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Sample records for cell recognition molecule

  1. Cell recognition molecule L1 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation through the regulation of cell surface glycosylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Clinical Laboratory, Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Huang, Xiaohua [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Clinical Biochemistry, College of Laboratory Medicine, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); An, Yue [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Ren, Feng [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hongmei; Zhou, Lei [The Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650228 (China); Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton 3800 (Australia); He, Xiaowen; Schachner, Melitta [Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience and Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Xiao, Zhicheng, E-mail: zhicheng.xiao@monash.edu [The Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650228 (China); Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton 3800 (Australia); Ma, Keli, E-mail: makeli666@aliyun.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Li, Yali, E-mail: yalilipaper@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Anatomy, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119078 (Singapore)

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •Down-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression blocks L1-induced neuronal differentiation of ESCs. •Up-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression in L1-ESCs depends on the activation of PLCγ. •L1 promotes ESCs to differentiate into neuron through regulating cell surface glycosylation. -- Abstract: Cell recognition molecule L1 (CD171) plays an important role in neuronal survival, migration, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, myelination, synaptic plasticity and regeneration after injury. Our previous study has demonstrated that overexpressing L1 enhances cell survival and proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) through promoting the expression of FUT9 and ST3Gal4, which upregulates cell surface sialylation and fucosylation. In the present study, we examined whether sialylation and fucosylation are involved in ESC differentiation through L1 signaling. RNA interference analysis showed that L1 enhanced differentiation of ESCs into neurons through the upregulation of FUT9 and ST3Gal4. Furthermore, blocking the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) signaling pathway with either a specific PLCγ inhibitor or knockdown PLCγ reduced the expression levels of both FUT9 and ST3Gal4 mRNAs and inhibited L1-mediated neuronal differentiation. These results demonstrate that L1 promotes neuronal differentiation from ESCs through the L1-mediated enhancement of FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression.

  2. Cell recognition molecule L1 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation through the regulation of cell surface glycosylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Down-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression blocks L1-induced neuronal differentiation of ESCs. •Up-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression in L1-ESCs depends on the activation of PLCγ. •L1 promotes ESCs to differentiate into neuron through regulating cell surface glycosylation. -- Abstract: Cell recognition molecule L1 (CD171) plays an important role in neuronal survival, migration, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, myelination, synaptic plasticity and regeneration after injury. Our previous study has demonstrated that overexpressing L1 enhances cell survival and proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) through promoting the expression of FUT9 and ST3Gal4, which upregulates cell surface sialylation and fucosylation. In the present study, we examined whether sialylation and fucosylation are involved in ESC differentiation through L1 signaling. RNA interference analysis showed that L1 enhanced differentiation of ESCs into neurons through the upregulation of FUT9 and ST3Gal4. Furthermore, blocking the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) signaling pathway with either a specific PLCγ inhibitor or knockdown PLCγ reduced the expression levels of both FUT9 and ST3Gal4 mRNAs and inhibited L1-mediated neuronal differentiation. These results demonstrate that L1 promotes neuronal differentiation from ESCs through the L1-mediated enhancement of FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression

  3. Differential recognition of MHC class I molecules of xeno-/allo-endothelial cells by human NK cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯志民; 张晓峰; 王宏芳; 丰美福

    2000-01-01

    Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC) as target cells, human peripheral blood NK cells (PBNK) and NK92 cells as effector cells, the differential cytotoxicities of NK cells to allo- and xeno-endothelial cells were studied. The influence of MHC class I molecules on the cytotoxicity of human NK cells was assayed using acid treatment, and blockades of MHC class I antigens, CD94 and KIR (NKB1). The results indicated that the killing of PAEC by the two kinds of NK cells is higher than that of HUVEC. After acid-treatment, the cytotoxicity of the two kinds of NK cells to PAEC and HUVEC is significantly enhanced, but the magnitude of the enhancement is different. The enhancement of NK killing to acid treated HUVEC is much greater than that to PAEC. Blockade of CD94 mAb did not alter the NK cytotoxicity, while blockade of NKB1 mAb enhanced the cytotoxicity of PBNK to HUVEC and PAEC by 95% and 29% respectively. The results above suggested that the different

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Cell-cell Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-Huai

    2004-01-01

    Cell-cell recognition is the key for multicellular organisms to survive. This recognition critically depends on protein-protein interactions from opposing cell surfaces. Recent structural investigations reveal unique features of these cell surface receptors and how they interact. These interactions are specific, but usually relatively weak, with more hydrophilic forces involved in binding. The receptors appear to have specialized ways to present their key interacting elements for ligand-binding from the cell surface. Cell-cell contacts are multivalent. A large group of cell surface molecules are engaged in interactions. Characteristic weak interactions make possible for each individual molecule pair within the group to constantly associate-dissociate-reassociate, such that the cell-cell recognition becomes a dynamic process. The immunological synapse is a good example for immune receptors to be orchestrated in performing immunological function in a collective fashion.

  5. Bergmann glia and the recognition molecule CHL1 organize GABAergic axons and direct innervation of Purkinje cell dendrites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Ango

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The geometric and subcellular organization of axon arbors distributes and regulates electrical signaling in neurons and networks, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. In rodent cerebellar cortex, stellate interneurons elaborate characteristic axon arbors that selectively innervate Purkinje cell dendrites and likely regulate dendritic integration. We used GFP BAC transgenic reporter mice to examine the cellular processes and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of stellate cell axons and their innervation pattern. We show that stellate axons are organized and guided towards Purkinje cell dendrites by an intermediate scaffold of Bergmann glial (BG fibers. The L1 family immunoglobulin protein Close Homologue of L1 (CHL1 is localized to apical BG fibers and stellate cells during the development of stellate axon arbors. In the absence of CHL1, stellate axons deviate from BG fibers and show aberrant branching and orientation. Furthermore, synapse formation between aberrant stellate axons and Purkinje dendrites is reduced and cannot be maintained, leading to progressive atrophy of axon terminals. These results establish BG fibers as a guiding scaffold and CHL1 a molecular signal in the organization of stellate axon arbors and in directing their dendritic innervation.

  6. Single-molecule recognition imaging microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Stroh, C.; Wang, H.; Bash, R.; B Ashcroft; Nelson, J.; Gruber, H; Lohr, D.; Lindsay, S M; Hinterdorfer, P.

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy is a powerful and widely used imaging technique that can visualize single molecules and follow processes at the single-molecule level both in air and in solution. For maximum usefulness in biological applications, atomic force microscopy needs to be able to identify specific types of molecules in an image, much as fluorescent tags do for optical microscopy. The results presented here demonstrate that the highly specific antibody–antigen interaction can be used to gener...

  7. The pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelgaard, Esben; Thiel, Steffen; Hansen, Troels Krarup;

    The pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy Esben Axelgaard*; Steffen Thiel*; Jakob Appel Østergaard† and Troels Krarup Hansen† *Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, Wilhelm Meyer´s Allé 4, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. †Department...... pattern-recognition molecules that may initiate the lectin pathway of complement activation. As opposed to obvious evolutionary beneficial effects of the complement system, MBL is associated with adverse effects in several diseases including diabetes. There is evidence that link MBL to poor prognosis for...... poorly elucidated. Two putative mechanisms are proposed, 1) the formation of neoepitopes for MBL pattern recognition on host cells would enable lectin pathway activation and 2) inactivation of complement regulatory proteins by glycation that may exaggerate complement attack on host cells. MBL initiates...

  8. Simple test system for single molecule recognition force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have established an easy-to-use test system for detecting receptor-ligand interactions on the single molecule level using atomic force microscopy (AFM). For this, avidin-biotin, probably the best characterized receptor-ligand pair, was chosen. AFM sensors were prepared containing tethered biotin molecules at sufficiently low surface concentrations appropriate for single molecule studies. A biotin tether, consisting of a 6 nm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain and a functional succinimide group at the other end, was newly synthesized and covalently coupled to amine-functionalized AFM tips. In particular, PEG800 diamine was glutarylated, the mono-adduct NH2-PEG-COOH was isolated by ion exchange chromatography and reacted with biotin succinimidylester to give biotin-PEG-COOH which was then activated as N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester to give the biotin-PEG-NHS conjugate which was coupled to the aminofunctionalized AFM tip. The motional freedom provided by PEG allows for free rotation of the biotin molecule on the AFM sensor and for specific binding to avidin which had been adsorbed to mica surfaces via electrostatic interactions. Specific avidin-biotin recognition events were discriminated from nonspecific tip-mica adhesion by their typical unbinding force (∼40 pN at 1.4 nN/s loading rate), unbinding length (<13 nm), the characteristic nonlinear force-distance relation of the PEG linker, and by specific block with excess of free d-biotin. The convenience of the test system allowed to evaluate, and compare, different methods and conditions of tip aminofunctionalization with respect to specific binding and nonspecific adhesion. It is concluded that this system is well suited as calibration or start-up kit for single molecule recognition force microscopy

  9. Calixarenes: Versatile molecules as molecular sensors for ion recognition study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subrata Patra; Debdeep Maity; Ravi Gunupuru; Pragati Agnihotri; Parimal Paul

    2012-11-01

    This article presents a brief account on designing of calixarene-based molecular sensor for recognition of various metal ions and anions and also different analytical techniques to monitor the recognition event. This review focuses only on calix[4]arene derivatives, in which mainly the lower rim is modified incorporating either crown moiety to make calix-crown hybrid ionophore to encapsulate metal ions or some fluoregenic inorganic and organic moieties to use it as signalling unit. In order to investigate effect of conformation of the calixarene unit and steric crowding on ion selectivity, designing of these molecules have been made using both the cone and 1,3-alternate conformations of the calixarene unit and also incorporating bulky tert-butyl group in few cases to impose controlled steric crowding. Among various ions, here focuses are mainly on biologically and commercially important alkali metal ion such as K+, toxic metal ions such as Hg2+, Pb2+, Cd2+, important transition metal ion such as Cu2+ and toxic anion like F−. The techniques used to monitor the recognition event and also to determine binding constants with strongly interacting ions are fluorescence, UV-vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Most of the ionophores reported in this review have been characterized crystallographically, however no structural information (except one case) are incorporated in this article, as it will occupy space without significant enhancement of chemistry part. Different factors such as size of the ionophore cavity, size of metal ion, coordination sites/donor atoms, steric crowding and solvents, which determine selectivity have been discussed. Response of ion recognition process to different analytical techniques is another interesting factor discussed in this article.

  10. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-mediated cell recognition plays a critical role in various biological and biomedical applications. However, strong antibody-cell interactions can lead to the difficulty of separating antibodies from the bound cells in a simple and non-destructive manner, which is often necessary to numerous applications such as cell sorting or separation. Thus, this thesis research is aimed to create an antibody-like nanomaterial with the function of reversible cell recognition It was hypothesized that nucleic acid aptamer and dendrimer could be used as fundamental structural components to develop an antibody-like nanomaterial. The aptamer functions as the binding site of an antibody; the dendrimer is used as a robust, defined nano-scaffold to support the aptamer and to carry small molecules (e.g., fluorophores). To test this hypothesis, a novel method was first developed to discover the essential nucleotides of full-length aptamers to mimic the binding sites of antibodies. The essential nucleotides were further conjugated with a dendrimer to synthesize a monovalent aptamer-dendrimer nanomaterial. The results clearly showed that the essential nucleotides could maintain high affinity and specificity after tethered on dendrimer surface. To further test the hypothesis that antibody-like nanomaterials can be rationally designed to acquire the capability of reversible cell recognition, an aptamer that was selected at 0 °C was used as a model to synthesize a "Y-shaped" nanomaterial by conjugating two aptamers to the same dendrimer. The results showed that the nanomaterial-cell interaction could be affected by the distance between two binding aptamers. In addition, the "Y-shaped" antibody-like nanomaterial could bind target cells more strongly than its monovalent control. Importantly, the strong cell-nanomaterial interaction could be rapidly reversed when the temperature was shifted from 0 °C to 37 °C. In summary, we developed a synthetic antibody that can not only mimic the

  11. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126. ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  12. Mechanically Interlocked Molecules Assembled by π–π Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barin, Gokhan [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Korea Advanced Inst. Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Coskun, Ali [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Korea Advanced Inst. Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Fouda, Moustafa M. G. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Stoddart, J. Fraser [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Korea Advanced Inst. Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-28

    The beauty and utility of interlocked architectures have been making their way relentlessly into chemistry in the form of mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) for almost half a century now. Few would challenge the assertion that the emergence of template-directed synthetic protocols has aided and abetted the facile and efficient construction of MIMs compared with the statistical approaches employed while the field was still in its infancy. To date, a panoply of MIMs has been created in the wake of emerging recognition motifs and the template-directed synthetic protocols they have forged. Among these motifs, those dependent on π–π stacking in the form of donor–acceptor interactions have played an important role in the increasingly rapid development of the field. The few integrated systems that have so far emerged based on this class of MIMs demonstrate their ability to act as active components in many potential applications. This review focuses on the progress which has been accomplished during the past decade involving MIMs comprising aromatic π–π stacking interactions. While progress has been remarkable, opportunities still abound for MIMs assembled by π–π recognition.

  13. ION AND MOLECULE SENSORS USING MOLECULAR RECOGNITION IN LUMINESCENT, CONDUCTIVE POLYMERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This program integrates three individual, highly interactive projects that will use molecular recognition strategies to develop sensor technology based on luminescent, conductive polymers that contain sites for binding specific molecules or ions in the presence of related molecul...

  14. Recognition Strategies of Group 3 Innate Lymphoid Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Killig, Monica; Glatzer, Timor; Romagnani, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    During the early phase of an inflammatory response, innate cells can use different strategies to sense environmental danger. These include the direct interaction of specific activating receptors with pathogen-encoded/danger molecules or the engagement of cytokine receptors by pro-inflammatory mediators produced by antigen presenting cells in the course of the infection. These general recognition strategies, which have been extensively described for innate myeloid cells, are shared by innate l...

  15. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  16. The pattern recognition molecule deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) and synthetic mimics inhibit liposomal nucleic acid delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Hansen, Pernille; Blaich, Stephanie; End, Caroline; Schmidt, Steffen; Møller, Jesper Bonnet; Holmskov, Uffe; Mollenhauer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Liposomal nucleic acid delivery is a preferred option for therapeutic settings. The cellular pattern recognition molecule DMBT1, secreted at high levels in various diseases, and synthetic mimics efficiently inhibit liposomal nucleic acid delivery to human cells. These findings may have relevance ...

  17. Efficient unfolding pattern recognition in single molecule force spectroscopy data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labudde Dirk

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS is a technique that measures the force necessary to unfold a protein. SMFS experiments generate Force-Distance (F-D curves. A statistical analysis of a set of F-D curves reveals different unfolding pathways. Information on protein structure, conformation, functional states, and inter- and intra-molecular interactions can be derived. Results In the present work, we propose a pattern recognition algorithm and apply our algorithm to datasets from SMFS experiments on the membrane protein bacterioRhodopsin (bR. We discuss the unfolding pathways found in bR, which are characterised by main peaks and side peaks. A main peak is the result of the pairwise unfolding of the transmembrane helices. In contrast, a side peak is an unfolding event in the alpha-helix or other secondary structural element. The algorithm is capable of detecting side peaks along with main peaks. Therefore, we can detect the individual unfolding pathway as the sequence of events labeled with their occurrences and co-occurrences special to bR's unfolding pathway. We find that side peaks do not co-occur with one another in curves as frequently as main peaks do, which may imply a synergistic effect occurring between helices. While main peaks co-occur as pairs in at least 50% of curves, the side peaks co-occur with one another in less than 10% of curves. Moreover, the algorithm runtime scales well as the dataset size increases. Conclusions Our algorithm satisfies the requirements of an automated methodology that combines high accuracy with efficiency in analyzing SMFS datasets. The algorithm tackles the force spectroscopy analysis bottleneck leading to more consistent and reproducible results.

  18. Ficolins and FIBCD1: Soluble and membrane bound pattern recognition molecules with acetyl group selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Theresa; Schlosser, Anders; Holmskov, Uffe;

    2011-01-01

    A network of molecules, which recognizes pathogens, work together to establish a quick and efficient immune response to infectious agents. Molecules containing a fibrinogen related domain in invertebrates and vertebrates have been implicated in immune responses against pathogens, and characterized......D-containing molecules, and discusses structural resemblance but also diversity in recognition of acetylated ligands....

  19. T cell avidity and tumor recognition: implications and therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roszkowski Jeffrey J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last two decades, great advances have been made studying the immune response to human tumors. The identification of protein antigens from cancer cells and better techniques for eliciting antigen specific T cell responses in vitro and in vivo have led to improved understanding of tumor recognition by T cells. Yet, much remains to be learned about the intricate details of T cell – tumor cell interactions. Though the strength of interaction between T cell and target is thought to be a key factor influencing the T cell response, investigations of T cell avidity, T cell receptor (TCR affinity for peptide-MHC complex, and the recognition of peptide on antigen presenting targets or tumor cells reveal complex relationships. Coincident with these investigations, therapeutic strategies have been developed to enhance tumor recognition using antigens with altered peptide structures and T cells modified by the introduction of new antigen binding receptor molecules. The profound effects of these strategies on T cell – tumor interactions and the clinical implications of these effects are of interest to both scientists and clinicians. In recent years, the focus of much of our work has been the avidity and effector characteristics of tumor reactive T cells. Here we review concepts and current results in the field, and the implications of therapeutic strategies using altered antigens and altered effector T cells.

  20. Interactions of the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 with the complement system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doni, Andrea; Garlanda, Cecilia; Bottazzi, Barbara;

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system comprises a cellular and a humoral arm. The long pentraxin PTX3 is a fluid phase pattern recognition molecule, which acts as an essential component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PTX3 has antibody-like properties including interactions with complement components....... PTX3 interacts with C1q, ficolin-1 and ficolin-2 as well as mannose-binding lectin, recognition molecules in the classical and lectin complement pathways. The formation of these heterocomplexes results in cooperative pathogen recognition and complement activation. Interactions with C4b binding protein...

  1. Early recognition of basal cell naevus syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra-Knol, HE; Scheewe, JH; van der Vlist, GJ; van Doorn, ME; Ausems, MGEM

    2005-01-01

    The basal cell naevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterised by major manifestations such as basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, palmar or plantar pits, and intracranial calcifications. Early recognition is important in order to reduce morbidity due to cutaneous and cerebral malignan

  2. A role for water molecules in DNA-ligand minor groove recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Binh; Neidle, Stephen; Wilson, W. David

    2009-01-01

    Targeting the minor groove of DNA through binding to a small molecule has long been considered an important molecular-recognition strategy in biology. A wide range of synthetic heterocyclic molecules bind non-covalently in the minor groove of the double helix and are also effective against a number of human and animal diseases. A classic structural concept, the isohelicity principle, has guided much of this work: such heterocyclic molecules require a shape that complements the convex surface ...

  3. Electronic Single Molecule Identification of Carbohydrate Isomers by Recognition Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Im, JongOne; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Yanan; Sen, Suman; Biswas, Sudipta; Ashcroft, Brian; Borges, Chad; Wang, Xu; Lindsay, Stuart; Zhang, Peiming

    2016-01-01

    Glycans play a central role as mediators in most biological processes, but their structures are complicated by isomerism. Epimers and anomers, regioisomers, and branched sequences contribute to a structural variability that dwarfs those of nucleic acids and proteins, challenging even the most sophisticated analytical tools, such as NMR and mass spectrometry. Here, we introduce an electron tunneling technique that is label-free and can identify carbohydrates at the single-molecule level, offering significant benefits over existing technology. It is capable of analyzing sub-picomole quantities of sample, counting the number of individual molecules in each subset in a population of coexisting isomers, and is quantitative over more than four orders of magnitude of concentration. It resolves epimers not well separated by ion-mobility and can be implemented on a silicon chip. It also provides a readout mechanism for direct single-molecule sequencing of linear oligosaccharides.

  4. Colour measurement and white blood cell recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Gelsema, E S

    1972-01-01

    As a part of a collaboration with NEMCH aimed at the automation of the differential white blood cell count, studies have been made of the different possibilities for using colour to help in the recognition process. Results are presented comparing data obtained with a microspectrophotometer and with a simulated three-colour scanner.

  5. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  6. Structure of the F-spondin Domain of Mindin an Integrin Ligand and Pattern Recognition Molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Li; C Cao; W Jia; L Yu; M Mo; Q Wang; Y Huang; J Lim; M Ishihara; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Mindin (spondin-2) is an extracellular matrix protein of unknown structure that is required for efficient T-cell priming by dendritic cells. Additionally, mindin functions as a pattern recognition molecule for initiating innate immune responses. These dual functions are mediated by interactions with integrins and microbial pathogens, respectively. Mindin comprises an N-terminal F-spondin (FS) domain and C-terminal thrombospondin type 1 repeat (TSR). We determined the structure of the FS domain at 1.8-A resolution. The structure revealed an eight-stranded antiparallel beta-sandwich motif resembling that of membrane-targeting C2 domains, including a bound calcium ion. We demonstrated that the FS domain mediates integrin binding and identified the binding site by mutagenesis. The mindin FS domain therefore represents a new integrin ligand. We further showed that mindin recognizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS) through its TSR domain, and obtained evidence that C-mannosylation of the TSR influences LPS binding. Through these dual interactions, the FS and TSR domains of mindin promote activation of both adaptive and innate immune responses.

  7. Structure of the F-Spondin Domain of Mindin, an Integrin Ligand and Pattern Recognition Molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Cao, C; Jia, W; Yu, L; Mo, M; Wang, Q; Huang, Y; Lim, J; Ishihara, M; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Mindin (spondin-2) is an extracellular matrix protein of unknown structure that is required for efficient T-cell priming by dendritic cells. Additionally, mindin functions as a pattern recognition molecule for initiating innate immune responses. These dual functions are mediated by interactions with integrins and microbial pathogens, respectively. Mindin comprises an N-terminal F-spondin (FS) domain and C-terminal thrombospondin type 1 repeat (TSR). We determined the structure of the FS domain at 1.8-A resolution. The structure revealed an eight-stranded antiparallel ?-sandwich motif resembling that of membrane-targeting C2 domains, including a bound calcium ion. We demonstrated that the FS domain mediates integrin binding and identified the binding site by mutagenesis. The mindin FS domain therefore represents a new integrin ligand. We further showed that mindin recognizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS) through its TSR domain, and obtained evidence that C-mannosylation of the TSR influences LPS binding. Through these dual interactions, the FS and TSR domains of mindin promote activation of both adaptive and innate immune responses.

  8. The role of polymorphic amino acids of the MHC molecule in the selection of the T cell repertoire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allelic variants of MHC molecules expressed on cells of the thymus affect the selection and the specificity of the T cell repertoire. The selection is based on either the direct recognition by the TCR of the MHC molecules, or the recognition of a complex determinant formed by self-peptides bound to MHC molecules. In an analysis of the T cell repertoire in bone marrow chimeras that express allelic forms of MHC class II molecules in the thymus epithelium, we find that amino acid substitutions that are predicted to affect peptide binding influence the selection of the T cell repertoire during thymic selection

  9. Recognition strategies of group 3 innate lymphoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eKillig

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available During the early phase of an inflammatory response, innate cells can use different strategies to sense environmental danger. These include the direct interaction of specific activating receptors (actR with pathogen-encoded/danger molecules or the engagement of cytokine receptors by pro-inflammatory mediators produced by antigen presenting cells (APC in the course of the infection. These general recognition strategies, which have been extensively described for innate myeloid cells, are shared by innate lymphoid cells (ILC, such as Natural Killer (NK cells. The family of ILC has recently expanded with the discovery of group 2 (ILC2 and group 3 ILC (ILC3, which play an important role in the defense against extracellular pathogens. Although ILC3 and NK cells share some phenotypic characteristics, the recognition strategies employed by the various ILC3 subsets have been only partially characterized. In this review, we will describe and comparatively discuss how ILC3 sense environmental cues and how the triggering of different receptors may regulate their functional behavior during an immune response.

  10. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics. PMID:24420248

  11. DMBT1 functions as pattern-recognition molecule for poly-sulfated and poly-phosphorylated ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    End, Caroline; Bikker, Floris; Renner, Marcus;

    2009-01-01

    unraveling the molecular basis of its function in mucosal protection and of its broad pathogen-binding specificity. We report that DMBT1 directly interacts with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and carrageenan, a structurally similar sulfated polysaccharide, which is used as a texturizer and thickener in human...... dietary products. However, binding of DMBT1 does not reduce the cytotoxic effects of these agents to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. DSS and carrageenan compete for DMBT1-mediated bacterial aggregation via interaction with its bacterial-recognition motif. Competition and ELISA studies identify poly-sulfated...... propose that DMBT1 functions as pattern-recognition molecule for poly-sulfated and poly-phosphorylated ligands providing a molecular basis for its broad bacterial-binding specificity and its inhibitory effects on LPS-induced TLR4-mediated NF-kappaB activation....

  12. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  13. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies.

  14. Structural study of TTR-52 reveals the mechanism by which a bridging molecule mediates apoptotic cell engulfment

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Yanyong; Zhao, Dongfeng; Liang, Huanhuan; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Qinwen; Wang, Xiaochen; Liu, Yingfang

    2012-01-01

    Apoptotic cells display various “eat me” signals that can be recognized through bridging molecules that cross-link the dying cells to phagocytes. This work illustrates the first full-length structure of such a bridging molecule, TTR-52. The study elucidates the binding of these bridging molecules with the apoptotic cell signals and phagocyte receptors, providing valuable new insight into the process of apoptotic cell recognition.

  15. Molecule Recognition Imaging and Highly Ordered Gold Nanoparticle Templating of Functional Bacterial S-Layer Nanoarrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jilin TANG; Andreas Ebner; Helga Badelt-Lichtblau; Christian Rankl; Michael Leitner; Hermann J.Gruber; Uwe B.Sleytr; Nicola Ilk; Peter Hinterdorfer

    2009-01-01

    @@ Molecular recognition between receptors and their cognate ligands plays an important role in life sciences.Such specific interactions include those between complementary strands of DNA,enzyme and substrate,antigen and antibody,lectin and carbohydrate,ligands and cell surface receptors as well as between cell adhesion proteins.

  16. Folding and ligand recognition of the TPP riboswitch aptamer at single-molecule resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Haller, Andrea; Altman, Roger B.; Soulière, Marie F.; Blanchard, Scott C; Micura, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)-sensitive mRNA domains are the most prevalent riboswitches known. Despite intensive investigation, the complex ligand recognition and concomitant folding processes in the TPP riboswitch that culminate in the regulation of gene expression remain elusive. Here, we used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging to probe the folding landscape of the TPP aptamer domain in the absence and presence of magnesium and TPP. To do so, distinct labeling pa...

  17. Recognition of microbial glycolipids by Natural Killer T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Michael Zajonc

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the Major Histocompatibility (MHC family (MHC I and II, lipids, glycolipids and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are Type I Natural killer T (iNKT cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi the causative agents of Lyme disease and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR, leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18 and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  18. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, JongOne; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic 'fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore. PMID:24705512

  19. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Jodie Lopez; Amina Bittame; Céline Massera; Virginie Vasseur; Grégory Effantin; Anne Valat; Célia Buaillon; Sophie Allart; Barbara A. Fox; Leah M. Rommereim; David J. Bzik; Guy Schoehn; Winfried Weissenhorn; Jean-François Dubremetz; Jean Gagnon

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV), resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN) of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effecto...

  20. Assay for the pattern recognition molecule collectin liver 1 (CL-L1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelgaard, Esben; Jensenius, Jens Christian; Jensen, Lisbeth;

    Collectin liver 1 (also termed collectin 10 and CL-L1) is a C-type lectin that functions as a pattern recognition molecule (PRM) in the innate immune system1. We have produced antibodies against CL-L1 and have developed a sandwich-type time-resolved immuno-fluorometric assay (TRIFMA) for the...... to co-purify with MASPs, possibly rendering it a role in complement. CL-L1 showed binding activity towards mannose-TSK beads in a Ca2+-dependent manner. This binding could be inhibited by mannose and glucose, but not by galactose, indicating that CL-L1 binds via its carbohydrate-recognition domain...

  1. Cell adhesion molecules: detection with univalent second antibody

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Identification of cell surface molecules that play a role in cell-cell adhesion (here called cell adhesion molecules) has been achieved by demonstrating the inhibitory effect of univalent antibodies that bind these molecules in an in vitro assay of cell-cell adhesion. A more convenient reagent, intact (divalent) antibody, has been avoided because it might agglutinate the cells rather than blocking cell-cell adhesion. In this report, we show that intact rabbit immunoglobulin directed against c...

  2. Optical Nanosensor Architecture for Cell-Signaling Molecules Using DNA Aptamer-Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Tae-Gon; Baker, Benjamin A.; Sauffer, M. Dane; Salgado, Janette; Jaroch, David; Rickus, Jenna; Porterfield, D. Marshall; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2011-01-01

    We report a novel optical biosensor platform using near-infrared fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with target-recognizing aptamer DNA for noninvasively detecting cell-signaling molecules In real time. Photoluminescence (PL) emission of aptamer-coated SWNTs is modulated upon selectively binding to target molecules, which is exploited to detect insulin using an insulin-binding aptamer (IBA) as a molecular recognition element. We find that nanotube PL quenches up...

  3. Caspr2 : possible synaptogenic cell adhesion molecule

    OpenAIRE

    Do, Trinh Thuy

    2011-01-01

    Synapses are crucial for communication among neurons in the central nervous system. Contactin-associated protein- like 2 (Caspr2) is a neuronal protein that is a member of the neurexin superfamily and is found in the juxtaparanodal regions of myelinated axons. Caspr2 has also been found in synapses and therefore is also thought to function as a cell adhesion molecule. As such, it should also induce synaptogenesis in vitro similar to the interaction between neurexins (located presynaptically) ...

  4. Immune receptors involved in Streptococcus suis recognition by dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pier Lecours

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is an important swine pathogen and an emerging zoonotic agent of septicemia and meningitis. Knowledge on host immune responses towards S. suis, and strategies used by this pathogen for subversion of these responses is scarce. The objective of this study was to identify the immune receptors involved in S. suis recognition by dendritic cells (DCs. Production of cytokines and expression of co-stimulatory molecules by DCs were shown to strongly rely on MyD88-dependent signaling pathways, suggesting that DCs recognize S. suis and become activated mostly through Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling. Supporting this fact, TLR2(-/- DCs were severely impaired in the release of several cytokines and the surface expression of CD86 and MHC-II. The release of IL-12p70 and CXC10, and the expression of CD40 were found to depend on signaling by both TLR2 and TLR9. The release of IL-23 and CXCL1 were partially dependent on NOD2. Finally, despite the fact that MyD88 signaling was crucial for DC activation and maturation, MyD88-dependent pathways were not implicated in S. suis internalization by DCs. This first study on receptors involved in DC activation by S. suis suggests a major involvement of MyD88 signaling pathways, mainly (but not exclusively through TLR2. A multimodal recognition involving a combination of different receptors seems essential for DC effective response to S. suis.

  5. Small-Molecule Target Engagement in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürmann, Marc; Janning, Petra; Ziegler, Slava; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-04-21

    Monitoring how, when, and where small molecules engage their targets inside living cells is a critical step in chemical biology and pharmacological research, because it enables compound efficacy and confirmation of mode of action to be assessed. In this mini-review we summarize the currently available methodologies to detect and prove direct target engagement in cells and offer a critical view of their key advantages and disadvantages. As the interest of the field shifts toward discovery and validation of high-quality agents, we expect that efforts to develop and refine these types of methodologies will also intensify in the near future. PMID:27049669

  6. Rapid recognition and functional analysis of membrane proteins on human cancer cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the physicochemical properties of cell surface signalling molecules is important for us to uncover the underlying mechanisms that guide the cellular behaviors. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a powerful tool for detecting the molecular interactions on individual cells with nanometer resolution. In this paper, AFM peak force tapping (PFT) imaging mode was applied to rapidly locate and visually map the CD20 molecules on human lymphoma cells using biochemically sensitive tips. First, avidin-biotin system was used to test the effectiveness of using PFT imaging mode to probe the specific molecular interactions. The adhesion images obtained on avidin-coated mica using biotin-tethered tips obviously showed the recognition spots which corresponded to the avidins in the simultaneously obtained topography images. The experiments confirmed the specificity and reproducibility of the recognition results. Then, the established procedure was applied to visualize the nanoscale organization of CD20s on the surface of human lymphoma Raji cells using rituximab (a monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody)-tethered tips. The experiments showed that the recognition spots in the adhesion images corresponded to the specific CD20-rituximab interactions. The cluster sizes of CD20s on lymphoma Raji cells were quantitatively analyzed from the recognition images. Finally, under the guidance of fluorescence recognition, the established procedure was applied to cancer cells from a clinical lymphoma patient. The results showed that there were significant differences between the adhesion images obtained on cancer cells and on normal cells (red blood cell). The CD20 distributions on ten cancer cells from the patient were quantified according to the adhesion images. The experimental results demonstrate the capability of applying PFT imaging to rapidly investigate the nanoscale biophysical properties of native membrane proteins on the cell surface, which is of potential significance in

  7. Design and preparation of matrine surface-imprinted material and studies on its molecule recognition selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qingjuan; Gao, Baojiao; Zhang, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    A matrine molecule surface-imprinted material was designed and prepared using an effective surface-imprinting technique developed by our group, and its molecular recognition performance and mechanism were investigated in depth. Monomer glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) was first graft-polymerized on the surfaces of micron-sized silica gel particles in surface-initiated graft polymerization manner, obtaining the grafted particles PGMA/SiO(2) with high grafting degree. Subsequently, the ring-opening reaction of the epoxy groups of the grafted macromolecules PGMA with 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) was carried out, resulting in the functional grafted particle SA-PGMA/SiO(2), on whose surfaces salicylic acid as functional group was chemically bonded. By right of the mutual strong secondary bond forces, electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding, SA-PGMA/SiO(2) particles produced strong adsorption for matrine. Finally, with this strong adsorption, matrine molecule surface imprinting was carried out on the surfaces of SA-PGMA/SiO(2) particles with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether as cross-linking agent, resulting in the matrine molecule surface-imprinted material MIP-SAP/SiO(2). The binding characteristic of MIP-SAP/SiO(2) toward matrine was investigated in depth with both batch and column methods and using oxymatrine and cytisine as two contrast alkaloids. The experimental results show that MIP-SAP/SiO(2) has special recognition selectivity and excellent binding affinity for matrine. Relative to oxymatrine and cytisine, the selectivity coefficients of MIP-SAP/SiO(2) for matrine are 5.66 and 11.17, respectively. PMID:26426206

  8. Natural Killer cell recognition of melanoma: new clues for a more effective immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel eTarazona

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells participate in the early immune response against melanoma and also contribute to the development of an adequate adaptive immune response by their crosstalk with dendritic cells and cytokine secretion. Melanoma resistance to conventional therapies together with its high immunogenicity justifies the development of novel therapies aimed to stimulate effective immune responses against melanoma. However, melanoma cells frequently escape to CD8 T cell recognition by the down-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. In this scenario, Natural killer cells emerge as potential candidates for melanoma immunotherapy due to their capacity to recognize and destroy melanoma cells expressing low levels of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. In addition, the possibility to combine immune checkpoint blockade with other NK cell potentiating strategies (e.g. cytokine induction of activating receptors has opened new perspectives in the potential use of adoptive NK cell-based immunotherapy in melanoma.

  9. Single cell analysis of signaling molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klepárník, Karel; Luksch, Jaroslav; Adamová, Eva; Potáčová, Anna; Matalová, E.; Foret, František

    Grupo VLS Print Solution, 2014 - (Guzman, N.; Taveres, M.). s. 49-49 [International Symposium on Electro- and Liquid Phase-Separation Techniques /21./ and Latin-American Symposium on Biotechnology, Biomedical, Biopharmaceutical, and Industrial Applications of Capillary Electrophoresis and Microchip Technology /21./. 04.10.2014-08.10.2014, Natal] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-28254S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : single cell analysis * signaling molecules * caspase Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  10. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Chemosensors of Ion and Molecule Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Czarnik, A

    1997-01-01

    In the broad field of supramolecular chemistry, the design and hence the use of chemosensors for ion and molecule recognition have developed at an extroardinary rate. This imaginative and creative area which involves the interface of different disciplines, e.g. organic and inorganic chemistry, physical chemistry, biology, medicine, environmental science, is not only fundamental in nature. It is also clear that progress is most rewarding for several new sensor applications deriving from the specific signal delivered by the analyte-probe interaction. Indeed, if calcium sensing in real time for biological purposes is actually possible, owing to the emergence of efficient fluorescent receptors, other elements can also be specifically detected, identified and finally titrated using tailored chemosensors. Pollutants such as heavy metals or radionuclides are among the main targets since their detection and removal could be envisioned at very low concentrations with, in addition, sensors displaying specific and stron...

  11. Self-Assembled Core-Satellite Gold Nanoparticle Networks for Ultrasensitive Detection of Chiral Molecules by Recognition Tunneling Current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanchao; Liu, Jingquan; Li, Da; Dai, Xing; Yan, Fuhua; Conlan, Xavier A; Zhou, Ruhong; Barrow, Colin J; He, Jin; Wang, Xin; Yang, Wenrong

    2016-05-24

    Chirality sensing is a very challenging task. Here, we report a method for ultrasensitive detection of chiral molecule l/d-carnitine based on changes in the recognition tunneling current across self-assembled core-satellite gold nanoparticle (GNP) networks. The recognition tunneling technique has been demonstrated to work at the single molecule level where the binding between the reader molecules and the analytes in a nanojunction. This process was observed to generate a unique and sensitive change in tunneling current, which can be used to identify the analytes of interest. The molecular recognition mechanism between amino acid l-cysteine and l/d-carnitine has been studied with the aid of SERS. The different binding strength between homo- or heterochiral pairs can be effectively probed by the copper ion replacement fracture. The device resistance was measured before and after the sequential exposures to l/d-carnitine and copper ions. The normalized resistance change was found to be extremely sensitive to the chirality of carnitine molecule. The results suggested that a GNP networks device optimized for recognition tunneling was successfully built and that such a device can be used for ultrasensitive detection of chiral molecules. PMID:27104661

  12. Gangliosides in cell recognition and membrane protein regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Pablo H. H.; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    Gangliosides, sialic acid-bearing glycosphingolipids, are expressed on all vertebrate cells, and are the major glycans on nerve cells. They are anchored to the plasma membrane through their ceramide lipids with their varied glycans extending into the extracellular space. Through sugar-specific interactions with glycan binding proteins on apposing cells, gangliosides function as receptors in cell-cell recognition, regulating natural killer cell cytotoxicity via Siglec-7 binding, myelin-axon in...

  13. Unstained viable cell recognition in phase-contrast microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoczylas, M.; Rakowski, W.; Cherubini, R.; Gerardi, S.

    2011-09-01

    Individual cell recognition is a relevant task to be accomplished when single-ion microbeam irradiations are performed. At INFN-LNL facility cell visualization system is based on a phase-contrast optical microscope, without the use of any cell dye. Unstained cells are seeded in the special designed Petri dish, between two mylar foils, and at present the cell recognition is achieved manually by an expert operator. Nevertheless, this procedure is time consuming and sometimes it could be not practical if the amount of living cells to be irradiated is large. To reduce the time needed to recognize unstained cells on the Petri dish, it has been designed and implemented an automated, parallel algorithm. Overlapping ROIs sliding in steps over the captured grayscale image are firstly pre-classified and potential cell markers for the segmentation are obtained. Segmented objects are additionally classified to categorize cell bodies from other structures considered as sample dirt or background. As a result, cell coordinates are passed to the dedicated CELLView program that controls all the LNL single-ion microbeam irradiation protocol, including the positioning of individual cells in front of the ion beam. Unstained cell recognition system was successfully tested in experimental conditions with two different mylar surfaces. The recognition time and accuracy was acceptable, however, improvements in speed would be useful.

  14. Origin of subdiffusion of water molecules on cell membrane surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasui, Masato; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Water molecules play an important role in providing unique environments for biological reactions on cell membranes. It is widely believed that water molecules form bridges that connect lipid molecules and stabilize cell membranes. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we show that translational and rotational diffusion of water molecules on lipid membrane surfaces exhibit subdiffusion. Moreover, we provide evidence that both divergent mean trapping time (continuous-time random walk) and long-correlated noise (fractional Brownian motion) contribute to this subdiffusion. These results suggest that subdiffusion on cell membranes causes the water retardation, an enhancement of cell membrane stability, and a higher reaction efficiency.

  15. Cell adhesion molecules in the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Togashi, Hideru; Sakisaka, Toshiaki; Takai, Yoshimi

    2009-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion molecules play key roles at the intercellular junctions of a wide variety of cells, including interneuronal synapses and neuron-glia contacts. Functional studies suggest that adhesion molecules are implicated in many aspects of neural network formation, such as axon-guidance, synapse formation, regulation of synaptic structure and astrocyte-synapse contacts. Some basic cell biological aspects of the assembly of junctional complexes of neurons and glial cells resemble those ...

  16. Soluble Collectin-12 (CL-12) Is a Pattern Recognition Molecule Initiating Complement Activation via the Alternative Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Hein, Estrid; Munthe-Fog, Lea;

    2015-01-01

    recognize Aspergillus fumigatus partially through the carbohydrate-recognition domain in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This led to activation of the alternative pathway of complement exclusively via association with properdin on A. fumigatus as validated by detection of C3b deposition and formation of the...... terminal complement complex. These results demonstrate the existence of CL-12 in a soluble form and indicate a novel mechanism by which the alternative pathway of complement may be triggered directly by a soluble pattern-recognition molecule....

  17. Bone marrow origin of Ia molecules purified from epidermal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using radiation bone marrow chimeras, we have shown that Ia molecules purified from epidermal cell preparations of the mouse reflect the Ia phenotype of the bone marrow donor. This result strongly suggests that Ia molecules are synthesized by a bone-marrow-derived cell in the epidermis. Furthermore, results of peptide map analysis of immunoprecipitated biosynthetically labeled Ia suggest that the Ia molecules found in skin are identical to those found on B lymphocytes. These results support biochemical as well as serologic identity

  18. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy. PMID:10811469

  19. Computer-aided molecular modeling study on antibody recognition of small molecules: an immunoassay for triazine herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Meng; Na, Yu; Li, Lingling; Liu, Bing; Sheng, Wei; Lu, Xiaonan; Kennedy, Ivan; Crossan, Angus; Wang, Shuo

    2012-10-24

    Most immunoassays for determination of small molecules are still designed on the basis of the "trial and error" method, due to the lack of understanding of antibody recognition. In the present study, we developed a heterologous indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determination of triazine herbicides, with limits of detection for 11 triazines ranging from 0.05 to 29.4 μg/L. Mechanisms of the antigen-antibody interaction were studied by computer-aided molecular modeling (CAMM)-based quantitative structure-activity relationship analyses. Co-effects of the analytes' substructural hydrophobic, electrostatic, and steric fields on antibody recognition were further revealed. Hydrophobicity of the antigens was demonstrated to have the most important impact. Even less exposed substituents provided hydrophobic force to the antigen-antibody interaction. Dislocated orientation of analyte functional groups could lead to steric hindrance and hydrophobic misleading of antibody recognition. This may happen even when the antigens contained the same substituent as the hapten. Frontier orbital energies also affect the reaction significantly. This study highlights of the power of CAMM-based analyses, providing insights into antibody recognition of small molecules. PMID:23043348

  20. Human thymic epithelial cells express functional HLA-DP molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Röpke, C; Nielsen, M;

    1996-01-01

    HLA-DP molecules function as restriction elements in the presentation of foreign antigens to T cells by antigen presenting cells and certain HLA-DP molecules confer susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Because HLA molecules play an essential role in thymic selection and elimination of autoreactive...... T lymphocytes, we examined whether human thymic epithelial cells (TEC) expressed HLA-DP molecules. We present evidence that TEC obtained from short time culture express low but significant levels of HLA-DP molecules. The expression of HLA-DP molecules was comparable to or higher than the expression...... of HLA-DQ but lower than that of HLA-DR. Upon IFN-gamma treatment, HLA-DP expression was strongly upregulated. Since HLA-DQ and DR expression was upregulated in parallel, the hierarchy between MHC class II isotypes remained unchanged following interferon treatment. TEC elicited significant...

  1. Recognition of Marrow Cell Images Based on Fuzzy Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xitao Zheng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the leukocyte distribution of human being to predict the recurrent leukemia, the mouse marrow cells are investigated to get the possible indication of the recurrence. This paper uses the C-mean fuzzy clustering recognition method to identify cells from sliced mouse marrow image. In our image processing, red cells, leukocytes, megakaryocyte, and cytoplasm can not be separated by their staining color, RGB combinations are used to classify the image into 8 sectors so that the searching area can be matched with these sectors. The gray value distribution and the texture patterns are used to construct membership function. Previous work on this project involves the recognition using pixel distribution and probability lays the background of data processing and preprocessing. Constraints based on size, pixel distribution, and grayscale pattern are used for the successful counting of individual cells. Tests show that this shape, pattern and color based method can reach satisfied counting under similar illumination condition.

  2. Human NKG2D-ligands: cell biology strategies to ensure immune recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola eFernández-Messina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Immune recognition mediated by the activating receptor NKG2D plays an important role for the elimination of stressed cells, including tumours and virus-infected cells. On the other hand, the ligands for NKG2D can also be shed into the sera of cancer patients where they weaken the immune response by downmodulating the receptor on effector cells, mainly NK and T cells. Although both families of NKG2D-ligands, MICA/B and ULBPs, are related to MHC molecules and their expression is increased after stress, many differences are observed in terms of their biochemical properties and cell trafficking. In this paper, we summarise the variety of NKG2D-ligands and propose that selection pressure has driven evolution of diversity in their trafficking and shedding, but not receptor binding affinity. However, it is also possible to identify functional properties common to individual ULBP molecules and MICA/B alleles, but not generally conserved within the MIC or ULBP families. These characteristics likely represent examples of convergent evolution for efficient immune recognition, but are also attractive targets for pathogen immune evasion strategies. Categorization of NKG2D-ligands according to their biological features, rather than their genetic family, may help to achieve a better understanding of NKG2D-ligand association with disease.

  3. CYTOMEGALOVIRUS VECTORS VIOLATE CD8+ T CELL EPITOPE RECOGNITION PARADIGMS

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Scott G.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Hughes, Colette M.; Ford, Julia C.; Burwitz, Benjamin J.; Scholz, Isabel; Gilbride, Roxanne M.; Lewis, Matthew S.; Gilliam, Awbrey N.; Ventura, Abigail B.; Malouli, Daniel; Xu, Guangwu; Richards, Rebecca; Whizin, Nathan; Reed, Jason S.

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T cell responses focus on a small fraction of pathogen- or vaccine-encoded peptides, and for some pathogens, these restricted recognition hierarchies limit the effectiveness of anti-pathogen immunity. We found that simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) protein-expressing Rhesus Cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) vectors elicit SIV-specific CD8+ T cells that recognize unusual, diverse and highly promiscuous epitopes, including dominant responses to epitopes restricted by class II major histocompatibil...

  4. Innate recognition of cell wall β-glucans drives invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cell responses against fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Nadia R.; Tatituri, Raju V.V.; Rivera, Amariliz; Watts, Gerald F.M.; Kim, Edy Y.; Chiba, Asako; Fuchs, Beth B.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Levitz, Stuart M.; Brigl, Manfred; Brenner, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY iNKT cells are innate T lymphocytes recognizing endogenous and foreign lipid antigens presented in the MHC-like molecule CD1d. The semi-invariant iNKT cell TCR can detect certain bacterial and parasitic lipids, and drive iNKT cell responses. How iNKT cells respond to fungi, however, is unknown. We found that CD1d-deficient mice, which lack iNKT cells, poorly control infection with the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Furthermore, A. fumigatus rapidly activates iNKT cells in vivo and in vitro in the presence of APCs. Surprisingly, despite a requirement for CD1d recognition, the anti-fungal iNKT cell response does not require fungal lipids. Instead, Dectin-1 and MyD88-mediated responses to β-1,3 glucans, major fungal cell-wall polysaccharides, trigger IL-12 production by APCs that drives self-reactive iNKT cells to secrete IFN-γ. Innate recognition of β-1,3 glucans also drives iNKT cell responses against Candida, Histoplasma and Alternaria, suggesting that this mechanism may broadly define the basis for anti-fungal iNKT cell responses. PMID:22100160

  5. Speech recognition systems on the Cell Broadband Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y; Jones, H; Vaidya, S; Perrone, M; Tydlitat, B; Nanda, A

    2007-04-20

    In this paper we describe our design, implementation, and first results of a prototype connected-phoneme-based speech recognition system on the Cell Broadband Engine{trademark} (Cell/B.E.). Automatic speech recognition decodes speech samples into plain text (other representations are possible) and must process samples at real-time rates. Fortunately, the computational tasks involved in this pipeline are highly data-parallel and can receive significant hardware acceleration from vector-streaming architectures such as the Cell/B.E. Identifying and exploiting these parallelism opportunities is challenging, but also critical to improving system performance. We observed, from our initial performance timings, that a single Cell/B.E. processor can recognize speech from thousands of simultaneous voice channels in real time--a channel density that is orders-of-magnitude greater than the capacity of existing software speech recognizers based on CPUs (central processing units). This result emphasizes the potential for Cell/B.E.-based speech recognition and will likely lead to the future development of production speech systems using Cell/B.E. clusters.

  6. Cell adhesion molecules during odontogenesis and tooth-related diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Heymann, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules play essential roles in the development and disease of tooth and oral structures, as well as in the maintenance of adult tissue structure/function. It has been shown that different types of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play an important part in craniofacial development when ectomesenchymal cells migrate from the neural list to the primitive oral cavity, giving rise to the palatal processes and tooth germs. The role of CAMs in craniofacial developmen...

