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navikas, Shohreh; Teimer, Roman; Bockermann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    It is no longer a myth that a balanced diet is fundamental for general health. Common dietary components including vitamins A and D, omega-3 and probiotics are now widely accepted to be essential to protect against many diseases with an inflammatory nature. On the other hand, high fat diets...

  2. Effective Alu Repeat Based RT-Qpcr Normalization in Cancer Cell Perturbation Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Rihani; Tom Van Maerken; Filip Pattyn; Gert Van Peer; Anneleen Beckers; Sara De Brouwer; Candy Kumps; Evelien Mets; Joni Van der Meulen; Pieter Rondou; Carina Leonelli; Pieter Mestdagh; Frank Speleman; Jo Vandesompele

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measuring messenger RNA (mRNA) levels using the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is common practice in many laboratories. A specific set of mRNAs as internal control reference genes is considered as the preferred strategy to normalize RT-qPCR data. Proper selection of reference genes is a critical issue, especially in cancer cells that are subjected to different in vitro manipulations. These manipulations may result in dramatic alterations in ...

  3. Construction of a repeat-free dual color fluorescent in situ hybridization probe for ROS1 gene in non-small cell lung cancer diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程弘夏

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish a repeat-free ROS1 gene fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH)probe,and to compare its efficacy with those of commercial FISH probes in non-small cell lung cancer.Methods The probe was constructed by combining human Cot-1 DNA genome into double-stranded sequence,and then digested by duples specific nuclease to establish a repeat-free sequene.The final repeat-free ROS1 FISH probe was labeled by red and green fluoresceins.Results Compared

  4. Cross-talk between the epidermal growth factor-like repeats/fibronectin 6-8 repeats domains of Tenascin-R and microglia modulates neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hong; Huang, Wenhui; Niu, Rui; Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Luyong

    2008-01-01

    Mounting evidence has demonstrated that the microenvironment of stem/progenitor cells plays an important role in their proliferation and commitment to their fate. However, it remains unclear how all elements, such as astrocytes, microglia, extracellular matrix molecules, soluble factors, and their cross-talk interactions in the microenvironments, affect neural stem/progenitor cell fate. This work explored the influences of cross-talk between Tenascin-R (TN-R) and microglia on neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. Our results show that microglia triggered by TN-R distinct domains EGF-like repeats (EGFL) and fibronectin 6-8 repeats (FN6-8) significantly enhanced the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells and also obviously induced the differentiation into neurons but not oligodendrocytes. Neurite processes of neurons generated from neural progenitor cells were promoted by both EGFL and FN6-8 domains-activated microglia. Microglia triggered by EGFL and FN6-8 secreted brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta); interestingly, FN6-8 could activate microglia to secrete nerve growth factor in addition to BDNF and TGF-beta, but EGFL domain could not. All these data implied that the cross-talk between TN-R distinct domains EGFL/FN6-8 and microglia promoted neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and induced their differentiation into neurons.

  5. Structure-function Aspects of Extracellular Leucine-rich Repeat-containing Cell Surface Receptors in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhang; Bart PHJ Thomma

    2013-01-01

    Plants exploit several types of cell surface receptors for perception of extracellular signals, of which the extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR)-containing receptors form the major class. Although the function of most plant eLRR receptors remains unclear, an increasing number of these receptors are shown to play roles in innate immunity and a wide variety of developmental processes. Recent efforts using domain swaps, gene shuffling analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, interaction studies, and crystallographic analyses resulted in the current knowledge on ligand binding and the mechanism of activation of plant eLRR receptors. This review provides an overview of eLRR receptor research, specifically summarizing the recent understanding of interactions among plant eLRR receptors, their co-receptors and corresponding ligands. The functions of distinct eLRR receptor domains, and their role in structure, ligand perception and multimeric complex formation are discussed.

  6. Basal cell carcinoma and breast carcinoma following repeated fluoroscopic examinations of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 69-year-old white Italian woman was first seen at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 1981 concerning several skin growths on her back. The patient had had several basal cell carcinomas surgically removed from her back during the preceding 5 years. There was no history of arsenic ingestion or prolonged sun exposure and her family history was negative for skin cancer. The patient had developed pulmonary tuberculosis in 1938 and was treated with pneumothorax therapy. She had had more than 50 fluoroscopic examinations of the chest following this therapy, as well as multiple diagnostic x-ray films since that time. On the back, clustered in the interscapular region, were multiple scars and nine erythematous nodules with pearly borders, telangiectasia, and translucent surfaces. Within several nodules there were areas of light and dark brown pigmentation. Biopsy of all lesions revealed basal cell carcinoma, some of which were pigmented, without evidence of chronic radiodermatitis. All lesions were treated with curettage and electrodesiccation three times with good cosmetic results

  7. Basal cell carcinoma and breast carcinoma following repeated fluoroscopic examinations of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myskowski, P.L.; Gumpertz, E.; Safai, B.

    1985-03-01

    A 69-year-old white Italian woman was first seen at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 1981 concerning several skin growths on her back. The patient had had several basal cell carcinomas surgically removed from her back during the preceding 5 years. There was no history of arsenic ingestion or prolonged sun exposure and her family history was negative for skin cancer. The patient had developed pulmonary tuberculosis in 1938 and was treated with pneumothorax therapy. She had had more than 50 fluoroscopic examinations of the chest following this therapy, as well as multiple diagnostic x-ray films since that time. On the back, clustered in the interscapular region, were multiple scars and nine erythematous nodules with pearly borders, telangiectasia, and translucent surfaces. Within several nodules there were areas of light and dark brown pigmentation. Biopsy of all lesions revealed basal cell carcinoma, some of which were pigmented, without evidence of chronic radiodermatitis. All lesions were treated with curettage and electrodesiccation three times with good cosmetic results.

  8. Essential components for ex vivo proliferation of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Natalie; Rojewski, Markus Thomas; Lotfi, Ramin; Schrezenmeier, Hubert

    2014-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are highly interesting candidates for clinical applications in regenerative medicine. Due to their low occurrence in human tissues, extensive in vitro expansion is necessary to obtain sufficient cell numbers applicable as a clinical dose in the context of cellular therapy. Current cell culture media formulations for the isolation and expansion of MSCs include fetal calf serum (FCS), human AB serum (ABS), or human platelet lysate (PL) as a supplement. However, these established supplements are inherently ill-defined formulations that contain a variety of bioactive molecules in varying batch-to-batch compositions and the risk of transmitting pathogens that escape routine screening procedures. In this study, we have comparatively characterized the capacity of commonly used basal media, such as the Minimum Essential Medium alpha (αMEM), Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM), Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's Medium (IMDM), and RPMI 1640 as well as human- and animal-derived supplements, that is, PL, ABS, and FCS to stimulate cell proliferation. MSC proliferation was observed to be optimal in the PL-supplemented αMEM. Using a combinatorial approach, we then assessed a library of soluble factors, including mitogens (TGF-β1, Activin A, bFGF, EGF, IGF-I, PDGF-BB, and VEGF), chemokines (CCL21, CCL25, CXCL12, and RANTES), proteins (human serum albumin), lipids (e.g., oleic acid, linoleic acid, and arachidonic acid), and hormones (dexamethasone, insulin, and TSH), to create a defined medium as well as coating of cell culture surfaces to promote robust MSC proliferation in vitro. A combination of recombinant human factors partially met the nutritional requirements of bone marrow-derived MSCs, and was able to promote cell proliferation comparable to about 5% PL if supplemented with auxiliary 0.6%-1.2% PL. Maximal MSC proliferation was achieved by combining 5% PL with a cocktail of recombinant factors and did not depend on coating of cell

  9. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels After Subchronic and Repeated Exposure of PC12 Cells to Different Classes of Insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Marieke; Brandsema, Joske A R; Nieuwenhuis, Desirée; Wijnolts, Fiona M J; Dingemans, Milou M L; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that acute inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is a common mode of action for (sub)micromolar concentrations of chemicals, including insecticides. However, because human exposure to chemicals is usually chronic and repeated, we investigated if selected insecticides from different chemical classes (organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, carbamates, and neonicotinoids) also disturb calcium homeostasis after subchronic (24 h) exposure and after a subsequent (repeated) acute exposure. Effects on calcium homeostasis were investigated with single-cell fluorescence (Fura-2) imaging of PC12 cells. Cells were depolarized with high-K(+) saline to study effects of subchronic or repeated exposure on VGCC-mediated Ca(2+) influx. The results demonstrate that except for carbaryl and imidacloprid, all selected insecticides inhibited depolarization (K(+))-evoked Ca(2+) influx after subchronic exposure (IC50's: approximately 1-10 µM) in PC12 cells. These inhibitory effects were not or only slowly reversible. Moreover, repeated exposure augmented the inhibition of the K(+)-evoked increase in intracellular calcium concentration induced by subchronic exposure to cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and endosulfan (IC50's: approximately 0.1-4 µM). In rat primary cortical cultures, acute and repeated chlorpyrifos exposure also augmented inhibition of VGCCs compared with subchronic exposure. In conclusion, compared with subchronic exposure, repeated exposure increases the potency of insecticides to inhibit VGCCs. However, the potency of insecticides to inhibit VGCCs upon repeated exposure was comparable with the inhibition previously observed following acute exposure, with the exception of chlorpyrifos. The data suggest that an acute exposure paradigm is sufficient for screening chemicals for effects on VGCCs and that PC12 cells are a sensitive model for detection of effects on VGCCs.

  10. Bacterial Wall Components such as Lipothecoid Acid, Peptidoglycan, Liposaccharide and Lipid A Stimulate Cell Proliferation in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Olaya, Jaime H.; Neopikhanov, Vadim; Söderman, Charlotte; Uribe, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies indicate that the microflora contains mitogens to intestinal epithelial cells. Our aim is to examine whether cell wall components of both Gram-negative and positive bacteria influence cell proliferation in small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. A human colonic epithelial cell line from adenocarcinoma (IEC-6) and a nontransformed small intestinal cell line from germ-free rats (LS-123) were incubated with (a) lipothecoid acid from Streptococcus faecalis at 1.56–50 ...

  11. Sarcomatoid chordoma: chordoma with a massive malignant spindle-cell component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimitsu, Yosuke; Hashimoto, H. [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan). Dept. of Pathology and Oncology; Aoki, Takatoshi [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Yokoyama, Koichiro [Dept. of Orthopedics, National Kokura Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    We report a case of chordoma containing a spindle cell sarcomatoid component with a gradual transition from conventional chordoma. Immunohistochemically, many tumor cells in both conventional chordoma and sarcomatoid components were positive for cytokeratins (AE1/AE3, CAM5.2) and epithelial membrane antigen as well as vimentin. This report provides a rare example of sarcomatoid chordoma. Familiarity with this type of bone tumor should help to avoid confusion with dedifferentiated chordoma and other spindle cell sarcomas or carcinomas. (orig.)

  12. Inulin isoforms differ by repeated additions of one crystal unit cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Peter D; Barclay, Thomas G; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Gerson, Andrea R; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-03-15

    Inulin isoforms, especially delta inulin, are important biologically as immune activators and clinically as vaccine adjuvants. In exploring action mechanisms, we previously found regular increments in thermal properties of the seven-member inulin isoform series that suggested regular additions of some energetic structural unit. Because the previous isolates carried additional longer chains that masked defining ranges, these were contrasted with new isoform isolates comprising only inulin chain lengths defining that isoform. The new series began with 19 fructose units per chain (alpha-1 inulin), increasing regularly by 6 fructose units per isoform. Thus the 'energetic unit' equates to 6 fructose residues per chain. All isoforms showed indistinguishable X-ray diffraction patterns that were also identical with known inulin crystals. We conclude that an 'energetic unit' equates to one helix turn of 6 fructose units per chain as found in one unit cell of the inulin crystal. Each isoform chain comprised progressively more helix turns plus one additional fructose and glucose residues per chain.

  13. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  14. In Vitro Study on Lethal Effect of Human Choroidal Melanoma OCM-1 Cell Line by Repeating-70℃Freeze Thawing%In Vitro Study on Lethal Effect of Human Choroidal Melanoma OCM-1 Cell Line by Repeating-70℃ Freeze Thawing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Liu; Yongping Li; Bo Zhang; Wenxin Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of repeating -70℃ freeze thawing on human choroidal melanoma cell line OCM-1.Methods: OCM-1 cells were frozen by repeating -70℃ freeze thawing with various durations and frequencies. Then the inhibit rate of cells was examined by MTT essay.The cell viability was measured by monoclonal formation assay. We also used the HE staining, immunohistochemistry staining and the laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to investigate the morphological changes of the cells.Results: The growth of OCM-1 cells was inhibited by repeating -70℃ freeze thawing in time-dependent and frequency-dependent manners (P < 0.01). Different morphous including necrosis and apoptosis of the cells could be observed after -70℃ freeze thawing by the LSCM.Conclusion: Repeating -70℃ freeze thawing can not only kill cells directly and induce considerable cells to apoptosis, but also inhibit the growth of the survivals. The kill and wound ratio of the cells disposal with different times and frequencies present variance. And the distinction when treated with different frequencies during the same time is much more significant than different times with the same frequency, which guide clinical workers to choose repeating cryotherapy with short term method instead of single cryotherapy with long term in choroidal melanoma treatment.

  15. Influence of single and repeated cannabidiol administration on emotional behavior and markers of cell proliferation and neurogenesis in non-stressed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Angélica Pupin; Bonato, Jéssica Mendes; Milani, Humberto; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira; Weffort de Oliveira, Rúbia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics may arise partially from their ability to stimulate neurogenesis. Cannabidiol (CBD), a phytocannabinoid present in Cannabis sativa, presents anxiolytic- and antipsychotic-like effects in preclinical and clinical settings. Anxiolytic-like effects of repeated CBD were shown in chronically stressed animals and these effects were parallel with increased hippocampal neurogenesis. However, antidepressant-like effects of repeated CBD administration in non-stressed animals have been scarcely reported. Here we investigated the behavioral consequences of single or repeated CBD administration in non-stressed animals. We also determined the effects of CBD on cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) and subventricular zone (SVZ). Single CBD 3mg/kg administration resulted in anxiolytic-like effect in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM). In the tail suspension test (TST), single or repeated CBD administration reduced immobility time, an effect that was comparable to those of imipramine (20 mg/kg). Moreover, repeated CBD administration at a lower dose (3 mg/kg) increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis, as seen by an increased number of Ki-67-, BrdU- and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in both in DG and SVZ. Despite its antidepressant-like effects in the TST, repeated CBD administration at a higher dose (30 mg/kg) decreased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG and SVZ. Our findings show a dissociation between behavioral and proliferative effects of repeated CBD and suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of CBD may occur independently of adult neurogenesis in non-stressed Swiss mice. PMID:26187374

  16. Enzyme Amplified Detection of Microbial Cell Wall Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Norman R.

    2004-01-01

    This proposal is MBL's portion of NASA's Johnson Space Center's Astrobiology Center led by Principal Investigator, Dr. David McKay, entitled: 'Institute for the Study of Biomarkers in Astromaterials.' Dr. Norman Wainwright is the principal investigator at MBL and is responsible for developing methods to detect trace quantities of microbial cell wall chemicals using the enzyme amplification system of Limulus polyphemus and other related methods.

  17. New Components for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aldo Di Carlo; Carlo Alberto Bignozzi; Rita Boaretto; Roberto Argazzi; Vito Cristino; Stefano Caramori

    2010-01-01

    Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) are among the most promising solar energy conversion devices of new generation, since coupling ease of fabrication and low cost offer the possibility of building integration in photovoltaic windows and facades. Although in their earliest configuration these systems are close to commercialization, fundamental studies are still required for developing new molecules and materials with more desirable properties as well as improving our understanding of the funda...

  18. Reconstitution of the B cell antigen receptor signaling components in COS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saouaf, S J; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Rowley, R B; Bolen, J B; Mahajan, S

    1995-11-10

    To elucidate interactions occurring between B cell protein tyrosine kinases and the signaling components of the B cell antigen receptor, we have co-transfected into COS cells individual tyrosine kinases together with chimeric cell surface receptors containing the cytoplasmic domains of Ig alpha or Ig beta. Of the tyrosine kinases transfected (Lyn, Blk, Hck, Syk, Fyn), only Blk was able to phosphorylate and subsequently associate with cotransfected Ig alpha and Ig beta chimeras in vivo. Association between Blk and the Ig alpha and Ig beta cytoplasmic domains was shown by mutational analyses to be the result of an SH2-phosphotyrosine interaction. We identified the tyrosine residues of the Ig alpha and Ig beta cytoplasmic domains was shown by mutational analyses to be the result of an SH2-phosphotyrosine interaction. We identified the tyrosine residues of the Ig alpha and Ig beta cytoplasmic domains phosphorylated by Blk. The enzymatic activity and membrane association of Blk were required for the observed phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta chimeras. Sequences within the amino-terminal unique domain of Blk are responsible for recognition and subsequent phosphorylation of the Ig alpha chimera since transfer of the unique region of Blk to Fyn results in the chimeric kinase's ability to phosphorylate the cytoplasmic domain of Ig alpha. These findings indicate that the unique domain of Src family kinases may direct recognition of certain substrates leading to their phosphorylation. PMID:7592958

  19. Cells must express components of the planar cell polarity system and extracellular matrix to support cytonemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila dorsal air sac development depends on Decapentaplegic (Dpp) and Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) proteins produced by the wing imaginal disc and transported by cytonemes to the air sac primordium (ASP). Dpp and FGF signaling in the ASP was dependent on components of the planar cell polarity (PCP) system in the disc, and neither Dpp- nor FGF-receiving cytonemes extended over mutant disc cells that lacked them. ASP cytonemes normally navigate through extracellular matrix (ECM) composed of collagen, laminin, Dally and Dally-like (Dlp) proteins that are stratified in layers over the disc cells. However, ECM over PCP mutant cells had reduced levels of laminin, Dally and Dlp, and whereas Dpp-receiving ASP cytonemes navigated in the Dally layer and required Dally (but not Dlp), FGF-receiving ASP cytonemes navigated in the Dlp layer, requiring Dlp (but not Dally). These findings suggest that cytonemes interact directly and specifically with proteins in the stratified ECM. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18979.001 PMID:27591355

  20. Repeated integration of antibody genes into a pre-selected chromosomal locus of CHO cells using an accumulative site-specific gene integration system

    OpenAIRE

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Makitsubo, Hirokatsu; Kameyama, Yujiro; Huang, Shuohao; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported an accumulative site-specific gene integration system using Cre recombinase and mutated loxP sites, where a recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) reaction is repeatable. This gene integration system was applied for antibody production using recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We introduced an exchange cassette flanked by wild-type and mutated loxP sites into the chromosome of CHO cells for the establishment of recipient founder cells. Then, the donor ...

  1. Spermatogonial Nature of the Germ Cell Component of Canine Testicular Mixed Germ Cell-Sex Cord Stromal Tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, S; Murakami, T; Tanaka, T; Machida, N; Nomura, K; Yoshida, T; Shibutani, M

    2016-07-01

    The present study has characterized the germ cell component of canine testicular mixed germ cell-sex cord stromal tumours (MGSCTs) by examining the histological nature and histochemical and immunohistochemical features using gonocytic and spermatogonial cellular markers, c-Kit, placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5), Sal-like protein 4 (SALL4), and the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reaction. Histologically, all 45 examples of MGSCTs were classified as spermatocytic seminomas (SSs) and Sertoli cell tumours in combination. The germ cell component of all MGSCTs was negative by PAS staining. Immunohistochemically, PLAP immunoreactivity was lacking in the germ cell component of all MGSCTs, which is not consistent with a gonocytic origin. The germ cell component was positive for PGP9.5 and SALL4 in all MGSCTs and positive for c-Kit in 53% of MGSCTs, which is consistent with the phenotype of spermatogonia. Furthermore, the germ cell component in 71% of MGSCTs had moderate immunoreactivity for SALL4, which is suggestive of a spermatogonial phenotype. Conversely, 29% of cases had a minor population of germ cells showing strong SALL4 immunoreactivity, suggesting a phenotype similar to prespermatogonia. The results suggest that the germ cell component of canine MGSCTs is morphologically classified as SS, with the majority of cases showing the spermatogonial phenotype and some cases containing a small population of prespermatogonia. PMID:27241073

  2. New Components for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Caramori

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs are among the most promising solar energy conversion devices of new generation, since coupling ease of fabrication and low cost offer the possibility of building integration in photovoltaic windows and facades. Although in their earliest configuration these systems are close to commercialization, fundamental studies are still required for developing new molecules and materials with more desirable properties as well as improving our understanding of the fundamental processes at the basis of the functioning of photoactive heterogeneous interfaces. In this contribution, some recent advances, made in the effort of improving DSSC devices by finding alternative materials and configurations, are reviewed.

  3. Ezrin Is a Component of the HIV-1 Virological Presynapse and Contributes to the Inhibition of Cell-Cell Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Nathan H.; Lambelé, Marie; Chan, Jany; Symeonides, Menelaos; Thali, Markus

    2014-01-01

    During cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1, viral and cellular proteins transiently accumulate at the contact zone between infected (producer) and uninfected (target) cells, forming the virological synapse. Rearrangements of the cytoskeleton in producer and target cells are required for proper targeting of viral and cellular components during synapse formation, yet little is known about how these processes are regulated, particularly within the producer cell. Since ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) p...

  4. Methylation of C9orf72 expansion reduces RNA foci formation and dipeptide-repeat proteins expression in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Peter O

    2016-01-26

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene is the most common genetic cause of both frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), together referred to as c9FTD/ALS. It has been suggested that a loss of C9orf72 protein expression, the formation of toxic RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins contribute to C9orf72-related diseases. Interestingly, it has been shown that trimethylation of histones and methylation of CpG islands near the repeat expansion may play a role in the pathogenesis c9FTD/ALS. Recently, methylation of expanded repeat itself has been reported. To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying these diseases, the influence of epigenetic modification in the repeat expansion on its pathogenic effect was assessed. Here, a reduced formation of toxic RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins upon methylation of the GGGGCC repeat in a cellular model of c9FTD/ALS is shown. Additionally, a novel methylcytosine-capture DNA hybridization immunoassay for semi-quantitative detection of the repeat methylation levels is presented, potentially usable for methylation analysis in patients carrying C9orf72 repeat expansion carriers as a diagnostic tool. Presented results suggest that increased level of pathogenic GGGGCC expansion methylation may be sufficient to alleviate the molecular pathology of the C9orf72-related diseases.

  5. Telomere Cap Components Influence the Rate of Senescence in Telomerase-Deficient Yeast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Enomoto, Shinichiro; Glowczewski, Lynn; Lew-Smith, Jodi; Berman, Judith G.

    2004-01-01

    Cells lacking telomerase undergo senescence, a progressive reduction in cell division that involves a cell cycle delay and culminates in “crisis,” a period when most cells become inviable. In telomerase-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking components of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway (Upf1,Upf2, or Upf3 proteins), senescence is delayed, with crisis occurring ∼10 to 25 population doublings later than in Upf+ cells. Delayed senescence is seen in upfΔ cells lacking th...

  6. Rapid multiplex analysis of lipid raft components with single-cell resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzlmaier, Philipp; Supper, Verena; Göschl, Lisa; Zwirzitz, Alexander; Eckerstorfer, Paul; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Huppa, Johannes B; Stockinger, Hannes

    2015-09-22

    Lipid rafts, a distinct class of highly dynamic cell membrane microdomains, are integral to cell homeostasis, differentiation, and signaling. However, their quantitative examination is challenging when working with rare cells, developmentally heterogeneous cell populations, or molecules that only associate weakly with lipid rafts. We present a fast biochemical method, which is based on lipid raft components associating with the nucleus upon partial lysis during centrifugation through nonionic detergent. Requiring little starting material or effort, our protocol enabled the multidimensional flow cytometric quantitation of raft-resident proteins with single-cell resolution, thereby assessing the membrane components from a few cells in complex cell populations, as well as their dynamics resulting from cell signaling, differentiation, or genetic mutation.

  7. Glucocorticoids entrain molecular clock components in human peripheral cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Marc; Cermakian, Nicolas; Boivin, Diane B

    2015-04-01

    In humans, shift work induces a desynchronization between the circadian system and the outside world, which contributes to shift work-associated medical disorders. Using a simulated night shift experiment, we previously showed that 3 d of bright light at night fully synchronize the central clock to the inverted sleep schedule, whereas the peripheral clocks located in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) took longer to reset. This underlines the need for testing the effects of synchronizers on both the central and peripheral clocks. Glucocorticoids display circadian rhythms controlled by the central clock and are thought to act as synchronizers of rodent peripheral clocks. In the present study, we tested whether the human central and peripheral clocks were sensitive to exogenous glucocorticoids (Cortef) administered in the late afternoon. We showed that 20 mg Cortef taken orally acutely increased PER1 expression in PBMC peripheral clocks. After 6 d of Cortef administration, the phases of central markers were not affected, whereas those of PER2-3 and BMAL1 expression in PBMCs were shifted by ∼ 9.5-11.5 h. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that human peripheral clocks are entrained by glucocorticoids. Importantly, they suggest innovative interventions for shift workers and jet-lag travelers, combining synchronizing agents for the central and peripheral clocks.

  8. An in-cell alpha detection system for radioisotope component assembly operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A remotely operated alpha detection system is being developed for use at the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. It will be used in hot cells being constructed to assemble components of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators for space power applications. The in-cell detection equipment will survey radiological swipe samples to determine smearable surface contamination levels on radioisotope fuel, fueled components, and hot-cell work areas. This system is potentially adaptable to other hot cell and glovebox applications where radiation dose rates and contamination levels are expected to be low. 2 figs

  9. Repeated measurement of the components of attention of older adults using the two versions of the Attention Network Test (ANT: stability, isolability, robustness, and reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko eIshigami

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ishigami and Klein (2010 showed that scores of the three attention networks (alerting, orienting, and executive control measured with the two versions of the Attention Network Test (ANT: Fan et al., 2002, Callejas et al., 2005 were robust over 10 sessions of repeated testing even though practice effects were consistently observed especially in the executive network when young adults were tested. The current study replicated their method to examine robustness, stability, reliability, and isolability of the networks scores when older adults were tested with these ANTs. Ten test sessions, each containing two versions of the ANT, were administered to 10 older adults. Participants were asked to indicate the direction of a target arrow, flanked by distractors, presented either above or below the fixation following auditory signals or/and visual cue. Network scores were calculated using orthogonal subtractions of performance in selected conditions. All network scores remained highly significant even after nine previous sessions despite some practice effects in the executive and the alerting networks. Some lack of independence among the networks was found. The relatively poor reliability of network scores with one session of data rises to respectable levels as more data is added.

  10. Giant repeater F-wave in patients with anterior horn cell disorders. Role of motor unit size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I K; el-Abd, M A

    1997-01-01

    Conventional F-wave responses as well as single motor unit F-wave responses together with the volitionally recruited motor unit action potentials (MUAP) were studied in hand and feet muscles of 10 healthy subjects and 32 patients with anterior horn cell disorders. The amplitude of the largest F-wave (Fl) was significantly greater in the affected patients compared with healthy subjects. Giant repeater F-wave responses "up to 4 mV" were recorded in muscles having volitionally recruited giant MUAPs. Although, the group mean percentage of motor unit F-wave responses per stimulation in all tested orthodromic MUAPs was significantly decreased in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients, the group mean percentage of motor unit F-wave responses per stimulation in all tested orthodromic MUAPs that gave motor unit F-wave response was significantly increased compared with healthy subjects. The responding orthodromic MUAP gave identical motor unit F-wave response, even for complex polyphasic units. Enhanced monosynaptic (H-) reflex, proximal axon reflex (A-wave), and repetitive muscle response as possible explanations for the giant F-wave responses could be discounted. The electrophysiologic behavior of the giant late responses described here fits well with the criteria of F-waves modulated by newly formed distal (and or proximal) axonal branching.

  11. Convergent synthesis of a tetrasaccharide repeating unit of the O-specific polysaccharide from the cell wall lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense strain Sp7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintu Kumar Mandal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A straightforward convergent synthesis has been carried out for the tetrasaccharide repeating unit of the O-specific cell wall lipopolysaccharide of the strain Sp7 of Azospirillum brasilense. The target tetrasaccharide has been synthesized from suitably protected monosaccharide intermediates in 42% overall yield in seven steps by using a [2 + 2] block glycosylation approach.

  12. Association of the polymorphism of the CAG repeat in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma gene (POLG) with testicular germ-cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, M; Leffers, H; Petersen, J H;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A possible association between the polymorphic CAG repeat in the DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) gene and the risk of testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCT) was investigated in this study. The hypothesis was prompted by an earlier preliminary study proposing an association of the absence of ...

  13. Convergent synthesis of a tetrasaccharide repeating unit of the O-specific polysaccharide from the cell wall lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense strain Sp7

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal, Pintu Kumar; Dhara, Debashis; Misra, Anup Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A straightforward convergent synthesis has been carried out for the tetrasaccharide repeating unit of the O-specific cell wall lipopolysaccharide of the strain Sp7 of Azospirillum brasilense. The target tetrasaccharide has been synthesized from suitably protected monosaccharide intermediates in 42% overall yield in seven steps by using a [2 + 2] block glycosylation approach.

  14. Structural Insights into the Stability and Flexibility of Unusual Erythroid Spectrin Repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusunoki, H.; Macdonald, R.I.; Mondragon, A. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    Erythroid spectrin, a major component of the cytoskeletal network of the red cell which contributes to both the stability and the elasticity of the red cell membrane, is composed of two subunits, {alpha} and {beta}, each formed by 16-20 tandem repeats. The properties of the repeats and their relative arrangement are thought to be key determinants of spectrin flexibility. Here we report a 2.4 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of human erythroid {beta}-spectrin repeats 8 and 9. This two-repeat fragment is unusual as it exhibits low stability of folding and one of its repeats lacks two tryptophans highly conserved among spectrin repeats. Two key factors responsible for the lower stability and, possibly, its flexibility, are revealed by the structure. A third novel feature of the structure is the relative orientation of the two repeats, which increases the range of possible conformations and provides new insights into atomic models of spectrin flexibility.

  15. Ovarian mixed germ cell tumor with yolk sac and teratomatous components in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nicholas A; Manivel, J Carlos; Olson, Erik J

    2013-05-01

    Mixed germ cell tumors of the ovary have rarely been reported in veterinary species. A 3-year-old intact female Labrador Retriever dog was presented for lethargy, abdominal distention, and a midabdominal mass. An exploratory laparotomy revealed a large (23 cm in diameter) left ovarian tumor and multiple small (2-3 cm in diameter) pale tan masses on the peritoneum and abdominal surface of the diaphragm. Histological examination of the left ovary revealed a mixed germ cell tumor with a yolk sac component with rare Schiller-Duval bodies and a teratomatous component comprised primarily of neural differentiation. The abdominal metastases were solely comprised of the yolk sac component. The yolk sac component was diffusely immunopositive for cytokeratin with scattered cells reactive for α-fetoprotein and placental alkaline phosphatase. Within the teratomatous component, the neuropil was diffusely immunopositive for S100, neuron-specific enolase, and neurofilaments with a few glial fibrillary acidic protein immunopositive cells. Ovarian germ cell tumors may be pure and consist of only 1 germ cell element or may be mixed and include more than 1 germ cell element, such as teratoma and yolk sac tumor. PMID:23604259

  16. Emerging role for leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptors LGR5 and LGR4 in cancer stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of cancer stem cells has gained considerable interest in the last few decades, partly because of their potential implication in therapy resistance. However, the lack of specific cellular surface markers for these cells has impeded their isolation, making the characterization of this cellular subpopulation technically challenging. Recent studies have indicated that leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 4 and 5 (LGR4 and LGR5) expression in multiple organs may represent a global marker of adult stem cells. This review aims to give an overview of LGR4 and LGR5 as cancer stem cell markers and their function in development

  17. Expression of the protein product of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat gene in phorbol ester-treated mouse T-cell-leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of C57BL/6 mouse EL-4 T-cell leukemia cells to phorbol ester (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) (TPA) induced the synthesis of protein products encoded by the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat (LTR) region. Analysis of TPA-treated EL-4 cells with antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide predicted by the MMTV LTR open reading frame sequence detected a polypeptide migrating in gels with an apparent molecular weight of 37,000 M/sub r/, as well as three less prominent proteins with apparent molecular weights of 31,000, 34,000, and 39,000. Tryptic peptide analysis established the identity of the immunoprecipitated cellular proteins with the LTR proteins obtained from in vitro translation of MMTV genomic RNA. All four proteins were glycosylated and were derived from one initial nonglycosylated translation product of 21,000 M/sub r/. At least 10 acquired MMTV proviruses are present in the EL-4 genome, and examination of the degree of proviral methylation revealed extensive demethylation. However, no qualitative differences in the state of proviral methylation were apparent between TPA-treated and untreated cells

  18. 21 CFR 864.2220 - Synthetic cell and tissue culture media and components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Synthetic cell and tissue culture media and components. 864.2220 Section 864.2220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue...

  19. Trans-Golgi Network-An Intersection of Trafficking Cell Wall Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natasha Worden; Eunsook Park; Georgia Drakakaki

    2012-01-01

    The cell wall,a crucial cell compartment,is composed of a network of polysaccharides and proteins,providing structural support and protection from external stimuli.While the cell wall structure and biosynthesis have been extensively studied,very little is known about the transport of polysaccharides and other components into the developing cell wall.This review focuses on endomembrane trafficking pathways involved in cell wall deposition.Cellulose synthase complexes are assembled in the Golgi,and are transported in vesicles to the plasma membrane.Non-cellulosic polysaccharides are synthesized in the Golgi apparatus,whereas cellulose is produced by enzyme complexes at the plasma membrane.Polvsaccharides and enzymes that are involved in cell wall modification and assembly are transported by distinct vesicle types to their destinations; however,the precise mechanisms involved in selection,sorting and delivery remain to be identified.The endomembrane system orchestrates the delivery of Golgi-derived and possibly endocytic vesicles carrying cell wall and cell membrane components to the newly-formed cell plate.However,the nature of these vesicles,their membrane compositions,and the timing of their delivery are largely unknown.Emerging technologies such as chemical genomics and proteomics are promising avenues to gain insight into the trafficking of cell wall components.

  20. Terpinolene, a component of herbal sage, downregulates AKT1 expression in K562 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Okumura, Naoko; Yoshida, Hitomi; Nishimura, Yuri; Kitagishi, Yasuko; Matsuda, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase AKT mediates cell proliferation and survival signals, and also contributes to cancer progression. Increased expression and/or activation of AKT is involved in a variety of human cancers. In cells treated with sage or rosemary extract, mRNA and protein expression levels of AKT1 were reduced compared with those of the control cells 48 h after the herbal treatments. We found that terpinolene, a common component of sage and rosemary, markedly reduced the protein expression of AKT1 ...

  1. Stimulated human mast cells secrete mitochondrial components that have autocrine and paracrine inflammatory actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodi Zhang

    Full Text Available Mast cells are hematopoietically-derived tissue immune cells that participate in acquired and innate immunity, as well as in inflammation through release of many chemokines and cytokines, especially in response to the pro-inflammatory peptide substance P (SP. Inflammation is critical in the pathogenesis of many diseases, but the trigger(s is often unknown. We investigated if mast cell stimulation leads to secretion of mitochondrial components and whether these could elicit autocrine and/or paracrine inflammatory effects. Here we show that human LAD2 mast cells stimulated by IgE/anti-IgE or by the SP led to secretion of mitochondrial particles, mitochondrial (mt mtDNA and ATP without cell death. Mitochondria purified from LAD2 cells and, when mitochondria added to mast cells trigger degranulation and release of histamine, PGD(2, IL-8, TNF, and IL-1β. This stimulatory effect is partially inhibited by an ATP receptor antagonist and by DNAse. These results suggest that the mitochondrial protein fraction may also contribute. Purified mitochondria also stimulate IL-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF release from cultured human keratinocytes, and VEGF release from primary human microvascular endothelial cells. In order to investigate if mitochondrial components could be secreted in vivo, we injected rats intraperiotoneally (ip with compound 48/80, which mimicks the action of SP. Peritoneal mast cells degranulated and mitochondrial particles were documented by transimission electron microscopy outside the cells. We also wished to investigate if mitochondrial components secreted locally could reach the systemic circulation. Administration ip of mtDNA isolated from LAD2 cells in rats was detected in their serum within 4 hr, indicating that extravascular mtDNA could enter the systemic circulation. Secretion of mitochondrial components from stimulated live mast cells may act as "autopathogens" contributing to the pathogenesis of inflammatory

  2. Repeated 0.5 Gy gamma-ray irradiation attenuates autoimmune disease in MRL-lpr/lpr mice with up-regulation of regulatory T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. MRL-lpr/lpr mice present a single gene mutation on the Fas (CD95) gene that leads to reduced signaling for apoptosis. With aging, these mice spontaneously develop autoimmune disease and are used as a model of systemic lupus erythematosus. We previously reported attenuation of autoimmune disease in MRL-lpr/lpr mice by repeated γ-ray irradiation (0.5 Gy each time). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of this attenuation focusing the highly activated CD3+CD4-CD8-B220+ T cells, which are characteristically involved in autoimmune pathology in these mice. We measured the weight of the spleen and the population of CD3+CD4-CD8-B220+ T cells. Splenomegaly and increase in percentage of CD3+CD4-CD8-B220+ T cells, which occur with aging in non-irradiated mice, were suppressed in irradiated mice. To investigate the function of CD3+CD4-CD8-B220+ T cells, we isolated these cells from splenocytes by magnetic cell sorting. Isolated CD3+CD4-CD8-B220+ T cells were more resistant to irradiation-induced cell death than isolated CD4+ T cells. Although high proliferation rate and IL-6 production were observed in isolated CD3+CD4-CD8-B220+ T cells, the proliferation rate and IL-6 production were lower in the cells isolated from the irradiated mice. Moreover, the production of autoantibodies (anti-collagen antibody and anti-single strand DNA antibody) was also lowered by irradiation. These results indicate that activation of CD3+CD4-CD8-B220+ T cells and progression of pathology would be suppressed by repeated 0.5 Gy γ-ray irradiation. To uncover the mechanism of the immune suppression, we analyzed population of regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+), which suppress activated T cells and excessive autoimmune responses. Intriguingly, significant increase of the percentage of regulatory T cells was observed in irradiated mice. In conclusion, we found that repeated 0.5 Gy γ-ray irradiation suppresses proliferation rate of CD3+CD4-CD8-B220+ T

  3. Umbilical cord Wharton's jelly repeated culture system: a new device and method for obtaining abundant mesenchymal stem cells for bone tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqi Chang

    Full Text Available To date, various types of cells for seeding regenerative scaffolds have been used for bone tissue engineering. Among seed cells, the mesenchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly (hUCMSCs represent a promising candidate and hold potential for bone tissue engineering due to the the lack of ethical controversies, accessibility, sourced by non-invasive procedures for donors, a reduced risk of contamination, osteogenic differentiation capacities, and higher immunomodulatory capacity. However, the current culture methods are somewhat complicated and inefficient and often fail to make the best use of the umbilical cord (UC tissues. Moreover, these culture processes cannot be performed on a large scale and under strict quality control. As a result, only a small quantity of cells can be harvested using the current culture methods. To solve these problems, we designed and evaluated an UC Wharton's jelly repeated culture device. Using this device, hUCMSCs were obtained from the repeated cultures and their quantities and biological characteristics were compared. We found that using our culture device, which retained all tissue blocks on the bottom of the dish, the total number of obtained cells increased 15-20 times, and the time required for the primary passage was reduced. Moreover, cells harvested from the repeated cultures exhibited no significant difference in their immunophenotype, potential for multilineage differentiation, or proliferative, osteoinductive capacities, and final osteogenesis. The application of the repeated culture frame (RCF not only made full use of the Wharton's jelly but also simplified and specified the culture process, and thus, the culture efficiency was significantly improved. In summary, abundant hUCMSCs of dependable quality can be acquired using the RCF.

  4. Effective component from verbena officinalis L. inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of human choriocarcinoma JAR cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Shan; Chen Qi; Xu Chang-fen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the action of the effective component, 4'-methylether -scutellarein, from Verbena officinalis L. (VOL) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human choriocarcinoma JAR cells.Methods: Cell proliferation was measured by MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) -2, 5-diphenyl tetrasodium bromide, MTT] assay and the incorporation of tritiated thymidine (3H-TdR). Apoptosis of cell was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM) and the characteristic apoptotic DNA ladder by agarose gel electrophoresis, and the morphological changes of apoptotic JAR cells were observed under fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM). Expressions of apoptosis proteins, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3, -8, and -9 were determined with Western blot.Results: The effective component from VOL inhibited the proliferation of JAR cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The treated cell cycle was arrested in S phase and an apoptotic peak was found in S phase using FCM analysis. A typical DNA ladder appeared in the treatment group when analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Using fluorescence microscopy, the percentage of apoptotic cell was 0.9%, 6%, and 14% after treatments of 10, 20, and 40 mg·L-1 of the effective component, respectively, for 48 h. Typical apoptotic changes, such as condensed chromatin and presence of apoptotic bodies, were observed under EM. Treatment with effective component for 48 h and 72 h also induced protein expression of PARP and caspase-3, -8, and -9 as seen by Western blot.Conclusions: The effective component from VOL inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in human choriocarcinoma JAR cells.

  5. Impact of dietary components on NK and Treg cell function for cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young S; Sayers, Thomas J; Colburn, Nancy H; Milner, John A; Young, Howard A

    2015-09-01

    An important characteristic of cancer is that the disease can overcome the surveillance of the immune system. A possible explanation for this resistance arises from the ability of tumor cells to block the tumoricidal activity of host immune cells such as natural killer (NK) cells by inducing the localized accumulation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Evidence exists that components in commonly consumed foods including vitamins A, D, and E, water-soluble constituents of mushrooms, polyphenolics in fruits and vegetables, and n-3 fatty acids in fish oil can modulate NK cell activities, Treg cell properties, and the interactions between those two cell types. Thus, it is extremely important for cancer prevention to understand the involvement of dietary components with the early stage dynamics of interactions among these immune cells. This review addresses the potential significance of diet in supporting the function of NK cells, Treg cells, and the balance between those two cell types, which ultimately results in decreased cancer risk. PMID:25845339

  6. Effect of repeated intracoronary injection of bone marrow cells in patients with ischaemic heart failure the Danish stem cell study--congestive heart failure trial (DanCell-CHF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Møller, Jacob E; Thayssen, Per;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that myocardial regeneration may be achieved by a single intracoronary bone marrow derived stem cell infusion in selected patients with ischaemic heart disease. The effect is uncertain in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure and it is not known whether...... repeated infusions would have additional positive effects. AIMS: To assess whether two treatments of intracoronary infusion of bone marrow stem cells, administered 4 months apart, could improve left ventricular (LV) systolic function in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure. METHODS: The study...... was prospective and non-randomised, comprising an observational baseline period of 4 months followed by an interventional period of 12 months. Intracoronary bone marrow cell infusion was performed at the end of the baseline period and repeated 4 months later. RESULTS: 32 patients were included. LV ejection...

  7. Regulation of pituitary hormones and cell proliferation by components of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Paez-Pereda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix is a three-dimensional network of proteins, glycosaminoglycans and other macromolecules. It has a structural support function as well as a role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The extracellular matrix conveys signals through membrane receptors called integrins and plays an important role in pituitary physiology and tumorigenesis. There is a differential expression of extracellular matrix components and integrins during the pituitary development in the embryo and during tumorigenesis in the adult. Different extracellular matrix components regulate adrenocorticotropin at the level of the proopiomelanocortin gene transcription. The extracellular matrix also controls the proliferation of adrenocorticotropin-secreting tumor cells. On the other hand, laminin regulates the production of prolactin. Laminin has a dynamic pattern of expression during prolactinoma development with lower levels in the early pituitary hyperplasia and a strong reduction in fully grown prolactinomas. Therefore, the expression of extracellular matrix components plays a role in pituitary tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the remodeling of the extracellular matrix affects pituitary cell proliferation. Matrix metalloproteinase activity is very high in all types of human pituitary adenomas. Matrix metalloproteinase secreted by pituitary cells can release growth factors from the extracellular matrix that, in turn, control pituitary cell proliferation and hormone secretion. In summary, the differential expression of extracellular matrix components, integrins and matrix metalloproteinase contributes to the control of pituitary hormone production and cell proliferation during tumorigenesis.

  8. Sub classification and targeted characterization of prophage-encoded two-component cell lysis cassette

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K V Srividhya; S Krishnaswamy

    2007-08-01

    Bacteriophage induced lysis of host bacterial cell is mediated by a two component cell lysis cassette comprised of holin and lysozyme. Prophages are integrated forms of bacteriophages in bacterial genomes providing a repertoire for bacterial evolution. Analysis using the prophage database (http://bicmku.in:8082) constructed by us showed 47 prophages were associated with putative two component cell lysis genes. These proteins cluster into four different subgroups. In this process, a putative holin (essd) and endolysin (ybcS), encoded by the defective lambdoid prophage DLP12 was found to be similar to two component cell lysis genes in functional bacteriophages like p21 and P1. The holin essd was found to have a characteristic dual start motif with two transmembrane regions and C-terminal charged residues as in class II holins. Expression of a fusion construct of essd in Escherichia coli showed slow growth. However, under appropriate conditions, this protein could be over expressed and purified for structure function studies. The second component of the cell lysis cassette, ybcS, was found to have an N-terminal SAR (Signal Arrest Release) transmembrane domain. The construct of ybcS has been over expressed in E. coli and the purified protein was functional, exhibiting lytic activity against E. coli and Salmonella typhi cell wall substrate. Such targeted sequence-structure-function characterization of proteins encoded by cryptic prophages will help understand the contribution of prophage proteins to bacterial evolution.

  9. Active Components of Fungus Shiraia bambusiscola Can Specifically Induce BGC823 Gastric Cancer Cell Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shubing; Qiu, Dewen; Liu, Jingjiang; Li, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gastric cancer is a major health issue worldwide. Using a therapeutic approach, with minor side-effects, is very essential for the treatment of the gastric cancer. Shiraia bambusicola is a parasitic fungus which is widely used in China for curing several diseases with little side-effects. However, the mechanisms are not well understood yet. The aim of this study was to further understand the pharmacological mechanisms of Shiraia bambusicola and investigate whether it can be used for curing gastric cancer. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we mainly tested the effect of active components extracted from Shiraia bambusicola on BGC823, A549 and HepG2 cells. We used MTT assay to test cell viability. We also analyzed morphologic changes caused by apoptosis using Hoechst 33342 fluorescence staining, as well as cell cycle status and apoptosis ratio using flow-cytometer. In addition, protein expression level was tested by Western-blotting assay. Results BGC-823 cell proliferation was specifically inhibited by active components of Shiraia bambusicola. Meanwhile, these active components could induce BGC-823 cells apoptosis and retard the cell cycle in S/G2 phase. We also determined that two critical protein markers cleaved Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), involved in apoptosis process, were regulated by these active components. Conclusion These data shed light on the treatment of human gastric cancer and conclude that Shiraia bambusicola can be a good therapeutic candidate for treatment of this malignancy.

  10. Understanding the effect of reformate gas components and stack component impurities on the performance of PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tao

    The performance can be lost depending on the concentration and type of reformate components. Gas crossover in PEMFCs can also cause performance loss and these effects are also presented. Impurities such as acetone coming from composite stack components and sealants can also deteriorate the performance severely. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used as a diagnostic tool to study the impurity poisoning. Reformate contains N2 and CO2 and these components affect performance differently. These effects were quantified using anode overvoltage. Data for anode overvoltage shows that CO2 yields a significant poisoning effect (about 30 mV) on a Pt electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) data showed that CO was produced in-situ from CO2 and H 2 (reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction) on both Pt and Pt/Ru electrodes. The coverage of CO achieved by RWGS can reach 5 x 10-7 mol/cm2 on an electrode with 0.4 mg/cm2 Pt under open circuit with normal operating conditions. This work also investigated how pressure, gas composition, and temperature affect the RWGS reaction in a PEMFC for both Pt and Pt/Ru alloy catalysts. The data are shown to be consistent with a kinetic catalytic model and not with an equilibrium model. Data was presented on H2 and O2 crossover in PEMFCs. Electrochemical techniques and mass balance measurements were used to quantify the crossover under typical working conditions. Mixed potential theory was applied to analyze the effect of gas crossover on open circuit voltage (OCV) of PEMFCs. Off-gassing from bipolar plates previously identified styrene, acetone, t-butyl alcohol, and dimethyl succinate as impurities. The effects of those impurities were quantified with both poisoning-recovery transient curves and steady state VI curves before, during, and after poisoning on anode and cathode side respectively. The poisoning effects of them to the anode side are smaller than to the cathode side. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

  11. A multi-structural single cell model of force-induced interactions of cytoskeletal components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Sara; Clausen, Casper H; Perrault, Cecile M; Fletcher, Daniel A; Lacroix, Damien

    2013-08-01

    Several computational models based on experimental techniques and theories have been proposed to describe cytoskeleton (CSK) mechanics. Tensegrity is a prominent model for force generation, but it cannot predict mechanics of individual CSK components, nor explain the discrepancies from the different single cell stimulating techniques studies combined with cytoskeleton-disruptors. A new numerical concept that defines a multi-structural 3D finite element (FE) model of a single-adherent cell is proposed to investigate the biophysical and biochemical differences of the mechanical role of each cytoskeleton component under loading. The model includes prestressed actin bundles and microtubule within cytoplasm and nucleus surrounded by the actin cortex. We performed numerical simulations of atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments by subjecting the cell model to compressive loads. The numerical role of the CSK components was corroborated with AFM force measurements on U2OS-osteosarcoma cells and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts exposed to different cytoskeleton-disrupting drugs. Computational simulation showed that actin cortex and microtubules are the major components targeted in resisting compression. This is a new numerical tool that explains the specific role of the cortex and overcomes the difficulty of isolating this component from other networks in vitro. This illustrates that a combination of cytoskeletal structures with their own properties is necessary for a complete description of cellular mechanics. PMID:23702149

  12. Primary mixed germ cell tumor of the liver with sarcomatous components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Germ cell tumor(GCT)of the liver is extremely rare. Here,we describe a case of hepatic mixed GCT with significant sarcomatous components and elevated serum α-fetoprotein(AFP)in a 34-year-old man.Histopathologically,the tumor was composed of two GCTs components:yolk sac tumor and immature teratoma.The predominant components of immature teratoma consisted of several types of tissue that represented different germinal layers(endoderm,mesoderm and ectoderm) and showed varying degrees of differentiation with sig...

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activator with WD40 repeats (MAWD) and MAWD-binding protein induce cell differentiation in gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Dongmei; Zhang, Jun; Xi, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Li, Wenmei; Cui, Jiantao; Xing, Rui; Pan, Yuanmin; Pan, Zemin; Li, Feng; Lu, Youyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Our previous proteomic analysis revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinase activator with WD40 repeats (MAWD) and MAWD-binding protein (MAWBP) were downregulated in gastric cancer (GC) tissues. These proteins interacted and formed complexes in GC cells. To investigate the role of MAWD and MAWBP in GC differentiation, we analyzed the relationship between MAWD/MAWBP and clinicopathologic characteristics of GC tissues and examined the expression of E-cadherin and pepsinogen C (PGC...