  7. Orthodenticle Is Required for the Expression of Principal Recognition Molecules That Control Axon Targeting in the Drosophila Retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Mencarelli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parallel processing of neuronal inputs relies on assembling neural circuits into distinct synaptic-columns and layers. This is orchestrated by matching recognition molecules between afferent growth cones and target areas. Controlling the expression of these molecules during development is crucial but not well understood. The developing Drosophila visual system is a powerful genetic model for addressing this question. In this model system, the achromatic R1-6 photoreceptors project their axons in the lamina while the R7 and R8 photoreceptors, which are involved in colour detection, project their axons to two distinct synaptic-layers in the medulla. Here we show that the conserved homeodomain transcription factor Orthodenticle (Otd, which in the eye is a main regulator of rhodopsin expression, is also required for R1-6 photoreceptor synaptic-column specific innervation of the lamina. Our data indicate that otd function in these photoreceptors is largely mediated by the recognition molecules flamingo (fmi and golden goal (gogo. In addition, we find that otd regulates synaptic-layer targeting of R8. We demonstrate that during this process, otd and the R8-specific transcription factor senseless/Gfi1 (sens function as independent transcriptional inputs that are required for the expression of fmi, gogo and the adhesion molecule capricious (caps, which govern R8 synaptic-layer targeting. Our work therefore demonstrates that otd is a main component of the gene regulatory network that regulates synaptic-column and layer targeting in the fly visual system.

  8. The interplay of sequence conservation and T cell immune recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresciani, Anne Gøther; Sette, Alessandro; Greenbaum, Jason;

    2014-01-01

    examined the hypothesis that conservation of a peptide in bacteria that are part of the healthy human microbiome leads to a reduced level of immunogenicity due to tolerization of T cells to the commensal bacteria. This was done by comparing experimentally characterized T cell epitope recognition data from...... the Immune Epitope Database with their conservation in the human microbiome. Indeed, we did see a lower immunogenicity for conserved peptides conserved. While many aspects how this conservation comparison is done require further optimization, this is a first step towards a better understanding T cell...... recognition of peptides in bacterial pathogens is influenced by their conservation in commensal bacteria. If the further work proves that this approach is successful, the degree of overlap of a peptide with the human proteome or microbiome could be added to the arsenal of tools available to assess peptide...

  9. Optical manipulation of single molecules in the living cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Jauffred, Liselotte; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers are the only nano-tools capable of manipulating and performing force-measurements on individual molecules and organelles within the living cell without performing destructive penetration through the cell wall and without the need for inserting a non-endogenous probe. Here, we...... describe how optical tweezers are used to manipulate individual molecules and perform accurate force and distance measurements within the complex cytoplasm of the living cell. Optical tweezers can grab individual molecules or organelles, if their optical contrast to the medium is large enough, as is the...

  10. Optical nanosensor architecture for cell-signaling molecules using DNA aptamer-coated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Tae-Gon; Baker, Benjamin A; Sauffer, M Dane; Salgado, Janette; Jaroch, David; Rickus, Jenna L; Porterfield, D Marshall; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2011-05-24

    We report a novel optical biosensor platform using near-infrared fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with target-recognizing aptamer DNA for noninvasively detecting cell-signaling molecules in real time. Photoluminescence (PL) emission of aptamer-coated SWNTs is modulated upon selectively binding to target molecules, which is exploited to detect insulin using an insulin-binding aptamer (IBA) as a molecular recognition element. We find that nanotube PL quenches upon insulin recognition via a photoinduced charge transfer mechanism with a quenching rate of k(q) = 5.85 × 10(14) M(-1) s(-1) and a diffusion-reaction rate of k(r) = 0.129 s(-1). Circular dichroism spectra reveal for the first time that IBA strands retain a four-stranded, parallel guanine quadruplex conformation on the nanotubes, ensuring target selectivity. We demonstrate that these IBA-functionalized SWNT sensors incorporated in a collagen extracellular matrix (ECM) can be regenerated by removing bound analytes through enzymatic proteolysis. As proof-of-concept, we show that the SWNT sensors embedded in the ECM promptly detect insulin secreted by cultured pancreatic INS-1 cells stimulated by glucose influx and report a gradient contour of insulin secretion profile. This novel design enables new types of label-free assays and noninvasive, in situ, real-time detection schemes for cell-signaling molecules. PMID:21520951

  11. Modulation of MHC class-I molecules on melanoma cells after photodynamic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Endogenous antigenic peptides are presented in the context of MHC class-I molecules on the cell surface for recognition by CD8+ T lymphocytes. Down-regulation of MHC molecules is a frequently observed strategy of tumor cells to escape immune attack. E.g., B16 melanoma is characterized by extremely low MHC-I surface expression and high tumorigenicity in syngeneic mice. Generally, the efficiency of photodynamic therapy is low for melanotic tumors. On the other hand, PDT has been shown capable of inducing anti-tumoral immunity. Therefore, we investigated the effect of PDT treatment in vitro on the MHC class-I surface expression of surviving B16 cells. When sensitized with 50 ng/mL hypericin and then irradiated the viability of the cells gradually decreased with increasing light dose. However, with 4 J/cm2 50 % of cells were still viable after 24 hours. Analysis by flow cytometry revealed that a subpopulation of these cells had significantly elevated the surface density of MHC class-I molecules (fluorescence intensity approx. 5-fold over that of untreated cells). These findings suggest that repetitive PDT might facilitate CTL-mediated cytolysis of tumor cells and might, therefore, synergize with immunotherapeutic approaches for at least some tumors. (author)

  12. Lack of the pattern recognition molecule mannose-binding lectin increases susceptibility to influenza A virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartshorn Kevan L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a pattern recognition innate immune molecule, inhibits influenza A virus infection in vitro. MBL deficiency due to gene polymorphism in humans has been associated with infection susceptibility. These clinical observations were confirmed by animal model studies, in which mice genetically lacking MBL were susceptible to certain pathogens, including herpes simplex virus 2. Results We demonstrate that MBL is present in the lung of naïve healthy wild type (WT mice and that MBL null mice are more susceptible to IAV infection. Administration of recombinant human MBL (rhMBL reverses the infection phenotype, confirming that the infection susceptibility is MBL-mediated. The anti-viral mechanisms of MBL include activation of the lectin complement pathway and coagulation, requiring serum factors. White blood cells (WBCs in the lung increase in WT mice compared with MBL null mice on day 1 post-infection. In contrast, apoptotic macrophages (MΦs are two-fold higher in the lung of MBL null mice compared with WT mice. Furthermore, MBL deficient macrophages appear to be susceptible to apoptosis in vitro. Lastly, soluble factors, which are associated with lung injury, are increased in the lungs of MBL null mice during IAV infection. These results suggest that MBL plays a key role against IAV infection. Conclusion MBL plays a key role in clearing IAV and maintaining lung homeostasis. In addition, our findings also suggest that MBL deficiency maybe a risk factor in IAV infection and MBL may be a useful adjunctive therapy for IAV infection.

  13. Single Molecule Imaging in Living Cell with Optical Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Significance, difficult, international developing actuality and our completed works for single molecules imaging in living cell with optical method are described respectively. Additionally we give out some suggestions for the technology development further.

  14. T cell receptor reversed polarity recognition of a self-antigen major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Dennis X; Kleijwegt, Fleur S; Wiede, Florian; van der Slik, Arno R; Loh, Khai Lee; Petersen, Jan; Dudek, Nadine L; Duinkerken, Gaby; Laban, Sandra; Joosten, Antoinette; Vivian, Julian P; Chen, Zhenjun; Uldrich, Adam P; Godfrey, Dale I; McCluskey, James; Price, David A; Radford, Kristen J; Purcell, Anthony W; Nikolic, Tatjana; Reid, Hugh H; Tiganis, Tony; Roep, Bart O; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2015-11-01

    Central to adaptive immunity is the interaction between the αβ T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule. Presumably reflecting TCR-MHC bias and T cell signaling constraints, the TCR universally adopts a canonical polarity atop the MHC. We report the structures of two TCRs, derived from human induced T regulatory (iT(reg)) cells, complexed to an MHC class II molecule presenting a proinsulin-derived peptide. The ternary complexes revealed a 180° polarity reversal compared to all other TCR-peptide-MHC complex structures. Namely, the iT(reg) TCR α-chain and β-chain are overlaid with the α-chain and β-chain of MHC class II, respectively. Nevertheless, this TCR interaction elicited a peptide-reactive, MHC-restricted T cell signal. Thus TCRs are not 'hardwired' to interact with MHC molecules in a stereotypic manner to elicit a T cell signal, a finding that fundamentally challenges our understanding of TCR recognition. PMID:26437244

  15. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jodie; Bittame, Amina; Massera, Céline; Vasseur, Virginie; Effantin, Grégory; Valat, Anne; Buaillon, Célia; Allart, Sophie; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Gagnon, Jean; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV), resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN) of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effectors GRA2 and GRA6. We show that membrane association regulates access of the GRA6 protective antigen to the MHC I pathway in infected cells. Although insertion of GRA6 in the PV membrane is key for immunogenicity, association of GRA6 with the IVN limits presentation and curtails GRA6-specific CD8 responses in mice. Thus, membrane deformations of the PV regulate access of antigens to the MHC class I pathway, and the IVN may play a role in immune modulation. PMID:26628378

  16. A new class of pluripotent stem cell cytotoxic small molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Richards

    Full Text Available A major concern in Pluripotent Stem Cell (PSC-derived cell replacement therapy is the risk of teratoma formation from contaminating undifferentiated cells. Removal of undifferentiated cells from differentiated cultures is an essential step before PSC-based cell therapies can be safely deployed in a clinical setting. We report a group of novel small molecules that are cytotoxic to PSCs. Our data indicates that these molecules are specific and potent in their activity allowing rapid eradication of undifferentiated cells. Experiments utilizing mixed PSC and primary human neuronal and cardiomyocyte cultures demonstrate that up to a 6-fold enrichment for specialized cells can be obtained without adversely affecting cell viability and function. Several structural variants were synthesized to identify key functional groups and to improve specificity and efficacy. Comparative microarray analysis and ensuing RNA knockdown studies revealed involvement of the PERK/ATF4/DDIT3 ER stress pathway. Surprisingly, cell death following ER stress induction was associated with a concomitant decrease in endogenous ROS levels in PSCs. Undifferentiated cells treated with these molecules preceding transplantation fail to form teratomas in SCID mice. Furthermore, these molecules remain non-toxic and non-teratogenic to zebrafish embryos suggesting that they may be safely used in vivo.

  17. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell......-like) as well as T cells producing both cytokines (THO-like) responded to class II mAb. The costimulatory effect was not restricted to IL-2-driven T cell growth, since TCR/CD3-induced T cell activation was also enhanced by HLA-DR mAb. Moreover, class II costimulation potentiated CD28-mAb-induced T cell...

  18. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries. PMID:26253722

  19. Glycoconjugates and Related Molecules in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiko Sasaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cells (ECs form the inner lining of blood vessels. They are critically involved in many physiological functions, including control of vasomotor tone, blood cell trafficking, hemostatic balance, permeability, proliferation, survival, and immunity. It is considered that impairment of EC functions leads to the development of vascular diseases. The carbohydrate antigens carried by glycoconjugates (e.g., glycoproteins, glycosphingolipids, and proteoglycans mainly present on the cell surface serve not only as marker molecules but also as functional molecules. Recent studies have revealed that the carbohydrate composition of the EC surface is critical for these cells to perform their physiological functions. In this paper, we consider the expression and functional roles of endogenous glycoconjugates and related molecules (galectins and glycan-degrading enzymes in human ECs.

  20. Fructose Induces the Inflammatory Molecule ICAM-1 in Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Glushakova, Olena; Kosugi, Tomoki; Roncal, Carlos; Mu, Wei; Heinig, Marcelo; Cirillo, Pietro; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G.; Richard J Johnson; Nakagawa, Takahiko

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked fructose intake with the metabolic syndrome, and it was recently reported that fructose induces an inflammatory response in the rat kidney. Here, we examined whether fructose directly stimulates endothelial inflammatory processes by upregulating the inflammatory molecule intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). When human aortic endothelial cells were stimulated with physiologic concentrations of fructose, ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression increased in a ...

  1. Single-Molecule and Superresolution Imaging in Live Bacteria Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Biteen, Julie S; Moerner, W. E.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule imaging enables biophysical measurements devoid of ensemble averaging, gives enhanced spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit, and permits superresolution reconstructions. Here, single-molecule and superresolution imaging are applied to the study of proteins in live Caulobacter crescentus cells to illustrate the power of these methods in bacterial imaging. Based on these techniques, the diffusion coefficient and dynamics of the histidine protein kinase PleC, the locali...

  2. Biogenesis and fate of the cell-cell adhesion molecule, agglutinin, during gametogenesis and fertilization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertilization in Chlamydomonas begins with the species-specific recognition and adhesion between gametes of opposite mating types via agglutinin molecules on the flagellar surface. This adhesion generates a cAMP-mediated sexual signal that initiates the subsequent events of call wall release, mating structure activation, and cell fusion. Although flagella of paired gametes remain attached to each other until the zygote forms, the process is dynamic. Engaged agglutinins rapidly become inactivated and turnover, requiring the constant supply of new agglutinins to replace the lost molecules. A population of cell body associated agglutinins has been postulated to the pool of agglutinins recruited during this turnover. Cell body agglutinins, therefore were identified, purified, localized within the cells and compared to flagellar agglutinins. The relationship between these two agglutinin populations was also examined. Cell body agglutinins were biochemically indistinguishable from the flagellar form with respect to their Mr, sedimentation coefficient, and hydrophobicity elution properties. Functionally, however, these molecules were inactive in situ. The calculated surface density of agglutinins in the cell body and flagellar domains was similar and thus could not explain their functional difference, but two domains contiguous and yet distinctive suggested they may be separated by a functional barrier. To test this, a method was developed, using a monoclonal antibody and cycloheximide, that removed the flagellar agglutinins so movement between the domains could be monitored. Mobilization of agglutinins onto the flagella did not occur unless sexual signaling was induced with cAMP and papaverine

  3. Electron Cryomicroscopy: From Molecules to Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today's biomolecular electron microscopy uses essentially three different imaging modalities: (i) electron crystallography, (ii) single particle analysis and (iii) electron tomography. Ideally, these imaging modalities are applied to frozen-hydrated samples to ensure an optimum preservation of the structures under scrutiny. Electron crystallography requires the existence of two-dimensional crystals. In principle, electron crystallography is a high-resolution technique and it has indeed been demonstrated in a number of cases that near-atomic resolution can be attained. Single-particle analysis is particularly suited for structural studies of large macromolecular complexes. The amount of material needed is minute and some degree of heterogeneity is tolerable since image classification can be used for further 'purification in silico'. In principle, single particle analysis can attain high-resolution but, in practice, this often remains an elusive goal. However, since medium resolution structures can be obtained relatively easily, it often provides an excellent basis for hybrid approaches in which high-resolution structures of components are integrated into the medium resolution structures of the holocomplexes. Electron tomography can be applied to non-repetitive structures. Most supramolecuar structures inside cells fall into this category. In order to obtain three-dimensional structures of objects with unique topologies it is necessary to obtain different views by physical tilting. The challenge is to obtain large numbers of projection images covering as wide a tilt range as possible and, at the same time, to minimize the cumulative electron dose. Cryoelectron tomography provides medium resolution three-dimensional images of a wide range of biological structures from isolated supramolecular assemblies to organelles and cells. It allows the visualization of molecular machines in their functional environment (in situ) and the mapping of entire molecular

  4. Electron Cryomicroscopy: From Molecules to Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, W.

    2014-06-01

    Today's biomolecular electron microscopy uses essentially three different imaging modalities: (i) electron crystallography, (ii) single particle analysis and (iii) electron tomography. Ideally, these imaging modalities are applied to frozen-hydrated samples to ensure an optimum preservation of the structures under scrutiny. Electron crystallography requires the existence of two-dimensional crystals. In principle, electron crystallography is a high-resolution technique and it has indeed been demonstrated in a number of cases that near-atomic resolution can be attained. Single-particle analysis is particularly suited for structural studies of large macromolecular complexes. The amount of material needed is minute and some degree of heterogeneity is tolerable since image classification can be used for further 'purification in silico'. In principle, single particle analysis can attain high-resolution but, in practice, this often remains an elusive goal. However, since medium resolution structures can be obtained relatively easily, it often provides an excellent basis for hybrid approaches in which high-resolution structures of components are integrated into the medium resolution structures of the holocomplexes. Electron tomography can be applied to non-repetitive structures. Most supramolecuar structures inside cells fall into this category. In order to obtain three-dimensional structures of objects with unique topologies it is necessary to obtain different views by physical tilting. The challenge is to obtain large numbers of projection images covering as wide a tilt range as possible and, at the same time, to minimize the cumulative electron dose. Cryoelectron tomography provides medium resolution three-dimensional images of a wide range of biological structures from isolated supramolecular assemblies to organelles and cells. It allows the visualization of molecular machines in their functional environment (in situ) and the mapping of entire molecular landscapes.

  5. Recognition and Regulation of T Cells by NK Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallmer, Katharina; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of T cell responses by innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) is increasingly documented and studied. Direct or indirect crosstalk between ILCs and T cells early during and after T cell activation can affect their differentiation, polarization, and survival. Natural killer (NK) cells that belong to the ILC1 group were initially described for their function in recognizing and eliminating “altered self” and as source of early inflammatory cytokines, most notably type II interferon. Using signals conveyed by various germ-line encoded activating and inhibitory receptors, NK cells are geared to sense sudden cellular changes that can be caused by infection events, malignant transformation, or cellular stress responses. T cells, when activated by TCR engagement (signal 1), costimulation (signal 2), and cytokines (signal 3), commit to a number of cellular alterations, including entry into rapid cell cycling, metabolic changes, and acquisition of effector functions. These abrupt changes may alert NK cells, and T cells might thereby expose themselves as NK cell targets. Here, we review how activated T cells can be recognized and regulated by NK cells and what consequences such regulation bears for T cell immunity in the context of vaccination, infection, or autoimmunity. Conversely, we will discuss mechanisms by which activated T cells protect themselves against NK cell attack and outline the significance of this safeguard mechanism. PMID:27446081

  6. Interfacial processes in small molecule organic solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the recent progress of small molecule organic solar cells mainly based on the previous worksof our group. We will mainly focus on the interfacial processes in the cells. The dissociation of excitons at electrode/organic andorganic/organic interfaces can be directly observed by transient photovoltage measurements. A simple model including dissociationof excitons at the interface and drift of free carriers in the built-in field is proposed to explain the observed signals of transientphotovoltage. Besides exciton-blocking and preventing damage due to cathode evaporation,blocking permeation of oxygen and/orwater molecules and modulating the built-in field are proposed as functions of the buffer layer between C60 and Al. By the use ofthe inverted structure,a shelf lifetime of over 1500 h is achieved for unencapsulated small-molecule organic solar cells.

  7. Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biechl, Daniela; Tietje, Kristin; Gerlach, Gabriele; Wullimann, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal. PMID:27087508

  8. Allergen Recognition by Innate Immune Cells: Critical Role of Dendritic and Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Fabián; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M.

    2013-01-01

    Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells (DCs), leading to Th2 polarization, switching to IgE production by B cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. DCs have been demonstrated to play a crucial...

  9. New method for recognition of sterol signalling molecules: Methinium salts as receptors for sulphated steroids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kejík, Z.; Bříza, T.; Králová, Jarmila; Mikula, I.; Poučková, P.; Martásek, P.; Král, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 94, February 2015 (2015), s. 15-20. ISSN 1878-5867 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020028; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/1291; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14008; GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.300/30.0060; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Polymethinium salts * Sulphated sterols * Molecular recognition * Synthetic receptors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Internalization-dependent recognition of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis by intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Johanna; Basler, Tina; Duerr, Claudia U; Rohde, Manfred; Goethe, Ralph; Hornef, Mathias W

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease, a highly prevalent chronic intestinal infection in domestic and wildlife ruminants. The microbial pathogenesis of MAP infection has attracted additional attention due to an association with the human enteric inflammatory Crohn's disease. MAP is acquired by the faecal-oral route prompting us to study the interaction with differentiated intestinal epithelial cells. MAP was rapidly internalized and accumulated in a late endosomal compartment. In contrast to other opportunistic mycobacteria or M. bovis, MAP induced significant epithelial activation as indicated by a NF-kappaB-independent but Erk-dependent chemokine secretion. Surprisingly, MAP-induced chemokine production was completely internalization-dependent as inhibition of Rac-dependent bacterial uptake abolished epithelial activation. In accordance, innate immune recognition of MAP by differentiated intestinal epithelial cells occurred through the intracellularly localized pattern recognition receptors toll-like receptor 9 and NOD1 with signal transduction via the adaptor molecules MyD88 and RIP2. The internalization-dependent innate immune activation of intestinal epithelial cells is in contrast to the stimulation of professional phagocytes by extracellular bacterial constituents and might significantly contribute to the histopathological changes observed during enteric MAP infection. PMID:19681906

  11. New small molecules targeting apoptosis and cell viability in osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Maugg

    Full Text Available Despite the option of multimodal therapy in the treatment strategies of osteosarcoma (OS, the most common primary malignant bone tumor, the standard therapy has not changed over the last decades and still involves multidrug chemotherapy and radical surgery. Although successfully applied in many patients a large number of patients eventually develop recurrent or metastatic disease in which current therapeutic regimens often lack efficacy. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In this study, we performed a phenotypic high-throughput screening campaign using a 25,000 small-molecule diversity library to identify new small molecules selectively targeting osteosarcoma cells. We could identify two new small molecules that specifically reduced cell viability in OS cell lines U2OS and HOS, but affected neither hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 nor primary human osteoblasts (hOB. In addition, the two compounds induced caspase 3 and 7 activity in the U2OS cell line. Compared to conventional drugs generally used in OS treatment such as doxorubicin, we indeed observed a greater sensitivity of OS cell viability to the newly identified compounds compared to doxorubicin and staurosporine. The p53-negative OS cell line Saos-2 almost completely lacked sensitivity to compound treatment that could indicate a role of p53 in the drug response. Taken together, our data show potential implications for designing more efficient therapies in OS.

  12. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Amino Acids and Peptides by Recognition Tunneling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, JongOne; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here we show that single ami...

  13. Pharmacology of cell adhesion molecules of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiryushko, Darya; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play a pivotal role in the development and maintenance of the nervous system under normal conditions. They also are involved in numerous pathological processes such as inflammation, degenerative disorders, and cancer, making them attractive targets for drug...

  14. Molecule mechanism of stem cells in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants possess the ability to continually produce new tissues and organs throughout their life. Unlike animals, plants are exposed to extreme variations in environmental conditions over the course of their lives. The vitality of plants is so powerful that they can survive several hundreds of years or even more making it an amazing miracle that comes from plant stem cells. The stem cells continue to divide to renew themselves and provide cells for the formation of leaves, stems, and flowers. Stem cells are not only quiescent but also immortal, pluripotent and homeostatic. Stem cells are the magic cells that repair tissues and regenerate organs. During the past decade, scholars around the world have paid more and more attention toward plant stem cells. At present, the major challenge is in relating molecule action mechanism to root apical meristem, shoot apical meristem and vascular system. The coordination between stem cells maintenance and differentiation is critical for normal plant growth and development. Elements such as phytohormones, transcription factors and some other known or unknown genes cooperate to balance this process. In this review, Arabidopsis thaliana as a pioneer system, we highlight recent developments in molecule modulating, illustrating how plant stem cells generate new mechanistic insights into the regulation of plants growth and development.

  15. New protein involved in the replacement of cell molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with colleagues from La Trobe University, Australia, scientists at Aarhus University have discovered and defined a novel enzyme involved in the replacement and renewal of cell molecules. The enzyme exerts its function within the so-called mitochondria - small “enclosed” compartme......” compartments in the human cell - where most cellular energy is produced. The findings may ultimately explain the cause of certain diseases with relation to the mitochondria.......In collaboration with colleagues from La Trobe University, Australia, scientists at Aarhus University have discovered and defined a novel enzyme involved in the replacement and renewal of cell molecules. The enzyme exerts its function within the so-called mitochondria - small “enclosed...

  16. The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) as a morphoregulatory molecule is a tool in surgical pathology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, M.J.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Litvinov, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Cell adhesion receptors (CAMs) are actively involved in regulating various cell processes, including growth, differentiation, and cell death. Therefore, CAMs represent a large group of morphoregulating molecules, mediating cross-talk between cells and of cells with their environment. From this persp

  17. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity. (paper)

  18. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, C.; Plochberger, B.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Rankl, C.; Heister, E.; Unterauer, B.; Brameshuber, M.; Danzberger, J.; Lukanov, P.; Flahaut, E.; Schütz, G.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ebner, A.

    2014-03-01

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity.

  19. The pattern recognition molecule ficolin-1 exhibits differential binding to lymphocyte subsets, providing a novel link between innate and adaptive immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genster, Ninette; Ma, Ying Jie; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    -lymphocyte interaction occurred via the pathogen-recognition domain of ficolin-1 to sialic acid on the cell surface. Thus, the differential binding of ficolin-1 to lymphocyte subsets suggests ficolin-1 as a novel link between innate and adaptive immunity. Our results provide new insight about the recognition properties...

  20. Laser Controlled Synthesis of Noble Metal Nanoparticle Arrays for Low Concentration Molecule Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enza Fazio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured gold and silver thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition.Performing the process in an ambient gas (Ar leads to the nucleation and growth ofnanoparticles in the ablation plasma and their self-organization on the substrate. Thedependence of surface nanostructuring of the films on the deposition parameters is discussedconsidering in particular the number of laser pulses and the ambient gas nature and pressure.The performance of the deposited thin films as substrates for surface-enhanced Ramanspectroscopy (SERS was tested against the detection of molecules at a low concentration.Taking Raman maps on micrometer-sized areas, the spatial homogeneity of the substrateswith respect to the SERS signal was tested.

  1. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovicka, J.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Paunov, V.N.

    2013-01-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called "colloid antibodies", were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating

  2. Roles of small molecules in somatic cell reprogramming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-bin SU; Duan-qing PEI; Bao-ming QIN

    2013-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine 2012 was awarded to Sir John B GURDON and Shinya YAMANAKA for their discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent.This event reaffirms the importance of research on cell fate plasticity and the technology progress in the stem cell field and regenerative medicine.Indeed,reprogramming technology has developed at a dazzling speed within the past 6 years,yet we are still at the early stages of understanding the mechanisms of cell fate identity.This is particularly true in the case of human induced pluripotent stem ceils (iPSCs),which lack reliable standards in the evaluation of their fidelity and safety prior to their application.Along with the genetic approaches,small molecules nowadays become convenient tools for modulating endogenous protein functions and regulating key cellular processes,including the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition,metabolism,signal transduction and epigenetics.Moreover,small molecules may affect not only the efficiency of clone formation but also the quality of the resulting cells.With increasing availability of such chemicals,we can better understand the biology of stems cells and further improve the technology of generation of stem cells.

  3. Studying the Nucleated Mammalian Cell Membrane by Single Molecule Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Wu, Jiazhen; Gao, Jing; Liu, Shuheng; Jiang, Junguang; Jiang, Shibo; Wang, Hongda

    2014-01-01

    The cell membrane plays a key role in compartmentalization, nutrient transportation and signal transduction, while the pattern of protein distribution at both cytoplasmic and ectoplasmic sides of the cell membrane remains elusive. Using a combination of single-molecule techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), to study the structure of nucleated cell membranes, we found that (1) proteins at the ectoplasmic side of the cell membrane form a dense protein layer (4 nm) on top of a lipid bilayer; (2) proteins aggregate to form islands evenly dispersed at the cytoplasmic side of the cell membrane with a height of about 10–12 nm; (3) cholesterol-enriched domains exist within the cell membrane; (4) carbohydrates stay in microdomains at the ectoplasmic side; and (5) exposed amino groups are asymmetrically distributed on both sides. Based on these observations, we proposed a Protein Layer-Lipid-Protein Island (PLLPI) model, to provide a better understanding of cell membrane structure, membrane trafficking and viral fusion mechanisms. PMID:24806512

  4. Sophisticated Functions for a Simple Molecule: The Role of Glucosylceramides in Fungal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Nimrichter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that mammalian glycosphingolipids (GSL play key roles in different physiological and pathophysiological processes. The simplest GSL, glucosylceramide (GlcCer, is formed through the enzymatic transfer of glucose to a ceramide moiety. In mammalian cells this molecule is the building block for the synthesis of lactosylceramides and many other complex GSLs. In fungal cells GlcCer is a major neutral GSL that has been considered during decades merely as a structural component of cell membranes. The recent literature, however, describes the participation of fungal GlcCer in vital processes such as secretion, cell wall assembly, recognition by the immune system and regulation of virulence. In this review we discuss the most recent information regarding fungal GlcCer, including (i new aspects of GlcCer metabolism, (ii the involvement of these molecules in virulence mechanisms, (iii their role as targets of new antifungal drugs and immunotherapeutic agents and, finally, (v their potential participation on cellular signaling in response to different stimuli.

  5. Role of cell adhesion signal molecules in hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Su; Li-Ying Wang; Yu-Long Liang; Xi-Liang Zha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Cell adhesion molecules and their signal molecules play a very important role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of these molecules and the signal molecules of integrins and E-cadherins, such as (focal adhesion kinase) FAK, (integrin linked kinase)ILK, and β-catenin in hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.METHODS: We first synthesized the small molecular compound, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), and identified it, by element analysis and 1H NMR. To establish the apoptosis model of the SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cell, we treated cells with DCVC in EBSS for different concentrations or for various length times in the presence of 20 μmol/L N,N-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine,which blocks necrotic cell death and identified this model by flow cytometry and DNA ladder. Then we studied the changes of FAK, ILK, β-catenin, and PKB in this apoptotic model by Western blot.RESULTS: We found that the loss or decrease of cell adhesion signal molecules is an important reason in apoptosis of SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cell and the apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cell was preceded by the loss or decrease of FAK, ILK, PKB, and β-catenin or the damage of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion.CONCLUSION: Our results suggested that the decrease of adhesion signal molecules, FAK, ILK, PKB, and β-catenin,could induce hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.

  6. A proactive role of water molecules in acceptor recognition by protein O-fucosyltransferase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-González, Jessika; Leonhard-Melief, Christina; Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Hernández-Ruiz, Cristina; Pallarés, María Carmen; Yruela, Inmaculada; Vasudevan, Deepika; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Haltiwanger, Robert S; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-04-01

    Protein O-fucosyltransferase 2 (POFUT2) is an essential enzyme that fucosylates serine and threonine residues of folded thrombospondin type 1 repeats (TSRs). To date, the mechanism by which this enzyme recognizes very dissimilar TSRs has been unclear. By engineering a fusion protein, we report the crystal structure of Caenorhabditis elegans POFUT2 (CePOFUT2) in complex with GDP and human TSR1 that suggests an inverting mechanism for fucose transfer assisted by a catalytic base and shows that nearly half of the TSR1 is embraced by CePOFUT2. A small number of direct interactions and a large network of water molecules maintain the complex. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates that POFUT2 fucosylates threonine preferentially over serine and relies on folded TSRs containing the minimal consensus sequence C-X-X-S/T-C. Crystallographic and mutagenesis data, together with atomic-level simulations, uncover a binding mechanism by which POFUT2 promiscuously recognizes the structural fingerprint of poorly homologous TSRs through a dynamic network of water-mediated interactions. PMID:26854667

  7. Growth hormone increases vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Troels Krarup; Fisker, Sanne; Dall, Rolf;

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the impact of GH administration on endothelial adhesion molecules, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin, in vivo and in vitro. Soluble VCAM-1, E-selectin, and C-reactive protein concentrations were measured before and after treatment in 25 healthy subjects and...... 25 adult GH-deficient (GHD) patients randomized to GH treatment or placebo. Furthermore, we studied the direct effect of GH and IGF-I and serum from GH-treated subjects on basal and TNF alpha-stimulated expression of VCAM-1 and E-selectin on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Baseline...... levels of VCAM-1, but not E-selectin, were significantly lower in GHD patients than in healthy subjects (362 +/- 15 microg/liter vs. 516 +/- 21 microg/liter, P < 0.001) and increased in GHD patients during GH treatment, compared with placebo [net difference between groups 151.8 microg/liter (95...

  8. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1), a serine protease associated with humoral pattern-recognition molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, S; Jensen, L; Degn, Søren Egedal; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Gál, Peter; Dobó, Joseph; Jensenius, J C

    2012-01-01

    The pattern-recognition molecules mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and the three ficolins circulate in blood in complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs). When MBL or ficolin recognizes a microorganism, activation of the MASPs occurs leading to activation of the complement system, an...

  9. Tracking single mRNA molecules in live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyungseok C.; Lee, Byung Hun; Lim, Kiseong; Son, Jae Seok; Song, Minho S.; Park, Hye Yoon

    2016-06-01

    mRNAs inside cells interact with numerous RNA-binding proteins, microRNAs, and ribosomes that together compose a highly heterogeneous population of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particles. Perhaps one of the best ways to investigate the complex regulation of mRNA is to observe individual molecules. Single molecule imaging allows the collection of quantitative and statistical data on subpopulations and transient states that are otherwise obscured by ensemble averaging. In addition, single particle tracking reveals the sequence of events that occur in the formation and remodeling of mRNPs in real time. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art techniques in tagging, delivery, and imaging to track single mRNAs in live cells. We also discuss how these techniques are applied to extract dynamic information on the transcription, transport, localization, and translation of mRNAs. These studies demonstrate how single molecule tracking is transforming the understanding of mRNA regulation in live cells.

  10. MHC class I-related molecule, MR1, and mucosal-associated invariant T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Salou, Marion; Legoux, Francois; Zhou, Qian; Cui, Yue; Bessoles, Stéphanie; Lantz, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    The MHC-related 1, MR1, molecule presents a new class of microbial antigens (derivatives of the riboflavin [Vitamin B2] biosynthesis pathway) to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. This raises many questions regarding antigens loading and intracellular trafficking of the MR1/ligand complexes. The MR1/MAIT field is also important because MAIT cells are very abundant in humans and their frequency is modified in many infectious and non-infectious diseases. Both MR1 and the invariant TCRα chain expressed by MAIT cells are strikingly conserved among species, indicating important functions. Riboflavin is synthesized by plants and most bacteria and yeasts but not animals, and its precursor derivatives activating MAIT cells are short-lived unless bound to MR1. The recognition of MR1 loaded with these compounds is therefore an exquisite manner to detect invasive bacteria. Herein, we provide an historical perspective of the field before describing the main characteristics of MR1, its ligands, and the few available data regarding its cellular biology. We then summarize the current knowledge of MAIT cell differentiation and discuss the definition of MAIT cells in comparison to related subsets. Finally, we describe the phenotype and effector activities of MAIT cells. PMID:27319347

  11. Differential expression of neural cell adhesion molecule and cadherins in pancreatic islets, glucagonomas, and insulinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, C J; Christgau, S; Williamson, M R; Madsen, O D; Niu, Z P; Bock, E; Baekkeskov, S

    1992-01-01

    a process where cell adhesion molecules are involved. In this study we have analyzed the expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and cadherin molecules in neonatal, young, and adult rat islet cells as well as in glucagonomas and insulinomas derived from a pluripotent rat islet cell tumor...

  12. Cell adhesion molecule control of planar spindle orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncay, Hüseyin; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Polarized epithelial cells align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet to maintain tissue integrity and to prevent malignant transformation. The orientation of the spindle apparatus is regulated by the immobilization of the astral microtubules at the lateral cortex and depends on the precise localization of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex which captures microtubule plus ends and generates pulling forces towards the centrosomes. Recent developments indicate that signals derived from intercellular junctions are required for the stable interaction of the dynein-dynactin complex with the cortex. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that regulate planar spindle orientation in polarized epithelial cells and we illustrate how different cell adhesion molecules through distinct and non-overlapping mechanisms instruct the cells to align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet. PMID:26698907

  13. Cell cycle control of DNA joint molecule resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Philipp; Matos, Joao

    2016-06-01

    The establishment of stable interactions between chromosomes underpins vital cellular processes such as recombinational DNA repair and bipolar chromosome segregation. On the other hand, timely disengagement of persistent connections is necessary to assure efficient partitioning of the replicated genome prior to cell division. Whereas great progress has been made in defining how cohesin-mediated chromosomal interactions are disengaged as cells prepare to undergo chromosome segregation, little is known about the metabolism of DNA joint molecules (JMs), generated during the repair of chromosomal lesions. Recent work on Mus81 and Yen1/GEN1, two conserved structure-selective endonucleases, revealed unforeseen links between JM-processing and cell cycle progression. Cell cycle kinases and phosphatases control Mus81 and Yen1/GEN1 to restrain deleterious JM-processing during S-phase, while safeguarding chromosome segregation during mitosis. PMID:26970388

  14. Regulation of CD1d expression by murine tumor cells: escape from immunosurveillance or alternate target molecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Tim; Walter, Wolfgang; Reichert, Torsten E; Maeurer, Markus J

    2002-03-20

    alpha beta+ TCR T cells recognize peptide fragments displayed by MHC-class I or -class II molecules. Recently, additional mechanisms of antigen recognition by T cells have been identified, including CD1-mediated presentation of nonpeptide antigens. Only a limited number of CD1 antigens is retained in the mouse, i.e., the group II CD1 antigens, which are split into CD1D1 and CD1d2. Several T cell subsets have been shown to interact with murine CD1 antigens, including NK cells or "natural T cells" with the invariant V alpha 14 J alpha 281 TCR chain. Even if TAP defects may prevent classical endogenous antigen presentation in tumor cell lines, antigen presentation via CD1 is still functional. Therefore, CD1-mediated recognition of transformed cells by NK cells or "natural T cells" may represent an alternative way for immune surveillance. CD1 cell surface expression in murine tumor cell lines of different histology, including the B cell lymphoma A20, macrophage cell lines J774 and P388D1, mastocytoma P815, thymoma EL-4, melanoma B16, colon adenocarcinoma MC-38 and renal carcinoma Renca is regulated by Th1- (IFN-gamma), Th2- (IL-4, IL-10 and vIL-10) or GM-CSF (Th1/Th2) cytokines, depending on the tumor histology. In order to distinguish between CD1D1 and CD1d2 molecules, we examined differential expression of these CD1 isoforms by ratio RT-PCR: A20, EL-4, P815 and MC-38 cells exclusively express CD1D1 transcripts but not CD1D2 mRNA independent of cytokine treatment. Decreased CD1d expression leads to reduced immune recognition of CD1d+ tumor cells by freshly isolated NK1.1(+) effector cells as defined by cytolysis and IFN-gamma release. Thus, modulation of CD1 expression on tumor cells by cytokines may be advantageous to drive cellular anti-tumor antigen directed immune responses directed against TAP-independent, non-classical MHC restricting molecules. PMID:11920590

  15. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie Lopez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV, resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effectors GRA2 and GRA6. We show that membrane association regulates access of the GRA6 protective antigen to the MHC I pathway in infected cells. Although insertion of GRA6 in the PV membrane is key for immunogenicity, association of GRA6 with the IVN limits presentation and curtails GRA6-specific CD8 responses in mice. Thus, membrane deformations of the PV regulate access of antigens to the MHC class I pathway, and the IVN may play a role in immune modulation.

  16. Self-recognition and Ca2+-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate cell adhesion provide clues to the cambrian explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier; Körnig, André; Bucior, Iwona; Burger, Max M; Anselmetti, Dario

    2009-11-01

    The Cambrian explosion of life was a relatively short period approximately 540 Ma that marked a generalized acceleration in the evolution of most animal phyla, but the trigger of this key biological event remains elusive. Sponges are the oldest extant Precambrian metazoan phylum and thus a valid model to study factors that could have unleashed the rise of multicellular animals. One such factor is the advent of self-/non-self-recognition systems, which would be evolutionarily beneficial to organisms to prevent germ-cell parasitism or the introduction of deleterious mutations resulting from fusion with genetically different individuals. However, the molecules responsible for allorecognition probably evolved gradually before the Cambrian period, and some other (external) factor remains to be identified as the missing triggering event. Sponge cells associate through calcium-dependent, multivalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions of the g200 glycan found on extracellular proteoglycans. Single molecule force spectroscopy analysis of g200-g200 binding indicates that calcium affects the lifetime (+Ca/-Ca: 680 s/3 s) and bond reaction length (+Ca/-Ca: 3.47 A/2.27 A). Calculation of mean g200 dissociation times in low and high calcium within the theoretical framework of a cooperative binding model indicates the nonlinear and divergent characteristics leading to either disaggregated cells or stable multicellular assemblies, respectively. This fundamental phenomenon can explain a switch from weak to strong adhesion between primitive metazoan cells caused by the well-documented rise in ocean calcium levels at the end of Precambrian time. We propose that stronger cell adhesion allowed the integrity of genetically uniform animals composed only of "self" cells, facilitating genetic constitutions to remain within the metazoan individual and be passed down inheritance lines. The Cambrian explosion might have been triggered by the coincidence in time of primitive animals

  17. Recognition of a subregion of human proinsulin by class I-restricted T cells in type 1 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Andréa; Haddouk, Samy; Briand, Jean-Paul; Camoin, Luc; Gahery, Hanne; Connan, Francine; Dubois-Laforgue, Danielle; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Carel, Jean-Claude; Muller, Sylviane; Choppin, Jeannine; Boitard, Christian

    2005-07-26

    Proinsulin is a key autoantigen in type 1 diabetes. Evidence in the mouse has underscored the importance of the insulin B chain region in autoimmunity to pancreatic beta cells. In man, a majority of proteasome cleavage sites are predicted by proteasome cleavage algorithms within this region. To study CD8+ T cell responses to the insulin B chain and adjacent C peptide, we selected 8- to 11-mer peptides according to proteasome cleavage patterns obtained by digestion of two peptides covering proinsulin residues 28 to 64. We studied their binding to purified HLA class I molecules and their recognition by T cells from diabetic patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 17 of 19 recent-onset and 12 of 13 long-standing type 1 diabetic patients produced IFN-gamma in response to proinsulin peptides as shown by using an ELISPOT assay. In most patients, the response was against several class I-restricted peptides. Nine peptides were recognized within the proinsulin region covering residues 34 to 61. Four yielded a high frequency of recognition in HLA-A1 and -B8 patients. Three peptides located in the proinsulin region 41-51 were shown to bind several HLA molecules and to be recognized in a high percentage of diabetic patients. PMID:16030147

  18. Human CD1-restricted T cell recognition of lipids from pollens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agea, Elisabetta; Russano, Anna; Bistoni, Onelia; Mannucci, Roberta; Nicoletti, Ildo; Corazzi, Lanfranco; Postle, Anthony D; De Libero, Gennaro; Porcelli, Steven A; Spinozzi, Fabrizio

    2005-07-18

    Plant pollens are an important source of environmental antigens that stimulate allergic responses. In addition to acting as vehicles for foreign protein antigens, they contain lipids that incorporate saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, which are necessary in the reproduction of higher plants. The CD1 family of nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex-related molecules is highly conserved in mammals, and has been shown to present microbial and self lipids to T cells. Here, we provide evidence that pollen lipids may be recognized as antigens by human T cells through a CD1-dependent pathway. Among phospholipids extracted from cypress grains, phosphatidyl-choline and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine were able to stimulate the proliferation of T cells from cypress-sensitive subjects. Recognition of phospholipids involved multiple cell types, mostly CD4(+) T cell receptor for antigen (TCR)alphabeta(+), some CD4(-)CD8(-) TCRgammadelta(+), but rarely Valpha24i(+) natural killer-T cells, and required CD1a(+) and CD1d(+) antigen presenting cell. The responding T cells secreted both interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon-gamma, in some cases IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta, and could provide help for immunoglobulin E (IgE) production. Responses to pollen phospholipids were maximally evident in blood samples obtained from allergic subjects during pollinating season, uniformly absent in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-exposed health care workers, but occasionally seen in nonallergic subjects. Finally, allergic, but not normal subjects, displayed circulating specific IgE and cutaneous weal and flare reactions to phospholipids. PMID:16009719

  19. Human NK cells selective targeting of colon cancer-initiating cells: A role for natural cytotoxicity receptors and MHC class i molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Tallerico, Rossana

    2013-01-23

    Tumor cell populations have been recently proposed to be composed of two compartments: tumor-initiating cells characterized by a slow and asymmetrical growth, and the "differentiated" cancer cells with a fast and symmetrical growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells (CICs) play a crucial role in tumor recurrence. The resistance of CICs to drugs and irradiation often allows them to survive traditional therapy. NK cells are potent cytotoxic lymphocytes that can recognize tumor cells. In this study, we have analyzed the NK cell recognition of tumor target cells derived from the two cancer cell compartments of colon adenocarcinoma lesions. Our data demonstrate that freshly purified allogeneic NK cells can recognize and kill colorectal carcinoma- derived CICs whereas the non-CIC counterpart of the tumors (differentiated tumor cells), either autologous or allogeneic, is less susceptible to NK cells. This difference in the NK cell susceptibility correlates with higher expression on CICs of ligands for NKp30 and NKp44 in the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) group of activating NK receptors. In contrast, CICs express lower levels of MHC class I, known to inhibit NK recognition, on their surface than do the "differentiated" tumor cells. These data have been validated by confocal microscopy where NCR ligands and MHC class I molecule membrane distribution have been analyzed. Moreover, NK cell receptor blockade in cytotoxicity assays demonstrates that NCRs play a major role in the recognition of CIC targets. This study strengthens the idea that biology-based therapy harnessing NK cells could be an attractive opportunity in solid tumors. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Modulation of lens cell adhesion molecules by particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, M. P.; Bjornstad, K. A.; Chang, P. Y.; Chou, W.; Lockett, S. J.; Blakely, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are proteins which anchor cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix (ECM), but whose functions also include signal transduction, differentiation, and apoptosis. We are testing a hypothesis that particle radiations modulate CAM expression and this contributes to radiation-induced lens opacification. We observed dose-dependent changes in the expression of beta 1-integrin and ICAM-1 in exponentially-growing and confluent cells of a differentiating human lens epithelial cell model after exposure to particle beams. Human lens epithelial (HLE) cells, less than 10 passages after their initial culture from fetal tissue, were grown on bovine corneal endothelial cell-derived ECM in medium containing 15% fetal bovine serum and supplemented with 5 ng/ml basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). Multiple cell populations at three different stages of differentiation were prepared for experiment: cells in exponential growth, and cells at 5 and 10 days post-confluence. The differentiation status of cells was characterized morphologically by digital image analysis, and biochemically by Western blotting using lens epithelial and fiber cell-specific markers. Cultures were irradiated with single doses (4, 8 or 12 Gy) of 55 MeV protons and, along with unirradiated control samples, were fixed using -20 degrees C methanol at 6 hours after exposure. Replicate experiments and similar experiments with helium ions are in progress. The intracellular localization of beta 1-integrin and ICAM-1 was detected by immunofluorescence using monoclonal antibodies specific for each CAM. Cells known to express each CAM were also processed as positive controls. Both exponentially-growing and confluent, differentiating cells demonstrated a dramatic proton-dose-dependent modulation (upregulation for exponential cells, downregulation for confluent cells) and a change in the intracellular distribution of the beta 1-integrin, compared to unirradiated controls. In contrast

  1. Development of small molecule non-peptide formyl peptide receptor (FPR) ligands and molecular modeling of their recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepetkin, I A; Khlebnikov, A I; Giovannoni, M P; Kirpotina, L N; Cilibrizzi, A; Quinn, M T

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on a variety of cell types. These receptors play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions and sensing cellular damage. They have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, cataract formation, and atherogenesis. Thus, FPR ligands, both agonists and antagonists, may represent novel therapeutics for modulating host defense and innate immunity. A variety of molecules have been identified as receptor subtype-selective and mixed FPR agonists with potential therapeutic value during last decade. This review describes our efforts along with recent advances in the identification, optimization, biological evaluation, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of small molecule non-peptide FPR agonists and antagonists, including chiral molecules. Questions regarding the interaction at the molecular level of benzimidazoles, pyrazolones, pyridazin-3(2H)-ones, N-phenylureas and other derivatives with FPR1 and FPR2 are discussed. Application of computational models for virtual screening and design of FPR ligands is also considered. PMID:24350845

  2. Assessing the role of cell-surface molecules in central synaptogenesis in the Drosophila visual system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Berger-Müller

    Full Text Available A hallmark of the central nervous system is its spatial and functional organization in synaptic layers. During neuronal development, axons form transient contacts with potential post-synaptic elements and establish synapses with appropriate partners at specific layers. These processes are regulated by synaptic cell-adhesion molecules. In the Drosophila visual system, R7 and R8 photoreceptor subtypes target distinct layers and form en passant pre-synaptic terminals at stereotypic loci of the axonal shaft. A leucine-rich repeat transmembrane protein, Capricious (Caps, is known to be selectively expressed in R8 axons and their recipient layer, which led to the attractive hypothesis that Caps mediates R8 synaptic specificity by homophilic adhesion. Contradicting this assumption, our results indicate that Caps does not have a prominent role in synaptic-layer targeting and synapse formation in Drosophila photoreceptors, and that the specific recognition of the R8 target layer does not involve Caps homophilic axon-target interactions. We generated flies that express a tagged synaptic marker to evaluate the presence and localization of synapses in R7 and R8 photoreceptors. These genetic tools were used to assess how the synaptic profile is affected when axons are forced to target abnormal layers by expressing axon guidance molecules. When R7 axons were mistargeted to the R8-recipient layer, R7s either maintained an R7-like synaptic profile or acquired a similar profile to r8s depending on the overexpressed protein. When R7 axons were redirected to a more superficial medulla layer, the number of presynaptic terminals was reduced. These results indicate that cell-surface molecules are able to dictate synapse loci by changing the axon terminal identity in a partially cell-autonomous manner, but that presynapse formation at specific sites also requires complex interactions between pre- and post-synaptic elements.

  3. Allergen recognition by innate immune cells: critical role of dendritic and epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Fabián; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2013-01-01

    Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells (DCs), leading to Th2 polarization, switching to IgE production by B cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. DCs have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in orchestrating allergic diseases. Using different C-type lectin receptors DCs are able to recognize and internalize a number of allergens from diverse sources leading to sensitization. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence highlighting the role of epithelial cells in triggering and modulating immune responses to allergens. As well as providing a physical barrier, epithelial cells can interact with allergens and influence DCs behavior through the release of a number of Th2 promoting cytokines. In this review we will summarize current understanding of how allergens are recognized by DCs and epithelial cells and what are the consequences of such interaction in the context of allergic sensitization and downstream events leading to allergic inflammation. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of allergen recognition and associated signaling pathways could enable developing more effective therapeutic strategies that target the initial steps of allergic sensitization hence hindering development or progression of allergic diseases. PMID:24204367

  4. The Granulocyte Receptor Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cell Adhesion Molecule 3 (CEACAM3) Directly Associates with Vav to Promote Phagocytosis of Human Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitter, Tim; Pils, Stefan; Sakk, Vadim; Frank, Ronald; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Hauck, Christof R.

    2007-01-01

    The human granulocyte-specific receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)3 is critically involved in the opsonin-independent recognition of several bacterial pathogens. CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis depends on the integrity of an ITAM-like sequence within the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM3 and is characterized by rapid stimulation of the GTPase Rac. By performing a functional screen with CEACAM3-expressing cells, we found that overexpression of a dominant-negativ...

  5. Graphene and Graphene-like Molecules: Prospects in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Kian Ping; Tong, Shi Wun; Wu, Jishan

    2016-02-01

    Graphene is constantly hyped as a game-changer for flexible transparent displays. However, to date, no solar cell fabricated on graphene electrodes has out-performed indium tin oxide in power conversion efficiency (PCE). This Perspective covers the enabling roles that graphene can play in solar cells because of its unique properties. Compared to transparent and conducting metal oxides, graphene may not have competitive advantages in terms of its electrical conductivity. The unique strength of graphene lies in its ability to perform various enabling roles in solar cell architectures, leading to overall improvement in PCE. Graphene can serve as an ultrathin and transparent diffusion barrier in solar cell contacts, as an intermediate layer in tandem solar cells, as an electron acceptor, etc. Inspired by the properties of graphene, chemists are also designing graphene-like molecules in which the topology of π-electron array, donor-acceptor structures, and conformation can be tuned to offer a new class of light-harvesting materials. PMID:26741946

  6. Pathogenic Actions of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 in Pulmonary Emphysema and Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoneshige, Azusa; Hagiyama, Man; Fujita, Mitsugu; Ito, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion mediated by adhesion molecules is of central importance in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Therefore, altered expression of adhesion molecules leads to the development of various tissue disorders involving cell activation, degeneration, and apoptosis. Nevertheless, it still remains unclear what initiates the altered expression of adhesion molecules and how the subsequent pathological cascades proceed. In this regard, cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) is one of the candidat...

  7. Transfection of glioma cells with the neural-cell adhesion molecule NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvardsen, K; Pedersen, P H; Bjerkvig, R; Hermann, G G; Zeuthen, J; Laerum, O D; Walsh, F S; Bock, E

    1994-01-01

    The tumor growth and the invasive capacity of a rat glioma cell line (BT4Cn) were studied after transfection with the human transmembrane 140-kDa isoform of the neural-cell adhesion molecule, NCAM. After s.c. injection, the NCAM-transfected cells showed a slower growth rate than the parent cell...... line (BT4Cn). Upon intracerebral implantation with BT4Cn cells and different clones of NCAM-transfected cells, all animals developed neurological symptoms within 13-16 days. However, the tumors showed different growth characteristics. The NCAM-transfected BT4Cn cells were localized in the region of the...

  8. Molecular mapping of interactions between a Mycobacterium leprae-specific T cell epitope, the restricting HLA-DR2 molecule, and two specific T cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D C; van Schooten, W C; Janson, A; Barry, M E; de Vries, R R

    1990-04-01

    A systematic series of 89 single residue substitution analogs of the Mycobacterium leprae 65-kDa protein-derived peptide LQAAPALDKL were tested for stimulation of two HLA-DR2 restricted 65 kDa-reactive T cell clones from a tuberculoid leprosy patient. Some analogs with substitutions outside a "core" region showed enhanced stimulation of the T cell clones. This core region of seven or eight residues was essential for recognition, whereas substitution of amino acids outside this region did not affect T cell recognition although these residues could not be omitted. Thus these core residues interact directly with the presenting HLA-DR2 molecule and/or the TCR. Except for analogs of position 419 for clone 2B6, the majority of the nonstimulatory substitution analogs did not inhibit the presentation of LQAAPALDKL and thus probably failed to bind to the HLA-DR2 molecule. Unless all of the core residues are physically involved in binding to DR2, substitution at a position not directly involved in binding appears to have an influence on other residues that do bind to the DR2 molecule. Active peptide analogs with two or more internal prolines suggest that not all analogs need be helical for activity with clone 2F10. PMID:1690768

  9. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule expression predicts lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, M. van den; Takes, R.P.; Blokpoel-deRuyter, M.; Slootweg, P.J.; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van

    2010-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is important for prognosis and clinical decision making concerning the treatment of the neck but may be difficult to detect. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM), has been shown to correlate with prognosis or tumor grade in dif

  10. Direct observation of catch bonds involving cell-adhesion molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Bryan T.; Long, Mian; Piper, James W.; Yago, Tadayuki; McEver, Rodger P.; Zhu, Cheng

    2003-05-01

    Bonds between adhesion molecules are often mechanically stressed. A striking example is the tensile force applied to selectin-ligand bonds, which mediate the tethering and rolling of flowing leukocytes on vascular surfaces. It has been suggested that force could either shorten bond lifetimes, because work done by the force could lower the energy barrier between the bound and free states (`slip'), or prolong bond lifetimes by deforming the molecules such that they lock more tightly (`catch'). Whereas slip bonds have been widely observed, catch bonds have not been demonstrated experimentally. Here, using atomic force microscopy and flow-chamber experiments, we show that increasing force first prolonged and then shortened the lifetimes of P-selectin complexes with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, revealing both catch and slip bond behaviour. Transitions between catch and slip bonds might explain why leukocyte rolling on selectins first increases and then decreases as wall shear stress increases. This dual response to force provides a mechanism for regulating cell adhesion under conditions of variable mechanical stress.

  11. Hypertonic saline impedes tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction by reducing adhesion molecule and laminin expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypertonic saline infusion dampens inflammatory responses and suppresses neutrophil-endothelial interaction by reducing adhesion molecule expression. This study tested the hypothesis that hypertonic saline attenuates tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium through a similar mechanism. METHODS: Human colon cancer cells (LS174T) were transfected with green fluorescent protein and exposed to lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6 under hypertonic and isotonic conditions for 1 and 4 hours. Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells were similarly exposed. Cellular apoptosis and expression of adhesion molecules and laminin were measured by flow cytometry. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelium and laminin was assessed with fluorescence microscopy. Data are represented as mean +\\/- standard error of mean, and an ANOVA test was performed to gauge statistical significance, with P <.05 considered significant. RESULTS: Hypertonic exposure significantly reduced tumor cell adhesion despite the presence of the perioperative cell stressors (42 +\\/- 2.9 vs 172.5 +\\/- 12.4, P <.05), attenuated tumor cell beta-1 integrin (14.43 vs 23.84, P <.05), and endothelial cell laminin expression (22.78 +\\/- 2.2 vs 33.74 +\\/- 2.4, P <.05), but did not significantly alter cell viability. CONCLUSION: Hypertonic saline significantly attenuates tumor cell adhesion to endothelium by inhibiting adhesion molecule and laminin expression. This may halt the metastatic behavior of tumor cells shed at surgery.

  12. Carrier injection dynamics in heterojunction solar cells with bipolar molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yosuke; Yonezawa, Kouhei [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi, E-mail: YASUDA.Takeshi@nims.go.jp, E-mail: moritomo.yutaka.gf@u.tsukuba.ac.jp [Photovoltaic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Moritomo, Yutaka, E-mail: YASUDA.Takeshi@nims.go.jp, E-mail: moritomo.yutaka.gf@u.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Center for Integrated Research in Fundamental Science and Engineering (CiRfSE), University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)

    2015-03-23

    A boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) is a bipolar molecule and is used in hetero-junction organic solar cells. Here, we investigated the carrier injection dynamics from the donor α-sexithiophene (6T) or acceptor C{sub 60} layers to the bipolar SubPc layer by means of the femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy. We observed gradual increase of the SubPc{sup –} (SubPc{sup +}) species within ≈300 ps. The increases are interpreted in terms of the exciton diffusion within the 6T (C{sub 60}) layer and subsequent electron (hole) injection at the interface. In 6T/SubPc heterojunction, the electron injection is observed even at 80 K. The robust electron injection is ascribed to the efficient charge separation within the 6T layer under photo exciation at 400 nm.

  13. Carrier injection dynamics in heterojunction solar cells with bipolar molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) is a bipolar molecule and is used in hetero-junction organic solar cells. Here, we investigated the carrier injection dynamics from the donor α-sexithiophene (6T) or acceptor C60 layers to the bipolar SubPc layer by means of the femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy. We observed gradual increase of the SubPc– (SubPc+) species within ≈300 ps. The increases are interpreted in terms of the exciton diffusion within the 6T (C60) layer and subsequent electron (hole) injection at the interface. In 6T/SubPc heterojunction, the electron injection is observed even at 80 K. The robust electron injection is ascribed to the efficient charge separation within the 6T layer under photo exciation at 400 nm

  14. Experimental techniques for single cell and single molecule biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, C.T. [Nano Biomechanics Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering and Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)]. E-mail: ctlim@nus.edu.sg; Zhou, E.H. [Nano Biomechanics Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering and Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Li, A. [Nano Biomechanics Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering and Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Vedula, S.R.K. [Nano Biomechanics Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering and Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Fu, H.X. [Nano Biomechanics Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering and Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2006-09-15

    Stresses and strains that act on the human body can arise either from external physical forces or internal physiological environmental conditions. These biophysical interactions can occur not only at the musculoskeletal but also cellular and molecular levels and can determine the health and function of the human body. Here, we seek to investigate the structure-property-function relationship of cells and biomolecules so as to understand their important physiological functions as well as establish possible connections to human diseases. With the recent advancements in cell and molecular biology, biophysics and nanotechnology, several innovative and state-of-the-art experimental techniques and equipment have been developed to probe the structural and mechanical properties of biostructures from the micro- down to picoscale. Some of these experimental techniques include the optical or laser trap method, micropipette aspiration, step-pressure technique, atomic force microscopy and molecular force spectroscopy. In this article, we will review the basic principles and usage of these techniques to conduct single cell and single molecule biomechanics research.

  15. Experimental techniques for single cell and single molecule biomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stresses and strains that act on the human body can arise either from external physical forces or internal physiological environmental conditions. These biophysical interactions can occur not only at the musculoskeletal but also cellular and molecular levels and can determine the health and function of the human body. Here, we seek to investigate the structure-property-function relationship of cells and biomolecules so as to understand their important physiological functions as well as establish possible connections to human diseases. With the recent advancements in cell and molecular biology, biophysics and nanotechnology, several innovative and state-of-the-art experimental techniques and equipment have been developed to probe the structural and mechanical properties of biostructures from the micro- down to picoscale. Some of these experimental techniques include the optical or laser trap method, micropipette aspiration, step-pressure technique, atomic force microscopy and molecular force spectroscopy. In this article, we will review the basic principles and usage of these techniques to conduct single cell and single molecule biomechanics research

  16. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM, a Close Relative to NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    molecule (NCAM) is a well characterized, ubiquitously expressed CAM that is highly expressed in the nervous system. In addition to mediating cell adhesion, NCAM participates in a multitude of cellular events, including survival, migration, and differentiation of cells, outgrowth of neurites, and formation......Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) constitute a large class of plasma membrane-anchored proteins that mediate attachment between neighboring cells and between cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). However, CAMs are more than simple mediators of cell adhesion. The neural cell adhesion...... and plasticity of synapses. NCAM shares an overall sequence identity of approximately 44% with the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2), a protein also known as olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) and Rb-8 neural cell adhesion molecule (RNCAM), and the region-for-region sequence homology...

  17. Gene delivery of the elastase inhibitor elafin protects macrophages from neutrophil elastase-mediated impairment of apoptotic cell recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Peter A; Devitt, Andrew; Kotelevtsev, Yuri; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2004-09-10

    The resolution of inflammation is dependent on recognition and phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells by macrophages. Receptors for apoptotic cells are sensitive to degradation by human neutrophil elastase (HNE). We show in the present study that HNE cleaves macrophage cell surface CD14 and in so doing, reduces phagocytic recognition of apoptotic lymphocytic cells (Mutu 1). Using an improved method of adenovirus-mediated transfection of macrophages with the HNE inhibitor elafin, we demonstrate that elafin overexpression prevents CD14 cleavage and restores apoptotic cell recognition by macrophages. This approach of genetic modification of macrophages could be used to restore apoptotic cell recognition in inflammatory conditions. PMID:15358543

  18. Paracrine Molecules of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche

    OpenAIRE

    Tian Li; Yaojiong Wu

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are both adult stem cells residing in the bone marrow. MSCs interact with HSCs, they stimulate and enhance the proliferation of HSCs by secreting regulatory molecules and cytokines, providing a specialized microenvironment for controlling the process of hematopoiesis. In this paper we discuss how MSCs contribute to HSC niche, maintain the stemness and proliferation of HSCs, and support HSC transplantation.

  19. Red cell adhesion molecules, foetal haemoglobin and endothelial factors in sickle cell disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Mundee, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SS) is a haemoglobinopathy involving production of sickle haemoglobin (HbS, β⁶Glu-->Val), which is able to polymerise leading to vaso-occlusion. Hydroxyurea (HU) treatment increases foetal haemoglobin (HbF) levels but decreases vaso-occlusion and red cell adhesion molecule (AM) expression, and therefore improves clinical symptoms. In this thesis, the contribution of AMs, HbF and endothelial factors to the severity of sickle cell disease has been studied....

  20. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Expression on Intracellular Granule Movement in Pancreatic α Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokawa, Satoru; Furuno, Tadahide; Suzuki, Takahiro; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Hirashima, Naohide

    2016-09-01

    Although glucagon secreted from pancreatic α cells plays a role in increasing glucose concentrations in serum, the mechanism regulating glucagon secretion from α cells remains unclear. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), identified as an adhesion molecule in α cells, has been reported not only to communicate among α cells and between nerve fibers, but also to prevent excessive glucagon secretion from α cells. Here, we investigated the effect of CADM1 expression on the movement of intracellular secretory granules in α cells because the granule transport is an important step in secretion. Spinning disk microscopic analysis showed that granules moved at a mean velocity of 0.236 ± 0.010 μm/s in the mouse α cell line αTC6 that expressed CADM1 endogenously. The mean velocity was significantly decreased in CADM1-knockdown (KD) cells (mean velocity: 0.190 ± 0.016 μm/s). The velocity of granule movement decreased greatly in αTC6 cells treated with the microtubule-depolymerizing reagent nocodazole, but not in αTC6 cells treated with the actin-depolymerizing reagent cytochalasin D. No difference in the mean velocity was observed between αTC6 and CADM1-KD cells treated with nocodazole. These results suggest that intracellular granules in pancreatic α cells move along the microtubule network, and that CADM1 influences their velocity. PMID:27262873

  1. Advanced Materials for the Recognition and Capture of Whole Cells and Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, Amanda L; Manesiotis, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    Selective cell recognition and capture has recently attracted significant interest due to its potential importance for clinical, diagnostic, environmental, and security applications. Current methods for cell isolation from complex samples are largely dependent on cell size and density, with limited application scope as many of the target cells do not exhibit appreciable differences in this respect. The most recent and forthcoming developments in the area of selective recognition and capture of whole cells, based on natural receptors, as well as synthetic materials utilising physical and chemical properties of the target cell or microorganism, are highlighted. Particular focus is given to the development of cell complementary surfaces using the cells themselves as templating agents, by means of molecular imprinting, and their combination with sensing platforms for rapid cell detection in complex media. The benefits and challenges of each approach are discussed and a perspective of the future of this research area is given. PMID:26662854

  2. Neural cell adhesion molecule differentially interacts with isoforms of the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) can be activated through direct interactions with various fibroblast growth factors or through a number of cell adhesion molecules, including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). We produced recombinant proteins comprising the ligand...... the expression pattern of various FGFR isoforms determines the cell context-specific effects of NCAM signaling through FGFR....

  3. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule in breast cancer: prognostic indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) (CD166) is an immunoglobulin molecule that has been implicated in cell migration. The present study examined the expression of ALCAM in human breast cancer and assessed its prognostic value. The immunohistochemical distribution and location of ALCAM was assessed in normal breast tissue and carcinoma. The levels of ALCAM transcripts in frozen tissue (normal breast, n = 32; breast cancer, n = 120) were determined using real-time quantitative PCR. The results were then analyzed in relation to clinical data including the tumor type, the grade, the nodal involvement, distant metastases, the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage, the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI), and survival over a 6-year follow-up period. Immunohistochemical staining on tissue sections in ducts/acini in normal breast and in breast carcinoma was ALCAM-positive. Differences in the number of ALCAM transcripts were found in different types of breast cancer. The level of ALCAM transcripts was lower (P = 0.05) in tumors from patients who had metastases to regional lymph nodes compared with those patients without, in higher grade tumors compared with Grade 1 tumors (P < 0.01), and in TNM Stage 3 tumors compared with TNM Stage 1 tumors (P < 0.01). Tumors from patients with poor prognosis (with NPI > 5.4) had significantly lower levels (P = 0.014) of ALCAM transcripts compared with patients with good prognosis (with NPI < 3.4), and tumors from patients with local recurrence had significantly lower levels than those patients without local recurrence or metastases (P = 0.04). Notably, tumors from patients who died of breast cancer had significantly lower levels of ALCAM transcripts (P = 0.0041) than those with primary tumors but no metastatic disease or local recurrence. Patients with low levels of ALCAM transcripts had significantly (P = 0.009) more incidents (metastasis, recurrence, death) compared with patients with primary breast tumors with high levels of

  4. Bioorganic chemistry à la baguette: studies on molecular recognition in biological systems using rigid-rod molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matile, S

    2001-01-01

    Initial studies using rigid-rod molecules or "baguettes" to address bioorganic topics of current scientific concern are reported. It is illustrated how transmembrane oligo(p-phenylene)s as representative model rods can be tuned to recognize lipid bilayer membranes either by their thickness or polarization. The construction of otherwise problematic hydrogen-bonded chains along transmembrane rods yields "proton wires," which act by a mechanism that is central in bioenergetics but poorly explored by means of synthetic models. Another example focuses on multivalent ligands assembling rigid-rod cell-surface receptors into transmembrane dynamic arene arrays. The potassium transport mediated by these ligand-receptor complexes provides experimental support for the potential biological importances of the controversial cation-pi mechanism. More complex supramolecular architecture is portrayed in the first artificial beta-barrels. It is shown how programmed assembly of toroidal rigid-rod supramolecules in detergent-free water permits control of diameter of the chemical nature of their interior. Reversed rigid-rod beta-barrels are assembled to function as self-assembled ionophores, ion channel models, and transmembrane nanopores. The potential of future intratoroidal chemistry is exemplified by encapsulation and planarization of beta-carotene in water and the construction of transmembrane B-DNA at the center of a second-sphere host-guest complex à al baguette. PMID:11893065

  5. Can cells and biomaterials in therapeutic medicine be shielded off from innate immune recognition?

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Bo; Korsgren, Olle; Lambris, John D.; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials (e.g. polymers, metals, or ceramics), cell, and cell cluster (e.g. pancreatic islets) transplantation are beginning to offer novel treatment modalities for some otherwise intractable diseases. The innate immune system is involved in incompatibility reactions that occur when biomaterials or cells are introduced into the blood circulation. In particular the complement, coagulation, and contact systems are involved in the recognition of biomaterials and cells, eliciting activation o...

  6. Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, and Regulated on Activation Normal T Cell Expressed and Secreted Are Expressed by Human Breast Carcinoma Cells and Support Eosinophil Adhesion and Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Shahina; Kaur, Jaswinder; Patel, Kamala D.

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophils are usually associated with parasitic and allergic diseases; however, eosinophilia is also observed in several types of human tumors, including breast carcinomas. In this study we examined several human breast carcinoma cell lines for adhesion molecule expression and the ability to bind and activate eosinophils. MDA-MB-435S and MDA-MB-468 cells constitutively expressed both intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and this expressio...

  7. Small molecule screening with laser cytometry can be used to identify pro-survival molecules in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Sherman

    Full Text Available Differentiated cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs provide an unlimited source of cells for use in regenerative medicine. The recent derivation of human induced pluripotent cells (hiPSCs provides a potential supply of pluripotent cells that avoid immune rejection and could provide patient-tailored therapy. In addition, the use of pluripotent cells for drug screening could enable routine toxicity testing and evaluation of underlying disease mechanisms. However, prior to establishment of patient specific cells for cell therapy it is important to understand the basic regulation of cell fate decisions in hESCs. One critical issue that hinders the use of these cells is the fact that hESCs survive poorly upon dissociation, which limits genetic manipulation because of poor cloning efficiency of individual hESCs, and hampers production of large-scale culture of hESCs. To address the problems associated with poor growth in culture and our lack of understanding of what regulates hESC signaling, we successfully developed a screening platform that allows for large scale screening for small molecules that regulate survival. In this work we developed the first large scale platform for hESC screening using laser scanning cytometry and were able to validate this platform by identifying the pro-survival molecule HA-1077. These small molecules provide targets for both improving our basic understanding of hESC survival as well as a tool to improve our ability to expand and genetically manipulate hESCs for use in regenerative applications.

  8. High-resolution single-molecule recognition imaging of the molecular details of ricin-aptamer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    The molecular details of DNA aptamer-ricin interactions were investigated. The toxic protein ricin molecules were immobilized on Au(111) surface using N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester to specifically react with lysine residues located on the ricin B chains. A single ricin molecule was visualized in ...

  9. Wavelet-SVM classification and automatic recognition of unstained viable cells in phase-contrast microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of individual cultured mammalian cells with a pre-selected number of ions down to one ion per single cell is a useful experimental approach to investigating the low-dose ionising radiation exposure effects and thus contributing to a more realistic human cancer risk assessment. One of the crucial tasks of all the microbeam apparatuses is the visualisation, recognition and positioning of every individual cell of the cell culture to be irradiated. Before irradiations, mammalian cells (specifically, Chinese hamster V79 cells) are seeded and grown as a monolayer on a mylar surface used as the bottom of a specially designed holder. Manual recognition of unstained cells in a bright-field microscope is a time-consuming procedure; therefore, a parallel algorithm has been conceived and developed in order to speed up this irradiation protocol step. Many technical problems have been faced to overcome the complexity of the images to be analysed: cell discrimination in an inhomogeneous background, among many disturbing bodies mainly due to the mylar surface roughness and culture medium bodies; cell shapes, depending on how they attach to the surface, which phase of the cell cycle they are in and on cell density. Preliminary results of the recognition and classification based on a method of wavelet kernels for the support vector machine classifier will be presented. (authors)

  10. Xanthomonas campestris cell-cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-11-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell-cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell-cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery. PMID:26248667

  11. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles as versatile carrier for small and large molecules across cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful transport of molecules across the cell membrane is a key point in biology and medicine. In most cases, molecules alone cannot penetrate the cell membrane, therefore an efficient carrier is needed. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles (diameter: 100–250 nm, depending on the functionalization) were loaded with fluorescent oligonucleotides, peptide, proteins, antibodies, polymers or porphyrins and characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Any excess of molecules was removed by ultracentrifugation, and the dissolved molecules at the same concentration were used as control. The uptake of such fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles into HeLa cells was monitored by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles were able to transport all molecules across the cell membrane, whereas the dissolved molecules alone were taken up only to a very small extent or even not at all.

  12. 3D tracking of single nanoparticles and quantum dots in living cells by out-of-focus imaging with diffraction pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, Lucia; Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-11-01

    Live cells are three-dimensional environments where biological molecules move to find their targets and accomplish their functions. However, up to now, most single molecule investigations have been limited to bi-dimensional studies owing to the complexity of 3d-tracking techniques. Here, we present a novel method for three-dimensional localization of single nano-emitters based on automatic recognition of out-of-focus diffraction patterns. Our technique can be applied to track the movements of single molecules in living cells using a conventional epifluorescence microscope. We first demonstrate three-dimensional localization of fluorescent nanobeads over 4 microns depth with accuracy below 2 nm in vitro. Remarkably, we also establish three-dimensional tracking of Quantum Dots, overcoming their anisotropic emission, by adopting a ligation strategy that allows rotational freedom of the emitter combined with proper pattern recognition. We localize commercially available Quantum Dots in living cells with accuracy better than 7 nm over 2 microns depth. We validate our technique by tracking the three-dimensional movements of single protein-conjugated Quantum Dots in living cell. Moreover, we find that important localization errors can occur in off-focus imaging when improperly calibrated and we give indications to avoid them. Finally, we share a Matlab script that allows readily application of our technique by other laboratories.

  13. Lysophospholipid presentation by CD1d and recognition by a human Natural Killer T-cell receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Sibener, Leah V.; Kung, Jennifer E.; Gumperz, Jenny; Adams, Erin J. (UC); (UW-MED)

    2014-10-02

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells use highly restricted {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) to probe the repertoire of lipids presented by CD1d molecules. Here, we describe our studies of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) presentation by human CD1d and its recognition by a native, LPC-specific iNKT TCR. Human CD1d presenting LPC adopts an altered conformation from that of CD1d presenting glycolipid antigens, with a shifted {alpha}1 helix resulting in an open A pocket. Binding of the iNKT TCR requires a 7-{angstrom} displacement of the LPC headgroup but stabilizes the CD1d-LPC complex in a closed conformation. The iNKT TCR CDR loop footprint on CD1d-LPC is anchored by the conserved positioning of the CDR3{alpha} loop, whereas the remaining CDR loops are shifted, due in part to amino-acid differences in the CDR3{beta} and J{beta} segment used by this iNKT TCR. These findings provide insight into how lysophospholipids are presented by human CD1d molecules and how this complex is recognized by some, but not all, human iNKT cells.

  14. Inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules as indicators of severity of atherosclerosis: the Rotterdam Study

    OpenAIRE

    de Maat, Moniek; Bots, Michiel; Breteler, Monique; Meijer, John; Kiliaan, Amanda; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hofman, Albert

    2002-01-01

    textabstractInflammatory mediators and soluble cell adhesion molecules predict cardiovascular events. It is not clear whether they reflect the severity of underlying atherosclerotic disease. Within the Rotterdam Study, we investigated the associations of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 with noninvasive measures of atherosclerosis. Levels of CRP were assessed in a random sample of 1317 part...

  15. Variants of the cell recognition site of fibronectin that retain attachment-promoting activity

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    A tetrapeptide sequence, Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser, is the minimal structure recognized by cells in the large, adhesive glycoprotein fibronectin. We now have defined the structural requirements for this cell recognition site by testing several synthetic variants of the active tetrapeptide sequence. The conservative substitutions of lysine for arginine, alanine for glycine, or glutamic acid for aspartic acid each resulted in abrogation of the cell attachment-promoting activity characteristic of the natu...

  16. Ambient roll-to-roll fabrication of flexible solar cells based on small molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Yuze; Dam, Henrik Friis; Andersen, Thomas Rieks;

    2013-01-01

    All solution-processed roll-to-roll flexible solar cells based on a starshaped small molecule donor and PCBMacceptor were fabricated by slot-die coating, as the first successful example reported for small molecule roll-to-roll flexible solar cells....

  17. Biosynthesis of the neural cell adhesion molecule: characterization of polypeptide C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybroe, O; Albrechtsen, M; Dahlin, J; Linnemann, D; Lyles, J M; Møller, C J; Bock, E

    1985-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) was studied in primary cultures of rat cerebral glial cells, cerebellar granule neurons, and skeletal muscle cells. The three cell types produced different N-CAM polypeptide patterns. Glial cells synthesized a 135,000 Mr polypeptide B...

  18. The cell adhesion molecule Fasciclin2 regulates brush border length and organization in Drosophila renal tubules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halberg, Kenneth A; Rainey, Stephanie M; Veland, Iben R; Neuert, Helen; Dornan, Anthony J; Klämbt, Christian; Davies, Shireen-Anne; Dow, Julian A T

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms rely on cell adhesion molecules to coordinate cell-cell interactions, and to provide navigational cues during tissue formation. In Drosophila, Fasciclin 2 (Fas2) has been intensively studied due to its role in nervous system development and maintenance; yet, Fas2 is most...... role for this well-known cell adhesion molecule, and propose that Fas2-mediated intermicrovillar homophilic adhesion complexes help stabilize the brush border....

  19. Toxicities of chimeric antigen receptor T cells: recognition and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudno, Jennifer N; Kochenderfer, James N

    2016-06-30

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can produce durable remissions in hematologic malignancies that are not responsive to standard therapies. Yet the use of CAR T cells is limited by potentially severe toxicities. Early case reports of unexpected organ damage and deaths following CAR T-cell therapy first highlighted the possible dangers of this new treatment. CAR T cells can potentially damage normal tissues by specifically targeting a tumor-associated antigen that is also expressed on those tissues. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS), a systemic inflammatory response caused by cytokines released by infused CAR T cells can lead to widespread reversible organ dysfunction. CRS is the most common type of toxicity caused by CAR T cells. Neurologic toxicity due to CAR T cells might in some cases have a different pathophysiology than CRS and requires different management. Aggressive supportive care is necessary for all patients experiencing CAR T-cell toxicities, with early intervention for hypotension and treatment of concurrent infections being essential. Interleukin-6 receptor blockade with tocilizumab remains the mainstay pharmacologic therapy for CRS, though indications for administration vary among centers. Corticosteroids should be reserved for neurologic toxicities and CRS not responsive to tocilizumab. Pharmacologic management is complicated by the risk of immunosuppressive therapy abrogating the antimalignancy activity of the CAR T cells. This review describes the toxicities caused by CAR T cells and reviews the published approaches used to manage toxicities. We present guidelines for treating patients experiencing CRS and other adverse events following CAR T-cell therapy. PMID:27207799

  20. Small Molecule-Mediated Cleavage of RNA in Living Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Lirui; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) control gene expression by triggering the degradation of a mRNA via recruitment of RNase H or the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), respectively.[1] These approaches are hampered, however, by the poor cellular permeability of oligonucleotides. A small molecule approach to cleave RNA targets could obviate uptake issues. Several compounds can induce RNA cleavage in vitro,[2] however, to the best of our knowledge no small molecul...

  1. Shape features for recognition of Pap smear cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, Shelly D. D.; Janson, Scott D.

    1996-10-01

    Automated cytology relies on the use of features extracted form cell images to classify cells. This paper examines the classification capability of a number of shape features on a database of normal, abnormal and endocervical cell nuclei images. The features include the chain code, the directed Hausdorff distance, measured of the length of the radii of the cell and measures of ellipticity. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve is used as a figure of merit. For the calculation of the directed Hausdorff distance, the images are filtered using the Sorbel gradient and erosion. The feature in the image with the largest chain code is considered to be the nucleus. The other features use images threshold at a percentage of the maximum intensity in the image. The best feature for the discrimination between normal cells and either abnormal or endocervical cells was the directed Hausdorff distance, but this feature is computationally expensive. The minimum diameter as determined by the chain code was the second best feature for recognizing abnormal cells and is less computationally expensive. Ellipticity was the second best feature for recognizing endocervical cells, which is also less computationally expensive than the directed Hausdorff distance. An optical design for the calculation of directed Hausdorff distance feature is included, which could reduce the computational expense.

  2. Cell surface molecules and fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion: effect of proteolytic digestion of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Proteases have been used as a tool to investigate the role of surface molecules in fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Proteolytic digestion of membrane-proteins by pronase (1 mg/ml for 20 min at 37 degrees C) completely inhibited adhesion of baby hamster kidney (BHK) fibroblasts on fibronectin-coated plastic dishes. Various degrees of inhibition were also obtained after treatment with proteinase K, chymotrypsin, papain, subtilopeptidase A, and thermolysin. Protein synthesis was required to r...

  3. Molecular recognition of PTCDI–C{sub 8} molecules on the Si(1 1 0)–(16 × 2) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lament, Katarzyna, E-mail: lament@ifd.uni.wroc.pl; Kamiński, Wojciech; Mazur, Piotr; Zuber, Stefan; Ciszewski, Antoni

    2014-06-01

    Mechanisms of PTCDI–C{sub 8} adsorption and thin films growth on Si(1 1 0)–(16 × 2) have been studied using a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density functional theory. Oxygen atoms of the PTCDI–C{sub 8} molecule interact with the substrate increasing substantially the adsorption energy. Adsorbed molecules do not form long-range ordered structures on the surface but local chain-like arrangements. A good agreement between the calculated isosurfaces of electronic charge density and the scanning tunneling microscopy images of the filled electron states of clean and adsorbate-covered surfaces allows to recognize the PTCDI–C{sub 8} molecules adsorbed on Si(1 1 0)–(16 × 2).

  4. Differential T-cell recognition of native and recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis GroES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrands, I; Weldingh, K; Ravn, P;

    1999-01-01

    and release of gamma interferon-gamma by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy tuberculin reactors, the recombinant protein failed to do so. The same difference in immunological recognition was observed in a mouse model of TB infection. Both the native and recombinant preparations were...

  5. Facts on the fragmentation of antigens in presenting cells, on the association of antigen fragments with MHC molecules in cell-free systems, and speculation on the cell biology of antigen processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, O; Mouritsen, S; Petersen, B L;

    1988-01-01

    The processing of a protein antigen is a multi-step event taking place in antigen-presenting cells. Processing is a prerequisite for the recognition of most antigens by T lymphocytes. The antigen is ingested by endocytosis, transported to an acid cellular compartment and subjected to proteolytic...... fragmentation. Some of the antigen fragments bind to MHC class II molecules and are transported to the surface of the antigen-presenting cell where the actual presentation to T lymphocytes occurs. The nature of the processed antigen, how and where it is derived and subsequently becomes associated with MHC...... molecules are the questions discussed in this review. To us, the entire concept of processing has appeal not only because it explains some hitherto well-established, but poorly understood, phenomena such as the fact that T lymphocytes focus their attention entirely upon antigens on other cells. It has...

  6. Expression and function of neural cell adhesion molecule during limb regeneration.

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, C E; Watanabe, M.(Niigata University, 950-2181, Niigata, Japan); Singer, M.; McQuarrie, I G; Sunshine, J.; Rutishauser, U.

    1986-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been detected in regenerating limb bud of adult newts in addition to brain and peripheral nerves. In the regenerating tissue, NCAM was found primarily on mesenchymal cells and also in wound epidermis. Infusion of Fab fragments of antibodies to NCAM into limb buds at the early blastema stage delayed the regenerative process. Previous studies have indicated that NCAM serves as a homophilic ligand for adhesion among cells that express this molecule an...

  7. Homophilic interaction of the L1 family of cell adhesion molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Chun Hua; Ryu, Seong Eon

    2012-01-01

    Homophilic interaction of the L1 family of cell adhesion molecules plays a pivotal role in regulating neurite outgrowth and neural cell networking in vivo. Functional defects in L1 family members are associated with neurological disorders such as X-linked mental retardation, multiple sclerosis, low-IQ syndrome, developmental delay, and schizophrenia. Various human tumors with poor prognosis also implicate the role of L1, a representative member of the L1 family of cell adhesion molecules, and...

  8. Goat anti-rabbit IgG conjugated fluorescent dye-doped silica nanoparticles for human breast carcinoma cell recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Yan; Chen, Ze-Zhong; Wu, Ling-Ling; Tang, Hong-Wu; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2013-11-12

    We report an indirect method for cancer cell recognition using photostable fluorescent silica nanoprobes as biological labels. The dye-doped fluorescent silica nanoparticles were synthesized using the water-in-oil (W/O) reverse microemulsion method. The silica matrix was produced by the controlled hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) in water nanodroplets with the initiation of ammonia (NH3·H2O). Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) or rhodamine B isothiocyanate conjugated with dextran (RBITC-Dextran) was doped in silica nanoparticles (NPs) with a size of 60 ± 5 nm as a fluorescent signal element by covalent bonding and steric hindrance, respectively. The secondary antibody, goat anti-rabbit IgG, was conjugated on the surface of the PEG-terminated modified FITC-doped or RBITC-Dextran-doped silica nanoparticles (PFSiNPs or PBSiNPs) by covalent binding to the PEG linkers using the cyanogen bromide method. The concentrations of goat anti-rabbit IgG covering the nanoprobes were quantified via the Bradford method. In the proof-of-concept experiment, an epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) on the human breast cancer SK-Br-3 cell surface was used as the tumor marker, and the nanoparticle functionalized with rabbit anti-EpCAM antibody was employed as the nanoprobe for cancer cell recognition. Compared with fluorescent dye labeled IgG (FITC-IgG and RBITC-IgG), the designed nanoprobes display dramatically increased stability of fluorescence as well as photostability under continuous irradiation. PMID:24179992

  9. [Design and synthesis of imine compound for metal cation logical gates recognition and setup of double-control fluorescent molecule switch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Zhu, Yu-lian; Dai, Xue-qin; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Yan

    2011-07-01

    The Schiff base's reduced product N,N-bis(4-methoxybenzyl) ethane-1,2-diamine, which was used as a receptor L, was designed and synthesized for the first time in the present article. It was found that Cu2+ and Fe3+ could quench L in fluorescence observably and Zn2+ and Cd2+ could enhance L remarkably. So the two pair metal cation could set up "OR" logical gate relation with the receptor molecule L, then a logical recognition system be formed. The data of resolved ZnL's single crystal indicated that ZnL belonged to monoclinic (CCDC No. 747994). Integrated spectrum instrument was used to characterize the structure of its alike series of complex compound. According to ZnL's excellent fluorescence character and the ability to exchange with contiguous metal cation, ZnZ+/ZnL/Co2+, Zn2+/ZnL/Nit+ fluorescent molecule switch was designed. It is hoped that the work above could be positive for the development of molecule computer, bio-intellectualized inspection technology (therapy) and instrument. PMID:21942034

  10. Reciprocal interactions between cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily and the cytoskeleton in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir eSytnyk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM and members of the L1 family of neuronal cell adhesion molecules play important functions in the developing nervous system by regulating formation, growth and branching of neurites and establishment of the synaptic contacts between neurons. In the mature brain, members of IgSF regulate synapse composition, function and plasticity required for learning and memory. The intracellular domains of IgSF cell adhesion molecules interact with the components of the cytoskeleton including the submembrane actin-spectrin meshwork, actin microfilaments, and microtubules. In this review, we summarize current data indicating that interactions between IgSF cell adhesion molecules and the cytoskeleton are reciprocal, and that while IgSF cell adhesion molecules regulate the assembly of the cytoskeleton, the cytoskeleton plays an important role in regulation of the functions of IgSF cell adhesion molecules. Reciprocal interactions between NCAM and L1 family members and the cytoskeleton and their role in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation are discussed in detail.

  11. Reciprocal Interactions between Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily and the Cytoskeleton in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and members of the L1 family of neuronal cell adhesion molecules play important functions in the developing nervous system by regulating formation, growth and branching of neurites, and establishment of the synaptic contacts between neurons. In the mature brain, members of IgSF regulate synapse composition, function, and plasticity required for learning and memory. The intracellular domains of IgSF cell adhesion molecules interact with the components of the cytoskeleton including the submembrane actin-spectrin meshwork, actin microfilaments, and microtubules. In this review, we summarize current data indicating that interactions between IgSF cell adhesion molecules and the cytoskeleton are reciprocal, and that while IgSF cell adhesion molecules regulate the assembly of the cytoskeleton, the cytoskeleton plays an important role in regulation of the functions of IgSF cell adhesion molecules. Reciprocal interactions between NCAM and L1 family members and the cytoskeleton and their role in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation are discussed in detail. PMID:26909348

  12. Stem Cell Hydrogel, Jump-Starting Zika Drug Discovery, and Engineering RNA Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, Milka

    2016-08-18

    Every month the editors of Cell Chemical Biology bring you highlights of the most recent chemical biology literature that impressed them with creativity and potential for follow up work. Our August 2016 selection includes a description of hydrogels with self-tunable stiffness that are used to profile lipid metabolites during stems cell differentiation, a look at whether we can find a drug repurposing solution to Zika virus infection, and an engineered RNA recognition motif (RRM). PMID:27541191

  13. Enhanced T cell responses to antigenic peptides targeted to B cell surface Ig, Ia, or class I molecules

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The helper T cell recognition of soluble globular protein antigens requires that the proteins be processed by an APC, releasing a peptide that is transported to and held on the APC surface where it is recognized by the specific T cell in conjunction with Ia. When cellular processing functions are blocked, APC lose their ability to present native antigens while retaining the capacity to activate T cells when provided with a cognate peptide fragment that contains the T cell antigenic determinan...

  14. Cell adhesion molecules involved in the leukocyte recruitment induced by venom of the snake Bothrops jararaca

    OpenAIRE

    Catarina F. P. Teixeira; Stella R. Zamuner

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV) induces a significant leukocyte accumulation, mainly neutrophils, at the local of tissue damage. Therefore, the role of the adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), LECAM-1, CD18, leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) on the BjV-induced neutrophil accumulation and the correlation with release of LTB4, TXA2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (I...

  15. Evidence for Nuclear Tensor Polarization of Deuterium Molecules in Storage Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium molecules were obtained by recombination, on a copper surface, of deuterium atoms prepared in specific hyperfine states. The molecules were stored for about 5ms in an open-ended cylindrical cell, placed in a 23mT magnetic field, and their tensor polarization was measured by elastic scattering of 704MeV electrons. The results of the measurements are consistent with the deuterium molecules retaining the tensor polarization of the initial atoms. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  16. The stereoconfiguration of newly formed molecules of bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate in BHK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joutti, A

    1979-10-26

    Newly formed molecules of bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (known also as lysobisphosphatidic acid), which were labeled with 32Pi in cultured BHK cells during relatively short pulses, were subjected to stereoanalysis. In contrast to the high proportion of sn-1-glycerophosphate residues in the bulk of the bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate molecules, the newly formed molecules were rich in sn-3-glycerophosphate residues. PMID:508774

  17. The T-cell accessory molecule CD4 recognizes a monomorphic determinant on isolated Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gay, D; Buus, S; Pasternak, J;

    1988-01-01

    The membrane protein CD4 is commonly found on mature T cells specific for antigen in association with class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC; Ia) proteins. This correlation has led to the suggestion that CD4 binds to a monomorphic region of the Ia molecule on the antigen-presenting cell...... proteins into a planar membrane system, we show that different Ia molecules can greatly enhance the ability of a CD4+ but not a CD4- variant of this class I-restricted T hybrid to respond to isolated class I molecules. T-cell responses can be strongly augmented by the concurrent expression of CD4 on the T...... cell and any of four different Ia proteins on planar membranes, thus supporting the idea that CD4 binds to a monomorphic region of the Ia molecule and increases the avidity with which the T cell can interact with its target....

  18. INFLUENCE OF SOLUBLE PLACENTAL TISSUE-DERIVED MOLECULES UPON EXPRESSION OF ADHESION MOLECULES BY EA.HY926 ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Stepanova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract.  Leukocyte  recruitment  to  placental  tissue  is  an  important  factor  of  its  development.  In  this respect, adhesion molecules at the endothelial cell surface represent a key determining factor of leukocyte adhesion and their trans-endothelial migration. The goal of investigation was to evaluate changed expression of adhesion molecules on the endothelial cells induced by supernates of placental tissue cultures. Placental tissue supernatants produced by the first- and third-trimester placental tissue from normal pregnancy, as well as from women with gestosis, induced higher expression of CD31, CD9, CD62E, CD62P, CD34, CD54, CD51/61, CD49d  and  integrin  β7  expression  by  endothelial  cells,  as  compared  with  their  baseline  levels.  However, the  supernates  from  pre-eclamptic  placental  tissue (3rd  trimester  caused  an  increased  CD9  expression by  endothelial  cells,  as  compared  with  effects  of placental  supernates  from  eclampsia-free  cases.  Our data  contribute  to  understanding  a  possible  role  of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in recruitment of leukocytes to placental tissue and possible participation of adhesion molecules in pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. The work was supported by a grant from Russian Ministry of Education and Science ГК №02.740.11.0711 and Presidential grant № НШ-3594.2010.7 and МД-150.2011.7. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 6, pp 589-596

  19. Fonsecaea pedrosoi-induced Th17-cell differentiation in mice is fostered by Dectin-2 and suppressed by Mincle recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Wang, Huafeng; Li, MengYi; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Hardison, Sarah E.; Brown, Gordon D.; Klein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Chromoblastomycosis is a chronic skin infection caused by the pigmented saprophytic mould Fonsecaea pedrosoi. Chronicity of infection can be broken by a coordinated innate recognition of the spores by pattern recognition receptors. While Mincle signaling via the Syk/Card9 pathway is required for fungal recognition by host cells, it is not sufficient for host control. Exogenously applied TLR agonists are necessary to promote the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and clearance of infection...

  20. Specific differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells by small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Heesang; Chang, Woochul; Song, Byeong-Wook; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent, self-renewing cells harboring multi-lineage differentiation potential and immunosuppressive properties that make them an attractive candidate for biological cell-based regenerative medicine. In addition to its undoubted clinical interest, controlling the fate and behaviors of MSCs is a crucial prerequisite for their therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine. Stem cell differentiation and modulation of functional activities are generally c...

  1. From single-cell transcriptomics to single-molecule counting

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Saiful

    2013-01-01

    RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) technology has been progressing so fast in the last few years and made it possible to perform transcriptome analysis at single-cell level that was even unimaginable a few years before. Nowadays, the importance of gene expression analysis at the single-cell level is increasingly appreciated for the study of complex heterogeneous tissue. Also, in order to solve the obscure and no consensus definition of cell types, the single-cell gene expression analysis ap...

  2. Cells, molecules and morphogenesis: The making of the vertebrate ear

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Pauley, Sarah; Beisel, Kirk W.

    2006-01-01

    The development and evolution of mechanosensory cells and the vertebrate ear is reviewed with an emphasis on delineating the cellular, molecular and developmental basis of these changes. Outgroup comparisons suggests that mechanosensory cells are ancient features of multicellular organisms. Molecular evidence suggests that key genes involved in mechanosensory cell function and development are also conserved among metazoans. The divergent morphology of mechanosensory cells across phyla is inte...

  3. Signaling through intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in a B cell lymphoma line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, J; Owens, T

    1997-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) (CD54) is an adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The interaction between ICAM-1 on B lymphocytes and leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 on T cells plays a major role in several aspects of the immune response, including T-dependent B...

  4. Small Molecules Enhance CRISPR Genome Editing in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chen; Liu, Yanxia; Ma, Tianhua; Liu, Kai; Xu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Honglei; La Russa, Marie; Xie, Min; Sheng, Ding; Qi, Lei S.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system has emerged as an effective tool for sequence-specific gene knockout through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), but it remains inefficient for precise editing of genome sequences. Here we develop a reporter-based screening approach for high-throughput identification of chemical compounds that can modulate precise genome editing through homology-directed repair (HDR). Using our screening method, we have identified small molecules that can enhance CRISPR-mediate...

  5. Potential of nanotechnologies for single molecule probing of individual cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klepárník, Karel; Přikryl, Jan; Voráčová, Ivona; Hezinová, Věra; Lišková, Marcela; Foret, František

    Berlin : PicoQuant GmbH, 2010. s. 83. ISBN N. [International Workshop on "Single Molecule Spectroscopy and Ultrasensitive Analysis in the Life Sciences" /16./. 15.09.2010-17.09.2010, Berlin] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/1680 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : nanotechnologies * quantum dots * fluorescent probes Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  6. Live cell tracking based on cellular state recognition from microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y-N; Lin, C-H; Kuo, C-C; Ho, C-L; Lin, C-J

    2009-07-01

    The analysis of cell motion is an essential process in fundamental medical studies because most active cellular functions involve motion. In this paper, a computer-assisted motion analysis system is proposed for cell tracking. In the proposed tracking process, unlike in conventional tracking methods, cellular states referring to the cellular life cycle are defined and appropriate strategies are adopted for cells at different states. The use of cellular state recognition allows detection of possible cell division and hence can improve the robustness of cell tracking. Experimental results show that cells can be successfully segmented and tracked over a long period of time, and the proposed system is found to be as accurate as manual tracking. Various quantitative analyses and visualizations are used to represent cell motion, which demonstrates the usefulness of the proposed system in the study of cell dynamics. PMID:19566631

  7. T cell recognition and immunity in the fetus and mother

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Cody A.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    All multicellular organisms protect themselves from invasion by allogeneic organisms and cells by mounting immune responses. While protective, allogeneic immune responses present a threat to successful reproduction in eutherian mammals in which the maternal immune system is exposed to the semi-allogeneic fetus. Thus, successful reproduction in eutherian mammals depends on mechanisms that control the potentially hostile maternal immune system without hindering immune responses to potentially d...

  8. Human sunlight-induced basal-cell-carcinoma-associated dendritic cells are deficient in T cell co-stimulatory molecules and are impaired as antigen-presenting cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Nestle, F.O.; Burg, G.; Fäh, J; Wrone-Smith, T; Nickoloff, B. J.

    1997-01-01

    Immune surveillance of skin cancer involves the stimulation of effector T cells by tumor-derived antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). An effective APC must not only display processed antigen in the context of MHC molecules but also express co-stimulatory molecules that are required to fully activate T cells. One of the most common cutaneous neoplasms is basal cell carcinoma. To investigate expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on tumor-associated dend...

  9. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule and prognosis in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedbakken, Linda; Jensen, Jesper K; Hallén, Jonas;

    2011-01-01

    Biomarkers predicting mortality and functional outcome in stroke may be clinically helpful in identification of patients likely to benefit from intervention. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is upregulated during neuroinflammation; we investigated whether ALCAM concentrations ar...