  14. Changes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane components and promotion to ethanol tolerance during the bioethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shi-Jun; Yi, Chen-Feng; Li, Hao

    2015-12-01

    During bioethanol fermentation process, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane might provide main protection to tolerate accumulated ethanol, and S. cerevisiae cells might also remodel their membrane compositions or structure to try to adapt to or tolerate the ethanol stress. However, the exact changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation still remains poorly understood. This study was performed to clarify changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation. Both cell diameter and membrane integrity decreased as fermentation time lasting. Moreover, compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher contents of ergosterol and oleic acid (C18:1) but lower levels of hexadecanoic (C16:0) and palmitelaidic (C16:1) acids. Contents of most detected phospholipids presented an increase tendency during fermentation process. Increased contents of oleic acid and phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids might indicate enhanced cell membrane fluidity. Compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher expressions of ACC1 and HFA1. However, OLE1 expression underwent an evident increase at exponential phase but a decrease at following stationary phase. These results indicated that during bioethanol fermentation process, yeast cells remodeled membrane and more changeable cell membrane contributed to acquiring higher ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae cells. These results highlighted our knowledge about relationship between the variation of cell membrane structure and compositions and ethanol tolerance, and would contribute to a better understanding of bioethanol fermentation process and construction of industrial ethanologenic strains with higher ethanol tolerance.

  15. Three Huntington's Disease Specific Mutation-Carrying Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Have Stable Number of CAG Repeats upon In Vitro Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laureen Jacquet

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD; OMIM 143100, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG (polyQ motif in the HTT gene. Cardiovascular symptoms, often present in early stage HD patients, are, in general, ascribed to dysautonomia. However, cardio-specific expression of polyQ peptides caused pathological response in murine models, suggesting the presence of a nervous system-independent heart phenotype in HD patients. A positive correlation between the CAG repeat size and severity of symptoms observed in HD patients has also been observed in in vitro HD cellular models. Here, we test the suitability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines carrying HD-specific mutation as in vitro models for understanding molecular mechanisms of cardiac pathology seen in HD patients. We have differentiated three HD-hESC lines into cardiomyocytes and investigated CAG stability up to 60 days after starting differentiation. To assess CAG stability in other tissues, the lines were also subjected to in vivo differentiation into teratomas for 10 weeks. Neither directed differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vitro nor in vivo differentiation into teratomas, rich in immature neuronal tissue, led to an increase in the number of CAG repeats. Although the CAG stability might be cell line-dependent, induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with larger numbers of CAG repeats could have an advantage as a research tool for understanding cardiac symptoms of HD patients.

  16. Bright-field cell image segmentation by principal component pursuit with an Ncut penalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuehuan; Wan, Justin W. L.

    2015-03-01

    Segmentation of cells in time-lapse bright-field microscopic images is crucial in understanding cell behaviours for oncological research. However, the complex nature of the cells makes it difficult to segment cells accurately. Furthermore, poor contrast, broken cell boundaries and the halo artifact pose additional challenges to this problem. Standard segmentation techniques such as edged-based methods, watershed, or active contours result in poor segmentation. Other existing methods for bright-field images cannot provide good results without localized segmentation steps. In this paper, we present two robust mathematical models to segment bright-field cells automatically for the entire image. These models treat cell image segmentation as a background subtraction problem, which can be formulated as a Principal Component Pursuit (PCP) problem. Our first segmentation model is formulated as a PCP with nonnegative constraints. We exploit the sparse component of the PCP solution for identifying the cell pixels. However, there is no control on the quality of the sparse component and the nonzero entries can scatter all over the image, resulting in a noisy segmentation. The second model is an improvement of the first model by combining PCP with spectral clustering. Seemingly unrelated approaches, we combine the two techniques by incorporating normalized-cut in the PCP as a measure for the quality of the segmentation. These two models have been applied to a set of C2C12 cells obtained from bright-field microscopy. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed models are effective in segmenting cells from bright-field images.

  17. SILAC Proteomics of Planarians Identifies Ncoa5 as a Conserved Component of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Böser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Planarian regeneration depends on the presence of pluripotent stem cells in the adult. We developed an in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC protocol in planarians to identify proteins that are enriched in planarian stem cells. Through a comparison of SILAC proteomes of normal and stem cell-depleted planarians and of a stem cell-enriched population of sorted cells, we identified hundreds of stem cell proteins. One of these is an ortholog of nuclear receptor coactivator-5 (Ncoa5/CIA, which is known to regulate estrogen-receptor-mediated transcription in human cells. We show that Ncoa5 is essential for the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell population in planarians and that a putative mouse ortholog is expressed in pluripotent cells of the embryo. Our study thus identifies a conserved component of pluripotent stem cells, demonstrating that planarians, in particular, when combined with in vivo SILAC, are a powerful model in stem cell research.

  18. An Arabidopsis aspartic protease functions as an anti-cell-death component in reproduction and embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaochun; Dietrich, Charles; Matsuno, Michiyo; Li, Guojing; Berg, Howard; Xia, Yiji

    2005-03-01

    The components and pathways that regulate and execute developmental cell death programmes in plants remain largely unknown. We have found that the PROMOTION OF CELL SURVIVAL 1 (PCS1) gene in Arabidopsis, which encodes an aspartic protease, has an important role in determining the fate of cells in embryonic development and in reproduction processes. The loss-of-function mutation of PCS1 causes degeneration of both male and female gametophytes and excessive cell death of developing embryos. Conversely, ectopic expression of PCS1 causes the septum and stomium cells that normally die in the anther wall to survive instead, leading to a failure in anther dehiscence and male sterility. PCS1 provides a new avenue for understanding the mechanisms of the programmed cell death processes that are associated with developmental pathways in plants and makes available a useful tool for engineering the male sterility trait for hybrid seed production.

  19. Preliminary study of small scale solar test cells for solar thermal evaluation of building components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, G. [CIEMAT, Renewable Energy Dept., Madrid (Spain)]|[CENIDET, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Jimenez, M.J.; Heras, M.R. [CIEMAT, Renewable Energy Dept., Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study to validate small scale solar test cells for thermal evaluation of building components such as windows and roofs. The description and performance of the scale test cells are described. The validation of the thermal performance was made with the real test cell Passys indirectly by applying the classical averaging method that was initially used for the Passys cells to determine overall heat loss coefficient, UA, and the solar heat gain, gA. The use of this methodology was selected, as a first approach, to evaluate the viability of the study of scale test cells. Our preliminary results indicate that some percentage differences were high for some tests. Therefore, it is necessary to increase the period of time of the measurements of the scale test cells, in order to use dynamic system methods to reduce the percentage differences of UA and gA. (orig.)

  20. The C-terminal pentapeptide of Nanog tryptophan repeat domain interacts with Nac1 and regulates stem cell proliferation but not pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tianhua; Wang, Zhe; Guo, Yunqian; Pei, Duanqing

    2009-06-12

    Overexpression of Nanog in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells has been shown to abrogate the requirement of leukemia inhibitory factor for self-renewal in culture. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of Nanog function. Here we describe the role of the tryptophan repeat (WR) domain, one of the two transactivators at its C terminus, in regulating stem cell proliferation as well as pluripotency. We first created a supertransactivator, W2W3x10, by duplicating repeats W2W3 10 times and discovered that it can functionally substitute for wild type WR at sustaining pluripotency, albeit with a significantly slower cell cycle, phenocopying Nanog(9W) with the C-terminal pentapeptide (WNAAP) of WR deleted. ES cells carrying both W2W3x10 and Nanog(9W) have a longer G1 phase, a shorter S phase in cell cycle distribution and progression analysis, and a lower level of pAkt(Ser473) compared with wild type Nanog, suggesting that both mutants impact the cell cycle machinery via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Both mutants remain competent in dimerizing with Nanog but cannot form a complex with Nac1 efficiently, suggesting that WNAAP may be involved in Nac1 binding. By tagging Gal4DBD with WNAAP, we demonstrated that this pentapeptide is sufficient to confer Nac1 binding. Furthermore, we can rescue W2W3x10 by placing WNAAP at the corresponding locations. Finally, we found that Nanog and Nac1 synergistically up-regulate ERas expression and promote the proliferation of ES cells. These results suggest that Nanog interacts with Nac1 through WNAAP to regulate the cell cycle of ES cells via the ERas/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway, but not pluripotency, thus decoupling cell cycle control from pluripotency.

  1. Storage-induced increase in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation in red blood cell components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükakin, Bülent; Kocak, Volkan; Lykkesfeldt, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion of blood components may increase the risk of complications in relation to surgery. During storage, red blood cells (RBCs) undergo structural and functional changes that may reduce function and viability after transfusion. The aim of the study was to evaluate the quality of buffy-coat ...

  2. Fabrication and Characterizations of Materials and Components for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells and Water Electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Prag, Carsten Brorson; Li, Qingfeng;

    The worldwide development of fuel cells and electrolysers has so far almost exclusively addressed either the low temperature window (20-200 °C) or the high temperature window (600-1000 °C). This work concerns the development of key materials and components of a new generation of fuel cells...... might be used. One of the key materials in the fuel cell and electrolyser systems is the electrolyte. Proton conducting materials such as cesium hydrogen phosphates, zirconium hydrogen phosphates and tin pyrophosphates have been investigated by others and have shown interesting potential....

  3. SOC Based Battery Cell Balancing with a Novel Topology and Reduced Component Count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Chen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel battery cell balancing topology with reduced component count and simplified control. The balancing algorithm is based on the state of charge (SOC of each individual cell instead of cell voltage. The principle of the proposed topology is analyzed and verified through simulation and experiments. Then an experimental battery test workbench is established to validate the proposed balancing algorithm. The experimental results show that the proposed balancing topology and associated algorithm can perform well in real applications.

  4. Effects of dendritic cell vaccine activated with protein components of toxoplasma gondii on tumor specific CD8+ T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amari A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Dendritic Cell (DC is an important antigen-presenting cell that present tumor antigen to CD8+ and CD4+ T- Lymphocytes and induce specific anti-tumor immunity. In order to induce effective anti-tumor response, an option is increasing the efficiency of antigen presentation of dendritic cells and T cell activation capacity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of dendritic cell maturation with protein components of toxoplasma gondii on cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and their infiltration in to the tumor."n"nMethods: For DC generation, bone marrow cells were cultured in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 for five days. After that, LPS, protein components and whole extract of toxoplasma gondii were added to the culture media and incubated for another two days for DC maturation. To generate tumor, mices were injected subcutaneously with WEHI-164 cell line. For immunotherapy 106 DCs matured with different compounds were injected around the tumor site. Infiltration of CD8+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry and cytotoxic activity was measured by LDH detection kit."n"nResults: Immunotherapy with DCs treated with protein components of toxoplasma gondii led to a significant increase in the

  5. Presence of alternative lengthening of telomeres associated circular extrachromosome telomere repeats in primary leukemia cells of chronic myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Samassekou, Oumar; Malina, Abba; Hébert, Josée; Yan, Ju

    2013-01-01

    Background The predominant mechanism by which human tumors maintain telomere length is via telomerase. In ~10% of tumor samples, however, telomere length is conserved, despite no detectable telomerase activity, in part through activation of the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway. Methods We studied the circular extra-chromosomal telomeric repeat (ECTR), an ALT hallmark, and telomerase activity in 24 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in chronic phase (CP). Results We iden...

  6. Intraepithelial p63-dependent expression of distinct components of cell adhesion complexes in normal esophageal mucosa and squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thépot, Amélie; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Pétré, Aurélia; Damour, Odile; Krutovskikh, Vladimir; Hainaut, Pierre

    2010-11-01

    TP63 gene is a member of TP53 tumor suppressor gene family that encodes several protein isoforms involved in the process of epithelial stratification and in epithelial-mesenchyme interactions. TP63 is amplified in a significant proportion of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (ESCC), resulting in the hyper-expression of DeltaNp63 as the major p63 isoform. To better understand the contribution of this high expression to tumorigenesis, we have analyzed the impact of intraepithelial p63 expression on the expression of cell adhesion complexes in normal esophagus and in ESCC cell lines. Cells expressing p63 showed an adhesion pattern characterized by lack of tight junctions and presence of adherens junctions. Cell differentiation was accompanied by a decrease in p63 and by a shift to adhesion patterns involving tight junctions. Silencing of p63 mRNA in ESCC cell lines resulted in a similar shift, characterized by increased expression of component of tight junctions, decreased cell-to-cell communication and downregulation of cell proliferation. These results indicate that DeltaNp63 may contribute to esophageal squamous carcinogenesis by maintaining cell adhesion patterns compatible with cell proliferation. PMID:20127860

  7. Cell edges accumulate gamma tubulin complex components and nucleate microtubules following cytokinesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Ambrose

    Full Text Available Microtubules emanate from distinct organizing centers in fungal and animal cells. In plant cells, by contrast, microtubules initiate from dispersed sites in the cell cortex, where they then self-organize into parallel arrays. Previous ultrastructural evidence suggested that cell edges participate in microtubule nucleation but so far there has been no direct evidence for this. Here we use live imaging to show that components of the gamma tubulin nucleation complex (GCP2 and GCP3 localize at distinct sites along the outer periclinal edge of newly formed crosswalls, and that microtubules grow predominantly away from these edges. These data confirm a role for cell edges in microtubule nucleation, and suggest that an asymmetric distribution of microtubule nucleation factors contributes to cortical microtubule organization in plants, in a manner more similar to other kingdoms than previously thought.

  8. Nuclear motility in glioma cells reveals a cell-line dependent role of various cytoskeletal components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa Kiss

    Full Text Available Nuclear migration is a general term for the movement of the nucleus towards a specific site in the cell. These movements are involved in a number of fundamental biological processes, such as fertilization, cell division, and embryonic development. Despite of its importance, the mechanism of nuclear migration is still poorly understood in mammalian cells. In order to shed light on the mechanical processes underlying nuclear movements, we adapted a micro-patterning based assay. C6 rat and U87 human glioma cells seeded on fibronectin patterns--thereby forced into a bipolar morphology--displayed oscillatory movements of the nucleus or the whole cell, respectively. We found that both the actomyosin system and microtubules are involved in the nuclear/cellular movements of both cell lines, but their contributions are cell-/migration-type specific. Dynein activity was necessary for nuclear migration of C6 cells but active myosin-II was dispensable. On the other hand, coupled nuclear and cellular movements of U87 cells were driven by actomyosin contraction. We explain these cell-line dependent effects by the intrinsic differences in the overall mechanical tension due to the various cytoskeletal elements inside the cell. Our observations showed that the movements of the nucleus and the centrosome are strongly correlated and display large variation, indicating a tight but flexible coupling between them. The data also indicate that the forces responsible for nuclear movements are not acting directly via the centrosome. Based on our observations, we propose a new model for nuclear oscillations in C6 cells in which dynein and microtubule dynamics are the main drivers of nuclear movements. This mechanism is similar to the meiotic nuclear oscillations of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and may be evolutionary conserved.

  9. The long terminal repeat of Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus is preferentially active in differentiated epithelial cells of the lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Palmarini, M; Datta, S; Omid, R.; Murgia, C.; Fan, H.

    2000-01-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the etiologic agent of a contagious bronchioloalveolar carcinoma of sheep known as sheep pulmonary adenomatosis (SPA; ovine pulmonary carcinoma). JSRV is unique among retroviruses because it transforms the alveolar type II cells and the nonciliated bronchiolar cells (Clara cells) of the lungs; these cells are where JSRV is specifically expressed in both naturally and experimentally SPA-affected sheep. In this study, we investigated the cell specificity of...

  10. The Long Terminal Repeat of Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus Is Preferentially Active in Differentiated Epithelial Cells of the Lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Palmarini, Massimo; Datta, Shoibal; Omid, Reza; Murgia, Claudio; Fan, Hung

    2000-01-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the etiologic agent of a contagious bronchioloalveolar carcinoma of sheep known as sheep pulmonary adenomatosis (SPA; ovine pulmonary carcinoma). JSRV is unique among retroviruses because it transforms the alveolar type II cells and the nonciliated bronchiolar cells (Clara cells) of the lungs; these cells are where JSRV is specifically expressed in both naturally and experimentally SPA-affected sheep. In this study, we investigated the cell specificity of...

  11. Laser selective microablation of sensitized intracellular components within auditory receptor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David M.; Evans, Burt N.; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    1995-05-01

    A laser system can be coupled to a light microscope for laser microbeam ablation and trapping of single cells in vitro. We have extended this technology by sensitization of target structures with vital dyes to provide selective ablation of specific subcellular components. Isolated auditory receptor cells (outer hair cells, OHCs) are known to elongate and contract in response to electrical, chemical and mechanical stimulation. Various intracellular structures are candidate components mediating motility of OHCs, but the exact mechanism(s) is currently unknown. In ongoing studies of OHC motility, we have used the microbeam for selective ablation of lateral wall components and of an axial cytoskeletal core that extends from the nucleus to the cell apex. Both the area beneath the subsurface cistemae of the lateral wall and the core are rich in mitochondria. OHCs isolated from guinea pig cochlea are suspended in L- 15 medium containing 2.0 (mu) M Rhodamine 123, a porphyrin with an affinity for mitochondria. A spark-pumped nitrogen laser pumping a dye cell (Coumarin 500) was aligned on the optical axis of a Nikon Optiphot-2 to produce a 3 ns, 0.5 - 10 micrometers spot (diameter above ablation threshold w/50X water immersion, N.A. 0.8), and energy at the target approximately equals 10 (mu) J/pulse. At short incubation times in Rh123 irradiation caused local blebbing or bulging of cytoplastic membrane and thus loss of the OHC's cylindrical shape. At longer Rh123 incubation times when the central axis of the cell was targeted we observed cytoplasmic clearing, immediate cell elongation (approximately equals 5%) and clumping of core material at nuclear and apical attachments. Experiments are underway to examine the significance of these preliminary observations.

  12. Homologs of SCAR/WAVE complex components are required for epidermal cell morphogenesis in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenqi; Wang, Yuchuan; Wu, Zhongliang; Luo, Liang; Liu, Ping; Yan, Longfeng; Hou, Suiwen

    2016-07-01

    Filamentous actins (F-actins) play a vital role in epidermal cell morphogenesis. However, a limited number of studies have examined actin-dependent leaf epidermal cell morphogenesis events in rice. In this study, two recessive mutants were isolated: less pronounced lobe epidermal cell2-1 (lpl2-1) and lpl3-1, whose leaf and stem epidermis developed a smooth surface, with fewer serrated pavement cell (PC) lobes, and decreased papillae. The lpl2-1 also exhibited irregular stomata patterns, reduced plant height, and short panicles and roots. Molecular genetic studies demonstrated that LPL2 and LPL3 encode the PIROGI/Specifically Rac1-associated protein 1 (PIR/SRA1)-like and NCK-associated protein 1 (NAP1)-like proteins, respectively, two components of the suppressor of cAMP receptor/Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-family verprolin-homologous protein (SCAR/WAVE) regulatory complex involved in actin nucleation and function. Epidermal cells exhibited abnormal arrangement of F-actins in both lpl2 and lpl3 expanding leaves. Moreover, the distorted trichomes of Arabidopsis pir could be partially restored by an overexpression of LPL2 A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that LPL2 can directly interact with LPL3 in vitro Collectively, the results indicate that LPL2 and LPL3 are two functionally conserved homologs of the SCAR/WAVE complex components, and that they play an important role in controlling epidermal cell morphogenesis in rice by organising F-actin.

  13. EFFECT OF BUNGARUS MULTICINCTUS CRUDE VENOM AND ITS COMPONENTS ON TUMOR CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈勇; 刘洁生; 高洁; 杨维东

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To confirm whether Bungarus multicinctus crude venom induces the apoptosis of K562 tumor cells and to find out the components inducing apoptosis of K562 cells from the crude venom. Methods: the crude venom separated and purified by cation exchange chromatography, and the effect of venoms on K562 was studied by MTT method and flow cytometry. Results: The crude venom began to kill K562 cells at than 8(103ng/ml (the survival rate was 82.5%) concentration and the effect was more significant in 24 h when administrating 8(105ng/ml (the survival rate was 29.4%) crude venom. Apoptotic bodies were observed in the K562 tumor cells by fluorescent microscopy after administration of 5 (g/ml cycloheximide (CHX) or the peak VI solution at about 8(105 ng/ml. The same results were detected by the flow cytometry. A sub-G1 peak appeared after administration of CHX or the sixth peak solution. Conclusion: The authors found that the venom can kill K562 tumor cells in time- and dose-dependent manner. However, the killing effect of the venom is not apoptosis. What's more, the peak VI solution, a component of the crude venom can induce the apoptosis of K562 tumor cells.

  14. Computational and genetic reduction of a cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seán M Murray

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available What are the minimal requirements to sustain an asymmetric cell cycle? Here we use mathematical modelling and forward genetics to reduce an asymmetric cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components. In the Alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell cycle progression is believed to be controlled by a cyclical genetic circuit comprising four essential master regulators. Unexpectedly, our in silico modelling predicted that one of these regulators, GcrA, is in fact dispensable. We confirmed this experimentally, finding that ΔgcrA cells are viable, but slow-growing and elongated, with the latter mostly due to an insufficiency of a key cell division protein. Furthermore, suppressor analysis showed that another cell cycle regulator, the methyltransferase CcrM, is similarly dispensable with simultaneous gcrA/ccrM disruption ameliorating the cytokinetic and growth defect of ΔgcrA cells. Within the Alphaproteobacteria, gcrA and ccrM are consistently present or absent together, rather than either gene being present alone, suggesting that gcrA/ccrM constitutes an independent, dispensable genetic module. Together our approaches unveil the essential elements of a primordial asymmetric cell cycle that should help illuminate more complex cell cycles.

  15. In utero exposure to nanosized carbon black (Printex90) does not induce tandem repeat mutations in female murine germ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anne Mette Zenner; Shipley, Thomas; Jackson, Petra;

    2013-01-01

    J mice were exposed four times during gestation by intratracheal instillation of 67μg/animal of nanosized carbon black Printex90 or vehicle (gestation days 7, 10, 15 and 18). Female offspring were raised to maturity and mated with unexposed CBA males. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) germline...... mutation rates in the resulting F2 generation were determined from full pedigrees (mother, father, offspring) of F1 female mice (178 CB-exposed and 258 control F2 offspring). ESTR mutation rates in CB-exposed F2 female offspring were not statistically different from those of F2 female control offspring....

  16. A unique HEAT repeat-containing protein SHOOT GRAVITROPISM6 is involved in vacuolar membrane dynamics in gravity-sensing cells of Arabidopsis inflorescence stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Yasuko; Yano, Daisuke; Nagafusa, Kiyoshi; Kato, Takehide; Saito, Chieko; Uemura, Tomohiro; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko; Tasaka, Masao; Terao Morita, Miyo

    2014-04-01

    Plant vacuoles play critical roles in development, growth and stress responses. In mature cells, vacuolar membranes (VMs) display several types of structures, which are formed by invagination and folding of VMs into the lumenal side and can gradually move and change shape. Although such VM structures are observed in a broad range of tissue types and plant species, the molecular mechanism underlying their formation and maintenance remains unclear. Here, we report that a novel HEAT-repeat protein, SHOOT GRAVITROPISM6 (SGR6), of Arabidopsis is involved in the control of morphological changes and dynamics of VM structures in endodermal cells, which are the gravity-sensing cells in shoots. SGR6 is a membrane-associated protein that is mainly localized to the VM in stem endodermal cells. The sgr6 mutant stem exhibits a reduced gravitropic response. Higher plants utilize amyloplast sedimentation as a means to sense gravity direction. Amyloplasts are surrounded by VMs in Arabidopsis endodermal cells, and the flexible and dynamic structure of VMs is important for amyloplast sedimentation. We demonstrated that such dynamic features of VMs are gradually lost in sgr6 endodermal cells during a 30 min observation period. Histological analysis revealed that amyloplast sedimentation was impaired in sgr6. Detailed live-cell imaging analyses revealed that the VM structures in sgr6 had severe defects in morphological changes and dynamics. Our results suggest that SGR6 is a novel protein involved in the formation and/or maintenance of invaginated VM structures in gravity-sensing cells.

  17. Extracellular Vesicle-Associated Transitory Cell Wall Components and Their Impact on the Interaction of Fungi with Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimrichter, Leonardo; de Souza, Marcio M; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Joffe, Luna; Tavares, Patricia de M; Rodrigues, Marcio L

    2016-01-01

    Classic cell wall components of fungi comprise the polysaccharides glucans and chitin, in association with glycoproteins and pigments. During the last decade, however, system biology approaches clearly demonstrated that the composition of fungal cell walls include atypical molecules historically associated with intracellular or membrane locations. Elucidation of mechanisms by which many fungal molecules are exported to the extracellular space suggested that these atypical components are transitorily located to the cell wall. The presence of extracellular vesicles (EVs) at the fungal cell wall and in culture supernatants of distinct pathogenic species suggested a highly functional mechanism of molecular export in these organisms. Thus, the passage of EVs through fungal cell walls suggests remarkable molecular diversity and, consequently, a potentially variable influence on the host antifungal response. On the basis of information derived from the proteomic characterization of fungal EVs from the yeasts Cryptoccocus neoformans and Candida albicans and the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, our manuscript is focused on the clear view that the fungal cell wall is much more complex than previously thought. PMID:27458437

  18. Extracellular Vesicle-Associated Transitory Cell Wall Components and Their Impact on the Interaction of Fungi with Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimrichter, Leonardo; de Souza, Marcio M.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Joffe, Luna; Tavares, Patricia de M.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2016-01-01

    Classic cell wall components of fungi comprise the polysaccharides glucans and chitin, in association with glycoproteins and pigments. During the last decade, however, system biology approaches clearly demonstrated that the composition of fungal cell walls include atypical molecules historically associated with intracellular or membrane locations. Elucidation of mechanisms by which many fungal molecules are exported to the extracellular space suggested that these atypical components are transitorily located to the cell wall. The presence of extracellular vesicles (EVs) at the fungal cell wall and in culture supernatants of distinct pathogenic species suggested a highly functional mechanism of molecular export in these organisms. Thus, the passage of EVs through fungal cell walls suggests remarkable molecular diversity and, consequently, a potentially variable influence on the host antifungal response. On the basis of information derived from the proteomic characterization of fungal EVs from the yeasts Cryptoccocus neoformans and Candida albicans and the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, our manuscript is focused on the clear view that the fungal cell wall is much more complex than previously thought. PMID:27458437

  19. Cytotoxicity of clove (Syzygium aromaticum) oil and its major components to human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashar, A; Locke, I C; Evans, C S

    2006-08-01

    The essential oil extracted from clove (Syzygium aromaticum) is used as a topical application to relieve pain and promote healing in herbal medicine and also finds use in the fragrance and flavouring industries. Clove oil has two major components, eugenol and beta-caryophyllene, which constitute 78% and 13% of the oil, respectively. Clove oil and these components are generally recognized as 'safe', but the in-vitro study here demonstrates cytotoxic properties of both the oil and eugenol, towards human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Clove oil was found to be highly cytotoxic at concentrations as low as 0.03% (v/v) with up to 73% of this effect attributable to eugenol. beta-caryophyllene did not exhibit any cytotoxic activity, indicating that other cytotoxic components may also exist within the parent oil. PMID:16872360

  20. Identification of sugarcane cDNAs encoding components of the cell cycle machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrietta Mírian Helene

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on cell cycle research in plants indicate that the majority of the fundamental regulators are conserved with other eukaryotes, but the controlling mechanisms imposed on them, and their integration into growth and development is unique to plants. To date, most studies on cell division have been conducted in dicot plants. However, monocot plants have distinct developmental strategies that will affect the regulation of cell division at the meristems. In order to advance our understanding how cell division is integrated with the basic mechanisms controlling cell growth and development in monocots, we took advantage of the sugarcane EST Project (Sucest to carry an exhaustive data mining to identify components of the cell cycle machinery. Results obtained include the description of distinct classes of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs; A, B, D, and H-type cyclins; CDK-interacting proteins, CDK-inhibitory and activating kinases, pRB and E2F transcription factors. Most sugarcane cell cycle genes seem to be member of multigene families. Like in dicot plants, CDKa transcription is not restricted to tissues with elevated meristematic activity, but the vast majority of CDKb-related ESTs are found in regions of high proliferation rates. Expression of CKI genes is far more abundant in regions of less cell division, notably in lateral buds. Shared expression patterns for a group of clusters was unraveled by transcriptional profiling, and we suggest that similar approaches could be used to identify genes that are part of the same regulatory network.

  1. Spectral network based on component cells under the SOPHIA European project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Núñez, Rubén, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es; Antón, Ignacio; Askins, Steve; Sala, Gabriel [Instituto de Energía Solar - Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Domínguez, César; Voarino, Philippe [CEA-INES, 50 avenue du Lac Léman, 73375 Le Bourget-du-Lac (France); Steiner, Marc; Siefer, Gerald [Fraunhofer ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Fucci, Rafaelle; Roca, Franco [ENEA, P.le E.Fermi 1, Località Granatello, 80055 Portici (Italy); Minuto, Alessandro; Morabito, Paolo [RSE, Via Rubattino 54, 20134 Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    In the frame of the European project SOPHIA, a spectral network based on component (also called isotypes) cells has been created. Among the members of this project, several spectral sensors based on component cells and collimating tubes, so-called spectroheliometers, were installed in the last years, allowing the collection of minute-resolution spectral data useful for CPV systems characterization across Europe. The use of spectroheliometers has been proved useful to establish the necessary spectral conditions to perform power rating of CPV modules and systems. If enough data in a given period of time is collected, ideally a year, it is possible to characterize spectrally the place where measurements are taken, in the same way that hours of annual irradiation can be estimated using a pyrheliometer.

  2. Repeatability of measurements of packed cell volume and egg count as indicators of endoparasite load and their relationship with sheep productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, T; Kasali, O B; Rege, J E

    1991-12-01

    Monthly measurements of packed cell volume (PCV) and nematode and trematode eggs per gram (EPG) were made in Ethiopian highland sheep at Debre Berhan, Dejen, Deneba, Tulu Meko and Wereilu from June 1988 to December 1989. High frequencies of low PCV, high nematode EPG and high trematode EPG were found at Tulu Meko. Among the productivity traits examined, body condition scores and live-weights were significantly (P less than 0.05) associated with differences in PCV and nematode and trematode EPG levels at most sites. The lambing interval was, however, not significantly (P greater than 0.05) affected by these variables. Monthly repeatabilities of PCV, body weight and body condition scores were 0.44 +/- 0.01, 0.71 +/- 0.01 and 0.35 +/- 0.01, respectively, while those of nematode (0.09 +/- 0.01) and trematode EPGs (0.20 +/- 0.02) were much lower. The high repeatability for PCV indicates that it was less affected by the variable factors influencing egg output, and hence it could be utilized in conjunction with nematode and trematode EPG levels for endoparasite monitoring. Repeatability of the lambing interval across parities was 0.43 +/- 0.14.

  3. The chromosome localization and the HCF repeats of the human host cell factor gene (HCFC1) are conserved in the mouse homologue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frattini, A.; Faranda, S.; Sacco, M.G.; Villa, A.; Vezzoni, P. [Istituto Technologie Biomediche Avansate, Milan (Italy)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The gene encoding the human host cell factor (HCFC1) has recently been cloned and mapped to Xq28. HCFC1 codes for a family of related polypeptides that apparently arise from posttranslational processing. Six extremely conserved 19-amino-acid (aa)-long motifs, unique to HCFC1 and located in the middle of the protein, could play a role in this processing or could be instrumental to the physiological role of the protein. Alternatively, these repeats could have arisen from recent duplications and may not have any specific function. To resolve this issue, we cloned the homologous region from the mouse Hcfc1 gene and demonstrated that the 19-aa motifs are extremely conserved in sequence, number, and genomic organization, while the {open_quotes}linker{close_quotes} region between the third and fourth repeat is not. This suggests an important function for these repeats. In addition, by RT-PCR analysis of human RNA and comparison to the human genomic sequence, an alternative transcript including a 44-aa in-frame insertion, driving from the 3{prime} nd of intron 18, was found. The significance of this alternative transcript is unknown, since it was not detectable in the mouse. The mouse Hcfc1 gene maps to a region syntenic to Xq28, and, as in human, is in close proximity to the Renin-binding protein gene, in a 100-kb region also including the L1cam and Vasopressin receptor type 2 genes. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Short communication: Repeatability of differential goat bulk milk culture and associations with somatic cell count, total bacterial count, and standard plate count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, G; Dik, N; Nielen, M; Lipman, L J A

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how different bacterial groups in bulk milk are related to bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), bulk milk total bacterial count (TBC), and bulk milk standard plate count (SPC) and to measure the repeatability of bulk milk culturing. On 53 Dutch dairy goat farms, 3 bulk milk samples were collected at intervals of 2 wk. The samples were cultured for SPC, coliform count, and staphylococcal count and for the presence of Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, SCC (Fossomatic 5000, Foss, Hillerød, Denmark) and TBC (BactoScan FC 150, Foss) were measured. Staphylococcal count was correlated to SCC (r=0.40), TBC (r=0.51), and SPC (r=0.53). Coliform count was correlated to TBC (r=0.33), but not to any of the other variables. Staphylococcus aureus did not correlate to SCC. The contribution of the staphylococcal count to the SPC was 31%, whereas the coliform count comprised only 1% of the SPC. The agreement of the repeated measurements was low. This study indicates that staphylococci in goat bulk milk are related to SCC and make a significant contribution to SPC. Because of the high variation in bacterial counts, repeated sampling is necessary to draw valid conclusions from bulk milk culturing.

  5. Ovarian germ cell tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous components and later development of growing teratoma syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Jumaily Usama; Al-Hussaini Maysa; Ajlouni Fatenah; Abulruz Abdulrahman; Sultan Iyad

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Development of a sarcomatous component in a germ cell tumor is an uncommon phenomenon. Most cases reported have a grim prognosis. Growing teratoma syndrome is also an uncommon phenomenon and occurs in approximately 2% to 7% of non seminomatous germ cell tumors and should be treated surgically. Case presentation We report the case of a 12-year-old Asian girl with an ovarian mixed germ cell tumor containing a rhabdomyosarcomatous component. She was treated with a germ cell...

  6. CLEAR CELL CARCINOMA WITH COEXISTENT SMALL MUCINOUS TUMOR COMPONENT ARISING FROM EXTRAGONADAL ENDOMETRIOTIC CYST

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar; Aravinth

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of clear cell carcinoma in extra gonadal endometriotic cyst is well documented in literature. We report a rare case of malignant tumor identified in the mural nodule of a cystic mass. The cyst was located in the retroperitoneum, posterior to caecum. The tumor had an unusual histomorphologic appearance with co - existent minor benign mucinous tumor component. Rare clinical presentation with unfamiliar histomorphological appearance of this tumor makes it w...

  7. Rapid identification of Bacillus anthracis by cell wall and capsule components direct fluorescent antibody assay

    OpenAIRE

    Lily Natalia; Rahmat Setya AdjI

    2008-01-01

    During the outbreak of anthrax, early diagnosis is critical for effective treatment. Numerous attempts have been made to design antigen based detection tests and to rapidly identify truly anthrax specific antigens for B. anthracis. In Indonesia, standard identification of B. anthracis relies on a combination of time consuming steps including bacterial culture and Ascoli precipitin test, which can take several days to provide a diagnosis. In this study, two component (cell wall and capsule) di...

  8. Foxp3(+)-Treg cells enhanced by repeated low-dose gamma-irradiation attenuate ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bum Soo; Hong, Gwan Ui; Ro, Jai Youl

    2013-05-01

    Gamma radiation is used for several therapeutic indications such as cancers and autoimmune diseases. Low-dose whole-body γ irradiation has been shown to activate immune responses in several ways, however, the effect and mechanism of irradiation on allergic asthma remains poorly understood. This study investigated whether or not irradiation exacerbates allergic asthma responses and its potential mechanism. C57BL/6 mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce asthma. The mice received whole-body irradiation once daily for 3 consecutive days with a dose of 0.667 Gy using (137)Cs γ rays 24 h before every OVA challenge. Repeated low-dose irradiation reduced OVA-specific IgE levels, the number of inflammatory cells including mast cells, goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition, airway hyperresponsiveness, expression of inflammatory cytokines, CCL2/CCR2, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 activities. All of these factors were increased in BAL cells and lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. Irradiation increased the number of Treg cells, expression of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-2 and IL-35 in BAL cells and lung tissue. Irradiation also increased Treg cell-expressed Foxp3 and IL-10 by NF-κB and RUNX1 in OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, while Treg cell-expressing OX40 and IL-10 were enhanced in lung tissue or act-bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) with Treg cells, but BMMCs-expressing OX40L and TGF-β were decreased. The data suggest that irradiation enhances Foxp3(+)- and IL-10-producing Treg cells, which reduce OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation and tissue remodeling through the down-regulation of migration by the CCL2/CCR2 axis and activation of mast cells via OX40/OX40L in lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. PMID:23560633

  9. Corepressor effect on androgen receptor activity varies with the length of the CAG encoded polyglutamine repeat and is dependent on receptor/corepressor ratio in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Grant; Need, Eleanor F; Barrett, Jeffrey M; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Thompson, Vanessa C; Butler, Lisa M; Marshall, Villis R; Tilley, Wayne D; Coetzee, Gerhard A

    2011-08-01

    The response of prostate cells to androgens reflects a combination of androgen receptor (AR) transactivation and transrepression, but how these two processes differ mechanistically and influence prostate cancer risk and disease outcome remain elusive. Given recent interest in targeting AR transrepressive processes, a better understanding of AR/corepressor interaction and responses is warranted. Here, we used transactivation and interaction assays with wild-type and mutant ARs, and deletion AR fragments, to dissect the relationship between AR and the corepressor, silencing mediator for retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT). We additionally tested how these processes are influenced by AR agonist and antagonist ligands, as well as by variation in the polyglutamine tract in the AR amino terminal domain (NTD), which is encoded by a polymorphic CAG repeat in the gene. SMRT was recruited to the AR ligand binding domain by agonist ligand, and as determined by the effect of strategic mutations in activation function 2 (AF-2), requires a precise conformation of that domain. A distinct region of SMRT also mediated interaction with the AR-NTD via the transactivation unit 5 (TAU5; residues 315-538) region. The degree to which SMRT was able to repress AR increased from 17% to 56% as the AR polyglutamine repeat length was increased from 9 to 42 residues, but critically this effect could be abolished by increasing the SMRT:AR molar ratio. These data suggest that the extent to which the CAG encoded polyglutamine repeat influences AR activity represents a balance between corepressor and coactivator occupancy of the same ligand-dependent and independent AR interaction surfaces. Changes in the homeostatic relationship of AR to these molecules, including SMRT, may explain the variable penetrance of the CAG repeat and the loss of AR signaling flexibility in prostate cancer progression.

  10. Treatment results and prognostic factors of clear cell ovarian carcinomas and ovarian carcinomas with clear cell component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ahmedova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important prognostic factors for clear cell carcinoma (CCC are clinical and morphological signs and clinical stage of the disease. Analyses of 5-year survival in patients with I stage of CCC is 69 %, in II stage – 55 %, in III stage – 14 % and in IV stage – 4 % patients. We analyzed distant results of treatment of 71 patients with CCC and of 25 patients with mixed malignant ovaries neoplasm with obligatory clear cell component taking into consideration main clinical and morphological sings of disease. On the base of performed reseal we revealed that morphological structure of the tumors and stage of the disease exerted heist influence on the exponent of survival of the patients with clear CCC ovaries neoplasm. Besides, there is a correlation between exponent of patients’ survival and radicalized of surgery, character of tumor growth, differentiation degree, cell anaplasia and mitotic activity of tumor cells.

  11. Modulation of human B cell immunoglobulin secretion by the C3b component of complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokos, G C; Berger, M; Balow, J E

    1984-02-01

    The human C3b component of complement was found to inhibit the differentiation of human B lymphocytes into immunoglobulin-secreting cells in vitro. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced plaque-forming cell (PFC) responses were inhibited by C3-coated zymosan particles and by purified human C3b. C3b inhibited the PWM-driven responses in a dose-dependent fashion, and it was necessary for C3b to be present in the early phases of the cultures. C3b acted directly on B cells rather than on helper T cells because it inhibited the PFC responses of MNC depleted of T cells and subsequently stimulated with a T cell-independent Epstein Barr virus mitogen. Furthermore, C3b failed to stimulate the generation of suppressor lymphocytes and/or monocytes that might have been responsible for the inhibition of B cell responses. Our results indicate that C3b or its fragments exert negative modulatory effects on human B lymphocyte responses. PMID:6228593

  12. Inhibition of telomerase in tumor cells by ribozyme targeting telomerase RNA component

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Bailin(刘柏林); QU; Yi(屈艺); LIU; Shuqiu(刘菽秋); OUYANG; Xuesong(欧阳雪松)

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase plays an important role in cell proliferation and carcinogenesis and is believed to be a good target for anti-cancer drugs. Elimination of template function of telomerase RNA may repress the telomerase activity. A hammer-headed ribozyme(telomerase ribozyme, teloRZ) directed against the RNA component of human telomerase(hTR) was designed and synthesized. TeloRZ showed a specific cleavage activity against the hTR. The cleavage efficacy reached 60%. A eukaryotic expression plasmid containing teloRZ gene was inducted into HeLa cells by lipofectamine, the telomerase activity in HeLa cells expressing teloRZ decreased to one eighth of that in the control cells. The doubling time increased significantly and the apoptosis ratio was elevated with increasing population doublings(PDS). After 19-20 PDS 95% cells were apoptotic. To further investigate the effect of teloRZ on tumor growth, the eukaryotic expression plasmid containing teloRZ was injected into transplanted tumor of nude mouse. The teloRZ effectively inhibited the telomerase activity in transplanted tumor, promoted apoptosis of the transplanted tumor cells, and decreased the tumor size significantly. These results indicate that teloRZ can effectively inhibit telomerase activity and growth of tumor cells, and suggest the potential use of this ribozyme in anti-cancer therapy.

  13. Scorpion venom component III inhibits cell proliferation by modulating NF-κB activation in human leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    SONG, XIANGFENG; Zhang, Guojun; SUN, AIPING; Guo, Jiqiang; TIAN, ZHONGWEI; Wang, Hui; Liu, Yufeng

    2012-01-01

    Scorpion venom contains various groups of compounds that exhibit anticancer activity against a variety of malignancies through a poorly understood mechanism. While the aberrant activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) has been linked with hematopoietic malignancies, we hypothesized that scorpion venom mediates its effects by modulating the NF-κB signaling pathway. In the present study, we examined the effects of scorpion venom component III (SVCIII) on the human leukemia cell lines THP-1 and J...

  14. Proapoptotic Activity of Propolis and Their Components on Human Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Line (CAL-27).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyżewska, Urszula; Siemionow, Katarzyna; Zaręba, Ilona; Miltyk, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Propolis has been used since ancient times in folk medicine. It is a popular medicine possessing a broad spectrum of biological activities. This material is one of the richest sources of polyphenolic compounds such as flavonoids and phenolic acids. The ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) evokes antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal and anticancer properties. Due to pharmacological properties it is used in the commercial production of nutritional supplements. In this study, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to quantify main polyphenols in EEPs. The effect of EEPs, individual EEPs components (chrysin, galangin, pinocembrin, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid) and their mixture on viability of human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line (CAL-27) as well as the molecular mechanisms of the process were examined. The results of MTTs assay demonstrated that EEP, polyphenols and mixture of polyphenolic compounds were cytotoxic for CAL-27 cells in a dose dependent manner. The mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by these components undergoes through apoptosis as detected by flow cytometry. The ethanolic extracts of propolis activated caspases -3, -8, -9. Mixture of polyphenols was found as the most potent inducer of apoptosis thorough both intrinsic and extrinsic pathway. Therefore, we suggest that anticancer properties of propolis is related to synergistic activity of its main components. PMID:27281369

  15. Microfluidic housing system: a useful tool for the analysis of dye-sensitized solar cell components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, A.; Lamberti, A.; Pugliese, D.; Chiodoni, A.; Shahzad, N.; Bianco, S.; Quaglio, M.; Gazia, R.; Tresso, E.; Pirri, C. F.

    2012-11-01

    In order to understand the behavior of the different dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) components, an in-situ analysis should give fundamental help but it is impossible to be performed without compromising the integrity of the cell. Our recently proposed novel microfluidic approach for the fabrication of DSCs is based on a reversible sealing of the two transparent electrodes and it allows the easy assembling and disassembling of the cell, making possible an analysis of the components over time. The aim of this work is not to investigate the different degradation mechanisms of a standard DSC: we want to show that, by using a microfluidic architecture, it is possible to perform a non-destructive analysis and to monitor the photoanode and the counter electrode properties during their lifetime. Morphological (field emission scanning electron microscopy), wetting (contact angle), optical (UV-visible spectroscopy) and electrical (current-voltage and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements under standard AM1.5G illumination) characterizations have been performed over a period of three weeks. The results show how the variation of the wetting and morphological properties at the counter electrode and of the dye absorbance at the photoanode are strongly related to the decrease of the cell performances as evidenced by electrical characterization, thus demonstrating the effectiveness of the use of our structure in this kind of studies.

  16. PROLIFERATION RESPONSES IN PREIMMUNIZED MICE LYMPHOCYTES BY BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS CELL WALL COMPONENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Mohabbati Mobarez

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis infects the respiratory tract of the human host and causes whooping cough in children. The nature of immunity against Bordetella pertussis infection and disease is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate cell mediated immunity in mice immunized with outer membrane component of cell wall, of B. Pertussis.A group of mice were immunized with outer membrane complex (OMC and killed whole cell (WCV of B. pertussis, with an interval of 2 weeks. During a period of 7 weeks following the immunization, lymphocytes were isolated from lymph nodes of immunized mice. The in vitro proliferative response of isolated lymphocyte to stimulation with 20 ^g of 30 and 69 kDa outer membrane protein (OMP were measured as parameters for cell mediated immunity (CMI. The data were expressed as mean count per minute (CPMxlO3 after subtraction of the CPM of unstimulated control cultures. Lymphoblastogenic response was observed in immunized mice with WCV and OMC. At 30 days of post immunization a significant increase in response to 30 and 69 kDa OMP was observed, a small decrease in the response was evident against P30 and P69 at 60 and 120 days of post immunization, but the response was still higher than what was observed in control mice.Current findings indicate strongly the potential of outer membrane protein component of B. pertussis in proliferating lymphocytes in the mice.

  17. Homologs of SCAR/WAVE complex components are required for epidermal cell morphogenesis in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenqi; Wang, Yuchuan; Wu, Zhongliang; Luo, Liang; Liu, Ping; Yan, Longfeng; Hou, Suiwen

    2016-07-01

    Filamentous actins (F-actins) play a vital role in epidermal cell morphogenesis. However, a limited number of studies have examined actin-dependent leaf epidermal cell morphogenesis events in rice. In this study, two recessive mutants were isolated: less pronounced lobe epidermal cell2-1 (lpl2-1) and lpl3-1, whose leaf and stem epidermis developed a smooth surface, with fewer serrated pavement cell (PC) lobes, and decreased papillae. The lpl2-1 also exhibited irregular stomata patterns, reduced plant height, and short panicles and roots. Molecular genetic studies demonstrated that LPL2 and LPL3 encode the PIROGI/Specifically Rac1-associated protein 1 (PIR/SRA1)-like and NCK-associated protein 1 (NAP1)-like proteins, respectively, two components of the suppressor of cAMP receptor/Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-family verprolin-homologous protein (SCAR/WAVE) regulatory complex involved in actin nucleation and function. Epidermal cells exhibited abnormal arrangement of F-actins in both lpl2 and lpl3 expanding leaves. Moreover, the distorted trichomes of Arabidopsis pir could be partially restored by an overexpression of LPL2 A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that LPL2 can directly interact with LPL3 in vitro Collectively, the results indicate that LPL2 and LPL3 are two functionally conserved homologs of the SCAR/WAVE complex components, and that they play an important role in controlling epidermal cell morphogenesis in rice by organising F-actin. PMID:27252469

  18. Analysis of Amorphous Thin-Film Tandem Solar Cells and Their Component Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Studies of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si:C:H) alloys used for the window layer of tandem cells showed that increasing carbon incorporation led to a greater structural disorder. Density of localised states (DOS), the minority carrier lifetime and the characteristic width of the tail states were all highly dependent on the silane -propane ratio, g. The optical bandgap which ranges from 1.88-2.32 eV, increases with propane flow but the refractive index decreases with propane flow. The highest dark and illuminated conductivity were observed at g = 5 which corresponds to the lowest DOS. A new structure, a double Schottky diode, was proposed for determination of DOS using space charge limited current (SCLC) technique. This was shown to be valid by using a thickness scaling test. For the first time the minority carrier storage time was observed in the diode recovery method not only in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) alloy diodes but also in a-Si:C:H alloy diodes. A new shutter system has been introduced in the plasma depositing chamber which has made it possible to analyse the components' effects on the properties of the pinpin tandem solar cells by physically separating the components. In this way the first p-layer and first pin cell were identified as the limiting components in the attainment of high short circuit current. Using a p-layer a-Si:C:H was found to be better than a wholly pin a-Si:C:H. The desired recombination of carriers at the middle n/p junction is obtained by correct design: An asymmetric junction with n-layer thicker than the p-layer resulted in the highest current density. A tandem solar cell equivalent circuit was proposed based on the results.

  19. Predicting essential components of signal transduction networks: a dynamic model of guard cell abscisic acid signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Li

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants both lose water and take in carbon dioxide through microscopic stomatal pores, each of which is regulated by a surrounding pair of guard cells. During drought, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA inhibits stomatal opening and promotes stomatal closure, thereby promoting water conservation. Dozens of cellular components have been identified to function in ABA regulation of guard cell volume and thus of stomatal aperture, but a dynamic description is still not available for this complex process. Here we synthesize experimental results into a consistent guard cell signal transduction network for ABA-induced stomatal closure, and develop a dynamic model of this process. Our model captures the regulation of more than 40 identified network components, and accords well with previous experimental results at both the pathway and whole-cell physiological level. By simulating gene disruptions and pharmacological interventions we find that the network is robust against a significant fraction of possible perturbations. Our analysis reveals the novel predictions that the disruption of membrane depolarizability, anion efflux, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, cytosolic pH increase, the phosphatidic acid pathway, or K(+ efflux through slowly activating K(+ channels at the plasma membrane lead to the strongest reduction in ABA responsiveness. Initial experimental analysis assessing ABA-induced stomatal closure in the presence of cytosolic pH clamp imposed by the weak acid butyrate is consistent with model prediction. Simulations of stomatal response as derived from our model provide an efficient tool for the identification of candidate manipulations that have the best chance of conferring increased drought stress tolerance and for the prioritization of future wet bench analyses. Our method can be readily applied to other biological signaling networks to identify key regulatory components in systems where quantitative information is limited.