  10. Inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules as indicators of severity of atherosclerosis: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek); M.L. Bots (Michiel); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); J. Meijer (John); A.J. Kiliaan (Amanda); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractInflammatory mediators and soluble cell adhesion molecules predict cardiovascular events. It is not clear whether they reflect the severity of underlying atherosclerotic disease. Within the Rotterdam Study, we investigated the associations of C-reactive protein (CRP), i

  11. Cooling, Collisions and non-Sticking of Polyatomic Molecules in a Cryogenic Buffer Gas Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Piskorski, Julia Hege

    2014-01-01

    We cool and study trans-Stilbene, Nile Red and Benzonitrile in a cryogenic (7K) cell filled with low density helium buffer gas. No molecule-helium cluster formation is observed, indicating limited atom-molecule sticking in this system. We place an upper limit of 5% on the population of clustered He-trans-Stilbene, consistent with a measured He-molecule collisional residence time of less than \\(1 \\mu s\\). With several low energy torsional modes, trans-Stilbene is less rigid than any molecule p...

  12. Persistent downregulation of the pancarcinoma-associated epithelial cell adhesion molecule via active intranuclear methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gun, Bernardina T. F.; Wasserkort, Reinhold; Monami, Amelie; Jeltsch, Albert; Rasko, Tamits; Slaska-Kiss, Krystyna; Cortese, Rene; Rots, Marianne G.; de Leij, Lou F. M. H.; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; Kiss, Antal; Weinhold, Elmar; McLaughlin, Pamela M. J.

    2008-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is expressed at high levels on the surface of most carcinoma cells. SiRNA silencing of EpCAM expression leads to reduced metastatic potential of tumor cells demonstrating its importance in oncogenesis and tumor progression. However, siRNA therapy require

  13. Entamoeba Clone-Recognition Experiments: Morphometrics, Aggregative Behavior, and Cell-Signaling Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Avelina; Paz-Y-Miño-C, Guillermo; Hackey, Meagan; Rutherford, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Studies on clone- and kin-discrimination in protists have proliferated during the past decade. We report clone-recognition experiments in seven Entamoeba lineages (E. invadens IP-1, E. invadens VK-1:NS, E. terrapinae, E. moshkovskii Laredo, E. moshkovskii Snake, E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS and E. dispar). First, we characterized morphometrically each clone (length, width, and cell-surface area) and documented how they differed statistically from one another (as per single-variable or canonical-discriminant analyses). Second, we demonstrated that amebas themselves could discriminate self (clone) from different (themselves vs. other clones). In mix-cell-line cultures between closely-related (E. invadens IP-1 vs. E. invadens VK-1:NS) or distant-phylogenetic clones (E. terrapinae vs. E. moshkovskii Laredo), amebas consistently aggregated with same-clone members. Third, we identified six putative cell-signals secreted by the amebas (RasGap/Ankyrin, coronin-WD40, actin, protein kinases, heat shock 70, and ubiquitin) and which known functions in Entamoeba spp. included: cell proliferation, cell adhesion, cell movement, and stress-induced encystation. To our knowledge, this is the first multi-clone characterization of Entamoeba spp. morphometrics, aggregative behavior, and cell-signaling secretion in the context of clone-recognition. Protists allow us to study cell-cell recognition from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Modern protistan lineages can be central to studies about the origins and evolution of multicellularity. PMID:26990199

  14. THE USE OF INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY FOR FOLLOWING DRUG-MEMBRANE INTERACTIONS: PROBING PACLITAXEL (TAXOL-CELL PHOSPHOLIPID SURFACE RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Süleymanoglu

    2009-01-01

    personnel, sophisticated instruments or methodological difficulties. Therefore, developing novel experimental procedures using complementary, easier to apply, user-friendly techniques is to be emphasized. Vibrational spectroscopy has been regarded as a suitable technique for studying drug-phospholipid complex formations. Here we report the use of infrared (IR spectroscopy to determine dynamic structural transitions of Taxol-phospholipid binary complex upon recognition of individual molecules engaged. Spectra of unbound components were compared with those of drug-lipid binary mixtures. Data obtained for carbonyl, phosphate, choline and CH groups are used for deductions of drug-lipid recognition profiles. The observed effects are considered as asymmetric and symmetric methylene stretching frequencies, splitting of its scissoring band and broadening of carbonyl stretching mode. The possible structure of the taxol-lipid complex formation and its significance in terms of its further potential to be used as an improved drug delivery formulation is also discussed.

  15. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells: from molecules to intercellular communication network

    OpenAIRE

    Till Sebastian Manuel Mathan; Carl Gustav Figdor; Sonja Ingrid Buschow

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presenting cells (APCs), making them an interesting target for immunotherapy against cancer. However, the modes of action of pDCs are not restricted to antigen presentation and IFN secretion alone. In this ...

  16. Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells: From Molecules to Intercellular Communication Network

    OpenAIRE

    Mathan, Till S. M.; Figdor, Carl G.; Buschow, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presenting cells, making them an interesting target for immunotherapy against cancer. However, the modes of action of pDCs are not restricted to antigen presentation and IFN secretion alone. In this review ...

  17. Molecule mechanism of stem cells in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjin Zhang; Rongming Yu

    2014-01-01

    Plants possess the ability to continually produce new tissues and organs throughout their life. Unlike animals, plants are exposed to extreme variations in environmental conditions over the course of their lives. The vitality of plants is so powerful that they can survive several hundreds of years or even more making it an amazing miracle that comes from plant stem cells. The stem cells continue to divide to renew themselves and provide cells for the formation of leaves, stems, and flowers. S...

  18. Integrin engagement mediates tyrosine dephosphorylation on platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, T T; Yan, L G; Madri, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, CD31) is a 130-kDa member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily expressed on endothelial cells, platelets, neutrophils, and monocytes and plays a role during endothelial cell migration. Phosphoamino acid analysis and Western blot analysis with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody show that endothelial PECAM-1 is tyrosine-phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is decreased with endothelial cell migration on fibronectin and collagen and with cell sprea...

  19. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Kole T Roybal; Puchner, Elias M.; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing promise in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, excessive activity and poor control over such engineered T cells can cause severe toxicities. We present the design of “ON-switch” CARs that enable small molecule-control over T cell therapeutic functions, while still retaining antigen spec...

  20. In Vitro Selection of Cancer Cell-Specific Molecular Recognition Elements from Amino Acid Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ryan M.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Differential cell systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is an in vitro selection method for obtaining molecular recognition elements (MREs) that specifically bind to individual cell types with high affinity. MREs are selected from initial large libraries of different nucleic or amino acids. This review outlines the construction of peptide and antibody fragment libraries as well as their different host types. Common methods of selection are also reviewed. Additionally, examples of cancer cell MREs are discussed, as well as their potential applications. PMID:26436100

  1. Microscopic observation of dye molecules for solar cells on a titania surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiya, Shogo; Yamashita, Shunsuke; Kimoto, Koji

    2016-04-01

    The lateral distribution and coverage of Ru-based dye molecules, which are used for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), were directly examined on a titania surface using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The clean surface of a free-standing titania nanosheet was first confirmed with atomic resolution, and then, the nanosheet was used as a substrate. A single dye molecule on the titania nanosheet was visualized for the first time. The quantitative STEM images revealed an inhomogeneous dye-molecule distribution at the early stage of its absorption, i.e., the aggregation of the dye molecules. The majority of the titania surface was not covered by dye molecules, suggesting that optimization of the dye molecule distribution could yield further improvement of the DSC conversion efficiencies.

  2. Binding capacity of a barley beta-D-glucan to the beta-glucan recognition molecule dectin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Rui; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Ken-ichi; Tsubaki, Kazufumi; Ohno, Naohito

    2008-02-27

    To clarify whether barley beta-glucans exhibit their biological effects via binding to dectin-1, a pivotal receptor for beta-1,3-glucan, the structure of barley beta-glucan E70-S (BBG-70) was unambiguously investigated by NMR spectroscopy and studied for its binding capacity and specificity to dectin-1 by ELISA. NMR spectroscopy confirmed that BBG-70 contains two different linkage glucans, namely, alpha-glucan and beta-glucan, which are not covalently attached to one another. Beta-glucan within BBG-70 is a linear mixed-linkage beta-glucan composed of 1,3- and 1,4-beta-D-glucopyranose residues but does not contain the continuous 1,3-linkage. Competitive ELISA revealed that highly purified barley beta-glucan E70-S (pBBG-70) inhibits the binding of soluble dectin-1 to sonifilan (SPG), a beta-1,3-glucan, although at a concentration higher than that of SPG and laminarin. It was found that barley beta-glucan can be recognized by dectin-1, implying that barley beta-glucan might, at least in part, exhibit its biological effects via the recognition by dectin-1 of the ligand sugar structure, which may be formed by 1,3-beta- and 1,4-beta-glucosyl linkage. PMID:18205312

  3. Single-molecule imaging of BMP4 dimerization on human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, H-W; Lee, M-C; Chiang, Y-C; Chow, L-P; Lin, C-P

    2011-11-01

    We expressed bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (BMP4-EGFP) in the secretory pathways of producer cells. Fluorescent EGFP was acquired only after we interrupted the transport of BMP4-EGFP by culturing cells at a lower temperature (20°C), and the dynamics of BMP4-EGFP could be monitored by single-molecule microscopy. Western blotting analysis confirmed that exposure to low temperature helped the integrated formation of BMP4-EGFP fusion proteins. In this study, for the first time, we could image the fluorescently labeled BMP4 molecules localized on the plasma membrane of living hPDL cells. The one-step photobleaching with EGFP and the "blinking" behavior of quantum dots suggest that the fluorescent spots represent the events of single BMP4 molecules. Single-molecule tracking showed that the BMP receptors (BMPR) dimerize after BMP4 stimulation, or that a complex of one BMP4 molecule and a pre-formed BMPR dimer develops first, followed by the binding of the second BMP4 molecule. Furthermore, BMP4-EGFP enhanced the osteogenic differentiation of hPDL cells via signal transduction involving BMP receptors. This single-molecule imaging technique might be a valuable tool for the future development of BMP4 gene therapy and regenerative medicine mediated by hPDLs. PMID:21841042

  4. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in rat heart with ischemia/reperfusion and limitation of infarct size by treatment with antibodies against cell adhesion molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, T; Seko, Y; Tamatani, T; Miyasaka, M.; Yagita, H; Okumura, K.; R. Nagai; Yazaki, Y

    1993-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) of myocardial reperfusion injury, we investigated the roles of cell adhesion molecules on both leukocytes and vascular endothelial cells in the reperfused myocardia. We found that within 2 hours after reperfusion leukocytes began to infiltrate into the rat myocardia subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia and clarified, for the first time, that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was enhanced on the capillary and venous endothelial cells from 8 to 96 ...

  5. Two-stage Recognition of Raw Acceleration Signals for 3-D Gesture-Understanding Cell Phones

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sung-Jung; Choi, Eunseok; Bang, Won-Chul; YANG Jing; Sohn, Junil; Kim, Dong Yoon; Lee, Young-Bum; Kim, Sangryong

    2006-01-01

    As many functionalities like cameras and MP3 players are converged to cell phones, more intuitive interaction methods are essential beyond tiny keypads. In this paper, we present gesture-based interactions and their two-stage recognition algorithm. Acceleration signals are generated from accelerometer. At the first stage, they are hierarchically modelled and matched as basic component and their relationships by Bayesian networks. At the second stage, they are further classified by SVMs for re...

  6. Crosslinking of the T cell-specific accessory molecules CD7 and CD28 modulates T cell adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Regulated adhesion enables T cells to migrate through tissue and transiently interact with an endless succession of cells. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) engagement of the CD3/T cell receptor (TCR) complex results in a rapid and transient augmentation of the adhesion function of LFA-1 and VLA integrin molecules on human T cells. We show in this study that mAb crosslinking of the T cell-specific accessory molecules CD7 and CD28, or treatment with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, results in the rapid indu...

  7. Photodynamic therapy application of PAMAM-porphyrin molecule on stomach cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Tugba; Burgucu, Mehmet Necmi; Sagir, Tugba; Senel, Mehmet; Isik, Sevim; Bölük-basi Ates, Gamze; Tabakoglu, Hasim Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    In this study, effect of a novel LED-based light source developed for 96-well-plates cell culture applications, was tried on AGS stomach cancer cell line, in combination with Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) modified - porhyrin molecule. For each 4 generation of modified PpIX molecule 5 different concentrations tried. According to results PAMAM molecule doesnt have any photosensitizer property also didn't show any toxic effect even if higher concentrations. Morphology and real time monitoring analysis results hold up each other and confirmed that, PpIX molecules with and without modificated high concentrations (>100μM) caused cell death via toxicicity this reason optimal concentration for PAMAM modified PpIX should be between 25 - 50 μm concentration .

  8. Recent Developments in β-Cell Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells Induced by Small and Large Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suresh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs, hold promise as novel therapeutic tools for diabetes treatment because of their self-renewal capacity and ability to differentiate into beta (β-cells. Small and large molecules play important roles in each stage of β-cell differentiation from both hESCs and hiPSCs. The small and large molecules that are described in this review have significantly advanced efforts to cure diabetic disease. Lately, effective protocols have been implemented to induce hESCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs to differentiate into functional β-cells. Several small molecules, proteins, and growth factors promote pancreatic differentiation from hESCs and hMSCs. These small molecules (e.g., cyclopamine, wortmannin, retinoic acid, and sodium butyrate and large molecules (e.g. activin A, betacellulin, bone morphogentic protein (BMP4, epidermal growth factor (EGF, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, noggin, transforming growth factor (TGF-α, and WNT3A are thought to contribute from the initial stages of definitive endoderm formation to the final stages of maturation of functional endocrine cells. We discuss the importance of such small and large molecules in uniquely optimized protocols of β-cell differentiation from stem cells. A global understanding of various small and large molecules and their functions will help to establish an efficient protocol for β-cell differentiation.

  9. In situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes: linking basic nanotechniques to cell biology, immunology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Jiang; Jin, Hua; Yang, Fen; Chen, Zheng W.; Cai, Jiye

    2014-10-01

    The cell membrane, which consists of a viscous phospholipid bilayer, different kinds of proteins and various nano/micrometer-sized domains, plays a very important role in ensuring the stability of the intracellular environment and the order of cellular signal transductions. Exploring the precise cell membrane structure and detailed functions of the biomolecules in a cell membrane would be helpful to understand the underlying mechanisms involved in cell membrane signal transductions, which could further benefit research into cell biology, immunology and medicine. The detection of membrane biomolecules at the single molecule level can provide some subtle information about the molecular structure and the functions of the cell membrane. In particular, information obtained about the molecular mechanisms and other information at the single molecule level are significantly different from that detected from a large amount of biomolecules at the large-scale through traditional techniques, and can thus provide a novel perspective for the study of cell membrane structures and functions. However, the precise investigations of membrane biomolecules prompts researchers to explore cell membranes at the single molecule level by the use of in situ imaging methods, as the exact conformation and functions of biomolecules are highly controlled by the native cellular environment. Recently, the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes has attracted increasing attention from cell biologists and immunologists. The size of biomolecules and their clusters on the cell surface are set at the nanoscale, which makes it mandatory to use high- and super-resolution imaging techniques to realize the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes. In the past few decades, some amazing imaging techniques and instruments with super resolution have been widely developed for molecule imaging, which can also be further employed for the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes. In

  10. Studies on organic solar cells based on small-molecules : tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene and fullerene C70

    OpenAIRE

    Galindo Lorente, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the research on organic solar cells based on small-molecules semiconductors. In particular, organic solar cells of this thesis have been used tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene as donor material and fullerene C70 as acceptor material. In the first part of this thesis, we focus on the influence of the density of states of the donor layer on the characteristic parameters of solar cells. Further, organic solar cells with p-i-n structure are presented, where the intrinsic lay...

  11. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used

  12. The innate pattern recognition molecule Ficolin-1 is secreted by monocytes/macrophages and is circulating in human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, Christian; Rørvig, Sara; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Hummelshøj, Tina; Madsen, Hans O; Borregaard, Niels; Garred, Peter

    2008-01-01

    and SDS-PAGE/western blot. Secretion of Ficolin-1 was investigated in cells and plasma from healthy donors through affinity purification using N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-agarose beads and ELISA. Ficolin-1 was found differentially expressed and synthesised by monocytes, macrophages and immature dendritic...

  13. Excess influx of Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells affects object recognition memory via attenuated LTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Miki; Fujise, Yuki; Tsuchiya, Yuka; Tamano, Haruna; Takeda, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    The influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells is nonessential for dentate gyrus long-term potentiation (LTP) and the physiological significance of extracellular Zn(2+) dynamics is unknown in the dentate gyrus. Excess increase in extracellular Zn(2+) in the hippocampal CA1, which is induced with excitation of zincergic neurons, induces memory deficit via excess influx of Zn(2+) into CA1 pyramidal cells. In the present study, it was examined whether extracellular Zn(2+) induces object recognition memory deficit via excess influx of Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells. KCl (100 mM, 2 µl) was locally injected into the dentate gyrus. The increase in intracellular Zn(2+) in dentate granule cells induced with high K(+) was blocked by co-injection of CaEDTA and CNQX, an extracellular Zn(2+) chelator and an AMPA receptor antagonist, respectively, suggesting that high K(+) increases the influx of Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells via AMPA receptor activation. Dentate gyrus LTP induction was attenuated 1 h after KCl injection into the dentate gyrus and also attenuated when KCl was injected 5 min after the induction. Memory deficit was induced when training of object recognition test was performed 1 h after KCl injection into the dentate gyrus and also induced when KCl was injected 5 min after the training. High K(+)-induced impairments of LTP and memory were rescued by co-injection of CaEDTA. These results indicate that excess influx of Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells via AMPA receptor activation affects object recognition memory via attenuated LTP induction. Even in the dentate gyrus where is scarcely innervated by zincergic neurons, it is likely that extracellular Zn(2+) homeostasis is strictly regulated for cognition. PMID:26044210

  14. Cooperative inhibitory effects of antisense oligonucleotide of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on cancer cell adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Hong Tang; Yan-Ling Chen; Xiao-Qian Wang; Xiu-Jin Li; Feng-Zhi Yin; Xiao-Zhong Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the cooperative effects of antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on the expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells and their adhesion to tumor cells.METHODS: After treatment of endothelial cells with ASON and/or cimetidine and induction with TNF-α, the protein and mRNA changes of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells were examined by flow cytometry and RT-PCR,respectively. The adhesion rates of endothelial cells to tumor cells were measured by cell adhesion experiment.RESULTS: In comparison with TNF-α inducing group, lipoASON and lipo-ASON/cimetidine could significantly decrease the protein and mRNA levels of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells, and lipo-ASON/cimetidine had most significant inhibitory effect on E-selectin expression (from 36.37±1.56% to 14.23±1.07%, P<0.001). Meanwhile,cimetidine alone could inhibit the expression of E-selectin (36.37±1.56% vs 27.2±1.31%, P<0.001), but not ICAM-1 (69.34±2.50% vs68.07±2.10%,P>O.05)and the two kinds of mRNA, either. Compared with TNF-αα inducing group, the rate of adhesion was markedly decreased in lipo-E-selectin ASON and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine treated groups(P<0.05),and Jipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine worked better than lipo-E-selectin ASON alone except for HepG2/ECV304 group(P<0.05). However, the decrease of adhesion was not significant in lipo-ICAM-1 ASON and lipo-ICAM-1 ASON/cimetidine treated groups except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P >0.05).CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that ASON in combination with cimetidine in vitro can significantly reduce the adhesion between endothelial cells and hepatic or colorectal cancer cells, which is stronger than ASON or cimetidine alone. This study provides some useful proofs for gene therapy of antiadhesion.

  15. MHC molecules protect T cell epitopes against proteolytic destruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, S; Meldal, M; Werdelin, O; Buus, Anette Stryhn; Buus, S

    1992-01-01

    There is a subtle duality in the role of proteolytic enzymes in Ag processing. They are required to fragment protein Ag ingested by APC. However, prolonged exposure to proteolytic enzymes may lead to a complete degradation of the Ag, leaving nothing for the T cell system to recognize. What ensures...

  16. T-cell recognition is shaped by epitope sequence conservation in the host proteome and microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresciani, Anne Gøther; Paul, Sinu; Schommer, Nina;

    2016-01-01

    allergen with the conservation of its sequence in the human proteome or the healthy human microbiome. Indeed, performing such comparisons on large sets of validated T-cell epitopes, we found that epitopes that are similar with self-antigens above a certain threshold showed lower immunogenicity, presumably...... as a result of negative selection of T cells capable of recognizing such peptides. Moreover, we also found a reduced level of immune recognition for epitopes conserved in the commensal microbiome, presumably as a result of peripheral tolerance. These findings indicate that the existence (and...

  17. Development of small molecule non-peptide formyl peptide receptor (FPR) ligands and molecular modeling of their recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Schepetkin I.A.; Klebnikov A.I.; Giovannoni M.P.; Kirpotina L.N.; Cilibrizzi A.; Quinn M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on a variety of cell types. These receptors play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions and sensing cellular damage. They have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, cataract formation, and atherogenesis. Thus, FPR ligands, both agonists and antagonists, may represent novel therapeutics for modulating host defense and innate immu...

  18. Solution-processed small-molecule solar cells: breaking the 10% power conversion efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Yongsheng Liu; Chun-Chao Chen; Ziruo Hong; Jing Gao; Yang Yang; Huanping Zhou; Letian Dou; Gang Li

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional conjugated small molecule (SMPV1) was designed and synthesized for high performance solution-processed organic solar cells. This study explores the photovoltaic properties of this molecule as a donor, with a fullerene derivative as an acceptor, using solution processing in single junction and double junction tandem solar cells. The single junction solar cells based on SMPV1 exhibited a certified power conversion efficiency of 8.02% under AM 1.5 G irradiation (100 mW cm−2). A...

  19. Expression and Function of the Homeostatic Molecule Del-1 in Endothelial Cells and the Periodontal Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Shin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1 is an endothelial cell-secreted protein that limits the recruitment of neutrophils by antagonizing the interaction between the LFA-1 integrin on neutrophils and the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 on endothelial cells. Mice with genetic or age-associated Del-1 deficiency exhibit increased neutrophil infiltration in the periodontium resulting in inflammatory bone loss. Here we investigated additional novel mechanisms whereby Del-1 could interfere with neutrophil recruitment and inflammation. Treatment of human endothelial cells with Del-1 did not affect the expression of endothelial molecules involved in the leukocyte adhesion cascade (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Moreover, genetic or age-associated Del-1 deficiency did not significantly alter the expression of these adhesion molecules in the murine periodontium, further ruling out altered adhesion molecule expression as a mechanism whereby Del-1 regulates leukocyte recruitment. Strikingly, Del-1 inhibited ICAM-1-dependent chemokine release (CXCL2, CCL3 by neutrophils. Therefore, Del-1 could potentially suppress the amplification of inflammatory cell recruitment mediated through chemokine release by infiltrating neutrophils. Interestingly, Del-1 was itself regulated by inflammatory stimuli, which generally exerted opposite effects on adhesion molecule expression. The reciprocal regulation between Del-1 and inflammation may contribute to optimally balance the protective and the potentially harmful effects of inflammatory cell recruitment.

  20. Transporter Molecules influence the Gene Expression in HeLa Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Waldeck, Waldemar; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Korn, Bernhard; Mueller, Gabriele; Schick, Matthias; Tóth, Katalin; Wiessler, Manfred; Didinger, Bernd; Braun, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Progresses in biology and pharmacology led to highly specific bioactive substances, but their poor bioavailability at the site of action is a result of their physico-chemical properties. Various design approaches for transport carrier molecules facilitating the cellular entry of bioactive substances could help to reach their molecular target in cells and tissues. The transfer efficacy and the subsequent pharmacological effects of the cargo molecules are well investigated, but the investigatio...

  1. Transporter Molecules influence the Gene Expression in HeLa Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Waldemar Waldeck, Ruediger Pipkorn, Bernhard Korn, Gabriele Mueller, Matthias Schick, Katalin Tóth, Manfred Wiessler, Bernd Didinger, Klaus Braun

    2009-01-01

    Progresses in biology and pharmacology led to highly specific bioactive substances, but their poor bioavailability at the site of action is a result of their physico-chemical properties. Various design approaches for transport carrier molecules facilitating the cellular entry of bioactive substances could help to reach their molecular target in cells and tissues. The transfer efficacy and the subsequent pharmacological effects of the cargo molecules are well investigated, but the investigatio...

  2. Single-molecule investigations of the stringent response machinery in living bacterial cells

    OpenAIRE

    English, Brian P.; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Sanamrad, Arash; Tankov, Stoyan; Dekker, Nynke H.; Elf, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The RelA-mediated stringent response is at the heart of bacterial adaptation to starvation and stress, playing a major role in the bacterial cell cycle and virulence. RelA integrates several environmental cues and synthesizes the alarmone ppGpp, which globally reprograms transcription, translation, and replication. We have developed and implemented novel single-molecule tracking methodology to characterize the intracellular catalytic cycle of RelA. Our single-molecule experiments show that Re...

  3. A New Biological Feature of Natural Killer Cells: The Recognition of Solid Tumor-Derived Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallerico, Rossana; Garofalo, Cinzia; Carbone, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are classified as a member of the innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) group 1. ILCs have been recently identified and grouped on the basis of their phenotypical and functional characteristics. They are effectors of innate immunity and are involved in secondary lymphoid organ generation and tissue remodeling. NK cells are powerful cytotoxic lymphocytes able to recognize and eliminate tumor- and virus-infected cells by limiting their spread and tissue damage. The recognition of tumor cells is mediated by both activating and inhibitory receptors. While in hematological malignancies the role played by NK cells is widely known, their role in recognizing solid tumors remains unclear. Recently, tumor cell populations have been divided into two compartments: cancer-initiating cells (CICs) or cancer stem cells (CSCs) and senescent tumor cells. Here, CSC will be used. CSCs are a small subset of malignant cells with stem-like properties that are involved in tumor maintenance and recurrence due to their ability to survive to traditional therapies; they are, moreover, poorly recognized by T lymphocytes. Recent data showed that NK cells recognize in vitro cancer-initiating cells derived from colon cancer, glioblastoma, and melanoma. However, more in vivo studies are urgently required to fully understand whether these new antitumor NK cells with cytotoxic capability may be considered in the design of new immunotherapeutic interventions. PMID:27242786

  4. The Role of Immunoglobulin Superfamily Cell Adhesion Molecules in Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Wai Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a major clinical problem and results in a poor prognosis for most cancers. The metastatic pathway describes the process by which cancer cells give rise to a metastatic lesion in a new tissue or organ. It consists of interconnecting steps all of which must be successfully completed to result in a metastasis. Cell-cell adhesion is a key aspect of many of these steps. Adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (Ig-SF commonly play a central role in cell-cell adhesion, and a number of these molecules have been associated with cancer progression and a metastatic phenotype. Surprisingly, the contribution of Ig-SF members to metastasis has not received the attention afforded other cell adhesion molecules (CAMs such as the integrins. Here we examine the steps in the metastatic pathway focusing on how the Ig-SF members, melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM, L1CAM, neural CAM (NCAM, leukocyte CAM (ALCAM, intercellular CAM-1 (ICAM-1 and platelet endothelial CAM-1 (PECAM-1 could play a role. Although much remains to be understood, this review aims to raise the profile of Ig-SF members in metastasis formation and prompt further research that could lead to useful clinical outcomes.

  5. Solution processable organic polymers and small molecules for bulk-heterojunction solar cells: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solution processed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs) have gained wide interest in past few years and are established as one of the leading next generation photovoltaic technologies for low cost power production. Power conversion efficiencies up to 6% and 6.5% have been reported in the literature for single layer and tandem solar cells, respectively using conjugated polymers. A recent record efficiency about 8.13% with active area of 1.13 cm2 has been reported. However Solution processable small molecules have been widely applied for photovoltaic (PV) devices in recent years because they show strong absorption properties, and they can be easily purified and deposited onto flexible substrates at low cost. Introducing different donor and acceptor groups to construct donor--acceptor (D--A) structure small molecules has proved to be an efficient way to improve the properties of organic solar cells (OSCs). The power conversion efficiency about 4.4 % has been reported for OSCs based on the small molecules. This review deals with the recent progress of solution processable D--A structure small molecules and discusses the key factors affecting the properties of OSCs based on D--A structure small molecules: sunlight absorption, charge transport and the energy level of the molecules.

  6. Integrin Activation by Regulated Dimerization and Oligomerization of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (Pecam)-1 from within the Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Tieming; Newman, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 is a 130-kD transmembrane glycoprotein having six Ig homology domains within its extracellular domain and an immunoreceptor tyrosine–based inhibitory motif within its cytoplasmic domain. Previous studies have shown that addition of bivalent anti–PECAM-1 mAbs to the surface of T cells, natural killer cells, neutrophils, or platelets result in increased cell adhesion to immobilized integrin ligands. However, the mechanism by which this occur...

  7. Label-free recognition of drug resistance via impedimetric screening of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Eker

    Full Text Available We present a novel study on label-free recognition and distinction of drug resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7 DOX from their parental cells (MCF-7 WT via impedimetric measurements. Drug resistant cells exhibited significant differences in their dielectric properties compared to wild-type cells, exerting much higher extracellular resistance (Rextra . Immunostaining revealed that MCF-7 DOX cells gained a much denser F-actin network upon acquiring drug resistance indicating that remodeling of actin cytoskeleton is probably the reason behind higher Rextra , providing stronger cell architecture. Moreover, having exposed both cell types to doxorubicin, we were able to distinguish these two phenotypes based on their substantially different drug response. Interestingly, impedimetric measurements identified a concentration-dependent and reversible increase in cell stiffness in the presence of low non-lethal drug doses. Combined with a profound frequency analysis, these findings enabled distinguishing distinct cellular responses during drug exposure within four concentration ranges without using any labeling. Overall, this study highlights the possibility to differentiate drug resistant phenotypes from their parental cells and to assess their drug response by using microelectrodes, offering direct, real-time and noninvasive measurements of cell dependent parameters under drug exposure, hence providing a promising step for personalized medicine applications such as evaluation of the disease progress and optimization of the drug treatment of a patient during chemotherapy.

  8. Modulation of pathogen recognition by autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun eOh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an ancient biological process for maintaining cellular homeostasis by degradation of long-lived cytosolic proteins and organelles. Recent studies demonstrated that autophagy is availed by immune cells to regulate innate immunity. On the one hand, cells exert direct effector function by degrading intracellular pathogens; on the other hand, autophagy modulates pathogen recognition and downstream signaling for innate immune responses. Pathogen recognition via pattern recognition receptors induces autophagy. The function of phagocytic cells is enhanced by recruitment of autophagy-related proteins. Moreover, autophagy acts as a delivery system for viral replication complexes to migrate to the endosomal compartments where virus sensing occurs. In another case, key molecules of the autophagic pathway have been found to negatively regulate immune signaling, thus preventing aberrant activation of cytokine production and consequent immune responses. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the role of autophagy in pathogen recognition and modulation of innate immune responses.

  9. Evolution of DNA aptamers for malignant brain tumor gliosarcoma cell recognition and clinical tissue imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiaoyi; Wu, Liang; Wang, Yuzhe; Zhu, Zhi; Song, Yanling; Tan, Yuyu; Wang, Xing-Fu; Li, Jiuxing; Kang, Dezhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-06-15

    Gliosarcoma, a variant of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is a highly invasive malignant tumor. Unfortunately, this disease still marked by poor prognosis regardless of modern treatments. It is of great significance to discover specific molecular probes targeting gliosarcoma for early cancer diagnosis and therapy. Herein, we have selected a group of DNA aptamers with high affinity and selectivity against gliosarcoma cells K308 using cell-SELEX. All the dissociation constants of these aptamers against gliosarcoma cells were in the nanomolar range and aptamer WQY-9 has the highest affinity and good selectivity among them. Furthermore, truncated aptamer sequence, WQY-9-B, shows similar recognition ability to aptamer WQY-9. In addition, WQY-9-B was found to be able to bind selectively and internalize into cytoplasm of target cancer cell at 37°C. More importantly, compared to a random sequence, aptamer WQY-9-B showed excellent recognition rate (73.3%) for tissue sections of clinical gliosarcoma samples. These data suggests that aptamer WQY-9-B has excellent potential as an effective molecular probe for gliosarcoma diagnosis. PMID:26802746

  10. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 signaling inhibits the activation of human platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Cicmil, Milenko; Stevens, Jo; Leduc, Mireille; Bon, Cassian; Gibbins, Jonathan M.

    2002-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31) is a 130-kd transmembrane glycoprotein and a member of the growing family of receptors with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). PECAM-1 is expressed on platelets, certain T cells, monocytes, neutrophils, and vascular endothelial cells and is involved in a range of cellular processes, though the role of PECAM-1 in platelets is unclear. Cross-linking of PECAM-1 results in phosphorylation of the ITIM allowing the r...

  11. Cell Death-Associated Molecular-Pattern Molecules: Inflammatory Signaling and Control

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Sangiuliano; Nancy Marcela Pérez; Moreira, Dayson F; Belizário, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis, necroptosis, and pyroptosis are different cellular death programs characterized in organs and tissues as consequence of microbes infection, cell stress, injury, and chemotherapeutics exposure. Dying and death cells release a variety of self-proteins and bioactive chemicals originated from cytosol, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. These endogenous factors are named cell death-associated molecular-pattern (CDAMP), damage-associated molecular-pattern (DAMP) molecules,...

  12. Distribution and surfactant association of carcinoembryonic cell adhesion molecule 6 in human lung

    OpenAIRE

    Chapin, Cheryl; Bailey, Nicole A.; Gonzales, Linda W.; Lee, Jae-Woo; Gonzalez, Robert F.; Ballard, Philip L.

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is a glycosylated, glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored protein expressed in epithelial cells of various primate tissues. It binds gram-negative bacteria and is overexpressed in human cancers. CEACAM6 is associated with lamellar bodies of cultured type II cells of human fetal lung and protects surfactant function in vitro. In this study, we characterized CEACAM6 expression in vivo in human lung. CEACAM6 was present in lung lavage of premature ...

  13. Effects of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors on cytokine-induced adhesion molecule expression by human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    May, M. J.; Wheeler-Jones, C. P.; Pearson, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. Endothelial cells can be stimulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 alpha and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha to express the leukocyte adhesion molecules E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 but the intracellular signalling mechanisms leading to this expression are incompletely understood. We have investigated the role of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) in adhesion molecule expression by cytokine-activated ...

  14. Expression and T cell recognition of hybrid antigens with amino-terminal domains encoded by Qa-2 region of major histocompatibility complex and carboxyl termini of transplantation antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroynowski, I; Forman, J; Goodenow, R S; Schiffer, S G; McMillan, M; Sharrow, S O; Sachs, D H; Hood, L

    1985-05-01

    Coding potential of the Q6 gene from the Qa-2a region of BALB/c Crgl mice was analyzed by a combination of hybrid class I gene construction and DNA-mediated gene transfer. Recombinant genes were created by exon shuffling of the 5' coding region of the Q6 gene and the 3' coding region of a gene encoding a transplantation antigen (Kd, Dd, or Ld), or the inverse. Some of these hybrid class I genes were expressed in the transfected mouse fibroblasts (L cells). The hybrid class I molecules encoded by the 5' end of the Q6 gene and the 3' end of the Ld gene precipitated as 45,000 mol wt molecules associated with beta 2-microglobulin. The expression of the hybrid proteins indicates that 926 basepairs of the 5' flanking region upstream of the structural Q6 gene contain a promoter that functions as a transcription initiation site in L cells. The 3' portion of the Q6 gene appears to be responsible for the lack of cell surface expression of the intact Q6 and the hybrid Ld/Q6 genes in mouse fibroblasts. Accordingly, this portion of the Q6 class I gene may play a regulatory role in tissue-specific expression. Serological analyses of hybrid Q6 proteins suggested that Q6 may be a structural gene for CR (H-2 crossreactive) antigen found normally on subpopulations of lymphocytes. If this identification is correct, Q6 gene will define a new category of class I genes encoding approximately 40,000 mol wt molecules and carrying a characteristic truncated cytoplasmic tail. Analysis of L cells transfected with Q6 hybrid genes demonstrated also that the cytotoxic T cells specific for Qa-2a region-coded antigens recognize the amino-terminal alpha 1-alpha 2 domain of Q6 fusion products. This recognition can be blocked by anti-Qa-2a alloantiserum and monoclonal antibodies reactive with the alpha 3-beta 2-microglobulin portion of the Q6 hybrids. We propose that the structural requirements for the anti-Qa-2a cytotoxic T lymphocyte-specific epitopes on target molecules are the same as for anti

  15. Single-molecule spectroscopy of protein conformational dynamics in live eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Iwo; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Aznauryan, Mikayel; Soranno, Andrea; Wunderlich, Bengt; Dingfelder, Fabian; Stüber, Jakob C; Plückthun, Andreas; Nettels, Daniel; Schuler, Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Single-molecule methods have become widely used for quantifying the conformational heterogeneity and structural dynamics of biomolecules in vitro. Their application in vivo, however, has remained challenging owing to shortcomings in the design and reproducible delivery of labeled molecules, the range of applicable analysis methods, and suboptimal cell culture conditions. By addressing these limitations in an integrated approach, we demonstrate the feasibility of probing protein dynamics from milliseconds down to the nanosecond regime in live eukaryotic cells with confocal single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy. We illustrate the versatility of the approach by determining the dimensions and submicrosecond chain dynamics of an intrinsically disordered protein; by detecting even subtle changes in the temperature dependence of protein stability, including in-cell cold denaturation; and by quantifying the folding dynamics of a small protein. The methodology opens possibilities for assessing the effect of the cellular environment on biomolecular conformation, dynamics and function. PMID:26147918

  16. Roles for glycosylation of cell surface receptors involved in cellular immune recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, P M; Wormald, M R; Stanfield, R L; Huang, M; Mattsson, N; Speir, J A; DiGennaro, J A; Fetrow, J S; Dwek, R A; Wilson, I A

    1999-10-22

    The majority of cell surface receptors involved in antigen recognition by T cells and in the orchestration of the subsequent cell signalling events are glycoproteins. The length of a typical N-linked sugar is comparable with that of an immunoglobulin domain (30 A). Thus, by virtue of their size alone, oligosaccharides may be expected to play a significant role in the functions and properties of the cell surface proteins to which they are attached. A databank of oligosaccharide structures has been constructed from NMR and crystallographic data to aid in the interpretation of crystal structures of glycoproteins. As unambiguous electron density can usually only be assigned to the glycan cores, the remainder of the sugar is then modelled into the crystal lattice by superimposing the appropriate oligosaccharide from the database. This approach provides insights into the roles that glycosylation might play in cell surface receptors, by providing models that delineate potential close packing interactions on the cell surface. It has been proposed that the specific recognition of antigen by T cells results in the formation of an immunological synapse between the T cell and the antigen-presenting cell. The cell adhesion glycoproteins, such as CD2 and CD48, help to form a cell junction, providing a molecular spacer between opposing cells. The oligosaccharides located on the membrane proximal domains of CD2 and CD48 provide a scaffold to orient the binding faces, which leads to increased affinity. In the next step, recruitment of the peptide major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) by the T-cell receptors (TCRs) requires mobility on the membrane surface. The TCR sugars are located such that they could prevent non-specific aggregation. Importantly, the sugars limit the possible geometry and spacing of TCR/MHC clusters which precede cell signalling. We postulate that, in the final stage, the sugars could play a general role in controlling the assembly and stabilisation of the

  17. Transmembrane adaptor molecules: a new category of lymphoid-cell markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedoldi, Sara; Paterson, Jennifer C; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Natkunam, Yasodha; Rüdiger, Thomas; Angelisova, Pavla; Du, Ming Q; Roberton, Helen; Roncador, Giovanna; Sanchez, Lydia; Pozzobon, Michela; Masir, Noraidah; Barry, Richard; Pileri, Stefano; Mason, David Y; Marafioti, Teresa; Horejsí, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (of which 7 have been identified so far) are involved in receptor signaling in immune cells. They have only a short extracellular region, with most of the molecule comprising a substantial intracytoplasmic region carrying multiple tyrosine residues that can be phosphorylated by Src- or Syk-family kinases. In this paper, we report an immunohistologic study of 6 of these molecules in normal and neoplastic human tissue sections and show that they are restricted to subpopulations of lymphoid cells, being present in either T cells (LAT, LIME, and TRIM), B cells (NTAL), or subsets of both cell types (PAG and SIT). Their expression in neoplastic lymphoid cells broadly reflects that of normal lymphoid tissue, including the positivity of plasma cells and myeloma/plasmacytoma for LIME, NTAL, PAG, and SIT. However, this study also revealed some reactions that may be of diagnostic/prognostic value. For example, lymphocytic lymphoma and mantle-cell lymphoma showed similar profiles but differed clearly from follicle-center lymphoma, whereas PAG tended to be selectively expressed in germinal center-derived subsets of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. These molecules represent a potentially important addition to the panel of immunophenotypic markers detectable in routine biopsies that can be used in hematopathologic studies. PMID:16160011

  18. Power losses in bilayer inverted small molecule organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Trinh, Cong

    2012-01-01

    Inverted bilayer organic solar cells using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) as a donor and C60 as an acceptor with the structure: glass/indium tin oxide (ITO)/ZnO/C60/CuPc/MoO3/Al, in which the zinc oxide (ZnO) was deposited by atomic layer deposition, are compared with a conventional device: glass/ITO/CuPc/C60/bathocuproine/Al. These inverted and conventional devices give short circuit currents of 3.7 and 4.8 mA/cm 2, respectively. However, the inverted device gives a reduced photoresponse from the CuPc donor compared to that of the conventional device. Optical field models show that the arrangement of organic layers in the inverted devices leads to lower absorption of long wavelengths by the CuPc donor; the low energy portion of the spectrum is concentrated near the metal oxide electrode in both devices. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  19. UP-scaling of inverted small molecule based organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Bhushan Ramesh; Madsen, Morten

    during up-scaling processes. The work presented here is focused on an approach towards up-scaling of small molecule based OSC with inverted device configuration. Bilayer OSC from Tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene (DBP) and Fullerenes (C70), as electron donor and acceptor respectively, with cell area......Organic solar cells (OSC), in spite of being a promising technology, still face challenges regarding large-scale fabrication. Although efficiencies of up to 12 % has been reached for small molecule OSC, their performance, both in terms of device efficiency and stability, is significantly reduced...... system. The work includes investigation of morphology and uniformity of the layers from atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical spectroscopy investigations....

  20. Human sunlight-induced basal-cell-carcinoma-associated dendritic cells are deficient in T cell co-stimulatory molecules and are impaired as antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, F O; Burg, G; Fäh, J; Wrone-Smith, T; Nickoloff, B J

    1997-02-01

    Immune surveillance of skin cancer involves the stimulation of effector T cells by tumor-derived antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). An effective APC must not only display processed antigen in the context of MHC molecules but also express co-stimulatory molecules that are required to fully activate T cells. One of the most common cutaneous neoplasms is basal cell carcinoma. To investigate expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs), cryosections from basal cell carcinomas were immunostained. In basal cell carcinomas, only 1 to 2% of intratumor and 5 to 10% of peritumor APCs expressed CD80 or CD86. In contrast, biopsies of immunological/inflammatory dermatoses revealed that 38 to 73% of APCs expressed CD80 and CD86. To further evaluate their phenotype and function, TADCs were isolated from tissue samples of basal cell carcinomas; they were non-adherent to plastic, displayed a typical dendritic morphology, and expressed high levels of major histocompatibility class II molecules on their surface. When TADCs were compared with dendritic cells from blood for presentation of superantigens (staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B) to resting autologous T cells, TADCs were consistently weaker stimulators of T cell proliferation than blood dendritic cells. When analyzed by flow cytometry, TADCs expressed high levels of HLA-DR, but only 5 to 10% co-expressed CD80 or CD86. A 3-day culture in granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-containing medium partially reconstituted the TADC expression of CD80 and CD86 as well as their immunostimulatory capacity. Thus, in this common skin cancer, although there are prominent collections of HLA-DR-positive APCs in and around tumor cells, the TADCs are deficient in important co-stimulatory molecules as well as being weak stimulators of T cell proliferation. The paucity of co-stimulatory molecule expression and functional activity of TADCs may explain why

  1. A Stochastic Single-Molecule Event Triggers Phenotype Switching of a Bacterial Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sunney; Choi, Paul; Cai, Long

    2009-03-01

    By monitoring fluorescently labeled lactose permease with single-molecule sensitivity, we investigated the molecular mechanism of how an Escherichia coli cell with the lac operon switches from one phenotype to another. At intermediate inducer concentrations, a population of genetically identical cells exhibits two phenotypes: induced cells with highly fluorescent membranes and uninduced cells with a small number of membrane-bound permeases. We found that this basal-level expression results from partial dissociation of the tetrameric lactose repressor from one of its operators on looped DNA. In contrast, infrequent events of complete dissociation of the repressor from DNA result in large bursts of permease expression that trigger induction of the lac operon. Hence, a stochastic single-molecule event determines a cell's phenotype.

  2. Solution-processed small-molecule solar cells: breaking the 10% power conversion efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongsheng; Chen, Chun-Chao; Hong, Ziruo; Gao, Jing; Yang, Yang Michael; Zhou, Huanping; Dou, Letian; Li, Gang; Yang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional conjugated small molecule (SMPV1) was designed and synthesized for high performance solution-processed organic solar cells. This study explores the photovoltaic properties of this molecule as a donor, with a fullerene derivative as an acceptor, using solution processing in single junction and double junction tandem solar cells. The single junction solar cells based on SMPV1 exhibited a certified power conversion efficiency of 8.02% under AM 1.5 G irradiation (100 mW cm(-2)). A homo-tandem solar cell based on SMPV1 was constructed with a novel interlayer (or tunnel junction) consisting of bilayer conjugated polyelectrolyte, demonstrating an unprecedented PCE of 10.1%. These results strongly suggest solution-processed small molecular materials are excellent candidates for organic solar cells. PMID:24285006

  3. HLA Class II Defects in Burkitt Lymphoma: Bryostatin-1-Induced 17 kDa Protein Restores CD4+ T-Cell Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azim Hossain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While the defects in HLA class I-mediated Ag presentation by Burkitt lymphoma (BL have been well documented, CD4+ T-cells are also poorly stimulated by HLA class II Ag presentation, and the reasons underlying this defect(s have not yet been fully resolved. Here, we show that BL cells are deficient in their ability to optimally stimulate CD4+ T cells via the HLA class II pathway. The observed defect was not associated with low levels of BL-expressed costimulatory molecules, as addition of external co-stimulation failed to result in BL-mediated CD4+ T-cell activation. We further demonstrate that BL cells express the components of the class II pathway, and the defect was not caused by faulty Ag/class II interaction, because antigenic peptides bound with measurable affinity to BL-associated class II molecules. Treatment of BL with broystatin-1, a potent modulator of protein kinase C, led to significant improvement of functional class II Ag presentation in BL. The restoration of immune recognition appeared to be linked with an increased expression of a 17 kDa peptidylprolyl-like protein. These results demonstrate the presence of a specific defect in HLA class II-mediated Ag presentation in BL and reveal that treatment with bryostatin-1 could lead to enhanced immunogenicity.