  20. Cell wall chitosaccharides are essential components and exposed patterns of the phytopathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badreddine, Ilham; Lafitte, Claude; Heux, Laurent; Skandalis, Nicholas; Spanou, Zacharoula; Martinez, Yves; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Bulone, Vincent; Dumas, Bernard; Bottin, Arnaud

    2008-11-01

    Chitin is an essential component of fungal cell walls, where it forms a crystalline scaffold, and chitooligosaccharides derived from it are signaling molecules recognized by the hosts of pathogenic fungi. Oomycetes are cellulosic fungus-like microorganisms which most often lack chitin in their cell walls. Here we present the first study of the cell wall of the oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches, a major parasite of legume plants. Biochemical analyses demonstrated the presence of ca. 10% N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) in the cell wall. Further characterization of the GlcNAc-containing material revealed that it corresponds to noncrystalline chitosaccharides associated with glucans, rather than to chitin per se. Two putative chitin synthase (CHS) genes were identified by data mining of an A. euteiches expressed sequence tag collection and Southern blot analysis, and full-length cDNA sequences of both genes were obtained. Phylogeny analysis indicated that oomycete CHS diversification occurred before the divergence of the major oomycete lineages. Remarkably, lectin labeling showed that the Aphanomyces euteiches chitosaccharides are exposed at the cell wall surface, and study of the effect of the CHS inhibitor nikkomycin Z demonstrated that they are involved in cell wall function. These data open new perspectives for the development of antioomycete drugs and further studies of the molecular mechanisms involved in the recognition of pathogenic oomycetes by the host plants. PMID:18806214

  1. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  2. Revealing changes in molecular composition of plant cell walls on the micron-level by Raman mapping and vertex component analysis (VCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Notburga eGierlinger

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available At the molecular level the plant cell walls consist of a few nanometer thick semi-crystalline cellulose fibrils embedded in amorphous matrix polymers such as pectins, hemicelluloses and lignins. The arrangement of these molecules within the cell wall in different plant tissues, cells and cell wall layers is of crucial importance for a better understanding and thus optimized utilization of plant biomass. During the last years Confocal Raman microscopy evolved as a powerful method in plant science by revealing the different molecules in context with the microstructure. In this study two-dimensional spectral maps have been acquired of micro-cross-sections of spruce (softwood and beech (hardwood. Raman images have been derived by using univariate (band integration, height ratios and multivariate methods (vertex component analysis, VCA. While univariate analysis only visualizes changes in selected band heights or areas, VCA separates anatomical regions and cell wall layers with the most different molecular structures by projecting the data to the identified orthogonal subspace in an interactive way and finding the endmember by repeated iteration. Beside visualization of the distinguished regions and features the underlying molecular structure can be derived based on the endmember spectra. Only one pure component spectrum (lignin from the cell corner was extracted, while all other endmember spectra represented mixtures characteristic for the different resolved spatial areas. VCA revealed that the lumen sided S3 layer has a similar molecular composition as the pit membrane, both revealing a clear change in lignin composition compared to all other cell wall regions. Within the S2 layer a lamellar structure was visualized, which was elucidated to derive also from slight changes in lignin composition and content and might be due to successive but not uniform lignification during growth.

  3. The cell signaling adaptor protein EPS-8 is essential for C. elegans epidermal elongation and interacts with the ankyrin repeat protein VAB-19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Ding

    Full Text Available The epidermal cells of the C. elegans embryo undergo coordinated cell shape changes that result in the morphogenetic process of elongation. The cytoskeletal ankyrin repeat protein VAB-19 is required for cell shape changes and localizes to cell-matrix attachment structures. The molecular functions of VAB-19 in this process are obscure, as no previous interactors for VAB-19 have been described.In screens for VAB-19 binding proteins we identified the signaling adaptor EPS-8. Within C. elegans epidermal cells, EPS-8 and VAB-19 colocalize at cell-matrix attachment structures. The central domain of EPS-8 is necessary and sufficient for its interaction with VAB-19. eps-8 null mutants, like vab-19 mutants, are defective in epidermal elongation and in epidermal-muscle attachment. The eps-8 locus encodes two isoforms, EPS-8A and EPS-8B, that appear to act redundantly in epidermal elongation. The function of EPS-8 in epidermal development involves its N-terminal PTB and central domains, and is independent of its C-terminal SH3 and actin-binding domains. VAB-19 appears to act earlier in the biogenesis of attachment structures and may recruit EPS-8 to these structures.EPS-8 and VAB-19 define a novel pathway acting at cell-matrix attachments to regulate epithelial cell shape. This is the first report of a role for EPS-8 proteins in cell-matrix attachments. The existence of EPS-8B-like isoforms in Drosophila suggests this function of EPS-8 proteins could be conserved among other organisms.

  4. Production of fructooligosaccharides and b-fructofuranosidase by batch and repeated batch fermentation with immobilized cells of Penicillium expansum

    OpenAIRE

    Mussatto, Solange I.; Prata, Margarida Barros; Rodrigues, L. R.; Teixeira, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The production of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and b-fructofuranosidase (FFase) by immobilized cells of Penicillium expansum was evaluated. In an initial stage, different low-cost materials including synthetic fiber, polyurethane foam, stainless steel sponge, loofah sponge, and cork oak were tested as carrier for the fungus immobilization. Additionally, the influence of the inoculum age (1 or 3 weeks) on cells immobilization, FOS and FFase production was also verified....

  5. Analysis of Active Components in Salvia Miltiorrhiza Injection Based on Vascular Endothelial Cell Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Jie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Correlation analysis based on chromatograms and pharmacological activities is essential for understanding the effective components in complex herbal medicines. In this report, HPLC and measurement of antioxidant properties were used to describe the active ingredients of Salvia miltiorrhiza injection (SMI. HPLC results showed that tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acid B, protocatechuic acid and their metabolites in rat serum may contribute to the efficacy of SMI. Assessment of antioxidant properties indicated that differences in the composition of serum powder of SMI caused differences in vascular endothelial cell protection. When bivariate correlation was carried out it was found that salvianolic acid B, tanshinol and protocatechuic aldehyde were active components of SMI because they were correlated to antioxidant properties.

  6. Design and development of major balance of plant components in solid oxide fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Wen-Tang; Huang, Cheng-Nan; Tan, Hsueh-I; Chao, Yu [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan County 32546 (Taiwan, Province of China); Yen, Tzu-Hsiang [Green Technology Research Institute, CPC Corporation, Chia-Yi City 60036 (Taiwan, Province of China)

    2013-07-01

    The balance of plant (BOP) of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system with a 2 kW stack and an electric efficiency of 40% is optimized using commercial GCTool software. The simulation results provide a detailed understanding of the optimal operating temperature, pressure and mass flow rate in all of the major BOP components, i.e., the gas distributor, the afterburner, the reformer and the heat exchanger. A series of experimental trials are performed to validate the simulation results. Overall, the results presented in this study not only indicate an appropriate set of operating conditions for the SOFC power system, but also suggest potential design improvements for several of the BOP components.

  7. Ethanol production by repeated batch and continuous fermentations of blackstrap molasses using immobilized yeast cells on thin-shell silk cocoons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Thin-shell silk cocoons for immobilization of Saccharomycescerevisiae. → Advantages: high mechanical strength, light weight, biocompatibility and high surface area. → Enhanced cell stability and ethanol productivity by the immobilization system. -- Abstract: A thin-shell silk cocoon (TSC), a residual from the silk industry, is used as a support material for the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae M30 in ethanol fermentation because of its properties such as high mechanical strength, light weight, biocompatibility and high surface area. In batch fermentation with blackstrap molasses as the main fermentation substrate, an optimal ethanol concentration of 98.6 g/L was obtained using a TSC-immobilized cell system at an initial reducing sugar concentration of 240 g/L. The ethanol concentration produced by the immobilized cells was 11.5% higher than that produced by the free cells. Ethanol production in five-cycle repeated batch fermentation demonstrated the enhanced stability of the immobilized yeast cells. Under continuous fermentation in a packed-bed reactor, a maximum ethanol productivity of 19.0 g/(L h) with an ethanol concentration of 52.8 g/L was observed at a 0.36 h-1 dilution rate.

  8. Pulmonary surfactant and its components inhibit secretion of phosphatidylcholine from cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary surfactant is synthesized and secreted by alveolar type II cells. Radioactive phosphatidylcholine has been used as a marker for surfactant secretion. The authors report findings that suggest that surfactant inhibits secretion of 3H-labeled phosphatidylcholine by cultured rat type II cells. The lipid components and the surfactant protein group of M/sub r/ 26,000-36,000 (SP 26-36) inhibit secretion to different extents. Surfactant lipids do not completely inhibit release; in concentrations of 100 μg/ml, lipids inhibit stimulated secretion by 40%. SP 26-36 inhibits release with an EC50 of 0.1 μg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 μg/ml, SP 26-36 inhibits basal secretion and reduces to basal levels secretion stimulated by terbutaline, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and the ionophore A23187. The inhibitory effect of SP 26-36 can be blocked by washing type II cells after adding SP 26-36, by heating the proteins to 1000C for 10 min, by adding antiserum specific to SP 26-36, or by incubating cells in the presence of 0.2 mM EGTA. SP 26-36 isolated from canine and human sources also inhibits phosphatidylcholine release from rat type II cells. Neither type I collagen nor serum apolipoprotein A-1 inhibits secretion. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that surfactant secretion is under feedback regulatory control

  9. Primary histiocytic sarcoma arising in the head and neck with predominant spindle cell component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao XF

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is the first case report of Histiocytic Sarcoma (HS with predominant spindle cell component occurring in the head and neck region of a 41-year-old man. The tumor was composed of sheets of large round to oval cells with pleomorphic vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Multinucleated forms, numerous mitoses, and tumor necrosis were also noted. Sheets, fascicles, and whorls of spindle cells with spindled to ovoid vesicular nuclei, small to medium-sized distinct nucleoli, and eosinophilic cytoplasm were frequently observed. Immunohistochemical staining in the tumor cells was positive for CD163, CD68, lysozyme, CD45, and NSE. Focal expression of CD4 and S-100 was also noted. Electron microscopy demonstrated an abundance of lysosomes in the cytoplasm of tumor cells. Chromosome study revealed a 57–80 hyperdiploid [7]/46, XY [13] karyotype, including 3 to 4 copies of various chromosomes. The immunohistochemical and ultrastructural findings confirmed the diagnosis of HS.

  10. Inhibition of A2780 Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Proliferation by a Rubus Component, Sanguiin H-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dahae; Ko, Hyeonseok; Kim, Young-Joo; Kim, Su-Nam; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Yamabe, Noriko; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kang, Ki Sung; Kim, Hyun Young; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    The effects of a red raspberry component, sanguiin H-6 (SH-6), on the induction of apoptosis and the related signaling pathways in A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells were investigated. SH-6 caused an antiproliferative effect and a severe morphological change resembling that of apoptotic cell death but no effect on the cancer cell cycle arrest. In addition, SH-6 induced an early apoptotic effect and activation of caspases as well as the cleavage of PARP, which is a hallmark of apoptosis. The early apoptotic percentages of A2780 cells exposed to 20 and 40 μM SH-6 were 35.39 and 41.76, respectively. Also, SH-6 caused the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), especially p38, and the increase of truncated p15/BID. These results in the present study suggest that the apoptosis of A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells by SH-6 is mediated by the MAPK p38 and a caspase-8-dependent BID cleavage pathway.

  11. Combining RNA interference and kinase inhibitors against cell signalling components involved in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanson Bonnie J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1 has been implicated in a large variety of biological processes including oncogenic transformation. The tyrosine kinases of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR constitute the beginning of one signal transduction cascade leading to AP-1 activation and are known to control cell proliferation and differentiation. Drug discovery efforts targeting this receptor and other pathway components have centred on monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors. Resistance to such inhibitors has already been observed, guiding the prediction of their use in combination therapies with other targeted agents such as RNA interference (RNAi. This study examines the use of RNAi and kinase inhibitors for qualification of components involved in the EGFR/AP-1 pathway of ME180 cells, and their inhibitory effects when evaluated individually or in tandem against multiple components of this important disease-related pathway. Methods AP-1 activation was assessed using an ME180 cell line stably transfected with a beta-lactamase reporter gene under the control of AP-1 response element following epidermal growth factor (EGF stimulation. Immunocytochemistry allowed for further quantification of small molecule inhibition on a cellular protein level. RNAi and RT-qPCR experiments were performed to assess the amount of knockdown on an mRNA level, and immunocytochemistry was used to reveal cellular protein levels for the targeted pathway components. Results Increased potency of kinase inhibitors was shown by combining RNAi directed towards EGFR and small molecule inhibitors acting at proximal or distal points in the pathway. After cellular stimulation with EGF and analysis at the level of AP-1 activation using a β-lactamase reporter gene, a 10–12 fold shift or 2.5–3 fold shift toward greater potency in the IC50 was observed for EGFR and MEK-1 inhibitors, respectively, in the presence of RNAi

  12. Materials and Components for Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells – an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Radhika, D; A. S. Nesaraj

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the recent advancements made in the area of materials and components for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LT-SOFCs). LT-SOFC is a new trend in SOFCtechnology since high temperature SOFC puts very high demands on the materials and too expensive to match marketability. The current status of the electrolyte and electrode materials used in SOFCs, their specific features and the need for utilizing them for LT-SOFC are presented precisely in this review article. The s...

  13. Effect of malaria components on blood mononuclear cells involved in immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuchard Punsawad

    2013-01-01

    During malaria infection, elevated levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and nitric oxide production have been associated with pathogenesis and disease severity. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have proposed that both Plasmodium falciparum hemozoin and glycosylphosphatidylinositols are able to modulate blood mononuclear cells, contributing to stimulation of signal transduction and downstream regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and subsequently leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and nitric oxide. The present review summarizes the published in vitro and in vivo studies that have investigated the mechanism of intracellular signal transduction and activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway in blood mononuclear cells after being inducted by Plasmodium falciparum malaria components. Particular attention is paid to hemozoin and glycosylphosphatidylinositols which reflect the important mechanism of signaling pathways involved in immune response.

  14. Structural components of the nuclear body in nuclei of Allium cepa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear bodies have long been noted in interphase nuclei of plant cells,but their structural component,origin and function are still unclear by now.The present work showed in onion cells the nuclear bodies appeared as a spherical structure about 0.3 to 0.8 μm in diameter.They possibly were formed in nucleolus and subsequently released,and entered into nucleoplasm.Observation through cytochemical staining method at the ultrastructural level confirmed that nuclear bodies consisted of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) and silver-stainable proteins.Immunocytochemical results revealed that nuclear bodies contained no DNA and ribosomal gene transcription factor (UBF).Based on these data,we suggested that nuclear bodies are not related to the ribosome or other gene transcription activities,instead they may act as subnuclear structures for RNPs transport from nucleolus to cytoplasm,and may also be involved in splicing of pre-mRNAs.

  15. PCA 4 DCA: The Application Of Principal Component Analysis To The Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Feng; Oates, Robert; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    As one of the newest members in the ?field of arti?cial immune systems (AIS), the Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA) is based on behavioural models of natural dendritic cells (DCs). Unlike other AIS, the DCA does not rely on training data, instead domain or expert knowledge is required to predetermine the mapping between input signals from a particular instance to the three categories used by the DCA. This data preprocessing phase has received the criticism of having manually over-?tted the data to the algorithm, which is undesirable. Therefore, in this paper we have attempted to ascertain if it is possible to use principal component analysis (PCA) techniques to automatically categorise input data while still generating useful and accurate classication results. The integrated system is tested with a biometrics dataset for the stress recognition of automobile drivers. The experimental results have shown the application of PCA to the DCA for the purpose of automated data preprocessing is successful.

  16. Scorpion venom component III inhibits cell proliferation by modulating NF-κB activation in human leukemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    SONG, XIANGFENG; ZHANG, GUOJUN; SUN, AIPING; GUO, JIQIANG; TIAN, ZHONGWEI; WANG, HUI; LIU, YUFENG

    2012-01-01

    Scorpion venom contains various groups of compounds that exhibit anticancer activity against a variety of malignancies through a poorly understood mechanism. While the aberrant activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) has been linked with hematopoietic malignancies, we hypothesized that scorpion venom mediates its effects by modulating the NF-κB signaling pathway. In the present study, we examined the effects of scorpion venom component III (SVCIII) on the human leukemia cell lines THP-1 and Jurkat and focused on the NF-κB signaling pathway. Our results showed that SVCIII inhibited cell proliferation, caused cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and inhibited the expression of cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 in a dose-dependent manner in THP-1 and Jurkat cells. SVCIII also suppressed the constitutive NF-κB activation through inhibition of the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. NF-κB luciferase reporter activity was also inhibited by SVCIII. Our data suggest that SVCIII, a natural compound, may exert its antiproliferative effects by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and, thus, has potential use in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies, alone or in combination with other agents. PMID:23060939

  17. DNA Methyltransferase Expression and Proliferation Status of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Line After Prolonged and Repeated Rapamycin and Melatonin Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Gökmen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Rapamycin and Melatonin and their combination on deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA methylation and cell proliferation in a estrogen receptor (ER-negative breast cancer cell line (4T1 cell line. Materials and Methods: Four groups were designed with 4T1 cell line depending on drug combination (control, Rapamycin, Melatonin, Rapamycin + Melatonin and their administration on different time periods (24, 48 and 72 hours. The drugs were administrated for 1, 2 and 3 times, respectively for these time periods. All samples were counted; immunostained (Ki67, DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT-1, DNA methyltransferase-3a (DNMT-3a and p53 and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR (DNMT-1 and DNMT-3a was performed. Results: The live/dead cell ratios were decreased in the Rapamycin and Rapamycin + Melatonin applied groups. Ki67 immunostaining showed that there was a decreased proliferation in the drug applied groups at 48th hours compared to the 24th hours. Also DNMT-1 expressions were decreased at 72th hour compared to that at 24th hour in all groups, especially in the Rapamycin administrated group. Adversely, DNMT-3a expression was increased at 72th hour compared to that at 24th hour in the groups, especially in the Rapamycin administrated group. Furthermore, an increased expression of p53 was seen in the drug given groups (highest in the Rapamycin applied group when the time prolonged. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of DNMT-1 gene expression showed a decreased expression level in the Melatonin given group compared to the control group and an increased expression level was seen in the Rapamycin and Rapamycin + Melatonin administrated groups compared to the control group. Conclusion: As a result, it was found that Rapamycin is more effective in metastatic breast cancer cells than Melatonin, both in the manner of cell viability and expressional changes of Ki67, DNMT-1, DNMT-3a and p53.

  18. Signal peptide cleavage is essential for surface expression of a regulatory T cell surface protein, leucine rich repeat containing 32 (LRRC32

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    Sugiyama Hideaki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs have been implicated in certain cancers. Depletion of Tregs has been shown to increase anti-tumor immunity. Tregs also play a critical role in the suppression of autoimmune responses. The study of Tregs has been hampered by a lack of adequate surface markers. Leucine Rich Repeat Containing 32 (LRRC32, also known as Glycoprotein A Repetitions Predominant (GARP, has been postulated as a novel surface marker of activated Tregs. However, there is limited information regarding the processing of LRRC32 or the regulatory phenotype and functional activity of Tregs expressing LRRC32. Results Using naturally-occurring freshly isolated Tregs, we demonstrate that low levels of LRRC32 are present intracellularly prior to activation and that freshly isolated LRRC32+ Tregs are distinct from LRRC32- Tregs with respect to the expression of surface CD62L. Using LRRC32 transfectants of HEK cells, we demonstrate that the N-terminus of LRRC32 is cleaved prior to expression of the protein at the cell surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate using a construct containing a deleted putative signal peptide region that the presence of a signal peptide region is critical to cell surface expression of LRRC32. Finally, mixed lymphocyte assays demonstrate that LRRC32+ Tregs are more potent suppressors than LRRC32- Tregs. Conclusions A cleaved signal peptide site in LRRC32 is necessary for surface localization of native LRRC32 following activation of naturally-occurring freshly-isolated regulatory T cells. LRRC32 expression appears to alter the surface expression of activation markers of T cells such as CD62L. LRRC32 surface expression may be useful as a marker that selects for more potent Treg populations. In summary, understanding the processing and expression of LRRC32 may provide insight into the mechanism of action of Tregs and the refinement of immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at targeting these cells.

  19. A proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP) variant is uniquely expressed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikaelsson, Eva; Österborg, Anders; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Kokhaei, Parviz; Ostadkarampour, Mahyar; Hadavi, Reza; Gholamin, Mehran; Akhondi, Mehdi; Shokri, Fazel; Rabbani, Hodjattallah; Mellstedt, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP) belongs to the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family, normally expressed in extracellular matrix of collagen-rich tissues. We have previously reported on another SLRP, fibromodulin (FMOD) in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). PRELP is structurally similar to FMOD with adjacent localization on chromosome 1 (1q32.1). As cluster-upregulation of genes may occur in malignancies, the aim of our study was to analyze PRELP expression in CLL. PRELP was expressed (RT-PCR) in all CLL patients (30/30), as well as in some patients with mantle cell lymphoma (3/5), but not in healthy donor leukocytes (0/20) or tumor samples from other hematological malignancies (0/35). PRELP was also detected in CLL cell-lines (4/4) but not in cell-lines from other hematological tumors (0/9). PRELP protein was detected in all CLL samples but not in normal leukocytes. Deglycosylation experiments revealed a CLL-unique 38 kDa core protein, with an intact signal peptide. This 38 kDa protein was, in contrast to the normal 55 kDa size, not detected in serum which, in combination with the uncleaved signal peptide, suggests cellular retention. The unique expression of a 38 kDa PRELP in CLL cells may suggest involvement in the pathobiology of CLL and merits further studies. PMID:23826326

  20. A proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP variant is uniquely expressed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Mikaelsson

    Full Text Available Proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP belongs to the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP family, normally expressed in extracellular matrix of collagen-rich tissues. We have previously reported on another SLRP, fibromodulin (FMOD in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. PRELP is structurally similar to FMOD with adjacent localization on chromosome 1 (1q32.1. As cluster-upregulation of genes may occur in malignancies, the aim of our study was to analyze PRELP expression in CLL. PRELP was expressed (RT-PCR in all CLL patients (30/30, as well as in some patients with mantle cell lymphoma (3/5, but not in healthy donor leukocytes (0/20 or tumor samples from other hematological malignancies (0/35. PRELP was also detected in CLL cell-lines (4/4 but not in cell-lines from other hematological tumors (0/9. PRELP protein was detected in all CLL samples but not in normal leukocytes. Deglycosylation experiments revealed a CLL-unique 38 kDa core protein, with an intact signal peptide. This 38 kDa protein was, in contrast to the normal 55 kDa size, not detected in serum which, in combination with the uncleaved signal peptide, suggests cellular retention. The unique expression of a 38 kDa PRELP in CLL cells may suggest involvement in the pathobiology of CLL and merits further studies.

  1. Internalization of components of the host cell plasma membrane during infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho TMU

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi attach to the macrophage surface and are internalized with the formation of a membrane bounded vacuole, known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV. In order to determine if components of the host cell membrane are internalized during formation of the PV we labeled the macrophage surface with fluorescent probes for proteins, lipids and sialic acid residues and then allowed the labeled cells to interact with the parasites. The interaction process was interrupted after 1 hr at 37ºC and the distribution of the probes analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. During attachment of the parasites to the macrophage surface an intense labeling of the attachment regions was observed. Subsequently labeling of the membrane lining the parasitophorous vacuole containing epimastigote and trypomastigote forms was seen. Labeling was not uniform, with regions of intense and light or no labeling. The results obtained show that host cell membrane lipids, proteins and sialoglycoconjugates contribute to the formation of the membrane lining the PV containing epimastigote and trypomastigote T. cruzi forms. Lysosomes of the host cell may participate in the process of PV membrane formation.

  2. Extension of the concept of an anomalous water component to images of T-cell organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tychinsky, Vladimir P.

    2014-12-01

    Microscopic images of a living cell are the main source of information on its functional state. Modern interference microscopy techniques allow the numerical parameters of cell images to be obtained with an accuracy not available with other methods. Quantitative analysis of phase images of T lymphocytes (TCs) in different functional states demonstrated that variations of the properties of intracellular water should be taken into account. This conclusion agrees with the current view that the physical parameters of water, including the refractive index (RI) of a water layer, depend on the hydrophilicity and other characteristics of the adjacent surface. Application of this concept to phase images of TCs showed that the contribution of the fourth phase of water (4-water) or the structured water component, which has an increased RI, should be considered. The proportion of 4-water depends on the functional state of the cell determined by the culture medium composition. Normally, the proportion of 4-water in organelles is as high as 30% it is considerably lower in organelles of cells with inhibited metabolism.

  3. Extracellular components implicated in the stationary organization of the actin cytoskeleton in mesophyll cells of Vallisneria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J H; Mizuno, K; Takagi, S; Nagai, R

    1997-04-01

    In mesophyll cells of Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, an aquatic angiosperm, the association of the plasma membrane with the cell wall at the end wall has been reported to be indispensable for the mechanism that maintains the stationary organization of the bundles of microfilaments (MFs) [Masuda et al. (1991) Protoplasma 162: 151]. To identify putative extracellular components that might play a crucial role in this mechanism, we examined the effects of two exogenously applied synthetic hexapeptides, GRGDSP and ARYDEI, which include an RGD and an RYD motif, respectively. The RGD motif is known as a recognition site in molecules required for adhesion to the substratum at sites of focal contacts. Within 24 h, both peptides (at concentrations of 1-15 mM) induced extremely abnormal patterns of cytoplasmic streaming, as well as the striking disruption of the arrangement of bundles of MFs. GRGESP and ARYEEI peptides, used as controls, had no detectable effects. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that polyclonal antibodies against the ARYDEI peptide bound to the cell walls of mesophyll cells while a preimmune serum did not. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that the antibodies recognized polypeptides of 54 kDa and 27 kDa in an extract of total proteins from the leaves of Vallisneria. The results suggest that some extracellular proteins(s), with a conserved RGD or RYD motif in its amino acid sequence, might be involved in the maintenance of the stationary organization of the bundles of MFs. PMID:9177028

  4. Cell envelope components influencing filament length in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnat, Mireia; Schleiff, Enrico; Flores, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as chains of cells (known as trichomes or filaments) that can be hundreds of cells long. The filament consists of individual cells surrounded by a cytoplasmic membrane and peptidoglycan layers. The cells, however, share a continuous outer membrane, and septal proteins, such as SepJ, are important for cell-cell contact and filament formation. Here, we addressed a possible role of cell envelope components in filamentation, the process of producing and maintaining filaments, in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. We studied filament length and the response of the filaments to mechanical fragmentation in a number of strains with mutations in genes encoding cell envelope components. Previously published peptidoglycan- and outer membrane-related gene mutants and strains with mutations in two genes (all5045 and alr0718) encoding class B penicillin-binding proteins isolated in this work were used. Our results show that filament length is affected in most cell envelope mutants, but the filaments of alr5045 and alr2270 gene mutants were particularly fragmented. All5045 is a dd-transpeptidase involved in peptidoglycan elongation during cell growth, and Alr2270 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of lipid A, a key component of lipopolysaccharide. These results indicate that both components of the cell envelope, the murein sacculus and the outer membrane, influence filamentation. As deduced from the filament fragmentation phenotypes of their mutants, however, none of these elements is as important for filamentation as the septal protein SepJ.

  5. Isomaltulose production using free cells: optimisation of a culture medium containing agricultural wastes and conversion in repeated-batch processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguti, Haroldo Y; Buzzato, Michele F; Sato, Hélia H

    2007-04-01

    The enzyme glucosyltransferase is an industrially important enzyme since it produces non-cariogenic isomaltulose (6-O-alpha-D-glucopyronosyl-1-6-D-fructofuranose) from sucrose by intramolecular transglucosylation. The experimental designs and response surface methodology (RSM) were applied for the optimisation of the nutrient concentrations in the culture medium for the production of glucosyltransferase by Erwinia sp. D12 in shaken flasks at 200 rpm and 30 degrees C. A statistical analysis of the results showed that, in the range studied, the factors had a significant effect (P sugar cane molasses (150 g l(-1)), corn steep liquor (20 g l(-1)), yeast extract Prodex Lac SD (15 g l(-1)) and K2HPO4 (0.5 g l(-1)) after 8 h at 30 degrees C. The production of cell biomass by the strain of Erwinia sp. D12 was carried out in a 6.6-l fermenter with a mixing rate of 200 rpm and an aeration rate of 1 vvm. Fermentation time, cellular growth, medium pH and glucosyltransferase production were observed. The greatest glucosyltransferase activity was 22.49 U/ml, obtained after 8 h of fermentation. The isomaltulose production from sucrose was performed using free Erwinia sp. D12 cells in a batch process using an orbital shaker. The influence of the parameters sucrose concentration, temperature, pH, and cell concentration on the conversion of sucrose into isomaltulose was studied. The free cells showed a high conversion rate of sucrose into isomaltulose using batch fermentation, obtaining an isomaltulose yield of 72.11% from sucrose solution 35% at 35 degrees C. PMID:17186209

  6. Melanin is an essential component for the integrity of the cell wall of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeault Sonia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common agent of invasive aspergillosis, a feared complication in severely immunocompromised patients. Despite the recent commercialisation of new antifungal drugs, the prognosis for this infection remains uncertain. Thus, there is a real need to discover new targets for therapy. Particular attention has been paid to the biochemical composition and organisation of the fungal cell wall, because it mediates the host-fungus interplay. Conidia, which are responsible for infections, have melanin as one of the cell wall components. Melanin has been established as an important virulence factor, protecting the fungus against the host's immune defences. We suggested that it might also have an indirect role in virulence, because it is required for correct assembly of the cell wall layers of the conidia. Results We used three A. fumigatus isolates which grew as white or brown powdery colonies, to demonstrate the role of melanin. Firstly, sequencing the genes responsible for biosynthesis of melanin (ALB1, AYG1, ARP1, ARP2, ABR1 and ABR2 showed point mutations (missense mutation, deletion or insertion in the ALB1 gene for pigmentless isolates or in ARP2 for the brownish isolate. The isolates were then shown by scanning electron microscopy to produce numerous, typical conidial heads, except that the conidia were smooth-walled, as previously observed for laboratory mutants with mutations in the PKSP/ALB1 gene. Flow cytometry showed an increase in the fibronectin binding capacity of conidia from mutant isolates, together with a marked decrease in the binding of laminin to the conidial surface. A marked decrease in the electronegative charge of the conidia and cell surface hydrophobicity was also seen by microelectrophoresis and two-phase partitioning, respectively. Ultrastructural studies of mutant isolates detected considerable changes in the organisation of the conidial wall, with the loss of the outermost

  7. Down-regulation of Leucine-rich Repeats and Immunoglobulin-like Domain Proteins (LRIG1-3) in HP75 Pituitary Adenoma Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Dongsheng; HAN Lin; SHU Kai; CHEN Jian; LEI Ting

    2007-01-01

    Three human leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains (LRIG) genes and proteins, named LRIG1-3, has been previously characterized and it was proposed that they may act as suppressors of tumor growth. The LRIG1 protein can inhibit the growth of tumors of glial cells and the down-regulation of the LRIG1 gene may be involved in the development and progression of the tumor. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a recently developed technique for quantitative assessment of specific RNA levels. In the current study, it was demonstrated that LRIG1-3 and EGFR mRNA was detected in human pituitary adenoma cell lines and a normal pituitary sample, with differences in the expression levels. Compared to the normal pituitary samples, the expression of LRIG1-3 in HP75 cell line was lower, but the expression of EGFR in HP75 cell line was higher. The results are consistent with LRIG1-3 being tumour suppressor genes, and LRIG genes decreasing the expression of EGFR. The ratio of EGFR/LRIG1 was increased at least 13-fold in HP75 cells compared with the normal pituitary cells, which was also the case for the ratio of EGFR/LRIG2 (14-fold increase in HP75) and EGFR/LRIG3 (11-fold increase in HP75). Further studies were needed to elucidate the explicit role of LRIG genes as negative regulators of oncogenesis in human pituitary adenoma.

  8. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  9. Disruption of human papillomavirus 16 E6 gene by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas system in human cervical cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lan Yu, Xiaoli Wang, Da Zhu, Wencheng Ding, Liming Wang, Changlin Zhang, Xiaohui Jiang, Hui Shen, Shujie Liao, Ding Ma, Zheng Hu, Hui Wang Cancer Biology Research Center, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China Abstract: High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV, especially HPV16, is considered a main causative agent of cervical cancer. Upon HPV infection, the viral oncoprotein E6 disrupts the host tumor-suppressor protein p53, thus promoting malignant transformation of normal cervical cells. Here, we used the newly developed programmable ribonucleic acid-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas system to disrupt the HPV16 E6 gene. We showed that HPV16 E6 deoxyribonucleic acid was cleaved at specific sites, leading to apoptosis and growth inhibition of HPV16-positive SiHa and CaSki cells, but not HPV-negative C33A or human embryonic kidney 293 cells. We also observed downregulation of the E6 protein and restoration of the p53 protein. These data proved that the HPV16 E6 ribonucleic acid-guided CRISPR/Cas system might be an effective therapeutic agent in treating HPV infection-related cervical malignancy. Keywords: CRISPR/Cas system, E6, p53, SiHa, CaSki, cervical cancer

  10. Cell and Signal Components of the Microenvironment of Bone Metastasis Are Affected by Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendinelli, Paola; Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastatic cells release bone microenvironment proteins, such as the matricellular protein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine), and share a cell signaling typical of the bone metabolism controlled by Runx2. The megakaryocytes in the bone marrow engrafted by the metastases seem to be one of the principal microenvironment sources of the biological stimuli, implicated in the formation of an osteoblastic niche, and affecting metastasis phenotype and colonization. Educated platelets in the circulation might derive from megakaryocytes in bone metastasis. The evaluation of predictive markers in the circulating platelets might be useful for the stratification of patients for therapeutic purposes. The hypoxic environment in bone metastasis is one of the key regulators of the network of the biological soluble and structural components of the matrix. In bone metastatic cells under hypoxia, similar patterns of Runx2 and SPARC are observed, both showing downregulation. Conversely, hypoxia induces Endothelin 1, which upregulates SPARC, and these biological stimuli may be considered prognostic markers of bone metastasis in breast carcinoma patients. PMID:27187355

  11. Cell and Signal Components of the Microenvironment of Bone Metastasis Are Affected by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Bendinelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastatic cells release bone microenvironment proteins, such as the matricellular protein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, and share a cell signaling typical of the bone metabolism controlled by Runx2. The megakaryocytes in the bone marrow engrafted by the metastases seem to be one of the principal microenvironment sources of the biological stimuli, implicated in the formation of an osteoblastic niche, and affecting metastasis phenotype and colonization. Educated platelets in the circulation might derive from megakaryocytes in bone metastasis. The evaluation of predictive markers in the circulating platelets might be useful for the stratification of patients for therapeutic purposes. The hypoxic environment in bone metastasis is one of the key regulators of the network of the biological soluble and structural components of the matrix. In bone metastatic cells under hypoxia, similar patterns of Runx2 and SPARC are observed, both showing downregulation. Conversely, hypoxia induces Endothelin 1, which upregulates SPARC, and these biological stimuli may be considered prognostic markers of bone metastasis in breast carcinoma patients.

  12. Connected components labeling for giga-cell multi-categorical rasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzel, Pawel; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    2013-09-01

    Labeling of connected components in an image or a raster of non-imagery data is a fundamental operation in fields of pattern recognition and machine intelligence. The bulk of effort devoted to designing efficient connected components labeling (CCL) algorithms concentrated on the domain of binary images where labeling is required for a computer to recognize objects. In contrast, in the Geographical Information Science (GIS) a CCL algorithm is mostly applied to multi-categorical rasters in order to either convert a raster to a shapefile, or for statistical characterization of individual clumps. Recently, it has become necessary to label connected components in very large, giga-cell size, multi-categorical rasters but performance of existing CCL algorithms lacks sufficient speed to accomplish such task. In this paper we present a modification to the popular two-scan CCL algorithm that enables labeling of giga-cell size, multi-categorical rasters. Our approach is to apply a divide-and-conquer technique coupled with parallel processing to a standard two-scan algorithm. For specificity, we have developed a variant of a standard CCL algorithm implemented as r.clump in GRASS GIS. We have established optimal values of data blocks (stemming from the divide-and-conquer technique) and optimal number of computational threads (stemming from parallel processing) for a new algorithm called r.clump3p. The performance of the new algorithm was tested on a series of rasters up to 160 Mcells in size; for largest size test raster a speed up over the original algorithm is 74 times. Finally, we have applied the new algorithm to the National Land Cover Dataset 2006 raster with 1.6×1010 cells. Labeling this raster took 39 h using two-processors, 16 cores computer and resulted in 221,718,501 clumps. Estimated speed up over the original algorithm is 450 times. The r.clump3p works within the GRASS environment and is available in the public domain.

  13. Parotid gland carcinosarcoma with follicular dendritic cell sarcoma as mesenchymal component: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qiang; ZHU Jian-shan; XU Yan-ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ The WHO has classified malignant mixed tumours of salivary glands into noninvasive carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma, invasive carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma, carcino-sarcoma and metastasizing mixed tumour.1 Carcinosarcoma, or true malignant mixed tumour, is a tumour composed of both carcinomatous and sarcomatous elements. It is an exceedingly rare tumour of the salivary glands and only about 60 cases have been reported.2 In this report we describe a case of carcinosarcoma of a parotid gland that contained an unusual mesenchymal component (follicular dendritic cell sarcoma, FDCS) in a 55-year-old man with cytological, histological and immunohistochemical findings. To our knowledge, this histological pattern has not been reported previously in the English literature.

  14. Materials and Components for Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells – an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Radhika

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the recent advancements made in the area of materials and components for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LT-SOFCs. LT-SOFC is a new trend in SOFCtechnology since high temperature SOFC puts very high demands on the materials and too expensive to match marketability. The current status of the electrolyte and electrode materials used in SOFCs, their specific features and the need for utilizing them for LT-SOFC are presented precisely in this review article. The section on electrolytes gives an overview of zirconia, lanthanum gallate and ceria based materials. Also, this review article explains the application of different anode, cathode and interconnect materials used for SOFC systems. SOFC can result in better performance with the application of liquid fuels such methanol and ethanol. As a whole, this review article discusses the novel materials suitable for operation of SOFC systems especially for low temperature operation.

  15. Prognostic significance of telomeric repeat length alterations in pathological stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, T; Komiya, T; Nitta, T; Takada, Y; Kobayashi, M; Masuda, N; Matui, K; Takada, M; Kikui, M; Yasumitu, T; Ohno, A; Nakagawa, K; Fukuoka, M; Kawase, I

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the prognostic significance of alteration in telomere length in pathological stage (p-stage) I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Paired cancer and normal lung tissues were obtained from 72 patients with histologically confirmed p-stage I-IIIA NSCLC. Terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length, which indicates telomere length, was measured by Southern blot analysis. Tumor telomerase activity was also assayed by non-radioactive PCR-ELISA in 55 patients. TRF length (mean +/- SD) in normal tissue was 6.2 +/- 1.1 Kb. Therefore, upper and lower limits of normal range in TRF length was set at 8.4 (mean + 2SD) Kb and 4.0 (mean-2SD) Kb, respectively. A tumor showing TRF length over normal range was defined as positive for the alteration. In 72 patients, 25 (34.7%) with alteration in TRF length had significantly shorter survival durations than those of the others. Telomerase activity did not correlate with survival duration. In multivariate analysis, alteration in TRF length (P = 0.0033) was second to p-stage (P = 0.0004) in importance among the various parameters.

  16. Divisome and segrosome components of Deinococcus radiodurans interact through cell division regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Ganesh K; Modi, Kruti; Misra, Hari S

    2016-08-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes many of the known components of divisome as well as four sets of genome partitioning proteins, ParA and ParB on its multipartite genome. Interdependent regulation of cell division and genome segregation is not understood. In vivo interactions of D. radiodurans' sdivisome, segrosome and other cell division regulatory proteins expressed on multicopy plasmids were studied in Escherichia coli using a bacterial two-hybrid system and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation with the proteins made in E. coli. Many of these showed interactions both with the self and with other proteins. For example, DrFtsA, DrFtsZ, DrMinD, DrMinC, DrDivIVA and all four ParB proteins individually formed at least homodimers, while DrFtsA interacted with DrFtsZ, DrFtsW, DrFtsE, DrFtsK and DrMinD. DrMinD also showed interaction with DrFtsW, DrFtsE and DrMinC. Interestingly, septum site determining protein, DrDivIVA showed interactions with secondary genome ParAs as well as ParB1, ParB3 and ParB4 while DrMinC interacted with ParB1 and ParB3. PprA, a pleiotropic protein recently implicated in cell division regulation, neither interacted with divisome proteins nor ParBs but interacted at different levels with all four ParAs. These results suggest the formation of independent multiprotein complexes of 'DrFts' proteins, segrosome proteins and cell division regulatory proteins, and these complexes could interact with each other through DrMinC and DrDivIVA, and PprA in D. radiodurans.

  17. Membrane secretory component is cleaved on the cell surface of rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musil, L.S.; Baenziger, J.U.

    1986-03-05

    Transcellular transport of polymeric IgA from serum to bile by rat hepatocytes is mediated by a 105Kd membranous form of secretory component (mSC). In the presence or absence of IgA, mSC is cleaved and released into bile as a soluble 80Kd protein (fSC). They used monolayer cultures of rat hepatocytes, which synthesize mSC and efficiently cleave it to fSC, to determine the site of this conversion. (/sup 35/S)Cys-mSC accumulated in hepatocytes in the presence of leupeptin and was released as fSC when hepatocytes were placed in leupeptin-free media at 37/sup 0/. Small amounts of fSC were also produced when leupeptin was removed at 4/sup 0/, suggesting cleavage might occur on the cell membrane. Lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination of hepatocytes at 4/sup 0/ selectively labeled surface mSC which remained trypsin sensitive at 4/sup 0/. Hepatocytes maintained at 4/sup 0/ released significant amounts of /sup 125/I-mSC as fSC. Anti-SC antiserum reduced fSC generation at 4/sup 0/ by 70%. Following incubation at 37/sup 0/ for 10 min, /sup 125/I-mSC became resistant to degradation by trypsin and no production of fSC was seen if the cells were returned to 4/sup 0/. /sup 125/I-mSC was also cleaved to fSC following disruption by Dounce homogenization if cells were maintained at 4/sup 0/ following iodination but not if they were incubated at 37/sup 0/ for 10 min. They propose that mSC is cleaved to fSC at the plasma membrane but not intracellularly. This may reflect localization of the protease at the cell surface in a bile canalicular-like domain.

  18. [Rapidly labelled low molecular weight components in nucleic acid preparations from plant cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, G; Grotha, R

    1974-09-01

    After pulse-labelling with [(3)H]nucleosides and [(3)H]orotic acid of freely suspended callus cells of Petroselinum sativum and tissue fragments of the liverwort Riella helicophylla, rapidly labelled low molecular weight components were detected among the total nucleic acids when these were extracted in the presence of Mg(2+) and finally precipitated with alcohol. These highly labelled species could clearly be distinguished from the 5 S- and 4 S-RNA on the basis of their migration in agarose-polyacrylamide gels (2.4%) and their elution from Sephadex G-150 columns. No degradation was obtained with DNase and RNase. By using [(14)C]ATP as a marker it was found that the low molecular components consisted mainly of nucleoside triphosphates. Only small amounts of nucleoside diphosphates were detected, which were obviously formed by degradation of the former. Nucleic acid preparations free of nucleoside phosphates were obtained by using Mg-free extraction buffers containing EDTA. PMID:24458196

  19. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (ppancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  20. UafB is a serine-rich repeat adhesin of Staphylococcus saprophyticus that mediates binding to fibronectin, fibrinogen and human uroepithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Nathan P; Beatson, Scott A; Totsika, Makrina; Ulett, Glen C; Alm, Richard A; Manning, Paul A; Schembri, Mark A

    2011-04-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is an important cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among young women, and is second only to uropathogenic Escherichia coli as the most frequent cause of UTI. The molecular mechanisms of urinary tract colonization by S. saprophyticus remain poorly understood. We have identified a novel 6.84 kb plasmid-located adhesin-encoding gene in S. saprophyticus strain MS1146 which we have termed uro-adherence factor B (uafB). UafB is a glycosylated serine-rich repeat protein that is expressed on the surface of S. saprophyticus MS1146. UafB also functions as a major cell surface hydrophobicity factor. To characterize the role of UafB we generated an isogenic uafB mutant in S. saprophyticus MS1146 by interruption with a group II intron. The uafB mutant had a significantly reduced ability to bind to fibronectin and fibrinogen. Furthermore, we show that a recombinant protein containing the putative binding domain of UafB binds specifically to fibronectin and fibrinogen. UafB was not involved in adhesion in a mouse model of UTI; however, we observed a striking UafB-mediated adhesion phenotype to human uroepithelial cells. We have also identified genes homologous to uafB in other staphylococci which, like uafB, appear to be located on transposable elements. Thus, our data indicate that UafB is a novel adhesin of S. saprophyticus that contributes to cell surface hydrophobicity, mediates adhesion to fibronectin and fibrinogen, and exhibits tropism for human uroepithelial cells.

  1. Characterization of membrane occupation and recognition nexus repeat containing 3, meiosis expressed gene 1 binding partner, in mouse male germ cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Zhang; ZhiBing Zhang; XueJun Shang; HongFei Li; YuQin Shi; Wei Li; Maria E Teves; ZhiQiong Wang; GaoFeng Jiang; ShiZhen Song

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a well‑organized process of cell development and differentiation. Meiosis expressed gene 1 (MEIG1) plays an essential role in the regulation of spermiogenesis. To explore potential mechanisms of MEIG1’s action, a yeast two‑hybrid screen was conducted, and several potential binding partners were identified; one of them was membrane occupation and recognition nexus repeat containing 3 (MORN3). MORN3 mRNA is only abundant in mouse testis. In the testis, Morn3 mRNA is highly expressed in the spermiogenesis stage. Specific anti‑MORN3 polyclonal antibody was generated against N‑terminus of the full‑length MORN3 protein, and MORN3 expression and localization was examined in vitro and in vivo. In transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, the antibody specifically crossed‑reacted the full‑length MORN3 protein, and immunofluorescence staining revealed that MORN3 was localized throughout the cytoplasm. Among multiple mouse tissues, about 25 kDa protein, was identified only in the testis. The protein was highly expressed after day 20 of birth. Immunofluorescence staining on mixed testicular cells isolated from adult wild‑type mice demonstrated that MORN3 was expressed in the acrosome in germ cells throughout spermiogenesis. The protein was also present in the manchette of elongating spermatids. The total MORN3 expression and acrosome localization were not changed in the Meig 1‑deficient mice. However, its expression in manchette was dramatically reduced in the mutant mice. Our studies suggest that MORN3 is another regulator for spermatogenesis, probably together with MEIG1.

  2. Study of a distributed feedback diode laser based hygrometer combined Herriot-gas cell and waterless optical components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yubin; Chang, Jun; Lian, Jie; Wang, Qiang; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    A distributed feedback diode laser (DFB-DL) based hygrometer combined with a long-path-length Herriot gas cell and waterless optical components was proposed and investigated. The main function of this sensor was to simultaneously improve the measurement reliability and resolution. A comparison test between a 10-cm normal transmission-type gas cell and a 3-m Herriot gas cell was carried out to demonstrate the improvement. Reliability improvement was achieved by influence suppression of water vapor inside optical components (WVOC) through combined action of the Herriot gas cell and waterless optical components. The influence of WVOC was suppressed from 726 ppmv to 25 ppmv using the Herriot gas cell. Moreover, combined with waterless optical components, the influence of WVOC was further suppressed to no more than 4 ppmv. Resolution improvement from 11.7 ppmv to 0.32 ppmv was achieved mainly due to the application of the long-path-length Herriot gas cell. The results show that the proposed sensor has a good performance and considerable potential application in gas sensing, especially when probed gas possibly permeates into optical components.

  3. Lipid II: a central component in bacterial cell wall synthesis and a target for antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruijff, Ben; van Dam, Vincent; Breukink, Eefjan

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall is mainly composed of peptidoglycan, which is a three-dimensional network of long aminosugar strands located on the exterior of the cytoplasmic membrane. These strands consist of alternating MurNAc and GlcNAc units and are interlinked to each other via peptide moieties that are attached to the MurNAc residues. Peptidoglycan subunits are assembled on the cytoplasmic side of the bacterial membrane on a polyisoprenoid anchor and one of the key components in the synthesis of peptidoglycan is Lipid II. Being essential for bacterial cell survival, it forms an attractive target for antibacterial compounds such as vancomycin and several lantibiotics. Lipid II consists of one GlcNAc-MurNAc-pentapeptide subunit linked to a polyiosoprenoid anchor 11 subunits long via a pyrophosphate linker. This review focuses on this special molecule and addresses three questions. First, why are special lipid carriers as polyprenols used in the assembly of peptidoglycan? Secondly, how is Lipid II translocated across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane? And finally, how is Lipid II used as a receptor for lantibiotics to kill bacteria? PMID:19008088

  4. Engineering design of the IFMIF EVEDA reference test cell and key components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latest design updates of the IFMIF-EVEDA reference test cell (TC) are described with emphasis on the following key components: active cooling pipes for concrete biological shielding walls and stainless steel liner, TC gas leak tight boundary, and piping and cabling inside TC and between TC and the access cell (AC). Water cooling is adopted for concrete shielding walls and the liner. Buried pipes are selected for active cooling of the TC surrounding shielding walls; directly welded pipes on the liner are used to remove nuclear heat of the liner. Technical features and layout of the cooling pipes are preliminary defined. The TC vacuum boundary, which includes the TC liner, an independent TC cover plate, a rubber based sealing gasket, and welding seams between interface shielding plugs and TC liner, is described. Engineering design of the piping and cabling plugs as well as the arrangement of pipes and cables under the TC covering plate and the AC floor are updated. Pipes and cable tunnels inside the shielding plugs are arranged with several bends for minimizing neutron streaming from inside to outside of the TC. Pipes, cables, and the corresponding penetrations between the TC and the AC are carefully arranged for convenient access and maintenances

  5. Effect of interleukin-4 on the synthesis of the third component of complement by pulmonary epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Christian-Ritter, K. K.; Hill, L. D.; Hoie, E. B.; Zach, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    Complement activation in the lung is important in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions. The third component of complement, C3, is the pivotal constituent of the complement cascade. C3 is produced in the lung by several cell types including pulmonary epithelial cells. Because pulmonary epithelial cells and T lymphocytes may interact within the lung to regulate local immune responses, we examined the effect of a T lymphocyte-derived cytokine, interleukin-4 (IL-4) on C3 product...

  6. Identifying components of the hair-cell interactome involved in cochlear amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheatham MaryAnn

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although outer hair cells (OHCs play a key role in cochlear amplification, it is not fully understood how they amplify sound signals by more than 100 fold. Two competing or possibly complementary mechanisms, stereocilia-based and somatic electromotility-based amplification, have been considered. Lacking knowledge about the exceptionally rich protein networks in the OHC plasma membrane, as well as related protein-protein interactions, limits our understanding of cochlear function. Therefore, we focused on finding protein partners for two important membrane proteins: Cadherin 23 (cdh23 and prestin. Cdh23 is one of the tip-link proteins involved in transducer function, a key component of mechanoelectrical transduction and stereocilia-based amplification. Prestin is a basolateral membrane protein responsible for OHC somatic electromotility. Results Using the membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system to screen a newly built cDNA library made predominantly from OHCs, we identified two completely different groups of potential protein partners using prestin and cdh23 as bait. These include both membrane bound and cytoplasmic proteins with 12 being de novo gene products with unknown function(s. In addition, some of these genes are closely associated with deafness loci, implying a potentially important role in hearing. The most abundant prey for prestin (38% is composed of a group of proteins involved in electron transport, which may play a role in OHC survival. The most abundant group of cdh23 prey (55% contains calcium-binding domains. Since calcium performs an important role in hair cell mechanoelectrical transduction and amplification, understanding the interactions between cdh23 and calcium-binding proteins should increase our knowledge of hair cell function at the molecular level. Conclusion The results of this study shed light on some protein networks in cochlear hair cells. Not only was a group of de novo genes closely associated

  7. A spontaneously arising mutation in connexin32 with repeated passage of FRTL-5 cells coincides with increased growth rate and reduced thyroxine release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Tran, D. T.; Nelson, G. A.; Shah, M. M.; Luben, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    regions of the Cx32 molecule contain the sequences and epitopes to which probes and antibodies are directed, and as such alterations of these regions with repeated passage explains reports by others that FRTL-5 cells do not express Cx32, and implies that cultures used for these assessments were passed more than 15 times. To determine if genetic or epigenetic abnormalities existed in FRTL-5 cells we performed chromosome spreads from various passage cultures. FRTL-5 cells have been reported to be diploid and more recently non-diploid; however, we found them to be fully tetraploid. This tetraploidy appears to be unstable in that later passes are tetraploid plus two or three extra chromosomes. There were no obvious translocations, breaks or large-scale interstitial deletions of any chromosomes in the FRTL-5 cultures tested. As FRTL-5 cells were repeatedly passed their morphology changed. Monolayer areas spread from beneath the follicles, and the follicles became flattened in appearance. These physical changes were coincident with dramatically increased growth rates. Early cultures (passed 3-12 times) divided on average every 49+/-1 h, whereas later passes (passes 20-25) divided every 28+/-3 h. To correlate these changes with a measure of thyroid function we assayed T(4) output. Early passage follicular cultures incubated for 6 h with sodium iodide, released on average 5.27+/- 0.33 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. Later passes, or early passes treated with heptanol to down-regulate Cx32, released an average of 3.84+/-0.50 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. There was a 27% difference in T(4) release between early follicular cultures, that were coupled by Cx32, and late or down-regulated early follicular cultures, that were uncoupled (P<0.0001). Collectively, the physical changes documented in this study were coincident with the loss of functional Cx32. This implies a relationship between the loss of intercellular communication and changes in morphogenic appearance, growth rate and

  8. A spontaneously arising mutation in connexin32 with repeated passage of FRTL-5 cells coincides with increased growth rate and reduced thyroxine release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Tran, D. T.; Nelson, G. A.; Shah, M. M.; Luben, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    regions of the Cx32 molecule contain the sequences and epitopes to which probes and antibodies are directed, and as such alterations of these regions with repeated passage explains reports by others that FRTL-5 cells do not express Cx32, and implies that cultures used for these assessments were passed more than 15 times. To determine if genetic or epigenetic abnormalities existed in FRTL-5 cells we performed chromosome spreads from various passage cultures. FRTL-5 cells have been reported to be diploid and more recently non-diploid; however, we found them to be fully tetraploid. This tetraploidy appears to be unstable in that later passes are tetraploid plus two or three extra chromosomes. There were no obvious translocations, breaks or large-scale interstitial deletions of any chromosomes in the FRTL-5 cultures tested. As FRTL-5 cells were repeatedly passed their morphology changed. Monolayer areas spread from beneath the follicles, and the follicles became flattened in appearance. These physical changes were coincident with dramatically increased growth rates. Early cultures (passed 3-12 times) divided on average every 49+/-1 h, whereas later passes (passes 20-25) divided every 28+/-3 h. To correlate these changes with a measure of thyroid function we assayed T(4) output. Early passage follicular cultures incubated for 6 h with sodium iodide, released on average 5.27+/- 0.33 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. Later passes, or early passes treated with heptanol to down-regulate Cx32, released an average of 3.84+/-0.50 ng/ml of T(4)/100 follicles. There was a 27% difference in T(4) release between early follicular cultures, that were coupled by Cx32, and late or down-regulated early follicular cultures, that were uncoupled (Pstudy were coincident with the loss of functional Cx32. This implies a relationship between the loss of intercellular communication and changes in morphogenic appearance, growth rate and reduced thyroid function and supports the previously postulated, tumor

  9. SHh-Gli1 signaling pathway promotes cell survival by mediating baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 3 (BIRC3) gene in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Huizhong; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Li, Yueyue; Xu, Xiaorong; Xu, Xuanfu; Xu, Jianming

    2016-07-01

    The abnormally activated hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells, while its exact molecular mechanism is not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the regulatory effect of Hh signaling pathway on the transcription of BIRC3 gene and its underlying mechanism in pancreatic cancer cells, as well as the relationship between the Gli1-dependent BIRC3 transcription and cell survival. Firstly, we examined the effect of knockdown or overexpression of Hh on BIRC3 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by real-time RT-PCR. Then, the regulatory mechanism of Gli1 to BIRC3 gene transcription was investigated by XChIP-PCR and luciferase assays. Finally, the cell survival mediated by the Gli1-dependent BIRC3 transcription was studied by MTT and annexin V-FITC/propidiumiodide (PI) assays. We found that the expression level of BIRC3 mRNA was positively correlated to SHh/Gli1 signaling activation in three pancreatic cancer cell lines. The XChIP-PCR and luciferase assays data showed that the transcription factor Gli1 bound to some enhancers within the promoter regions of BIRC3 gene and promoted gene transcription. The cell proliferation was increased significantly by SHh/Gli1 expression while the apoptotic rate was reduced under the same condition. Moreover, BIRC3 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and survival induced by SHh overexpression. Our study reveals that Gli1 promoted transcription of BIRC3 gene via cis-acting elements and the SHh-Gli1 signaling pathway maintained cell survival partially through this Gli1-dependent BIRC3 model in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:26815504

  10. B cells exposed to enterobacterial components suppress development of experimental colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Larsen, Hjalte List; Kristensen, Nanna Ny;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: B cells positively contribute to immunity by antigen presentation to CD4(+) T cells, cytokine production, and differentiation into antibody secreting plasma cells. Accumulating evidence implies that B cells also possess immunoregulatory functions closely linked to their capability of ...

  11. Immunogenicity of Coxiella burnetii whole cells and their other membrane components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the phase I and phase II Coxiella burnetii whole cells (Cb I and Cb II) and their other membrane components (OMC), i.e. phase I trichloroacetic acid extract (TCAE), phase I 29 K protein (PRO), phase I and II lipopolysaccharides (LPS I, LPS II, polysaccharides (PS I, PS II), and lipid A (LA I, LA II), were compared. The highest immune response was observed in BALB/c mice by Cb I in both humoral immunity and lymphocyte transformation assays, and in the protective effect as well. The immune response was also significant by Cb II, but their protective capacity was low. The OMC reacted variously. Only TCAE and PRO gave a high value of humoral immunity evaluated by the serological methods. All OMC reacted in the hemolytic plaque assay giving different responses. Lymphoprolipheration of splenocytes was positive with all OMC using both Cb I and Cb II antigens with the exception of PS I and PS II in the case of Cb II antigen. The induction of protection against infectious Cb I was demonstrated after immunization with TCAE, PRO, and LPS I. Other OMC did not induce protection against this agent. (author)

  12. EXTRACTION OF COPPER FROM LEACH LIQUOR OF METALLIC COMPONENT IN DISCARDED CELL PHONE BY CYANEX® 272

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALAFARA A. BABA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Discarded cell phones contribute significantly to the amount of electronic waste generation whilst some of its components are toxic and recoverable. Also, due to the increasing demand for Cu(II in building/construction, electrical and as chemical tool in freshwater, it is imperative to develop low cost and ecofriendly technique as a substitute for the conventional treatments such as reduction-roasting route at elevated temperatures. In the present study, the hydrometallurgical operations involving leaching, solvent extraction and precipitation for the recovery of Cu(II by Cyanex® 272 in kerosene was examined. Various parameters affecting the extraction of Cu(II such as pH, extractant concentration and phase ratio were optimized. At optimal conditions, about 96.3 % Cu(II was extracted into the organic phase by 0.2 mol/L Cyanex® 272 at equilibrium pH 5.0 and aqueous to organic phase ratio 1:1. The stripping of the loaded organic was carried out by 0.1 mol/L HCl solution and stripping efficiency of 98 % was obtained. By McCabe Thiele diagram, four stages are required for complete extraction of Cu(II.

  13. Fabrication and electrochemical performance of solid oxide fuel cell components by atmospheric and suspension plasma spray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Wei-sheng; YANG Yun-zhen; ZHANG Hai-ou; WANG Gui-lan

    2009-01-01

    The theory of functionally graded material (FGM) was applied in the fabrication process of PEN (Positive- Electrolyte-Negative),the core component of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC).To enhance its electrochemical performance,the functionally graded PEN of planar SOFC was prepared by atmospheric plasma spray (APS).The cross-sectional SEM micrograph and element energy spectrum of the resultant PEN were analyzed.Its interface resistance was also compared with that without the graded layers to investigate the electrochemical performance enhanced by the functionally graded layers.Moreover,a new process,suspension plasma spray (SPS) was applied to preparing the SOFC electrolyte.Higher densification of the coating by SPS,1.61%,is observed,which is helpful to effectively improve its electrical conductivity.The grain size of the electrolyte coating fabricated by SPS is also smaller than that by APS,which is more favourable to obtain the dense electrolyte coatings.To sum up,all mentioned above can prove that the hybrid process of APS and SPS could be a better approach to fabricate the PEN of SOFC stacks,in which APS is for porous electrodes and SPS for dense electrolyte.

  14. Convergent synthesis of a tetrasaccharide repeating unit of the O-specific polysaccharide from the cell wall lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense strain Sp7

    OpenAIRE

    Pintu Kumar Mandal; Debashis Dhara; Anup Kumar Misra

    2014-01-01

    A straightforward convergent synthesis has been carried out for the tetrasaccharide repeating unit of the O-specific cell wall lipopolysaccharide of the strain Sp7 of Azospirillum brasilense. The target tetrasaccharide has been synthesized from suitably protected monosaccharide intermediates in 42% overall yield in seven steps by using a [2 + 2] block glycosylation approach.

  15. TMC1 and TMC2 are components of the mechanotransduction channel in hair cells of the mammalian inner ear

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Bifeng; Géléoc, Gwenaelle S.; Asai, Yukako; Horwitz, Geoffrey C.; Kurima, Kiyoto; Ishikawa, Kotaro; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Griffith, Andrew J; Holt, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Sensory transduction in auditory and vestibular hair cells requires expression of transmembrane channel-like (Tmc) 1 and 2 genes, but the function of these genes is unknown. To investigate the hypothesis that TMC1 and TMC2 proteins are components of the mechanosensitive ion channels that convert mechanical information into electrical signals, we recorded whole-cell and single-channel currents from mouse hair cells that expressed Tmc1, Tmc2 or mutant Tmc1. Cells that expressed mutant Tmc1 had ...

  16. Interaction of coal-derived synthesis gas impurities with solid oxide fuel cell metallic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Edwards, Danny J.; Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Cramer, Carolyn N.

    Oxidation-resistant alloys find use as interconnect materials, heat exchangers, and gas supply tubing in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems, especially when operated at temperatures below ∼800 °C. If fueled with synthesis gas derived from coal or biomass, such metallic components could be exposed to impurities contained in those fuel sources. In this study, coupons of ferritic stainless steels Crofer 22 APU and SS 441, austenitic nickel-chromium superalloy Inconel 600, and an alumina-forming high nickel alloy alumel were exposed to synthesis gas containing ≤2 ppm phosphorus, arsenic and antimony, and reaction products were tested. Crofer 22 APU coupons coated with a (Mn,Co) 3O 4 protective layer were also evaluated. Phosphorus was found to be the most reactive. On Crofer 22 APU, the (Mn,Cr) 3O 4 passivation layer reacted to form an Mn-P-O product, predicted to be manganese phosphate from thermochemical calculations, and Cr 2O 3. On SS 441, reaction of phosphorus with (Mn,Cr) 3O 4 led to the formation of manganese phosphate as well as an Fe-P product, predicted from thermochemical calculations to be Fe 3P. Minimal interactions with antimony or arsenic in synthesis gas were limited to Fe-Sb and Fe-As solid solution formation. Though not intended for use on the anode side, a (Mn,Co) 3O 4 spinel coating on Crofer 22 APU reacted with phosphorus in synthesis gas to produce products consistent with Mn 3(PO 4) 2 and Co 2P. A thin Cr 2O 3 passivation layer on Inconel 600 did not prevent the formation of nickel phosphides and arsenides and of iron phosphides and arsenides, though no reaction with Cr 2O 3 was apparent. On alumel, an Al 2O 3 passivation layer rich in Ni did not prevent the formation of nickel phosphides, arsenides, and antimonides, though no reaction with Al 2O 3 occurred. This work shows that unprotected metallic components of an SOFC stack and system can provide a sink for P, As and Sb impurities that may be present in fuel gases, and thus complicate

  17. Differential Regulation of Strand-Specific Transcripts from Arabidopsis Centromeric Satellite Repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres interact with the spindle apparatus to enable chromosome disjunction and typically contain thousands of tandemly arranged satellite repeats interspersed with retrotransposons. While their role has been obscure, centromeric repeats are epigenetically modified and centromere specification has a strong epigenetic component. In the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, long heterochromatic repeats are transcribed and contribute to centromere function via RNA interference (RNAi. In the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana, as in mammalian cells, centromeric satellite repeats are short (180 base pairs, are found in thousands of tandem copies, and are methylated. We have found transcripts from both strands of canonical, bulk Arabidopsis repeats. At least one subfamily of 180-base pair repeats is transcribed from only one strand and regulated by RNAi and histone modification. A second subfamily of repeats is also silenced, but silencing is lost on both strands in mutants in the CpG DNA methyltransferase MET1, the histone deacetylase HDA6/SIL1, or the chromatin remodeling ATPase DDM1. This regulation is due to transcription from Athila2 retrotransposons, which integrate in both orientations relative to the repeats, and differs between strains of Arabidopsis. Silencing lost in met1 or hda6 is reestablished in backcrosses to wild-type, but silencing lost in RNAi mutants and ddm1 is not. Twenty-four-nucleotide small interfering RNAs from centromeric repeats are retained in met1 and hda6, but not in ddm1, and may have a role in this epigenetic inheritance. Histone H3 lysine-9 dimethylation is associated with both classes of repeats. We propose roles for transcribed repeats in the epigenetic inheritance and evolution of centromeres.

  18. Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Skerker

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. These systems allow cells to adapt to prevailing conditions by modifying cellular physiology, including initiating programs of gene expression, catalyzing reactions, or modifying protein-protein interactions. These signaling pathways have also been demonstrated to play a role in coordinating bacterial cell cycle progression and development. Here we report a system-level investigation of two-component pathways in the model organism Caulobacter crescentus. First, by a comprehensive deletion analysis we show that at least 39 of the 106 two-component genes are required for cell cycle progression, growth, or morphogenesis. These include nine genes essential for growth or viability of the organism. We then use a systematic biochemical approach, called phosphotransfer profiling, to map the connectivity of histidine kinases and response regulators. Combining these genetic and biochemical approaches, we identify a new, highly conserved essential signaling pathway from the histidine kinase CenK to the response regulator CenR, which plays a critical role in controlling cell envelope biogenesis and structure. Depletion of either cenK or cenR leads to an unusual, severe blebbing of cell envelope material, whereas constitutive activation of the pathway compromises cell envelope integrity, resulting in cell lysis and death. We propose that the CenK-CenR pathway may be a suitable target for new antibiotic development, given previous successes in targeting the bacterial cell wall. Finally, the ability of our in vitro phosphotransfer profiling method to identify signaling pathways that operate in vivo takes advantage of an observation that histidine kinases are endowed with a global kinetic preference for their cognate response regulators. We propose that this

  19. Integration of deep transcriptome and proteome analyses reveals the components of alkaloid metabolism in opium poppy cell cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Schriemer David C; Khan Morgan F; Desgagné-Penix Isabel; Cram Dustin; Nowak Jacek; Facchini Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Papaver somniferum (opium poppy) is the source for several pharmaceutical benzylisoquinoline alkaloids including morphine, the codeine and sanguinarine. In response to treatment with a fungal elicitor, the biosynthesis and accumulation of sanguinarine is induced along with other plant defense responses in opium poppy cell cultures. The transcriptional induction of alkaloid metabolism in cultured cells provides an opportunity to identify components of this process via the i...

  20. An Interleaved Reduced-Component-Count Multivoltage Bus DC/DC Converter for Fuel Cell Powered Electric Vehicle Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Lixin [ORNL; Su, Gui-Jia [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    An interleaved reduced-component-count dc/dc converter is proposed for power management in fuel cell powered vehicles with a multivoltage electric net. The converter is based on a simplified topology and can handle more power with less ripple current, therefore reducing the capacitor requirements, making it more suited for fuel cell powered vehicles in the near future. A prototype rated at 4.3 kW was built and tested to verify the proposed topology.

  1. Inventory of telomerase components in human cells reveals multiple subpopulations of hTR and hTERT

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Linghe; Cech, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme that elongates telomeric DNA to compensate for the attrition occurring during each cycle of DNA replication. Knowing the levels of telomerase in continuously dividing cells is important for understanding how much telomerase is required for cell immortality. In this study, we measured the endogenous levels of the human telomerase RNP and its two key components, human telomerase RNA (hTR) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). We est...

  2. Water Stress Effect on Cell Wall Components of Maize (Zea mays Bran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleazar LUGO-CRUZ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In México, around 82% of the total production of maize is grown under rainfed conditions leading to a water stress environment which affects physiologic and biochemical process of the plant. Maize bran is a composited plant material consisting mainly in aleurone layer, testa and pericarp; the cell walls of these tissues are composed of proteins, non-starch polysaccharides, phenolic acids and lignin which are potential bioactive substances for human nutrition. In this research it was investigated the effect of water stress on cell wall components in the bran of three genotypes of maize by applying irrigation and water stress treatments. The content of protein, lignin, arabinoxylans, total phenols and phenolic acids was performed in the bran of ʽCebúʼ, ʽDK2027ʼ and ʽDK2034ʼ genotypes. Water stress applied through grain development stage increased protein levels of ʽCebúʼ, ʽDK2027ʼ and ʽDK2034ʼ in 4.05, 16.13 and 0.40% respectively. Respecting to lignin content, water stress increased levels at 1.28, 2.26 and 4.24% for ʽCebúʼ, ʽDK2027ʼ and ʽDK2034ʼ, respectively. Arabinoxylans content also increased in water stress treatment at levels of 1.28, 2.26 and 3.66% in ʽCebúʼ, ʽDK2027ʼ and ʽDK2034ʼ. On the other hand, water stress treatment decreased the levels of total phenols and hydroxycinnamic acids in the three maize hybrids analysed. Reduction of total phenols was 35.34, 5.59 and 31.57% for ʽCebúʼ, ʽDK2027ʼ and ʽDK2034ʼ, respectively. In addition, the levels of t-ferulic, c-ferulic and p-coumaric acids decreased 17.74, 23.93, 29.83% in ʽCebúʼ, 8.92, 8.62, 24.03% in ʽDK2027ʼ and 13.66, 11.03, 10.38% in ʽDK2034ʼ respectively.

  3. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  4. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  5. Effect of toxic components on microbial fuel cell-polarization curves and estimation of the type of toxic inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, N.E.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Straten, G. van; Keesman, K.J.

    2012-01-01

    Polarization curves are of paramount importance for the detection of toxic components in microbial fuel cell (MFC) based biosensors. In this study, polarization curves were made under non-toxic conditions and under toxic conditions after the addition of various concentrations of nickel, bentazon, so

  6. Expression patterns of cell cycle components in sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 1-related malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agesen, Trude Holmeide; Florenes, Viva Ann; Molenaar, Willemina M.; Lind, Guro E.; Berner, Jeane-Marie; Plaat, Boudewijn E.C.; Komdeur, Rudy; Myklebost, Ola; van den Berg, Eva; Lothe, Ragnhild A.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular biology underlying the development of highly malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) remains mostly unknown. In the present study, the expression pattern of 10 selected cell cycle components is investigated in a series of 15 MPNSTs from patients with (n = 9) or without (n = 5

  7. Impact of food components during in vitro digestion of silver nanoparticles on cellular uptake and cytotoxicity in intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Dajana; Ebmeyer, Johanna; Knappe, Patrick; Juling, Sabine; Böhmert, Linda; Selve, Sören; Niemann, Birgit; Braeuning, Albert; Thünemann, Andreas F; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-11-01

    Because of the rising application of nanoparticles in food and food-related products, we investigated the influence of the digestion process on the toxicity and cellular uptake of silver nanoparticles for intestinal cells. The main food components--carbohydrates, proteins and fatty acids--were implemented in an in vitro digestion process to simulate realistic conditions. Digested and undigested silver nanoparticle suspensions were used for uptake studies in the well-established Caco-2 model. Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to estimate particle core size, size distribution and stability in cell culture medium. Particles proved to be stable and showed radii from 3.6 to 16.0 nm. Undigested particles and particles digested in the presence of food components were comparably taken up by Caco-2 cells, whereas the uptake of particles digested without food components was decreased by 60%. Overall, these findings suggest that in vivo ingested poly (acrylic acid)-coated silver nanoparticles may reach the intestine in a nanoscaled form even if enclosed in a food matrix. While appropriate for studies on the uptake into intestinal cells, the Caco-2 model might be less suited for translocation studies. Moreover, we show that nanoparticle digestion protocols lacking food components may lead to misinterpretation of uptake studies and inconclusive results.

  8. Molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and tumor microenvironment components suggests potential targets for new therapeutic approaches in mobile tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We characterized tumor microenvironment (TME) components of mobile tongue (MT) cancer patients in terms of overall inflammatory infiltrate, focusing on the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes and on cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in order to determine their interrelations and associations with clinical outcomes. In addition, by culturing tongue carcinoma cells (HSC-3) on a three-dimensional myoma organotypic model that mimics TME, we attempted to investigate the possible existence of a molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Analysis of 64 cases of MT cancer patients revealed that the overall density of the inflammatory infiltrate was inversely correlated to the density of CAFs (P = 0.01), but that the cumulative density of the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes, including regulatory T cells (Tregs, Foxp3+), tumor-associated macrophages (TAM2, CD163+), and potentially Tregs-inducing immune cells (CD80+), was directly correlated with the density of CAFs (P = 0.01). The hazard ratio (HR) for recurrence in a TME rich in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+ was 2.9 (95% CI 1.03–8.6, P = 0.043 compared with low in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+). The HR for recurrence in a TME rich in CAFs was 4.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–12.8, P = 0.012 compared with low in CAFs). In vitro studies showed cancer-derived exosomes, epithelial–mesenchymal transition process, fibroblast-to-CAF-like cell transdifferentiation, and reciprocal interrelations between different cytokines suggesting the presence of molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Collectively, these results highlighted the emerging need of new therapies targeting this crosstalk between the cancer cells and TME components in MT cancer

  9. Chemotherapy refractory testicular germ cell tumor is associated with a variant in Armadillo Repeat gene deleted in Velco-Cardio-Facial syndrome (ARVCF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunkit eFung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is evidence that inherited genetic variation affects both testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT treatment outcome and risks of late-complications arising from cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Using a candidate gene approach, we examined associations of three genes involved in the cisplatin metabolism pathway, GSTP1, COMT, and TPMT, with TGCT outcome and cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. Material and Methods: Our study population includes a subset of patients (n=137 from a genome-wide association study at the University of Pennsylvania that evaluates inherited genetic susceptibility to TGCT. All patients in our study had at least one course of cisplatin-based chemotherapy with at least one year of follow up. A total of 90 markers in GSTP1, COMT and TPMT and their adjacent genomic regions (± 20 kb were analyzed for associations with refractory TGCT after first course of chemotherapy, progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS, peripheral neuropathy, and ototoxicity. Results: After adjustment for multiple comparisons, one SNP, rs2073743, in the flanking region (± 20 kb of COMT was associated with refractory TGCT after initial chemotherapy. This SNP lies within the intron region of the Armadillo Repeat gene deleted in Velco-Cardio-Facial syndrome (ARVCF. The G allele of rs2073743 predisposed patients to refractory disease with a relative risk of 2.6 (95% CI 1.1, 6.3; P=0.03. Assuming recessive inheritance, patients with the GG genotype had 22.7 times higher risk (95% CI 3.3, 155.8; P=0.04 of developing refractory disease when compared to those with the GC or CC genotypes. We found no association of our candidate genes with peripheral neuropathy, ototoxicity, PFS and OS. Discussion: This is the first study to suggest that germline genetic variants of ARVCF may affect TGCT outcome. The result of this study is hypothesis generating and should be validated in future studies.

  10. Neurotransmitters and synaptic components in the Merkel cell-neurite complex, a gentle touch receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Maksimovic, Srdjan; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cells are an enigmatic group of rare cells found in the skin of vertebrates. Most make contacts with somatosensory afferents to form Merkel cell-neurite complexes, which are gentle-touch receptors that initiate slowly adapting type I responses. The function of Merkel cells within the complex remains debated despite decades of research. Numerous anatomical studies demonstrate that Merkel cells form synaptic-like contacts with sensory afferent terminals. Moreover, recent molecular analys...

  11. The Investigation and Development of Low Cost Hardware Components for Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George A. Marchetti

    1999-12-15

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell components, which would have a low-cost structure in mass production, were fabricated and tested. A fuel cell electrode structure, comprising a thin layer of graphite (50 microns) and a front-loaded platinum catalyst layer (600 angstroms), was shown to produce significant power densities. In addition, a PEM bipolar plate, comprising flexible graphite, carbon cloth flow-fields and an integrated polymer gasket, was fabricated. Power densities of a two-cell unit using this inexpensive bipolar plate architecture were shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art bipolar plates.

  12. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  13. One-Step Detection of Major Lipid Components in Submicroliter Volumes of Unpurified Liposome and Cell Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ssu-Ying; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chie; Urban, Pawel L

    2016-07-19

    Liposomes and cells have high lipid contents, which are the main components of the external and internal membranes. Mass spectrometry (MS) is widely used in the analysis of the lipids present in the biological matrixes. However, MS analysis of liposome and cell suspensions is challenging due to the presence of other high-abundance matrix components (e.g., salts, buffers, and growth media) that cause ion suppression. These interfering species would normally be removed by dialysis or centrifugation. Here we propose a simple and fast method to detect major lipid components in cells and cell suspensions by MS while circumventing dialysis and centrifugation. Capillary hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC) has been coupled online with the aid of an electrospray ionization (ESI) interface to an ion-trap mass spectrometer. Complex samples containing bioparticles and a large amount of potential interferences (buffer, inorganic salts, amino acids) were separated hydrodynamically, detected optically (by light absorption/scattering), and immediately transferred to the MS interface. Liposomes and animal cells are disintegrated during electrospray, and the constituent lipids are ionized. The signal-to-noise ratios are ∼10× higher in HDC-ESI-MS than in direct infusion ESI-MS experiments (with or without dilution). This method has been tested on liposomes (containing phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol) and four types of animal/human cells, i.e., mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7), human breast cancer cells (T47D and Hs578T), and mouse preadipocyte cells (3T3-L1). We suggest that HDC-ESI-MS can be used in quality control analyses of bioparticle suspensions in the fields of biotechnology, molecular biology, drug discovery, and cosmetics. PMID:27337108

  14. TRPM5, a taste-signaling transient receptor potential ion-channel, is a ubiquitous signaling component in chemosensory cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of TRP channels have been identified as key players in the sensation of smell, temperature, mechanical forces and taste. TRPM5 is known to be abundantly expressed in taste receptor cells where it participates in sweet, amino acid and bitter perception. A role of TRPM5 in other sensory systems, however, has not been studied so far. Results Here, we systematically investigated the expression of TRPM5 in rat and mouse tissues. Apart from taste buds, where we found TRPM5 to be predominantly localized on the basolateral surface of taste receptor cells, TRPM5 immunoreactivity was seen in other chemosensory organs – the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ. Most strikingly, we found solitary TRPM5-enriched epithelial cells in all parts of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. Based on their tissue distribution, the low cell density, morphological features and co-immunostaining with different epithelial markers, we identified these cells as brush cells (also known as tuft, fibrillovesicular, multivesicular or caveolated cells. In terms of morphological characteristics, brush cells resemble taste receptor cells, while their origin and biological role are still under intensive debate. Conclusion We consider TRPM5 to be an intrinsic signaling component of mammalian chemosensory organs, and provide evidence for brush cells being an important cellular correlate in the periphery.

  15. Development of a cell formation heuristic by considering realistic data using principal component analysis and Taguchi's method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shailendra; Sharma, Rajiv Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Over the last four decades of research, numerous cell formation algorithms have been developed and tested, still this research remains of interest to this day. Appropriate manufacturing cells formation is the first step in designing a cellular manufacturing system. In cellular manufacturing, consideration to manufacturing flexibility and production-related data is vital for cell formation. The consideration to this realistic data makes cell formation problem very complex and tedious. It leads to the invention and implementation of highly advanced and complex cell formation methods. In this paper an effort has been made to develop a simple and easy to understand/implement manufacturing cell formation heuristic procedure with considerations to the number of production and manufacturing flexibility-related parameters. The heuristic minimizes inter-cellular movement cost/time. Further, the proposed heuristic is modified for the application of principal component analysis and Taguchi's method. Numerical example is explained to illustrate the approach. A refinement in the results is observed with adoption of principal component analysis and Taguchi's method.

  16. Ovarian germ cell tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous components and later development of growing teratoma syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Jumaily Usama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Development of a sarcomatous component in a germ cell tumor is an uncommon phenomenon. Most cases reported have a grim prognosis. Growing teratoma syndrome is also an uncommon phenomenon and occurs in approximately 2% to 7% of non seminomatous germ cell tumors and should be treated surgically. Case presentation We report the case of a 12-year-old Asian girl with an ovarian mixed germ cell tumor containing a rhabdomyosarcomatous component. She was treated with a germ cell tumor chemotherapy regimen and rhabdomyosarcoma-specific chemotherapy. Towards the end of her treatment, she developed a retroperitoneal mass that was increasing in size. It was completely resected, revealing a mature teratoma, consistent with growing teratoma syndrome. She is still in complete remission approximately three years after presentation. Conclusion The presence of rhabdomyosarcoma in a germ cell tumor should be treated by a combined chemotherapy regimen (for germ cell tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma. In addition, development of a mass during or after therapy with normal serum markers should raise the possibility of growing teratoma syndrome that should be treated surgically.

  17. Basic studies of 3-5 high efficiency cell components. Annual subcontract report, 15 August 1989--14 August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Pierret, R.F.; Carpenter, M.S.; Chuang, H.L.; Dodd, P.E.; Keshavarzi, A.; Klausmeier-Brown, M.E.; Lush, G.B.; Stellwag, T.B. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This project`s objective is to improve our understanding of the generation, recombination, and transport of carriers within III-V homo- and heterostructures. The research itself consists of fabricating and characterizing solar cell ``building blocks`` such as junctions and heterojunctions as well as basic measurements of material parameters. A significant effort is also being directed at characterizing loss mechanisms in high-quality, III-V solar cells fabricated in industrial research laboratories throughout the United States. The project`s goal is to use our understanding of the device physics of high-efficiency cell components to maximize cell efficiency. A related goal is the demonstration of new cell structures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The development of measurement techniques and characterization methodologies is also a project objective. This report describes our progress during the fifth and final year of the project. During the past five years, we`ve teamed a great deal about heavy doping effects in p{sup +} and n{sup +} GaAs and have explored their implications for solar cells. We have developed an understanding of the dominant recombination losses in present-day, high-efficiency cells. We`ve learned to appreciated the importance of recombination at the perimeter of the cell and have developed techniques for chemically passivating such edges. Finally, we`ve demonstrated that films grown by molecular beam epitaxy are suitable for high-efficiency cell research.

  18. Metabolites of Ginger Component [6]-Shogaol Remain Bioactive in Cancer Cells and Have Low Toxicity in Normal Cells: Chemical Synthesis and Biological Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Yingdong Zhu; Warin, Renaud F.; Soroka, Dominique N.; Huadong Chen; Shengmin Sang

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study found that [6]-shogaol, a major bioactive component in ginger, is extensively metabolized in cancer cells and in mice. It is unclear whether these metabolites retain bioactivity. The aim of the current study is to synthesize the major metabolites of [6]-shogaol and evaluate their inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis in human cancer cells. Twelve metabolites of [6]-shogaol (M1, M2, and M4-M13) were successfully synthesized using simple and easily accessible chemic...

  19. Effects of Supplementation of Various Medium Components on Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Cultures Producing Recombinant Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Do Yun; Lee, Joon Chul; Chang, Ho Nam; Oh, Duk Jae

    2005-01-01

    Thirteen vitamins, twenty amino acids, hormones, inorganic salts, and other chemical agents, which constitute typical serum-free media, were evaluated for the development of fortified medium to enhance cell growth and productivity of recombinant antibody in the cultures of the recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells. Two different rCHO cell lines, rCHO-A producing recombinant antibodies against the human platelet and rCHO-B secreting recombinant antibodies against the S surface antigen...

  20. Insights into age- and sickle-cell-disease- interaction using principal components analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Thakre Tushar P; Amin Manik; Mamtani Manju R; Sharma Mamta; Sharma Smita; Amin Amit; Kulkarni Hemant

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background In the context of sickle cell anemia, peripheral blood indexes provide key information that is also potentially influenced by age. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the extent and nature of interactions between sickle cell anemia and age, especially in situations where there is a high prevalence of sickle cell anemia. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 374 subjects with varying hemoglobin S (HbS) status, we characterized the interaction between age and sickle hem...

  1. Enzymatically quiescent heparanase augments T cell interactions with VCAM-1 and extracellular matrix components under versatile dynamic contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, Ilya; Hershkoviz, Rami; Grabovsky, Valentin; Ilan, Neta; Cahalon, Liora; Vlodavsky, Israel; Alon, Ronen; Lider, Ofer

    2004-05-01

    During their migration into inflammatory sites, immune cells, such as T cells, secrete extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes, such as heparanase, which, under mildly acidic conditions, degrade heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). We have previously shown that at pH 7.2, human placental heparanase loses its enzymatic activity, while retaining its ability to bind HSPG and promote T cell adhesion to unfractionated ECM. We now demonstrate that the 65-kDa recombinant human heparanase, which is devoid of enzymatic activity, but can still bind HSPG, captures T cells under shear flow conditions and mediates their rolling and arrest, in the absence or presence of stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF-1 alpha; CXCL12), in an alpha(4)beta(1)-VCAM-1-dependent manner. Furthermore, heparanase binds to and induces T cell adhesion to key ECM components, like fibronectin and hyaluronic acid, in beta(1) integrin- and CD44-specific manners, respectively, via the activation of the protein kinase C and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase intracellular signaling machineries. Although the nature of the putative T cell heparanase-binding moiety is unknown, it appears that heparanase exerts its proadhesive activity by interacting with the T cells' surface HSPG, because pretreatment of the cells with heparinase abolished their subsequent response to heparanase. Also, heparanase augmented the SDF-1 alpha-triggered phosphorylation of Pyk-2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 implicated in integrin functioning. Moreover, heparanase, which had no chemotactic effect on T cells on its own, augmented the SDF-1 alpha-induced T cell chemotaxis across fibronectin. These findings add another dimension to the known versatility of heparanase as a key regulator of T cell activities during inflammation, both in the context of the vasculature and at extravascular sites. PMID:15100255

  2. Dissection of the Mechanical Impedance Components of the Outer Hair Cell Using a Chloride-Channel Blocker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasztosi, Csaba; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2011-11-01

    The voltage-dependent chloride-channel blocker anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (9AC) has been found to reduce the imaginary but not the real part of the mechanical impedance of the organ of Corti, suggesting that the effective stiffness of outer hair cells (OHCs) is reduced by 9AC. To examine whether 9AC interacts directly with the motor protein prestin to reduce the membrane component of the impedance, the patch-clamp technique in whole-cell configuration was used to measure the nonlinear capacitance (NLC) of isolated OHCs and, as control, prestin-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. Extracellular application of 9AC significantly reduced the NLC of both OHCs and HEK293 cells. Intracellular 9AC did not influence the blocking effect of the extracellular applied drug. These results suggest that 9AC interacts directly with prestin, reducing the effective stiffness of the motor, and that the interaction is extracellular.

  3. Differential Cytotoxicity of MEX: a Component of Neem Oil Whose Action Is Exerted at the Cell Membrane Level

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Ricci; Valerio Berardi; Gianfranco Risuleo

    2008-01-01

    Neem oil is obtained from the seeds of the tree Azadirachta indica. Its chemical composition is very complex, being rich in terpenoids and limonoids, as well as volatile sulphur modified compounds. This work focused on the evaluation of a component of the whole Neem oil obtained by methanolic extraction and defined as MEX. Cytotoxicity was assessed on two different cell populations: a stabilized murine fibroblast line (3T6) and a tumor cell line (HeLa). The data presented here suggest a diffe...

  4. Probing red blood cell mechanics, rheology and dynamics with a two-component multi-scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejin; Peng, Zhangli; Lei, Huan; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George Em

    2014-01-01

    This study is partially motivated by the validation of a new two-component multi-scale cell model we developed recently that treats the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton as two distinct components. Here, the whole cell model is validated and compared against several available experiments that examine red blood cell (RBC) mechanics, rheology and dynamics. First, we investigated RBC deformability in a microfluidic channel with a very small cross-sectional area and quantified the mechanical properties of the RBC membrane. Second, we simulated twisting torque cytometry and compared predicted rheological properties of the RBC membrane with experimental measurements. Finally, we modelled the tank-treading (TT) motion of a RBC in a shear flow and explored the effect of channel width variation on the TT frequency. We also investigated the effects of bilayer–cytoskeletal interactions on these experiments and our simulations clearly indicated that they play key roles in the determination of cell membrane mechanical, rheological and dynamical properties. These simulations serve as validation tests and moreover reveal the capabilities and limitations of the new whole cell model. PMID:24982252

  5. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  6. The Contribution of Cell Surface Components to the Neutrophil Mechanosensitivity to Shear Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Akenhead

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses the regulation of neutrophils by fluid shear stress in the context of factors that may govern cell mechanosensitivity and its influence on cell functions. There is substantial evidence that mechanoreceptors located on the peripheral membrane contribute to the ability of shear stress to regulate cell activity. In the case of neutrophils, the formyl peptide receptor (FPR and the CD18 integrins on the cell membrane have been shown to provide neutrophils with the ability to sense shear stresses in their local environment and alter their physiological state, accordingly. This configuration is also found for other types of cells, although they involve different cell-specific mechanoreceptors. Moreover, from an examination of the neutrophil mechanotransducing capacity, it is apparent that cellular mechanosensitivity depends on a number of factors that, if altered, contribute to dysregulation and ultimately pathophysiology. To exemplify this, we first describe the neutrophil responses to shear exposure. We then review two neutrophil mechanoreceptors, specifically FPR and CD18 integrins, which participate in controlling cell activity levels under physiological conditions. Next, we discuss the various factors that may alter neutrophil mechanosensitivity to shear stress and how these may underlie the circulatory pathobiology of two cardiovascular disease states: hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Based on the material presented, it is conceivable that cell mechanosensitivity is a powerful global metric that permits a more efficient approach to understanding the contribution of mechanobiology to physiology and to disease processes.

  7. Honesty through repeated interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Patricia; Zollman, Kevin J S

    2016-04-21

    In the study of signaling, it is well known that the cost of deception is an essential element for stable honest signaling in nature. In this paper, we show how costs for deception can arise endogenously from repeated interactions between individuals. Utilizing the Sir Philip Sidney game as an illustrative case, we show that repeated interactions can sustain honesty with no observable signal costs, even when deception cannot be directly observed. We provide a number of potential experimental tests for this theory which distinguish it from the available alternatives. PMID:26869213

  8. Identification of hop polyphenolic components which inhibit prostaglandin E2 production by gingival epithelial cells stimulated with periodontal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hiroaki; Tagashira, Motoyuki; Honma, Daiki; Kanda, Tomomasa; Kou, Yurong; Ohtake, Yasuyuki; Amano, Atsuo

    2008-03-01

    Chronic marginal periodontitis is a destructive inflammatory disease caused by an imbalance between bacterial virulence and host defense ability, resulting in eventual tooth exfoliation. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major periodontal pathogen, triggers a series of cellular inflammatory responses including the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which causes periodontal destruction; thus, anti-inflammatory reagents are considered beneficial for periodontal therapy. In the present study, we examined whether hop- and apple-derived polyphenols (HBP and ACT, respectively) inhibit PGE2 production by human gingival epithelial (HGE) cells stimulated with P. gingivalis components. HGE cells were stimulated with P. gingivalis membrane vesicles, and the effects of HBP, ACT and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) on PGE2 production by HGE cells were evaluated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HBP and EGCg significantly inhibited PGE2 production, whereas ACT did not. By further fractionation steps of HBP to identify the effective components, 3 components of HBP, 2-[(2-methylpropanoyl)-phloroglucinol]1-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (MPPG), quercetin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (isoquercitrin), and kaempferol 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside (astragalin), were found to be elements which significantly inhibited cellular PGE2 production. These results suggest that HBP is a potent inhibitor of cellular PGE2 production induced by P. gingivalis, and HBP may be useful for the prevention and attenuation of periodontitis. PMID:18310924

  9. Integration of Magnetic Components in a Step-Up Converter for Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimczak, Pawel; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2009-01-01

    converter is a critical part. The input voltage of the converter decreases while the output power increases. It creates challenges in design of the converter's magnetic components. Scope of this paper is integration of the dc inductor and the transformer on a single core. Such integration improves...

  10. The essential YycFG two-component system controls cell wall metabolism in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisicchia, Paola; Noone, David; Lioliou, Efthimia;

    2007-01-01

    Adaptation of bacteria to the prevailing environmental and nutritional conditions is often mediated by two-component signal transduction systems (TCS). The Bacillus subtilis YycFG TCS has attracted special attention as it is essential for viability and its regulon is poorly defined. Here we show...

  11. Cyclic AMP represents a crucial component of Treg cell-mediated immune regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bopp

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available T regulatory (Treg cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network (ITN and a plethora of manuscripts has described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for in principle two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC directly to the effector T cells (Teff leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine which trigger the adenylate cyclases (AC in Teff via A2A and A2B receptors thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation.

  12. Getting into the flow: Red cells go on a roll, two-component vesicles swing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallat, Annie; Dupire, Jules; Khelloufi, Kamel; Al Halifa, Al Hair; Adhesion and Inflammation Team

    2013-11-01

    Red blood cells are soft capsules. Under shear flow, their two known motions were ``tumbling'' and ``swinging-tank treading,'' depending on cell mechanics and flow conditions. We reveal new wobbling regimes, among which the ``rolling'' regime, where red cells move as wheels on a road. We show, by coupling two video-microscopy approaches providing multi-directional cell pictures that the orientation of cells flipping into the flow is determined by the shear rate. Rolling permits to avoid energetically costly cellular deformations and is a true signature of the cytoskeleton elasticity. We highlight two transient dynamics: an intermittent regime during the ``tank-treading-to-flipping'' transition and a Frisbee-like ``spinning'' regime during the ``rolling-to-tank-treading'' transition. We find that the biconcave red cell shape is very stable under moderate shear stresses, and we interpret this result in terms of shape memory and elastic buckling. Finally, we generate lipid vesicles with a shape memory by using two lipids with different bending rigidities. These vesicles swing in shear flow similarly to red blood cells but their non-axisymmetric stress-free shape changes the periodicity of the motion and induces specific features.

  13. Components of yeast (Sacchromyces cervisiae) extract as defined media additives that support the growth and productivity of CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, Maureen; Chan, Sarah; Jung, Vince; Kowbel, Vanessa; Mendoza, Meg; Miranda, Vivian; Butler, Michael

    2016-09-10

    Yeast and plant hydrolysates are used as media supplements to support the growth and productivity of CHO cultures for biopharmaceutical production. Through fractionation of a yeast lysate and metabolic analysis of a fraction that had bioactivity equivalent to commercial yeast extract (YE), bioactive components were identified that promoted growth and productivity of two recombinant CHO cell lines (CHO-Luc and CHO-hFcEG2) equivalent to or greater than YE-supplemented media. Autolysis of the yeast lysate was not necessary for full activity, suggesting that the active components are present in untreated yeast cells. A bioactive fraction (3KF) of the yeast lysate was isolated from the permeate using a 3kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) filter. Supplementation of this 3KF fraction into the base media supported growth of CHO-Luc cells over eight passages equivalent to YE-supplemented media. The 3KF fraction was fractionated further by a cation exchange spin column using a stepwise pH elution. Metabolomic analysis of a bioactive fraction isolated at high pH identified several arginine and lysine-containing peptides as well as two polyamines, spermine and spermidine, with 3.5× and 4.5× higher levels compared to a fraction showing no bioactivity. The addition of a mixture of polyamines and their precursors (putrescine, spermine, spermidine, ornithine and citrulline) as well as increasing the concentration of some of the components of the original base medium resulted in a chemically-defined (CD) formulation that produced an equivalent viable cell density (VCD) and productivity of the CHO-Luc cells as the YE-supplemented medium. The VCD of the CHO-hFcEG2 culture in the CD medium was 1.9× greater and with equivalent productivity to the YE-supplemented media.

  14. Impact of bacteria and bacterial components on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Tomas, E-mail: tomas.fiedler@med.uni-rostock.de [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Virology, and Hygiene, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Salamon, Achim; Adam, Stefanie; Herzmann, Nicole [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Taubenheim, Jan [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Virology, and Hygiene, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Peters, Kirsten [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are present in several tissues, e.g. bone marrow, heart muscle, brain and subcutaneous adipose tissue. In invasive infections MSC get in contact with bacteria and bacterial components. Not much is known about how bacterial pathogens interact with MSC and how contact to bacteria influences MSC viability and differentiation potential. In this study we investigated the impact of three different wound infection relevant bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes, and the cell wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Gram-negative bacteria) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA; Gram-positive bacteria) on viability, proliferation, and osteogenic as well as adipogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adMSC). We show that all three tested species were able to attach to and internalize into adMSC. The heat-inactivated Gram-negative E. coli as well as LPS were able to induce proliferation and osteogenic differentiation but reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. Conspicuously, the heat-inactivated Gram-positive species showed the same effects on proliferation and adipogenic differentiation, while its cell wall component LTA exhibited no significant impact on adMSC. Therefore, our data demonstrate that osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of adMSC is influenced in an oppositional fashion by bacterial antigens and that MSC-governed regeneration is not necessarily reduced under infectious conditions. - Highlights: • Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Escherichia coli bind to and internalize into adMSC. • Heat-inactivated cells of these bacterial species trigger proliferation of adMSC. • Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS induce osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. • Heat-inactivated E. coli and LPS reduce adipogenic differentiation of adMSC. • LTA does not influence adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation of adMSC.

  15. A Model of Yeast Cell-Cycle Regulation Based on a Standard Component Modeling Strategy for Protein Regulatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laomettachit, Teeraphan; Chen, Katherine C.; Baumann, William T.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression in eukaryotes, a variety of mathematical modeling approaches have been employed, ranging from Boolean networks and differential equations to stochastic simulations. Each approach has its own characteristic strengths and weaknesses. In this paper, we propose a “standard component” modeling strategy that combines advantageous features of Boolean networks, differential equations and stochastic simulations in a framework that acknowledges the typical sorts of reactions found in protein regulatory networks. Applying this strategy to a comprehensive mechanism of the budding yeast cell cycle, we illustrate the potential value of standard component modeling. The deterministic version of our model reproduces the phenotypic properties of wild-type cells and of 125 mutant strains. The stochastic version of our model reproduces the cell-to-cell variability of wild-type cells and the partial viability of the CLB2-dbΔ clb5Δ mutant strain. Our simulations show that mathematical modeling with “standard components” can capture in quantitative detail many essential properties of cell cycle control in budding yeast. PMID:27187804

  16. Soluble components of Hericium erinaceum induce NK cell activation via production of interleukin-12 in mice splenocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Myung-hyun YIM; Chang-gue SON; Jang-woo SHIN; Jin-young SON; Se-mi OH; Seung-hyun HAN; Jung-hyo CHO; Chong-kwan CHO; Hwa-seung YOO; Yeon-weol LEE

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the immunoregulatory functions of water extracts of Hericium erinaceum (WEHE) focusing on natural killer (NK) cell-based anticancer activities.Methods: Mouse splenocytes or purely isolated NK cells were stimulated with 1-100 mg/L WEHE for 24 h followed by co-culture with 51Cr-labled Yac-1 cells for 4 h, then NK cell-derived cytolytic activity was measured using a radio-release assay. Neutralizing antibodies against mouse interleukin-12 (IL-12) were added into the WEHE-stimulated splenocytes, thereafter, cytotoxicity was measured to examine the involvement of IL-12. RT-PCR and ELISA analyses were performed to confirm the induction of transcription and the translation of IL-12 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the WEHE-treated splenocytes.Results: WEHE enhanced the cytolytic activity of total splenocytes towards Yac-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, this activation was not observed when the NK cells isolated from the splenocytes were treated with WEHE. Furthermore, the treatment with antibodies against IL-12 abolished the effect of WEHE on splenocyte-derived cytolytic activity. RT-PCR and ELISA analyses showed the induction of IL-12 and IFN-gamma in the WEHE-treated splenocytes.Conclusion: WEHE indirectly activates the cytolytic ability of NK cells via the induction of IL-12 in total splenocytes, and possibly via other immuno-mediators or cellular components.

  17. Preparation of Biotubes with vascular cells component by in vivo incubation using adipose-derived stromal cell-exuding multi-microporous molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Ryosuke; Tsujinaka, Takahiro; Nakayama, Yasuhide

    2015-12-01

    Biotubes, prepared using in-body tissue architecture (IBTA) technology, have adequate mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility for vascular grafts. However, they have thin walls, lack vascular constructing cells, and are composed of subcutaneous connective tissues consisting mainly of collagen and fibroblasts. This study aimed to prepare Biotubes with a vascular-like structure including an endothelial cell lining and a smooth muscle cell by IBTA using adipose-derived vascular stromal cell (ADSCs)-exuding specially designed multiporous tubes (outer diameter 5 mm, length 24 mm, pore size 500 μm, pore number 180, cell number/tube >3.0 × 10(6)). ADSCs were separated from rat subcutaneous fat, suspended in a Matrigel™ solution at 4 °C, and then filled into the tubes. After the tubes were embedded into dorsal subcutaneous pouches of the same rats for 2 weeks, robust Biotubes with a wall thickness of >600 μm were formed surrounding the tubes. The luminal layer of the obtained Biotubes was dominated by the cells positive for an endothelial marker. Almost the entire intima, with a thickness of about 400 μm, was occupied with cells positive for a smooth muscle marker. Both cells were derived from ADSCs. Biotube walls were constructed by fusing ADSC-derived vascular constructing cells exuded from the tubes and fibroblasts and collagen from the surrounding connective tissue. A robust Biotubes with vascular cells component, were formed after only 2 weeks of subcutaneous incubation of ADSCs-exuding multiporous tubes.

  18. Component composition of essential oils and ultrastructure of secretory cells of resin channel needles Juniperus communis (Cupressaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Gerling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of determining the qualitative and quantitative composition of essential oil Juniperus communis, growing under the canopy of spruce blueberry sphagnum subzone middle taiga. Juniperus communis essential oil is liquid light yellow color. The content of essential oil was 0.46 % in shoots with needles. 37 substances of components identified. Mass fraction of components in the essential oil of Juniperus communis reached 89 %. The highest percentage of occupied fraction of monoterpenes (82.3 %, the proportion of sesquiterpenes less than 0.5 % of the total composition of essential oils, alcohols 3.5 and 0.7 % esters. In monoterpenes fraction predominant α-pinene (24.5–32.6 %, β-pinene (15–20.3 % and α-phellandrene (6.4–8.8 %. Essential oil of Juniperus communis is characterized by high content of monoterpenoids in contrast to other conifers of the taiga zone. All stages of biosynthesis essential oils occur in the epithelial cells of the resin channel (terpenoidogennyh cells. An oval shape have epithelial cells of the resin channel needles in transverse sections the Juniperus communis, which is situated vacuole in the center. Large number of lipid globules (up to 40 noted in the hyaloplasm of explored cells. Leucoplasts surrounded by membranes of smooth endoplasmic reticulum in cross sections of epithelial cells in resin channel of juniper. Endoplasmic reticulum is poorly developed in epithelial cells, which corresponds to the low content of sesquiterpenes in the needles during the study period. Development of large leucoplasts and large number of mitochondria associated with predominance of synthesis monoterpenoids the in the epithelium cells resin channel.