  4. Roles of the Laodelphax striatellus Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule in Rice stripe virus infection of its insect vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F; Li, Q; Chen, X; Huo, Y; Guo, H; Song, Z; Cui, F; Zhang, L; Fang, R

    2016-08-01

    The arthropod Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) mediates pathogen-specific recognition via an extensive protein isoform repertoire produced by alternative splicing. To date, most studies have focused on the subsequent pathogen-specific immune response, and few have investigated the entry into cells of viruses or endosymbionts. In the present study, we cloned and characterized the cDNA of Laodelphax striatellus Dscam (LsDscam) and investigated the function of LsDscam in rice stripe virus (RSV) infection and the influence on the endosymbiont Wolbachia. LsDscam displayed a typical Dscam domain architecture, including 10 immunoglobulin (Ig) domains, six fibronectin type III domains, one transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic tail. Alternative splicing occurred at the N-termini of the Ig2 and Ig3 domains, the complete Ig7 domain, the transmembrane domain and the C-terminus, comprising 10, 51, 35, two and two variable exons, respectively. Potentially LsDscam could encode at least 71 400 unique isoforms and 17 850 types of extracellular regions. LsDscam was expressed in various L. striatellus tissues. Knockdown of LsDscam mRNA via RNA interference decreased the titres of both RSV and Wolbachia, but did not change the numbers of the extracellular symbiotic bacterium Acinetobacter rhizosphaerae. Specific Dscam isoforms may play roles in enhancing the infection of vector-borne viruses or endosymbionts. PMID:26991800

  5. The role of the cytokines and cell-adhesion molecules on the immunopathology of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the local expression of the proinflammatory cytokine such as interferon gamma and anti-inflammatory cytokine like interleukin-10 (IL-10) and their role in cell adhesion molecules (CAM) expression on the surface of endothelial cell at the site of inflammation in acute appendicitis. The local expression of these cytokines and CAM was correlated with clinical findings to shed light on their role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis. Thirty-five patients with acute appendicitis and 6 apparently normal appendices were removed incidentally from individuals presented with problems other than appendicitis, were included in this prospective study. They were attendant of the emergency room in Al-Khadhumiyah Teaching Hospital in Baghdad, from October 2003 to September 2004. Cell adhesion molecules (intracellular adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-l], ICAM-3 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1]) were detected by immunohistochemistry while IL-10 and interferon gamma were detected by in situ hybridization. The specimens were classified into 5 groups; early acute appendicitis, phlegmonous appendicitis, ulcero-phlegmonousappendicitis, and gangrenous appendicitis, and the fifth group included specimens that showed no histopathological changes, defined as histologically normal appendix. Intracellular adhesion molecule-1, VCAM-I, IL-10 and interferon gamma were expressed weakly in the control group, while ICAM-3 was not detected in the control group. The average score for ICAM-I, VCAM-1 and the percentage of cells expressing IL-l0 and interferon gamma were significantly higher in the patient groups when compared with the control group. Intracellular adhesion molecule-3 was expressed in the patient group. The kinetics of CAM expression were tightly correlated to the balance between IL-10 and interferon gamma especially after 12.5 hours from the first symptoms experienced by the patients. The interferon gamma was the main player and the most significant factor that leads

  6. Drug and bioactive molecule screening based on a bioelectrical impedance cell culture platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sakthivel Ramasamy,1 Devasier Bennet,1 Sanghyo Kim1,2 1Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-Do, Republic of Korea; 2Graduate Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Medical Center, Incheon, Republic of Korea Abstract: This review will present a brief discussion on the recent advancements of bioelectrical impedance cell-based biosensors, especially the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS system for screening of various bioactive molecules. The different technical integrations of various chip types, working principles, measurement systems, and applications for drug targeting of molecules in cells are highlighted in this paper. Screening of bioactive molecules based on electric cell-substrate impedance sensing is a trial-and-error process toward the development of therapeutically active agents for drug discovery and therapeutics. In general, bioactive molecule screening can be used to identify active molecular targets for various diseases and toxicity at the cellular level with nanoscale resolution. In the innovation and screening of new drugs or bioactive molecules, the activeness, the efficacy of the compound, and safety in biological systems are the main concerns on which determination of drug candidates is based. Further, drug discovery and screening of compounds are often performed in cell-based test systems in order to reduce costs and save time. Moreover, this system can provide more relevant results in in vivo studies, as well as high-throughput drug screening for various diseases during the early stages of drug discovery. Recently, MEMS technologies and integration with image detection techniques have been employed successfully. These new technologies and their possible ongoing transformations are addressed. Select reports are outlined, and not all the work that has been performed in the field of drug screening and development is covered. Keywords: screening of bioactive agents, impedance-based cell

  7. Human granulosa-luteal cells initiate an innate immune response to pathogen-associated molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Laila A; Kramer, Joseph M; Williams, R Stan; Bromfield, John J

    2016-10-01

    The microenvironment of the ovarian follicle is key to the developmental success of the oocyte. Minor changes within the follicular microenvironment can significantly disrupt oocyte development, compromising the formation of competent embryos and reducing fertility. Previously described as a sterile environment, the ovarian follicle of women has been shown to contain colonizing bacterial strains, whereas in domestic species, pathogen-associated molecules are concentrated in the follicular fluid of animals with uterine infection. The aim of this study is to determine whether human granulosa-luteal cells mount an innate immune response to pathogen-associated molecules, potentially disrupting the microenvironment of the ovarian follicle. Human granulosa-luteal cells were collected from patients undergoing assisted reproduction. Cells were cultured in the presence of pathogen-associated molecules (LPS, FSL-1 and Pam3CSK4) for 24h. Supernatants and total RNA were collected for assessment by PCR and ELISA. Granulosa-luteal cells were shown to express the molecular machinery required to respond to a range of pathogen-associated molecules. Expression of TLR4 varied up to 15-fold between individual patients. Granulosa-luteal cells increased the expression of the inflammatory mediators IL1B, IL6 and CXCL8 in the presence of the TLR4 agonist E. coli LPS. Similarly, the TLR2/6 ligand, FSL-1, increased the expression of IL6 and CXCL8. Although no detectable changes in CYP19A1 or STAR expression were observed in granulosa-luteal cells following challenge, a significant reduction in progesterone secretion was measured after treatment with FSL-1. These findings demonstrate the ability of human granulosa-luteal cells to respond to pathogen-associated molecules and generate an innate immune response. PMID:27512120

  8. Diffusion, thermalization and optical pumping of YbF molecules in a cold buffer gas cell

    CERN Document Server

    Skoff, S M; Sinclair, C D J; Hudson, J J; Segal, D M; Sauer, B E; Hinds, E A; Tarbutt, M R

    2010-01-01

    We produce YbF molecules with a density of 10^18 m^-3 using laser ablation inside a cryogenically-cooled cell filled with a helium buffer gas. Using absorption imaging and absorption spectroscopy we study the formation, diffusion, thermalization and optical pumping of the molecules. The absorption images show an initial rapid expansion of molecules away from the ablation target followed by a much slower diffusion to the cell walls. We study how the time constant for diffusion depends on the helium density and temperature, and obtain values for the YbF-He diffusion cross-section at two different temperatures. We measure the translational and rotational temperatures of the molecules as a function of time since formation, obtain the characteristic time constant for the molecules to thermalize with the cell walls, and elucidate the process responsible for limiting this thermalization rate. Finally, we make a detailed study of how the absorption of the probe laser saturates as its intensity increases, showing that...

  9. HIV infection--induced posttranslational modification of T cell signaling molecules associated with disease progression.

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanová, I; Saville, M W; C. Peters; Cleghorn, F. R.; Schwartz, D; Venzon, D J; Weinhold, K J; Jack, N.; Bartholomew, C; Blattner, W A; Yarchoan, R; Bolen, J B; Horak, I D

    1996-01-01

    In attempt to elucidate the mechanism of the HIV infection induced T cell unresponsiveness, we studied signal-transducing molecules proximal to the T cell receptor (TCR) in T lymphocytes of HIV-infected individuals. Total amounts of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) Lck, Fyn, and ZAP-70 and the zeta chain of the TCR were found significantly decreased in T cells of symptomatic/AIDS patients as well as in T cells of individuals in acute and early asymptomatic stages of HIV infection. Unexpectedly...

  10. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Promotes HIV-1 Attachment but Not Fusion to Target Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Naoyuki Kondo; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) into HIV-1 particles is known to markedly enhance the virus binding and infection of cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). At the same time, ICAM-1 has been reported to exert a less pronounced effect on HIV-1 fusion with lymphoid cells. Here we examined the role of ICAM-1/LFA-1 interactions in productive HIV-1 entry into lymphoid cells using a direct virus-cell fusion assay. ICAM-1 promoted HIV-1 attachme...

  11. Linear organization of the liver cell adhesion molecule L-CAM.

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, B A; Leutzinger, Y; Gallin, W J; Sorkin, B C; Edelman, G M

    1984-01-01

    A linear model of the liver cell adhesion molecule L-CAM from embryonic chickens is proposed in terms of its orientation on the cell surface, the number, type, and distribution of carbohydrate moieties, and sites of phosphorylation. L-CAM is isolated from cell membranes as a glycoprotein of Mr = 124,000. A soluble fragment (Ft1) of Mr = 81,000 can be released from cells by digestion with trypsin in the presence of calcium. Radiochemical amino acid sequence analyses indicated that both polypep...

  12. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woof, J M; Burton, D R

    1988-07-22

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used. PMID:2840465

  13. The neural cell adhesion molecule binds to fibroblast growth factor receptor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Lauridsen, Jes B; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Kiselyov, Vladislav V

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) can bind to and activate fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). However, there are four major FGFR isoforms (FGFR1-FGFR4), and it is not known whether NCAM also interacts directly with the other three FGFR isoforms. In this study, we show by surface...

  14. Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and prealbumin in cerebrospinal fluid from depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1988-01-01

    The size of the soluble form of the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM-sol, was by gel permeation chromatography estimated to 160-250 kDa. Within the CSF the concentration of NCAM-sol was found about 15-25% increased in lumbar fluid and 25% increased in ventricular...

  15. Neural cell adhesion molecule induces intracellular signaling via multiple mechanisms of Ca2+ homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiryushko, Darya; Korshunova, Irina; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in the development of the nervous system, promoting neuronal differentiation via homophilic (NCAM-NCAM) as well as heterophilic (NCAM-fibroblast growth factor receptor [FGFR]) interactions. NCAM-induced intracellular signaling has been...

  16. Metal Nanowire Networks as Transparent Electrode for Small-Molecule Organic Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sachse, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the development of metal nanowire networks for the use as transparent electrodes in small-molecule organic solar cells. Broad adoption of organic solar cells requires inexpensive roll-to-roll processing on flexible, lightweight substrates. Under these conditions, traditional metal oxide electrodes suffer from significant drawbacks such as brittleness and cost. In contrast, metal nanowire networks provide properties more suitable for high-throughput processing and thus...

  17. Targeting Superficial or Nodular Basal Cell Carcinoma with Topically Formulated Small Molecule Inhibitor of Smoothened

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Tracy; Tang, Jean Y.; Li, Dongwei(Department of Physics, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, 453007, China); Reich, Mike; Callahan, Christopher A.; Fu, Ling; Yauch, Robert L.; Wang, Frank; Kotkow, Karen; Chang, Kris S.; Shpall, Elana; Wu, Angela; Rubin, Lee; Marsters, James C.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Inappropriate activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in skin is critical for the development of basal cell carcinomas (BCC). We have investigated the anti-BCC efficacy of topically-applied CUR61414, an inhibitor of the Hh signal transduction molecule Smoothened. Experimental Design: In preclinical studies, we used a depilatory model to evaluate the ability of topical formulations of CUR61414 to repress Hh responsive cells found at the base of hair follicles in normal sk...

  18. Expression and Function of the Homeostatic Molecule Del-1 in Endothelial Cells and the Periodontal Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Jieun Shin; Hosur, Kavita B.; Kalyani Pyaram; Ravi Jotwani; Shuang Liang; Triantafyllos Chavakis; George Hajishengallis

    2013-01-01

    Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is an endothelial cell-secreted protein that limits the recruitment of neutrophils by antagonizing the interaction between the LFA-1 integrin on neutrophils and the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 on endothelial cells. Mice with genetic or age-associated Del-1 deficiency exhibit increased neutrophil infiltration in the periodontium resulting in inflammatory bone loss. Here we investigated additional novel mechanisms whereby Del-1 could interf...

  19. Intratumoral regulatory T cells upregulate immunosuppressive molecules in head and neck cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jie, H-B; Gildener-Leapman, N; Li, J.; Srivastava, R. M.; Gibson, S P; Whiteside, T L; Ferris, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although regulatory T cells (Treg) are highly enriched in human tumours compared with peripheral blood, expression of the immune-checkpoint receptors, immunosuppressive molecules and function of Treg in these two sites remains undefined. Methods: Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from a cohort of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. The immunosuppressive phenotypes and function of intratumoral Treg were compared with ...

  20. Correlation of Serum Concentrations of Soluble Thrombomodulin, Soluble Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1,Intracellular Adhesion Molecule -1 And E-Selectin In Patients WithSystemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Malak., A. Mohsen*, Magda.A.Gamil*,Maha. I.Shehata

    2003-01-01

    To date no specific serological parameters are available to assess disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective of this study was to correlate serum levels of thrombomodulin (TM), intracellular adhesion molecule-1 sICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 sVCAM-1, and E-selectin with standard laboratory tests and clinical indices of disease activity in 40 patients with SLE and 20 apparently healthy persons as controls. According to British Isles Lupus Assessment Grou...

  1. Discovery of Small-Molecule Enhancers of Reactive Oxygen Species That are Nontoxic or Cause Genotype-Selective Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Drew J.; Boskovic, Zarko; Theriault, Jimmy R.; Wang, Alex J.; Stern, Andrew M.; Wagner, Bridget K.; Shamji, Alykhan Farid; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2013-01-01

    Elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels has been observed in many cancer cells relative to nontransformed cells, and recent reports have suggested that small-molecule enhancers of ROS may selectively kill cancer cells in various in vitro and in vivo models. We used a high-throughput screening approach to identify several hundred small-molecule enhancers of ROS in a human osteosarcoma cell line. A minority of these compounds diminished the viability of cancer cell lines, indicating t...

  2. A novel junctional adhesion molecule A (CgJAM-A-L) from oyster (Crassostrea gigas) functions as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Conghui; Wang, Mengqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Hao; Liu, Zhaoqun; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-02-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM), a subfamily of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) with a couple of immunoglobulin domains, can act as regulator in homeostasis and inflammation of vertebrates. In the present study, a structural homolog of JAM-A (designated CgJAM-A-L) was screened out from oyster, Crassostrea gigas, through a search of JAM-A D1 domain (N-terminal Ig domain in JAM-A). The cDNA of CgJAM-A-L was of 1188 bp encoding a predicted polypeptide of 395 amino acids. The immunoreactive area of CgJAM-A-L mainly distributed over the plasma membrane of hemocytes. After Vibro splendidus or tumor necrosis factor (CgTNF-1) stimulation, the mRNA transcripts of CgJAM-A-L in hemocytes increased significantly by 4.46-fold and 9.00-fold (p Yarrowia lipolytica. The phagocytic rates of oyster hemocytes towards Gram-negative bacteria V. anguillarum and yeast P. pastoris were significantly enhanced after the incubation of rCgJAM-A-L, and even increased more significantly after the pre-incubation of rCgJAM-A-L with microbes (p < 0.01). The results collectively indicated that CgJAM-A-L functioned as an important pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and opsonin in the immune defense against invading pathogen in oyster. Moreover, as the most primitive specie with homolog of JAMs, the information of CgJAM-A-L in oyster would provide useful clues for the evolutionary study of JAMs and immunoglobulins. PMID:26434620

  3. Decreased soluble cell adhesion molecules after tirofiban infusion in patients with unstable angina pectoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyev Emil

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim The inflammatory response, initiated by neutrophil and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, is important in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes. Platelets play an important role in inflammatory process by interacting with monocytes and neutrophils. In this study, we investigated the effect of tirofiban on the levels of cell adhesion molecules (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, sICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, sVCAM-1 in patients with unstable angina pectoris (AP. Methods Thirty-five patients with unstable AP (Group I, ten patients with stable AP (Group II and ten subjects who had angiographycally normal coronary arteries (Group III were included the study. Group I was divided into two subgroups for the specific treatment regimens: Group IA (n = 15 received tirofiban and Group IB (n = 20 did not. Blood samples for investigating the cell adhesion molecules were drawn at zero time (baseline; 0 h in all patients and at 72 h in Group I. Results The baseline levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were higher in Group I than in Groups II and III. They were higher in Group IA than in Group IB. However, the sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 levels decreased significantly in Group IA after tirofiban infusion. In contrast, these levels remained unchanged or were increased above the baseline value in Group IB at 72 h. Conclusion The levels of cell adhesion molecules in patients with unstable AP decreased significantly after tirofiban infusion. Inhibition of platelet function by specific glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists may decrease platelet-mediated inflammation and the ischemic end-point.

  4. Decreased soluble cell adhesion molecules after tirofiban infusion in patients with unstable angina pectoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Ertugrul; Bozdemir, Huseyin; Tengiz, Istemihan; Sekuri, Cevad; Aliyev, Emil; Akilli, Azem; Akin, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    Aim The inflammatory response, initiated by neutrophil and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, is important in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes. Platelets play an important role in inflammatory process by interacting with monocytes and neutrophils. In this study, we investigated the effect of tirofiban on the levels of cell adhesion molecules (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, sICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, sVCAM-1) in patients with unstable angina pectoris (AP). Methods Thirty-five patients with unstable AP (Group I), ten patients with stable AP (Group II) and ten subjects who had angiographycally normal coronary arteries (Group III) were included the study. Group I was divided into two subgroups for the specific treatment regimens: Group IA (n = 15) received tirofiban and Group IB (n = 20) did not. Blood samples for investigating the cell adhesion molecules were drawn at zero time (baseline; 0 h) in all patients and at 72 h in Group I. Results The baseline levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were higher in Group I than in Groups II and III. They were higher in Group IA than in Group IB. However, the sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 levels decreased significantly in Group IA after tirofiban infusion. In contrast, these levels remained unchanged or were increased above the baseline value in Group IB at 72 h. Conclusion The levels of cell adhesion molecules in patients with unstable AP decreased significantly after tirofiban infusion. Inhibition of platelet function by specific glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists may decrease platelet-mediated inflammation and the ischemic end-point. PMID:15059285

  5. Inherent ER stress in pancreatic islet β cells causes self-recognition by autoreactive T cells in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marré, Meghan L; Profozich, Jennifer L; Coneybeer, Jorge T; Geng, Xuehui; Bertera, Suzanne; Ford, Michael J; Trucco, Massimo; Piganelli, Jon D

    2016-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by pancreatic β cell destruction induced by islet reactive T cells that have escaped central tolerance. Many physiological and environmental triggers associated with T1D result in β cell endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and dysfunction, increasing the potential for abnormal post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins. We hypothesized that β cell ER stress induced by environmental and physiological conditions generates abnormally-modified proteins for the T1D autoimmune response. To test this hypothesis we exposed the murine CD4(+) diabetogenic BDC2.5 T cell clone to murine islets in which ER stress had been induced chemically (Thapsigargin). The BDC2.5 T cell IFNγ response to these cells was significantly increased compared to non-treated islets. This β cell ER stress increased activity of the calcium (Ca(2+))-dependent PTM enzyme tissue transglutaminase 2 (Tgase2), which was necessary for full stress-dependent immunogenicity. Indeed, BDC2.5 T cells responded more strongly to their antigen after its modification by Tgase2. Finally, exposure of non-antigenic murine insulinomas to chemical ER stress in vitro or physiological ER stress in vivo caused increased ER stress and Tgase2 activity, culminating in higher BDC2.5 responses. Thus, β cell ER stress induced by chemical and physiological triggers leads to β cell immunogenicity through Ca(2+)-dependent PTM. These findings elucidate a mechanism of how β cell proteins are modified and become immunogenic, and reveal a novel opportunity for preventing β cell recognition by autoreactive T cells. PMID:27173406

  6. Multicolour single molecule imaging in cells with near infra-red dyes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Tynan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The autofluorescence background of biological samples impedes the detection of single molecules when imaging. The most common method of reducing the background is to use evanescent field excitation, which is incompatible with imaging beyond the surface of biological samples. An alternative would be to use probes that can be excited in the near infra-red region of the spectrum, where autofluorescence is low. Such probes could also increase the number of labels that can be imaged in multicolour single molecule microscopes. Despite being widely used in ensemble imaging, there is a currently a shortage of information available for selecting appropriate commercial near infra-red dyes for single molecule work. It is therefore important to characterise available near infra-red dyes relevant to multicolour single molecule imaging. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A range of commercially available near infra-red dyes compatible with multi-colour imaging was screened to find the brightest and most photostable candidates. Image series of immobilised samples of the brightest dyes (Alexa 700, IRDye 700DX, Alexa 790 and IRDye 800CW were analysed to obtain the mean intensity of single dye molecules, their photobleaching rates and long period blinking kinetics. Using the optimum dye pair, we have demonstrated for the first time widefield, multi-colour, near infra-red single molecule imaging using a supercontinuum light source in MCF-7 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have demonstrated that near infra-red dyes can be used to avoid autofluorescence background in samples where restricting the illumination volume of visible light fails or is inappropriate. We have also shown that supercontinuum sources are suited to single molecule multicolour imaging throughout the 470-1000 nm range. Our measurements of near infra-red dye properties will enable others to select optimal dyes for single molecule imaging.

  7. How do CD4+ T cells detect and eliminate tumor cells that either lack or express MHC class II molecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Audun Werner Haabeth

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells contribute to tumor eradication, even in the absence of CD8+ T cells. Cytotoxic CD4+ T cells can directly kill MHC class II positive tumor cells. More surprisingly, CD4+ T cells can indirectly eliminate tumor cells that lack MHC class II expression. Here, we review the mechanisms of direct and indirect CD4+ T cell-mediated elimination of tumor cells. An emphasis is put on T cell receptor (TCR transgenic models, where anti-tumor responses of naïve CD4+ T cells of defined specificity can be tracked. Some generalizations can tentatively be made. For both MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, presentation of tumor specific antigen by host antigen presenting cells (APCs appears to be required for CD4+ T cell priming. This has been extensively studied in a myeloma model (MOPC315, where host APCs in tumor-draining lymph nodes are primed with secreted tumor antigen. Upon antigen recognition, naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into Th1 cells and migrate to the tumor. At the tumor site, the mechanisms for elimination of MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumor cells differ. In a TCR transgenic B16 melanoma model, MHCIIPOS melanoma cells are directly killed by cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. By contrast, MHCIINEG myeloma cells are killed by IFN-g stimulated M1-like macrophages. In summary, while the priming phase of CD4+ T cells appears similar for MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, the killing mechanisms are different. Unresolved issues and directions for future research are addressed.

  8. Adhesion of human basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils to interleukin 1-activated human vascular endothelial cells: contributions of endothelial cell adhesion molecules

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Cytokines such as interleukin 1 (IL-1) promote adhesiveness in human umbilical vein endothelial cells for leukocytes including basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils, and induce expression of adherence molecules including ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), ELAM-1 (endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1), and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). In the present study, blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAb) recognizing ICAM-1, ELAM-1, and VCAM-1 have been used to compare their ...

  9. Killing multiple myeloma cells with the small molecule 3-bromopyruvate: implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkowska-Skrobek, Grażyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Lis, Paweł; Bartkowiak, Anna; Gonchar, Mykhailo; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2014-07-01

    The small molecule 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP), which has emerged recently as the first member of a new class of potent anticancer agents, was tested for its capacity to kill multiple myeloma (MM) cancer cells. Human MM cells (RPMI 8226) begin to lose viability significantly within 8 h of incubation in the presence of 3-BP. The Km (0.3 mmol/l) for intracellular accumulation of 3-BP in MM cells is 24 times lower than that in control cells (7.2 mmol/l). Therefore, the uptake of 3-BP by MM cells is significantly higher than that by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Further, the IC50 values for human MM cells and control peripheral blood mononuclear cells are 24 and 58 µmol/l, respectively. Therefore, specificity and selectivity of 3-BP toward MM cancer cells are evident on the basis of the above. In MM cells the transcription levels of the gene encoding the monocarboxylate transporter MCT1 is significantly amplified compared with control cells. The level of intracellular ATP in MM cells decreases by over 90% within 1 h after addition of 100 µmol/l 3-BP. The cytotoxicity of 3-BP, exemplified by a marked decrease in viability of MM cells, is potentiated by the inhibitor of glutathione synthesis buthionine sulfoximine. In addition, the lack of mutagenicity and its superior capacity relative to Glivec to kill MM cancer cells are presented in this study. PMID:24557015

  10. Interaction of an immunodominant epitope with Ia molecules in T-cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adorini, L; Sette, A; Buus, S;

    1988-01-01

    The amino acid sequence corresponding to residues 107-116 of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) has been identified as containing an immunodominant T-cell epitope recognized in association with the I-Ed molecule. The immunodominance of this epitope in HEL-primed H-2d mice was demonstrated by analysis o......-120)-peptide was found to be immunogenic in H-2d mice. Thus, a single semiconservative substitution drastically reduces binding capacity and abolishes immunogenicity, suggesting that a strict correlation exists between binding of a peptide to Ia molecules and its immunogenicity....

  11. Gene expression of adhesion molecules in pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells during sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴荣谦; 徐迎新; 宋旭华; 孟宪钧

    2002-01-01

    To study the gene expression of adhesion molecules in pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells during sepsis in mice. Methods: Male mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and microvascular endothelial cells in pulmonary and hepatic tissues were harvested at 3 hours (early sepsis) and 12 hours (late sepsis) after CLP, respectively. Gene expression of the adhesion molecules was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Simultaneously, the alterations of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in pulmonary and hepatic tissues were also examined. Results: E-selectin mRNA levels markedly increased at 3 hours after CLP in both pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells, then they returned to the normal level at 12 hours after CLP. Increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA levels were found at 3 hours after CLP in both pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells, and these levels became higher at 12 hours after CLP. Adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA expression of vascular cells also increased significantly at 3 hours and 12 hours after CLP in both pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells. The level of VCAM-1 mRNA in hepatic microvascular endothelial cells was higher at 3 hours than that at 12 hours after CLP, while the level of VCAM-1 mRNA in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells was higher at 12 hours than that at 3 hours after CLP. The MPO activity in pulmonary and hepatic tissues increased at 3 hours after CLP, compared with that of the sham group. They both declined significantly at 12 hours after CLP, but they were still higher than that of the sham group. Conclusions: The up-regulation of the gene expression of adhesion molecules in pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells is an important step for the migration and accumulation of leukocytes at the site of inflammation, which plays a critical role in organ damage during sepsis. And the contribution

  12. Higher-Order Architecture of Cell Adhesion Mediated by Polymorphic Synaptic Adhesion Molecules Neurexin and Neuroligin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Tanaka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphic adhesion molecules neurexin and neuroligin (NL mediate asymmetric trans-synaptic adhesion, which is crucial for synapse development and function. It is not known whether or how individual synapse function is controlled by the interactions between variants and isoforms of these molecules with differing ectodomain regions. At a physiological concentration of Ca2+, the ectodomain complex of neurexin-1 β isoform (Nrx1β and NL1 spontaneously assembled into crystals of a lateral sheet-like superstructure topologically compatible with transcellular adhesion. Correlative light-electron microscopy confirmed extracellular sheet formation at the junctions between Nrx1β- and NL1-expressing non-neuronal cells, mimicking the close, parallel synaptic membrane apposition. The same NL1-expressing cells, however, did not form this higher-order architecture with cells expressing the much longer neurexin-1 α isoform, suggesting a functional discrimination mechanism between synaptic contacts made by different isoforms of neurexin variants.

  13. Signaling mechanisms of neurite outgrowth induced by the cell adhesion molecules NCAM and N-cadherin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S M; Berezin, V; Bock, E

    2008-01-01

    Formation of appropriate neural circuits depends on a complex interplay between extracellular guiding cues and intracellular signaling events that result in alterations of cytoskeletal dynamics and a neurite growth response. Surface-expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) interact with the...... extracellular guidance cues to intracellular events and thereby regulating neurite outgrowth. In this review, we focus on two CAMs, the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and N-cadherin, and their ability to mediate signaling associated with a neurite outgrowth response. In particular, we will focus on direct...... surroundings via the extracellular domain and bind to the cytoskeleton via their intracellular domain. In addition, several CAMs induce signaling events via direct interactions with intracellular proteins or via interactions with cell surface receptors. Thus, CAMs are obvious candidates for transmitting...

  14. Natural killer cells and neuroblastoma: tumor recognition, escape mechanisms, and possible novel immunotherapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, Cristina; Dondero, Alessandra; Bellora, Francesca; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Pistoia, Vito; Moretta, Alessandro; Castriconi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of childhood and arises from developing sympathetic nervous system. Most primary tumors localize in the abdomen, the adrenal gland, or lumbar sympathetic ganglia. Amplification in tumor cells of MYCN, the major oncogenic driver, patients' age over 18 months, and the presence at diagnosis of a metastatic disease (stage IV, M) identify NB at high risk of treatment failure. Conventional therapies did not significantly improve the overall survival of these patients. Moreover, the limited landscape of somatic mutations detected in NB is hampering the development of novel pharmacological approaches. Major efforts aim to identify novel NB-associated surface molecules that activate immune responses and/or direct drugs to tumor cells and tumor-associated vessels. PVR (Poliovirus Receptor) and B7-H3 are promising targets, since they are expressed by most high-risk NB, are upregulated in tumor vasculature and are essential for tumor survival/invasiveness. PVR is a ligand of DNAM-1 activating receptor that triggers the cytolytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells against NB. In animal models, targeting of PVR with an attenuated oncolytic poliovirus induced tumor regression and elimination. Also B7-H3 was successfully targeted in preclinical studies and is now being tested in phase I/II clinical trials. B7-H3 down-regulates NK cytotoxicity, providing NB with a mechanism of escape from immune response. The immunosuppressive potential of NB can be enhanced by the release of soluble factors that impair NK cell function and/or recruitment. Among these, TGF-β1 modulates the cytotoxicity receptors and the chemokine receptor repertoire of NK cells. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the main cell surface molecules and soluble mediators that modulate the function of NK cells in NB, considering the pros and cons that must be taken into account in the design of novel NK cell-based immunotherapeutic approaches

  15. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mesquita Júnior

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (TREG cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25+/highCD127Ø/lowFoxP3+, and effector T cells were defined as CD25+CD127+FoxP3Ø. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4+TREG and CD28+TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L+TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR+, HLA-DR+, OX40+, and CD45RO+ cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L+ cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L+TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163. In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease.

  16. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita Júnior, D. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruvinel, W.M. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Biomedicina, Universidade Católica de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Araujo, J.A.P. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Salmazi, K.C.; Kallas, E.G. [Disciplina de Imunologia Clínica e Alergia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, L.E.C. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-22

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25{sup +/high}CD127{sup Ø/low}FoxP3{sup +}, and effector T cells were defined as CD25{sup +}CD127{sup +}FoxP3{sup Ø}. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4{sup +}TREG and CD28{sup +}TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L{sup +}TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR{sup +}, HLA-DR{sup +}, OX40{sup +}, and CD45RO{sup +} cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L{sup +} cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L{sup +}TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease.

  17. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25+/highCD127Ø/lowFoxP3+, and effector T cells were defined as CD25+CD127+FoxP3Ø. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4+TREG and CD28+TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L+TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR+, HLA-DR+, OX40+, and CD45RO+ cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L+ cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L+TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease

  18. Systemic Sclerosis Patients Present Alterations in the Expression of Molecules Involved in B-Cell Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Lilian; Ferrier, Ashley; Aravena, Octavio; Fonseca, Elianet; Berendsen, Jorge; Biere, Andrea; Bueno, Daniel; Ramos, Verónica; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Catalán, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The activation threshold of B cells is tightly regulated by an array of inhibitory and activator receptors in such a way that disturbances in their expression can lead to the appearance of autoimmunity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of activating and inhibitory molecules involved in the modulation of B cell functions in transitional, naive, and memory B-cell subpopulations from systemic sclerosis patients. To achieve this, blood samples were drawn from 31 systemic sclerosis patients and 53 healthy individuals. Surface expression of CD86, MHC II, CD19, CD21, CD40, CD22, Siglec 10, CD35, and FcγRIIB was determined by flow cytometry. IL-10 production was evaluated by intracellular flow cytometry from isolated B cells. Soluble IL-6 and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA from supernatants of stimulated B cells. Systemic sclerosis patients exhibit an increased frequency of transitional and naive B cells related to memory B cells compared with healthy controls. Transitional and naive B cells from patients express higher levels of CD86 and FcγRIIB than healthy donors. Also, B cells from patients show high expression of CD19 and CD40, whereas memory cells from systemic sclerosis patients show reduced expression of CD35. CD19 and CD35 expression levels associate with different autoantibody profiles. IL-10+ B cells and secreted levels of IL-10 were markedly reduced in patients. In conclusion, systemic sclerosis patients show alterations in the expression of molecules involved in B-cell regulation. These abnormalities may be determinant in the B-cell hyperactivation observed in systemic sclerosis. PMID:26483788

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal molecules interfere with dendritic cell-induced T-cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skindersø, Mette Elena; Zeuthen, Louise; Pedersen, Susanne Brix;

    2009-01-01

    -oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (OdDHL) exhibits both quorum-sensing signalling and immune-modulating properties. Recently, yet another quorum-sensing signal molecule, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), has been shown to affect cytokine release by mitogen-stimulated human T cells. In the present...

  20. Interaction of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC with mammalian cell surface molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Tal-Singer, R; Peng, C.; Ponce de Leon, M; Abrams, W R; Banfield, B W; Tufaro, F; Cohen, G H; Eisenberg, R J

    1995-01-01

    The entry of herpes simplex virus (HSV) into mammalian cells is a multistep process beginning with an attachment step involving glycoproteins gC and gB. A second step requires the interaction of glycoprotein gD with a cell surface molecule. We explored the interaction between gC and the cell surface by using purified proteins in the absence of detergent. Truncated forms of gC and gD, gC1(457t), gC2(426t), and gD1(306t), lacking the transmembrane and carboxyl regions were expressed in the bacu...

  1. Morphology versus Vertical Phase Segregation in Solvent Annealed Small Molecule Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kovalenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The deep study of solvent annealed small molecules bulk heterojunction organic solar cells based on DPP(TBFu2 : PC60BM blend is carried out. To reveal the reason of the solvent annealing advantage over the thermal one, capacitance-voltage measurements were applied. It was found that controlling the vertical phase segregation in the solar cells a high fullerene population in the vicinity of the cathode could be achieved. This results in increase of the shunt resistance of the cell, thus improving the light harvesting efficiency.

  2. Small-molecule-driven hepatocyte differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Richard; Greenhough, Sebastian; Naumovska, Elena; Sullivan, Gareth J

    2015-05-12

    The differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to hepatocytes is well established, yet current methods suffer from several drawbacks. These include a lack of definition and reproducibility, which in part stems from continued reliance on recombinant growth factors. This has remained a stumbling block for the translation of the technology into industry and the clinic for reasons associated with cost and quality. We have devised a growth-factor-free protocol that relies on small molecules to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells toward a hepatic phenotype. The procedure can efficiently direct both human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells to hepatocyte-like cells. The final population of cells demonstrates marker expression at the transcriptional and protein levels, as well as key hepatic functions such as serum protein production, glycogen storage, and cytochrome P450 activity. PMID:25937370

  3. The granulocyte receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 3 (CEACAM3) directly associates with Vav to promote phagocytosis of human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter, Tim; Pils, Stefan; Sakk, Vadim; Frank, Ronald; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Hauck, Christof R

    2007-03-15

    The human granulocyte-specific receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)3 is critically involved in the opsonin-independent recognition of several bacterial pathogens. CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis depends on the integrity of an ITAM-like sequence within the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM3 and is characterized by rapid stimulation of the GTPase Rac. By performing a functional screen with CEACAM3-expressing cells, we found that overexpression of a dominant-negative form of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav, but not the dominant-negative versions SWAP70, Dock2, or ELMO1 interfered with CEACAM3-initiated phagocytosis. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of Vav reduced uptake and abrogated the stimulation of Rac in response to bacterial CEACAM3 engagement. In Vav1/Vav2-deficient cells, CEACAM3-mediated internalization was only observed after re-expression of Vav. Vav colocalized with CEACAM3 upon bacterial infection, coimmunoprecipitated in a complex with CEACAM3, and the Vav Src homology 2 domain directly associated with phosphorylated Tyr(230) of CEACAM3. In primary human granulocytes, TAT-mediated transduction of dominant-negative Vav, but not SWAP70, severely impaired the uptake of CEACAM3-binding bacteria. These data support the view that, different from canonical ITAM signaling, the CEACAM3 ITAM-like sequence short-wires bacterial recognition and Rac stimulation via a direct association with Vav to promote rapid phagocytosis and elimination of CEACAM-binding human pathogens. PMID:17339478

  4. Molecular cloning and characterisation of a pattern recognition molecule, lipopolysaccharide- and beta-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) from the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Winton; Liu, Chun-Hung; Tsai, Chiung-Hui; Chen, Jiann-Chu

    2005-04-01

    A lipopolysaccharide- and beta-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) cDNA was cloned from the haemocyte and hepatopancreas of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei using oligonucleotide primers and RT-PCR. Both 3'- and 5'-regions were isolated by rapid amplification of cDNA end RACE method. Analysis of nucleotide sequence revealed that the cDNA clone has an open reading frame of 1101 bp encoding a protein of 367 amino acids including a 17 amino acid signal peptide. The calculated molecular mass of the mature proteins (350 amino acids) is 39.92 kDa with an estimated pI of 4.37. Two putative integrin binding motifs (cell adhesion site), RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) and a potential recognition motif for beta- (1-->3) linkage of polysaccharides were observed in the LGBP. Sequence comparison showed that LGBP deduced amino acid of L. vannamei has an overall similarity of 95%, 92% and 61% to that of blue shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris LGBP, tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon BGBP and crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus LGBP, respectively. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that LGBP transcript in haemocyte of L. vannamei increased in 3- and 6-h post Vibrio alginolyticus injection. PMID:15561560

  5. Light scattering sensing detection of pathogens based on the molecular recognition of immunoglobulin with cell wall-associated protein A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this contribution, we report a rapid optical detection method of pathogens using Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) as the model analyte based on the molecular recognition of immunoglobulin with cell wall-associated Protein A (SpA). It was found that the molecular recognition of human immunoglobulin (IgG) with protein A on the cell wall of S. aureus on glass slide sensing area could result in strong surface enhanced light scattering (SELS) signals, and the SELS intensity (ΔI) increases proportionally with the concentration of S. aureus over the range of 2.5 x 105-1.0 x 108 CFU mL-1 with right angle light scattering (RALS) signals detection mode. In order to identify the solid support based molecular recognition between IgG with SpA, we also employed water-soluble CdS quantum dots (CdS-QDs) as a fluorescent marker for IgG by immobilizing the IgG onto the surfaces of CdS-QDs through covalent binding in order to generate recognition probes for SpA on the cell wall of S. aureus. Consequently, the fluorescent method also showed that the detection for pathogens with solid supports is reliable based on the molecular recognition of IgG with SpA

  6. Cytotoxicity Effects of Different Surfactant Molecules Conjugated to Carbon Nanotubes on Human Astrocytoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witkowski Colette

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy were utilized to monitor morphological changes in human astrocytoma cells during a time-course exposure to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT conjugates with different surfactants and to investigate sub-cellular distribution of the nanotube conjugates, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of the nanotube/surfactant conjugates is related to the toxicity of surfactant molecules attached on the nanotube surfaces. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS are toxic to cells. Exposure to CNT/SDS conjugates (0.5 mg/mL for less than 5 min caused changes in cell morphology resulting in a distinctly spherical shape compared to untreated cells. In contrast, sodium cholate (SC and CNT/SC did not affect cell morphology, proliferation, or growth. These data indicate that SC is an environmentally friendly surfactant for the purification and dispersion of SWCNTs. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis of CNT/DNA conjugates revealed distribution in the cytoplasm of cells and did not show adverse effects on cell morphology, proliferation, or viability during a 72-h incubation. These observations suggest that the SWCNTs could be used as non-viral vectors for diagnostic and therapeutic molecules across the blood–brain barrier to the brain and the central nervous system.

  7. Cytotoxicity Effects of Different Surfactant Molecules Conjugated to Carbon Nanotubes on Human Astrocytoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lifeng; Witkowski, Colette M.; Craig, Michael M.; Greenwade, Molly M.; Joseph, Katherine L.

    2009-12-01

    Phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy were utilized to monitor morphological changes in human astrocytoma cells during a time-course exposure to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conjugates with different surfactants and to investigate sub-cellular distribution of the nanotube conjugates, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of the nanotube/surfactant conjugates is related to the toxicity of surfactant molecules attached on the nanotube surfaces. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) are toxic to cells. Exposure to CNT/SDS conjugates (0.5 mg/mL) for less than 5 min caused changes in cell morphology resulting in a distinctly spherical shape compared to untreated cells. In contrast, sodium cholate (SC) and CNT/SC did not affect cell morphology, proliferation, or growth. These data indicate that SC is an environmentally friendly surfactant for the purification and dispersion of SWCNTs. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis of CNT/DNA conjugates revealed distribution in the cytoplasm of cells and did not show adverse effects on cell morphology, proliferation, or viability during a 72-h incubation. These observations suggest that the SWCNTs could be used as non-viral vectors for diagnostic and therapeutic molecules across the blood-brain barrier to the brain and the central nervous system.

  8. The molecule HLA-G: radiosensitivity indicator of a human melanoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physiological and pathological relevance of the HLA-G molecule (non-classical Human Leukocyte Antigen) has been motif of important research studies. Its distribution is restricted to only few tissues. HLA-G takes part in the implantation after in vitro fecundation, in graft tolerance, in auto-immune diseases, and in tumoral immune escape. Its expression has been demonstrated in more than 30% of tumors of 15 different histological types. Gamma radiation modulates HLA-G expression at the cell surface. However, its involvement in tumoral radiosensitivity has not been demonstrated yet. The objective of this work was to demonstrate if the HLA-G molecule intervenes in the radiosensibility of human melanoma cells cultured in vitro. For this purpose we used the human melanoma cell line M8, which was transfected with the plasmid containing the HLA-G gene (M8 HLA-G+) or with the plasmid alone, without the HLA-G gene (M8 pc DNA). Both cell lines were irradiated with 0, 2, 5 y 10 Gy and in all cases survival frequency was determined with the clonogenic assay. We observed a significant reduction in M8 HLA-G+ survival with respect to M8 pc DNA for all irradiation doses and was independent of doses. These results, if confirmed in other histological types, could postulate the HLA-G molecule as a tumoral radiosensitivity marker. The specific mechanism involved in the radiosensibility modification exerted by HLA-G has not been elucidated yet. (authors)

  9. Effects of resistin-like molecule β over-expression on gastric cancer cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Duan Zheng; Chun-Lei Yang; Teng Qi; Meng Qi; Ling Tong; Qiang-Song Tong

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effects of resistin-like molecule β (RELMβ) over-expression on the invasion,metastasis and angiogenesis of gastric cancer cells.METHODS:Human RELMβ encoding expression vector was constructed and transfected into the RELMβ lowly-expressed gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and MKN-45.Gene expression was measured by Western blotting,reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR.Cell proliferation was measured by 2-(4,5-dimethyltriazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide colorimetry,colony formation and 5-ethynyl-20-deoxyuridine incorporation assays.The in vitro migration,invasion and metastasis of cancer cells were measured by cell adhesion assay,scratch assay and matrigel invasion assay.The angiogenic capabilities of cancer cells were measured by tube formation of endothelial cells.RESULTS:Transfection of RELMβ vector into SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cells resulted in over-expression of RELMβ,which did not influence the cellular proliferation.However,over-expression of RELMβ suppressed the in vitro adhesion,invasion and metastasis of cancer cells,accompanied by decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9.Moreover,transfection of RELMβ attenuated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and in vitro angiogenic capabilities of cancer cells.CONCLUSION:Over-expression of RELMβ abolishes the invasion,metastasis and angiogenesis of gastric cancer cells in vitro,suggesting its potentials as a novel therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  10. Aptamer-based single-molecule imaging of insulin receptors in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Minhyeok; Kwon, Mijin; Kim, Sooran; Yunn, Na-Oh; Kim, Daehyung; Ryu, Sung Ho; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2014-05-01

    We present a single-molecule imaging platform that quantitatively explores the spatiotemporal dynamics of individual insulin receptors in living cells. Modified DNA aptamers that specifically recognize insulin receptors (IRs) with a high affinity were selected through the SELEX process. Using quantum dot-labeled aptamers, we successfully imaged and analyzed the diffusive motions of individual IRs in the plasma membranes of a variety of cell lines (HIR, HEK293, HepG2). We further explored the cholesterol-dependent movement of IRs to address whether cholesterol depletion interferes with IRs and found that cholesterol depletion of the plasma membrane by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduces the mobility of IRs. The aptamer-based single-molecule imaging of IRs will provide better understanding of insulin signal transduction through the dynamics study of IRs in the plasma membrane.

  11. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition

  12. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Zhang, Qing [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biological Cancer Therapy, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou 221002 (China); Yang, Yu [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Wu, Chuanfang, E-mail: wuchuanfangsichuan@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition.

  13. Following the nanostructural molecular orientation guidelines for sulfur versus thiophene units in small molecule photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Jin; Park, Chan Eon

    2016-03-01

    In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics, particularly those using small molecules, electron donor and/or electron acceptor materials form a distributed network in the photoactive layer where critical photo-physical processes occur. Extensive research has recently focused on the importance of sulfur atoms in the small molecules. Little is known about the three-dimensional orientation of these sulfur atom-containing molecules. Herein, we report on our research concerning the heterojunction textures of the crystalline molecular orientation of small compounds having sulfur-containing units in the side chains, specifically, compounds known as DR3TSBDT that contain the alkylthio group and DR3TBDTT that does not. The improved performance of the DR3TBDTT-based devices, particularly in the photocurrent and the fill factor, was attributed to the large population of donor compound crystallites with a favorable face-on orientation along the perpendicular direction. This orientation resulted in efficient charge transport and a reduction in charge recombination. These findings underscore the great potential of small-molecule solar cells and suggest that even higher efficiencies can be achieved through materials development and molecular orientation control.In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics, particularly those using small molecules, electron donor and/or electron acceptor materials form a distributed network in the photoactive layer where critical photo-physical processes occur. Extensive research has recently focused on the importance of sulfur atoms in the small molecules. Little is known about the three-dimensional orientation of these sulfur atom-containing molecules. Herein, we report on our research concerning the heterojunction textures of the crystalline molecular orientation of small compounds having sulfur-containing units in the side chains, specifically, compounds known as DR3TSBDT that contain the alkylthio group and DR3TBDTT that does not

  14. Fluorescence imaging for bacterial cell biology: from localization to dynamics, from ensembles to single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhizhong; Carballido-López, Rut

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins and developments in superresolution (nanoscopy) and single-molecule techniques bring high sensitivity, speed, and one order of magnitude gain in spatial resolution to live-cell imaging. These technologies have only recently been applied to prokaryotic cell biology, revealing the exquisite subcellular organization of bacterial cells. Here, we review the parallel evolution of fluorescence microscopy methods and their application to bacteria, mainly drawing examples from visualizing actin-like MreB proteins in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We describe the basic principles of nanoscopy and conventional techniques and their advantages and limitations to help microbiologists choose the most suitable technique for their biological question. Looking ahead, multidimensional live-cell nanoscopy combined with computational image analysis tools, systems biology approaches, and mathematical modeling will provide movie-like, mechanistic, and quantitative description of molecular events in bacterial cells. PMID:25002084

  15. Inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase inhibit expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in human melanoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin WANG; Bin ZHOU; Ji LI; Yong-bing CAO; Xin-sheng CHEN; Ming-he CHENG; Ming YIN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors on the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in melanoma cells. METHODS: ICAM-1 protein of human melanoma cell a375 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent, flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. Level of ICAM-1 mRNA in a375 was evaluated by Northern blot analysis. Adhesion of a375 to endothelial cell EC304 was analyzed by isotopic tracing. RESULTS:5-Lipoxygenase inhibitors nordihydroguaiaretic acid, AA861 and MK886, could suppress the expression of ICAM-1 protein as well as of its mRNA in a375 cells and reduce the adhesion of a375 to EC304. CONCLUSION:5-Lipoxygenase inhibitors can inhibit the expression of ICAM-1 in human melanoma cells and may be valuable for treatment of melanoma metastasis.

  16. Ultrastructure of the extended ribonucleic acid molecules from purified ribosomes of Rous sarcoma virus-induced mouse ascites sarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto,Goki

    1974-04-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the ultrastructure of the extended ribosomal RNA molecules, electron microscopic observations were carried out on the RNA molecules extracted from purified ribosomes of mouse ascites sarcoma cells. By the treatment with ethylenediamine-tetraacetate agglomerated rRNA molecules were elongated to thread-like structure by partial unfolding. The lengths of thread-like molecules were measured as less than Iii. The strand of RNA molecules stained with uranyl acetate was observed approximately l5A in width.

  17. Condensation by DNA looping facilitates transfer of large DNA molecules into mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Montigny, William J.; Houchens, Christopher R.; Illenye, Sharon; Gilbert, Jonathan; Coonrod, Emily; Chang, Young-Chae; Nicholas H. Heintz

    2001-01-01

    Experimental studies of complete mammalian genes and other genetic domains are impeded by the difficulty of introducing large DNA molecules into cells in culture. Previously we have shown that GST–Z2, a protein that contains three zinc fingers and a proline-rich multimerization domain from the polydactyl zinc finger protein RIP60 fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), mediates DNA binding and looping in vitro. Atomic force microscopy showed that GST–Z2 is able to condense 1...

  18. Influence of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Molecules on Cell Phenotype and Neocartilage Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Grogan, Shawn P.; Chen, Xian; Sovani, Sujata; Taniguchi, Noboru; Colwell, Clifford W.; Lotz, Martin K; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2013-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for maintaining the cartilage's role as a low-friction and load-bearing tissue. In this study, we examined the influence of cartilage zone-specific ECM on human articular chondrocytes (HAC) in two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) environments. Two culture systems were used. SYSTEM 1: HAC were cultured on cell-culture plates that had been precoated with the following ECM molecules for 7 days: decor...

  19. Synthesis and characterization of new electron-withdrawing moiety thieno[2,3-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione-based molecules for small molecule solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Lei; Pan, Hongbin; Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod;

    2013-01-01

    –π–donor–π–acceptor type end-capped with thieno[2,3-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione (TPD) units for small molecule solar cells have been prepared through coupling of dithienosilole and TPD units bridged with thienylene and bithienylene. They are soluble in common organic solvents and show an interesting absorption. These small...

  20. Transporter Molecules influence the Gene Expression in HeLa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Waldeck, Ruediger Pipkorn, Bernhard Korn, Gabriele Mueller, Matthias Schick, Katalin Tóth, Manfred Wiessler, Bernd Didinger, Klaus Braun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Progresses in biology and pharmacology led to highly specific bioactive substances, but their poor bioavailability at the site of action is a result of their physico-chemical properties. Various design approaches for transport carrier molecules facilitating the cellular entry of bioactive substances could help to reach their molecular target in cells and tissues. The transfer efficacy and the subsequent pharmacological effects of the cargo molecules are well investigated, but the investigations of effects of the carrier molecules themselves on the target cells or tissues remain necessary. A special attention should be paid to the differential gene expression, particularly in the interpretation of the data achieved by highly specific active pharmaceutical products. After application of transmembrane transport peptides, particularly the pAnt and also the HIV-1 Tat, cells respond with a conspicuous altered gene expression of at least three genes. The PKN1 gene was induced and two genes (ZCD1 and BSG were slightly repressed. The genes and the chromosomes are described, the moderate differential gene expression graphed, and the ontology is listed.