  19. Transcriptional activation of homologous viral long terminal repeats by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 or the human T-cell leukemia virus type I tat proteins occurs in the absence of de novo protein synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeang, K T; Shank, P R; Kumar, A

    1988-01-01

    The genomes of human retroviruses [human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I)] encode positive trans-activator proteins, named tat. In the presence of tat, the transcriptional activity of the homologous HIV-1 or HTLV-I long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter is markedly increased. We have constructed mammalian cell lines that contain stably integrated copies of a HIV-1 or a HTLV-I LTR-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. When presynthesized HIV-1...

  20. Frequent mutations of genes encoding ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway components in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Guangwu; Gui, Yaoting; Gao, Shengjie;

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced whole exomes of ten clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and performed a screen of similar to 1,100 genes in 88 additional ccRCCs, from which we discovered 12 previously unidentified genes mutated at elevated frequencies in ccRCC. Notably, we detected frequent mutations in the u...

  1. Changes During Growth in Cell Wall Components of Berseem Clover Under Different Cutting Treatments in a Mediterranean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuditta De Santis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Forage digestibility of berseem clover (Trifolium Alexandrinum L. is influenced by plant cell wall composition. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different cutting treatments on cell-wall components of the herbage and plant fractions in two Mediterranean berseem genotypes during growth and to examine the relationship between digestibility and cell wall components in these plant fractions. Cutting treatments were initiated at sixth internode elongation (A and early flowering (B and there was an uncut control treatment (C. Spring growth of genotypes of Egyptian (cv. Giza 10 and Italian (cv. Sacromonte origins was harvested in each of two years beginning 196 days after sowing and thereafter every 6 days (twelve harvests in total to measure cell wall components. Neutral detergent fibre (NDF, acid detergent fibre (ADF and acid detergent lignin (ADL concentrations were determined for leaf, stem, and total forage of each cultivar at each harvest. Without defoliation, NDF, ADF and ADL concentrations of herbage increased linearly to a maximum of 528, 375 and 84 g kg-1 DM, respectively, by 220 days after planting, when plant height reached maximum values, then plateaued until 257 days after planting. Plant parts differed in cell-wall concentration, with stems being of higher fibre components than leaves, in the two cutting treatments. Herbage and plant fraction fibre concentrations were negatively correlated with digestibility for all cutting treatments. Defoliation induced a reduction in fibre concentrations and plant height, although a rapid regrowth was observed after cutting, in both treatments A and B. However, delaying defoliation to the early flowering stage (B increased fibre components concentrations both at cutting time and during the growing season and significantly reduced the regrowth height. Conversely, plants cut at the sixth internode elongation (treatment A showed lower concentrations of fibre fractions than initiating

  2. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  3. Failure Characteristic of Laser Cladding Samples on Repeated Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Shi-hong; ZHENG Qi-guang; FU Ge-yan; ZHANG Jin-ping

    2004-01-01

    Using self-made impact fatigue test instruments and related analytic devices,the mechanical components with laser cladding layer have been attempted.It is found that,on repeated impact force,several failure modes of the components include the surface cracks,surface plastic deformation,corrosive pitting and coat collapse,etc.The paper reported the test method and initial analysis conclusions about the unique failure characteristics of the mechanical components on repeated impact load.

  4. Androgenic regulation of hedgehog signaling pathway components in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Mengqian; Tanner, Matthew; Levine, Alice C.; Levina, Elina; Ohouo, Patrice; Buttyan, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is thought to play a role in several human cancers including prostate cancer. Although prostate cancer cells express many of the gene products involved in hedgehog signaling, these cells are refractory to the canonical signaling effects of exogenous hedgehog ligands or to activated Smoothened, the hedgehog-regulated mediator of Gli transcriptional activation. Here, we show that the expression of hedgehog ligands and some hedgehog target genes are regulated by androgen in th...

  5. miR-210 and hypoxic microvesicles: Two critical components of hypoxia involved in the regulation of killer cells function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Janji, Bassam; Berchem, Guy; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-09-28

    It has become clear that tumor stroma components are engaged in an active and complex molecular cross-talk that has serious implications for immunological recognition of tumor cells in shaping the microenvironment. Hypoxia which is a major component of tumor microenvironment influences the characteristics of neoplasia by favoring heterogeneity, invasiveness, metastatic potency and tumor progression. In this regard, an important mode of communication between carcinoma cells and immune cells may involve tumor-derived microvesicles, which are able to carry lipids, proteins, mRNAs and miRNAs. This review covers new evidence indicating that the efficacy of the cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CTLs and NK) may be dependent on hypoxia induced miRNA and microvesicles in the tumor microenvironment by inhibiting the efficacy of natural host anti-tumor immune response and improving the ability of tumors to avoid immunosurveillance. This emphasizes that hypoxic tumors actively develop additional mechanisms to suppress the sensing of the immunologic danger signals in order to survive and propagate without inciting anti-tumor immunity. PMID:26523672

  6. Secretion of the C3 component of complement by peritoneal cells cultured with encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans.

    OpenAIRE

    Blackstock, R; Murphy, J W

    1997-01-01

    Two isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans were identified as being widely divergent in pathogenic potential after intratracheal infection of mice. These isolates differed in their ability to upregulate capsule synthesis when grown under tissue culture conditions, and this property correlated with virulence. We postulated that differential capsule synthesis may cause differential stimulation of macrophages to produce products such as complement components. To test this hypothesis, heat-killed ye...

  7. Immunochemical characterization of three components of the hemidesmosome and their expression in cultured epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Treatment of bovine tongue mucosa with 1 M KCl induced a split in the lamina densa of the basement membrane zone (BMZ). The epithelium was then separated from the underlying connective tissue. Electron microscopic analysis of the stripped epithelium revealed that hemidesmosomes and their associated intermediate filaments (IF) remain along the basal surface of the epithelium. This surface was solubilized in an SDS/urea-containing buffer. Characterization of components of this protein mixture w...

  8. Histopathological, immunohistochemical, and image analytic parameters characterizing the stromal component in primary and recurrent giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Charu Chandra; Safaya, Rajni; Kawatra Madan, Neha; Khan, Shah Alam; Iyer, Venkateswaran K

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a benign locally aggressive tumor whose biological behavior is unpredictable. Currently, there are no definitive clinical, histological, biochemical, or immunological parameters that can predict its behavior. This study was undertaken to examine whether delineation of reactive and neoplastic stromal component of GCT can help in this regard. 55 cases of GCT (30 primary, 25 recurrent) were subjected to histopathological grading, immunohistochemistry, and image analysis. Spindling of stroma was more frequent in recurrent GCT with 64% cases having more than 50% spindled stroma (p group (24.75% and 7.7%, respectively). A single numerical parameter encompassing stromal cell population and its proliferation was derived as ratio of PCNA/CD68 and PCNA/α1-ACT. Both ratios were higher in recurrent (0.81 ± 0.38; 1.58 ± 1.50) than in primary GCT (0.58 ± 0.62; 0.34 ± 0.29) (p = 0.002; 0.01). On image analysis, parameters significantly different between the two groups were nuclear area and nuclear integrated optical density. It was thus concluded that recurrent GCT shows higher grade, increased mitosis, more spindling, fewer reactive components, and higher proliferation than primary GCT. Delineation of reactive component (α1-ACT positive) and proliferating component (PCNA positive cells) using immunohistochemistry with calculation of the PCNA/ACT ratio delivers more information than image analysis.

  9. Alternatively Activated Mononuclear Phagocytes from the Skin Site of Infection and the Impact of IL-4Rα Signalling on CD4+T Cell Survival in Draining Lymph Nodes after Repeated Exposure to Schistosoma mansoni Cercariae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Catriona T.; Sanin, David E.; Mountford, Adrian P.

    2016-01-01

    In a murine model of repeated exposure of the skin to infective Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, events leading to the priming of CD4 cells in the skin draining lymph nodes were examined. The dermal exudate cell (DEC) population recovered from repeatedly (4x) exposed skin contained an influx of mononuclear phagocytes comprising three distinct populations according to their differential expression of F4/80 and MHC-II. As determined by gene expression analysis, all three DEC populations (F4/80-MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIint) exhibited major up-regulation of genes associated with alternative activation. The gene encoding RELMα (hallmark of alternatively activated cells) was highly up-regulated in all three DEC populations. However, in 4x infected mice deficient in RELMα, there was no change in the extent of inflammation at the skin infection site compared to 4x infected wild-type cohorts, nor was there a difference in the abundance of different mononuclear phagocyte DEC populations. The absence of RELMα resulted in greater numbers of CD4+ cells in the skin draining lymph nodes (sdLN) of 4x infected mice, although they remained hypo-responsive. Using mice deficient for IL-4Rα, in which alternative activation is compromised, we show that after repeated schistosome infection, levels of regulatory IL-10 in the skin were reduced, accompanied by increased numbers of MHC-IIhigh cells and CD4+ T cells in the skin. There were also increased numbers of CD4+ T cells in the sdLN in the absence of IL-4Rα compared to cells from singly infected mice. Although their ability to proliferate was still compromised, increased cellularity of sdLN from 4x IL-4RαKO mice correlated with reduced expression of Fas/FasL, resulting in decreased apoptosis and cell death but increased numbers of viable CD4+ T cells. This study highlights a mechanism through which IL-4Rα may regulate the immune system through the induction of IL-10 and regulation of Fas/FasL mediated cell death

  10. Differential Cytotoxicity of MEX: a Component of Neem Oil Whose Action Is Exerted at the Cell Membrane Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Ricci

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Neem oil is obtained from the seeds of the tree Azadirachta indica. Its chemical composition is very complex, being rich in terpenoids and limonoids, as well as volatile sulphur modified compounds. This work focused on the evaluation of a component of the whole Neem oil obtained by methanolic extraction and defined as MEX. Cytotoxicity was assessed on two different cell populations: a stabilized murine fibroblast line (3T6 and a tumor cell line (HeLa. The data presented here suggest a differential sensitivity of these two populations, the tumor line exhibiting a significantly higher sensitivity to MEX. The data strongly suggest that its toxic target is the cell membrane. In addition the results presented here imply that MEX may contain one or more agents that could find a potential use in anti-proliferative therapy.

  11. FIA functions as an early signal component of abscisic acid signal cascade in Vicia faba guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Yusuke; Uraji, Misugi; Watanabe-Sugimoto, Megumi; Okuma, Eiji; Munemasa, Shintaro; Shimoishi, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Iwai, Sumio; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    An abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive Vicia faba mutant, fia (fava bean impaired in ABA-induced stomatal closure) had previously been isolated. In this study, it was investigated how FIA functions in ABA signalling in guard cells of Vicia faba. Unlike ABA, methyl jasmonate (MeJA), H(2)O(2), and nitric oxide (NO) induced stomatal closure in the fia mutant. ABA did not induce production of either reactive oxygen species or NO in the mutant. Moreover, ABA did not suppress inward-rectifying K(+) (K(in)) currents or activate ABA-activated protein kinase (AAPK) in mutant guard cells. These results suggest that FIA functions as an early signal component upstream of AAPK activation in ABA signalling but does not function in MeJA signalling in guard cells of Vicia faba. PMID:22131163

  12. Identification of a Streptococcus salivarius Cell Wall Component Mediating Coaggregation with Veillonella alcalescens VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerkamp, Anton H.; McBride, Barry C.

    1981-01-01

    Cell walls of Streptococcus salivarius HB aggregated Veillonella alcalescens V1, but cell walls of the mutant S. salivarius HB-V5 did not. We found no correlation between the presence of fimbriae on streptococcal walls and the ability to aggregate Veillonella strains. Treatment of the walls with lysozyme solubilized a fraction which possessed Veillonella-aggregating activity. Solubilized cell wall preparations of strain HB contained three major (glyco)proteins as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and at least four antigens as determined by immunoelectrophoresis with antiserum prepared against strain HB walls. A specific antiserum, which was obtained by adsorption of anti-HB serum on strain HB-V5 cells, contained monospecific antibody that reacted with the solubilized strain HB wall preparation. Similar fractions prepared from strain HB-V5 cell walls did not possess aggregating activity and lacked one protein band (protein I) after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and one antigen (antigen b) after immunoelectrophoresis. The same antigen was absent when lysozyme-solubilized wall preparations of strain HB were reacted with anti-HB-V5 serum. Crossed-immunoisoelectric focusing indicated that this specific (glyco)protein and this antigen were identical and had an isoelectric point of 4.60. Protein I and antigen b were specifically adsorbed when solubilized strain HB cell walls were incubated with V. alcalescens V1 but were not adsorbed by nonaggregating Veillonella parvula ATCC 10790 cells. Culture supernatants of strain HB contained V. alcalescens V1-aggregating activity. Antigen b was present in the culture supernatant, but was not found in cultures of strain HB-V5. A total of 18 S. salivarius isolates possessing the streptococcal group K antigen released aggregating activity and antigen b into the culture medium, but 11 strains which lacked the K-antigen did not. Images PMID:7251145

  13. Quantitative Raman spectral changes of the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into islet-like cells by biochemical component analysis and multiple peak fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xin; Fang, Shaoyin; Zhang, Daosen; Zhang, Qinnan; He, Yingtian; Lu, Xiaoxu; Liu, Shengde; Zhong, Liyun

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into islet-like cells, providing a possible solution for type I diabetes treatment. To search for the precise molecular mechanism of the directional differentiation of MSC-derived islet-like cells, biomolecular composition, and structural conformation information during MSC differentiation, is required. Because islet-like cells lack specific surface markers, the commonly employed immunostaining technique is not suitable for their identification, physical separation, and enrichment. Combining Raman spectroscopic data, a fitting accuracy-improved biochemical component analysis, and multiple peaks fitting approach, we identified the quantitative biochemical and intensity change of Raman peaks that show the differentiation of MSCs into islet-like cells. Along with increases in protein and glycogen content, and decreases in deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid content, in islet-like cells relative to MSCs, it was found that a characteristic peak of insulin (665 cm-1) has twice the intensity in islet-like cells relative to MSCs, indicating differentiation of MSCs into islet-like cells was successful. Importantly, these Raman signatures provide useful information on the structural and pathological states during MSC differentiation and help to develop noninvasive and label-free Raman sorting methods for stem cells and their lineages.

  14. Desmosomal component expression in normal, dysplastic, and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Nagamani; Gist, Julie; Smith, Tyler; Tylka, Daniel; Trogdon, Gavin; Wahl, James K

    2010-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (oral SCC) is the most common oral cancer in the U.S., affecting nearly 30,000 Americans each year. Despite recent advances in detection and treatment, there has been little improvement in the five-year survival rate for this devastating disease. Oral cancer may be preceded by premalignant disease that appears histologically as dysplasia. Identification of molecular markers for cellular change would assist in determining the risk of dysplasia progressing to oral squamous cell carcinoma. The goal of this study was to determine if any correlation exists between histological diagnosed dysplasia and OSCC lesions and altered expression of desmosomal cell-cell adhesion molecules in the oral epithelium. Our data showed that oral SCC tissue samples showed decreased immunoreactivity of both desmoplakin and plakophilin-1 proteins compared to normal oral epithelium. Furthermore, significant decrease in desmoplakin immunoreactivity was observed in dysplastic tissue compared to normal oral epithelium. In contrast, the level of desmoglein-1 staining was unchanged between samples however desmoglein-1 was found localized to cell borders in oral SCC samples. These data suggest that changes in expression of desmoplakin and plakophilin-1 may prove to be a useful marker for changes in tissue morphology and provide a tool for identifying pre-neoplastic lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:20585603

  15. Desmosomal Component Expression in Normal, Dysplastic, and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagamani Narayana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma (oral SCC is the most common oral cancer in the U.S., affecting nearly 30,000 Americans each year. Despite recent advances in detection and treatment, there has been little improvement in the five-year survival rate for this devastating disease. Oral cancer may be preceded by premalignant disease that appears histologically as dysplasia. Identification of molecular markers for cellular change would assist in determining the risk of dysplasia progressing to oral squamous cell carcinoma. The goal of this study was to determine if any correlation exists between histological diagnosed dysplasia and OSCC lesions and altered expression of desmosomal cell-cell adhesion molecules in the oral epithelium. Our data showed that oral SCC tissue samples showed decreased immunoreactivity of both desmoplakin and plakophilin-1 proteins compared to normal oral epithelium. Furthermore, significant decrease in desmoplakin immunoreactivity was observed in dysplastic tissue compared to normal oral epithelium. In contrast, the level of desmoglein-1 staining was unchanged between samples however desmoglein-1 was found localized to cell borders in oral SCC samples. These data suggest that changes in expression of desmoplakin and plakophilin-1 may prove to be a useful marker for changes in tissue morphology and provide a tool for identifying pre-neoplastic lesions of the oral cavity.

  16. Somatic cell count and biochemical components of milk related to udder health in buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.T. Singh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The 399 clinically healthy quarters from 101 Murrah buffaloes were analyzed for somatic cell count (SCC; DCC and microscope methods and biochemical composition of milk in relation to udder health. The udder health revealed specific subclinical mastitis (SSM in 7% and non-specific mastitis (NSM in 49% of quarters. Latent infections comprised 1%. Staphylococci (43%, streptococci (39% and corynebacteria (18% constituted chief etiological agents in SSM. Electrical conductivity increased significantly both in SSM and NSM compared to healthy quarters. Significant effects for SNF and density were seen in SSM only. DCC and microscope depicted similar cell counts with a correlation coefficient of 0.89. The correlations of DCC with CMT and EC were 0.85 and 0.51, respectively. Quarters with negative CMT reactions had DCC values of < 3 × 105 cells/ml. The DCC means for negative, trace, and +1 to 2 CMT scores were 122, 238, and 593 (× 103 cells/ml, respectively. Lactose with discrimination ability of 83.76% was found better indicator of udder inflammation in buffaloes. Buffaloes unlike cows have low numbers of quarter infections, respond similarly as cows to udder inflammation but at different levels, and DCC may be effectively employed for expressing milk cell count in this species.

  17. A Proline/Arginine-Rich End Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein (PRELP) Variant Is Uniquely Expressed in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Mikaelsson; Anders Österborg; Mahmood Jeddi-Tehrani; Parviz Kokhaei; Mahyar Ostadkarampour; Reza Hadavi; Mehran Gholamin; Mehdi Akhondi; Fazel Shokri; Hodjattallah Rabbani; Håkan Mellstedt

    2013-01-01

    Proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP) belongs to the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family, normally expressed in extracellular matrix of collagen-rich tissues. We have previously reported on another SLRP, fibromodulin (FMOD) in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). PRELP is structurally similar to FMOD with adjacent localization on chromosome 1 (1q32.1). As cluster-upregulation of genes may occur in malignancies, the aim of our study was to analyze...

  18. A Subset of Protective γ9δ2 T Cells Is Activated by Novel Mycobacterial Glycolipid Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mei; Hesser, Danny C; De, Prithwiraj; Sakala, Isaac G; Spencer, Charles T; Kirkwood, Jay S; Abate, Getahun; Chatterjee, Delphi; Dobos, Karen M; Hoft, Daniel F

    2016-09-01

    γ9δ2 T cells provide a natural bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, rapidly and potently respond to pathogen infection in mucosal tissues, and are prominently induced by both tuberculosis (TB) infection and bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccination. Mycobacterium-expanded γ9δ2 T cells represent only a subset of the phosphoantigen {isopentenyl pyrophosphate [IPP] and (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enylpyrophosphate [HMBPP]}-responsive γ9δ2 T cells, expressing an oligoclonal set of T cell receptor (TCR) sequences which more efficiently recognize and inhibit intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Based on this premise, we have been searching for M. tuberculosis antigens specifically capable of inducing a unique subset of mycobacterium-protective γ9δ2 T cells. Our screening strategy includes the identification of M. tuberculosis fractions that expand γ9δ2 T cells with biological functions capable of inhibiting intracellular mycobacterial replication. Chemical treatments of M. tuberculosis whole-cell lysates (MtbWL) ruled out protein, nucleic acid, and nonpolar lipids as the M. tuberculosis antigens inducing protective γ9δ2 T cells. Mild acid hydrolysis, which transforms complex carbohydrate to monomeric residues, abrogated the specific activity of M. tuberculosis whole-cell lysates, suggesting that a polysaccharide was required for biological activity. Extraction of MtbWL with chloroform-methanol-water (10:10:3) resulted in a polar lipid fraction with highly enriched specific activity; this activity was further enriched by silica gel chromatography. A combination of mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of bioactive fractions indicated that 6-O-methylglucose-containing lipopolysaccharides (mGLP) are predominant components present in this active fraction. These results have important implications for the development of new immunotherapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of TB. PMID:27297390

  19. Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Cell Wall Components as Tools for Ochratoxin A Decontamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Piotrowska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall preparations in the adsorption of ochratoxin A (OTA. The study involved the use of a brewer’s yeast cell wall devoid of protein substances, glucans obtained by water and alkaline extraction, a glucan commercially available as a dietary supplement for animals and, additionally, dried brewer’s yeast for comparison. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR analysis of the obtained preparations showed bands characteristic for glucans in the resulting spectra. The yeast cell wall preparation, water-extracted glucan and the commercial glucan bound the highest amount of ochratoxin A, above 55% of the initial concentration, and the alkaline-extracted glucan adsorbed the lowest amount of this toxin. It has been shown that adsorption is most effective at a close-to-neutral pH, while being considerably limited in alkaline conditions.

  20. Real time outdoor exposure testing of solar cell modules and component materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, E.; Forestieri, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Plastic samples, solar cell modules, and sub-modules were exposed at test sites in Florida, Arizona, Puerto Rico, and Cleveland, Ohio, in order to determine materials suitable for use in solar cell modules with a proposed 20-year lifetime. Various environments were encountered including subtropical, subtropical with a sea air atmosphere, desert, rain forest, normal urban, and urban-polluted. The samples were exposed for periods up to six months. Materials found not suitable were polyurethane, polyester, Kapton, Mylar, and UV-stabilized Lexan. Suitable materials were acrylic, FEP-A, and glass. The results of exposure of polyvinylidene fluoride were dependent on the specific formulation, but several types appear suitable. RTV silicone rubber (clear) appears to pick up and hold dirt both as a free film and as a potting medium for modules. The results indicate that dirt accumulation and cleanability are important factors in the selection of solar cell module covers and encapsulants.

  1. Growth of hybridoma cells in serum-free medium: ethanolamine is an essential component.

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, H.; Masui, H; Sato, G H; Sueoka, N; Chow, T P; Kano-Sueoka, T

    1982-01-01

    A serum-free medium supplemented with a few growth factors was devised to grow lymphocyte hybridomas. The medium was developed with the hybridoma line MPC11-BL, a fusion product between a mouse plasmacytoma cell line (MPC11TG70na3) and mouse (BALB/c) spleen cells. In the process of developing the medium, ethanolamine was found to be an essential growth factor for the hybridoma. Phosphoethanolamine at 10-fold higher concentration could substitute for ethanolamine. Long-term cultivation of the ...

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Components for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells And Electrolyzers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede

    it might become possible to use non-noble metal catalysts. On the other hand, the temperature is low enough for a wide range of materials to be used as construction materials. In this work a set-up was built and fuel cell hardware was made for demonstration of fuel cells for the intermediate temperature...... and other materials must be sought for. It was attempted to use stainless steel (316L), this however corroded and therefore a protective tantalum coating was applied. The tantalum coatings were found to be corrosion resistant and furthermore provided extremely low interfacial contact resistances of only 1...

  3. Enzymatic production of atranorin: a component of the oak moss absolute by immobilized lichen cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, C; Fontaniella, B; Millanes, A M; Sebastián, B; Legaz, M E

    2003-04-01

    Cells of the lichen, Evernia prunastri, immobilized in calcium alginate were able to produce the depside atranorin from acetate. The synthesis of the depside was enhanced by molecular oxygen and NADH. This enhancement suggested the participation of an oxidase and an alcohol dehydrogenase to produce an aldehyde-substituted phenolic acid, hematommic acid, as the most probable precursor of atranorin. The participation of both enzymes was confirmed by loading immobilized cells with sodium azide, an inhibitor of several metallo-oxidases, and pyrazole, an inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase, which impeded atranorin production and accumulated beta-methyl orsellinate (after azide loading) or its alcohol derivative (after pirazole treatment). PMID:18494879

  4. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with bilateral middle cerebellar peduncle lesions confirmed by repeated CSF-JC virus tests and coexistence of JC virus granule cell neuronopathy. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Yasui, Keizo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Katsuno, Masahisa; Takahashi, Akira

    2016-07-28

    A 65 year-old woman with small lymphocytic leukemia presented with subacute cerebellar ataxia. Six months after rituximab chemotherapy, a cranial MRI revealed lesions in the bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles. Both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) JC virus (JCV)-DNA PCR test on three occasions and brain biopsy were negative. CSF tests were repeated. The fourth test performed 6 months after the onset showed positive JCV-DNA, and a definite diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) was made. Neuroimaging of cerebellar atrophy was considered to be coexistence of granule cell neuronopathy. Medication with mirtazapine and mefloquine was temporarily effective for several months. Little are known solitary bilateral MRI lesions of the middle cerebellar peduncle in PML. JCV-PCR test of CSF may be negative at an earlier stage of PML. Repeated CSF tests should be essential to confirming the diagnosis in such cases. PMID:27356732

  5. Copy number of tandem direct repeats within the inverted repeats of Marek's disease virus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, A; Nakajima, K; Ikuta, K; Ueda, S; Kato, S; Hirai, K

    1986-12-01

    We previously reported that DNA of the oncogenic strain BC-1 of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1) contains three units of tandem direct repeats with 132 base pair (bp) repeats within the inverted repeats of the long regions of the MDV1 genome, whereas the attenuated, nononcogenic viral DNA contains multiple units of tandem direct repeats (Maotani et al., 1986). In the present study, the difference in the copy numbers of 132 bp repeats of oncogenic and nononcogenic MDV1 DNAs in other strains of MDV1 was investigated by Southern blot hybridization. The main copy numbers in different oncogenic MDV1 strains differed: those of BC-1, JM and highly oncogenic Md5 were 3, 5 to 12 and 2, respectively. The viral DNA population with two units of repeats was small, but detectable, in cells infected with either the oncogenic BC-1 or JM strain. The MDV1 DNA in various MD cell lines contained either two units or both two and three units of repeats. The significance of the copy number of repeats in oncogenicity of MDV1 is discussed.

  6. The molecular components of phospho- and glycolipid metabolism in plant cell membranes under the phosphorus deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svietlova N. B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the aspects of molecular regulation of phosphorus metabolism in plants, the lipid components of membrane structures, has been reviewed. The refocusing of phosphoand glycolipid metabolism is an indicator of phosphorus accessibility in plants. The compensatory mechanisms of substitution of phospholipids with non-phosphorus containing glycolipids in membranes, allow plants to adapt to the phosphate (Pi starvation. Phospholipids are the reserve pool of cellular phosphorus at reutilization of ions in the donor-acceptor system of plants. The mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of genes involved in the synthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids under Pi deficit have been analyzed.

  7. Storage-induced increase in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation in red blood cell components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucukakin, B.; Kocak, Volkan; Lykkesfeldt, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    buffy-coat reduced red cells in SAG-M additive solution, by assessing biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress during a storage period of 35 days. Study design and methods. Ten units of RBCs were stored for 35 days. Samples were collected from the units at storage days 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35...

  8. Basement membrane components secreted by mouse yolk sac carcinoma cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damjanov, A; Wewer, U M; Tuma, B;

    1990-01-01

    Three new cell lines (NE, ME, LRD) were cloned from mouse-embryo-derived teratocarcinomas and characterized on the basis of developmental, ultrastructural, and cytochemical criteria as nullipotent embryonal carcinoma (EC), pure parietal yolk sac (PYS) carcinoma and mixed parieto-visceral yolk sac...

  9. Raman Spectroscopy and Microscopy of Individual Cells andCellular Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J; Fore, S; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S; Huser, T

    2008-05-15

    Raman spectroscopy provides the unique opportunity to non-destructively analyze chemical concentrations on the submicron length scale in individual cells without the need for optical labels. This enables the rapid assessment of cellular biochemistry inside living cells, and it allows for their continuous analysis to determine cellular response to external events. Here, we review recent developments in the analysis of single cells, subcellular compartments, and chemical imaging based on Raman spectroscopic techniques. Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy provides for the full spectral assessment of cellular biochemistry, while coherent Raman techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering is primarily used as an imaging tool comparable to confocal fluorescence microscopy. These techniques are complemented by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, which provides higher sensitivity and local specificity, and also extends the techniques to chemical indicators, i.e. pH sensing. We review the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, demonstrate some of their applications and discuss their potential for future research in cell biology and biomedicine.

  10. Cell surface-expressed moesin-like receptor regulates T cell interactions with tissue components and binds an adhesion-modulating IL-2 peptide generated by elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, A; Hershkoviz, R; Altbaum-Weiss, I; Ganor, S; Lider, O

    2001-03-01

    The adhesion of leukocytes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) depends on their responses to variations in the chemotactic signals in their milieu, as well as on the functioning of cytoskeletal and context-specific receptors. Ezrin, radixin, and moesin constitute a family of proteins that link the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton. The surface expression of moesin on T cells and its role in cell adhesion has not been fully elucidated. Recently, we found that IL-2 peptides generated by elastase modified the adhesion of activated T cells to ECM ligands. Here, we further examined the adhesion regulatory effects of EFLNRWIT, one of the IL-2 peptides, as well as the existence and putative function of its receptor on T cells. We found that when presented to T cells in the absence of another activator, the EFLNRWIT peptide induced cell adhesion to vessel wall and ECM components. Binding of a radiolabeled peptide to T cells, precipitation with the immobilized peptide, and amino acid sequencing of the precipitated protein revealed that EFLNRWIT exerts its function via a cell surface-expressed moesin-like moiety, whose constitutive expression on T cells was increased after activation. This notion was further supported by our findings that: 1) anti-moesin mAb inhibited the binding of T cells to the immobilized EFLNRWIT peptide, 2) immobilized recombinant moesin bound the IL-2 peptide, and 3) soluble moesin inhibited the EFLNRWIT-induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin. Interestingly, moesin appears to be generally involved in T cell responses to adhesion-regulating signals. Thus, the IL-2 peptide EFLNRWIT appears to exert its modulating capacities via an adhesion-regulating moesin-like receptor. PMID:11207255

  11. Prospective use of the 3D printing technology for the microstructural engineering of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Rodriguez, E. M.; Acosta-Mora, P.; Mendez-Ramos, J.; Borges Chinea, E.; Esparza Ferrera, P.; Canales-Vazquez, J.; Nunez, P.; Ruiz-Morales, J.

    2014-07-01

    A cost-effective micro-manufacturing process to accurately build 3D microstructures for their prospective use in the fabrication of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells components has been tested. The 3D printing method, based on the stereo lithography, allows solidifying layer by layer a dispersion of ceramic material in a liquid photosensitive organic monomer. A simple projector, a computer-controlled z-stage and a few PowerPoint slides may be used for the fabrication of a wide range of complex 3D microstructures in few minutes. In this work, 3D ceramic microstructures based on the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were successfully fabricated. The micro structured ceramic components produced were stable after sintering at 1400 degree centigrade for 4 h. Impedance measurements show that the fabrication process does not have any detrimental effect on the electrical properties of the structured material. (Author)

  12. Prospective use of the 3D printing technology for the microstructural engineering of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cost-effective micro-manufacturing process to accurately build 3D microstructures for their prospective use in the fabrication of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells components has been tested. The 3D printing method, based on the stereo lithography, allows solidifying layer by layer a dispersion of ceramic material in a liquid photosensitive organic monomer. A simple projector, a computer-controlled z-stage and a few PowerPoint slides may be used for the fabrication of a wide range of complex 3D microstructures in few minutes. In this work, 3D ceramic microstructures based on the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were successfully fabricated. The micro structured ceramic components produced were stable after sintering at 1400 degree centigrade for 4 h. Impedance measurements show that the fabrication process does not have any detrimental effect on the electrical properties of the structured material. (Author)

  13. Recent Progress on the Key Materials and Components for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells in Vehicle Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel cells are the most clean and efficient power source for vehicles. In particular, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs are the most promising candidate for automobile applications due to their rapid start-up and low-temperature operation. Through extensive global research efforts in the latest decade, the performance of PEMFCs, including energy efficiency, volumetric and mass power density, and low temperature startup ability, have achieved significant breakthroughs. In 2014, fuel cell powered vehicles were introduced into the market by several prominent vehicle companies. However, the low durability and high cost of PEMFC systems are still the main obstacles for large-scale industrialization of this technology. The key materials and components used in PEMFCs greatly affect their durability and cost. In this review, the technical progress of key materials and components for PEMFCs has been summarized and critically discussed, including topics such as the membrane, catalyst layer, gas diffusion layer, and bipolar plate. The development of high-durability processing technologies is also introduced. Finally, this review is concluded with personal perspectives on the future research directions of this area.

  14. Somatically expressed germ-granule components, PGL-1 and PGL-3, repress programmed cell death in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Mohammad; Min, Hyemin; Shim, Yhong-Hee; Kawasaki, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that germline apoptosis in C. elegans increased by loss of PGL-1 and PGL-3, members of a family of constitutive germ-granule components, from germ cells in adult hermaphrodite gonads. In this study, we found that somatic apoptosis was reduced in synthetic multivulva class B (synMuv B) mutants due to ectopic expression of PGL-1 and PGL-3 in the soma. In synMuv B-mutant somatic cells, CED-4 expression level was reduced due to ectopic expression of PGL-1. Furthermore, in contrast to wild type, somatic apoptosis in synMuv B mutants increased following DNA damage in a SIR-2.1-dependent manner. Intriguingly, somatic apoptosis was repressed not only in synMuv B mutants but also by ectopically expressing pgl-1 and/or pgl-3 transgenes in wild-type somatic cells. Our study demonstrates that germ-granule components, PGL-1 and PGL-3, can serve as negative regulators of apoptosis not only in the germline but also in the soma in C. elegans. PMID:27650246

  15. Analysis of coal tar pitch and smoke extract components and their cytotoxicity on human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhitao; Wu, Yongjun; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Lixia; Zhu, Hansong; Qin, Lijuan; Feng, Feifei; Wang, Wei; Wu, Yiming

    2011-02-28

    Coal tar pitch and its smoke are considered hazardous by-products and common pollutant generated from coal industry processing. In this study, coal tar pitch and its smoke extracts were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with dimethylsulfoxide. We identified only 0.3025% of components in the total coal tar pitch using GC/MS. Among 18 identified compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has the highest relative abundance (0.19%). The remaining components were composed of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic compounds and alkenes. In contrast, among 38 coal tar pitch smoke extract constituents that have been profiled, 87.91% were PAHs, and the remaining 12.09% were composed of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic compounds and alkenes. The cytotoxic effect of coal tar pitch and its smoke extracts on BEAS-2B cells were also evaluated by MTT assay. BEAS-2B cells exposed to coal tar pitch showed a non dose-dependent U-shaped cytotoxicity with a dosage for maximal inhibitory of 3.75 mg/L. In contrast, BEAS-2B cells exposed to coal tar pitch smoke extracts showed a dose dependent cytotoxicity with a LC(50) of 8.64 mg/L. Our study demonstrated the significant different composition and cytotoxicity of coal tar pitch and its extracts, suggesting two different underlying mechanisms that are pending future investigation.

  16. Fission yeast Nod1 is a component of cortical nodes involved in cell size control and division site placement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Jourdain

    Full Text Available Most cells enter mitosis once they have reached a defined size. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, mitotic entry is orchestrated by a geometry-sensing mechanism that involves the Cdk1/Cdc2-inhibiting Wee1 kinase. The factors upstream of Wee1 gather together in interphase to form a characteristic medial and cortical belt of nodes. Nodes are also considered to be precursors of the cytokinesis contractile actomyosin ring (CAR. Here we describe a new component of the interphase nodes and cytokinesis rings, which we named Nod1. Consistent with its role in cell size control at division, nod1Δ cells were elongated and epistatic with regulators of Wee1. Through biochemical and localisation studies, we placed Nod1 in a complex with the Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor Gef2. Nod1 and Gef2 mutually recruited each other in nodes and Nod1 also assembles Gef2 in rings. Like gef2Δ, nod1Δ cells showed a mild displacement of their division plane and this phenotype was severely exacerbated when the parallel Polo kinase pathway was also compromised. We conclude that Nod1 specifies the division site by localising Gef2 to the mitotic cell middle. Previous work showed that Gef2 in turn anchors factors that control the spatio-temporal recruitment of the actin nucleation machinery. It is believed that the actin filaments originated from the nodes pull nodes together into a single contractile ring. Surprisingly however, we found that node proteins could form pre-ring helical filaments in a cdc12-112 mutant in which nucleation of the actin ring is impaired. Furthermore, the deletion of either nod1 or gef2 created an un-expected situation where different ring components were recruited sequentially rather than simultaneously. At later stages of cytokinesis, these various rings appeared inter-fitted rather than merged. This study brings a new slant to the understanding of CAR assembly and function.

  17. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  18. Patterns Prediction of Chemotherapy Sensitivity in Cancer Cell lines Using FTIR Spectrum, Neural Network and Principal Components Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendehdel, Rezvan; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; H Shirazi, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance enables cancer cells to break away from cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs. Identification of resistant phenotype is very important because it can lead to effective treatment plan. There is an interest in developing classifying models of resistance phenotype based on the multivariate data. We have investigated a vibrational spectroscopic approach in order to characterize a sensitive human ovarian cell line, A2780, and its cisplatin-resistant derivative, A2780-cp. In this study FTIR method have been evaluated via the use of principal components analysis (PCA), ANN (artificial neuronal network) and LDA (linear discriminate analysis). FTIR spectroscopy on these cells in the range of 400-4000 cm(-1) showed alteration in the secondary structure of proteins and a CH stretching vibration. We have found that the ANN models correctly classified more than 95% of the cell lines, while the LDA models with the same data sets could classify 85% of cases. In the process of different ranges of spectra, the best classification of data set in the range of 1000-2000 cm(-1) was done using ANN model, while the data set between 2500-3000 cm(-1) was more correctly classified with the LDA model. PCA of the spectral data also provide a good separation for representing the variety of cell line spectra. Our work supports the promise of ANN analysis of FTIR spectrum as a supervised powerful approach and PCA as unsupervised modeling for the development of automated methods to determine the resistant phenotype of cancer classification.

  19. 2-ethylpyridine, a cigarette smoke component, causes mitochondrial damage in human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mansoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Our goal was to identify the cellular and molecular effects of 2-ethylpyridine (2-EP, a component of cigarette smoke on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 in vitro. Materials and Methods: ARPE-19 cells were exposed to varying concentrations of 2-EP. Cell viability (CV was measured by a trypan blue dye exclusion assay. Caspase-3/7 and caspase-9 activities were measured by fluorochrome assays. The production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS was detected with a 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate dye assay. The JC-1 assay was used to measure mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm. Mitochondrial redox potential was measured using a RedoxSensor Red kit and mitochondria were evaluated with Mitotracker dye. Results: After 2-EP exposure, ARPE-19 cells showed significantly decreased CV, increased caspase-3/7 and caspase-9 activities, elevated ROS/RNS levels, decreased ΔΨm value and decreased redox fluorescence when compared with control samples. Conclusions: These results show that 2-EP treatment induced cell death by caspase-dependent apoptosis associated with an oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. These data represent a possible mechanism by which smoking contributes to age-related macular degeneration and other retinal diseases and identify mitochondria as a target for future therapeutic interventions.

  20. Characterization of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Components Using Electromagnetic Model-Based Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilberstein, Vladimir; Craven, Chris; Goldfine, Neil

    2004-12-28

    In this Phase I SBIR, the contractor demonstrated a number of capabilities of model-based sensors such as MWM sensors and MWM-Arrays. The key results include (1) porosity/microstructure characterization for anodes, (2) potential for cathode material characterization, (3) stress measurements in nickel and cobalt, and (4) potential for stress measurements in non-magnetic materials with a ferromagnetic layer. In addition, potential applications for manufacturing quality control of nonconductive layers using interdigitated electrode dielectrometers have been identified. The results indicate that JENTEK's MWM technology can be used to significantly reduce solid oxide fuel cell production and operating costs in a number of ways. Preliminary investigations of solid oxide fuel cell health monitoring and scale-up issues to address industry needs have also been performed.

  1. Pro-inflammatory response and oxidative stress induced by specific components in ambient particulate matter in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lawei; Liu, Gang; Lin, Ziying; Wang, Yahong; He, Huijuan; Liu, Tie; Kamp, David W

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that biological effect of particulate matter (PM2.5) is involved in including chemical composition and mass concentration, but the precise components and biological action on human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) are still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro toxicity of PM2.5 collected at six urban sites in China, and to investigate how particle composition affects cytotoxicity. We used human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell lines as model in vitro to expose to PM2.5 from different source, and then reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide dismutase activity and total antioxidant capacity were analyzed. Furthermore, we estimated the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and transition metal and the endotoxin contents. The mRNA expression of IL-1β and IL-10 following exposure to PM2.5 was measured by QRT-PCR. We also observed the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) using JC-1 staining, and apoptosis of BEAS-2B using flow cytometry. In addition, double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) were assessed using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence. Our results show that high concentrations of PAHs and elemental Ni were strongly associated with high apoptosis rates and high expression of IL-1β, in addition, Fe element was associated with the ROS level, furthermore, Fe and Cr element were associated with DNA damage in BEAS-2B cells. The cytotoxic effects of urban PM2.5 derived from six different cities in China appear dependent on the specific components in each. Our results indicate that air quality standards based on PM2.5 components may be more relevant than concentration-response functions (CRF). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 923-936, 2016. PMID:25533354

  2. [Therapeutic potential of human mesenchymal stromal cells secreted components: a problem with standartization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaradze, G D; Grigorieva, O A; Efimenko, A Yu; Chaplenko, A A; Suslina, S N; Sysoeva, V Yu; Kalinina, N I; Akopyan, Zh A; Tkachuk, V A

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine approaches, such as replacement of damaged tissue by ex vivo manufactured constructions or stimulation of endogenous reparative and regenerative processes to treat different diseases, are actively developing. One of the major tools for regenerative medicine are stem and progenitor cells, including multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). Because the paracrine action of bioactive factors secreted by MSC is considered as a main mechanism underlying MSC regenerative effects, application of MSC extracellular secreted products could be a promising approach to stimulate tissue regeneration; it also has some advantages compared to the injection of the cells themselves. However, because of the complexity of composition and multiplicity of mechanisms of action distinguished the medicinal products based on bioactive factors secreted by human MSC from the most of pharmaceuticals, it is important to develop the approaches to their standardization and quality control. In the current study, based on the literature data and guidelines as well as on our own experimental results, we provided rationalization for nomenclature and methods of quality control for the complex of extracellular products secreted by human adipose-derived MSC on key indicators, such as "Identification", "Specific activity" and "Biological safety". Developed approaches were tested on the samples of conditioned media contained products secreted by MSC isolated from subcutaneous adipose tissue of 30 donors. This strategy for the standardization of innovative medicinal products and biomaterials based on the bioactive extracellular factors secreted by human MSC could be applicable for a wide range of bioactive complex products, produced using the different types of stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26716748

  3. Process for recycling components of a PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Lawrence

    2012-02-28

    The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a PEM fuel cell can be recycled by contacting the MEA with a lower alkyl alcohol solvent which separates the membrane from the anode and cathode layers of the assembly. The resulting solution containing both the polymer membrane and supported noble metal catalysts can be heated under mild conditions to disperse the polymer membrane as particles and the supported noble metal catalysts and polymer membrane particles separated by known filtration means.

  4. Desmosomal Component Expression in Normal, Dysplastic, and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nagamani Narayana; Julie Gist; Tyler Smith; Daniel Tylka; Gavin Trogdon; Wahl, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (oral SCC) is the most common oral cancer in the U.S., affecting nearly 30,000 Americans each year. Despite recent advances in detection and treatment, there has been little improvement in the five-year survival rate for this devastating disease. Oral cancer may be preceded by premalignant disease that appears histologically as dysplasia. Identification of molecular markers for cellular change would assist in determining the risk of dysplasia progressing to oral squamo...

  5. A novel pseudopodial component of the dendritic cell anti-fungal response: the fungipod.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron K Neumann

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal pathologies are seen in immunocompromised and healthy humans. C-type lectins expressed on immature dendritic cells (DC recognize fungi. We report a novel dorsal pseudopodial protrusion, the "fungipod", formed by DC after contact with yeast cell walls. These structures have a convoluted cell-proximal end and a smooth distal end. They persist for hours, exhibit noticeable growth and total 13.7+/-5.6 microm long and 1.8+/-0.67 microm wide at the contact. Fungipods contain clathrin and an actin core surrounded by a sheath of cortactin. The actin cytoskeleton, but not microtubules, is required for fungipod integrity and growth. An apparent rearward flow (225+/-55 nm/second exists from the zymosan contact site into the distal fungipod. The phagocytic receptor Dectin-1 is not required for fungipod formation, but CD206 (Mannose Receptor is the generative receptor for these protrusions. The human pathogen Candida parapsilosis induces DC fungipod formation strongly, but the response is species specific since the related fungal pathogens Candida tropicalis and Candida albicans induce very few and no fungipods, respectively. Our findings show that fungipods are dynamic actin-driven cellular structures involved in fungal recognition by DC. They may promote yeast particle phagocytosis by DC and are a specific response to large (i.e., 5 microm particulate ligands. Our work also highlights the importance of this novel protrusive structure to innate immune recognition of medically significant Candida yeasts in a species specific fashion.

  6. Emp is a component of the nuclear matrix of mammalian cells and undergoes dynamic rearrangements during cell division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emp, originally detected in erythroblastic islands, is expressed in numerous cell types and tissues suggesting a functionality not limited to hematopoiesis. To study the function of Emp in non-hematopoietic cells, an epitope-tagged recombinant human Emp was expressed in HEK cells. Preliminary studies revealed that Emp partitioned into both the nuclear and Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeletal fractions in approximately a 4:1 ratio. In this study, we report investigations of Emp in the nucleus. Sequential extractions of interphase nuclei showed that recombinant Emp was present predominantly in the nuclear matrix. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that Emp was present in typical nuclear speckles enriched with the spliceosome assembly factor SC35 and partially co-localized with actin staining. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down assays confirmed the apparent close association of Emp with nuclear actin. During mitosis, Emp was detected at the mitotic spindle/spindle poles, as well as in the contractile ring during cytokinesis. These results suggest that Emp undergoes dynamic rearrangements within the nuclear architecture that are correlated with cell division

  7. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Part 2. Physical radiations and biological significance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report comprises a teaching text, encompassing all physical radiations likely to be of biological interest, and the relevant biological effects and their significance. Topics include human radiobiology, delayed effects, radiation absorption in organisms, aqueous radiation chemistry, cell radiobiology, mutagenesis, and photobiology

  8. Formula Compatibility Identification of Dachengqi Decoction Based on the Effects of Absorbed Components in Cerulein-Injured Pancreatic AR42J Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify the herbal formula compatibility law based on the effects of the absorbed components from DCQD on the cerulein-injured AR42J cells. Methods. AR42J cells were pretreated for 30 min with or without the different concentrations of the absorbed components from DCQD individually or in combination or DCQD and coincubated with cerulein (10 nM for a further 24 h. Cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, and the levels of apoptosis and necrosis were measured. Results. Compared to DCQD, the individual or combination components partially protected cerulein-injured AR42J cells by increasing cell viability, reducing LDH release, and promoting apoptosis. Rhein, naringin, and honokiol were the main absorbed components from DCQD in cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, rhein in combination with naringin and honokiol had synergistic effects in protecting cerulein-injured AR42J cells and was better than the individual or the pairwise combination of the three components. Conclusions. The ten effective components from DCQD may elicit similar protective effects as DCQD on cerulein-induced pancreatitis. The principle of the formula compatibility of DCQD may be identified based on the effects of its absorbed components in cerulein-injured AR42J cells.

  9. Formula Compatibility Identification of Dachengqi Decoction Based on the Effects of Absorbed Components in Cerulein-Injured Pancreatic AR42J Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumei; Zhu, Lin; Wang, Jia; Zhao, Jianlei; Zhao, Xianlin; Guo, Hui; Li, Juan; Tang, Wenfu

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify the herbal formula compatibility law based on the effects of the absorbed components from DCQD on the cerulein-injured AR42J cells. Methods. AR42J cells were pretreated for 30 min with or without the different concentrations of the absorbed components from DCQD individually or in combination or DCQD and coincubated with cerulein (10 nM) for a further 24 h. Cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and the levels of apoptosis and necrosis were measured. Results. Compared to DCQD, the individual or combination components partially protected cerulein-injured AR42J cells by increasing cell viability, reducing LDH release, and promoting apoptosis. Rhein, naringin, and honokiol were the main absorbed components from DCQD in cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, rhein in combination with naringin and honokiol had synergistic effects in protecting cerulein-injured AR42J cells and was better than the individual or the pairwise combination of the three components. Conclusions. The ten effective components from DCQD may elicit similar protective effects as DCQD on cerulein-induced pancreatitis. The principle of the formula compatibility of DCQD may be identified based on the effects of its absorbed components in cerulein-injured AR42J cells. PMID:27123032

  10. Analytical Research to Determine the effects of the Components of ONGABO on the Viability of HepG2 Cancer Cells by Using the Sovereign, Minister, Assistant and Courier Principle (君臣佐使論

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Jeong-Hun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study used the basic principle of Oriental medicine, the sovereign, minister, assistant and courier principle (君臣佐使論 to investigate the effects of the component of ONGABO, which is composed of Ginseng Radix (Red Ginseng, Angelica Gigantis Radix, Schisandrae Fructus, Cuscuta Semen and Curcumae tuber on the viability of HepG2 cells. Methods: Single and mixed extracts of the component of ONGABO were prepared by lypohilizing powder of Red Ginseng (6-year root from Kanghwa, Angelica Gigantis Radix, Schisandrae Fructus, Cuscuta Semen, Curcumae Tuber (from Omniherb Co., Ltd., Korea at the laboratory of herbal medicine in Woosuk University and were eluted after being macerated with 100% ethanol for three days. The cell viability of HepG2 was determined by using an absorptiometric analysis with PrestoBlue (Invitrogen reagent after the plate had been incubated for 48 hours. All of the experiments were repeated three times to obtain the average value and standard deviation. The statistical analysis was done and the correlation factor was obtained by using Microsoft Office Excel 2007 and Origin 6.0 software. Results: Although Ginseng Radix (Red Ginseng and Schisandrae Fructus did not enhance the viability of HepG2 cells, they were shown to provide protection of those cells. On the other hand, Angelica Gigantis Radix decreased the viability of HepG2 cells significantly, Cuscuta Semen and Curcumae Tuber had a small or no effect on the viability of HepG2 cells. Conclusions: In the sovereign, minister, assistant and courier principle (君臣佐使論, Ginseng Radix (Red Ginseng corresponds to the sovereign component because it provides cell protection effects, Angelica Gigantis Radix corresponds to minister medicinal because it kills cells, Schisandrae Fructus corresponds to the assistant medicinal to help red ginseng having cell protect effects. Cuscuta Semen and Curcumae Tuber correspond to the courier medicinal having no effect in

  11. The Transmembrane Electrical Potential in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides Determined from the Distribution of Tetraphenylphosphonium after Correction for Its Binding to Cell Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.; Abbing, Arend; Hellingwerf, K; Konings, Wilhelmus

    1983-01-01

    The membrane potential was determined in intact cells of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides from the distribution of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (Ph4P+) after correction for probe binding to cell components. The concentration of Ph4P+ in the external medium of the cells was recorded with

  12. Fluorescence Quenching Property of C-Phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis and its Binding Efficacy with Viable Cell Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paswan, Meenakshi B; Chudasama, Meghna M; Mitra, Madhusree; Bhayani, Khushbu; George, Basil; Chatterjee, Shruti; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-03-01

    Phycocyanin is a natural brilliant blue colored, fluorescent protein, which is commonly present in cyanobacteria. In this study, C-phycocyanin was extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis, which are multicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria of greater importance because of its various biological and pharmacological potential. It was analyzed for its binding affinity towards blood cells, algal cells, genomic DNA of microalgae, and bacteria at different temperature and incubation time. It showed good binding affinity with these components even at low concentration of 2.5 μM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of C-phycocyanin as a green fluorescent dye substituting carcinogenic chemical dyes. PMID:26678758

  13. Thrombin regulates components of the fibrinolytic system in human mesangial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides its procoagulant activity, thrombin has been shown to stimulate cell proliferation and to regulate the fibrinolytic pathway. We report here the effect of purified human alpha thrombin on the synthesis of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) by cultured human mesangial cells. Thrombin (0 to 2.5 U/ml) increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner the production of t-PA and PAI-1 (2- to 3-fold increase of secreted t-PA and PAI-1 release during a 24 hour incubation). This effect was associated with a twofold increase in DNA synthesis measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation. Zymographic analysis and reverse fibrin autography showed that thrombin also increased the level of the 110 Kd t-PA-PAI-1 complex, whereas PAI-1 was present as a free 50 Kd form in the culture medium conditioned by unstimulated and thrombin-stimulated cells. Free t-PA was never observed. Both membrane binding and catalytic activity of thrombin were required since the effects of 1 U/ml thrombin were inhibited by addition 2 U/ml hirudin, which inhibits the membrane binding and catalytic activity of thrombin, and since DFP-inactivated thrombin, which has the ability to bind but which has no enzymatic activity, did not induce t-PA or PAI-1. Gamma thrombin, which does not bind to thrombin receptor, did not increase t-PA and PAI-1 releases. The effects of thrombin were probably mediated by protein kinase C activation since H7, an inhibitor of protein kinases, inhibited significantly thrombin effects on t-PA and PAI-1 production, and since addition of an activator of protein kinase A, 8-bromocyclic AMP (100 microM), induced a significant inhibition of the thrombin effect. The effects of thrombin were also suppressed by 1.25 micrograms/ml alpha amanitin, suggesting a requirement of de novo RNA synthesis

  14. In Cell Interactome of Oleocanthal, an Extra Virgin Olive Oil Bioactive Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiano, Chiara; Casapullo, Agostino; Tosco, Alessandra; Monti, Maria Chiara; Riccio, Raffaele

    2015-06-01

    A copper-(I)-catalyzed variation of the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition has been applied to lead the in living-cell mass-spectrometry based identification of protein targets of oleocanthal, a natural metabolite daily ingested by millions of people. Chemical proteomics revealed heat-shock proteins, HSP70 and HSP90, as main oleocanthal interactors in living systems. These two proteins are involved in cancer development and, thus, our findings could have important outcomes for a deep evaluation of the bio-pharmacological significance of oleocanthal. PMID:26197539

  15. Genus-specific protein binding to the large clusters of DNA repeats (short regularly spaced repeats) present in Sulfolobus genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Shen, Biao;

    2003-01-01

    Short regularly spaced repeats (SRSRs) occur in multiple large clusters in archaeal chromosomes and as smaller clusters in some archaeal conjugative plasmids and bacterial chromosomes. The sequence, size, and spacing of the repeats are generally constant within a cluster but vary between clusters....... For the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2, the repeats in the genome fall mainly into two closely related sequence families that are arranged in seven clusters containing a total of 441 repeats which constitute ca. 1% of the genome. The Sulfolobus conjugative plasmid pNOB8 contains a small cluster of six repeats...... that are identical in sequence to one of the repeat variants in the S. solfataricus chromosome. Repeats from the pNOB8 cluster were amplified and tested for protein binding with cell extracts from S. solfataricus. A 17.5-kDa SRSR-binding protein was purified from the cell extracts and sequenced. The protein is N...

  16. Thermally labile components of aqueous humor potently induce osteogenic potential in adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Joshua T; Kwon, Heung Sun; Wood, Joshua A; Borjesson, Dori L; Tomarev, Stanislav I; Murphy, Christopher J; Russell, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) hold promise for use in cell-based therapies. Their intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties are potentially useful for treatments of inflammatory conditions such as uveitis, while their ability to differentiate along multiple cell lineages suggests use in regenerating damaged or degenerated tissue. However, how ASCs will respond to the intraocular environment is poorly studied. We have recently reported that aqueous humor (AH), the fluid that nourishes the anterior segment of the eye, potently increases alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of ASCs, indicating osteogenic differentiation. Here, we expand on our previous findings to better define the nature of this response. To this end, we cultured ASCs in the presence of 0, 5, 10, and 20% AH and assayed them for ALP activity. We found ALP activity correlates with increasing AH concentrations from 5 to 20%, and that longer treatments result in increased ALP activity. By using serum free media and pretreating AH with dextran-coated charcoal, we found that serum and charcoal-adsorbable AH components augment but are not required for this response. Further, by heat-treating the AH, we established that thermally labile components are required for the osteogenic response. Finally, we showed myocilin, a protein present in AH, could induce ALP activity in ASCs. However, this was to a lesser extent than untreated 5% AH, and myocilin could only partially rescue the effect after heat treatment, documenting there were additional thermally labile constituents of AH involved in the osteogenic response. Our work adds to the understanding of the induction of ALP in ASCs following exposure to AH, providing important insight in how ASCs will be influenced by the ocular environment. In conclusion, increased osteogenic potential upon exposure to AH represents a potential challenge to developing ASC cell-based therapies directed at the eye.

  17. CRISPRs for Optimal Targeting: Delivery of CRISPR Components as DNA, RNA, and Protein into Cultured Cells and Single-Cell Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouranova, Evguenia; Forbes, Kevin; Zhao, Guojun; Warren, Joe; Bartels, Angela; Wu, Yumei; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2016-06-01

    The rapid development of CRISPR technology greatly impacts the field of genetic engineering. The simplicity in design and generation of highly efficient CRISPR reagents allows more and more researchers to take on genome editing in different model systems in their own labs, even for those who found it daunting before. An active CRISPR complex contains a protein component (Cas9) and an RNA component (small guide RNA [sgRNA]), which can be delivered into cells in various formats. Cas9 can be introduced as a DNA expression plasmid, in vitro transcripts, or as a recombinant protein bound to the RNA portion in a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), whereas the sgRNA can be delivered either expressed as a DNA plasmid or as an in vitro transcript. Here we compared the different delivery methods in cultured cell lines as well as mouse and rat single-cell embryos and view the RNPs as the most convenient and efficient to use. We also report the detection of limited off-targeting in cells and embryos and discuss approaches to lower that chance. We hope that researchers new to CRISPR find our results helpful to their adaptation of the technology for optimal gene editing. PMID:27094534

  18. Effects of stem structure and cell wall components on bending strength in wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Morphological traits, anatomical features, chemical components and bending stress in the stems of three genotypes of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), namely Xiaoyan54, 8602 and Xiaoyan81, were examined by means of light microscopy coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Noticeable changes in morphological and anatomical traits were observed, including outer radius of stem, the ratio of stem outer radius to stem wall thickness, various tissue proportions and variations among different types of vascular bundles. The results of chemical analysis revealed that Xiaoyan81 had the highest cellulose content in comparison with Xiaoyan54 and 8602, whereas lignin level in Xiaoyan81 was lower than that in 8602 but higher that that in Xiaoyan54. Bending stress analysis demonstrated that Xiaoyan81 may be the main target for identification, for it had the highest bending stress among the stems of three genotypes. Associated with bending stress, all the results presented here suggested that the ratio of stem wall thickness to its outer radius, schlerenchyma tissue proportion, the average number of big VB per unit and the cellulose content are four important factors affecting the mechanical strength of Xiaoyan81 wheat stems, which can be considered as the key parameters for selecting varieties with bending stress. Therefore, it was suggested that in the selection of lodging resistant cultivars one should consider those characterized with large ratio of outer radius of stem to stem wall thickness, greaterschlerenchyma tissue proportion, high average number of big VB per unit with high cellulose content in their stems.

  19. Growth factor priming differentially modulates components of the extracellular matrix proteome in chondrocytes and synovium-derived stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Alegre-Aguarón

    Full Text Available To make progress in cartilage repair it is essential to optimize protocols for two-dimensional cell expansion. Chondrocytes and SDSCs are promising cell sources for cartilage repair. We previously observed that priming with a specific growth factor cocktail (1 ng/mL transforming growth factor-β1, 5 ng/mL basic fibroblast growth factor, and 10 ng/mL platelet-derived growth factor-BB in two-dimensional culture, led to significant improvement in mechanical and biochemical properties of synovium-derived stem cell (SDSC-seeded constructs. The current study assessed the effect of growth factor priming on the proteome of canine chondrocytes and SDSCs. In particular, growth factor priming modulated the proteins associated with the extracellular matrix in two-dimensional cultures of chondrocytes and SDSCs, inducing a partial dedifferentiation of chondrocytes (most proteins associated with cartilage were down-regulated in primed chondrocytes and a partial differentiation of SDSCs (some collagen-related proteins were up-regulated in primed SDSCs. However, when chondrocytes and SDSCs were grown in pellet culture, growth factor-primed cells maintained their chondrogenic potential with respect to glycosaminoglycan and collagen production. In conclusion, the strength of the label-free proteomics technique is that it allows for the determination of changes in components of the extracellular matrix proteome in chondrocytes and SDSCs in response to growth factor priming, which could help in future tissue engineering strategies.

  20. Stability of CIGS solar cells and component materials evaluated by a step-stress accelerated degradation test method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15°C and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40°C/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85°C/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear "stepwise" feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH = 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and "capacitor quality" factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells' p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH >= 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS cell pieces was observed that was not seen on BZO/glass, and a CdS/CIGS sample displayed a small darkening and then

  1. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ≥ 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ≥ 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of

  2. Distribution of immunocompetent cells in the lungs of premature newborns on the background of some components of mother metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudyak O.M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In immunohistochemical researching of the local immune system of the lungs (90 premature newborns, 29-33 weeks gestation, divided into 3 groups with respect to the components of mothers metabolic syndrome , the features and patterns of distribution, quantitative indicators of immune cells in the bronchial and respiratory departments are detected. It was determined that children who belong to group №1 (mothers hypertension and dyslipidemia have the total depression of T-lymphocytes (CD3, reduction of helper function (CD4, mixed reaction of suppressors (CD8, decreasing the number of B-lymphocytes - subpopulations (CD20, inhibition of macrophagic function (CD68. In group№2 (mothers diabetes type 2 and dyslipidemia we observed depression of helper-suppressor functions (CD4, CD8, increasing of macrophagic reaction (CD68. Reducing of the absolute number of suppressor and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes subpopulations, a decreasing of B-lymphocytes (CD20 and inhibition of macrophagic functions (CD68 is observed in group№3 of children at the background of mothers adiposity and dyslipidemia. Reducing of expression of CD3 lymphocytes and levels of CD4 cells shows intensive reaction of cellular immunity in premature newborns. Comparative analysis of the immune status of the lungs of children in three groups with different components of mothers metabolic syndrome shows an acute disbalance of immunoregulation index, and the negative impact of mothers disease on histogenetic processes of respiratory organization.

  3. Preparation of CulnS2 Thin Films on the Glass Substrate by DC Sputtering for Solar Cell Component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CuInS2 alloys were deposited on glass substrate using plasma DC sputtering technique. A CuInS2 alloy target was made from Cu, In, Se powder with impurity of 99.998%. The deposition process was done with the following process parameter variations: deposition time and substrate temperature were the range of 15 to 45 min and 150 to 300 ℃, the gas pressure was kept at 1.4x10-1 Torr. The purpose of the research is to obtain the solar cell component of CuInS2 thin films. The electrical and optical properties measurement has been done by four-point probe and UV-Vis. Crystal structure was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The result shows that minimum resistance of CuInS2 thin films is 35.7 kΩ and optical transmittance is 14.7 %. The crystal structure of CuInS2 is oriented at (112) plane and by Touc-plot method was obtained that the band gap energy of thin films is 1.45 eV. It could be concluded that the CuInS2 thin film can be used as a solar cell component. (author)

  4. Targeting cancer stem cells with sulforaphane, a dietary component from broccoli and broccoli sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Tao

    2013-08-01

    Many studies have supported the protective effects of broccoli and broccoli sprouts against cancer. The chemopreventive properties of sulforaphane, which is derived from the principal glucosinolate of broccoli and broccoli sprouts, have been extensively studied. Recent research into the effects of sulforaphane on cancer stem cells (CSCs) has drawn lots of interest. CSCs are suggested to be responsible for initiating and maintaining cancer, and to contribute to recurrence and drug resistance. A number of studies have indicated that sulforaphane may target CSCs in different types of cancer through modulation of NF-κB, SHH, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. Combination therapy with sulforaphane and chemotherapy in preclinical settings has shown promising results. In this article, we focus on the effects of sulforaphane on CSCs and self-renewal pathways, as well as giving a brief review of recent human studies using broccoli sprout preparations.

  5. Effects of tebuconazole on morphology, structure, cell wall components and trichothecene production of Fusarium culmorum in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Z; Huang, L; Krieg, U; Mauler-Machnik, A; Buchenauer, H

    2001-06-01

    The effects of tebuconazole, a systemic fungicide, on the morphology, structure, cell wall components and toxin production of Fusarium culmorum were investigated in vitro. Treatment was by application of four filter paper strips (0.75 cm x 5.0 cm) soaked in 20 micrograms ml-1 fungicide placed around a point inoculum in Petri dishes. Mycelial growth was strongly inhibited by fungicide treatment. Scanning electron microscopic observations showed that the fungicide caused irregular swelling and excessive branching of hyphae. The morphological changes induced by the fungicide at the ultrastructural level included considerable thickening of the hyphal cell walls, excessive septation, the formation of the incomplete septa, extensive vacuolisation, accumulation of lipid bodies and progressing necrosis or degeneration of the hyphal cytoplasm. Non-membrane inclusion bodies were often detected in the hyphal cytoplasm. Furthermore, the formation of new hyphae (daughter hyphae) inside collapsed hyphal cells was common following treatment. The daughter hyphae also displayed severe alterations such as irregular thickening of the cell walls and necrosis of the cytoplasm. Using cytochemical techniques, the labelling densities of chitin and beta-1,3-glucan in the cell walls of the fungicide-treated hyphae were more pronounced than in those of the control hyphae. Moreover, immunogold labelling with antiserum against deoxynivalenol (DON) revealed that Fusarium toxin DON was localized in the cell walls, cytoplasm, mitochondria and vacuoles of the hyphae from the control and the fungicide treatment, but the labelling density in the fungicide-treated hyphae decreased dramatically compared with the control hyphae, indicating that tebuconazole reduced Fusarium toxin production of the fungus.

  6. TNF Regulates Essential Alternative Complement Pathway Components and Impairs Activation of Protein C in Human Glomerular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartain, Sarah E; Turner, Nancy A; Moake, Joel L

    2016-01-15

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy with severe renal injury secondary to an overactive alternative complement pathway (AP). aHUS episodes are often initiated or recur during inflammation. We investigated gene expression of the surface complement regulatory proteins (CD55, CD59, CD46, and CD141 [thrombomodulin]) and AP components in human glomerular microvascular endothelial cells (GMVECs) and in HUVECs, a frequently used investigational model of endothelial cells. Surface complement regulatory proteins were also quantified by flow cytometry. All experiments were done with and without exposure to IL-1β or TNF. Without cytokine stimulation, we found that GMVECs had greater AP activation than did HUVECs. With TNF stimulation, THBD gene expression and corresponding CD141 surface presence in HUVECs and GMVECs were reduced, and gene expression of complement components C3 (C3) and factor B (CFB) was increased. Consequently, AP activation, measured by Ba production, was increased, and conversion of protein C (PC) to activated PC by CD141-bound thrombin was decreased, in GMVECs and HUVECs exposed to TNF. IL-1β had similar, albeit lesser, effects on HUVEC gene expression, and it only slightly affected GMVEC gene expression. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed study of the expression/display of AP components and surface regulatory proteins in GMVECs with and without cytokine stimulation. In aHUS patients with an underlying overactive AP, additional stimulation of the AP and inhibition of activated PC-mediated anticoagulation in GMVECs by the inflammatory cytokine TNF are likely to provoke episodes of renal failure. PMID:26673143

  7. Metabolites of ginger component [6]-shogaol remain bioactive in cancer cells and have low toxicity in normal cells: chemical synthesis and biological evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingdong Zhu

    Full Text Available Our previous study found that [6]-shogaol, a major bioactive component in ginger, is extensively metabolized in cancer cells and in mice. It is unclear whether these metabolites retain bioactivity. The aim of the current study is to synthesize the major metabolites of [6]-shogaol and evaluate their inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis in human cancer cells. Twelve metabolites of [6]-shogaol (M1, M2, and M4-M13 were successfully synthesized using simple and easily accessible chemical methods. Growth inhibition assays showed that most metabolites of [6]-shogaol had measurable activities against human cancer cells HCT-116 and H-1299. In particular, metabolite M2 greatly retained the biological activities of [6]-shogaol, with an IC(50 of 24.43 µM in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells and an IC(50 of 25.82 µM in H-1299 human lung cancer cells. Also exhibiting a relatively high potency was thiol-conjugate M13, with IC(50 values of 45.47 and 47.77 µM toward HCT-116 and H-1299 cells, respectively. The toxicity evaluation of the synthetic metabolites (M1, M2, and M4-M13 against human normal fibroblast colon cells CCD-18Co and human normal lung cells IMR-90 demonstrated a detoxifying metabolic biotransformation of [6]-shogaol. The most active metabolite M2 had almost no toxicity to CCD-18Co and IMR-90 normal cells with IC(50s of 99.18 and 98.30 µM, respectively. TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay indicated that apoptosis was triggered by metabolites M2, M13, and its two diastereomers M13-1 and M13-2. There was no significant difference between the apoptotic effect of [6]-shogaol and the effect of M2 and M13 after 6 hour treatment.

  8. Metabolites of ginger component [6]-shogaol remain bioactive in cancer cells and have low toxicity in normal cells: chemical synthesis and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingdong; Warin, Renaud F; Soroka, Dominique N; Chen, Huadong; Sang, Shengmin

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study found that [6]-shogaol, a major bioactive component in ginger, is extensively metabolized in cancer cells and in mice. It is unclear whether these metabolites retain bioactivity. The aim of the current study is to synthesize the major metabolites of [6]-shogaol and evaluate their inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis in human cancer cells. Twelve metabolites of [6]-shogaol (M1, M2, and M4-M13) were successfully synthesized using simple and easily accessible chemical methods. Growth inhibition assays showed that most metabolites of [6]-shogaol had measurable activities against human cancer cells HCT-116 and H-1299. In particular, metabolite M2 greatly retained the biological activities of [6]-shogaol, with an IC(50) of 24.43 µM in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells and an IC(50) of 25.82 µM in H-1299 human lung cancer cells. Also exhibiting a relatively high potency was thiol-conjugate M13, with IC(50) values of 45.47 and 47.77 µM toward HCT-116 and H-1299 cells, respectively. The toxicity evaluation of the synthetic metabolites (M1, M2, and M4-M13) against human normal fibroblast colon cells CCD-18Co and human normal lung cells IMR-90 demonstrated a detoxifying metabolic biotransformation of [6]-shogaol. The most active metabolite M2 had almost no toxicity to CCD-18Co and IMR-90 normal cells with IC(50)s of 99.18 and 98.30 µM, respectively. TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay indicated that apoptosis was triggered by metabolites M2, M13, and its two diastereomers M13-1 and M13-2. There was no significant difference between the apoptotic effect of [6]-shogaol and the effect of M2 and M13 after 6 hour treatment. PMID:23382939

  9. Integration of deep transcriptome and proteome analyses reveals the components of alkaloid metabolism in opium poppy cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schriemer David C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papaver somniferum (opium poppy is the source for several pharmaceutical benzylisoquinoline alkaloids including morphine, the codeine and sanguinarine. In response to treatment with a fungal elicitor, the biosynthesis and accumulation of sanguinarine is induced along with other plant defense responses in opium poppy cell cultures. The transcriptional induction of alkaloid metabolism in cultured cells provides an opportunity to identify components of this process via the integration of deep transcriptome and proteome databases generated using next-generation technologies. Results A cDNA library was prepared for opium poppy cell cultures treated with a fungal elicitor for 10 h. Using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing, 427,369 expressed sequence tags (ESTs with an average length of 462 bp were generated. Assembly of these sequences yielded 93,723 unigenes, of which 23,753 were assigned Gene Ontology annotations. Transcripts encoding all known sanguinarine biosynthetic enzymes were identified in the EST database, 5 of which were represented among the 50 most abundant transcripts. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS of total protein extracts from cell cultures treated with a fungal elicitor for 50 h facilitated the identification of 1,004 proteins. Proteins were fractionated by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and digested with trypsin prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. Query of an opium poppy-specific EST database substantially enhanced peptide identification. Eight out of 10 known sanguinarine biosynthetic enzymes and many relevant primary metabolic enzymes were represented in the peptide database. Conclusions The integration of deep transcriptome and proteome analyses provides an effective platform to catalogue the components of secondary metabolism, and to identify genes encoding uncharacterized enzymes. The establishment of corresponding transcript and protein databases generated by next-generation technologies in a

  10. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  11. Analysis of the position of robotic cell components and its impact on energy consumption by robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, W.; Gwiazda, A.; Monica, Z.; Sekala, A.; Foit, K.

    2016-08-01

    Location elements in the robot cell is very important must provide reasonable access to technological points. This is a basic condition, but it is possible to shift these elements worth considering over other criteria. One of them can be energy consumption. This is an economic parameter and in most cases its improvement make shorten the working time an industrial robot. In most conventional mechanical systems you do not need to consume power in standby mode only for a move. Robot because of its construction, even if it does not move has enabled engines and is ready to move. In this case, the servo speed is zero. During this stop servo squeak. Low-speed motors cause the engine torque is reduced and increases power consumption. In larger robots are installed brakes that when the robot does not move mechanically hold the position. Off the robot has enabled brakes and remembers the position servo drives. Brakes must be released when the robot wants to move and drives hold the position.

  12. Norvaline and norleucine may have been more abundant protein components during early stages of cell evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Carreño, Claudia; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The absence of the hydrophobic norvaline and norleucine in the inventory of protein amino acids is readdressed. The well-documented intracellular accumulation of these two amino acids results from the low-substrate specificity of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic enzymes that act over a number of related α-ketoacids. The lack of absolute substrate specificity of leucyl-tRNA synthase leads to a mischarged norvalyl-tRNA(Leu) that evades the translational proofreading activities and produces norvaline-containing proteins, (cf. Apostol et al. J Biol Chem 272:28980-28988, 1997). A similar situation explains the presence of minute but detectable amounts of norleucine in place of methionine. Since with few exceptions both leucine and methionine are rarely found in the catalytic sites of most enzymes, their substitution by norvaline and norleucine, respectively, would have not been strongly hindered in small structurally simple catalytic polypeptides during the early stages of biological evolution. The report that down-shifts of free oxygen lead to high levels of intracellular accumulation of pyruvate and the subsequent biosynthesis of norvaline (Soini et al. Microb Cell Factories 7:30, 2008) demonstrates the biochemical and metabolic consequences of the development of a highly oxidizing environment. The results discussed here also suggest that a broader definition of biomarkers in the search for extraterrestrial life may be required. PMID:24013929

  13. Accuracy of velocities from repeated GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, V.; Sanli, D. U.; Arslan, E.

    2015-04-01

    Today repeated GPS measurements are still in use, because we cannot always employ GPS permanent stations due to a variety of limitations. One area of study that uses velocities/deformation rates from repeated GPS measurements is the monitoring of crustal motion. This paper discusses the quality of the velocities derived using repeated GPS measurements for the aim of monitoring crustal motion. From a global network of International GNSS Service (IGS) stations, we processed GPS measurements repeated monthly and annually spanning nearly 15 years and estimated GPS velocities for GPS baseline components latitude, longitude and ellipsoidal height. We used web-based GIPSY for the processing. Assuming true deformation rates can only be determined from the solutions of 24 h observation sessions, we evaluated the accuracy of the deformation rates from 8 and 12 h sessions. We used statistical hypothesis testing to assess the velocities derived from short observation sessions. In addition, as an alternative control method we checked the accuracy of GPS solutions from short observation sessions against those of 24 h sessions referring to statistical criteria that measure the accuracy of regression models. Results indicate that the velocities of the vertical component are completely affected when repeated GPS measurements are used. The results also reveal that only about 30% of the 8 h solutions and about 40% of 12 h solutions for the horizontal coordinates are acceptable for velocity estimation. The situation is much worse for the vertical component in which none of the solutions from campaign measurements are acceptable for obtaining reliable deformation rates.

  14. The cell wall component lipoteichoic acid of Staphylococcus aureus induces chemokine gene expression in bovine mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIKU, Yoshio; NAGASAWA, Yuya; TANABE, Fuyuko; SUGAWARA, Kazue; WATANABE, Atsushi; HATA, Eiji; OZAWA, Tomomi; NAKAJIMA, Kei-ichi; ARAI, Toshiro; HAYASHI, Tomohito

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is a major cause of bovine mastitis, but its pathogenic mechanism remains poorly understood. To evaluate the role of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in the immune or inflammatory response of SA mastitis, we investigated the gene expression profile in bovine mammary epithelial cells stimulated with LTA alone or with formalin-killed SA (FKSA) using cap analysis of gene expression. Seven common differentially expressed genes related to immune or inflammatory mediators were up-regulated under both LTA and FKSA stimulations. Three of these genes encode chemokines (IL-8, CXCL6 and CCL2) functioning as chemoattractant molecules for neutrophils and macrophages. These results suggest that the initial inflammatory response of SA infection in mammary gland may be related with LTA induced chemokine genes. PMID:27211287

  15. Tol-Pal proteins are critical cell envelope components of Erwinia chrysanthemi affecting cell morphology and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuisson, Jean-François; Vianney, Anne; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, Nicole; Lazzaroni, Jean Claude

    2005-10-01

    The tol-pal genes are necessary for maintaining the outer-membrane integrity of Gram-negative bacteria. These genes were first described in Escherichia coli, and more recently in several other species. They are involved in the pathogenesis of E. coli, Haemophilus ducreyi, Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica. The role of the tol-pal genes in bacterial pathogenesis was investigated in the phytopathogenic enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi, assuming that this organism might be a good model for such a study. The whole Er. chrysanthemi tol-pal region was characterized. Tol-Pal proteins, except TolA, showed high identity scores with their E. coli homologues. Er. chrysanthemi mutants were constructed by introducing a uidA-kan cassette in the ybgC, tolQ, tolA, tolB, pal and ybgF genes. All the mutants were hypersensitive to bile salts. Mutations in tolQ, tolA, tolB and pal were deleterious for the bacteria, which required high concentrations of sugars or osmoprotectants for their viability. Consistent with this observation, they were greatly impaired in their cell morphology and division, which was evidenced by observations of cell filaments, spherical forms, membrane blebbing and mislocalized bacterial septa. Moreover, tol-pal mutants showed a reduced virulence in a potato tuber model and on chicory leaves. This could be explained by a combination of impaired phenotypes in the tol-pal mutants, such as reduced growth and motility and a decreased production of pectate lyases, the major virulence factor of Er. chrysanthemi.

  16. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  17. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  18. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K upregulates the kinetochore complex component NUF2 and promotes the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimasa, Hironobu; Taniue, Kenzui [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Kurimoto, Akiko [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Oncology Research Laboratories, Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd, 1-2-58, Hiromachi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, 140-8710 (Japan); Takeda, Yasuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Akiyama, Tetsu, E-mail: akiyama@iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan)

    2015-03-27

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, mRNA stabilization and translation. Although hnRNP K has been suggested to play a role in the development of many cancers, its molecular function in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. Here we show that hnRNP K plays an important role in the mitotic process in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hnRNP K directly transactivates the NUF2 gene, the product of which is a component of the NDC80 kinetochore complex and which is known to be critical for a stable spindle microtubule-kinetochore attachment. In addition, knockdown of both hnRNP K and NUF2 caused failure in metaphase chromosome alignment and drastic decrease in the growth of colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the mitotic process and proliferation of colon cancer cells and that this axis could be a target for the therapy of colon cancer. - Highlights: • hnRNP K is required for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. • hnRNP K binds to the promoter region of NUF2 and activates its transcription. • NUF2 expression is correlated with hnRNP K expression in colorectal cancer tissue. • hnRNP K and NUF2 are required for metaphase chromosome alignment. • The hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  19. Ultrastructural Study of Salmonella typhimurium Treated with Membrane-Active Agents: Specific Reaction of Dansylchloride with Cell Envelope Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Peter R. G.; Teuber, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Amino groups of cell envelope proteins, lipids, and lipopolysaccharides cannot be labeled in intact cells of Salmonella typhimurium G 30 by using 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonylchloride incorporated in lecithin-cholesterol vesicles. However, application of membrane-interacting agents like tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris)-hydrochloride, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Na salt) (EDTA), divalent cations, and sublethal doses of the cationic antibacterial agents polymyxin B and chlorhexidine induced specific fluorescent labeling of envelope proteins and lipids but not of cytoplasmic compounds, with the exception of a soluble protein with a molecular weight of 46,000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Treatment with Tris-hydrochloride buffer produced labeling of the heat-modifiable protein B/B+ and of proteins with molecular weights of 26,000, 22,000, and below 17,000. A combination of Tris-hydrochloride and EDTA induced additional dansylation of the major protein A and of proteins of molecular weights 80,000, 60,000, and 44,000. Polymyxin B and chlorhexidine caused similar labeling patterns. In every case, except with divalent cation treatment, protein B/B+ was the most prominently labeled species. Phosphatidylethanolamine was dansylated up to 30%. Lipopolysaccharide was not reactive under any condition or treatment. In addition, the peptidoglycan-bound lipoprotein did not react with dansylchloride in either intact or Tris-hydrochloride-treated cells. The results are discussed with regard to a possible localization of labeled and unlabeled compounds of the cell envelope on the basis of a model placing cell envelope amino groups into ion-ion interactions with anionic components of other envelope compounds like phosphate and carboxyl groups. Images PMID:97268

  20. Strategies for regeneration of components of nervous system: scaffolds, cells and biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lingling; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2015-03-01

    Nerve diseases including acute injury such as peripheral nerve injury (PNI), spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), and chronic disease like neurodegeneration disease can cause various function disorders of nervous system, such as those relating to memory and voluntary movement. These nerve diseases produce great burden for individual families and the society, for which a lot of efforts have been made. Axonal pathways represent a unidirectional and aligned architecture allowing systematic axonal development within the tissue. Following a traumatic injury, the intricate architecture suffers disruption leading to inhibition of growth and loss of guidance. Due to limited capacity of the body to regenerate axonal pathways, it is desirable to have biomimetic approach that has the capacity to graft a bridge across the lesion while providing optimal mechanical and biochemical cues for tissue regeneration. And for central nervous system injury, one more extra precondition is compulsory: creating a less inhibitory surrounding for axonal growth. Electrospinning is a cost-effective and straightforward technique to fabricate extracellular matrix (ECM)-like nanofibrous structures, with various fibrous forms such as random fibers, aligned fibers, 3D fibrous scaffold and core-shell fibers from a variety of polymers. The diversity and versatility of electrospinning technique, together with functionalizing cues such as neurotrophins, ECM-based proteins and conductive polymers, have gained considerable success for the nerve tissue applications. We are convinced that in the future the stem cell therapy with the support of functionalized electrospun nerve scaffolds could be a promising therapy to cure nerve diseases. PMID:26813399

  1. Polyazomethine as a component of solar cells-theoretical and optical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korona, K. P.; Korona, T.; Rutkowska-Zbik, D.; Grankowska-Ciechanowicz, S.; Iwan, A.; Kamińska, M.

    2015-11-01

    A recently synthesized 25Th-cardo polyazomethine (PAZ) and its photocurrent generating junction with [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) have been examined as possible materials for construction of new-generation solar cells. Properties of a 25Th-cardo/PCBM system, where PAZ and PCBM act as donor and acceptor materials, respectively, have been studied theoretically by time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) and experimentally by means of optical absorption, photocurrent spectroscopy (PCS), and time-resolved luminescence (TRPL). Theoretical calculations show that highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy levels of PAZ and PCBM are almost equal (values of -6.01 and -5.98 eV were obtained with the B3LYP functional and the def2-TZVP orbital basis for PAZ and PCBM, respectively), what suggests a possibility of charge transfer in both directions for this system. The shape of the calculated absorption spectrum is in a qualitative agreement with the experiment. The PCS measurements of the new material show that the external quantum efficiency is the highest (about 0.3%) in the near UV range. The TRPL studies reveal a fast decay of a Langevin type (in picosecond range) of the PAZ-related photoluminescence, which accelerates in presence of PCBM, probably due to the charge transfer to PCBM. In addition, our measurements document a usually neglected process of the hole transfer from a donor to an acceptor. A leakage of holes from PAZ to PCBM is supported by a small energy difference of the HOMO energies, as predicted by theory.

  2. Epigenetic changes in Basal Cell Carcinoma affect SHH and WNT signaling components.

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    Tjinta Brinkhuizen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genetic background of Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC has been studied extensively, while its epigenetic makeup has received comparatively little attention. Epigenetic alterations such as promoter hypermethylation silence tumor suppressor genes (TSG in several malignancies. OBJECTIVE: We sought to analyze the promoter methylation status of ten putative (tumor suppressor genes that are associated with Sonic Hedgehog (SHH, WNT signaling and (hair follicle tumors in a large series of 112 BCC and 124 healthy control samples by methylation-specific PCR. RESULTS: Gene promoters of SHH (P = 0.016, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC (P = 0.003, secreted frizzled-related protein 5 (SFRP5 (P = 0.004 and Ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A (P = 0.023 showed significantly more methylation in BCC versus normal skin. mRNA levels of these four genes were reduced for APC and SFRP5 in BCC (n = 6 vs normal skin (n = 6. Down regulation of SHH, APC and RASSF1A could be confirmed on protein level as well (P<0.001 for all genes by immunohistochemical staining. Increased canonical WNT activity was visualized by β-catenin staining, showing nuclear β-catenin in only 28/101 (27.7% of BCC. Absence of nuclear β-catenin in some samples may be due to high levels of membranous E-cadherin (in 94.1% of the samples. CONCLUSIONS: We provide evidence that promoter hypermethylation of key players within the SHH and WNT pathways is frequent in BCC, consistent with their known constitutive activation in BCC. Epigenetic gene silencing putatively contributes to BCC tumorigenesis, indicating new venues for treatment.

  3. RNA of Enterococcus faecalis Strain EC-12 Is a Major Component Inducing Interleukin-12 Production from Human Monocytic Cells.

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    Ryoichiro Nishibayashi

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 (IL-12 is an important cytokine for the immunomodulatory effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB. Using murine immune cells, we previously reported that the RNA of Enterococcus faecalis EC-12, a LAB strain exerting probiotic-like beneficial effects, is the major IL-12-inducing immunogenic component. However, it was recently revealed that bacterial RNA can be a ligand for Toll-like receptor (TLR 13, which is only expressed in mice. Because TLR13 is not expressed in humans, the immuno-stimulatory and -modulatory effects of LAB RNA in human cells should be augmented excluding TLR13 contribution. In experiment 1 of this study, the role of LAB RNA in IL-12 induction in human immune cells was studied using three LAB strains, E.faecalis EC-12, Lactobacillus gasseri JCM5344, and Bifidobacterium breve JCM1192. RNase A treatment of heat-killed LAB significantly decreased the IL-12 production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells on stimulation, while RNase III treatment revealed virtually no effects. Further, IL-12 production against heat-killed E. faecalis EC-12 was abolished by depleting monocytes. These results demonstrated that single stranded RNA (ssRNA of LAB is a strong inducer of IL-12 production from human monocytes. In experiment 2, major receptor for ssRNA of E. faecalis EC-12 was identified using THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line. The type of RNA molecules of E. faecalis EC-12 responsible for IL-12 induction was also identified. IL-12 production induced by the total RNA of E. faecalis EC-12 was significantly reduced by the treatment of siRNA for TLR8 but not for TLR7. Furthermore, both 23S and 16S rRNA, but not mRNA, of E. faecalis EC-12 markedly induced IL-12 production from THP-1 cells. These results suggested that the recognition of ssRNA of E. faecalis EC-12 was mediated by TLR8 and that rRNA was the RNA molecule that exhibited IL-12-inducing ability in human cells.

  4. The Clustered, Regularly Interspaced, Short Palindromic Repeats-associated Endonuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9)-created MDM2 T309G Mutation Enhances Vitreous-induced Expression of MDM2 and Proliferation and Survival of Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yajian; Ma, Gaoen; Huang, Xionggao; D'Amore, Patricia A; Zhang, Feng; Lei, Hetian

    2016-07-29

    The G309 allele of SNPs in the mouse double minute (MDM2) promoter locus is associated with a higher risk of cancer and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), but whether SNP G309 contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR is to date unknown. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas) 9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) can be harnessed to manipulate a single or multiple nucleotides in mammalian cells. Here we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using dual adeno-associated virus-derived vectors to target the MDM2 genomic locus together with a homologous repair template for creating the mutation of MDM2 T309G in human primary retinal pigment epithelial (hPRPE) cells whose genotype is MDM2 T309T. The next-generation sequencing results indicated that there was 42.51% MDM2 G309 in the edited hPRPE cells using adeno-associated viral CRISPR/Cas9. Our data showed that vitreous induced an increase in MDM2 and subsequent attenuation of p53 expression in MDM2 T309G hPRPE cells. Furthermore, our experimental results demonstrated that MDM2 T309G in hPRPE cells enhanced vitreous-induced cell proliferation and survival, suggesting that this SNP contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR.

  5. The Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity Pathway Component Vangl2 Induces Synapse Formation through Direct Control of N-Cadherin

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    Tadahiro Nagaoka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Although regulators of the Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP pathway are widely expressed in vertebrate nervous systems, their roles at synapses are unknown. Here, we show that Vangl2 is a postsynaptic factor crucial for synaptogenesis and that it coprecipitates with N-cadherin and PSD-95 from synapse-rich brain extracts. Vangl2 directly binds N-cadherin and enhances its internalization in a Rab5-dependent manner. This physical and functional interaction is suppressed by β-catenin, which binds the same intracellular region of N-cadherin as Vangl2. In hippocampal neurons expressing reduced Vangl2 levels, dendritic spine formation as well as synaptic marker clustering is significantly impaired. Furthermore, Prickle2, another postsynaptic PCP component, inhibits the N-cadherin-Vangl2 interaction and is required for normal spine formation. These results demonstrate direct control of classic cadherin by PCP factors; this control may play a central role in the precise formation and maturation of cell-cell adhesions at the synapse.

  6. [PRODUCT OF THE BMI1--A KEY COMPONENT OF POLYCOMB--POSITIVELY REGULATES ADIPOCYTE DIFFERENTIATION OF MOUSE MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, N S; Vereschagina, N A; Sushilova, E N; Kropotov, A V; Miheeva, N F; Popov, B V

    2016-01-01

    Bmil is a key component of Polycomb (PcG), which in mammals controls the basic functions of mammalian somatic stem cells (SSC) such as self-renewal and differentiation. Bmi1 supports SSC via transcriptional suppression of genes associated with cell cycle and differentiation. The most studied target genes of Bmi1 are the genes of Ink4 locus, CdkI p16(Ink4a) and p1(Arf), suppression of which due to activating mutations of the BMI1 results in formation of cancer stem cells (CSC) and carcinomas in various tissues. In contrast, inactivation of BMI1 results in cell cycle arrest and cell senescence. Although clinical phenomena of hypo- and hyperactivation of BMI1 are well known, its targets and mechanisms of regulation of tissue specific SSC are still obscure. The goal of this study was to evaluate the regulatory role of BMI1 in adipocyte differentiation (AD) of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Induction of AD in mouse MSC of the C3H10T1/2 cell line was associated with an increase in the expression levels of BMI1, the genes of pRb family (RB, p130) and demethylase UTX, but not methyltransferase EZH2, whose products regulate the methylation levels of H3K27. It was observed earlier that H3K27me3 may play the role of the epigenetic switch by promoting AD of human MSC via activating expression of the PPARγ2, the master gene of AD (Hemming et al., 2014). Here we show that inactivation of BMI1 using specific siRNA slows and decreases the levels of AD, but does not abolish it. This is associated with a complete inhibition of the expression of adipogenic marker genes--PPARγ2, ADIPOQ and a decrease in the expression of RB, p130, but not UTX. The results obtained give evidence that the epigenetic mechanism regulating AD differentiation in mouse and human MSC is different.

  7. Selective observation of photo-induced electric fields inside different material components in bulk-heterojunction organic solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa, E-mail: iwamoto@pe.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, S3-33 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2014-01-06

    By using electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement at two laser wavelengths of 1000 nm and 860 nm, we investigated carrier behavior inside the pentacene and C{sub 60} component of co-deposited pentacene:C{sub 60} bulk-heterojunctions (BHJs) organic solar cells (OSCs). The EFISHG experiments verified the presence of two carrier paths for electrons and holes in BHJs OSCs. That is, two kinds of electric fields pointing in opposite directions are identified as a result of the selectively probing of SHG activation from C{sub 60} and pentacene. Also, under open-circuit conditions, the transient process of the establishment of open-circuit voltage inside the co-deposited layer has been directly probed, in terms of photovoltaic effect. The EFISHG provides an additional promising method to study carrier path of electrons and holes as well as dissociation of excitons in BHJ OSCs.

  8. Diagnosing basal cell carcinoma in vivo by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy: a Principal Components Analysis discrimination algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Silveira, Fabrício L.; Bodanese, Benito; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T.; Zângaro, Renato A.

    2012-02-01

    This work demonstrated the discrimination among basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and normal human skin in vivo using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were obtained in the suspected lesion prior resectional surgery. After tissue withdrawn, biopsy fragments were submitted to histopathology. Spectra were also obtained in the adjacent, clinically normal skin. Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm) with a fiber Raman probe. By comparing the mean spectra of BCC with the normal skin, it has been found important differences in the 800-1000 cm-1 and 1250-1350 cm-1 (vibrations of C-C and amide III, respectively, from lipids and proteins). A discrimination algorithm based on Principal Components Analysis and Mahalanobis distance (PCA/MD) could discriminate the spectra of both tissues with high sensitivity and specificity.

  9. Synthesis of fluorene-based polyelectrolytes tethering different counterions for single-component white light-emitting electrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Hsiung; Tsai, Chia-Sheng; Liu, Bo-Cun; Su, Hai-Ching

    2013-09-01

    A series of polyfluorene (PF) electrolytes bearing Br-, BF4 -, or PF6 - counterions were synthesized and characterized. 2,1,3-benzoselenadiazole moieties were incorporated into polymer main chains to produce single-component white lightemitting polymers. The thermal stability of Br-containing ionic PF was decreased because of the Hofmann elimination occurred at higher temperature. By replacing Br- with BF4 - or PF6 - counterions, the thermal stability of polymers was significantly improved. The emission intensity around 550 nm was decreased for ionic polyelectrolytes. The optimized spin-coated light-emitting electrochemical cell (LEC) with the configuration of ITO/PEDOT/polymer/Ag showed a maximum luminescence efficiency of 1.56 lm/W at a low operation bias of 3 V. The single-component LEC device exhibited pure white light emission with CIE'1931 coordinates approaching (0.33, 0.33) and high color rendering index (CRI < 85), referring to its potential use in solid-state-lighting application.

  10. 454 Transcriptome sequencing suggests a role for two-component signalling in cellularization and differentiation of barley endosperm transfer cells.

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    Johannes Thiel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell specification and differentiation in the endosperm of cereals starts at the maternal-filial boundary and generates the endosperm transfer cells (ETCs. Besides the importance in assimilate transfer, ETCs are proposed to play an essential role in the regulation of endosperm differentiation by affecting development of proximate endosperm tissues. We attempted to identify signalling elements involved in early endosperm differentiation by using a combination of laser-assisted microdissection and 454 transcriptome sequencing. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 454 sequencing of the differentiating ETC region from the syncytial state until functionality in transfer processes captured a high proportion of novel transcripts which are not available in existing barley EST databases. Intriguingly, the ETC-transcriptome showed a high abundance of elements of the two-component signalling (TCS system suggesting an outstanding role in ETC differentiation. All components and subfamilies of the TCS, including distinct kinds of membrane-bound receptors, have been identified to be expressed in ETCs. The TCS system represents an ancient signal transduction system firstly discovered in bacteria and has previously been shown to be co-opted by eukaryotes, like fungi and plants, whereas in animals and humans this signalling route does not exist. Transcript profiling of TCS elements by qRT-PCR suggested pivotal roles for specific phosphorelays activated in a coordinated time flow during ETC cellularization and differentiation. ETC-specificity of transcriptionally activated TCS phosphorelays was assessed for early differentiation and cellularization contrasting to an extension of expression to other grain tissues at the beginning of ETC maturation. Features of candidate genes of distinct phosphorelays and transcriptional activation of genes putatively implicated in hormone signalling pathways hint at a crosstalk of hormonal influences, putatively ABA and ethylene, and

  11. Screening antiallergic components from Carthamus tinctorius using rat basophilic leukemia 2H3 cell membrane chromatography combined with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shengli; Huang, Jing; Cui, Ronghua; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-01

    Carthamus tinctorius, used in traditional Chinese medicine, has many pharmacological effects, such as anticoagulant effects, antioxidant effects, antiaging effects, regulation of gene expression, and antitumor effects. However, there is no report on the antiallergic effects of the components in C. tinctorius. In the present study, we investigated the antiallergic components of C. tinctorius and its mechanism of action. A rat basophilic leukemia 2H3/cell membrane chromatography coupled online with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry method was developed to screen antiallergic components from C. tinctorius. The screening results showed that Hydroxysafflor yellow A, from C. tinctorius, was the targeted component that retained on the rat basophilic leukemia 2H3/cell membrane chromatography column. We measured the amount of β-hexosaminidase and histamine released in mast cells and the key markers of degranulation. The release assays showed that Hydroxysafflor yellow A could attenuate the immunoglobulin E induced release of allergic cytokines without affecting cell viability from 1.0 to 50.0 μM. In conclusion, the established rat basophilic leukemia 2H3 cell membrane chromatography coupled with online high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry method successfully screened and identified Hydroxysafflor yellow A from C. tinctorius as a potential antiallergic component. Pharmacological analysis elucidated that Hydroxysafflor yellow A is an effective natural component for inhibiting immunoglobulin E-antigen-mediated degranulation.

  12. Characterization of Damp-Heat Degradation of CuInGaSe2 Solar Cell Components and Devices by (Electrochemical) Impedance Spectroscopy: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F. J. J.; Noufi, R.

    2011-09-01

    This work evaluated the capability of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (IS, or ECIS as used here) to monitor damp heat (DH) stability of contact materials, CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell components, and devices. Cell characteristics and its variation of the CIGS devices were also examined by the ECIS.

  13. Erythrocytes and cell line-based assays to evaluate the cytoprotective activity of antioxidant components obtained from natural sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Albert; Martínez, Verónica; Mitjans, Montserrat; Balboa, Elena; Conde, Enma; Vinardell, M Pilar

    2014-02-01

    Oxidative stress can damage cellular components including DNA, proteins or lipids, and may cause several skin diseases. To protect from this damage and addressing consumer's appeal to natural products, antioxidants obtained from algal and vegetal extracts are being proposed as antioxidants to be incorporated into formulations. Thus, the development of reliable, quick and economic in vitro methods to study the cytoactivity of these products is a meaningful requirement. A combination of erythrocyte and cell line-based assays was performed on two extracts from Sargassum muticum, one from Ulva lactuca, and one from Castanea sativa. Antioxidant properties were assessed in erythrocytes by the TBARS and AAPH assays, and cytotoxicity and antioxidant cytoprotection were assessed in HaCaT and 3T3 cells by the MTT assay. The extracts showed no antioxidant activity on the TBARS assay, whereas their antioxidant capacity in the AAPH assay was demonstrated. On the cytotoxicity assays, extracts showed low toxicity, with IC50 values higher than 200μg/mL. C. sativa extract showed the most favourable antioxidant properties on the antioxidant cytoprotection assays; while S. muticum and U. lactuca extracts showed a slight antioxidant activity. This battery of methods was useful to characterise the biological antioxidant properties of these natural extracts.

  14. [Nerve conduction velocity of repeater F-waves is identical to that of M-waves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, O; Matsumoto, S; Gondo, G; Arita, T; Iwasawa, H

    2001-12-01

    F-wave normally varies in latency and waveform from one response to the next. But the number of identical responses in a series of F-waves may be increased with neurogenic atrophy consistent with a decreased number of motoneurons capable of responding to antidromic stimulation. They are called "repeater F-waves". We herein demonstrate some repeater F-waves observed in three patients with moderate or slight diabetic polyneuropathy. In their motor nerve conduction studies on the peroneal nerve the maximum conduction velocity was 33 m/sec in patient 1, 36 m/sec in patient 2 and 48 m/sec in patient 3. A total of 6 delayed indirect potentials were repeatedly evoked after nerve trunk stimulation. They fulfilled the characteristics of F-wave. Their conduction velocities in the leg segment were 27, 26, 23 m/sec in patient 1, 34, 33 m/sec in patient 2 and 46 m/sec in patient 3. Repeater F-waves are occasionally observed in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cervical spondylosis or entrapment neuropathies, in which the number of motoneuron is decreased. In diabetic polyneuropathy some repeater F-waves were also observed in patients not only with moderate to severe neuropathy but also with normal nerve conduction. F-waves are generated by an antidromic backfiring of motor neurons, and they occur preferentially in large motor neurons. Larger motor neurons inhibit smaller axons through the activation of Renshaw cells. In our 3 patients conduction velocities of the repeated F-waves were all identical to the main component of M-wave. These observations reconfirmed the hypothesis that relatively large motor neurons generating F-waves are preferentially activated also in repeater F-waves.