  1. Transporter Molecules influence the Gene Expression in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldeck, Waldemar; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Korn, Bernhard; Mueller, Gabriele; Schick, Matthias; Tóth, Katalin; Wiessler, Manfred; Didinger, Bernd; Braun, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Progresses in biology and pharmacology led to highly specific bioactive substances, but their poor bioavailability at the site of action is a result of their physico-chemical properties. Various design approaches for transport carrier molecules facilitating the cellular entry of bioactive substances could help to reach their molecular target in cells and tissues. The transfer efficacy and the subsequent pharmacological effects of the cargo molecules are well investigated, but the investigations of effects of the carrier molecules themselves on the target cells or tissues remain necessary. A special attention should be paid to the differential gene expression, particularly in the interpretation of the data achieved by highly specific active pharmaceutical products. After application of transmembrane transport peptides, particularly the pAnt and also the HIV-1 Tat, cells respond with a conspicuous altered gene expression of at least three genes. The PKN1 gene was induced and two genes (ZCD1 and BSG) were slightly repressed. The genes and the chromosomes are described, the moderate differential gene expression graphed, and the ontology is listed. PMID:19214198

  2. History of Maternal Recognition of Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazer, Fuller W

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism for signaling pregnancy recognition is highly variable among species, and the signaling molecule itself varies between estrogens in pigs to chorionic gonadotrophin in primates. This chapter provides insight into the menstrual cycle of women and estrous cycles of rodents, dog, cat, pigs, sheep, rabbits, and marsupials, as well as the hormones required for pregnancy recognition. Pregnancy recognition involves specific hormones such as prolactin in rodents or interferons in ruminants and estrogens in pigs that in their own way ensure the maintenance of the corpus luteum and its secretion of progesterone which is the hormone of pregnancy. However, these pregnancy recognition signals may also modify gene expression in a cell-specific and temporal manner to ensure the growth and development of the conceptus. This chapter provides some historical aspects of the development of understanding of mechanisms for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy in several species of mammals. PMID:26450492

  3. DMPD: The role of viral nucleic acid recognition in dendritic cells for innate andadaptive antiviral immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18086372 The role of viral nucleic acid recognition in dendritic cells for innate a...1-14. Epub 2007 Nov 9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The role of viral nucleic acid recognition in dend...ritic cells for innate andadaptive antiviral immunity. PubmedID 18086372 Title The

  4. Cell adhesion molecules involved in the leukocyte recruitment induced by venom of the snake Bothrops jararaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella R. Zamuner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV induces a significant leukocyte accumulation, mainly neutrophils, at the local of tissue damage. Therefore, the role of the adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, LECAM-1, CD18, leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 on the BjV-induced neutrophil accumulation and the correlation with release of LTB4, TXA2, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-1 and IL-6 have been investigated. Anti-mouse LECAM-1, LFA-1, ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 monoclonal antibody injection resulted in a reduction of 42%, 80%, 66% and 67%, respectively, of neutrophil accumulation induced by BjV (250 μg/kg, intraperitoneal injection in male mice compared with isotype-matched control injected animals. The anti-mouse CD18 monoclonal antibody had no significant effect on venom-induced neutrophil accumulation. Concentrations of LTB4, TXA2, IL-6 and TNF-α were significant increased in the peritoneal exudates of animals injected with venom, whereas no increment in IL-1 was detected. This results suggest that ICAM-1, LECAM-1, LFA-1 and PECAM-1, but not CD18, adhesion molecules are involved in the recruitment of neutrophils into the inflammatory site induced by BjV. This is the first in vivo evidence that snake venom is able to up-regulate the expression of adhesion molecules by both leukocytes and endothelial cells. This venom effect may be indirect, probably through the release of the inflammatory mediators evidenced in the present study.

  5. Neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule interacts with neurons and astroglia via different binding mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule (Ng-CAM) is present in the central nervous system on postmitotic neurons and in the periphery on neurons and Schwann cells. It has been implicated in binding between neurons and between neurons and glia. To understand the molecular mechanisms of Ng-CAM binding, we analyzed the aggregation of chick Ng- CAM either immobilized on 0.5-micron beads (Covaspheres) or reconstituted into liposomes. The results were correlated with the binding of these particles t...

  6. Cost-effective differentiation of hepatocyte-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells using small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnim, Farah; Phan, Derek; Toh, Yi-Chin; Yu, Hanry

    2015-11-01

    Significant efforts have been invested into the differentiation of stem cells into functional hepatocyte-like cells that can be used for cell therapy, disease modeling and drug screening. Most of these efforts have been concentrated on the use of growth factors to recapitulate developmental signals under in vitro conditions. Using small molecules instead of growth factors would provide an attractive alternative since small molecules are cell-permeable and cheaper than growth factors. We have developed a protocol for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells using a predominantly small molecule-based approach (SM-Hep). This 3 step differentiation strategy involves the use of optimized concentrations of LY294002 and bromo-indirubin-3'-oxime (BIO) for the generation of definitive endoderm; sodium butyrate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for the generation of hepatoblasts and SB431542 for differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells. Activin A is the only growth factor required in this protocol. Our results showed that SM-Hep were morphologically and functionally similar or better compared to the hepatocytes derived from the growth-factor induced differentiation (GF-Hep) in terms of expression of hepatic markers, urea and albumin production and cytochrome P450 (CYP1A2 and CYP3A4) activities. Cell viability assays following treatment with paradigm hepatotoxicants Acetaminophen, Chlorpromazine, Diclofenac, Digoxin, Quinidine and Troglitazone showed that their sensitivity to these drugs was similar to human primary hepatocytes (PHHs). Using SM-Hep would result in 67% and 81% cost reduction compared to GF-Hep and PHHs respectively. Therefore, SM-Hep can serve as a robust and cost effective replacement for PHHs for drug screening and development. PMID:26310107

  7. Abrogation of junctional adhesion molecule-A expression induces cell apoptosis and reduces breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Murakami

    Full Text Available Intercellular junctions promote homotypic cell to cell adhesion and transfer intracellular signals which control cell growth and apoptosis. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A is a transmembrane immunoglobulin located at tight junctions of normal epithelial cells of mammary ducts and glands. In the present paper we show that JAM-A acts as a survival factor for mammary carcinoma cells. JAM-A null mice expressing Polyoma Middle T under MMTV promoter develop significantly smaller mammary tumors than JAM-A positive mice. Angiogenesis and inflammatory or immune infiltrate were not statistically modified in absence of JAM-A but tumor cell apoptosis was significantly increased. Tumor cells isolated from JAM-A null mice or 4T1 cells incubated with JAM-A blocking antibodies showed reduced growth and increased apoptosis which paralleled altered junctional architecture and adhesive function. In a breast cancer clinical data set, tissue microarray data show that JAM-A expression correlates with poor prognosis. Gene expression analysis of mouse tumor samples showed a correlation between genes enriched in human G3 tumors and genes over expressed in JAM-A +/+ mammary tumors. Conversely, genes enriched in G1 human tumors correlate with genes overexpressed in JAM-A-/- tumors. We conclude that down regulation of JAM-A reduces tumor aggressive behavior by increasing cell susceptibility to apoptosis. JAM-A may be considered a negative prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target.

  8. A single-molecule force spectroscopy study of the interactions between lectins and carbohydrates on cancer and normal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weidong; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2013-03-01

    The interaction forces between carbohydrates and lectins were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy on both cancer and normal cells. The binding kinetics was also studied, which shows that the carbohydrate-lectin complex on cancer cells is less stable than that on normal cells.The interaction forces between carbohydrates and lectins were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy on both cancer and normal cells. The binding kinetics was also studied, which shows that the carbohydrate-lectin complex on cancer cells is less stable than that on normal cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00553d

  9. The cell adhesion molecules Echinoid and Friend of Echinoid coordinate cell adhesion and cell signaling to regulate the fidelity of ommatidial rotation in the Drosophila eye

    OpenAIRE

    Fetting, Jennifer L.; Spencer, Susan A; Wolff, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    Directed cellular movements are a universal feature of morphogenesis in multicellular organisms. Differential adhesion between the stationary and motile cells promotes these cellular movements to effect spatial patterning of cells. A prominent feature of Drosophila eye development is the 90° rotational movement of the multicellular ommatidial precursors within a matrix of stationary cells. We demonstrate that the cell adhesion molecules Echinoid (Ed) and Friend of Echi...

  10. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 promotes HIV-1 attachment but not fusion to target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Kondo

    Full Text Available Incorporation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 into HIV-1 particles is known to markedly enhance the virus binding and infection of cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1. At the same time, ICAM-1 has been reported to exert a less pronounced effect on HIV-1 fusion with lymphoid cells. Here we examined the role of ICAM-1/LFA-1 interactions in productive HIV-1 entry into lymphoid cells using a direct virus-cell fusion assay. ICAM-1 promoted HIV-1 attachment to cells in a temperature-dependent manner. It exerted a marginal effect on virus binding in the cold, but enhanced binding up to 4-fold at physiological temperature. ICAM-1-independent attachment in the cold was readily reversible upon subsequent incubation at elevated temperature, whereas ICAM-1-bearing particles were largely retained by cells. The better virus retention resulted in a proportional increase in HIV-1 internalization and fusion, suggesting that ICAM-1 did not specifically accelerate endocytosis or fusion steps. We also measured the rates of CD4 engagement, productive endocytosis and HIV-endosome fusion using specific fusion inhibitors. These rates were virtually independent of the presence of ICAM-1 in viral particles. Importantly, irrespective of the presence of ICAM-1, HIV-1 escaped from the low temperature block, which stopped virus endocytosis and fusion, much later than from a membrane-impermeant fusion inhibitor targeting surface-accessible particles. This result, along with the complete inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a small molecule dynamin inhibitor, implies this virus enters lymphoid cells used in this study via endocytosis and that this pathway is not altered by the viral ICAM-1. Our data highlight the role of ICAM-1 in stabilizing the HIV-1 attachment to LFA-1 expressing cells, which leads to a proportional enhancement of the receptor-mediated uptake and fusion with endosomes.

  11. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  12. Cutting edge: neuronal recognition by CD8 T cells elicits central diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheikl, Tanja; Pignolet, Béatrice; Dalard, Cécile; Desbois, Sabine; Raison, Danièle; Yamazaki, Masanori; Saoudi, Abdelhadi; Bauer, Jan; Lassmann, Hans; Hardin-Pouzet, Hélène; Liblau, Roland S

    2012-05-15

    An increasing number of neurologic diseases is associated with autoimmunity. The immune effectors contributing to the pathogenesis of such diseases are often unclear. To explore whether self-reactive CD8 T cells could attack CNS neurons in vivo, we generated a mouse model in which the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is expressed specifically in CNS neurons. Transfer of cytotoxic anti-HA CD8 T cells induced an acute but reversible encephalomyelitis in HA-expressing recipient mice. Unexpectedly, diabetes insipidus developed in surviving animals. This robust phenotype was associated with preferential accumulation of cytotoxic CD8 T cells in the hypothalamus, upregulation of MHC class I molecules, and destruction of vasopressin-expressing neurons. IFN-γ production by the pathogenic CD8 T cells was necessary for MHC class I upregulation by hypothalamic neurons and their destruction. This novel mouse model, in combination with related human data, supports the concept that autoreactive CD8 T cells can trigger central diabetes insipidus. PMID:22504649

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Used by Tumors to Escape Immune Recognition: Immunogenetherapy and the Cell Biology of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I

    OpenAIRE

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Kawakami, Yutaka; Marincola, Franco; Shamamian, Peter; Taggarse, Akash; ESQUIVEL, FERNANDO; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, we explore the hypothesis that tumor cells can escape recognition by CD8+ T cells via deficiencies in antigen processing and presentation. Aspects of the molecular and cellular biology of major histocompatibility complex class I are reviewed. Evidence for histology-specific molecular mechanisms in the antigen-processing and -presentation deficiencies observed in some human and murine tumors is presented. Mechanisms identified include down-regulation of antigen processing, los...

  14. Single Molecule Spectroelectrochemistry of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics In Hybrid Organic Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Shanlin [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2014-11-16

    Our research under support of this DOE grant is focused on applied and fundamental aspects of model organic solar cell systems. Major accomplishments are: 1) we developed a spectroelectorchemistry technique of single molecule single nanoparticle method to study charge transfer between conjugated polymers and semiconductor at the single molecule level. The fluorescence of individual fluorescent polymers at semiconductor surfaces was shown to exhibit blinking behavior compared to molecules on glass substrates. Single molecule fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements showed the conformation of the polymer molecules did not differ appreciably between glass and semiconductor substrates. The similarities in molecular conformation suggest that the observed differences in blinking activity are due to charge transfer between fluorescent polymer and semiconductor, which provides additional pathways between states of high and low fluorescence quantum efficiency. Similar spectroelectrochemistry work has been done for small organic dyes for understand their charge transfer dynamics on various substrates and electrochemical environments; 2) We developed a method of transferring semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets into organic solvent for a potential electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells which employed polymer semiconductor as the electron donor. Electron transfer from the polymer semiconductor to semiconductor and GO in solutions and thin films was established through fluorescence spectroscopy and electroluminescence measurements. Solar cells containing these materials were constructed and evaluated using transient absorption spectroscopy and dynamic fluorescence techniques to understand the charge carrier generation and recombination events; 3) We invented a spectroelectorchemistry technique using light scattering and electroluminescence for rapid size determination and studying electrochemistry of single NPs in an

  15. Effects of Estrogen Level on the Function of Vascular Endothelial Cells and Expression of Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule - 1φ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Saizhu(吴赛珠); LIU Jiangguo(刘建国); TAN Jiayu(谭家余); ZHoU Kexiang(周可祥); Gorge D Webb; WEI Heming(隗和明); GUO Zhiguang(郭志刚)

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To ob- serve the effect of different estrogen levels on the se- cretory function of vascular endothelial cells of female rats, and study the effect of modulation of estrogen level on the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule - 1 and the concentration of estrogen receptorin vascular endothelial cells. Methods Radioim-munology was used to measure the serum concentrationof endothelin and PGI2, and copper-cadmium re-duction was employed to measure the serum content ofnitrogen monoxide. Radioligand binding and flowcy-tometry were used to measure the expression of estrogenreceptor and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 ) of vascular endothelial cells respectively. Re-sults 1. The serum concentration of nitric oxide andPGI2 decreased when the ovaries of female rats wereremoved. In ovariectomized rats, given estrogen, theconcentration rose ( P < 0.05), but the plasma con-centration of endothelin was adverse to it. 2. Theconcentration of estrogen receptor of vascular endothe-lial cells decreased remarkably when the ovaries of fe-male rats were removed. When given estrogen, it in-creased. 3. The percent of expressed VCAM - 1 in-creased siguificantly after interleukin- lβoperated onthe cells, but 17 - βestradiol at 3 × 10-8 ~ 10-6 mol/lall decreased the percent. Conclusions Estrogenlevel can influence the secretion of nitrogen monoxide,PGI2 and endothlin of vascular endothelial cells, andalso influence the concentration of estrogen receptor ofvascular endothelial cells. 17 -β Estradiol at 3 × 10-8~ 10-6 M can decrease the elevation of VCAM - 1 ofvascular endothelial cells induced by interleukin - 1 β.

  16. Single molecule narrowfield microscopy of protein-DNA binding dynamics in glucose signal transduction of live yeast cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wollman, Adam J M

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule narrowfield microscopy is a versatile tool to investigate a diverse range of protein dynamics in live cells and has been extensively used in bacteria. Here, we describe how these methods can be extended to larger eukaryotic, yeast cells, which contain sub-cellular compartments. We describe how to obtain single-molecule microscopy data but also how to analyse these data to track and obtain the stoichiometry of molecular complexes diffusing in the cell. We chose glucose mediated signal transduction of live yeast cells as the system to demonstrate these single-molecule techniques as transcriptional regulation is fundamentally a single molecule problem - a single repressor protein binding a single binding site in the genome can dramatically alter behaviour at the whole cell and population level.

  17. Mass spectrometric characterization of elements and molecules in cell cultures and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, H. F.; Kriegeskotte, C.; Fartmann, M.; Wittig, A.; Sauerwein, W.; Lipinsky, D.

    2006-07-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS) have been used to image and quantify targeted compounds, intrinsic elements and molecules with subcellular resolution in single cells of both cell cultures and tissues. Special preparation procedures for analyzing cell cultures and tissue materials were developed. Cancer cells type MeWo, incubated with boronated compounds, were sandwiched between two substrates, cryofixed, freeze-fractured and freeze-dried. Also, after injection with boronated compounds, different types of mouse tissues were extracted, prepared on a special specimen carrier and plunged with high velocity into LN 2-cooled propane for cryofixation. After trimming, these tissue blocks were freeze-dried. The measurements of the K/Na ratio demonstrated that for both cell cultures and tissue materials the special preparation techniques used were appropriate for preserving the chemical and structural integrity of the living cell. The boron images show inter- and intracellular boron signals with different intensities. Molecular images show distinct features partly correlated with the cell structure. A comparison between laser-SNMS and ToF-SIMS showed that especially laser-SNMS is particularly well-suited for identifying specific cell structures and imaging ultratrace element concentrations in tissues.

  18. Mass spectrometric characterization of elements and molecules in cell cultures and tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlinghaus, H.F. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)]. E-mail: arlinghaus@uni-muenster.de; Kriegeskotte, C. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Fartmann, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Wittig, A. [Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Sauerwein, W. [Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Lipinsky, D. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2006-07-30

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS) have been used to image and quantify targeted compounds, intrinsic elements and molecules with subcellular resolution in single cells of both cell cultures and tissues. Special preparation procedures for analyzing cell cultures and tissue materials were developed. Cancer cells type MeWo, incubated with boronated compounds, were sandwiched between two substrates, cryofixed, freeze-fractured and freeze-dried. Also, after injection with boronated compounds, different types of mouse tissues were extracted, prepared on a special specimen carrier and plunged with high velocity into LN{sub 2}-cooled propane for cryofixation. After trimming, these tissue blocks were freeze-dried. The measurements of the K/Na ratio demonstrated that for both cell cultures and tissue materials the special preparation techniques used were appropriate for preserving the chemical and structural integrity of the living cell. The boron images show inter- and intracellular boron signals with different intensities. Molecular images show distinct features partly correlated with the cell structure. A comparison between laser-SNMS and ToF-SIMS showed that especially laser-SNMS is particularly well-suited for identifying specific cell structures and imaging ultratrace element concentrations in tissues.

  19. HLA-DQ molecules as affinity matrix for identification of gluten T cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dørum, Siri; Bodd, Michael; Fallang, Lars-Egil; Bergseng, Elin; Christophersen, Asbjørn; Johannesen, Marie K; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Stamnaes, Jorunn; de Souza, Gustavo A; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2014-11-01

    Even though MHC class II is a dominant susceptibility factor for many diseases, culprit T cell epitopes presented by disease-associated MHC molecules remain largely elusive. T cells of celiac disease lesions recognize cereal gluten epitopes presented by the disease-associated HLA molecules DQ2.5, DQ2.2, or DQ8. Employing celiac disease and complex gluten Ag digests as a model, we tested the feasibility of using DQ2.5 and DQ2.2 as an affinity matrix for identification of disease-relevant T cell epitopes. Known gluten T cell epitope peptides were enriched by DQ2.5, whereas a different set of peptides was enriched by DQ2.2. Of 86 DQ2.2-enriched peptides, four core sequences dominated. One of these core sequences is a previously known epitope and two others are novel epitopes. The study provides insight into the selection of gluten epitopes by DQ2.2. Furthermore, the approach presented is relevant for epitope identification in other MHC class II-associated disorders. PMID:25261484

  20. Solution-Processed Organic Solar Cells from Dye Molecules: An Investigation of Diketopyrrolopyrrole:Vinazene Heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Walker, Bright

    2012-01-25

    Although one of the most attractive aspects of organic solar cells is their low cost and ease of fabrication, the active materials incorporated into the vast majority of reported bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells include a semiconducting polymer and a fullerene derivative, classes of materials which are both typically difficult and expensive to prepare. In this study, we demonstrate that effective BHJs can be fabricated from two easily synthesized dye molecules. Solar cells incorporating a diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based molecule as a donor and a dicyanoimidazole (Vinazene) acceptor function as an active layer in BHJ solar cells, producing relatively high open circuit voltages and power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) up to 1.1%. Atomic force microscope images of the films show that active layers are rough and apparently have large donor and acceptor domains on the surface, whereas photoluminescence of the blends is incompletely quenched, suggesting that higher PCEs might be obtained if the morphology could be improved to yield smaller domain sizes and a larger interfacial area between donor and acceptor phases. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. Light sheet microscopy for tracking single molecules on the apical surface of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Hu, Ying; Cang, Hu

    2013-12-12

    Single particle tracking is a powerful tool to study single molecule dynamics in living biological samples. However, current tracking techniques, which are based mainly on epifluorescence, confocal, or TIRF microscopy, have difficulties in tracking single molecules on the apical surface of a cell. We present here a three-dimensional (3D) single particle tracking technique that is based on prism coupled light-sheet microscopy (PCLSM). This novel design provides a signal-to-noise ratio comparable to confocal microscopy while it has the capability of illuminating at arbitrary depth. We demonstrate tracking of single EGF molcules on the apical surface of live cell membranes from their binding to EGF receptors until they are internalized or photobleached. We found that EGF exhibits multiple diffusion behaviors on live A549 cell membranes. At room temperature, the average diffusion coefficient of EGF on A549 cells was measured to be 0.13 μm(2)/s. Depletion of cellular cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin leads to a broader distribution of diffusion coefficients and an increase of the average diffusion coefficient at room temperature. This light-sheet based 3D single particle tracking technique solves the technique difficulty of tracking single particles on apical membranes and is able to document the whole "lifetime" of a particle from binding till photobleaching or internalization. PMID:23895420

  2. Reversible cryo-arrest for imaging molecules in living cells at high spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masip, Martin E; Huebinger, Jan; Christmann, Jens; Sabet, Ola; Wehner, Frank; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Fuhr, Günther R; Bastiaens, Philippe I H

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of molecules in living cells hampers precise imaging of molecular patterns by functional and super-resolution microscopy. We developed a method that circumvents lethal chemical fixation and allows on-stage cryo-arrest for consecutive imaging of molecular patterns within the same living, but arrested, cells. The reversibility of consecutive cryo-arrests was demonstrated by the high survival rate of different cell lines and by intact growth factor signaling that was not perturbed by stress response. Reversible cryo-arrest was applied to study the evolution of ligand-induced receptor tyrosine kinase activation at different scales. The nanoscale clustering of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the plasma membrane was assessed by single-molecule localization microscopy, and endosomal microscale activity patterns of ephrin receptor A2 (EphA2) were assessed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Reversible cryo-arrest allows the precise determination of molecular patterns while conserving the dynamic capabilities of living cells. PMID:27400419

  3. Fonsecaea pedrosoi-induced Th17-cell differentiation in mice is fostered by Dectin-2 and suppressed by Mincle recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Wang, Huafeng; Li, Mengyi; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Hardison, Sarah E; Brown, Gordon D; Klein, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    Chromoblastomycosis is a chronic skin infection caused by the pigmented saprophytic mould Fonsecaea pedrosoi. Chronicity of infection can be broken by a coordinated innate recognition of the spores by pattern recognition receptors. While Mincle signaling via the Syk/Card9 pathway is required for fungal recognition by host cells, it is not sufficient for host control. Exogenously applied TLR agonists are necessary to promote the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and clearance of infection in vivo. Here, we investigated whether costimulation by TLR agonists fosters the development of adaptive immune responses, by examining the development of fungus-specific T cells. Subcutaneous infection of mice with F. pedrosoi spores induced the activation, expansion, and differentiation of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells but TLR costimulation did not further augment these T-cell responses. The Dectin-2/FcRγ/Card9 signaling pathway promoted the differentiation of fungus-specific CD4(+) T cells into Th17 cells, whereas Mincle inhibited the development of this T-helper subset in infected mice. These results indicate differential roles for Dectin-2 and Mincle in the generation of adaptive immune responses to F. pedrosoi infection. PMID:26140582

  4. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses by chimeric thymocytes. Self-recognition is determined early in T cell development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruisbeek, A.M.; Hodes, R.J.; Singer, A.

    1981-01-01

    In this study the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) recognition pattern of thymocytes from recently reconstituted parent leads to F1 and F1 leads to parent radiation bone marrow chimeras was investigated. Chimeric thymocytes were entirely of donor origin approximately 4 weeks after irradiation and reconstitution but were not capable of autonomously generating either alloreactive or trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified-self-reactive CTL responses. These experiments demonstrte that even at the earliest time CTL effectors of donor origin from the thymuses of chimeras can be studied, their self-receptor repertoire has already been restricted to recognition of host MHC determinants. These results support the cocept that the host environment influences the self-recognition capacity of T cells at the pre- or intrathymic stage of differentation.

  5. Determination of the Absolute Number of Cytokine mRNA Molecules within Individual Activated Human T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Marshall, Gwen; Hockett, Richard D.; Bucy, R. Pat; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A primary function of activated T cells is the expression and subsequent secretion of cytokines, which orchestrate the differentiation of other lymphocytes, modulate antigen presenting cell activity, and alter vascular endothelium to mediate an immune response. Since many features of immune regulation probably result from modest alterations of endogenous rates of multiple interacting processes, quantitative analysis of the frequency and specific activity of individual T cells is critically important. Using a coordinated set of quantitative methods, the absolute number of molecules of several key cytokine mRNA species in individual T cells has been determined. The frequency of human blood T cells activated in vitro by mitogens and recall protein antigens was determined by intracellular cytokine protein staining, in situ hybridization for cytokine mRNA, and by limiting dilution analysis for cytokine mRNA+ cells. The absolute number of mRNA molecules was simultaneously determined in both homogenates of the entire population of cells and in individual cells obtained by limiting dilution, using a quantitative, competitive RT-PCR assay. The absolute numbers of mRNA molecules in a population of cells divided by the frequency of individual positive cells, yielded essentially the same number of mRNA molecules per cell as direct analysis of individual cells by limiting dilution analysis. Mean numbers of mRNA per positive cell from both mitogen and antigen activated T cells, using these stimulation conditions, were 6000 for IL-2, 6300 for IFN-gamma, and 1600 for IL-4.

  6. Electronic excitations in solution-processed oligothiophene small-molecules for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala, F; Mattiello, L; Brunetti, F; Zollo, G

    2016-02-28

    First principles calculations based on density functional theory and many body perturbation theory have been employed to study the optical absorption properties of a newly synthesized oligo-thiophene molecule, with a quaterthiophene central unit, that has been designed for solution-processed bulk-heterojunction solar cells. To this aim we have employed the GW approach to obtain quasiparticle energies as a pre-requisite to solve the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the excitonic Hamiltonian. We show that the experimental absorption spectrum can be explained only by taking into account the inter-molecular transitions among the π-stacked poly-conjugated molecules that are typically obtained in solid-state organic samples. PMID:26931705

  7. Determination of the number of photoreactivating enzyme molecules per haploid Saccharomyces cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two haploid radiation-sensitive mutants of Saccharomyces were studied to investigate the formation of complex between photoreactivating-enzyme and substrate after ultra-violet irradiation. Using photo-flashes, the time necessary for maximum complex formation has been determined. Within 1 min, 70 per cent of the complexes have been formed. To determine the number of photoreactivating enzyme molecules per cell, the maximum dose decrement obtained after one photo-flash was determined and corrected for the effects of non-photoreactivable lesions. The corrected maximum dose decrement was found to be identical for both strains (8.5 erg mm-2). The number of photoreactivating-enzyme molecules involved in the photorepair of nuclear DNA damage was calculated as 272 +- 27. (author)

  8. Small Molecule-BIO Accelerates and Enhances Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Vitro Chondrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadreza Baghaban Eslaminejad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyaline cartilage defects exhibit a major challenge in the field of orthopedic surgery owing to its limited repair capacity. On the other hand, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are regarded as potent cells with a property of cartilage regeneration. We aimed to optimize marrow-derived MSC chondrogenic culture using a small bioactive molecule referred to as BIO. Methods: MSCs from the marrow of NMRI mice were extracted, culture-expanded, and characterized. Micro-mass culture was then established for chondrogenic differentiation (control group. The cultures of MSC in chondrogenic medium supplemented with 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, and 1 µM BIO were taken as the experimental groups. Cartilage differentiation was examined by both histological sections and real-time PCR for Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen II at different time points. Moreover, the involvement of the Wnt pathway was investigated. Results: Based on histological sections, there was seemingly more intense metachromatic matrix produced in the cultures with 0.01 µM BIO. In this experimental group, cartilage-specific genes tended to be upregulated at day 14 compared to day 21 of the control group, indicating the accelerating effect of BIO on cartilage differentiation. Overall, there was statistically a significant increase (P=0.01 in the expression level of cartilage-specific genes in cultures with 0.01 µM BIO (enhancing effects. These upregulations appeared to be mediated through the Wnt pathway evident from the significant upregulation of T-cell factor and beta-catenin molecules (P=0.01. Conclusion: Taken together, BIO at 0.01 µM could accelerate and enhance in vitro chondrogenesis of mouse marrow-derived MSCs. Please cite this article as: Baghaban Eslaminejad MR, Fallah N. Small Molecule-BIO Accelerates and Enhances Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Vitro Chondrogenesis. Iran J Med Sci. 2014;39(2:107-116.

  9. Phenotypic modulation of auto-reactive cells by insertion of tolerogenic molecules via MSC-derived exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aram Mokarizadeh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Auto-reactive cells-mediated immune responses are responsible for the current tissue damages during autoimmunity. Accordingly, functional modulation of auto-reactive cells has been a pivotal aim in many of recent studies. In the current study, we investigated the possibility for insertion of regulatory molecules onto auto-reactive cells through exosomal nano-shuttles as a novel approach for phenotype modification of auto-reactive cells. The exosomes were isolated from supernatant of mesenchymal stem cells culture. Resultant exosomes co-cultured with lymphocytes were harvested from established EAE mice in the presence of antigenic MOG35-55 peptide. After 24 hr, insertion of exosomal tolerogenic molecules (PD-L1, TGF-β, galectin-1 onto auto-reactive cells were explored through flow cytometry. The potency of exosomal inserted membrane molecules to modulate phenotype of auto-reactive lymphocytes was assessed upon ELISA test for their-derived cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17. Incorporation of exosomal molecules into lymohocytes’ membrane was confirmed by flow cytometric analyses for surface levels of mentioned molecules. Additionally, the decreased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 were detected in exosome pre-treated lymphocytes upon stimulation with MOG peptide. Mesenchymal stem cells -derived exosomes showed to be efficient organelles for insertion of bioactive tolerogenic molecules onto auto-reactive cells and modulation of their phenotypes.

  10. Characterization of nanostructures in the live cell plasma membrane utilizing advanced single molecule fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unrevealing the detailed structure of the cellular plasma membrane at a nanoscopic length scale is the key for understanding the regulation of various signaling pathways or interaction mechanism. Hypotheses postulate the existence of nanoscopic lipid platforms in the cell membrane which are termed lipid- or membrane rafts. Based on biochemical studies, rafts are believed to play a crucial role in many signaling processes. However, there is currently not much information on their size, shape, stability, surface density, composition and heterogeneity. In this thesis I present an ultra-sensitive fluorescence based method which allows for the first time the direct imaging of single mobile rafts in the live cell plasma membrane. The method senses rafts by their property to assemble a characteristic set of fluorescent marker-proteins or lipids on a time-scale of seconds. A special photobleaching protocol was developed and used to reduce the surface density of labeled mobile rafts down to the level of well-isolated diffraction-limited spots, without altering the single spot brightness. The statistical distribution of probe molecules per raft was determined by single molecule brightness analysis. For demonstration, I used the consensus markers Bodipy-GM1, a fluorescent lipid analogue, and glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol-anchored monomeric GFP. For both markers I found cholesterol-dependent association in the plasma membrane of living CHO and Jurkat T cells in the resting state, indicating the presence of mobile, stable rafts hosting these probes. I further characterized these structures by taking cell-to-cell variations under consideration. By comparing Bodipy-GM1 with mGFP-GPI homo-association upon temperature variation, two different states - a non-equilibrated and an equilibrated state - could be identified. I conclude that rafts are loaded non-randomly; the characteristic load is maintained during its lifetime in the plasma membrane of a non-activated cell. Beside these

  11. Superantigen presentation by human retinal pigment epithelial cells to T cells is dependent on CD2-CD58 and CD18-CD54 molecule interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Junker, N; Kaestel, C G;

    2001-01-01

    . Proliferation was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. In selected experiments, either RPE or T cells were pre-treated with blocking antibodies specific for cell surface molecules. For comparison, dendritic cells were used as superantigen presenting cells for T cells. This study showed that......Human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are capable of presenting bacterial superantigens (SAg) to T cells in vitro by ligation of MHC class II molecules on RPE cells with the T cell receptor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the involvement of adhesion molecules in presentation of...... SAg. Cultured human fetal and adult RPE cells were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma, 500 U ml(-1) for 72 hr) and afterwards pulsed with the SAg staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA, 500 ng ml(-1) for 2 hr) followed by coculture with freshly obtained T cells isolated from peripheral blood...

  12. A High-avidity WT1-reactive T-Cell Receptor Mediates Recognition of Peptide and Processed Antigen but not Naturally Occurring WT1-positive Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaigirdar, Adnan; Rosenberg, Steven A; Parkhurst, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) is an attractive target antigen for cancer immunotherapy because it is overexpressed in many hematologic malignancies and solid tumors but has limited, low-level expression in normal adult tissues. Multiple HLA class I and class II restricted epitopes have been identified in WT1, and multiple investigators are pursuing the treatment of cancer patients with WT1-based vaccines and adoptively transferred WT1-reactive T cells. Here we isolated an HLA-A*0201-restricted WT1-reactive T-cell receptor (TCR) by stimulating peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors with the peptide WT1:126-134 in vitro. This TCR mediated peptide recognition down to a concentration of ∼0.1 ng/mL when pulsed onto T2 cells as well as recognition of HLA-A*0201 target cells transfected with full-length WT1 cDNA. However, it did not mediate consistent recognition of many HLA-A*0201 tumor cell lines or freshly isolated leukemia cells that endogeneously expressed WT1. We dissected this pattern of recognition further and observed that WT1:126-134 was more efficiently processed by immunoproteasomes compared with standard proteasomes. However, pretreatment of WT1 tumor cell lines with interferon gamma did not appreciably enhance recognition by our TCR. In addition, we highly overexpressed WT1 in several leukemia cell lines by electroporation with full-length WT1 cDNA. Some of these lines were still not recognized by our TCR suggesting possible antigen processing defects in some leukemias. These results suggest WT1:126-134 may not be a suitable target for T-cell based tumor immunotherapies. PMID:26938944

  13. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljona Gaiko-Shcherbak

    Full Text Available The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function.

  14. Signal transduction by HLA class II molecules in human T cells: induction of LFA-1-dependent and independent adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Yoshizumi, H; Okamoto, Y;

    1992-01-01

    Crosslinking HLA-DR molecules by monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation and results in a secondary elevation of free cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in activated human T cells. Binding of bacterial superantigens or moAbs to DR molecules on activated T cells was...... antigen- and alloantigen-activated T cells, antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell lines, a CD8+ T-cytotoxic cell line, and T-leukemia cells (HUT78). Protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor herbimycin A partly blocked class-II-induced aggregation responses. In contrast, phorbol ester (PMA)-induced aggregation was......, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor (2'5'-dideoxyadenosine), and moAbs against other adhesion molecules (CD2/CD58 [LFA-3], CD28/CD28 ligand B7, CD4, and CD44). In conclusion, HLA class-II-induced aggregation responses in activated T cells appear to involve PTK and PKC activation and to be mediated through...

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on cell-matrix interactions at the single molecule level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single molecule microscopy is a technology that allows for accurate assessment of the location and motion of single fluorescent molecules, even in the context of observations on living biological samples. In the present thesis, a flexible analysis tool for single molecule data as obtained in biological experiments was established. The development of a tool to faithfully detect and localize diffraction-limited images of individual fluorescent probes was necessary since data acquired under cell cultivation conditions that account for a three-dimensional microenvironment as experienced physiologically by cells in native tissue poses a challenge not faced ordinarily. After design, implementation, quantitative tests using simulations for comparisons and verification, and evaluation of the different steps of the analysis procedure including local background estimation, local noise estimation, de-noising approaches, detection, localization, and post-processing, analysis capabilities were utilized to evaluate the impact of x-ray irradiation on the plasma membrane architecture of U2OS human osteosarcoma cells as assessed by tracking individual fluorescent lipid-mimetic dye molecules diffusing in the outer membrane leaflet. It was shown that lateral diffusion in the plasma membrane is well described as two-phase anomalous subdiffusion and presence of 3D extracellular matrix leads to lower anomalous exponents of the fast fraction in comparison to monolayer cell culture. Interestingly, even high single-dose (25 Gy) treatments known to induce membrane-mediated apoptosis in tumor microvessel endothelium via membrane viscosity enhancing ceramide generation were not observed to alter membrane architecture in U2OS cells which can be related to amplifying, feedback-driven redox-signaling in the endothelium absent in U2OS. In summary, the sensitive and accurate framework developed in this thesis to assess minute changes of plasma membrane located dynamic processes did not uncover a

  16. Effects of ionizing radiation on cell-matrix interactions at the single molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauer, Florian

    2015-04-20

    Single molecule microscopy is a technology that allows for accurate assessment of the location and motion of single fluorescent molecules, even in the context of observations on living biological samples. In the present thesis, a flexible analysis tool for single molecule data as obtained in biological experiments was established. The development of a tool to faithfully detect and localize diffraction-limited images of individual fluorescent probes was necessary since data acquired under cell cultivation conditions that account for a three-dimensional microenvironment as experienced physiologically by cells in native tissue poses a challenge not faced ordinarily. After design, implementation, quantitative tests using simulations for comparisons and verification, and evaluation of the different steps of the analysis procedure including local background estimation, local noise estimation, de-noising approaches, detection, localization, and post-processing, analysis capabilities were utilized to evaluate the impact of x-ray irradiation on the plasma membrane architecture of U2OS human osteosarcoma cells as assessed by tracking individual fluorescent lipid-mimetic dye molecules diffusing in the outer membrane leaflet. It was shown that lateral diffusion in the plasma membrane is well described as two-phase anomalous subdiffusion and presence of 3D extracellular matrix leads to lower anomalous exponents of the fast fraction in comparison to monolayer cell culture. Interestingly, even high single-dose (25 Gy) treatments known to induce membrane-mediated apoptosis in tumor microvessel endothelium via membrane viscosity enhancing ceramide generation were not observed to alter membrane architecture in U2OS cells which can be related to amplifying, feedback-driven redox-signaling in the endothelium absent in U2OS. In summary, the sensitive and accurate framework developed in this thesis to assess minute changes of plasma membrane located dynamic processes did not uncover a

  17. Efficient polymer solar cells employing a non-conjugated small-molecule electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xinhua; Peng, Ruixiang; Ai, Ling; Zhang, Xingye; Ge, Ziyi

    2015-08-01

    Polymer solar cells have drawn a great deal of attention due to the attractiveness of their use in renewable energy sources that are potentially lightweight and low in cost. Recently, numerous significant research efforts have resulted in polymer solar cells with power conversion efficiencies in excess of 9% (ref. 1). Nevertheless, further improvements in performance are sought for commercial applications. Here, we report polymer solar cells with a power conversion efficiency of 10.02% that employ a non-conjugated small-molecule electrolyte as an interlayer. The material offers good contact for photogenerated charge carrier collection and allows optimum photon harvesting in the device. Furthermore, the enhanced performance is attributed to improved electron mobility, enhanced active-layer absorption and properly active-layer microstructures with optimal horizontal phase separation and vertical phase gradation. Our discovery opens a new avenue for single-junction devices by fully exploiting the potential of various material systems with efficiency over 10%.

  18. Sniping the scout: Targeting the key molecules in dendritic cell functions for treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Han, Yanping; Sun, Erwei

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a power tool for manipulating immune system. They play important roles in the induction of immunity as well as inducing intrathymic and peripheral tolerance. After generated from stem cells in the bone marrow, DCs traffic to the peripheral tissues, where they capture and process antigens, express lymphocyte co-stimulators, migrate to the secondary lymph organs and present the processed antigen to naive T cells to either activate or tolerize them. These processes are modulated subtly and influenced by various factors. Aberrant regulation of the processes may cause autoimmunity. Investigation into the biology of DCs and the molecules and mechanisms that regulate them helps us understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and reveals numerous steps for pharmacological manipulation. In this review, we made a sketch line of the critical events of DC biology that are potential pharmacologic targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26931618

  19. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  20. A general method to improve fluorophores for live-cell and single-molecule microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jonathan B; English, Brian P; Chen, Jiji; Slaughter, Joel P; Zhang, Zhengjian; Revyakin, Andrey; Patel, Ronak; Macklin, John J; Normanno, Davide; Singer, Robert H; Lionnet, Timothée; Lavis, Luke D

    2015-03-01

    Specific labeling of biomolecules with bright fluorophores is the keystone of fluorescence microscopy. Genetically encoded self-labeling tag proteins can be coupled to synthetic dyes inside living cells, resulting in brighter reporters than fluorescent proteins. Intracellular labeling using these techniques requires cell-permeable fluorescent ligands, however, limiting utility to a small number of classic fluorophores. Here we describe a simple structural modification that improves the brightness and photostability of dyes while preserving spectral properties and cell permeability. Inspired by molecular modeling, we replaced the N,N-dimethylamino substituents in tetramethylrhodamine with four-membered azetidine rings. This addition of two carbon atoms doubles the quantum efficiency and improves the photon yield of the dye in applications ranging from in vitro single-molecule measurements to super-resolution imaging. The novel substitution is generalizable, yielding a palette of chemical dyes with improved quantum efficiencies that spans the UV and visible range. PMID:25599551

  1. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Mochrie, Simon; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body looking for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) to antigen induces signaling cascades that lead to B cell activation and eventual production of high affinity antibodies. During activation, BCR organize into signaling microclusters, which are platforms for signal amplification. The physical processes underlying receptor movement and aggregation are not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of single BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using TIRF imaging and single particle tracking. The tracks obtained are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM) a systems-level analysis that allows the identification of different short-time diffusive states from a set of single particle tracks. We identified five different diffusive states on wild type cells, which correspond to different molecular states of the BCR. By using actin polymerization inhibitors and mutant cells lacking important actin regulators we were able to identify the BCR molecule configuration associated with each diffusive state.

  2. Small-molecule-directed, efficient generation of retinal pigment epithelium from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruotti, Julien; Sripathi, Srinivas R; Bharti, Kapil; Fuller, John; Wahlin, Karl J; Ranganathan, Vinod; Sluch, Valentin M; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Davis, Janine; Kim, Catherine; Zhao, Lijun; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Corneo, Barbara; Temple, Sally; Dubey, Ramin; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z; Bhutto, Imran; Lutty, Gerard A; Zack, Donald J

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with dysfunction and death of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Cell-based approaches using RPE-like cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are being developed for AMD treatment. However, most efficient RPE differentiation protocols rely on complex, stepwise treatments and addition of growth factors, whereas small-molecule-only approaches developed to date display reduced yields. To identify new compounds that promote RPE differentiation, we developed and performed a high-throughput quantitative PCR screen complemented by a novel orthogonal human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-based RPE reporter assay. Chetomin, an inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factors, was found to strongly increase RPE differentiation; combination with nicotinamide resulted in conversion of over one-half of the differentiating cells into RPE. Single passage of the whole culture yielded a highly pure hPSC-RPE cell population that displayed many of the morphological, molecular, and functional characteristics of native RPE. PMID:26269569

  3. Sensitivity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to small targeted therapeutic molecules: An in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvan, Sandra Eketorp; Skribek, Henriette; Norin, Stefan; Muhari, Orsolya; Österborg, Anders; Szekely, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    New drugs targeting important cellular signaling pathways are currently being developed for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It is therefore of interest to analyze their in vitro killing capacity in manufacturer-independent, comparative experiments. We here report on the sensitivity of CLL cells to a panel of emerging targeted therapeutics using high-throughput screening based on an automated fluorescence digital scanning system. Fresh CLL cells from 42 patients with indolent or progressive CLL were cultured for 72 hours on microtiter plates in a unique primary cell culture medium. Antitumor effects of 31 small therapeutic molecules (and, as controls, 29 cytostatic agents) at equimolar concentration were compared in a fluorescence survival assay. In vitro sensitivity to each drug exhibited considerable interpatient variability. The highest mean direct killing was observed for one survivin inhibitor (YM-155), two bcl-2 inhibitors (ABT-199, ABT-737), and one selective CDK inhibitor (dinaciclib). Their killing capacity was, in contrast to most cytostatic agents, similarly high in refractory versus untreated CLL patients and was significantly higher on cells with the 17p deletion/TP53 mutation than on cells with other cytogenetic abnormalities (p = 0.02). Sensitivity of bone marrow and lymph node cells was highly correlated with that of blood cells. Even though direct killing may not be the only therapeutic effector function in vivo, results from this head-to-head comparison may help to identify drugs of particular interest for intensified clinical development. PMID:26325331

  4. A combination of small molecules directly reprograms mouse fibroblasts into neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Choi, Kyung-Ah; Kang, Phil Jun; Hyeon, Solji; Kwon, Suhyun; Moon, Jai-Hee; Hwang, Insik; Kim, Yang In; Kim, Yoon Sik; Yoon, Byung Sun; Park, Gyuman; Lee, JangBo; Hong, SungHoi; You, Seungkwon

    2016-07-15

    The generation of induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) from somatic cells using defined factors provides new avenues for basic research and cell therapies for various neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and spinal cord injuries. However, the transcription factors used for direct reprogramming have the potential to cause unexpected genetic modifications, which limits their potential application in cell therapies. Here, we show that a combination of four chemical compounds resulted in cells directly acquiring a NSC identity; we termed these cells chemically-induced NSCs (ciNSCs). ciNSCs expressed NSC markers (Pax6, PLZF, Nestin, Sox2, and Sox1) and resembled NSCs in terms of their morphology, self-renewal, gene expression profile, and electrophysiological function when differentiated into the neuronal lineage. Moreover, ciNSCs could differentiate into several types of mature neurons (dopaminergic, GABAergic, and cholinergic) as well as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest that stably expandable and functional ciNSCs can be directly reprogrammed from mouse fibroblasts using a combination of small molecules without any genetic manipulation, and will provide a new source of cells for cellular replacement therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27207831

  5. Type I interferon production during herpes simplex virus infection is controlled by cell-type-specific viral recognition through Toll-like receptor 9, the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein pathway, and novel recognition systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Brandtoft; Sørensen, Louise Nørgaard; Malmgaard, Lene; Ank, Nina; Baines, JD; Chen, ZJ; Paludan, Søren Riis

    2007-01-01

    Recognition of viruses by germ line-encoded pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system is essential for rapid production of type I interferon (IFN) and early antiviral defense. We investigated the mechanisms of viral recognition governing production of type I IFN during herpes...... fibroblasts, where the virus was able to replicate, HSV-induced IFN-alpha/beta production was dependent on both viral entry and replication, and ablated in cells unable to signal through the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein pathway. Thus, during an HSV infection in vivo, multiple mechanisms of...

  6. A Cell Lysis and Protein Purification - Single Molecule Assay Devices for Evaluation of Genetically Engineered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakyama, Tetsuya; Tabata, Kazuhito; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    We have developed two devices applicable to evaluate genetically engineered proteins in single molecule assay: on-chip cell lysis device, and protein purification - assay device. A motor protein, F1-ATPase expressed in E.coli, was focused in this report as a target protein. Cell lysis was simply performed by applying pulse voltage between Au electrodes patterned by photolithography, and its efficiency was determined by absorptiometry. The subsequent processes, purification and assay of extracted proteins, were demonstrated in order to detect F1-ATPase and to evaluate its activity. The specific bonding between his-tag in F1-ATPase and Ni-NTA coated on a glass surface was utilized for the purification process. After immobilization of F1-ATPase, avidin-coated microspheres and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) solution were infused sequentially to assay the protein. Microsphere rotation was realized by activity of F1-ATPase corresponding to ATP hydrolysis. Results show that the cell lysis device, at the optimum condition, extracts enough amount of protein for single molecule assay. Once cell lysate was injected to the purification - assay device, proteins were diffused in the lateral direction in a Y-shape microchannel. The gradient of protein concentratioin provides an optimal concentration for the assay i.e. the highest density of rotating beads. Density of rotating beads is also affected by the initial concentration of protein injected to the device. The optimum concentration was achieved by our cell lysis device not by the conventional method by ultrasonic wave. Rotation speed was analyzed for several microspheres assayed in the purification - assay device, and the results were compatible to that of conventional assay in which F1-ATPase was purified in bulk scale. In conclusion, we have demonstrated on-chip cell lysis and assay appropriate for the sequential analysis without any pretreatment. On-chip devices replacing conventional bioanalytical methods will be

  7. T cells, adhesion molecules and modulation of apoptosis in visceral leishmaniasis glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goto Hiro

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune complex deposition is the accepted mechanism of pathogenesis of VL glomerulopathy however other immune elements may participate. Further in the present study, no difference was seen between immunoglobulin and C3b deposit intensity in glomeruli between infected and non-infected dogs thus T cells, adhesion molecules and parameters of proliferation and apoptosis were analysed in dogs with naturally acquired VL from an endemic area. The dog is the most important domestic reservoir of the protozoa Leishmania (L. chagasi that causes visceral leishmaniasis (VL. The similarity of VL manifestation in humans and dogs renders the study of canine VL nephropathy of interest with regard to human pathology. Methods From 55 dogs with VL and 8 control non-infected dogs from an endemic area, kidney samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for immunoglobulin and C3b deposits, staining for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, ICAM-1, P-selectin and quantified using morphometry. Besides proliferation marker Ki-67, apoptosis markers M30 and TUNEL staining, and related cytokines TNF-α, IL-1α were searched and quantified. Results We observed similar IgG, IgM and IgA and C3b deposit intensity in dogs with VL and non-infected control dogs. However we detected the Leishmania antigen in cells in glomeruli in 54, CD4+ T cells in the glomeruli of 44, and CD8+ T cells in 17 of a total of 55 dogs with VL. Leishmania antigen was absent and T cells were absent/scarse in eight non-infected control dogs. CD 4+ T cells predominate in proliferative patterns of glomerulonephritis, however the presence of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were not different in intensity in different patterns of glomerulonephritis. The expression of ICAM-1 and P-selectin was significantly greater in the glomeruli of infected dogs than in control dogs. In all patterns of glomerulonephritis the expression of ICAM-1 ranged from minimum to moderately severe and P-selectin from absent to severe. In

  8. Live-cell microscopy reveals small molecule inhibitor effects on MAPK pathway dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Anderson

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway are prevalent in human tumors, making this pathway a target of drug development efforts. Recently, ATP-competitive Raf inhibitors were shown to cause MAPK pathway activation via Raf kinase priming in wild-type BRaf cells and tumors, highlighting the need for a thorough understanding of signaling in the context of small molecule kinase inhibitors. Here, we present critical improvements in cell-line engineering and image analysis coupled with automated image acquisition that allow for the simultaneous identification of cellular localization of multiple MAPK pathway components (KRas, CRaf, Mek1 and Erk2. We use these assays in a systematic study of the effect of small molecule inhibitors across the MAPK cascade either as single agents or in combination. Both Raf inhibitor priming as well as the release from negative feedback induced by Mek and Erk inhibitors cause translocation of CRaf to the plasma membrane via mechanisms that are additive in pathway activation. Analysis of Erk activation and sub-cellular localization upon inhibitor treatments reveals differential inhibition and activation with the Raf inhibitors AZD628 and GDC0879 respectively. Since both single agent and combination studies of Raf and Mek inhibitors are currently in the clinic, our assays provide valuable insight into their effects on MAPK signaling in live cells.