  15. Concomitant detection of IFNα signature and activated monocyte/dendritic cell precursors in the peripheral blood of IFNα-treated subjects at early times after repeated local cytokine treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizza Paola

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferons alpha (IFNα are the cytokines most widely used in clinical medicine for the treatment of cancer and viral infections. Among the immunomodulatory activities possibly involved in their therapeutic efficacy, the importance of IFNα effects on dendritic cells (DC differentiation and activation has been considered. Despite several studies exploiting microarray technology to characterize IFNα mechanisms of action, there is currently no consensus on the core signature of these cytokines in the peripheral blood of IFNα-treated individuals, as well as on the existence of blood genomic and proteomic markers of low-dose IFNα administered as a vaccine adjuvant. Methods Gene profiling analysis with microarray was performed on PBMC isolated from melanoma patients and healthy individuals 24 hours after each repeated injection of low-dose IFNα, administered as vaccine adjuvant in two separate clinical trials. At the same time points, cytofluorimetric analysis was performed on CD14+ monocytes, to detect the phenotypic modifications exerted by IFNα on antigen presenting cells precursors. Results An IFNα signature was consistently observed in both clinical settings 24 hours after each repeated administration of the cytokine. The observed modulation was transient, and did not reach a steady state level refractory to further stimulations. The molecular signature observed ex vivo largely matched the one detected in CD14+ monocytes exposed in vitro to IFNα, including the induction of CXCL10 at the transcriptional and protein level. Interestingly, IFNα ex vivo signature was paralleled by an increase in the percentage and expression of costimulatory molecules by circulating CD14+/CD16+ monocytes, indicated as natural precursors of DC in response to danger signals. Conclusions Our results provide new insights into the identification of a well defined molecular signature as biomarker of IFNα administered as immune adjuvants, and

  16. Two-component system cross-regulation integrates Bacillus anthracis response to heme and cell envelope stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Mike

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signaling systems (TCSs are one of the mechanisms that bacteria employ to sense and adapt to changes in the environment. A prototypical TCS functions as a phosphorelay from a membrane-bound sensor histidine kinase (HK to a cytoplasmic response regulator (RR that controls target gene expression. Despite significant homology in the signaling domains of HKs and RRs, TCSs are thought to typically function as linear systems with little to no cross-talk between non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Here we have identified several cell envelope acting compounds that stimulate a previously uncharacterized Bacillus anthracis TCS. Furthermore, this TCS cross-signals with the heme sensing TCS HssRS; therefore, we have named it HssRS interfacing TCS (HitRS. HssRS reciprocates cross-talk to HitRS, suggesting a link between heme toxicity and cell envelope stress. The signaling between HssRS and HitRS occurs in the parental B. anthracis strain; therefore, we classify HssRS-HitRS interactions as cross-regulation. Cross-talk between HssRS and HitRS occurs at both HK-RR and post-RR signaling junctions. Finally, HitRS also regulates a previously unstudied ABC transporter implicating this transporter in the response to cell envelope stress. This chemical biology approach to probing TCS signaling provides a new model for understanding how bacterial signaling networks are integrated to enable adaptation to complex environments such as those encountered during colonization of the vertebrate host.

  17. Effect of oxygen on the expression of renin-angiotensin system components in a human trophoblast cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delforce, Sarah J; Wang, Yu; Van-Aalst, Meg E; Corbisier de Meaultsart, Celine; Morris, Brian J; Broughton-Pipkin, Fiona; Roberts, Claire T; Lumbers, Eugenie R; Pringle, Kirsty G

    2016-01-01

    During the first trimester, normal placental development occurs in a low oxygen environment that is known to stimulate angiogenesis via upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Expression of the placental renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is highest in early pregnancy. While the RAS and oxygen both stimulate angiogenesis, how they interact within the placenta is unknown. We postulated that low oxygen increases expression of the proangiogenic RAS pathway and that this is associated with increased VEGF in a first trimester human trophoblast cell line (HTR-8/SVneo). HTR-8/SVneo cells were cultured in one of three oxygen tensions (1%, 5% and 20%). RAS and VEGF mRNA expression were determined by qPCR. Prorenin, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and VEGF protein levels in the supernatant, as well as prorenin and ACE in cell lysates, were measured using ELISAs. Low oxygen significantly increased the expression of both angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) and VEGF (both P < 0.05). There was a positive correlation between AGTR1 and VEGF expression at low oxygen (r = 0.64, P < 0.005). Corresponding increases in VEGF protein were observed with low oxygen (P < 0.05). Despite no change in ACE1 mRNA expression, ACE levels in the supernatant increased with low oxygen (1% and 5%, P < 0.05). Expression of other RAS components did not change. Low oxygen increased AGTR1 and VEGF expression, as well as ACE and VEGF protein levels, suggesting that the proangiogenic RAS pathway is activated. This highlights a potential role for the placental RAS in mediating the proangiogenic effects of low oxygen in placental development.

  18. Synchronizing Progression of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cells from G2 through Repeated Rounds of Mitosis and S Phase with cdc25-22 Arrest Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Iain M; Grallert, Agnes; Simanis, Viesturs

    2016-01-01

    Transient inactivation of the cdc25(+) gene product by manipulation of the culture temperature for cdc25-22 cells is the most commonly exploited approach to mitotic synchronization in fission yeast. Because Cdc25 removes the inhibitory phosphate placed on Cdk1 by Wee1, inactivation of Cdc25 arrests cells at the G2/M boundary. Incubation at the restrictive temperature of 36°C for just over one generation time forces all cells in the culture to accumulate at the G2/M boundary. Restoration of Cdc25 function via a return to the permissive temperature or chemical inhibition of Wee1 activity at 36°C can then promote a highly synchronous wave of cell division throughout the culture. These approaches can be performed on any scale and thus support simultaneous assessment of numerous events within a single culture. After describing this simple and widely applicable procedure, we discuss frequently overlooked issues that can have a considerable impact on the interpretation of data from cdc25-22 induction-synchronized cultures. PMID:27480720

  19. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls: I. The Macromolecular Components of the Walls of Suspension-cultured Sycamore Cells with a Detailed Analysis of the Pectic Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmadge, K W; Keegstra, K; Bauer, W D; Albersheim, P

    1973-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers dealing with the structure of cell walls isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus). These studies have been made possible by the availability of purified hydrolytic enzymes and by recent improvements in the techniques of methylation analysis. These techniques have permitted us to identify and quantitate the macromolecular components of sycamore cell walls. These walls are composed of 10% arabinan, 2% 3,6-linked arabinogalactan, 23% cellulose, 9% oligo-arabinosides (attached to hydroxyproline), 8% 4-linked galactan, 10% hydroxyproline-rich protein, 16% rhamnogalacturonan, and 21% xyloglucan.The structures of the pectic polymers (the neutral arabinan, the neutral galactan, and the acidic rhamnogalacturonan) were obtained, in part, by methylation analysis of fragments of these polymers which were released from the sycamore walls by the action of a highly purified endopolygalacturonase. The data suggest a branched arabinan and a linear 4-linked galactan occurring as side chains on the rhamnogalacturonan. Small amounts or pieces of a xyloglucan, the wall hemicellulose, appear to be covalently linked to some of the galactan chains. Thus, the galactan appears to serve as a bridge between the xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan components of the wall.The rhamnogalacturonan consists of an alpha-(1 --> 4)-linked galacturonan chain which is interspersed with 2-linked rhamnosyl residues. The rhamnosyl residues are not randomly distributed in the chain but probably occur in units of rhamnosyl- (1 --> 4)-galacturonosyl- (1 --> 2)-rhamnosyl. This sequence appears to alternate with a homogalacturonan sequence containing approximately 8 residues of 4-linked galacturonic acid. About half of the rhamnosyl residues are branched, having a substituent attached to carbon 4. This is likely to be the site of attachment of the 4-linked galactan.The hydroxyprolyl oligo-arabinosides of the hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein

  20. Establishment of the model of white blood cell membrane chromatography and screening of antagonizing TLR4 receptor component from Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Cuiqin; HE; Langchong

    2006-01-01

    A model of white blood cell membrane chromatography (WB-CMC) was established to screen active component from Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz. The component can antagonize Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and inhibit inflammatory reaction. In the model of WB-CMC, cell membrane stationary phase (CMSP) was prepared by immobilizing the rabbit white blood cell membrane (WBCM) onto the surface of silica carrier and taxinol was used as a model molecule. The active component which can act on WBCM and its receptor (such as TLR4) as an effective target in A. macrocephala was determined by using a replacement experiment. The anti-inflammatory effects of the active component were tested by using pharmacological methods in vivo. The results indicated that the retention characteristics of atractylenolide I as active component was similar to that of taxinol in the model of WB-CMC. And so, atractylenolide I acted on the WBCM and TLR4 and its anti-inflammatory activity was related with antagonizing TLR4. Therefore, the interaction between the active component and WBCM and its receptor can be simulated by the model of WB-CMC in vitro. This model can be used to screen active components and to study effective characteristics for acting on definite targets.

  1. Optimizing the fabrication process and interplay of device components of polymer solar cells using a field-based multiscale solar-cell algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, Sergii; Pershin, Anton; Baeurle, Stephan A.

    2015-05-01

    Both the device composition and fabrication process are well-known to crucially affect the power conversion efficiency of polymer solar cells. Major advances have recently been achieved through the development of novel device materials and inkjet printing technologies, which permit to improve their durability and performance considerably. In this work, we demonstrate the usefulness of a recently developed field-based multiscale solar-cell algorithm to investigate the influence of the material characteristics, like, e.g., electrode surfaces, polymer architectures, and impurities in the active layer, as well as post-production treatments, like, e.g., electric field alignment, on the photovoltaic performance of block-copolymer solar-cell devices. Our study reveals that a short exposition time of the polymer bulk heterojunction to the action of an external electric field can lead to a low photovoltaic performance due to an incomplete alignment process, leading to undulated or disrupted nanophases. With increasing exposition time, the nanophases align in direction to the electric field lines, resulting in an increase of the number of continuous percolation paths and, ultimately, in a reduction of the number of exciton and charge-carrier losses. Moreover, we conclude by modifying the interaction strengths between the electrode surfaces and active layer components that a too low or too high affinity of an electrode surface to one of the components can lead to defective contacts, causing a deterioration of the device performance. Finally, we infer from the study of block-copolymer nanoparticle systems that particle impurities can significantly affect the nanostructure of the polymer matrix and reduce the photovoltaic performance of the active layer. For a critical volume fraction and size of the nanoparticles, we observe a complete phase transformation of the polymer nanomorphology, leading to a drop of the internal quantum efficiency. For other particle-numbers and -sizes

  2. Saturation of repeated quantum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapasalo, Erkka; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kuramochi, Yui

    2016-08-01

    We study sequential measurement scenarios where the system is repeatedly subjected to the same measurement process. We first provide examples of such repeated measurements where further repetitions of the measurement do not increase our knowledge on the system after some finite number of measurement steps. We also prove, however, that repeating the Lüders measurement of an unsharp two-outcome observable never saturates in this sense, and we characterize the observable measured in the limit of infinitely many repetitions. Our result implies that a repeated measurement can be used to correct the inherent noise of an unsharp observable.

  3. DWI Repeaters and Non-Repeaters: A Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeber, Stan

    1981-01-01

    Discussed how driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) repeaters differed signigicantly from nonrepeaters on 4 of 23 variables tested. Repeaters were more likely to have zero or two dependent children, attend church frequently, drink occasionally and have one or more arrests for public intoxication. (Author)

  4. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  5. Molecular Genetic Alterations in Renal Cell Carcinomas With Tubulocystic Pattern: Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma, Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma With Heterogenous Component and Familial Leiomyomatosis-associated Renal Cell Carcinoma. Clinicopathologic and Molecular Genetic Analysis of 15 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulamec, Monika; Skenderi, Faruk; Zhou, Ming; Krušlin, Božo; Martínek, Petr; Grossmann, Petr; Peckova, Kvetoslava; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Kalusova, Kristyna; Kokoskova, Bohuslava; Rotterova, Pavla; Hora, Milan; Daum, Ondrej; Dubova, Magdalena; Bauleth, Kevin; Slouka, David; Sperga, Maris; Davidson, Whitney; Rychly, Boris; Perez Montiel, Delia; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej

    2016-08-01

    The characteristic morphologic spectrum of tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TC-RCC) may include areas resembling papillary RCC (PRCC). Our study includes 15 RCCs with tubulocystic pattern: 6 TC-RCCs, 1 RCC-high grade with tubulocystic architecture, 5 TC-RCCs with foci of PRCC, 2 with high-grade RCC (HGRCC) not otherwise specified, and 1 with a clear cell papillary RCC/renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor-like component. We analyzed aberrations of chromosomes 7, 17, and Y; mutations of VHL and FH genes; and loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 3p. Genetic analysis was performed separately in areas of classic TC-RCC and in those with other histologic patterns. The TC-RCC component demonstrated disomy of chromosome 7 in 9/15 cases, polysomy of chromosome 17 in 7/15 cases, and loss of Y in 1 case. In the PRCC component, 2/3 analyzable cases showed disomy of chromosome 7 and polysomy of chromosome 17 with normal Y. One case with focal HGRCC exhibited only disomy 7, whereas the case with clear cell papillary RCC/renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor-like pattern showed polysomies of 7 and 17, mutation of VHL, and loss of heterozygosity 3p. FH gene mutation was identified in a single case with an aggressive clinical course and predominant TC-RCC pattern. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) TC-RCC demonstrates variable status of chromosomes 7, 17, and Y even in cases with typical/uniform morphology. (2) The biological nature of PRCC/HGRCC-like areas within TC-RCC remains unclear. Our data suggest that heterogenous TC-RCCs may be associated with an adverse clinical outcome. (3) Hereditary leiomyomatosis-associated RCC can be morphologically indistinguishable from "high-grade" TC-RCC; therefore, in TC-RCC with high-grade features FH gene status should be tested. PMID:26447894

  6. Historical review: the carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) and its membrane (DM) and red cell (Theta.Vc) components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J M B; Bates, D V

    2003-11-14

    The single breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO sb), also called the transfer factor (TLCO), was introduced by Marie and August Krogh in two papers (Krogh and Krogh, Skand. Arch. Physiol. 23, 236-247, 1909; Krogh, J. Physiol., Lond. 49, 271-296, 1915). Physiologically, their measurements showed that sufficient oxygen (by extrapolation from CO) diffused passively from gas to blood without the need to postulate oxygen secretion, a popular theory at the time. Their DLCO sb technique was neglected until the advent of the infra-red CO meter in the 1950s. Ogilvie et al., J. Clin. Invest. 36, 1-17, 1957 published a standardized technique for a 'modified Krogh' single breath DLCO, which eventually became the method of choice in pulmonary function laboratories. The Roughton-Forster equation (J. Appl. Physiol. 1957, 11, 290-302) was an important step conceptually; it partitioned alveolar-capillary diffusion of oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) into a membrane component (DM) and a red cell component (theta.Vc) where theta is the DLCO (or DL(O2)) per ml of blood (measured in vitro), and Vc is the pulmonary capillary volume. This equation was based on the kinetics of O2 and CO with haemoglobin (Hb) in solution and with whole blood Hartridge and Roughton, Nature, 1923, 111, 325-326; Proc. R. Soc. Lond. Ser. A, 1923, 104, 376-394; (Proc. R. Soc. Lond. Ser. B, 1923, 94, 336-367; Proc. R. Soc. Lond. Ser. A 1923, 104, 395-430; J. Physiol., Lond. 1927, 62, 232-242; Roughton, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. Ser. B 1932, 111, 1-36) and on the relationship between alveolar P(O2) and 1/DLCO. Subsequently, the relationship between DL(O2) (Lilienthal et al., Am. J. Physiol. 147, 199-216, 1946) and DL(CO) was defined. More recently, the measurement of the nitric oxide diffusing capacity (DLNO) has been introduced. For DL(O2) and DLNO the membrane component (as 1/DM) is an important part of the overall diffusion (transfer) resistance. For the DLCO, 1/theta.Vc probably plays the greater

  7. Clinical observation of factors in the efficacy of blood component transfusion in patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Factors affecting the efficacy of platelet and red blood cell (RBC transfusion in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT have not been studied extensively. We aimed to evaluate platelet and RBC transfusion efficacy by measuring the platelet corrected count increment and the hemoglobin increment, respectively, 24 h after transfusion in 105 patients who received HSCT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using retrospective analysis, we studied whether factors, including gender, time of transplantation, the compatibility of ABO group between HSC donors and recipients, and autologous or allogenic transplantation, influence the efficacy of blood component transfusion. We found that the infection rate of HSCT patients positively correlated with the transfusion amount, and the length of stay in the laminar flow room was associated with transfusion. We found that platelet transfusion performed during HSCT showed significantly better efficacy than that performed before HSCT. The effect of platelet transfusion in auto-transplantation was significantly better than that in allo-transplantation. The efficacy of RBC transfusion during HSCT was significantly lower than that performed before HSCT. The efficacy of RBC transfusion in auto-transplantation was significantly higher than that in allo-transplantation. Allo-transplantation patients who received HSCs from compatible ABO groups showed significantly higher efficacy during both platelet and RBC transfusion. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the efficacy of platelet and RBC transfusions does not correlate with the gender of patients, while it significantly correlates with the time of transplantation, type of transplantation, and ABO compatibility between HSC donors and recipients. During HSCT, the infection rate of patients positively correlates with the transfusion amount of RBCs and platelets. The total volume of RBC units transfused positively correlates with the length of

  8. 78 FR 65594 - Vehicular Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (May 1, 1998). Electronic Filers: Comments may be filed electronically using the... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 90 Vehicular Repeaters AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed... the Commission's rules to allow the licensing and operation of vehicular repeater systems and...

  9. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  10. Nonparametric additive regression for repeatedly measured data

    KAUST Repository

    Carroll, R. J.

    2009-05-20

    We develop an easily computed smooth backfitting algorithm for additive model fitting in repeated measures problems. Our methodology easily copes with various settings, such as when some covariates are the same over repeated response measurements. We allow for a working covariance matrix for the regression errors, showing that our method is most efficient when the correct covariance matrix is used. The component functions achieve the known asymptotic variance lower bound for the scalar argument case. Smooth backfitting also leads directly to design-independent biases in the local linear case. Simulations show our estimator has smaller variance than the usual kernel estimator. This is also illustrated by an example from nutritional epidemiology. © 2009 Biometrika Trust.

  11. The permeability characteristics and interaction of the main components from Zhizi Bopi decoction in the MDCK cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhengyue; Huang, Cheng; Shen, Chenlin; Meng, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhaolin; Hu, Tingting; Li, Yangyang; Li, Jun

    2016-08-01

    1. Although emerging evidence indicates the therapeutic effects of Zhizi Bopi Decoction, the extent to which essential ingredients are absorbed and the possible synergistic actions are poorly understood. 2. In this study, MDCK cell model was used to determine the bi-directional permeability and interaction between the main components (geniposide, berberine and glycyrrhizic acid) of Zhizi Bopi Decoction. 3. The transport of the active ingredients was concentration-dependent in both directions. Moreover, the Papp (AP-BL) values of berberine and glycyrrhizic acid were significantly reduced when co-incubation with an ATP inhibitor. Additionally, uptake of berberine, glycyrrhizic acid were clearly inhibited by the inhibitors of P-glycoprotein and MRP2, indicating that P-gp and MRP2 may be involved in the transport of berberine and glycyrrhizic acid, respectively. However, it was found that geniposide may be purely passive diffusion. Furthermore, the combined incubation of geniposide with berberine and glycyrrhizic acid had a powerful sorbefacient effect than use of a single drug alone which may be regulated by tight junctions. 4. In summary, our study provides useful information for pharmacological applications of Zhizi Bopi Decoction and offers new insights into this ancient decoction for further researches, especially in drug synergism. PMID:26634613

  12. DNA methylation at a bovine alpha satellite I repeat CpG site during development following fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Couldrey

    Full Text Available Incomplete epigenetic reprogramming is postulated to contribute to the low developmental success following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. Here, we describe the epigenetic reprogramming of DNA methylation at an alpha satellite I CpG site (αsatI-5 during development of cattle generated either by artificial insemination (AI or in vitro fertilization (IVF and SCNT. Quantitative methylation analysis identified that SCNT donor cells were highly methylated at αsatI-5 and resulting SCNT blastocysts showed significantly more methylation than IVF blastocysts. At implantation, no difference in methylation was observed between SCNT and AI in trophoblast tissue at αsatI-5, however, SCNT embryos were significantly hyper-methylated compared to AI controls at this time point. Following implantation, DNA methylation at αsatI-5 decreased in AI but not SCNT placental tissues. In contrast to placenta, the proportion of methylation at αsatI-5 remained high in adrenal, kidney and muscle tissues during development. Differences in the average proportion of methylation were smaller in somatic tissues than placental tissues but, on average, SCNT somatic tissues were hyper-methylated at αsatI-5. Although sperm from all bulls was less methylated than somatic tissues at αsatI-5, on average this site remained hyper-methylated in sperm from cloned bulls compared with control bulls. This developmental time course confirms that epigenetic reprogramming does occur, at least to some extent, following SCNT. However, the elevated methylation levels observed in SCNT blastocysts and cellular derivatives implies that there is either insufficient time or abundance of appropriate reprogramming factors in oocytes to ensure complete reprogramming. Incomplete reprogramming at this CpG site may be a contributing factor to low SCNT success rates, but more likely represents the tip of the iceberg in terms of incompletely reprogramming. Until protocols ensure the epigenetic

  13. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  14. Lung carcinoma with rhabdoid component. A series of seven cases associated with uncommon types of non-small cell lung carcinomas and alveolar entrapment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, Francisco M; Moreno-Mata, Nicolás; Herranz-Aladro, María Luisa; Cañizares, Miguel Angel; Alvarez-Fernandez, Emilio

    2010-10-01

    Rhabdoid tumor, included in the WHO classification among large cell carcinomas of the lung, is an uncommon type of lung carcinoma with poor prognosis. We report a series of 7 cases of lung carcinomas with rhabdoid component in 10% and 80% of the tumor. The associated tumor was adenocarcinoma in 3 cases--one of them with focal micropapillary pattern--large cell carcinoma in 2 cases, squamous cell carcinoma in 1 case and pleomorphic carcinoma in 1 case. Two adenocarcinomas showed a focal spindle cell component. Micropapillary and pleomorphic types had not been reported before as a component associated with rhabdoid carcinomas. All cases were positive for vimentin, and AE1/AE3 cytokeratin and 5 cases for cytokeratin 7. All cases were negative for muscle and endothelial markers and for chromogranin A. Synaptophysin was focally positive only in one case. Alveolar trapping inside the tumor was present in 3 cases--a phenomenon not well studied in lung carcinomas and also not reported in tumors with rhabdoid component. Five patients died because of the tumor within 2 to 31 months after diagnosis, one of myocardial infarction and only one is alive and disease free 123 months after the diagnosis. In summary, we describe 7 new cases of this uncommon lung tumor with aggressive clinical course, associated with infrequent histological types in nonrhabdoid component and with alveolar trapping, a nondescribed finding.

  15. Dynamics of Graft Function Measured by DNA-Technology in a Patient with Severe Aplastic Anemia and Repeated Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Karastaneva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although bone marrow transplantation (BMT from an HLA identical sibling is considered as treatment of choice in pediatric patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA, a significant number of them experience graft failure (GF after BMT. We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with SAA who presented with a complicated posttransplant course due to parvovirus B19 infection and GF. A subsequent attempt to support the graft by antithymocyte globulin (ATG and a peripheral stem cell boost resulted in transitory autologous recovery of hematopoiesis followed by mixed chimerism, supported by donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs and finally graft rejection with relapse of SAA. Permanent complete chimerism was achieved by a second BMT. Dynamics of graft function, measured by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs analysis, are discussed.

  16. An Organic Dyad Composed of Diathiafulvalene-Functionalized Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Fullerene for Single-Component High-Efficiency Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, K; Venkateswararao, A; Nagarjuna, P; Bishnoi, Swati; Gupta, Vinay; Chand, Suresh; Singh, Surya Prakash

    2016-09-26

    A new low-band gap dyad DPP-Ful, which consists of covalently linked dithiafulvalene-functionalized diketopyrrolopyrrole as donor and fullerene (C60 ) as the acceptor, has been designed and synthesized. Organic solar cells were successfully constructed using the DPP-Ful dyad as an active layer. This system has a record power-conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.2 %, which is the highest value when compared to reported single-component organic solar cells.

  17. A Toxoplasma palmitoyl acyl transferase and the palmitoylated armadillo repeat protein TgARO govern apical rhoptry tethering and reveal a critical role for the rhoptries in host cell invasion but not egress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh R Beck

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexans are obligate intracellular parasites that actively penetrate their host cells to create an intracellular niche for replication. Commitment to invasion is thought to be mediated by the rhoptries, specialized apical secretory organelles that inject a protein complex into the host cell to form a tight-junction for parasite entry. Little is known about the molecular factors that govern rhoptry biogenesis, their subcellular organization at the apical end of the parasite and subsequent release of this organelle during invasion. We have identified a Toxoplasma palmitoyl acyltransferase, TgDHHC7, which localizes to the rhoptries. Strikingly, conditional knockdown of TgDHHC7 results in dispersed rhoptries that fail to organize at the apical end of the parasite and are instead scattered throughout the cell. While the morphology and content of these rhoptries appears normal, failure to tether at the apex results in a complete block in host cell invasion. In contrast, attachment and egress are unaffected in the knockdown, demonstrating that the rhoptries are not required for these processes. We show that rhoptry targeting of TgDHHC7 requires a short, highly conserved C-terminal region while a large, divergent N-terminal domain is dispensable for both targeting and function. Additionally, a point mutant lacking a key residue predicted to be critical for enzyme activity fails to rescue apical rhoptry tethering, strongly suggesting that tethering of the organelle is dependent upon TgDHHC7 palmitoylation activity. We tie the importance of this activity to the palmitoylated Armadillo Repeats-Only (TgARO rhoptry protein by showing that conditional knockdown of TgARO recapitulates the dispersed rhoptry phenotype of TgDHHC7 knockdown. The unexpected finding that apicomplexans have exploited protein palmitoylation for apical organelle tethering yields new insight into the biogenesis and function of rhoptries and may provide new avenues for therapeutic

  18. Response of plasma facing components in Tokamaks due to intense energy deposition using Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genco, Filippo

    Damage to plasma-facing components (PFC) due to various plasma instabilities is still a major concern for the successful development of fusion energy and represents a significant research obstacle in the community. It is of great importance to fully understand the behavior and lifetime expectancy of PFC under both low energy cycles during normal events and highly energetic events as disruptions, Edge-Localized Modes (ELM), Vertical Displacement Events (VDE), and Run-away electron (RE). The consequences of these high energetic dumps with energy fluxes ranging from 10 MJ/m2 up to 200 MJ/m 2 applied in very short periods (0.1 to 5 ms) can be catastrophic both for safety and economic reasons. Those phenomena can cause a) large temperature increase in the target material b) consequent melting, evaporation and erosion losses due to the extremely high heat fluxes c) possible structural damage and permanent degradation of the entire bulk material with probable burnout of the coolant tubes; d) plasma contamination, transport of target material into the chamber far from where it was originally picked. The modeling of off-normal events such as Disruptions and ELMs requires the simultaneous solution of three main problems along time: a) the heat transfer in the plasma facing component b) the interaction of the produced vapor from the surface with the incoming plasma particles c) the transport of the radiation produced in the vapor-plasma cloud. In addition the moving boundaries problem has to be considered and solved at the material surface. Considering the carbon divertor as target, the moving boundaries are two since for the given conditions, carbon doesn't melt: the plasma front and the moving eroded material surface. The current solution methods for this problem use finite differences and moving coordinates system based on the Crank-Nicholson method and Alternating Directions Implicit Method (ADI). Currently Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods are widely used for solving

  19. Telomere extension by telomerase and ALT generates variant repeats by mechanistically distinct processes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Michael; Hills, Mark; Conomos, Dimitri; Stutz, Michael D.; Dagg, Rebecca A.; Lau, Loretta M. S.; Reddel, Roger R; Hilda A Pickett

    2013-01-01

    Telomeres are terminal repetitive DNA sequences on chromosomes, and are considered to comprise almost exclusively hexameric TTAGGG repeats. We have evaluated telomere sequence content in human cells using whole-genome sequencing followed by telomere read extraction in a panel of mortal cell strains and immortal cell lines. We identified a wide range of telomere variant repeats in human cells, and found evidence that variant repeats are generated by mechanistically distinct processes during te...

  20. Anode biofilm transcriptomics reveals outer surface components essential for high density current production in Geobacter sulfurreducens fuel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly P Nevin

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which Geobacter sulfurreducens transfers electrons through relatively thick (>50 microm biofilms to electrodes acting as a sole electron acceptor were investigated. Biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens were grown either in flow-through systems with graphite anodes as the electron acceptor or on the same graphite surface, but with fumarate as the sole electron acceptor. Fumarate-grown biofilms were not immediately capable of significant current production, suggesting substantial physiological differences from current-producing biofilms. Microarray analysis revealed 13 genes in current-harvesting biofilms that had significantly higher transcript levels. The greatest increases were for pilA, the gene immediately downstream of pilA, and the genes for two outer c-type membrane cytochromes, OmcB and OmcZ. Down-regulated genes included the genes for the outer-membrane c-type cytochromes, OmcS and OmcT. Results of quantitative RT-PCR of gene transcript levels during biofilm growth were consistent with microarray results. OmcZ and the outer-surface c-type cytochrome, OmcE, were more abundant and OmcS was less abundant in current-harvesting cells. Strains in which pilA, the gene immediately downstream from pilA, omcB, omcS, omcE, or omcZ was deleted demonstrated that only deletion of pilA or omcZ severely inhibited current production and biofilm formation in current-harvesting mode. In contrast, these gene deletions had no impact on biofilm formation on graphite surfaces when fumarate served as the electron acceptor. These results suggest that biofilms grown harvesting current are specifically poised for electron transfer to electrodes and that, in addition to pili, OmcZ is a key component in electron transfer through differentiated G. sulfurreducens biofilms to electrodes.

  1. Silica Induced Suppression of the Production of Third and Fifth Components of the Complement System by Human Lung Cells In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothman, Barbara L.; Contrino, Josephine; Merrow, Martha; Despins, Alan; Kennedy, Thomas; Kreutzer, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    Although investigations to date have demonstrated the ability of the monocyte/macrophage to synthesize complement components, only a limited number of studies on complement synthesis by nonhepatic tissue cells have been reported. To begin to fill this gap in our knowledge we have recently evaluated

  2. Analysis and Comparison Based on Component Stress Factor of Dual Active Bridge and Isolated Full Bridge Boost Converters for Bidirectional Fuel Cells Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pittini, Riccardo; Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen; Zhang, Zhe;

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis and comparison of isolated topologies for bidirectional fuel cell systems. The analyzed topologies are the dua l active bridge (DAB) and the isolated full bridge boost converter (IFBBC). The analysis is performed based on the component stress factor (CSF). Results ...

  3. A combination of proteomics, principal component analysis and transcriptomics is a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers for macrophage maturation in the U937 cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeckx, K.C.M.; Bijlsma, S.; Groene, E.M. de; Witkamp, R.F.; Greef, J. van der; Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2004-01-01

    The monocyte-like human histiocytic lymphoma cell line U937 can be induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to undergo differentiation into a macrophage-like phenotype. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), oligonucleotide microarrays and principal component analysis (PCA)

  4. Development of a solid polymer electrolyte electrolysis cell module and ancillary components for a breadboard water electrolysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, F. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte technology in a water electrolysis system along with ancillary components to generate oxygen and hydrogen for a manned space station application are considered. Standard commercial components are utilized wherever possible. Presented are the results of investigations, surveys, tests, conclusions and recommendations for future development efforts.

  5. Protective effects of components of the Chinese herb grassleaf sweetflag rhizome on PC12 cells incubated with amyloid-beta42

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Zi-hao; Cheng, Xiao-hui; Ruan, Zhi-gang; Wang, Han; Li, Shan-Shan; Liu, Jing; Li, Guo-Ying; Tian, Su-min

    2015-01-01

    The major ingredients of grassleaf sweetflag rhizome are β-asarone and eugenol, which can cross the blood-brain barrier and protect neurons. This study aimed to observe the neuroprotective effects and mechanisms of β-asarone and eugenol, components of the Chinese herb grassleaf sweetflag rhizome, on PC12 cells. First, PC12 cells were cultured with different concentrations (between 1 × 10-10 M and 1 × 10-5 M) of β-asarone and eugenol. Survival rates of PC12 cells were not significantly affecte...

  6. Warfarin and coumarin-like Murraya paniculata extract down-regulate EpCAM-mediated cell adhesion: individual components versus mixture for studying botanical metastatic chemopreventives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jingwei; Zhou, Suxia; Jiang, Zhou; Chi, Ting; Ma, Ji; Kuo, Minliang; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    We recently defined cancer metastatic chemoprevention as utilizing safe and effective molecules to comprehensively prevent the spark of activation-adhesion-extravasation-proliferation metastatic cascade caused by circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The strategy focuses on preventing the most important starting point of the cascade. We identified an extract from a well-known medical plant Murraya paniculata, which inhibited both embryonic implantation to human endometrium as traditionally-used for abortion and CTC adhesion to human endothelium. Here, we separated and characterized five coumarin-containing components (Z1-Z5) from the botanic extract. Flow cytometry revealed that within 1-100 μg/mL, Z3 and Z5 down-regulated EpCAM expression in human colon HCT116, whereas, Z1 and Z2 did oppositely. Warfarin and Z1-Z5 component mixture (CM) also down-regulated EpCAM expression. The down-regulation of EpCAM by Z3, Z5, CM and warfarin was confirmed by western blotting, and caused inhibition on adhesion of cancer cells to human endothelial cells. Rat coagulation study showed that warfarin prolonged prothrombin time, whereas, Z3 did not. The present studies revealed that, for the first time, warfarin and coumarin-like components Z3, Z5 and CM from Murraya paniculata could directly inhibit EpCAM-mediated cell-cell adhesion. PMID:27480614

  7. Protective effects of components of the Chinese herb grassleaf sweetlfag rhizome on PC12 cells incubated with amyloid-beta42

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-hao Liang; Xiao-hui Cheng; Zhi-gang Ruan; Han Wang; Shan-shan Li; Jing Liu; Guo-ying Li; Su-min Tian

    2015-01-01

    The major ingredients of grassleaf sweetlfag rhizome areβ-asarone and eugenol, which can cross the blood-brain barrier and protect neurons. This study aimed to observe the neuroprotective effects and mechanisms ofβ-asarone and eugenol, components of the Chinese herb grassleaf sweetlfag rhizome, on PC12 cells. First, PC12 cells were cultured with different concentrations (between 1 × 10–10 M and 1 × 10–5 M) ofβ-asarone and eugenol. Survival rates of PC12 cells were not significantly affected. Second, PC12 cells incubated with amyloid-beta42, which reduced cell survival, were cultured under the same conditions (1 × 10–6 Mβ-asarone and eugenol). The survival rates of PC12 cells significantly increased, while expression levels of the mRNAs for the pro-apoptotic protein Bax decreased, and those for the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl mRNA increased. In addition, the combination ofβ-asarone with eugenol achieved better results than either component alone. Our experimental ifndings indicate that bothβ-asarone and eugenol protect PC12 cells through inhibiting apoptosis, and that the combination of the two is better than either alone.

  8. Protective effects of components of the Chinese herb grassleaf sweetflag rhizome on PC12 cells incubated with amyloid-beta42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-hao Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The major ingredients of grassleaf sweetflag rhizome are β-asarone and eugenol, which can cross the blood-brain barrier and protect neurons. This study aimed to observe the neuroprotective effects and mechanisms of β-asarone and eugenol, components of the Chinese herb grassleaf sweetflag rhizome, on PC12 cells. First, PC12 cells were cultured with different concentrations (between 1 × 10 -10 M and 1 × 10 -5 M of β-asarone and eugenol. Survival rates of PC12 cells were not significantly affected. Second, PC12 cells incubated with amyloid-beta42, which reduced cell survival, were cultured under the same conditions (1 × 10 -6 M β-asarone and eugenol. The survival rates of PC12 cells significantly increased, while expression levels of the mRNAs for the pro-apoptotic protein Bax decreased, and those for the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl mRNA increased. In addition, the combination of β-asarone with eugenol achieved better results than either component alone. Our experimental findings indicate that both β-asarone and eugenol protect PC12 cells through inhibiting apoptosis, and that the combination of the two is better than either alone.

  9. Evidence for ovarian granulosa stem cells: telomerase activity and localization of the telomerase ribonucleic acid component in bovine ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavranos, T C; Mathis, J M; Latham, S E; Kalionis, B; Shay, J W; Rodgers, R J

    1999-08-01

    We have previously postulated that granulosa cells of developing follicles arise from a population of stem cells. Stem cells and cancer cells can divide indefinitely partly because they express telomerase. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that repairs the ends of telomeres that otherwise shorten progressively upon each successive cell division. In this study we carried out cell cycle analyses and examined telomerase expression to examine our hypothesis. Preantral (60-100 microm) and small (1 mm) follicles, as well as granulosa cells from medium-sized (3 mm) and large (6-8 mm) follicles, were isolated. Cell cycle analyses and expression of Ki-67, a cell cycle-related protein, were undertaken on follicles of each size (n = 3) by flow cytometry; 12% to 16% of granulosa cells in all follicles were in the S phase, and less than 2% were in the G(2)/M phase. Telomerase activity (n = 3) was highest in the small preantral follicles, declining at the 1-mm stage and even further at the 3-mm stage. In situ hybridization histochemistry was carried out on bovine ovaries, and telomerase RNA was detected in the granulosa cells of growing follicles but not primordial follicles. Two major patterns of staining were observed in the membrana granulosa of antral follicles: staining in the middle and antral layers, and staining in the middle and basal layers. No staining was detected in oocytes. Our results strongly support our hypothesis that granulosa cells arise from a population of stem cells. PMID:10411512

  10. Inhibition of Glioblastoma Cell Growth In Vitro and In Vivo by Brucine, a Component of Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijun, Wang; Wenbin, Meng; Yumin, Wang; Ruijian, Zhang; Puweizhong, Huang; Yulin, Li

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most common glial cell tumors and has drawn more and more attention in the clinic in recent years. Brucine has been reported to significantly suppress gastric cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer growth in vivo by inducing cell apoptosis. Here, the effects of brucine on U251 human glioma cell growth were investigated in vitro by cell proliferation assay, FACs, and qPCR in a xenograft tumor model. Treatment with brucine reduced the expression of BCL-2 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), while upregulated BAX expression in U251 human glioma cells resulted in reduced glioma cell survival rate and inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors. We concluded that brucine has a suppressive effect on U251 human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo, which could help in understanding the role of brucine in glioma cells and guiding drug use in the clinic. PMID:26629939

  11. The dynamic impact of repeated stress on the hippocampal spatial map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Anupratap; Polygalov, Denis; Chattarji, Sumantra; McHugh, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Stress alters the function of many physiological processes throughout the body, including in the brain. A neural circuit particularly vulnerable to the effects of stress is the hippocampus, a key component of the episodic and spatial memory system in both humans and rodents. Earlier studies have provided snapshots of morphological, molecular, physiological and behavioral changes in the hippocampus following either acute or repeated stress. However, the cumulative impact of repeated stress on in vivo hippocampal physiology remains unexplored. Here we report the stress-induced modulation of the spatially receptive fields of the hippocampal CA1 'place cells' as mice explore familiar and novel tracks after 5 and 10 days of immobilization stress. We find that similar to what has been observed following acute stress, five days of repeated stress results in decreased excitability of CA1 pyramidal cells. Following ten days of chronic stress, however, this decreased hippocampal excitability is no longer evident, suggesting adaptation may have occurred. In addition to these changes in neuronal excitability, we find deficient context discrimination, wherein both short-term and chronic stress impair the ability of the hippocampus to unambiguously distinguish novel and familiar environments. These results suggest that a loss of network flexibility may underlie some of the behavioral deficits accompanying chronic stress. PMID:25139366

  12. Characterization of anti-leukemia components from Indigo naturalis using comprehensive two-dimensional K562/cell membrane chromatography and in silico target identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xunxun; Chen, Xiaofei; Dan, Jia; Cao, Yan; Gao, Shouhong; Guo, Zhiying; Zerbe, Philipp; Chai, Yifeng; Diao, Yong; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been developed for thousands of years and has formed an integrated theoretical system based on a large amount of clinical practice. However, essential ingredients in TCM herbs have not been fully identified, and their precise mechanisms and targets are not elucidated. In this study, a new strategy combining comprehensive two-dimensional K562/cell membrane chromatographic system and in silico target identification was established to characterize active components from Indigo naturalis, a famous TCM herb that has been widely used for the treatment of leukemia in China, and their targets. Three active components, indirubin, tryptanthrin and isorhamnetin, were successfully characterized and their anti-leukemia effects were validated by cell viability and cell apoptosis assays. Isorhamnetin, with undefined cancer related targets, was selected for in silico target identification. Proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (Src) was identified as its membrane target and the dissociation constant (Kd) between Src and isorhamnetin was 3.81 μM. Furthermore, anti-leukemia effects of isorhamnetin were mediated by Src through inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest. The results demonstrated that the integrated strategy could efficiently characterize active components in TCM and their targets, which may bring a new light for a better understanding of the complex mechanism of herbal medicines. PMID:27150638

  13. The CD2 isoform of protocadherin-15 is an essential component of the tip-link complex in mature auditory hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepermans, Elise; Michel, Vincent; Goodyear, Richard; Bonnet, Crystel; Abdi, Samia; Dupont, Typhaine; Gherbi, Souad; Holder, Muriel; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Marlin, Sandrine; Zenati, Akila; Richardson, Guy; Avan, Paul; Bahloul, Amel; Petit, Christine

    2014-07-01

    Protocadherin-15 (Pcdh15) is a component of the tip-links, the extracellular filaments that gate hair cell mechano-electrical transduction channels in the inner ear. There are three Pcdh15 splice isoforms (CD1, CD2 and CD3), which only differ by their cytoplasmic domains; they are thought to function redundantly in mechano-electrical transduction during hair-bundle development, but whether any of these isoforms composes the tip-link in mature hair cells remains unknown. By immunolabelling and both morphological and electrophysiological analyses of post-natal hair cell-specific conditional knockout mice (Pcdh15ex38-fl/ex38-fl Myo15-cre+/-) that lose only this isoform after normal hair-bundle development, we show that Pcdh15-CD2 is an essential component of tip-links in mature auditory hair cells. The finding, in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state, of a PCDH15 frameshift mutation (p.P1515Tfs*4) that affects only Pcdh15-CD2, in profoundly deaf children from two unrelated families, extends this conclusion to humans. These results provide key information for identification of new components of the mature auditory mechano-electrical transduction machinery. This will also serve as a basis for the development of gene therapy for deafness caused by PCDH15 defects. PMID:24940003

  14. The disease resistance signaling components EDS1 and PAD4 are essential regulators of the cell death pathway controlled by LSD1 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustérucci, C; Aviv, D H; Holt, B F; Dangl, J L; Parker, J E

    2001-10-01

    Specific recognition of pathogens is mediated by plant disease resistance (R) genes and translated into a successful defense response. The extent of associated hypersensitive cell death varies from none to an area encompassing cells surrounding an infection site, depending on the R gene activated. We constructed double mutants in Arabidopsis between positive regulators of R function and a negative regulator of cell death, LSD1, to address whether genes required for normal R function also regulate the runaway cell death observed in lsd1 mutants. We report here that EDS1 and PAD4, two signaling genes that mediate some but not all R responses, also are required for runaway cell death in the lsd1 mutant. Importantly, this novel function of EDS1 and PAD4 is operative when runaway cell death in lsd1 is initiated through an R gene that does not require EDS1 or PAD4 for disease resistance. NDR1, another component of R signaling, also contributes to the control of plant cell death. The roles of EDS1 and PAD4 in regulating lsd1 runaway cell death are related to the interpretation of reactive oxygen intermediate-derived signals at infection sites. We further demonstrate that the fate of superoxide at infection sites is different from that observed at the leading margins of runaway cell death lesions in lsd1 mutants.

  15. Characterization of a new small cell lung cancer (SCLC cell line STP54 derived from a metastatic bioptate of a combined type of SCLC with Non-SCLC component.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Domagała-Kulawik

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer constitutes 15-20% cases of lung cancers, currently the leading cause of death from malignant diseases. It also causes the demise of >90% of affected individuals in 5 years. We have established a new SCLC cell line STP54 derived from fine needle aspirate of metastatic supraclavicular lymph node of 54 -year-old women for model experiments. The primary tumor was diagnosed by histopathological examination as combined type of small cell lung cancer with a non-small cell component. We cultured the cancer cells in the RPMI 1640 medium. In the long-term culture only the small cell component survived. The cell line was established after 30 passages and then characterized by performing cell morphology, cell growth analysis, tumorigenicity in vitro and flow cytometry analysis of selected markers (like NCAM, cytokeratines, HLA-ABC, Fas, Bcl-2, p53, CXCR4, CD210. The cells were growing in floating aggregates and show features suggesting its invasiveness. We suggest that this new cell line may serve as a valuable tool for further studies on lung tumor biology, molecular pathogenesis and metastatic mechanism.

  16. Expansion and Function of Repeat Domain Proteins During Stress and Development in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Girdhar K

    2015-01-01

    The recurrent repeats having conserved stretches of amino acids exists across all domains of life. Subsequent repetition of single sequence motif and the number and length of the minimal repeating motifs are essential characteristics innate to these proteins. The proteins with tandem peptide repeats are essential for providing surface to mediate protein-protein interactions for fundamental biological functions. Plants are enriched in tandem repeat containing proteins typically distributed into various families. This has been assumed that the occurrence of multigene repeats families in plants enable them to cope up with adverse environmental conditions and allow them to rapidly acclimatize to these conditions. The evolution, structure, and function of repeat proteins have been studied in all kingdoms of life. The presence of repeat proteins is particularly profuse in multicellular organisms in comparison to prokaryotes. The precipitous expansion of repeat proteins in plants is presumed to be through internal tandem duplications. Several repeat protein gene families have been identified in plants. Such as Armadillo (ARM), Ankyrin (ANK), HEAT, Kelch-like repeats, Tetratricopeptide (TPR), Leucine rich repeats (LRR), WD40, and Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPR). The structure and functions of these repeat proteins have been extensively studied in plants suggesting a critical role of these repeating peptides in plant cell physiology, stress and development. In this review, we illustrate the structural, functional, and evolutionary prospects of prolific repeat proteins in plants. PMID:26793205

  17. Water soluble and insoluble components of urban PM2.5 and their cytotoxic effects on epithelial cells (A549) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yajuan; Jin, Chengyu; Su, Yue; Li, Jiaru; Zhu, Bangshang

    2016-05-01

    When PM2.5 enters human bodies, the water soluble (WS-PM2.5) and insoluble components (WIS-PM2.5) of PM2.5 would interact with cells and cause adverse effects. However, the knowledge about the individual toxicity contribution of these two components is limited. In this study, the physiochemical properties of PM2.5 were well characterized. The toxic effects of WS-PM2.5 and WIS-PM2.5, which include the cell viability, cell membrane damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and morphological changes, were examined with human lung epithelial A549 cells in vitro. The results indicated that WS-PM2.5 could induce the early response of ROS generation, multiplied mitochondria and multi-lamellar bodies in A549 cells, which might cause cell damage through oxidative stress. Meanwhile, WIS-PM2.5 was predominantly associated with the cell membrane disruption, which might lead to the cell damage through cell-particle interactions. Moreover, the synergistic cytotoxic effects of WS-PM2.5 and WIS-PM2.5 were observed at longer exposure time. These findings demonstrate the different cytotoxicity mechanisms of WS-PM2.5 and WIS-PM2.5, which suggest that not only the size and dosage of PM2.5 but also the solubility of PM2.5 should be taken into consideration when evaluating the toxicity of PM2.5. PMID:27039898

  18. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  19. The early predictive value of a decrease of metabolic tumor volume in repeated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with concurrent radiochemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wei, E-mail: weihuang@mcw.com [Department of Radiation Oncology (Chest Section), Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 440 Jiyan Road, Jinan 250117 (China); Liu, Bo; Fan, Min [Department of Internal Medicine Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Zhou, Tao [Department of Radiation Oncology (Chest Section), Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 440 Jiyan Road, Jinan 250117 (China); Fu, Zheng [PET/CT center, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Zhang, Zicheng; Li, Hongsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology (Chest Section), Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 440 Jiyan Road, Jinan 250117 (China); Li, Baosheng, E-mail: alvinbird@163.com [Department of Radiation Oncology (Chest Section), Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, 440 Jiyan Road, Jinan 250117 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •The patients underwent the second FDG PET during the early stage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). •To our knowledge, this could be the first study showing that the repeated FDG PET during the early stage of CCRT has added value by being a prognostic factor for recurrence of the locally advanced NSCLC patients. •This is a result of continuous research. •The decrease of MTV was the only significant risk factor for recurrence. -- Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the value of [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F FDG PET/CT) to predict recurrence of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during the early stage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods: A total of 53 stage III NSCLC patients without diabetics or undergoing surgery were enrolled in the prospective study. Those patients were evaluated by FDG PET before and following 40 Gy radiotherapy (RT) with a concurrent cisplatin-based heterogeneous chemotherapy regimen. Semiquantitative assessment was used to determine maximum and mean SUVs (SUVmax/SUVmean) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) of the primary tumor. The prognostic significance of PET/CT parameters and other clinical variables was assessed using Cox regression analyses. The cutoffs of PET/CT parameters which have been determined by the previous study were used to separate the groups with Kaplan–Meier curves. Results: Recurrence rates at 1- and 2-years were 18.9% (10/53) and 50.9% (27/53) for all patients, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed that the only prognostic factor for recurrence was a decrease of MTV. Using the cutoff of 29.7%, a decrease of MTV can separate the patients into 2 groups with Kaplan–Meier curve successfully. Conclusion: The prospective study has reinforced the early predictive value of MTV in repeated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence in a subgroup of locally advanced NSCLC who

  20. Expression of progesterone receptor membrane component-2 within the immature rat ovary and its role in regulating mitosis and apoptosis of spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Daniel; Liu, Xiufang; Pru, Cindy; Pru, James K; Peluso, John J

    2014-08-01

    Progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (Pgrmc2) mRNA was detected in the immature rat ovary. By 48 h after eCG, Pgrmc2 mRNA levels decreased by 40% and were maintained at 48 h post-hCG. Immunohistochemical studies detected PGRMC2 in oocytes and ovarian surface epithelial, interstitial, thecal, granulosa, and luteal cells. PGRMC2 was also present in spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells, localizing to the cytoplasm of interphase cells and apparently to the mitotic spindle of cells in metaphase. Interestingly, PGRMC2 levels appeared to decrease during the G1 stage of the cell cycle. Moreover, overexpression of PGRMC2 suppressed entry into the cell cycle, possibly by binding the p58 form of cyclin dependent kinase 11b. Conversely, Pgrmc2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) treatment increased the percentage of cells in G1 and M stage but did not increase the number of cells, which was likely due to an increase in apoptosis. Depleting PGRMC2 did not inhibit cellular (3)H-progesterone binding, but attenuated the ability of progesterone to suppress mitosis and apoptosis. Taken together these studies suggest that PGRMC2 affects granulosa cell mitosis by acting at two specific stages of the cell cycle. First, PGRMC2 regulates the progression from the G0 into the G1 stage of the cell cycle. Second, PGRMC2 appears to localize to the mitotic spindle, where it likely promotes the final stages of mitosis. Finally, siRNA knockdown studies indicate that PGRMC2 is required for progesterone to slow the rate of granulosa cell mitosis and apoptosis. These findings support a role for PGRMC2 in ovarian follicle development.

  1. Mixed-linkage (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-D-glucan is not unique to the Poales and is an abundant component of Equisetum arvense cell walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Iben; Pettolino, Filomena A; Wilson, Sarah M;

    2008-01-01

    Mixed-linkage (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta-D-glucan (MLG) is widely considered to be a defining feature of the cell walls of plants in the Poales order. However, we conducted an extensive survey of cell-wall composition in diverse land plants and discovered that MLG is also abundant in the walls...... consists mostly of cellotetraose rather than cellotetriose, and lacks long 1,4-beta-linked glucan blocks. Monosaccharide linkage analyses and immunochemical profiling indicated that, in E. arvense, MLG is a component of cell walls that have a novel architecture that differs significantly from...... that of the generally recognized type I and II cell walls. Unlike in type II walls, MLG in E. arvense does not appear to be co-extensive with glucuroarabinoxylans but occurs in walls that are rich in pectin. Immunofluorescence and immunogold localization showed that MLG occurs in both young and old regions of E...