  9. Role of soluble and cell surface molecules in the pathogenesis of autoimmune skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosera, M; Facchetti, F; Landolfo, S; Mondini, M; Nyberg, F; Parodi, A; Santoro, A; Zampieri, S; Doria, A

    2006-01-01

    The skin is one of the most commonly involved tissue in rheumatic autoimmune diseases. Different mechanisms are thought to be implicated in the pathogenesis of skin lesions. In genetically predisposed individuals, ultraviolet (UV) light can contribute to the induction of skin lesions via an inflammatory process. UV light promotes the release of cytokines by keratinocytes and the induction of adhesion molecules on the surface of epidermal cells initiating a cascade of inflammatory events and recruiting immunoinflammatory cells into the skin. In this review data regarding the expression of TNF-alpha in lesional skin tissue from subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus patients and the role of interferons in the pathogenesis of skin manifestations of rheumatic autoimmune diseases are reported. In addition, an overview on the expression of cellular adhesion molecules in these diseases is provided.UV light can also induce apoptosis in keratinocytes. During this cell death several enzymes became activated. Among them, desoxyribonuclease (DNase) is an enzyme involved in degrading DNA during apoptosis. Data regarding the activity of DNAse in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus as a possible risk factor for the development of systemic disease are here reported. PMID:16466628

  10. A secreted form of the human lymphocyte cell surface molecule CD8 arises from alternative splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human lymphocyte differentiation antigen CD8 is encoded by a single gene that gives rise to a 33- to 34-kDa glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface as a dimer and in higher molecular mass forms. The authors demonstrate that the mRNA is alternatively spliced so that an exon encoding a transmembrane domain is deleted. This gives rise to a 30-kDa molecule that is secreted and exists primarily as a monomer. mRNA corresponding to both forms is present in peripheral blood lymphocytes, Con A-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes, and three CD8+ T-cell lines, with the membrane form being the major species. However, differences in the ratio of mRNA for membrane CD8 and secreted CD8 exist. In addition, the splicing pattern observed differs from the pattern found for the mouse CD8 gene. This mRNA is also alternatively spliced, but an exon encoding a cytoplasmic region is deleted, giving rise to a cell surface molecule that differs in its cytoplasmic tail from the protein encoded by the longer mRNA. Neither protein is secreted. This is one of the first examples of a different splicing pattern between two homologous mouse and human genes giving rise to very different proteins. This represents one mechanism of generating diversity during speciation

  11. Quantitative spatial analysis of transcripts in multinucleate cells using single-molecule FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ChangHwan; Roberts, Samantha E; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2016-04-01

    mRNA positioning in the cell is important for diverse cellular functions and proper development of multicellular organisms. Single-molecule RNA FISH (smFISH) enables quantitative investigation of mRNA localization and abundance at the level of individual molecules in the context of cellular features. Details about spatial mRNA patterning at various times, in different genetic backgrounds, at different developmental stages, and under varied environmental conditions provide invaluable insights into the mechanisms and functions of spatial regulation. Here, we describe detailed methods for performing smFISH along with immunofluorescence for two large, multinucleate cell types: the fungus Ashbya gossypii and cultured mouse myotubes. We also put forward a semi-automated image processing tool that systematically detects mRNAs from smFISH data and statistically analyzes the spatial pattern of mRNAs using a customized MATLAB code. These protocols and image analysis tools can be adapted to a wide variety of transcripts and cell types for systematically and quantitatively analyzing mRNA distribution in three-dimensional space. PMID:26690072

  12. Cloning and expression of the receptor for human urokinase plasminogen activator, a central molecule in cell surface, plasmin dependent proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan, A L; Cubellis, M V; Masucci, M T;

    1990-01-01

    The surface receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) has been recognized in recent years as a key molecule in regulating plasminogen mediated extracellular proteolysis. Surface plasminogen activation controls the connections between cells, basement membrane and extracellular matrix, an...

  13. Expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecules on adult stem cells after neuronal differentiation of inner ear spiral ganglion neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyoung Ho [Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Sang Won, E-mail: swyeo@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Troy, Frederic A., E-mail: fatroy@ucdavis.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, School of Medicine, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Xiamen University, School of Medicine, Xiamen City (China)

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • PolySia expressed on neurons primarily during early stages of neuronal development. • PolySia–NCAM is expressed on neural stem cells from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion. • PolySia is a biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. - Abstract: During brain development, polysialylated (polySia) neural cell adhesion molecules (polySia–NCAMs) modulate cell–cell adhesive interactions involved in synaptogenesis, neural plasticity, myelination, and neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and differentiation. Our findings show that polySia–NCAM is expressed on NSC isolated from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion (GPSG), and in neurons and Schwann cells after differentiation of the NSC with epidermal, glia, fibroblast growth factors (GFs) and neurotrophins. These differentiated cells were immunoreactive with mAb’s to polySia, NCAM, β-III tubulin, nestin, S-100 and stained with BrdU. NSC could regenerate and be differentiated into neurons and Schwann cells. We conclude: (1) polySia is expressed on NSC isolated from adult GPSG and on neurons and Schwann cells differentiated from these NSC; (2) polySia is expressed on neurons primarily during the early stage of neuronal development and is expressed on Schwann cells at points of cell–cell contact; (3) polySia is a functional biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. These new findings suggest that replacement of defective cells in the inner ear of hearing impaired patients using adult spiral ganglion neurons may offer potential hope to improve the quality of life for patients with auditory dysfunction and impaired hearing disorders.

  14. Expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecules on adult stem cells after neuronal differentiation of inner ear spiral ganglion neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PolySia expressed on neurons primarily during early stages of neuronal development. • PolySia–NCAM is expressed on neural stem cells from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion. • PolySia is a biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. - Abstract: During brain development, polysialylated (polySia) neural cell adhesion molecules (polySia–NCAMs) modulate cell–cell adhesive interactions involved in synaptogenesis, neural plasticity, myelination, and neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and differentiation. Our findings show that polySia–NCAM is expressed on NSC isolated from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion (GPSG), and in neurons and Schwann cells after differentiation of the NSC with epidermal, glia, fibroblast growth factors (GFs) and neurotrophins. These differentiated cells were immunoreactive with mAb’s to polySia, NCAM, β-III tubulin, nestin, S-100 and stained with BrdU. NSC could regenerate and be differentiated into neurons and Schwann cells. We conclude: (1) polySia is expressed on NSC isolated from adult GPSG and on neurons and Schwann cells differentiated from these NSC; (2) polySia is expressed on neurons primarily during the early stage of neuronal development and is expressed on Schwann cells at points of cell–cell contact; (3) polySia is a functional biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. These new findings suggest that replacement of defective cells in the inner ear of hearing impaired patients using adult spiral ganglion neurons may offer potential hope to improve the quality of life for patients with auditory dysfunction and impaired hearing disorders

  15. Small molecule inhibition of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase suppresses t cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telang Sucheta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cell activation is associated with a rapid increase in intracellular fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6BP, an allosteric activator of the glycolytic enzyme, 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase. The steady state concentration of F2,6BP in T cells is dependent on the expression of the bifunctional 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatases (PFKFB1-4 and the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, TIGAR. Of the PFKFB family of enzymes, PFKFB3 has the highest kinase:bisphosphatase ratio and has been demonstrated to be required for T cell proliferation. A small molecule antagonist of PFKFB3, 3-(3-pyridinyl-1-(4-pyridinyl-2-propen-1-one (3PO, recently has been shown to reduce F2,6BP synthesis, glucose uptake and proliferation in transformed cells. We hypothesized that the induction of PFKFB3 expression may be required for the stimulation of glycolysis in T cells and that exposure to the PFKFB3 antagonist, 3PO, would suppress T cell activation. Methods We examined PFKFB1-4 and TIGAR expression and F2,6BP concentration in purified CD3+ T cells stimulated with microbead-conjugated agonist antibodies specific for CD3 and the co-stimulatory receptor, CD28. We then determined the effect of 3PO on anti-CD3/anti-CD28-induced T cell activation, F2,6BP synthesis, 2-[1-14C]-deoxy-d-glucose uptake, lactate secretion, TNF-α secretion and proliferation. Finally, we examined the effect of 3PO administration on the development of delayed type hypersensitivity to methylated BSA and on imiquimod-induced psoriasis in mice. Results We found that purified human CD3+ T cells express PFKFB2, PFKFB3, PFKFB4 and TIGAR, and that anti-CD3/anti-CD28 conjugated microbeads stimulated a >20-fold increase in F2,6BP with a coincident increase in protein expression of the PFKFB3 family member and a decrease in TIGAR protein expression. We then found that exposure to the PFKFB3 small molecule antagonist, 3PO (1–10 μM, markedly attenuated the stimulation of F2,6BP

  16. Surface-Mediated Stimuli Responsive Delivery of Organic Molecules from Porous Carriers to Adhered Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergün, Bahar; De Cola, Luisa; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Kehr, Nermin Seda

    2016-07-01

    The alternating layer-by-layer deposition of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes on fluorescence-dye-(Hst)-loaded zeolites L ((Hst) Zeo-PSS/PLL) is described. The arrays and nanocomposite (NC) hydrogels of (Hst) Zeo-PSS/PLL are prepared. The subsequent cell experiments show the potential application of arrays and NC hydrogels of (Hst) Zeo-PSS/PLL as alternative 2D- and 3D-surfaces, respectively, for 2D- and 3D-surface-mediated controlled organic molecules delivery applications. PMID:27114067

  17. Solvent additive effects on small molecule crystallization in bulk heterojunction solar cells probed during spin casting

    KAUST Repository

    Pérez, Louis A.

    2013-09-04

    Solvent additive processing can lead to drastic improvements in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) in solution processable small molecule (SPSM) bulk heterojunction solar cells. In situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the kinetics of crystallite formation during and shortly after spin casting. The additive is shown to have a complex effect on structural evolution invoking polymorphism and enhanced crystalline quality of the donor SPSM. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Dual Function Additives: A Small Molecule Crosslinker for Enhanced Efficiency and Stability in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rumer, Joseph W.

    2015-02-01

    A bis-azide-based small molecule crosslinker is synthesized and evaluated as both a stabilizing and efficiency-boosting additive in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells. Activated by a noninvasive and scalable solution processing technique, polymer:fullerene blends exhibit improved thermal stability with suppressed polymer skin formation at the cathode and frustrated fullerene aggregation on ageing, with initial efficiency increased from 6% to 7%. © 2015 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Changes in numbers of epidermal cell adhesion molecules caused by oral cyclosporin in psoriasis.

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, B D; Andrew, S M; O'Driscoll, J B; Chalmers, R J; Ballardie, F W; Freemont, A J

    1993-01-01

    AIM--To determine the effects of a three month course of low dose cyclosporin on the expression of epidermal cell adhesion molecules. METHODS--Eighteen patients with psoriasis were treated for 12 weeks with either 2.5 or 5 mg/kg/day of oral cyclosporin. Biopsy specimens taken from skin before, during, and after cyclosporin treatment were stained immunohistochemically for CD 54 (ICAM-1), CD 29 (beta-1 integrins), and CD18 (beta-2 integrins). RESULTS--There was a highly significant (p < 0.01) c...

  20. Self-assembly of 5,11,17,23-Tetranitro-25,26,27,28-tetramethoxythiacalix[4]arene with Neutral Molecules and its Use for Anion Recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, M.; Himl, M.; Budka, J.; Pojarová, M.; Císařová, I.; Eigner, V.; Cuřínová, Petra; Dvořáková, H.; Lhoták, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 4 (2013), s. 1397-1402. ISSN 0040-4020 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0691; GA AV ČR IAAX08240901 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thiacalixarenes * self assembly * anion recognition Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.817, year: 2013

  1. Tauopathy Differentially Affects Cell Adhesion Molecules in Mouse Brain: Early Down-Regulation of Nectin-3 in Stratum Lacunosum Moleculare

    OpenAIRE

    Hervé Maurin; Claire Marie Seymour; Benoit Lechat; Peter Borghgraef; Herman Devijver; Tomasz Jaworski; Schmidt, Mathias V.; Sebastian Kuegler; Fred Van Leuven

    2013-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules are important structural substrates, required for synaptic plasticity and synaptogenesis. CAMs differ widely in their expression throughout different brain regions and their specific structural and functional roles in the brain remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated selected cell adhesion molecules for alterations in expression levels and neuronal localization in validated mouse models for Alzheimer's disease that mimic the age-related progression of amyloid ac...

  2. A small synthetic molecule functions as a chloride-bicarbonate dual-transporter and induces chloride secretion in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng-Yun; Li, Shing-To; Shen, Fang-Fang; Ko, Wing-Hung; Yao, Xiao-Qiang; Yang, Dan

    2016-05-31

    A C2 symmetric small molecule composed of l-phenylalanine and isophthalamide was found to function as a Cl(-)/HCO3(-) dual transporter and self-assemble into chloride channels. In Ussing-chamber based short-circuit current measurements, this molecule elicited chloride-dependent short-circuit current (Isc) increase in both Calu-3 cell and CFBE41o-cell (with F508del mutant CFTR) monolayers. PMID:27188496

  3. Small round blue cell tumours: diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of the expression of B7-H3 surface molecule

    OpenAIRE

    Gregorio, A.; Corrias, M V; R. Castriconi; Dondero, A; Mosconi, M.; Gambini, C; Moretta, A; Moretta, L; Bottino, C

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To assess whether the expression of B7-H3 surface molecule could improve differential diagnosis of small cell round tumours. Methods and results: One hundred and one well-characterized paraffin-embedded small round cell tumours, stored in the pathology archive of the Gaslini Institute, were immunohistochemically analysed with the 5B14 monoclonal antibody, which recognizes the surface molecule B7-H3. All lymphoblastic lymphomas and the blastematous component of Wilms’ tumours were comple...

  4. Enhancing the recognition of tumor associated antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Irvine, Kari R.; Minev, Boris R.; Taggarse, Akash S.; McFariand, Barbra J.; Wang, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Activated CD8+ T cells (TCD8+) can directly recognize malignant cells because processed fragments of tumor associated antigens (TAA), 8-10 amino acids in length and complexed with MHC class I molecules, are displayed on tumor cell surfaces. Tumor cells have been genetically modified in a variety of ways in efforts to enhance the immune recognition of TAA. An alternative strategy is the expression of TAA in recombinant or synthetic form. This has been made possible by the recent cloning of TAA...

  5. Human cell adhesion molecules: annotated functional subtypes and overrepresentation of addiction-associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaoming; Drgonova, Jana; Li, Chuan-Yun; Uhl, George R

    2015-09-01

    Human cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are essential for proper development, modulation, and maintenance of interactions between cells and cell-to-cell (and matrix-to-cell) communication about these interactions. Despite the differential functional significance of these roles, there have been surprisingly few systematic studies to enumerate the universe of CAMs and identify specific CAMs in distinct functions. In this paper, we update and review the set of human genes likely to encode CAMs with searches of databases, literature reviews, and annotations. We describe likely CAMs and functional subclasses, including CAMs that have a primary function in information exchange (iCAMs), CAMs involved in focal adhesions, CAM gene products that are preferentially involved with stereotyped and morphologically identifiable connections between cells (e.g., adherens junctions, gap junctions), and smaller numbers of CAM genes in other classes. We discuss a novel proposed mechanism involving selective anchoring of the constituents of iCAM-containing lipid rafts in zones of close neuronal apposition to membranes expressing iCAM binding partners. We also discuss data from genetic and genomic studies of addiction in humans and mouse models to highlight the ways in which CAM variation may contribute to a specific brain-based disorder such as addiction. Specific examples include changes in CAM mRNA splicing mediated by differences in the addiction-associated splicing regulator RBFOX1/A2BP1 and CAM expression in dopamine neurons. PMID:25988664

  6. Changes in cell adhesion molecule expression on T cells associated with systemic virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, E C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O;

    1994-01-01

    -4, LFA-1, and ICAM-1, are up-regulated on CD8+ cells, whereas the lymph node homing receptor MEL-14 is down-regulated during the infection; only marginal changes were observed for CD4+ cells. Basically similar but less marked results were obtained in mice infected with Pichinde virus. Further......, it was found that up-regulation of VLA-4 expression on splenic T cells correlated with influx of inflammatory cells into the cerebrospinal fluid of intracerebrally infected animals, and that the number of CD8+VLA-4hi cells increased from lymph nodes and spleen to blood and cerebrospinal fluid. These...... results support the hypothesis that up-regulation of VLA-4 is important for effector T cell homing to sites of inflammation....

  7. Identification and characterization of a small-molecule inhibitor of Wnt signaling in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Alessandra; Valensin, Silvia; Rossi, Marco; Tunici, Patrizia; Verani, Margherita; De Rosa, Antonella; Giordano, Cinzia; Varrone, Maurizio; Nencini, Arianna; Pratelli, Carmela; Benicchi, Tiziana; Bakker, Annette; Hill, Jeffrey; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Pendharkar, Vishal; Liu, Boping; Ng, Fui Mee; Then, Siew Wen; Jing Tai, Shi; Cheong, Seong-Moon; He, Xi; Caricasole, Andrea; Salerno, Massimiliano

    2013-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and prognostically unfavorable form of brain tumor. The aggressive and highly invasive phenotype of these tumors makes them among the most anatomically damaging human cancers with a median survival of less than 1 year. Although canonical Wnt pathway activation in cancers has been historically linked to the presence of mutations involving key components of the pathway (APC, β-catenin, or Axin proteins), an increasing number of studies suggest that elevated Wnt signaling in GBM is initiated by several alternative mechanisms that are involved in different steps of the disease. Therefore, inhibition of Wnt signaling may represent a therapeutically relevant approach for GBM treatment. After the selection of a GBM cell model responsive to Wnt inhibition, we set out to develop a screening approach for the identification of compounds capable of modulating canonical Wnt signaling and associated proliferative responses in GBM cells. Here, we show that the small molecule SEN461 inhibits the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in GBM cells, with relevant effects at both molecular and phenotypic levels in vitro and in vivo. These include SEN461-induced Axin stabilization, increased β-catenin phosphorylation/degradation, and inhibition of anchorage-independent growth of human GBM cell lines and patient-derived primary tumor cells in vitro. Moreover, in vivo administration of SEN461 antagonized Wnt signaling in Xenopus embryos and reduced tumor growth in a GBM xenograft model. These data represent the first demonstration that small-molecule-mediated inhibition of Wnt signaling may be a potential approach for GBM therapeutics. PMID:23619303

  8. Identification and characterization of a small molecule inhibitor of WNT signaling in glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Alessandra; Valensin, Silvia; Rossi, Marco; Tunici, Patrizia; Verani, Margherita; De Rosa, Antonella; Giordano, Cinzia; Varrone, Maurizio; Nencini, Arianna; Pratelli, Carmela; Benicchi, Tiziana; Bakker, Annette; Hill, Jeffrey; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Pendharkar, Vishal; Boping, Liu; Mee, Ng Fui; Wen, Then Siew; Jing, Tai Shi; Cheong, Seong-Moon; He, Xi; Caricasole, Andrea; Salerno, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and prognostically unfavorable form of brain tumor. The aggressive and highly invasive phenotype of these tumors makes them among the most anatomically damaging human cancers with a median survival of less than one year. Although canonical WNT pathway activation in cancers has been historically linked to the presence of mutations involving key components of the pathway (APC, β-CATENIN or AXIN proteins), an increasing number of studies suggest that elevated WNT signaling in GBM is initiated by several alternative mechanisms that are involved in different steps of the disease. Therefore, inhibition of WNT signaling may represent a therapeutically relevant approach for GBM treatment. After the selection of a GBM cell model responsive to WNT inhibition, we set out to develop a screening approach for the identification of compounds capable of modulating canonical WNT signaling and associated proliferative responses in GBM cells. Here we show that the small molecule SEN461 inhibits the canonical WNT signaling pathway in GBM cells, with relevant effects at both molecular and phenotypic levels in vitro and in vivo. These include SEN461-induced AXIN stabilization, increased β-CATENIN phosphorylation/degradation, and inhibition of anchorage-independent growth of human GBM cell lines and patient-derived primary tumor cells in vitro. Moreover, in vivo administration of SEN461 antagonized WNT signaling in Xenopus embryos and reduced tumor growth in a GBM xenograft model. These data represent the first demonstration that small molecule-mediated inhibition of WNT signaling may be a potential approach for GBM therapeutics. PMID:23619303

  9. Treg cells expressing the co-inhibitory molecule TIGIT selectively inhibit pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    Joller, Nicole; Lozano, Ester; Burkett, Patrick R.; Patel, Bonny; Xiao, Sheng; Zhu, Chen; Xia, Junrong; Tan, Tze G.; Sefik, Esen; Yajnik, Vijay; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Quintana, Francisco J.; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe; Hafler, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells regulate immune responses and maintain self-tolerance. Recent work shows that Treg cells are comprised of many subpopulations with specialized regulatory functions. Here we identified Foxp3+ T cells expressing the co-inhibitory molecule TIGIT as a distinct Treg cell subset that specifically suppresses pro-inflammatory T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cell, but not Th2 cell responses. Transcriptional profiling characterized TIGIT+ Treg cells as an activated Treg subse...

  10. Regulation of Arabidopsis Early Anther Development by Putative Cell-Cell Signaling Molecules and Transcriptional Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jin Sun; Carey LH Hord; Chang-Bin Chen; Hong Ma

    2007-01-01

    Anther development in flowering plants involves the formation of several cell types, including the tapetal and pollen mother cells. The use of genetic and molecular tools has led to the identification and characterization of genes that are critical for normal cell division and differentiation in Arabidopsis early anther development. We review here several recent studies on these genes, including the demonstration that the putative receptor protein kinases BAM1 and BAM2 together play essential roles in the control of early cell division and differentiation. In addition, we discuss the hypothesis that BAM1/2 may form a positive-negative feedback regulatory loop with a previously identified key regulator, SPOROCYTELESS (also called NOZZLE),to control the balance between sporogenous and somatic cell types in the anther. Furthermore, we summarize the isolation and functional analysis of the DYSFUNCTIONAL TAPETUM1 (DYT1) gene in promoting proper tapetal cell differentiation. Our finding that DYT1 encodes a putative transcription factor of the bHLH family, as well as relevant expression analyses, strongly supports a model that DYT1 serves as a critical link between upstream factors and downstream target genes that are critical for normal tapetum development and function. These studies, together with other recently published works, indicate that cell-cell communication and transcriptional control are key processes essential for cell fate specification in anther development.

  11. Cellular adhesion molecules on endothelial cells participate in radiation-mediated inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The acute and subacute clinical manifestations of ionizing radiation mimic the inflammatory response to a number of stimuli. During the early stages of the inflammatory response, endothelial cells rapidly and transiently express a number of glycoproteins such as E-selectin, P-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 which influence leucocyte adhesion. We quantified the expression of these cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in irradiated endothelial cells in order to determine whether these glycoproteins participate in radiation-mediated inflammation. Methods: Primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and HMEC cells were grown to 90% confluence and irradiated with a GE Maxitron x-ray generator. The cells were incubated with primary IgG1 antibody (mouse anti-human ICAM-1, VCAM-1, P-selectin and E-selectin and incubated with FITC-conjugated secondary antibody (goat anti-mouse IgG1). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis was utilized for quantitation of receptor expression of each CAM on irradiated endothelial cells. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays of nuclear protein extracts from irradiated HUVEC cells were performed using the E-selectin NFkB binding sequence (5'AGCTTAGAGGGGATTTCCGAGAGGA-3'). The E-selectin promoter was ligated to the growth hormone reporter. Plasmids pE-sel(-587 +35)GH or pE-sel(-587 +35)GH Δ NFκB (5 μg) was transfected into HMEC or HUVEC cells by use of lipofection. Transfectants were incubated for 16 h after transfection followed by treatment with 10 Gy (1 Gy/min, GE Maxitron) of ionizing radiation, and or with TNF or IL-1. Leukocyte adhesion to irradiated endothelial cells was quantified by HL-60 binding. Results: The log fluorescence of cells incubated with the antibody to E-selectin shifted by 32% at 4 h after irradiation. In comparison, a shift of 35% occurred 20 h after irradiation for cells incubated with the antibody to ICAM. However, there was no significant increase in P-selectin or VCAM

  12. Low-dose formaldehyde delays DNA damage recognition and DNA excision repair in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luch

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks.

  13. [Pathogenetic and clinical significance of the adhesion molecule expression on T cells of the lung in sarcoid alveolitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerli, R; Galandrini, R; Agea, E; Bini, P; Tognellini, R

    1990-01-01

    A double immunofluorescence analysis of CD4+ cell population from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples of patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis was carried out. The results showed that, unlike BAL and peripheral blood CD4+ cells of healthy subjects, almost all BAL CD4+ cells of the patients highly express, besides CDw29 antigen, LFA-1 and ICAM-1 adhesion molecules. The co-expression of these molecules on BAL CD4+ cells during high intensity sarcoid alveolitis could represent a marker of immunological memory. The relevant pathogenetic and clinical implications of this observation are discussed. PMID:2199744

  14. Single Molecule Localization Microscopy of Mammalian Cell Nuclei on the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander; Xing, Jun; Birk, Udo J; Cremer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear texture analysis is a well-established method of cellular pathology. It is hampered, however, by the limits of conventional light microscopy (ca. 200 nm). These limits have been overcome by a variety of super-resolution approaches. An especially promising approach to chromatin texture analysis is single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) as it provides the highest resolution using fluorescent based methods. At the present state of the art, using fixed whole cell samples and standard DNA dyes, a structural resolution of chromatin in the 50-100 nm range is obtained using SMLM. We highlight how the combination of localization microscopy with standard fluorophores opens the avenue to a plethora of studies including the spatial distribution of DNA and associated proteins in eukaryotic cell nuclei with the potential to elucidate the functional organization of chromatin. These views are based on our experience as well as on recently published research in this field. PMID:27446198

  15. Triple Effect of Mimetic Peptides Interfering with Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Homophilic Cis Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, S. Z.; Kolkova, Kateryna; Rudenko, Olga;

    2005-01-01

    and P2 acted as conventional antagonists, agonists, and reverse agonists of NCAM at low, intermediate, and high peptide concentrations, respectively. The demonstrated in vitro triple pharmacological effect of mimetic peptides interfering with the NCAM homophilic cis binding will be valuable for the......The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is pivotal in neural development, regeneration, and learning. Here we characterize two peptides, termed P1-B and P2, derived from the homophilic binding sites in the first two N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig) modules of NCAM, with regard to their effects on...... neurite extension and adhesion. To evaluate how interference of these mimetic peptides with NCAM homophilic interactions in cis influences NCAM binding in trans, we employed a coculture system in which PC12-E2 cells were grown on monolayers of fibroblasts with or without NCAM expression and the rate of...

  16. A highly specific gold nanoprobe for live-cell single-molecule imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Leduc, Cecile; Gautier, Jérémie; Soto-Ribeiro, Martinho; Wehrle-Haller, B; Gautreau, Alexis; Giannone, Gregory; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim

    2013-01-01

    Single molecule tracking in live cells is the ultimate tool to study subcellular protein dynamics, but it is often limited by the probe size and photostability. Due to these issues, long-term tracking of proteins in confined and crowded environments, such as intracellular spaces, remains challenging. We have developed a novel optical probe consisting of 5-nm gold nanoparticles functionalized with a small fragment of camelid antibodies that recognize widely used GFPs with a very high affinity, which we call GFP-nanobodies. These small gold nanoparticles can be detected and tracked using photothermal imaging for arbitrarily long periods of time. Surface and intracellular GFP-proteins were effectively labeled even in very crowded environments such as adhesion sites and cytoskeletal structures both in vitro and in live cell cultures. These nanobody-coated gold nanoparticles are probes with unparalleled capabilities; small size, perfect photostability, high specificity, and versatility afforded by combination with...

  17. Age-related changes in expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1993-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is expressed by muscle and involved in muscle-neuron and muscle-muscle cell interactions. The expression in muscle is regulated during myogenesis and by the state of innervation. In aged muscle, both neurogenic and myogenic degenerative processes occur. We here...... virtually unchanged at all ages examined. However, changes in the extent of sialylation of NCAM were demonstrated. Even though the relative amounts of the various NCAM polypeptides were unchanged during aging, distinct changes in NCAM mRNA classes were observed. Three NCAM mRNA classes of 6.7, 5.2 and 2.......9 kb were present in perinatal and young adult skeletal muscle, whereas only the 5.2 and 2.9 kb mRNA classes could be demonstrated in aged muscle. This indicates that metabolism of the various NCAM polypeptides is individually regulated during aging. Alternative splicing of NCAM mRNA in skeletal muscle...

  18. Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) regulates polarized neutrophil transendothelial cell migration in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfin, Abigail; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Beyrau, Martina; Colom, Bartomeu; Caille, Dorothée; Diapouli, Frantzeska-Maria; Nash, Gerard B; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Albelda, Steven M.; Rainger, G Ed; Meda, Paolo; Imhof, Beat A.; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophil migration into inflamed tissues is a fundamental component of innate immunity. A decisive step in this process is the polarised migration of blood neutrophils through endothelial cells (ECs) lining the venular lumen (transendothelial cell migration; TEM) in a luminal to abluminal direction. Using real-time confocal imaging we report that neutrophils can exhibit disrupted polarised TEM (“hesitant” and “reverse”) in vivo. These events were noted in inflammation following ischemia-reperfusion injury, characterised by reduced expression of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) from EC junctions, and were enhanced by EC JAM-C blockade or genetic deletion. The results identify JAM-C as a key regulator of polarised neutrophil TEM in vivo and suggest that reverse TEM neutrophils can contribute to dissemination of systemic inflammation. PMID:21706006

  19. Effective Absorption Enhancement in Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells by Employing Trapezoid Gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Chun-Ping, Xiang; Yu, Jin; Bin-Zong, Xu; Wei-Min, Wang; Xin, Wei; Guo-Feng, Song; Yun, Xu

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the optical absorption has been enhanced in the small molecule organic solar cells by employing trapezoid grating structure. The enhanced absorption is mainly attributed to both waveguide modes and surface plasmon modes, which has been simulated by using finite-difference time-domain method. The simulated results show that the surface plasmon along the semitransparent metallic Ag anode is excited by introducing the periodical trapezoid gratings, which induce high intensity field increment in the donor layer. Meanwhile, the waveguide modes result a high intensity field in acceptor layer. The increment of field improves the absorption of organic solar cells, significantly, which has been demonstrated by simulating the electrical properties. The simulated results exhibiting 31 % increment of the short-circuit current has been achieved in the optimized device, which is supported by the experimental measurement. The power conversion efficiency of the grating sample obtained in experiment exhibits an...

  20. Artemether Combined with shRNA Interference of Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Significantly Inhibited the Malignant Biological Behavior of Human Glioma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ying-Bin Wang; Yi Hu; Zhen Li; Ping Wang; Yi-Xue Xue; Yi-Long Yao; Bo Yu; Yun-Hui Liu

    2013-01-01

    Artemether is the derivative extracted from Chinese traditional herb and originally used for malaria. Artemether also has potential therapeutic effects against tumors. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is an important cell surface adhesion molecule associated with malignancy of gliomas. In this work, we investigated the role and mechanism of artemether combined with shRNA interference of VCAM-1 (shRNA-VCAM-1) on the migration, invasion and apoptosis of glioma cells. U87 human glioma ...

  1. Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and endothelial adhesion molecules (intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) as predictive markers for blood pressure reduction after renal sympathetic denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, Oliver; Liebetrau, Christoph; Möllmann, Helge; Gaede, Luise; Troidl, Christian; Rixe, Johannes; Hamm, Christian; Nef, Holger

    2014-05-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) is a treatment option for patients with resistant arterial hypertension, but in some patients it is not successful. Predictive parameters on the success of RSD remain unknown. The angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFLT-1), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) are known to be associated with endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodeling, and hypertension. We evaluated whether sFLT-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 are predictive markers for blood pressure reduction after RSD. Consecutive patients (n=55) undergoing renal denervation were included. Venous serum samples for measurement of sFlt-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 were collected before and 6 months after RSD. A therapeutic response was defined as an office systolic blood pressure reduction of >10 mm Hg 6 months after RSD. A significant mean office systolic blood pressure reduction of 31.2 mm Hg was observed in 46 patients 6 months after RSD. Nine patients were classified as nonresponders, with a mean systolic blood pressure reduction of 4.6 mm Hg. At baseline, sFLT-1 levels were significantly higher in responders than in nonresponders (P<0.001) as were ICAM-1 (P<0.001) and VCAM-1 levels (P<0.01). The areas under the curve for sFLT-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 were 0.82 (interquartile range, 0.718-0.921; P<0.001), 0.754 (0.654-0.854; P<0.001), and 0.684 (0.564-804; P=0.01), respectively, demonstrating prediction of an RSD response. Responders showed significantly higher serum levels of sFLT-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 at baseline compared with nonresponders. Thus, this study identified for the first time potential biomarkers with a predictive value indicating a responder or nonresponder before renal denervation. PMID:24470464

  2. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5–7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T2 relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T2 relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 107 cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy

  3. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rümenapp, Christine, E-mail: ruemenapp@tum.de [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Mannherz, Hans Georg [Abteilung für Anatomie und Molekulare Embryologie, Ruhr Universität Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Haase, Axel [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5–7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T{sub 2} relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T{sub 2} relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 10{sup 7} cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Induction of various immune modulatory molecules in CD34(+) hematopoietic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Umland, Oliver; Heine, Holger; Miehe, Michaela;

    2004-01-01

    necrosis factor alpha (TauNF-alpha), but not LPS alone, can activate nuclear factor-kappaB in KG-1a cells. By cDNA subtraction and multiplex polymerase chain reaction, we revealed differential expression of cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1, inhibitor of kappaB (IkappaB)/IkappaBalpha (MAD-3), and...... intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in SUP(LPS)-stimulated KG-1a cells and up-regulation of interferon (IFN)-inducible T cell-chemoattractant, interleukin (IL)-8, macrophage-inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha), MIP-1beta, RANTES, CD70, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and IL-1beta...... in stimulated KG-1a cells and CD34(+) BMCs. Although monokine induced by IFN-gamma, IFN-inducible protein 10, and IFN-gamma were exclusively up-regulated in KG-1a cells, differential expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage-derived chemokine, myeloid progenitor inhibitory...

  5. Improved Reliability of Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells by Double Anode Buffer Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Hsun Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimized hybrid planar heterojunction (PHJ of small molecule organic solar cells (SM-OSCs based on copper phthalocyanine (CuPc as donor and fullerene (C60 as acceptor was fabricated, which obviously enhanced the performance of device by sequentially using both MoO3 and pentacene as double anode buffer layers (ABL, also known as hole extraction layer (HEL. A series of the vacuum-deposited ABL, acting as an electron and exciton blocking layer, were examined for their characteristics in SM-OSCs. The performance and reliability were compared between conventional ITO/ABL/CuPc/C60/BCP/Ag cells and the new ITO/double ABL/CuPc/C60/BCP/Ag cells. The effect on the electrical properties of these materials was also investigated to obtain the optimal thickness of ABL. The comparison shows that the modified cell has an enhanced reliability compared to traditional cells. The improvement of lifetime was attributed to the idea of double layers to prevent humidity and oxygen from diffusing into the active layer. We demonstrated that the interfacial extraction layers are necessary to avoid degradation of device. That is to say, in normal temperature and pressure, a new avenue for the device within double buffer layers has exhibited the highest values of open circuit voltage (Voc, fill factor (FF, and lifetime in this work compared to monolayer of ABL.

  6. Decreased Expression of T-Cell Costimulatory Molecule CD28 on CD4 and CD8 T Cells of Mexican Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German Bernal-Fernandez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with tuberculosis frequently develop anergy, a state of T-cell hyporesponsiveness in which defective T-cell costimulation could be a factor. To know if the expression of T-cell costimulatory molecules was altered in tuberculosis, we analyzed the peripheral blood T-cell phenotype of 23 Mexican patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. There was severe CD4 (P<.001 and CD8 (P<.01 lymphopenia and upregulation of costimulatory molecule CD30 on CD4 and CD8 T cells (P<.05; this increase was higher in relapsing tuberculosis. The main finding was severe downregulation of the major costimulatory molecule CD28 on both CD8 and CD4 T cells (P<.001. Depletion of the CD4/CD28 subset, a hitherto undescribed finding, is relevant because CD4 T cells constitute the main arm of the cell-mediated antimycobacterial immune response.

  7. Biomimetic Receptors for Bioanalyte Detection by Quartz Crystal Microbalances — From Molecules to Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Latif

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A universal label-free detection of bioanalytes can be performed with biomimetic quartz crystal microbalance (QCM coatings prepared by imprinting strategies. Bulk imprinting was used to detect the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs known as estradiols. The estrogen 17β-estradiol is one of the most potent EDCs, even at very low concentrations. A highly sensitive, selective and robust QCM sensor was fabricated for real time monitoring of 17β-estradiol in water samples by using molecular imprinted polyurethane. Optimization of porogen (pyrene and cross-linker (phloroglucinol levels leads to improved sensitivity, selectivity and response time of the estradiol sensor. Surface imprinting of polyurethane as sensor coating also allowed us to generate interaction sites for the selective recognition of bacteria, even in a very complex mixture of interfering compounds, while they were growing from their spores in nutrient solution. A double molecular imprinting approach was followed to transfer the geometrical features of natural bacteria onto the synthetic polymer to generate biomimetic bacteria. The use of biomimetic bacteria as template makes it possible to prepare multiple sensor coatings with similar sensitivity and selectivity. Thus, cell typing, e.g., differentiation of bacteria strains, bacteria growth profile and extent of their nutrition, can be monitored by biomimetic mass sensors. Obviously, this leads to controlled cell growth in bioreactors.

  8. Protein and Small Molecule Recognition Properties of Deep Cavitands in a Supported Lipid Membrane Determined by Calcination-Enhanced SPR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ying; Liao, Puhong; Cheng, Quan; Hooley, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    This report details the incorporation of a water-soluble deep cavitand into a membrane bilayer assembled onto a nanoglassified surface for study of molecular recognition in a membrane-mimicking setting. The cavitand retains its host properties, and real-time analysis of the host:guest properties of the membrane:cavitand complex via surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence microscopy is described. The host shows selectivity for choline-derived substrates, and no competitive incorporation of ...

  9. Hydrodynamic guiding for addressing subsets of immobilized cells and molecules in microfluidic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyer Michael

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interest in microfluidics and surface patterning is increasing as the use of these technologies in diverse biomedical applications is substantiated. Controlled molecular and cellular surface patterning is a costly and time-consuming process. Methods for keeping multiple separate experimental conditions on a patterned area are, therefore, needed to amplify the amount of biological information that can be retrieved from a patterned surface area. We describe, in three examples of biomedical applications, how this can be achieved in an open microfluidic system, by hydrodynamically guiding sample fluid over biological molecules and living cells immobilized on a surface. Results A microfluidic format of a standard assay for cell-membrane integrity showed a fast and dose-dependent toxicity of saponin on mammalian cells. A model of the interactions of human mononuclear leukocytes and endothelial cells was established. By contrast to static adhesion assays, cell-cell adhesion in this dynamic model depended on cytokine-mediated activation of both endothelial and blood cells. The microfluidic system allowed the use of unprocessed blood as sample material, and a specific and fast immunoassay for measuring the concentration of C-reactive protein in whole blood was demonstrated. Conclusion The use of hydrodynamic guiding made multiple and dynamic experimental conditions on a small surface area possible. The ability to change the direction of flow and produce two-dimensional grids can increase the number of reactions per surface area even further. The described microfluidic system is widely applicable, and can take advantage of surfaces produced by current and future techniques for patterning in the micro- and nanometer scale.

  10. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously demonstrated that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by skeletal muscle cells after muscle overload contributes to ensuing regenerative and hypertrophic processes in skeletal muscle. The objective of the present study is to reveal mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augments regenerative and hypertrophic processes of myogenesis. This was accomplished by genetically engineering C2C12 myoblasts to stably express ICAM-1, and by inhibiting the adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 through the use of a neutralizing antibody or cell penetrating peptide, respectively. Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured skeletal muscle cells augmented myoblast–myoblast adhesion, myotube formation, myonuclear number, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size without influencing the ability of myoblasts to proliferate or differentiate. ICAM-1 augmented myotube formation, myonuclear accretion, and myotube alignment through a mechanism involving adhesion-induced activation of ICAM-1 signaling, as these dependent measures were reduced via antibody and peptide inhibition of ICAM-1. The adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 also facilitated myotube hypertrophy through a mechanism involving myotube–myotube fusion, protein synthesis, and Akt/p70s6k signaling. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis, and establish a novel mechanism through which the inflammatory response facilitates growth processes in skeletal muscle. - Highlights: • We examined mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 facilitates events of in vitro myogenesis. • Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured myoblasts did not influence their ability to proliferate or differentiate. • Skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augmented myoblast fusion, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size. • ICAM-1 augmented myogenic processes through

  11. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Qingnian; Dearth, Christopher L.; Corbett, Jacob T. [Department of Kinesiology, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Pierre, Philippe [Centre d’Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy U2M, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille (France); INSERM U631, Institut National de la Santé et Recherche Médicale, Marseille (France); CNRS UMR6102, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marseille (France); Chadee, Deborah N. [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Pizza, Francis X., E-mail: Francis.Pizza@utoledo.edu [Department of Kinesiology, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by skeletal muscle cells after muscle overload contributes to ensuing regenerative and hypertrophic processes in skeletal muscle. The objective of the present study is to reveal mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augments regenerative and hypertrophic processes of myogenesis. This was accomplished by genetically engineering C2C12 myoblasts to stably express ICAM-1, and by inhibiting the adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 through the use of a neutralizing antibody or cell penetrating peptide, respectively. Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured skeletal muscle cells augmented myoblast–myoblast adhesion, myotube formation, myonuclear number, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size without influencing the ability of myoblasts to proliferate or differentiate. ICAM-1 augmented myotube formation, myonuclear accretion, and myotube alignment through a mechanism involving adhesion-induced activation of ICAM-1 signaling, as these dependent measures were reduced via antibody and peptide inhibition of ICAM-1. The adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 also facilitated myotube hypertrophy through a mechanism involving myotube–myotube fusion, protein synthesis, and Akt/p70s6k signaling. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis, and establish a novel mechanism through which the inflammatory response facilitates growth processes in skeletal muscle. - Highlights: • We examined mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 facilitates events of in vitro myogenesis. • Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured myoblasts did not influence their ability to proliferate or differentiate. • Skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augmented myoblast fusion, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size. • ICAM-1 augmented myogenic processes through

  12. Kinetics of T cell-activation molecules in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antas Paulo RZ

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic features acquired subsequent to antigen-specific stimulation in vitro were evaluated by means of the kinetic expressions of CD69 and CD25 activation molecules on T lymphocytes and assayed by flow cytometry in response to PPD, Ag85B, and ferritin in PPD-positive healthy control individuals. In response to PHA, CD69 staining on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells became initially marked after 4 h, peaked at 24 h, and quickly decreased after 120 h. For CD25, a latter expression was detected around 8 h, having increased after 96 h. As expected, the response rate to the mycobacterial antigens was much lower than that to the mitogen. Positive staining was high after 96 h for CD25 and after 24 h for CD69. CD69 expression was significantly enhanced (p < 0.05 on CD8+ as compared to CD4+ T cells. High levels were also found between 96-120 h. Regarding Ag85B, CD25+ cells were mostly CD4+ instead of CD8+ T cells. Moreover, in response to ferritin, a lower CD25 expression was noted. The present data will allow further characterization of the immune response to new mycobacterial-specific antigens and their evaluation for possible inclusion in developing new diagnostic techniques for tuberculosis as well in a new vaccine to prevent the disease.

  13. Cell investigation of nanostructures: zero-mode waveguides for plasma membrane studies with single molecule resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma membranes are highly dynamic structures, with key molecular interactions underlying their functionality occurring at nanometre scales. A fundamental challenge in biology is to observe these interactions in living cells. Although fluorescence microscopy has enabled advances in characterizing molecular distributions in cells, optical techniques are restricted by the diffraction limit. We address this limitation with an approach based on zero-mode waveguides (ZMWs), which are optical nanostructures that confine fluorescence excitation to sub-diffraction volumes. Successful use of ZMWs with cell membranes is reported in this paper. We demonstrate that plasma membranes from live cells penetrate these nanostructures. Cellular exploration of the nanoapertures depends heavily on actin filaments but not on microtubules. Thus, membranes enter the confined excitation volume, and diffusion of individual fluorescent lipids can be monitored. Through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we compared DiIC12 and DiIC16 fluorescent labels incorporated into plasma membranes and found distinctive diffusion behaviours. These results show that the use of optical nanostructures enables the measurement of membrane events with single molecule resolution in sub-diffraction volumes

  14. Cell Death-Associated Molecular-Pattern Molecules: Inflammatory Signaling and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Sangiuliano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis, necroptosis, and pyroptosis are different cellular death programs characterized in organs and tissues as consequence of microbes infection, cell stress, injury, and chemotherapeutics exposure. Dying and death cells release a variety of self-proteins and bioactive chemicals originated from cytosol, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. These endogenous factors are named cell death-associated molecular-pattern (CDAMP, damage-associated molecular-pattern (DAMP molecules, and alarmins. Some of them cooperate or act as important initial or delayed inflammatory mediators upon binding to diverse membrane and cytosolic receptors coupled to signaling pathways for the activation of the inflammasome platforms and NF-κB multiprotein complexes. Current studies show that the nonprotein thiols and thiol-regulating enzymes as well as highly diffusible prooxidant reactive oxygen and nitrogen species released together in extracellular inflammatory milieu play essential role in controlling pro- and anti-inflammatory activities of CDAMP/DAMP and alarmins. Here, we provide an overview of these emerging concepts and mechanisms of triggering and maintenance of tissue inflammation under massive death of cells.

  15. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanotransporter for Molecule Delivery to Intact Plant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wenlong; Wang, Junya; Wang, Qiang; O’Hare, Dermot; Wan, Yinglang

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a powerful method that facilitates the transport of biologically active materials across the cell wall barrier in plant cells. Positively charged delaminated layered double hydroxide lactate nanosheets (LDH-lactate-NS) with a 0.5‒2 nm thickness and 30‒60 nm diameter exhibit a high adsorptive capacity for negatively charged biomolecules, including fluorescent dyes such as tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC), fluorescein isothiocyanate isomer I(FITC) and DNA molecules, forming neutral LDH-nanosheet conjugates. These neutral conjugates can shuttle the bound fluorescent dye into the cytosol of intact plant cell very efficiently. Furthermore, typical inhibitors of endocytosis and low temperature incubation did not prevent LDH-lactate-NS internalization, suggesting that LDH-lactate-NS penetrated the plasma membrane via non-endocytic pathways, which will widen the applicability to a variety of plant cells. Moreover, the absence of unwanted side effects in our cytological studies, and the nuclear localization of ssDNA-FITC suggest that nano-LDHs have potential application as a novel gene carrier to plants. PMID:27221055

  16. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  17. Molecular recognition and organizational and polyvalent effects in vesicles induce the formation of artificial multicompartment cells as model systems of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleos, Constantinos M; Pantos, A

    2014-05-20

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in the preparation and characterization of artificial cells based on amphiphilic molecules. In particular, artificial cells with multiple compartments are primitive mimics of the structure of eukaryotic cells. Endosymbiotic theory, widely accepted among biologists, states that eukaryotic cells arose from the assembly of prokaryotic cells inside other cells. Therefore, replicating this process in a synthetic system could allow researchers to model molecular and supramolecular processes that occur in living cells, shed light on mass and energy transport through cell membranes, and provide a unique, isolated space for conducting chemical reactions. In addition, such structures can serve as drug delivery systems that encapsulate both bioactive and nonbiocompatible compounds. In this Account, we present various coating, incubation, and electrofusion strategies for forming multicompartment vesicle systems, and we are focusing on strategies that rely on involving molecular recognition of complementary vesicles. All these methods afforded multicompartment systems with similar structures, and these nanoparticles have potential applications as drug delivery systems or nanoreactors for conducting diverse reactions. The complementarity of interacting vesicles allows these artificial cells to form, and the organization and polyvalency of these interacting vesicles further promote their formation. The incorporation of cholesterol in the bilayer membrane and the introduction of PEG chains at the surface of the interacting vesicles also support the structure of these multicompartment systems. PEG chains appear to destabilize the bilayers, which facilitates the fusion and transport of the small vesicles to the larger ones. Potential applications of these well-structured and reproducibly produced multicompartment systems include drug delivery, where researchers could load a cocktail of drugs within the encapsulated vesicles, a process

  18. Novel patient cell-based HTS assay for identification of small molecules for a lysosomal storage disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Geng

    Full Text Available Small molecules have been identified as potential therapeutic agents for lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs, inherited metabolic disorders caused by defects in proteins that result in lysosome dysfunctional. Some small molecules function assisting the folding of mutant misfolded lysosomal enzymes that are otherwise degraded in ER-associated degradation. The ultimate result is the enhancement of the residual enzymatic activity of the deficient enzyme. Most of the high throughput screening (HTS assays developed to identify these molecules are single-target biochemical assays. Here we describe a cell-based assay using patient cell lines to identify small molecules that enhance the residual arylsulfatase A (ASA activity found in patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD, a progressive neurodegenerative LSD. In order to generate sufficient cell lines for a large scale HTS, primary cultured fibroblasts from MLD patients were transformed using SV40 large T antigen. These SV40 transformed (SV40t cells showed to conserve biochemical characteristics of the primary cells. Using a specific colorimetric substrate para-nitrocatechol sulfate (pNCS, detectable ASA residual activity were observed in primary and SV40t fibroblasts from a MLD patient (ASA-I179S cultured in multi-well plates. A robust fluorescence ASA assay was developed in high-density 1,536-well plates using the traditional colorimetric pNCS substrate, whose product (pNC acts as "plate fluorescence quencher" in white solid-bottom plates. The quantitative cell-based HTS assay for ASA generated strong statistical parameters when tested against a diverse small molecule collection. This cell-based assay approach can be used for several other LSDs and genetic disorders, especially those that rely on colorimetric substrates which traditionally present low sensitivity for assay-miniaturization. In addition, the quantitative cell-based HTS assay here developed using patient cells creates an

  19. Diffusion, thermalization, and optical pumping of YbF molecules in a cold buffer-gas cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoff, S. M.; Hendricks, R. J.; Sinclair, C. D. J.; Hudson, J. J.; Segal, D. M.; Sauer, B. E.; Hinds, E. A.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2011-02-01

    We produce YbF molecules with a density of 1018 m-3 using laser ablation inside a cryogenically cooled cell filled with a helium buffer gas. Using absorption imaging and absorption spectroscopy we study the formation, diffusion, thermalization, and optical pumping of the molecules. The absorption images show an initial rapid expansion of molecules away from the ablation target followed by a much slower diffusion to the cell walls. We study how the time constant for diffusion depends on the helium density and temperature and obtain values for the YbF-He diffusion cross section at two different temperatures. We measure the translational and rotational temperatures of the molecules as a function of time since formation, obtain the characteristic time constant for the molecules to thermalize with the cell walls, and elucidate the process responsible for limiting this thermalization rate. Finally, we make a detailed study of how the absorption of the probe laser saturates as its intensity increases, showing that the saturation intensity is proportional to the helium density. We use this to estimate collision rates and the density of molecules in the cell.