  2. Evaluation of the effects of Streptococcus mutans chaperones and protein secretion machinery components on cell surface protein biogenesis, competence, and mutacin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, P J; Brady, L J

    2016-02-01

    The respective contributions of components of the protein translocation/maturation machinery to cell surface biogenesis in Streptococcus mutans are not fully understood. Here we used a genetic approach to characterize the effects of deletion of genes encoding the ribosome-associated chaperone RopA (Trigger Factor), the surface-localized foldase PrsA, and the membrane-localized chaperone insertases YidC1 and YidC2, both singly and in combination, on bacterial growth, chain length, self-aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity, autolysis, and antigenicity of surface proteins P1 (AgI/II, PAc), WapA, GbpC, and GtfD. The single and double deletion mutants, as well as additional mutant strains lacking components of the signal recognition particle pathway, were also evaluated for their effects on mutacin production and genetic competence. PMID:26386361

  3. Dose- and time-dependent changes of micronucleus frequency and gene expression in the progeny of irradiated cells: Two components in radiation-induced genomic instability?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huumonen, Katriina [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Korkalainen, Merja [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, 70701 Kuopio (Finland); Boman, Eeva; Heikkilä, Janne [Kuopio University Hospital, Cancer Center, P.O. Box 1777, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Höytö, Anne [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Lahtinen, Tapani [Kuopio University Hospital, Cancer Center, P.O. Box 1777, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Luukkonen, Jukka [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Viluksela, Matti [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, 70701 Kuopio (Finland); Naarala, Jonne [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Juutilainen, Jukka, E-mail: jukka.juutilainen@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Development with time of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI) was studied. • Dose–response of micronuclei showed marked time-dependent changes. • A new model assuming two components in RIGI was found to fit with the data. • The persisting component of RIGI seems to be independent of dose above a threshold. • Increasing heterogeneity was characteristic to delayed gene expression changes. - Abstract: Murine embryonic C3H/10T½ fibroblasts were exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2 or 5 Gy. To follow the development of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI), the frequency of micronuclei was measured with flow cytometry at 2 days after exposure and in the progeny of the irradiated cells at 8 and 15 days after exposure. Gene expression was measured at the same points in time by PCR arrays profiling the expression of 84 cancer-relevant genes. The micronucleus results showed a gradual decrease in the slope of the dose–response curve between days 2 and 15. The data were consistent with a model assuming two components in RIGI. The first component is characterized by dose-dependent increase in micronuclei. It may persist more than ten cell generations depending on dose, but eventually disappears. The second component is more persistent and independent of dose above a threshold higher than 0.2 Gy. Gene expression analysis 2 days after irradiation at 5 Gy showed consistent changes in genes that typically respond to DNA damage. However, the consistency of changes decreased with time, suggesting that non-specificity and increased heterogeneity of gene expression are characteristic to the second, more persistent component of RIGI.

  4. Soft X-ray imaging and spectromicroscopy: new insights in chemical state and morphology of the key components in operating fuel-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Abyaneh, Majid Kazemian; Amati, Matteo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Gregoratti, Luca; Kaulich, Burkhard; Kiskinova, Maya

    2012-08-13

    Fuel cells are one of the most appealing environmentally friendly devices for the effective conversion of chemical energy into electricity and heat, but still there are key barriers to their broad commercialization. In addition to efficiency, a major challenge of fuel-cell technology is the durability of the key components (interconnects, electrodes, and electrolytes) that can be subject to corrosion or undesired morphology and chemical changes occurring under operating conditions. The complementary capabilities of synchrotron-based soft X-ray microscopes in terms of imaging, spectroscopy, spatial and time resolution, and variable probing depths are opening unique opportunities to shed light on the multiple processes occurring in these complex systems at microscopic length scales. This type of information is prerequisite for understanding and controlling the performance and durability of such devices. This paper reviews the most recent efforts in the implementation of these methods for exploring the evolving structure and chemical composition of some key fuel cell components. Recent achievements are illustrated by selected results obtained with simplified versions of proton-exchange fuel-cells (PEFC) and solid-oxide fuel-cells (SOFC), which allow in situ monitoring of the redox reactions resulting in: 1) undesired deposits at interconnects and electrodes (PEFC); 2) material interactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface (PEFC); 3) release of corrosion products to the electrolyte phase (PEFC, and 4) mass-transport processes and structural changes occurring at the high operation temperatures of SOFC and promoted by the polarization. PMID:22836392

  5. Components and distributions of cytoskeleton network in neoplastic Hep G2cells extracted with triton X-100 and (NH4)2SO4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Wei Zhang

    2000-01-01

    AIM To explore the components and the distributions of the cytoskeleton network in neoplastic Hep G2 cellsextracted with triton X-100 and (NH4)2SO4.METHODS Using the mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell sublines (C6/C7) with low and high metastasis as acontrol, the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (Hep G2) as well as the cell sublines (C6/C7) wasextracted with triton X-100 and/or (NH4)2SO4, then stained with Coomasie blue R250 or labeled withimmunoenzymatic technique to identify the cytokeratin-type or vimentin-type intermediate filamentcomponents and study the distributions of cytoskeleton comparatively.RESULTS Extracted with triton X-100 and/or (NH4)2SO4, then stained with Coomasie blue R250, the cells'cytoskeleton network were showed clearly; still it was very difficult to identify the variations of thecytoskeleton network in morphology by light microscopy when the same cells was extracted with the differentextraction above; compared with the low metastasis cells (C7), most of the high metastasis cells (C6) werelikely showed that the distribution of the cytoskeleton network was more irregular and uneven as well asgathering on one side to the cell neucleus, and so did a few of Hep G2 cells (the percentage of regular andeven distribution of cytoskeleton, C6: 8.0±1.0; C7: 84.0±2.0; Hep G2: 96.0±2.0; n = 500; x2-test,P<0.01). Moreover, extracted with triton X-100 and (NH4)2SO4, then labeled by immunoenzymatictechnique, the mouse lung adenocarcinoma sublines (C6/C7) were positive for cytokeratin antibody only, butthe hepatocellular carcinoma cell (Hep G2) was positive for both cytokeratin and vimentin antibodies.Besides these, in the same cells, the distribution of the intermediate filament network showed by theimmunoenzymatic technique was nearly keeping with that of the cytoskeleton network showed by Coomasieblue R250 stain.CONCLUSION ① It is very difficult to identify the variations of the cytoskeleton network in morphologyby light microscopy when the same

  6. The lung function score and its components as predictors of overall survival and chronic graft-vs-host disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Ditz, Diana; Rabanus, Robert; Schulz, Christian; Wolff, Daniel; Holler, Barbara; HOLLER, ERNST; Hildebrandt, Gerhard Carl

    2016-01-01

    Aim To retrospectively assess if the modified lung function score (LFS) and/or its components, forced expiratory volume within the first second (FEV1) and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide corrected for hemoglobin level (cDLCO), predict overall survival (OS) and chronic graft-vs-host-disease (cGvHD). Methods We evaluated 241 patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) at the University of Regensburg Transplant Center between June 1998 and July 2005 i...

  7. Occurrence of antigenic (species-specific?) partially 3-O-methylated heteromannans in cell wall and soluble cellular (nonwall) components of Coccidioides immitis mycelia.

    OpenAIRE

    Wheat, R. W.; Woodruff, W W; Haltiwanger, R S

    1983-01-01

    Skin test-active, phenol-soluble, water-soluble (PSWS) extracts of Coccidioides immitis whole, defatted mycelia were compared with skin test-active, alkali-soluble, water-soluble (ASWS) extracts of mycelial cell walls. Both PSWS and ASWS extracts contained partially 3-O-methylated mannan. Composition analysis of both PSWS and ASWS extracts indicated mannose and glucose as major components, whereas 3-O-methylmannose and galactose were minor constituents. These heteromannans and glucans could b...

  8. The choroid plexus response to a repeated peripheral inflammatory stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palha Joana A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic systemic inflammation triggers alterations in the central nervous system that may relate to the underlying inflammatory component reported in neurodegenerative disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. However, it is far from being understood whether and how peripheral inflammation contributes to induce brain inflammatory response in such illnesses. As part of the barriers that separate the blood from the brain, the choroid plexus conveys inflammatory immune signals into the brain, largely through alterations in the composition of the cerebrospinal fluid. Results In the present study we investigated the mouse choroid plexus gene expression profile, using microarray analyses, in response to a repeated inflammatory stimulus induced by the intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide every two weeks for a period of three months; mice were sacrificed 3 and 15 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection. The data show that the choroid plexus displays a sustained response to the repeated inflammatory stimuli by altering the expression profile of several genes. From a total of 24,000 probes, 369 are up-regulated and 167 are down-regulated 3 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection, while at 15 days the number decreases to 98 and 128, respectively. The pathways displaying the most significant changes include those facilitating entry of cells into the cerebrospinal fluid, and those participating in the innate immune response to infection. Conclusion These observations contribute to a better understanding of the brain response to peripheral inflammation and pave the way to study their impact on the progression of several disorders of the central nervous system in which inflammation is known to be implicated.

  9. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeatedDNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C.

    2007-05-05

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  10. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  11. Sequencing Games with Repeated Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estevez Fernandez, M.A.; Borm, P.E.M.; Calleja, P.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Two classes of one machine sequencing situations are considered in which each job corresponds to exactly one player but a player may have more than one job to be processed, so called RP(repeated player) sequencing situations.In max-RP sequencing situations it is assumed that each player's cost funct

  12. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  13. Theoretical examination of effective oxygen diffusion coefficient and electrical conductivity of polymer electrolyte fuel cell porous components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Gen; Yokoyama, Kouji; Ooyama, Junpei; Terao, Takeshi; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Kubo, Norio; Kawase, Motoaki

    2016-09-01

    The reduction of oxygen transfer resistance through porous components consisting of a gas diffusion layer (GDL), microporous layer (MPL), and catalyst layer (CL) is very important to reduce the cost and improve the performance of a PEFC system. This study involves a systematic examination of the relationship between the oxygen transfer resistance of the actual porous components and their three-dimensional structure by direct measurement with FIB-SEM and X-ray CT. Numerical simulations were carried out to model the properties of oxygen transport. Moreover, based on the model structure and theoretical equations, an approach to the design of new structures is proposed. In the case of the GDL, the binder was found to obstruct gas diffusion with a negative effect on performance. The relative diffusion coefficient of the MPL is almost equal to that of the model structure of particle packing. However, that of CL is an order of magnitude less than those of the other two components. Furthermore, an equation expressing the relative diffusion coefficient of each component can be obtained with the function of porosity. The electrical conductivity of MPL, which is lower than that of the carbon black packing, is considered to depend on the contact resistance.

  14. Dissolved carbon dioxide determines the productivity of a recombinant hemagglutinin component of an influenza vaccine produced by insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghrous, Jamal; Khramtsov, Nikolai; Buckland, Barry C; Cox, Manon M J; Palomares, Laura A; Srivastava, Indresh K

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved carbon dioxide (dCO2 ) accumulation during cell culture has been recognized as an important parameter that needs to be controlled for successful scale-up of animal cell culture because above a certain concentration there are adverse effects on cell growth performance and protein production. We investigated the effect of accumulation of dCO2 in bioreactor cultures of expresSF+(®) insect cells infected with recombinant baculoviruses expressing recombinant influenza virus hemagglutinins (rHA). Different strategies for bioreactor cultures were used to obtain various ranges of concentrations of dCO2 (200 mmHg) and to determine their effects on recombinant protein production and cell metabolic activity. We show that the accumulation of dCO2 at levels > 100 mmHg resulted in reduced metabolic activity, slowed cell growth, prolonged culture viability after infection, and decreased infection kinetics. The reduced rHA yields were not caused by the decrease in the extracellular pH that resulted from dCO2 accumulation, but were most likely due to the effect of dCO2 accumulation in cells. The results obtained here at the 2 L scale have been used for the design of large-scale processes to manufacture the rHA based recombinant vaccine Flublok™ at the 2500 L scale Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2015;112: 2267-2275. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. IL-12 and IL-18 induce MAP kinase-dependent adhesion of T cells to extracellular matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Amiram; Novick, Daniela; Rubinstein, Menachem; Dinarello, Charles A; Lider, Ofer; Hershkoviz, Rami

    2002-07-01

    Cytokines and chemokines play an essential role in recruiting leukocytes from the circulation to the peripheral sites of inflammation by modulating cellular interactions with endothelial cell ligands and extracellular matrix (ECM). Herein, we examined regulation of T cell adhesion to ECM ligands by two major proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18. IL-12 and IL-18 induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin (FN) and hyaluronic acid at low (pM) concentrations that were mediated by specific adhesion molecules expressed on the T cell surface, namely, beta(1) integrins and CD44, respectively. The induction of adhesion by IL-12 and IL-18 was inhibited by extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors (PD098059 and SB203580, respectively). In contrast, IL-12- and IL-18-induced interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) secretion from T cells was inhibited by SB203580, but not by PD098059. It is interesting that low concentrations of IL-12 and IL-18 induced T cell adhesion to FN in a synergistic manner. Thus, in addition to the regulation of late inflammatory functions such as INF-gamma production, IL-12 and IL-18, alone or in combination, regulate early inflammatory events such as T cell adhesion to inflamed sites. PMID:12101280

  16. The mitochondrial H(+)-ATP synthase and the lipogenic switch: new core components of metabolic reprogramming in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cufi, Sílvia; Vellon, Luciano; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Menendez, Octavio J; Joven, Jorge; Lupu, Ruth; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-01-15

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells share some basic properties, such as self-renewal and pluripotency, with cancer cells, and they also appear to share several metabolic alterations that are commonly observed in human tumors. The cancer cells' glycolytic phenotype, first reported by Otto Warburg, is necessary for the optimal routing of somatic cells to pluripotency. However, how iPS cells establish a Warburg-like metabolic phenotype and whether the metabolic pathways that support the bioenergetics of iPS cells are produced by the same mechanisms that are selected during the tumorigenic process remain largely unexplored. We recently investigated whether the reprogramming-competent metabotype of iPS cells involves changes in the activation/expression status of the H(+)-ATPase, which is a core component of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation that is repressed at both the activity and protein levels in human carcinomas, and of the lipogenic switch, which refers to a marked overexpression and hyperactivity of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACACA) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) lipogenic enzymes that has been observed in nearly all examined cancer types. A comparison of a starting population of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and their iPS cell progeny revealed that somatic cell reprogramming involves a significant increase in the expression of ATPase inhibitor factor 1 (IF1), accompanied by extremely low expression levels of the catalytic β-F1-ATPase subunit. The pharmacological inhibition of ACACA and FASN activities markedly decreases reprogramming efficiency, and ACACA and FASN expression are notably upregulated in iPS cells. Importantly, iPS cells exhibited a significant intracellular accumulation of neutral lipid bodies; however, these bodies may be a reflection of intense lysosomal/autophagocytic activity rather than bona fide lipid droplet formation in iPS cells, as they were largely unresponsive to pharmacological modulation of PPARgamma and FASN activities. The

  17. A Semiparametric Bayesian Model for Repeatedly Repeated Binary Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Quintana, Fernando A.; Müller, Peter; Rosner, Gary L.; Mary V Relling

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the analysis of data from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays comparing tumor and normal tissues. The data consist of sequences of indicators for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and involve three nested levels of repetition: chromosomes for a given patient, regions within chromosomes, and SNPs nested within regions. We propose to analyze these data using a semiparametric model for multi-level repeated binary data. At the top level of the hierarchy we assume a sampling model fo...

  18. The distal short consensus repeats 1 and 2 of the membrane cofactor protein CD46 and their distance from the cell membrane determine productive entry of species B adenovirus serotype 35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischli, Christoph; Verhaagh, Sandra; Havenga, Menzo; Sirena, Dominique; Schaffner, Walter; Cattaneo, Roberto; Greber, Urs F; Hemmi, Silvio

    2005-08-01

    The human regulator of complement activation membrane cofactor protein (CD46) has recently been identified as an attachment receptor for most species B adenoviruses (Ads), including Ad type 3 (Ad3), Ad11, and Ad35, as well as species D Ad37. To characterize the interaction between Ad35 and CD46, hybrid receptors composed of different CD46 short consensus repeat (SCR) domains fused to immunoglobulin-like domains of CD4 and a set of 36 CD46 mutants containing semiconservative changes of single amino acids within SCR domains I and II were tested in binding and in Ad35-mediated luciferase transduction assays. In addition, anti-CD46 antibodies and soluble polypeptides constituting various CD46 domains were used in binding inhibition studies. Our data indicate that (i) CD46 SCR I or SCR II alone confers low but significant Ad35 binding; (ii) the presence of SCR I and II is required for optimal binding and transgene expression; (iii) transduction efficiencies equivalent to that of full-length CD46 are obtained if SCR I and II are at an appropriate distance from the cell membrane; (iv) ablation of the N-glycan attached to SCR I has no influence on receptor function, whereas ablation of the SCR II N-glycan results in about a two- to threefold reduction of binding and transgene expression; (v) most putative Ad35 binding residues are located on the same solvent-exposed face of the SCR I or SCR II domain, which are twisted by about 90 degrees ; and (vi) the putative Ad35 binding sites partly overlap with the measles virus binding surface.

  19. Podoplanin is a component of extracellular vesicles that reprograms cell-derived exosomal proteins and modulates lymphatic vessel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Germán; Gopal, Shashi K.; Martín-Villar, Ester; Renart, Jaime; Simpson, Richard J.; Quintanilla, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays crucial roles in embryonic development, the immune response, and malignant progression. Here, we report that cells ectopically or endogenously expressing PDPN release extracellular vesicles (EVs) that contain PDPN mRNA and protein. PDPN incorporates into membrane shed microvesicles (MVs) and endosomal-derived exosomes (EXOs), where it was found to colocalize with the canonical EV marker CD63 by immunoelectron microscopy. We have previously found that expression of PDPN in MDCK cells induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Proteomic profiling of MDCK-PDPN cells compared to control cells shows that PDPN-induced EMT is associated with upregulation of oncogenic proteins and diminished expression of tumor suppressors. Proteomic analysis of exosomes reveals that MDCK-PDPN EXOs were enriched in protein cargos involved in cell adhesion, cytoskeletal remodeling, signal transduction and, importantly, intracellular trafficking and EV biogenesis. Indeed, expression of PDPN in MDCK cells stimulated both EXO and MV production, while knockdown of endogenous PDPN in human HN5 squamous carcinoma cells reduced EXO production and inhibited tumorigenesis. EXOs released from MDCK-PDPN and control cells both stimulated in vitro angiogenesis, but only EXOs containing PDPN were shown to promote lymphatic vessel formation. This effect was mediated by PDPN on the surface of EXOs, as demonstrated by a neutralizing specific monoclonal antibody. These results contribute to our understanding of PDPN-induced EMT in association to tumor progression, and suggest an important role for PDPN in EV biogenesis and/or release and for PDPN-EXOs in modulating lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26893367

  20. Patterns Prediction of Chemotherapy Sensitivity in Cancer Cell lines Using FTIR Spectrum, Neural Network and Principal Components Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zendehdel, Rezvan; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; H. Shirazi, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance enables cancer cells to break away from cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs. Identification of resistant phenotype is very important because it can lead to effective treatment plan. There is an interest in developing classifying models of resistance phenotype based on the multivariate data. We have investigated a vibrational spectroscopic approach in order to characterize a sensitive human ovarian cell line, A2780, and its cisplatin-resistant derivative, A2780-cp. In this stu...

  1. Neisseria meningitidis differentially controls host cell motility through PilC1 and PilC2 components of type IV Pili.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe C Morand

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a strictly human pathogen that has two facets since asymptomatic carriage can unpredictably turn into fulminant forms of infection. Meningococcal pathogenesis relies on the ability of the bacteria to break host epithelial or endothelial cellular barriers. Highly restrictive, yet poorly understood, mechanisms allow meningococcal adhesion to cells of only human origin. Adhesion of encapsulated and virulent meningococci to human cells relies on the expression of bacterial type four pili (T4P that trigger intense host cell signalling. Among the components of the meningococcal T4P, the concomitantly expressed PilC1 and PilC2 proteins regulate pili exposure at the bacterial surface, and until now, PilC1 was believed to be specifically responsible for T4P-mediated meningococcal adhesion to human cells. Contrary to previous reports, we show that, like PilC1, the meningococcal PilC2 component is capable of mediating adhesion to human ME180 epithelial cells, with cortical plaque formation and F-actin condensation. However, PilC1 and PilC2 promote different effects on infected cells. Cellular tracking analysis revealed that PilC1-expressing meningococci caused a severe reduction in the motility of infected cells, which was not the case when cells were infected with PilC2-expressing strains. The amount of both total and phosphorylated forms of EGFR was dramatically reduced in cells upon PilC1-mediated infection. In contrast, PilC2-mediated infection did not notably affect the EGFR pathway, and these specificities were shared among unrelated meningococcal strains. These results suggest that meningococci have evolved a highly discriminative tool for differential adhesion in specific microenvironments where different cell types are present. Moreover, the fine-tuning of cellular control through the combined action of two concomitantly expressed, but distinctly regulated, T4P-associated variants of the same molecule (i.e. PilC1 and Pil

  2. Choroidal neovascularization is inhibited via an intraocular decrease of inflammatory cells in mice lacking complement component C3

    OpenAIRE

    Xue Tan; Katsuhito Fujiu; Ichiro Manabe; Junko Nishida; Reiko Yamagishi; Ryozo Nagai; Yasuo Yanagi

    2015-01-01

    In early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), complement component C3 can be observed in drusen, which is the accumulation of material beneath the retinal pigment epithelium. The complement pathways, via the activation of C3, can upregulate the expression of cytokines and their receptors and the recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes, both of which play an important role in the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in exudative AMD. Laser-induced CNV lesions were found to be si...

  3. Response Of Plasma Facing Components In Tokamaks Due To Intense Energy Deposition Using Particle-In-Cell(pic) Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Genco, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Damage to plasma-facing components (PFC) due to various plasma instabilities is still a major concern for the successful development of fusion energy and represents a significant research obstacle in the community. It is of great importance to fully understand the behavior and lifetime expectancy of PFC under both low energy cycles during normal events and highly energetic events as disruptions, Edge-Localized Modes (ELM), Vertical Displacement Events (VDE), and Run-away electron (RE). The co...

  4. Directionality switchable gain stabilized linear repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takayuki; Ohmachi, Tadashi; Aida, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new approach to realize a bidirectional linear repeater suitable for future optical internet networks and fault location in repeater chain with OTDR. The proposed approach is the linear repeater of simple configuration whose directionality is rearranged dynamically by electrical control signal. The repeater is composed of a magneto-optical switch, a circulator, a dynamically gain stabilized unidirectional EDFA, and control circuits. The repeater directionality is rearranged as fast as 0.1ms by an electrical control pulse. It is experimentally confirmed that OTDR with the directionality switchable repeater is feasible for repeater chain. The detailed design and performance of the repeater are also discussed, including the multi-pass interference (MPI) which may arise in the proposed repeater, the effect of the MPI on SNR degradation of the repeater chain and the feed-forward EDFA gain control circuit.

  5. Quantitation of Leishmania lipophosphoglycan repeat units by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Tamara L; Turco, Salvatore J

    2006-04-01

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored lipophosphoglycan (LPG) of Leishmania is the dominant cell surface glycoconjugate of these pathogenic parasites. LPG is structurally characterized by a series of phosphoglycan repeat units. Determining the number of repeat units per LPG molecule has proven difficult using current technologies, such as mass spectrometry. As an alternative method to quantitate the number of repeat units in LPG, a procedure based on capillary electrophoretic analysis of the proportion of mannose to 2,5-anhydromannose (derived from the nonacetylated glucosamine of the GPI anchor of LPG) was developed. The CE-based technique is sensitive and relatively rapid compared to GC-MS-based protocols. Its application was demonstrated in quantitating the number of LPG repeat units from several species of Leishmania as well as from two life-cycle stages of these organisms. PMID:16310310

  6. Blood haematological and biochemical parameters in normal cycling, pregnant and repeat breeding buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) maintained in isothermic and isonutritional conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anthony Sabasthin; Venkataswamy Girish Kumar; Sumanta Nandi

    2012-01-01

    Objective:The present study was envisaged to examine the hematological and biochemical, parameters in three different groups of buffaloes (regularly cycling, pregnant and repeat breeding) maintained in isothermic and isonutritional conditions to establish the variations in blood and/or serum components in these groups.Methods:Blood samples were analyzed for hemoglobin, PCV, TLC, neutophil, lymphocyte, eosinophil, and monocyte count, glucose, total protein, albumin, globulin, urea and cholesterol.Results:The results revealed significantly lower haemoglobin and packed cell volume value in repeat breeding when compared to pregnant and regularly cycling animals. The WBC value significantly higher in repeat breeding when compared to regularly cycling animals. The average mean values of neutrophils, lymphocyte and eosinophils revealed a no significant difference in the neutrophils, lymphocyte and eosinophils in between the group. The mean values of monocytes revealed a significantly higher value in repeat breeding animals when compared to pregnant animals. The serum glucose, total protein, cholesterol and urea levels were significantly lower in repeat breeding compared to pregnant and regularly cycling animals. The levels of albumin and globulin revealed non-significant difference among the groups.Conclusions: A significant decrease in the hemoglobin, PCV, glucose, total protein, cholesterol and urea was observed in the repeat breeding animals when compared to pregnant and regularly cycling animals.

  7. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  8. Peptidoglycan metabolism is controlled by the WalRK (YycFG) and PhoPR two-component systems in phosphate-limited Bacillus subtilis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisicchia, Paola; Lioliou, Efthimia; Noone, David; Salzberg, Letal I; Botella, Eric; Hübner, Sebastian; Devine, Kevin M

    2010-02-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the WalRK (YycFG) two-component system controls peptidoglycan metabolism in exponentially growing cells while PhoPR controls the response to phosphate limitation. Here we examine the roles of WalRK and PhoPR in peptidoglycan metabolism in phosphate-limited cells. We show that B. subtilis cells remain viable in a phosphate-limited state for an extended period and resume growth rapidly upon phosphate addition, even in the absence of a PhoPR-mediated response. Peptidoglycan synthesis occurs in phosphate-limited wild-type cells at approximately 27% the rate of exponentially growing cells, and at approximately 18% the rate of exponentially growing cells in the absence of PhoPR. In phosphate-limited cells, the WalRK regulon genes yocH, cwlO(yvcE), lytE and ydjM are expressed in a manner that is dependent on the WalR recognition sequence and deleting these genes individually reduces the rate of peptidoglycan synthesis. We show that ydjM expression can be activated by PhoP approximately P in vitro and that PhoP occupies its promoter in phosphate-limited cells. However, iseA(yoeB) expression cannot be repressed by PhoP approximately P in vitro, but can be repressed by non-phosphorylated WalR in vitro. Therefore, we conclude that peptidoglycan metabolism is controlled by both WalRK and PhoPR in phosphate-limited B. subtilis cells. PMID:20487291

  9. Cotyledon cells of Vigna mungo seedlings use at least two distinct autophagic machineries for degradation of starch granules and cellular components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyooka, K; Okamoto, T; Minamikawa, T

    2001-09-01

    alpha-Amylase is expressed in cotyledons of germinated Vigna mungo seeds and is responsible for the degradation of starch that is stored in the starch granule (SG). Immunocytochemical analysis of the cotyledon cells with anti-alpha-amylase antibody showed that alpha-amylase is transported to protein storage vacuole (PSV) and lytic vacuole (LV), which is converted from PSV by hydrolysis of storage proteins. To observe the insertion/degradation processes of SG into/in the inside of vacuoles, ultrastructural analyses of the cotyledon cells were conducted. The results revealed that SG is inserted into LV through autophagic function of LV and subsequently degraded by vacuolar alpha-amylase. The autophagy for SG was structurally similar to micropexophagy detected in yeast cells. In addition to the autophagic process for SG, autophagosome-mediated autophagy for cytoplasm and mitochondria was detected in the cotyledon cells. When the embryo axes were removed from seeds and the detached cotyledons were incubated, the autophagosome-mediated autophagy was observed, but the autophagic process for the degradation of SG was not detected, suggesting that these two autophagic processes were mediated by different cellular mechanisms. The two distinct autophagic processes were thought to be involved in the breakdown of SG and cell components in the cells of germinated cotyledon.

  10. Revealing changes in molecular composition of plant cell walls on the micron-level by Raman mapping and vertex component analysis (VCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierlinger, Notburga

    2014-01-01

    At the molecular level the plant cell walls consist of a few nanometer thick semi-crystalline cellulose fibrils embedded in amorphous matrix polymers such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and lignins. The arrangement of these molecules within the cell wall in different plant tissues, cells and cell wall layers is of crucial importance for a better understanding and thus optimized utilization of plant biomass. During the last years Confocal Raman microscopy evolved as a powerful method in plant science by revealing the different molecules in context with the microstructure. In this study two-dimensional spectral maps have been acquired of micro-cross-sections of spruce (softwood) and beech (hardwood). Raman images have been derived by using univariate (band integration, height ratios) and multivariate methods [vertex component analysis (VCA)]. While univariate analysis only visualizes changes in selected band heights or areas, VCA separates anatomical regions and cell wall layers with the most different molecular structures. Beside visualization of the distinguished regions and features the underlying molecular structure can be derived based on the endmember spectra. VCA revealed that the lumen sided S3 layer has a similar molecular composition as the pit membrane, both revealing a clear change in lignin composition compared to all other cell wall regions. Within the S2 layer a lamellar structure was visualized, which was elucidated to derive from slight changes in lignin composition and content and might be due to successive but not uniform lignification during growth. PMID:25071792

  11. Repeatability of Harris Corner Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Lili

    2003-01-01

    Interest point detectors are commonly employed to reduce the amount of data to be processed. The ideal interest point detector would robustly select those features which are most appropriate or salient for the application and data at hand. This paper shows that interest points are geometrically stable under different transformations.This property makes interest points very successful in the context of image matching. To measure this property quantatively, we introduce a evaluation criterion: repeatability rate.

  12. Nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main features of the EPR concerning the fabrication of the reactor are: -) the size of the components, -) the modification of the design compared with classical PWR, and -) an intensive use of forging (in particular the cold and hot legs of the primary circuit are forged). This series of slides overviews the fabrication of the components for the EPR by highlighting the differences with the previous generation of reactors. 4 types of components are reviewed: the reactor vessel and internals, steam generators, primary circuit pipes, and primary coolant pumps. (A.C.)

  13. The Repeat Pattern Toolkit (RPT): Analyzing the structure and evolution of the C. elegans genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, P.; States, D.J. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Over 3.6 million bases of DNA sequence from chromosome III of the C. elegans have been determined. The availability of this extended region of contiguous sequence has allowed us to analyze the nature and prevalence of repetitive sequences in the genome of a eukaryotic organism with a high gene density. We have assembled a Repeat Pattern Toolkit (RPT) to analyze the patterns of repeats occurring in DNA. The tools include identifying significant local alignments (utilizing both two-way and three-way alignments), dividing the set of alignments into connected components (signifying repeat families), computing evolutionary distance between repeat family members, constructing minimum spanning trees from the connected components, and visualizing the evolution of the repeat families. Over 7000 families of repetitive sequences were identified. The size of the families ranged from isolated pairs to over 1600 segments of similar sequence. Approximately 12.3% of the analyzed sequence participates in a repeat element.

  14. A repeating fast radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  15. Gallic Acid Is the Major Active Component of Cortex Moutan in Inhibiting Immune Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Chung Lap Chan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a widely prevalent and chronically relapsing inflammatory skin disease. Penta Herbs Formula (PHF is efficacious in improving the quality of life and reducing topical corticosteroid used in children with AD and one of the active herbs it contains is Cortex Moutan. Recent studies showed that altered functions of dendritic cells (DC were observed in atopic individuals, suggesting that DC might play a major role in the generation and maintenance of inflammation by their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Hence, the aims of the present study were to identify the major active component(s of Cortex Moutan, which might inhibit DC functions and to investigate their possible interactions with conventional corticosteroid on inhibiting the development of DC from monocytes. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC culture model coupled with the high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC, high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS analyses were used. Gallic acid was the major active component from Cortex Moutan which could dose dependently inhibit interleukin (IL-12 p40 and the functional cluster of differentiation (CD surface markers CD40, CD80, CD83 and CD86 expression from cytokine cocktail-activated moDC. Gallic acid could also lower the concentration of hydrocortisone required to inhibit the activation of DC.

  16. Snake venoms components with antitumor activity in murine melanoma cells; Componentes derivados de venenos de serpentes com acao antitumoral em celulas de melanoma murino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Rodrigo Guimaraes

    2012-07-01

    Despite the constant advances in the treatment of cancer, this disease remains one of the main causes of mortality worldwide. So, the development of new treatment modalities is imperative. Snake venom causes a variety of biological effects because they constitute a complex mixture of substances as disintegrins, proteases (serine and metalo), phospholipases A2, L-amino acid oxidases and others. The goal of the present work is to evaluate a anti-tumor activity of some snake venoms fractions. There are several studies of components derived from snake venoms with this kind of activity. After fractionation of snake venoms of the families Viperidae and Elapidae, the fractions were assayed towards murine melanoma cell line B16-F10 and fibroblasts L929. The results showed that the fractions of venom of the snake Notechis ater niger had higher specificity and potential antitumor activity on B16-F10 cell line than the other studied venoms. Since the components of this venom are not explored yet coupled with the potential activity showed in this work, we decided to choose this venom to develop further studies. The cytotoxic fractions were evaluated to identify and characterize the components that showed antitumoral activity. Western blot assays and zymography suggests that these proteins do not belong to the class of metallo and serine proteinases. (author)

  17. Expression of the B-cell receptor component CD79a on immature myeloid cells contributes to their tumor promoting effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dror Luger

    Full Text Available The role of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in promoting tumorigenesis is well-established, and significant effort is being made to further characterize surface markers on MDSCs both for better diagnosis and as potential targets for therapy. Here we show that the B cell receptor adaptor molecule CD79a is unexpectedly expressed on immature bone marrow myeloid cells, and is upregulated on MDSCs generated in multiple different mouse models of metastatic but not non-metastatic cancer. CD79a on MDSCs is upregulated and activated in response to soluble factors secreted by tumor cells. Activation of CD79a on mouse MDSCs, by crosslinking with a specific antibody, maintained their immature phenotype (CD11b+Gr1+, enhanced their migration, increased their suppressive effect on T cell proliferation, and increased secretion of pro-tumorigenic cytokines such as IL-6 and CCL22. Furthermore, crosslinking CD79a on myeloid cells activated signaling through Syk, BLNK, ERK and STAT3 phosphorylation. In vivo, CD79+ myeloid cells showed enhanced ability to promote primary tumor growth and metastasis. Finally we demonstrate that CD79a is upregulated on circulating myeloid cells from lung cancer patients, and that CD79a+ myeloid cells infiltrate human breast tumors. We propose that CD79a plays a functional role in the tumor promoting effects of myeloid cells, and may represent a novel target for cancer therapy.

  18. Survey of extrachromosomal circular DNA derived from plant satellite repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macas Jiří

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Satellite repeats represent one of the most dynamic components of higher plant genomes, undergoing rapid evolutionary changes of their nucleotide sequences and abundance in a genome. However, the exact molecular mechanisms driving these changes and their eventual regulation are mostly unknown. It has been proposed that amplification and homogenization of satellite DNA could be facilitated by extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA molecules originated by recombination-based excision from satellite repeat arrays. While the models including eccDNA are attractive for their potential to explain rapid turnover of satellite DNA, the existence of satellite repeat-derived eccDNA has not yet been systematically studied in a wider range of plant genomes. Results We performed a survey of eccDNA corresponding to nine different families and three subfamilies of satellite repeats in ten species from various genera of higher plants (Arabidopsis, Oryza, Pisum, Secale, Triticum and Vicia. The repeats selected for this study differed in their monomer length, abundance, and chromosomal localization in individual species. Using two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis followed by Southern blotting, eccDNA molecules corresponding to all examined satellites were detected. EccDNA occurred in the form of nicked circles ranging from hundreds to over eight thousand nucleotides in size. Within this range the circular molecules occurred preferentially in discrete size intervals corresponding to multiples of monomer or higher-order repeat lengths. Conclusion This work demonstrated that satellite repeat-derived eccDNA is common in plant genomes and thus it can be seriously considered as a potential intermediate in processes driving satellite repeat evolution. The observed size distribution of circular molecules suggests that they are most likely generated by molecular mechanisms based on homologous recombination requiring long stretches of sequence

  19. Antihepatic Fibrosis Effect of Active Components Isolated from Green Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) Involves the Inactivation of Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chunge; Jiang, Chunyu; Xia, Xichun; Mu, Teng; Wei, Lige; Lou, Yuntian; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Zhao, Yuqing; Bi, Xiuli

    2015-07-01

    Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a vegetable with numerous nutritional properties. In the current study, a total of 23 compounds were isolated from green asparagus, and 9 of these compounds were obtained from this genus for the first time. Preliminary data showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-extracted fraction of green asparagus exerted a stronger inhibitory effect on the growth of t-HSC/Cl-6 cells, giving an IC50 value of 45.52 μg/mL. The biological activities of the different compounds isolated from the EtOAc-extracted fraction with respect to antihepatic fibrosis were investigated further. Four compounds, C3, C4, C10, and C12, exhibited profound inhibitory effect on the activation of t-HSC/Cl-6 cells induced by TNF-α. The activation t-HSC/Cl-6 cells, which led to the production of fibrotic matrix (TGF-β1, activin C) and accumulation of TNF-α, was dramatically decreased by these compounds. The mechanisms by which these compounds inhibited the activation of hepatic stellate cells appeared to be associated with the inactivation of TGF-β1/Smad signaling and c-Jun N-terminal kinases, as well as the ERK phosphorylation cascade.

  20. Antihepatic Fibrosis Effect of Active Components Isolated from Green Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) Involves the Inactivation of Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chunge; Jiang, Chunyu; Xia, Xichun; Mu, Teng; Wei, Lige; Lou, Yuntian; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Zhao, Yuqing; Bi, Xiuli

    2015-07-01

    Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a vegetable with numerous nutritional properties. In the current study, a total of 23 compounds were isolated from green asparagus, and 9 of these compounds were obtained from this genus for the first time. Preliminary data showed that the ethyl acetate (EtOAc)-extracted fraction of green asparagus exerted a stronger inhibitory effect on the growth of t-HSC/Cl-6 cells, giving an IC50 value of 45.52 μg/mL. The biological activities of the different compounds isolated from the EtOAc-extracted fraction with respect to antihepatic fibrosis were investigated further. Four compounds, C3, C4, C10, and C12, exhibited profound inhibitory effect on the activation of t-HSC/Cl-6 cells induced by TNF-α. The activation t-HSC/Cl-6 cells, which led to the production of fibrotic matrix (TGF-β1, activin C) and accumulation of TNF-α, was dramatically decreased by these compounds. The mechanisms by which these compounds inhibited the activation of hepatic stellate cells appeared to be associated with the inactivation of TGF-β1/Smad signaling and c-Jun N-terminal kinases, as well as the ERK phosphorylation cascade. PMID:26089141

  1. Progesterone, Inflammatory Cytokine (TNF-α), and Oxidative Stress (H2O2) Regulate Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 Expression in Fetal Membrane Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yan; Murtha, Amy P; Feng, Liping

    2016-09-01

    Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) is an important novel mediator of progesterone (P4) function in fetal membrane cells. We demonstrated previously that PGRMC1 is differentially expressed in fetal membranes among pregnancy subjects and diminished in preterm premature rupture of membrane subjects. In the current study, we aim to elucidate whether PGRMC1 expression is regulated by P4, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and H2O2 in fetal membrane cells. Primary cultured membrane cells were serum starved for 24 hours followed by treatments of P4, 17 hydroxyprogesterone caproate, and medroxyprogesterone 17 acetate (MPA) at 10(-7) mol/L with ethanol as vehicle control; TNF-α at 10, 20, and 50 ng/mL with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as control; and H2O2 at 10 and 100 μmol/L with culture media as control for 24, 48, and 72 hours. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of PGRMC1 was quantified using polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. We found that PGRMC1 protein expression was regulated by MPA, TNF-α, and H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. This regulation is also specific to the type of cell (amnion, chorion, or decidua). The upregulation of PGRMC1 by MPA might be mediated through glucocorticoid receptor (GR) demonstrated using amnion and chorion cells model with GR knockdown by specific small interfering RNA transfection. The mRNA expression of PGRMC1 was decreased by H2O2 (100 μmol/L) treatment in amnion cells, which might ultimately result in downregulation of PGRMC1 protein as our data demonstrated. None of other treatments changed PGRMC1 mRNA level in these cells. We conclude that these stimuli act as regulatory factors of PGRMC1 in a cell-specific manner. PMID:26919974

  2. Carcinosarcoma of the Ureter with a Small Cell Component: Report of a Rare Pathologic Entity and Potential for Diagnostic Error on Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Newsom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinosarcomas of the ureter are rare biphasic neoplasms, composed of both malignant epithelial (carcinomatous and malignant mesenchymal (sarcomatous components. Carcinosarcomas of the urinary tract are exceedingly rare. We report a unique case of a carcinosarcoma of the ureter with a chondrosarcoma and small cell tumor component arising in a 68-year-old male who presented with microscopic hematuria. CT intravenous pyelogram revealed right-sided hydroureter and hydronephrosis with thickening and narrowing of the right ureter. The patient underwent robot-assisted ureterectomy with bladder cuff excision and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy. The patient is disease-free at 32 months after treatment. We provide a brief synoptic review of carcinosarcoma of the ureter and bladder with utilization of immunohistochemical (IHC stains and potential diagnostic pitfalls.

  3. Inhibitory activity of Socheongryong‑tang and its constituent components against the production of RANTES, eotaxin, eotaxin‑3 and MMP‑9 from BEAS‑2B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junh-Hoon; Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Seo, Chang-Seob; Lim, Hye-Sun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2014-12-01

    Socheongryeong‑tang (SCRT) is a herbal formula previously used to treat pulmonary diseases primarily caused by the common cold virus, including airway inflammation, asthma and allergy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of SCRT water extract and its 13 constituent components on chemokine and enzyme production in the human bronchial epithelium cell line BEAS‑2B when induced by tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑4. The chemokines examined included regulated on activation of normal T‑cell‑expressed‑and‑secreted (RANTES), eotaxin and eotaxin‑3. The SCRT water extract demonstrated a dose‑dependent inhibition of RANTES, eotaxin, eotaxin‑3 and matrix metalloproteinase‑9 (MMP‑9) in BEAS‑2B cells. The 13 constituent compounds of SCRT water extract were quantitatively determined, and it was found that gallic acid, 6‑gingerol and methyl eugenol produced the most potent inhibition of RANTES, eotaxin and eotaxin‑3 as well as MMP‑9 activity regardless of their concentration in SCRT water extract. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis revealed that the inhibitory effect of these three compounds contributed to that of SCRT water extract. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the inhibitory effects of SCRT on chemokine and enzyme production in BEAS‑2B cells was associated with three of its constituent compounds, gallic acid, 6‑gingerol and methyl eugenol. This therefore suggested the potential use of these compounds as anti‑inflammatory agents.

  4. The Bacillus cereus Hbl and Nhe tripartite enterotoxin components assemble sequentially on the surface of target cells and are not interchangeable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inka Sastalla

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming, Gram-positive bacterium commonly associated with outbreaks of food poisoning. It is also known as an opportunistic pathogen causing clinical infections such as bacteremia, meningitis, pneumonia, and gas gangrene-like cutaneous infections, mostly in immunocompromised patients. B. cereus secretes a plethora of toxins of which four are associated with the symptoms of food poisoning. Two of these, the non-hemolytic enterotoxin Nhe and the hemolysin BL (Hbl toxin, are predicted to be structurally similar and are unique in that they require the combined action of three toxin proteins to induce cell lysis. Despite their dominant role in disease, the molecular mechanism of their toxic function is still poorly understood. We report here that B. cereus strain ATCC 10876 harbors not only genes encoding Nhe, but also two copies of the hbl genes. We identified Hbl as the major secreted toxin responsible for inducing rapid cell lysis both in cultured cells and in an intraperitoneal mouse toxicity model. Antibody neutralization and deletion of Hbl-encoding genes resulted in significant reductions of cytotoxic activity. Microscopy studies with Chinese Hamster Ovary cells furthermore showed that pore formation by both Hbl and Nhe occurs through a stepwise, sequential binding of toxin components to the cell surface and to each other. This begins with binding of Hbl-B or NheC to the eukaryotic membrane, and is followed by the recruitment of Hbl-L1 or NheB, respectively, followed by the corresponding third protein. Lastly, toxin component complementation studies indicate that although Hbl and Nhe can be expressed simultaneously and are predicted to be structurally similar, they are incompatible and cannot complement each other.

  5. Anti-hepatitis B virus activities of cinobufacini and its active components bufalin and cinobufagin in HepG2.2.15 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Xu, Huanli; Wang, Dongliang; Qi, Fanghua; Kokudo, Norihiro; Fang, Dingzhi; Tang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Cinobufacini (Huachansu) is a Chinese medicine prepared from the skin of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor (Bufonidae), which has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The aim of present study was to examine the anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) activities of cinobufacini and its active components bufalin and cinobufagin in the human HBV-transfected cell line HepG2.2.15. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), and hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg) concentrations in cell culture medium were determined by chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay after HepG2.2.15 cells were respectively treated with different concentrations of cinobufacini, bufalin, and cinobufagin for 3 or 6 d. HBV DNA and mRNA were determined using transcription-mediated amplification and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. On d 3, cinobufacini at a concentration of 1 µg/ml had no activity against HBV virological markers. However, on d 6, cinobufacini at 1 µg/ml effectively inhibited the secretion of HBsAg, HBeAg, and HBcrAg by 29.58, 32.87, and 42.52%. It was more potent than the positive control lamivudine (100 µg/ml). Bufalin and cinobufagin slightly inhibited HBV antigen secretion. Treatment with cinobufacini, bufalin, or cinobufagin had no anti-HBV effect on DNA in cell culture medium. Consistent with the HBV antigen reduction, HBV mRNA expression was markedly inhibited in comparison to the control when HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with cinobufacini, bufalin, or cinobufagin. Results suggested that cinobufacini had more potent activity against HBV antigen secretion than its components bufalin and cinobufagin and this inhibitory role was attributed to the specific inhibition of HBV mRNA expression.

  6. Stress relaxation and creep on living cells with the atomic force microscope: a means to calculate elastic moduli and viscosities of cell components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Flores, Susana; Toca-Herrera, Jose Luis [Biosurfaces Unit, CIC BiomaGUNE, Paseo Miramon 182, E-20009 San Sebastian-Donostia (Spain); Benitez, Rafael [Departamento Matematicas, Centro Universitario de Plasencia, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida Virgen del Puerto 2, E-10600 Plasencia (Spain); Vivanco, Maria dM, E-mail: jltocaherrera@cicbiomagune.es, E-mail: jose.toca-herrera@boku.ac.at [Cell Biology and Stem Cells Unit, CIC BioGUNE, Parque tecnologico de Bizkaia, Ed. 801A, E-48160 Derio (Spain)

    2010-11-05

    In this work we present a unified method to study the mechanical properties of cells using the atomic force microscope. Stress relaxation and creep compliance measurements permitted us to determine, the relaxation times, the Young moduli and the viscosity of breast cancer cells (MCF-7). The results show that the mechanical behaviour of MCF-7 cells responds to a two-layered model of similar elasticity but differing viscosity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with an actin-depolymerising agent results in an overall decrease in both cell elasticity and viscosity, however to a different extent for each layer. The layer that undergoes the smaller decrease (36-38%) is assigned to the cell membrane/cortex while the layer that experiences the larger decrease (70-80%) is attributed to the cell cytoplasm. The combination of the method presented in this work, together with the approach based on stress relaxation microscopy (Moreno-Flores et al 2010 J. Biomech. 43 349-54), constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study cell mechanics. This methodology can also be extended to study the mechanical properties of biomaterials in general.

  7. The ETS domain transcription factor ELK1 directs a critical component of growth signaling by the androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Mugdha; Chari, Venkatesh; Sivakumaran, Suneethi; Gonit, Mesfin; Trumbly, Robert; Ratnam, Manohar

    2013-04-19

    The androgen receptor (AR) is essential for diverse aspects of prostate development and function. Molecular mechanisms by which prostate cancer (PC) cells redirect AR signaling to genes that primarily support growth are unclear. A systematic search for critical AR-tethering proteins led to ELK1, an ETS transcription factor of the ternary complex factor subfamily. Although genetically redundant, ELK1 was obligatory for AR-dependent growth and clonogenic survival in both hormone-dependent PC and castration-recurrent PC cells but not for AR-negative cell growth. AR required ELK1 to up-regulate a major subset of its target genes that was strongly and primarily enriched for cell growth functions. AR functioned as a coactivator of ELK1 by association through its A/B domain, bypassing the classical mechanism of ELK1 activation by phosphorylation and without inducing ternary complex target genes. The ELK1-AR synergy per se was ligand-independent, although it required ligand for nuclear localization of AR as targeting the AR A/B domain to the nucleus recapitulated the action of hormone; accordingly, Casodex was a poor antagonist of the synergy. ELK3, the closest substitute for ELK1 in structure/function and genome recognition, did not interact with AR. ELK1 thus directs selective and sustained gene induction that is a substantial and critical component of growth signaling by AR in PC cells. The ELK1-AR interaction offers a functionally tumor-selective drug target. PMID:23426362

  8. Spatially Controlled Delivery of siRNAs to Stem Cells in Implants Generated by Multi-Component Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Østergaard; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Chen, Muwan;

    2013-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a promising technique in tissue engineering, as it enables truly individualized implants to be made to fit a particular defect. As previously shown, a feasible strategy to produce complex multicellular tissues is to deposit different small interfering RNA (siRNA) in porous...... implants that are subsequently sutured together. In this study, an additive manufacturing strategy to deposit carbohydrate hydrogels containing different siRNAs is applied into an implant, in a spatially controlled manner. When the obtained structures are seeded with mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells......, the selected siRNAs are delivered to the cells and induces specific and localized gene silencing. Here, it is demonstrated how to replicate part of a patient's spinal cord from a computed tomography scan, using an additive manufacturing technique to produce an implant with compartmentalized si...

  9. Pilhas a combustível de óxido sólido: materiais, componentes e configurações Solid oxide fuel cells: materials, components and configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Salgado Amado

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the current status of fuel cells is described with particular emphasis on high (T > 800 ºC and intermediate (T < 800 ºC temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Also the importance of the fuel cell technology is shown. Reviewed are the fundamental features, the basic principles, types of fuel cell, fabrication methods, cell configurations and the development of components (cathodes, anodes, electrolytes, interconnect and materials.

  10. The Expression Pattern of the Pre-B Cell Receptor Components Correlates with Cellular Stage and Clinical Outcome in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongfeng; Zheng, Junxiong; Gerasimcik, Natalija; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Sjögren, Helene; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Fogelstrand, Linda; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2016-01-01

    Precursor-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) signaling represents a crucial checkpoint at the pre-B cell stage. Aberrant pre-BCR signaling is considered as a key factor for B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) development. BCP-ALL are believed to be arrested at the pre-BCR checkpoint independent of pre-BCR expression. However, the cellular stage at which BCP-ALL are arrested and whether this relates to expression o