  20. Bone marrow-derived thymic antigen-presenting cells determine self-recognition of Ia-restricted T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors previously have demonstrated that in radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras, T-cell self-Ia restriction specificity appeared to correlate with the phenotype of the bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting (or dendritic) cell in the thymus during T-cell development. However, these correlations were necessarily indirect because of the difficulty in assaying thymic function directly by adult thymus transplant, which has in the past been uniformly unsuccessful. They now report success in obtaining functional T cells from nude mice grafted with adult thymuses reduced in size by treatment of the thymus donor with anti-thymocyte globulin and cortisone. When (B10 Scn X B10.D2)F1 nude mice (I-Ab,d) are given parental B10.D2 (I-Ad) thymus grafts subcutaneously, their T cells are restricted to antigen recognition in association with I-Ad gene products but not I-Ab gene products. Furthermore, thymuses from (B10 X B10.D2)F1 (I-Ab,d)----B10 (I-Ab) chimeras transplanted 6 months or longer after radiation (a time at which antigen-presenting cell function is of donor bone marrow phenotype) into (B10 X B10.D2)F1 nude mice generate T cells restricted to antigen recognition in association with both I-Ad and I-Ab gene products. Thymuses from totally allogeneic bone marrow chimeras appear to generate T cells of bone marrow donor and thymic host restriction specificity. Thus, when thymus donors are radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras, the T-cell I-region restriction of the nude mice recipients is determined at least in part by the phenotype of the bone marrow-derived thymic antigen presenting cells or dendritic cells in the chimeric thymus

  1. Proapoptotic and antiinvasive activity of Rac1 small molecule inhibitors on malignant glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardama GA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Georgina A Cardama,1 Nazareno Gonzalez,1 Matias Ciarlantini,2 Lucia Gandolfi Donadío,2 María Julieta Comin,2 Daniel F Alonso,1 Pablo Lorenzano Menna,1,* Daniel E Gomez1,*1Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, National University of Quilmes, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Laboratory of Organic Synthesis, Center of Research and Development in Chemistry, National Institute of Industrial Technology, San Martín, Argentina, *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Malignant gliomas are characterized by an intrinsic ability to invade diffusely throughout the normal brain tissue. This feature contributes mainly to the failure of existing therapies. Deregulation of small GTPases signaling, in particular Rac1 activity, plays a key role in the invasive phenotype of gliomas. Here we report the effect of ZINC69391, a specific Rac1 inhibitor developed by our group, on human glioma cell lines LN229 and U-87 MG. ZINC69391 is able to interfere with the interaction of Rac1 with Dock180, a relevant Rac1 activator in glioma invasion, and to reduce Rac1-GTP levels. The kinase Pak1, a downstream effector of Dock180–Rac1 signaling, was also downregulated upon ZINC69391 treatment. ZINC69391 reduced cell proliferation, arrested cells in G1 phase, and triggered apoptosis in glioma cells. Importantly, ZINC69391 dramatically affected cell migration and invasion in vitro, interfering with actin cytoskeleton dynamics. We also evaluated the effect of analog 1A-116, a compound derived from ZINC69391 structure. 1A-116 showed an improved antiproliferative and antiinvasive activity on glioma cells. These findings encourage further preclinical testing in clinically relevant animal models.Keywords: GTPases. invasion, Dock180, small molecule

  2. MHC class II molecules deliver costimulatory signals in human T cells through a functional linkage with IL-2-receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Kanner, S B; Ledbetter, J A;

    1993-01-01

    a regulatory function in T cell activation. Here, we show that cross-linking HLA-DR and -DP but not -DQ molecules by immobilized mAb enhanced proliferative T cell responses to IL-2. In contrast, class II stimulation had no effect on IL-4-induced proliferation. The costimulatory effect was most......Ab induced tyrosine phosphorylation of specific substrates including PLC-gamma 1. Combined stimulation of IL-2R and class II molecules had an additive effect on tyrosine phosphorylation. Pretreatment of T cells with a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A, inhibited IL-2 and class II...

  3. Roll-coating fabrication of ITO-free flexible solar cells based on a non-fullerene small molecule acceptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenqing; Shi, Hangqi; Andersen, Thomas Rieks;

    2015-01-01

    We report organic solar cells (OSCs) with non-fullerene small molecule acceptors (SMAs) prepared in large area via a roll coating process. We employ all solution-processed indium tin oxide (ITO)-free flexible substrates for inverted solar cells with a new SMA of F(DPP)(2)B-2. By utilizing poly(3...

  4. Cell adhesion molecules and hyaluronic acid as markers of inflammation, fibrosis and response to antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Granot

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cell adhesion molecules (intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 and hyaluronic acid, markers of inflammation and fibrosis were monitored in hepatitis C patients to determine whether changes in plasma levels, during antiviral treatment, can predict long-term response to therapy.

  5. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecules on the Neurite Outgrowth of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Su-Ping; Schachner, Melitta; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2016-04-01

    Intrastriatal transplantation of dopaminergic neurons has been shown to be a potentially very effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). With the detection of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), an unlimited source of autologous dopaminergic (DA) neurons became available. Although the iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons exhibited most of the fundamental dopaminergic characteristics, detailed analysis and comparison with primary DA neurons have shown some aberrations in the expression of genes involved in neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. The limited outgrowth of the iPSC-derived DA neurons may hamper their potential application in cell transplantation therapy for PD. In the present study, we examined whether the forced expression of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) and polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), via gene transduction, can promote the neurite formation and outgrowth of iPSC-derived DA neurons. In cultures on astrocyte layers, both adhesion factors significantly increased neurite formation of the adhesion factor overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons in comparison to control iPSC-derived DA neurons. The same tendency was observed when the DA neurons were plated on postnatal organotypic striatal slices; however, this effect did not reach statistical significance. Next, we examined the neurite outgrowth of the L1CAM- or PSA-NCAM-overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons after implantation in the striatum of unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, the animal model for PD. Like the outgrowth on the organotypic striatal slices, no significant L1CAM- and PSA-NCAM-enforced neurite outgrowth of the implanted DA neurons was observed. Apparently, induced expression of L1CAM or PSA-NCAM in the iPSC-derived DA neurons cannot completely restore the neurite outgrowth potential that was reduced in these DA neurons as a consequence of epigenetic aberrations resulting from the i

  6. Influence of Lithium Additives in Small Molecule Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuo-Yao; Bastatas, Lyndon D; Suhr, Kristin J; Moore, Matthew D; Holliday, Bradley J; Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Slinker, Jason D

    2016-07-01

    Light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEECs) utilizing small molecule emitters such as iridium complexes have great potential as low-cost emissive devices. In these devices, ions rearrange during operation to facilitate carrier injection, bringing about efficient operation from simple, single layer devices. Recent work has shown that the luminance, efficiency, and responsiveness of iridium-based LEECs are greatly enhanced by the inclusion of small amounts of lithium salts (≤0.5%/wt) into the active layer. However, the origin of this enhancement has yet to be demonstrated experimentally. Furthermore, although iridium-based devices have been the longstanding leader among small molecule LEECs, fundamental understanding of the ionic distribution in these devices under operation is lacking. Herein, we use scanning Kelvin probe microscopy to measure the in situ potential profiles and electric field distributions of planar iridium-based LEECs and clarify the role of ionic lithium additives. In pristine devices, it is found that ions do not pack densely at the cathode, and ionic redistribution is slow. Inclusion of small amounts of Li[PF6] greatly increases ionic space charge near the cathode that doubles the peak electric fields and enhances electronic injection relative to pristine devices. This study confirms and clarifies a number of longstanding hypotheses regarding iridium LEECs and recent postulates concerning optimization of their operation. PMID:27299981

  7. Structures of MART-126/27-35Peptide/HLA-A2 Complexes Reveal a Remarkable Disconnect between Antigen Structural Homology and T Cell Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Insaidoo, Francis K; Baxter, Tiffany K; Powell, Jr., Daniel J.; Johnson, Laura A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Baker, Brian M [NIH; (Notre)

    2008-09-17

    Small structural changes in peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules often result in large changes in immunogenicity, supporting the notion that T cell receptors are exquisitely sensitive to antigen structure. Yet there are striking examples of TCR recognition of structurally dissimilar ligands. The resulting unpredictability of how T cells will respond to different or modified antigens impacts both our understanding of the physical bases for TCR specificity as well as efforts to engineer peptides for immunomodulation. In cancer immunotherapy, epitopes and variants derived from the MART-1/Melan-A protein are widely used as clinical vaccines. Two overlapping epitopes spanning amino acid residues 26 through 35 are of particular interest: numerous clinical studies have been performed using variants of the MART-1 26-35 decamer, although only the 27-35 nonamer has been found on the surface of targeted melanoma cells. Here, we show that the 26-35 and 27-35 peptides adopt strikingly different conformations when bound to HLA-A2. Nevertheless, clonally distinct MART-1{sub 26/27-35}-reactive T cells show broad cross-reactivity towards these ligands. Simultaneously, however, many of the cross-reactive T cells remain unable to recognize anchor-modified variants with very subtle structural differences. These dichotomous observations challenge our thinking about how structural information on unligated peptide/MHC complexes should be best used when addressing questions of TCR specificity. Our findings also indicate that caution is warranted in the design of immunotherapeutics based on the MART-1 26/27-35 epitopes, as neither cross-reactivity nor selectivity is predictable based on the analysis of the structures alone.

  8. Fundamental High-Speed Limits in Single-Molecule, Single-Cell, and Nanoscale Force Spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amo, Carlos A; Garcia, Ricardo

    2016-07-26

    Force spectroscopy is enhancing our understanding of single-biomolecule, single-cell, and nanoscale mechanics. Force spectroscopy postulates the proportionality between the interaction force and the instantaneous probe deflection. By studying the probe dynamics, we demonstrate that the total force acting on the probe has three different components: the interaction, the hydrodynamic, and the inertial. The amplitudes of those components depend on the ratio between the resonant frequency and the frequency at which the data are measured. A force-distance curve provides a faithful measurement of the interaction force between two molecules when the inertial and hydrodynamic components are negligible. Otherwise, force spectroscopy measurements will underestimate the value of unbinding forces. Neglecting the above force components requires the use of frequency ratios in the 50-500 range. These ratios will limit the use of high-speed methods in force spectroscopy. The theory is supported by numerical simulations. PMID:27359243

  9. High expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 and 8 in primary myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Thomassen, Mads; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Jensen, Morten; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Kruse, Torben A

    2011-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is characterized by leukoerythroblastic anemia with circulating immature myeloid cells, including CD34+ cells, progressive splenomegaly and accumulation of connective tissue and neoangiogenesis in the bone marrow. Altered bone marrow stroma and cell adherence account for...... the egress of CD34+ cells from the bone marrow. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 has been implicated in cell adhesion, cellular invasiveness, angiogenesis, and inflammation, which are all key processes in the pathophysiology of PMF. Accordingly, CEACAMs may play an...

  10. Quantum dots modified with quaternized poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) for selective recognition and killing of bacteria over mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Qin; Ma, Chao; Tian, Chang; Yuan, Maosen; Han, Xiang; Wang, Dong-En; Cao, Chenyu; Wang, Jinyi

    2016-05-23

    Copper-free click chemistry has been used to graft quaternized poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (QPA) modified with azide to the quantum dots (QDs) derived with dibenzocyclooctynes (DBCO). The success of the quaternary ammonium polymer-modified QDs was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis), fluorescence spectroscopy, zeta (ζ) potential, size distribution, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The QPA-modified QDs exhibited properties of selective recognition and killing of bacteria. The novelty of this study lies in fact that the synthesis method of the antimicrobial QPA-modified QDs is simple. Moreover, from another standpoint, QPA-modified QDs simultaneously possess abilities of selective recognition and killing of bacteria over mammalian cells, which is very different from the currently designed multifunctional antimicrobial systems composed of complicated systematic compositions. PMID:27111264

  11. Increased ectodomain shedding of cell adhesion molecule 1 as a cause of type II alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Yoneshige, Azusa; Hagiyama, Man; Inoue, Takao; Mimae, Takahiro; Kato, Takashi; Okada, Morihito; Enoki, Eisuke; Ito, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis has attracted attention as an early pathogenic event in the development of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP); however, the causative mechanism remains unclear. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) is an AEC adhesion molecule in the immunoglobulin superfamily. It generates a membrane-associated C-terminal fragment, αCTF, through protease-mediated ectodomain shedding, termed α-shedding. Increased CADM1 α-shedding contributes to AEC apop...

  12. Nitric oxide modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression via interleukin-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeda, C B; Teixeira, S A; Tamura, E K; Muscará, M N; de Mello, S B V; Markus, R P; Farsky, S H P

    2011-08-01

    We have shown previously that nitric oxide (NO) controls platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) expression on both neutrophils and endothelial cells under physiological conditions. Here, the molecular mechanism by which NO regulates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endothelial PECAM-1 expression and the role of interleukin (IL)-10 on this control was investigated. For this purpose, N-(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20 mg/kg/day for 14 days dissolved in drinking water) was used to inhibit both constitutive (cNOS) and inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) synthase activities in LPS-stimulated Wistar rats (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). This treatment resulted in reduced levels of serum NO. Under this condition, circulating levels of IL-10 was enhanced, secreted mainly by circulating lymphocytes, dependent on transcriptional activation, and endothelial PECAM-1 expression was reduced independently on reduced gene synthesis. The connection between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 expression was examined by incubating LPS-stimulated (1 µg/ml) cultured endothelial cells obtained from naive rats with supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes, which were obtained from blood of control or L-NAME-treated rats. Supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from L-NAME-treated rats, which contained higher levels of IL-10, reduced LPS-induced PECAM-1 expression by endothelial cells, and this reduction was reversed by adding the anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody. Therefore, an association between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 was found and may represent a novel mechanism by which NO controls endothelial cell functions. PMID:21564091

  13. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis and degradation of murine epithelial cell adhesion molecule mEpCAM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hachmeister

    Full Text Available Epithelial cell adhesion molecule EpCAM is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is highly and frequently expressed in carcinomas and (cancer-stem cells, and which plays an important role in the regulation of stem cell pluripotency. We show here that murine EpCAM (mEpCAM is subject to regulated intramembrane proteolysis in various cells including embryonic stem cells and teratocarcinomas. As shown with ectopically expressed EpCAM variants, cleavages occur at α-, β-, γ-, and ε-sites to generate soluble ectodomains, soluble Aβ-like-, and intracellular fragments termed mEpEX, mEp-β, and mEpICD, respectively. Proteolytic sites in the extracellular part of mEpCAM were mapped using mass spectrometry and represent cleavages at the α- and β-sites by metalloproteases and the b-secretase BACE1, respectively. Resulting C-terminal fragments (CTF are further processed to soluble Aβ-like fragments mEp-β and cytoplasmic mEpICD variants by the g-secretase complex. Noteworthy, cytoplasmic mEpICD fragments were subject to efficient degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. In addition the γ-secretase complex dependent cleavage of EpCAM CTF liberates different EpICDs with different stabilities towards proteasomal degradation. Generation of CTF and EpICD fragments and the degradation of hEpICD via the proteasome were similarly demonstrated for the human EpCAM ortholog. Additional EpCAM orthologs have been unequivocally identified in silico in 52 species. Sequence comparisons across species disclosed highest homology of BACE1 cleavage sites and in presenilin-dependent γ-cleavage sites, whereas strongest heterogeneity was observed in metalloprotease cleavage sites. In summary, EpCAM is a highly conserved protein present in fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, marsupials, and placental mammals, and is subject to shedding, γ-secretase-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis, and proteasome-mediated degradation.

  14. Soluble melanoma cell adhesion molecule (sMCAM/sCD146) promotes angiogenic effects on endothelial progenitor cells through angiomotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalin, Jimmy; Harhouri, Karim; Hubert, Lucas; Subrini, Caroline; Lafitte, Daniel; Lissitzky, Jean-Claude; Elganfoud, Nadia; Robert, Stéphane; Foucault-Bertaud, Alexandrine; Kaspi, Elise; Sabatier, Florence; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Bardin, Nathalie; Holmgren, Lars; Dignat-George, Françoise; Blot-Chabaud, Marcel

    2013-03-29

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule (CD146) contains a circulating proteolytic variant (sCD146), which is involved in inflammation and angiogenesis. Its circulating level is modulated in different pathologies, but its intracellular transduction pathways are still largely unknown. Using peptide pulldown and mass spectrometry, we identified angiomotin as a sCD146-associated protein in endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Interaction between angiomotin and sCD146 was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence, and binding of sCD146 on both immobilized recombinant angiomotin and angiomotin-transfected cells. Silencing angiomotin in EPC inhibited sCD146 angiogenic effects, i.e. EPC migration, proliferation, and capacity to form capillary-like structures in Matrigel. In addition, sCD146 effects were inhibited by the angiomotin inhibitor angiostatin and competition with recombinant angiomotin. Finally, binding of sCD146 on angiomotin triggered the activation of several transduction pathways that were identified by antibody array. These results delineate a novel signaling pathway where sCD146 binds to angiomotin to stimulate a proangiogenic response. This result is important to find novel target cells of sCD146 and for the development of therapeutic strategies based on EPC in the treatment of ischemic diseases. PMID:23389031

  15. A systematic investigation of differential effects of cell culture substrates on the extent of artifacts in single-molecule tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Zanetti-Domingues

    Full Text Available Single-molecule techniques are being increasingly applied to biomedical investigation, notwithstanding the numerous challenges they pose in terms of signal-to-noise ratio issues. Non-specific binding of probes to glass substrates, in particular, can produce experimental artifacts due to spurious molecules on glass, which can be particularly deleterious in live-cell tracking experiments. In order to resolve the issue of non-specific probe binding to substrates, we performed systematic testing of a range of available surface coatings, using three different proteins, and then extended our assessment to the ability of these coatings to foster cell growth and retain non-adhesive properties. Linear PEG, a passivating agent commonly used both in immobilized-molecule single-molecule techniques and in tissue engineering, is able to both successfully repel non-specific adhesion of fluorescent probes and to foster cell growth when functionalized with appropriate adhesive peptides. Linear PEG treatment results in a significant reduction of tracking artifacts in EGFR tracking with Affibody ligands on a cell line expressing EGFR-eGFP. The findings reported herein could be beneficial to a large number of experimental situations where single-molecule or single-particle precision is required.

  16. Efficient small-molecule organic solar cells incorporating a doped buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Dei-Wei [Department of aviation and Communication Electronics, Air Force Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kan-Lin [Department of Electronic Engineering, Fortune Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung 831, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chien-Jung, E-mail: chien@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Nanzih, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Yao-Jen [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Nanzih, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ray; Meen, Teen-Hang [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Formosa University, Hu-Wei, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)

    2013-06-01

    Small-molecule organic solar cells (OSCs) with an optimized structure of indium tin oxide/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) (10 nm)/CuPc: fullerene (C{sub 60}) mixed (20 nm)/C{sub 60} (20 nm)/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) (5 nm)/Ag were fabricated. In this study, the cesium carbonate-doped BPhen (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen) was adopted as the buffer layer to enhance the efficiency of the OSCs. The photovoltaic parameters of the OSCs, such as the short-circuit current density and fill factor, depend on the doping concentration of Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in the BPhen layer. The cell with a Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen (1:4) cathode buffer layer exhibits a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.51%, compared to 3.37% for the device with the pristine BPhen layer. The enhancement of PCE was attributed to the energy-level alignment between the C{sub 60} layer and the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen layer. In addition, the characterization measured using atomic force microscopy shows that the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen layers have smoother surfaces. - Highlight: • Cs2CO3-doped 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) cathode buffer layer. • Cs2CO3:BPhen layer with different ratios affects organic solar cells performance. • Cell with 1:4 (Cs2CO3:BPhen) ratio shows 3.51% power conversion efficiency.

  17. HIV-1 Nef control of cell signalling molecules: multiple strategies to promote virus replication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alison L Greenway; Gavan Holloway; Dale A McPhee; Phoebe Ellis; Alyssa Cornall; Michael Lidman

    2003-04-01

    HIV-1 has at its disposal numerous proteins encoded by its genome which provide the required arsenal to establish and maintain infection in its host for a considerable number of years. One of the most important and enigmatic of these proteins is Nef. The Nef protein of HIV-1 plays a fundamental role in the virus life cycle. This small protein of approximately 27 kDa is required for maximal virus replication and disease progression. The mechanisms by which it is able to act as a positive factor during virus replication is an area of intense research and although some controversy surrounds Nef much has been gauged as to how it functions. Its ability to modulate the expression of key cellular receptors important for cell activation and control signal transduction elements and events by interacting with numerous cellular kinases and signalling molecules, including members of the Src family kinases, leading to an effect on host cell function is likely to explain at least in part its role during infection and represents a finely tuned mechanism where this protein assists HIV-1 to control its host.

  18. Deep absorbing porphyrin small molecule for high-performance organic solar cells with very low energy losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ke; Li, Lisheng; Lai, Tianqi; Xiao, Liangang; Huang, Yuan; Huang, Fei; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong; Liu, Feng; Russell, Thomas P; Janssen, René A J; Peng, Xiaobin

    2015-06-17

    We designed and synthesized the DPPEZnP-TEH molecule, with a porphyrin ring linked to two diketopyrrolopyrrole units by ethynylene bridges. The resulting material exhibits a very low energy band gap of 1.37 eV and a broad light absorption to 907 nm. An open-circuit voltage of 0.78 V was obtained in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells, showing a low energy loss of only 0.59 eV, which is the first report that small molecule solar cells show energy losses X-ray diffraction, resonant soft X-ray scattering, and transmission electron microscopy under different fabrication conditions. PMID:26035342

  19. Solution-Processable Organic Molecule for High-Performance Organic Solar Cells with Low Acceptor Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Guo, Bing; Xu, Zhuo; Guo, Xia; Zhang, Maojie; Li, Yongfang

    2015-11-11

    A new planar D2-A-D1-A-D2 structured organic molecule with bithienyl benzodithiophene (BDT) as central donor unit D1 and fluorine-substituted benzothiadiazole (BTF) as acceptor unit and alkyl-dithiophene as end group and donor unit D2, BDT-BTF, was designed and synthesized for the application as donor material in organic solar cells (OSCs). BDT-BTF shows a broad absorption in visible region, suitable highest occupied molecular orbital energy level of -5.20 eV, and high hole mobility of 1.07 × 10(-2) cm(2)/(V s), benefitted from its high coplanarity and strong crystallinity. The OSCs based on BDT-BTF as donor (D) and PC71BM as acceptor (A) at a D/A weight ratio of 3:1 without any extra treatment exhibit high photovoltaic performance with Voc of 0.85 V, Jsc of 10.48 mA/cm(2), FF of 0.66, and PCE of 5.88%. The morphological study by transmission electron microscopy reveals that the blend of BDT-BTF and PC71BM (3:1, w/w) possesses an appropriate interpenetrating D/A network for the exciton separation and charge carrier transport, which agrees well with the good device performance. The optimized D/A weight ratio of 3:1 is the lowest acceptor content in the active layer reported so far for the high-performance OSCs, and the organic molecules with the molecular structure like BDT-BTF could be promising high-performance donor materials in solution-processable OSCs. PMID:26492421

  20. Netrin-1 induces local translation of down syndrome cell adhesion molecule in axonal growth cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shruti; Welshhans, Kristy

    2016-07-01

    Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) plays an important role in many neurodevelopmental processes such as axon guidance, dendrite arborization, and synapse formation. DSCAM is located in the Down syndrome trisomic region of human chromosome 21 and may contribute to the Down syndrome brain phenotype, which includes a reduction in the formation of long-distance connectivity. The local translation of a select group of mRNA transcripts within growth cones is necessary for the formation of appropriate neuronal connectivity. Interestingly, we have found that Dscam mRNA is localized to growth cones of mouse hippocampal neurons, and is dynamically regulated in response to the axon guidance molecule, netrin-1. Furthermore, netrin-1 stimulation results in an increase in locally translated DSCAM protein in growth cones. Deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), a netrin-1 receptor, is required for the netrin-1-induced increase in Dscam mRNA local translation. We also find that two RNA-binding proteins-fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) and cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein (CPEB)-colocalize with Dscam mRNA in growth cones, suggesting their regulation of Dscam mRNA localization and translation. Finally, overexpression of DSCAM in mouse cortical neurons results in a severe stunting of axon outgrowth and branching, suggesting that an increase in DSCAM protein results in a structural change having functional consequences. Taken together, these results suggest that netrin-1-induced local translation of Dscam mRNA during embryonic development may be an important mechanism to regulate axon growth and guidance in the developing nervous system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 799-816, 2016. PMID:26518186

  1. Chimeric molecules facilitate the degradation of androgen receptors and repress the growth of LNCaP cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Qing Tang; Bang-Min Han; Xin-Quan Yao; Yan Hong; Yan Wang; Fu-Jun Zhao; Sheng-Qiang Yu; Xiao-Wen Sun; Shu-Jie Xia

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational degradation of protein plays an important role in cell life.We employed chimeric molecules (dihydrotestosterone-based proteolysis-targeting chimeric molecule [DHT-PROTAC]) to facilitate androgen receptor (AR) degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and to investigate the role of AR in cell proliferation and viability in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells.Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were applied to analyse AR levels in LNCaP cells after DHT-PROTAC treatment.Cell counting and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability assay were used to evaluate cell proliferation and viability after AR elimination in both LNCaP and PC-3 cells.AR was tagged for elimination via the UPP by DHT-PROTAC,and this could be blocked by proteasome inhibitors.Degradation of AR depended on DHT-PROTAC concentration,and either DHT or an ALAPYIP-(arg)s peptide could compete with DHT-PROTAC.Inhibition of cell proliferation and decreased viability were observed in LNCaP cells,but not in PC-3 or 786-O cells after DHT-PROTAC treatment.These data indicate that AR elimination is facilitated via the UPP by DHT-PROTAC,and that the growth of LNCaP cells is repressed after AR degradation.

  2. Biochemical and toxicological evaluation of nano-heparins in cell functional properties, proteasome activation and expression of key matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperigkou, Zoi; Karamanou, Konstantina; Afratis, Nikolaos A; Bouris, Panagiotis; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Belmiro, Celso L R; Pavão, Mauro S G; Vynios, Dimitrios H; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan heparin and its derivatives act strongly on blood coagulation, controlling the activity of serine protease inhibitors in plasma. Nonetheless, there is accumulating evidence highlighting different anticancer activities of these molecules in numerous types of cancer. Nano-heparins may have great biological significance since they can inhibit cell proliferation and invasion as well as inhibiting proteasome activation. Moreover, they can cause alterations in the expression of major modulators of the tumor microenvironment, regulating cancer cell behavior. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of two nano-heparin formulations: one isolated from porcine intestine and the other from the sea squirt Styela plicata, on a breast cancer cell model. We determined whether these nano-heparins are able to affect cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion, as well as proteasome activity and the expression of extracellular matrix molecules. Specifically, we observed that nano-Styela compared to nano-Mammalian analogue has higher inhibitory role on cell proliferation, invasion and proteasome activity. Moreover, nano-Styela regulates cell apoptosis, expression of inflammatory molecules, such as IL-6 and IL-8 and reduces the expression levels of extracellular matrix macromolecules, such as the proteolytic enzymes MT1-MMP, uPA and the cell surface proteoglycans syndecan-1 and -2, but not on syndecan-4. The observations reported in the present article indicate that nano-heparins and especially ascidian heparin are effective agents for heparin-induced effects in critical cancer cell functions, providing an important possibility in pharmacological targeting. PMID:26476401

  3. Expression pattern of epithelial cell adhesion molecule on normal and malignant colon tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Xie; Chun-Yan Wang; Yun-Xin Cao; Wei Wang; Ran Zhuang; Li-Hua Chen; Na-Na Dang; Liang Fang; Bo-Quan Jin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression pattern of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) on normal and malignant colon tissues to evaluate its diagnostic and therapeutic significance.METHODS: cDNA encoding Ep-CAv extracellular domain was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from excised malignant colon tissues and inserted into a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged vector. EpCAM-GST fusion protein was induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and purified with glutathionesepharose. The Ep-CAM-GST fusion protein was mixed with Freund's adjuvant and Balb/c mice were immunized with it. Sp2/0 myeloma cells were fused with the spleen cells of the immunized mice. After having selected by indirect ELISA, the anti-Ep-CAM monoclonal antibodies (NAbs) were generated and the corresponding ascites were obtained.Finally, the human colon carcinoma tissue array prepared from seventy individual patients was stained with the antiEp-CAM NAbs.RESULTS: The isolated Ep-CAM cDNA sequence was identical to the data in GenBank. The expressed fusion protein was almost soluble and had a molecular weight (NW) of 53 ku.Four NAbs against Ep-CAM were obtained and designated as FMU-Ep1, FMU-Ep2, FMU-Ep3 and FMU-Ep4 respectively.Among them, FMU-Ep4 could recognize the natural EpCAM on Colo205 and SW480 cells, and all of them could be used for immunohistochemical staining of tissue sections.It was found that Ep-CAM was distributed differently in normal and various malignant colon tissues, including squamous cell carcinoma, signet-ring cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma.In normal colon gland epithelia, Ep-CAM antigen was mainly distributed on the basolateral membrane and in the region between the basolateral membrane and the cytoplastic part near the nuclei, whereas the expression pattern of colon malignancies was mainly on the whole surface of epithelia and the expression was much higher than the normal colon tissues. The staining pattern of tissue array

  4. Efficacy and Feasibility of the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) Immunomagnetic Cell Sorter for Studies of DNA Methylation in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Failli; Annalisa Legitimo; Francesca Migheli; Fabio Coppedè; Mathers, John C.; Roberto Spisni; Paolo Miccoli; Lucia Migliore; Rita Consolini

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the impact on measurements of methylation of a panel of four cancer gene promoters of purifying tumor cells from colorectal tissue samples using the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-immunomagnetic cell enrichment approach. We observed that, on average, methylation levels were higher in enriched cell fractions than in the whole tissue, but the difference was significant only for one out of four studied genes. In addition, there were strong correlatio...

  5. Loss of cell adhesion molecule CHL1 improves homeostatic adaptation and survival in hypoxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X; Sun, J; Rong, W; Zhao, T; Li, D H; Ding, X; Wu, L Y; Wu, K; Schachner, M; Xiao, Z C; Zhu, L L; Fan, M

    2013-01-01

    Close homologue of L1 (CHL1) is a transmembrane cell adhesion molecule that is critical for brain development and for the maintenance of neural circuits in adults. Recent studies revealed that CHL1 has diverse roles and is involved in the regulation of recovery after spinal cord injury. CHL1 expression was downregulated in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and brain stem after the induction of acute hypoxia (AH). In the current study, we sought to address the role of CHL1 in regulating homeostasis responses to hypoxia using CHL1-knockout (CHL1(-/-)) mice. We found that, compared with wild-type littermates, CHL1(-/-) mice showed a dramatically lower mortality rate and an augmented ventilatory response after they were subjected to AH. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that CHL1 was expressed in the carotid body (CB), the key oxygen sensor in rodents, and CHL1 expression level in the CB as assayed by western blot was decreased after hypoxic exposure. The number of glomus cells and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (a marker for glomus cells) in the CB of CHL1(-/-) mice appeared to be increased compared with CHL1(+/+) mice. In addition, in the ex vivo CB preparation, hypoxia induced a significantly greater afferent nerve discharge in CHL1(-/-) mice compared with CHL1(+/+) mice. Furthermore, the arterial blood pressure and plasma catecholamine levels of CHL1(-/-) mice were also significantly higher than those of CHL1(+/+) mice. Our findings first demonstrate that CHL1 is a novel intrinsic factor that is involved in CB function and in the ventilatory response to AH. PMID:23949217

  6. Inefficient assembly limits transport and cell surface expression of HLA-Cw4 molecules in C1R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemmour, J

    1996-12-01

    HLA-C antigens are expressed to the cell surface at roughly 10% the level of HLA-B or -A, and their serological definition remains persistently difficult. To characterize the factors limiting surface expression, the processes of assembly and intracellular transport of HLA-Cw4 molecules were investigated in the C1R cell line. When appropriate peptides were added to cultured cells or in cell lysates significant amounts of conformed HLA-C molecules that associate with beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2 m) are detected, but are indeed not sufficient to restore expression to the level observed for HLA-A or -B molecules. Furthermore, a precursor/product relationship exists between the free class I heavy chain and the mature conformation of HLA-Cw4 molecules. Thus, HLA-C assembly promotes the conversion of HC-10-reactive molecules (weakly-beta 2m-associated non-ligand associated free HC form) into the beta 2m-associated class I molecules recognized by W6/32. To further investigate the factors that regulate cell surface expression, intracellular transport of HLA-Cw4 was studied in pulse chase analysis. In contrast to some HLA-A and B, maturation of HLA-Cw4 heavy chains and their export to the medial and trans-Golgi compartments are quite inefficient. After 4 h of chase period, roughly half of the pulse-labeled HLA-Cw4 molecules have transited to the medial-Golgi and acquired complex oligosaccharides characteristic of mature form. In addition, treatment with gamma-interferon does not appear to improve maturation of HLA-Cw4 heavy chains, suggesting that increased supply of peptides does not influence intracellular transport. Moreover, only a small fraction in the pool of HLA-Cw4 molecules was subsequently transported through the trans-Golgi network, as indicated by their acquisition of sialic acids. Taken together these studies show that HLA-Cw4 molecules are inefficiently transported through the Golgi apparatus and presumably retained in the endoplasmic reticulum or cis

  7. Bergmann glia and the recognition molecule CHL1 organize GABAergic axons and direct innervation of Purkinje cell dendrites.

    OpenAIRE

    Ango, Fabrice; Wu, Caizhi; van der Want, Johannes; Wu, Priscilla; Schachner, Melitta; Huang, Z. Josh

    2008-01-01

    Author Summary Large principal neurons in vertebrate neural circuits often consist of distinct anatomical and physiological compartments, which allow distributed and compartmentalized signaling and greatly increase the computational power of single neurons. Superimposed upon this intrinsic compartmental architecture is the subcellular organization of synaptic inputs, which exert local control over the biophysical properties and differentially regulate the input, integration, and output of pri...

  8. Propofol protects against high glucose-induced endothelial adhesion molecules expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Minmin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia could induce oxidative stress, activate transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, up-regulate expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, and lead to endothelial injury. Studies have indicated that propofol could attenuate oxidative stress and suppress NF-κB activation in some situations. In the present study, we examined whether and how propofol improved high glucose-induced up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Methods Protein expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, NF-κB, inhibitory subunit of NF-κBα (IκBα, protein kinase Cβ2 (PKCβ2, and phosphorylation of PKCβ2 (Ser660 were measured by Western blot. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. PKC activity was measured with SignaTECT PKC assay system. Superoxide anion (O2.- accumulation was measured with the reduction of ferricytochrome c assay. Human peripheral mononuclear cells were prepared with Histopaque-1077 solution. Results High glucose induced the expression of endothelial selectin (E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1, and increased mononuclear-endothelial adhesion. High glucose induced O2.- accumulation, PKCβ2 phosphorylation and PKC activation. Further, high glucose decreased IκBα expression in cytoplasm, increased the translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nuclear, and induced NF-κB activation. Importantly, we found these high glucose-mediated effects were attenuated by propofol pretreatment. Moreover, CGP53353, a selective PKCβ2 inhibitor, decreased high glucose-induced NF-κB activation, adhesion molecules expression, and mononuclear-endothelial adhesion. Conclusion Propofol, via decreasing O2.- accumulation, down-regulating PKCβ2 Ser660 phosphorylation and PKC as well as NF-κB activity, attenuated high glucose-induced endothelial adhesion molecules expression

  9. Development of novel small molecules for imaging and drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanting

    Small organic molecules, including small molecule based fluorescent probes, small molecule based drugs or prodrugs, and smart multifunctional fluorescent drug delivery systems play important roles in biological research, drug discovery, and clinical practices. Despite the significant progress made in these fields, the development of novel and diverse small molecules is needed to meet various demands for research and clinical applications. My Ph.D study focuses on the development of novel functional molecules for recognition, imaging and drug release. In the first part, a turn-on fluorescent probe is developed for the detection of intracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) levels based on multiplexing recognitions. Considering the unique and complicated structure of ATP molecules, a fluorescent probe has been implemented with improved sensitivity and selectivity due to two synergistic binding recognitions by incorporating of 2, 2'-dipicolylamine (Dpa)-Zn(II) for targeting of phospho anions and phenylboronic acid group for cis-diol moiety. The novel probe is able to detect intracellular ATP levels in SH-SY5Y cells. Meanwhile, the advantages of multiplexing recognition design concept have been demonstrated using two control molecules. In the second part, a prodrug system is developed to deliver multiple drugs within one small molecule entity. The prodrug is designed by using 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl (NPE) as phototrigger, and biphenol biquaternary ammonium as the prodrug. With controlled photo activation, both DNA cross-linking agents mechlorethamine and o-quinone methide are delivered and released at the preferred site, leading to efficient DNA cross-links formation and cell death. The prodrug shows negligible cytotoxicity towards normal skin cells (Hekn cells) with and without UV activation, but displays potent activity towards cancer cells (HeLa cells) upon UV activation. The multiple drug release system may hold a great potential for practical application. In the

  10. Correlation of Serum Concentrations of Soluble Thrombomodulin, Soluble Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1,Intracellular Adhesion Molecule -1 And E-Selectin In Patients WithSystemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malak., A. Mohsen*, Magda.A.Gamil*,Maha. I.Shehata

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available To date no specific serological parameters are available to assess disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. The objective of this study was to correlate serum levels of thrombomodulin (TM, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 sICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 sVCAM-1, and E-selectin with standard laboratory tests and clinical indices of disease activity in 40 patients with SLE and 20 apparently healthy persons as controls. According to British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG disease activity index, the 40 patients were divided into two groups, the first consisted of 22 with active disease, and the second consisted of 18 patients with inactive SLE. Serum sTM, sICAM-1, sVCAM-I, and E-selectin were measured in their sera, using enzyme linked immuonosorbent assay (ELISA technique.C-reactiv protein (CRP, Erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR and serum creatinines were measured by standard laboratory tests. Total leukocytic count and hemoglobin concentration were detected by coulter counter. Levels of sTM and sVCAM were highly elevated in the group of patients with active SLE as compared to the inactive one (P0.05. In SLE, the BILAG disease activity index, ESR and serum creatinine correlated best with sTM, sVCAM-1 and E-selectin levels while there was a weak association between CRP levels and the adhesion molecules, and no correlation between CRP level and disease activity. In conclusion, sTM and sVCAM were the most important serological indices of disease activity in SLE and might be valuable serological parameters for monitoring therapy.

  11. Preconditioning Serum Levels of Endothelial Cell-Derived Molecules and the Risk of Posttransplant Complications in Patients Treated with Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roald Lindås

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells are involved in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. These cells express several molecules that can be detected as biologically active soluble forms; serum levels of these molecules may thereby reflect the functional status of endothelial cells. Furthermore, acute GVHD is an inflammatory reaction and endothelial cells function as local regulators of inflammation. We therefore investigated whether differences in preconditioning/pretransplant serum levels of endothelium-expressed molecules (i.e., endocan, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1, and E-selectin were associated with a risk of posttransplant GVHD. Our study should be regarded as a population-based study of consecutive and thereby unselected patients (n=56. Analysis of this pretreatment endothelium biomarker profile by unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified a subset of patients with increased early nonrelapse mortality. Furthermore, low endocan levels were significantly associated with acute GVHD in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, whereas high VCAM-1 levels were associated with acute GVHD in the skin only. Our study suggests that the preconditioning/pretransplant status of endothelial cells (possibly through altered trafficking of immunocompetent cells is important for the risk and the organ involvement of later acute GVHD.

  12. Reversing hypoxic cell chemoresistance in vitro using genetic and small molecule approaches targeting hypoxia inducible factor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Louisa M; Cowen, Rachel L; Debray, Camille;

    2006-01-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to conventional chemotherapy is well documented. Using both adenovirus-mediated gene delivery and small molecules targeting hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), we evaluated the impact of HIF-1 inhibition on the sensitivity of hypoxic tumor cells to etoposide. The...... genetic therapy exploited a truncated HIF-1alpha protein that acts as a dominant-negative HIF-1alpha (HIF-1alpha-no-TAD). Its functionality was validated in six human tumor cell lines using HIF-1 reporter assays. An EGFP-fused protein demonstrated that the dominant-negative HIF-1alpha was nucleus......-localized and constitutively expressed irrespective of oxygen tension. The small molecules studied were quinocarmycin monocitrate (KW2152), its analog 7-cyanoquinocarcinol (DX-52-1), and topotecan. DX-52-1 and topotecan have been previously established as HIF-1 inhibitors. HT1080 and HCT116 cells were treated...

  13. Direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptor molecules in A549 human lung epithelial cells by nanodiamond labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C.-Y.; Perevedentseva, E.; Tu, J.-S.; Chung, P.-H.; Cheng, C.-L.; Liu, K.-K.; Chao, J.-I.; Chen, P.-H.; Chang, C.-C.

    2007-04-01

    This letter presents direct observation of growth hormone receptor in one single cancer cell using nanodiamond-growth hormone complex as a specific probe. The interaction of surface growth hormone receptor of A549 human lung epithelial cells with growth hormone was observed using nanodiamond's unique spectroscopic signal via confocal Raman mapping. The growth hormone molecules were covalent conjugated to 100nm diameter carboxylated nanodiamonds, which can be recognized specifically by the growth hormone receptors of A549 cell. The Raman spectroscopic signal of diamond provides direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptors in physiology condition in a single cell level.

  14. Age-Related Cognitive Impairments in Mice with a Conditional Ablation of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisaz, Reto; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Genoux, David; Sandi, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Most of the mechanisms involved in neural plasticity support cognition, and aging has a considerable effect on some of these processes. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) of the immunoglobulin superfamily plays a pivotal role in structural and functional plasticity and is required to modulate cognitive and emotional behaviors. However,…

  15. Improved Efficiency in Inverted Perovskite Solar Cells Employing a Novel Diarylamino-Substituted Molecule as PEDOT:PSS Replacement

    KAUST Repository

    El Labban, Abdulrahman

    2016-03-15

    An approach to fabricate high-efficiency inverted planar perovskites solar cells using solution-processed organic small molecules hole transporting layer is reported. Devices using CH3NH3PbI3 as photoactive layer and PC60BM as electron transport layer show power conversion efficiencies exceeding 12% and open-circuit voltages (VOC) higher than 1 V.

  16. Porcine blood mononuclear cell cytokine responses to PAMP molecules: comparison of mRNA and protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nanna Skall; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) are conserved molecules of microorganisms inducing innate immune cells to secrete distinct patterns of cytokines. In veterinary species, due to a lack of specific antibodies, cytokines are often monitored as expressed mRNA only. This study investigated...

  17. A novel molecule integrating therapeutic and diagnostic activities reveals multiple aspects of stem cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingtgen, Shawn D; Kasmieh, Randa; van de Water, Jeroen; Weissleder, Ralph; Shah, Khalid

    2010-04-01

    Stem cells are promising therapeutic delivery vehicles; however pre-clinical and clinical applications of stem cell-based therapy would benefit significantly from the ability to simultaneously determine therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetics of therapies delivered by engineered stem cells. In this study, we engineered and screened numerous fusion variants that contained therapeutic (TRAIL) and diagnostic (luciferase) domains designed to allow simultaneous investigation of multiple events in stem cell-based therapy in vivo. When various stem cell lines were engineered with the optimized molecule, SRL(O)L(2)TR, diagnostic imaging showed marked differences in the levels and duration of secretion between stem cell lines, while the therapeutic activity of the molecule showed the different secretion levels translated to significant variability in tumor cell killing. In vivo, simultaneous diagnostic and therapeutic monitoring revealed that stem cell-based delivery significantly improved pharmacokinetics and anti-tumor effectiveness of the therapy compared to intravenous or intratumoral delivery. As treatment for highly malignant brain tumor xenografts, tracking SRL(O)L(2)TR showed stable stem cell-mediated delivery significantly regressed peripheral and intracranial tumors. Together, the integrated diagnostic and therapeutic properties of SRL(O)L(2)TR answer critical questions necessary for successful utilization of stem cells as novel therapeutic vehicles. PMID:20127797

  18. The role of cell adhesion molecules in visual circuit formation: From neurite outgrowth to maps and synaptic specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Missaire, Mégane; Hindges, Robert

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of visual circuitry is a multistep process that involves cell–cell interactions based on a range of molecular mechanisms. The correct implementation of individual events, including axon outgrowth and guidance, the formation of the topographic map, or the synaptic targeting of specific cellular subtypes, are prerequisites for a fully functional visual system that is able to appropriately process the information captured by the eyes. Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) with th...

  19. Candidate autism gene screen identifies critical role for cell-adhesion molecule CASPR2 in dendritic arborization and spine development

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Garret R.; Galfin, Timothy; XU, WEI; Aoto, Jason; Malenka, Robert C.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the contactin-associated protein 2 (CNTNAP2) gene encoding CASPR2, a neurexin-related cell-adhesion molecule, predispose to autism, but the function of CASPR2 in neural circuit assembly remains largely unknown. In a knockdown survey of autism candidate genes, we found that CASPR2 is required for normal development of neural networks. RNAi-mediated knockdown of CASPR2 produced a cell-autonomous decrease in dendritic arborization and spine development in pyramidal neurons, leading ...

  20. Effect of gliadin and other food peptides on expression of MHC class II molecules by HT-29 cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Mothes, T; Bendix, U; Pfannschmidt, C; Lehmann, I

    1995-01-01

    Expression of major histocompatibility (MHC) class II molecules by enterocytes is known to be enhanced in coeliac disease and other disorders characterised by intestinal inflammation--an effect thought to be mediated via intestinal lymphocytes. To investigate if food peptides can exert direct effects on class II expression, the influence of gliadins, casein, and beta lactoglobulin on an intestinal epithelial cell line (HT-29) was examined in the absence of immune cells. Class II expression wa...

  1. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Polycrystalline Silicon : From Gas Molecule To Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veenendaal, P. A. T. T.

    2002-10-01

    Although the effort to investigate the use of renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar energy, has increased, their contribution to the total energy consumption remains insignificant. The conversion of solar energy into electricity through solar cells is one of the most promising techniques, but the use of these cells is limited by the high cost of electricity. The major contributions to these costs are the material and manufacturing costs. Over the past decades, the development of silicon based thin film solar cells has received much attention, because the fabrication costs are low. A promising material for use in thin film solar cells is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si:H). A relatively new technique to deposit poly-Si:H is Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (Hot-Wire CVD), in which the reactant gases are catalytically decomposed at the surface of a hot filament, mainly tungsten and tantalum. The main advantages of Hot-Wire CVD over PE-CVD are absence of ion bombardment, high deposition rate, low equipment cost and high gas utilization. This thesis deals with the full spectrum of deposition, characterization and application of poly-Si:H thin films, i.e. from gas molecule to solar cell. Studies on the decomposition of silane on the filament showed that the process is catalytic of nature and that silane is decomposed into Si and 4H. The dominant gas phase reaction is the reaction of Si and H with silane, resulting in SiH3, Si2H6, Si3H6 and H2SiSiH2. The film growth precursors are Si, SiH3 and Si2H4. Also, XPS results on used tantalum and tungsten filaments are discussed. The position dependent measurements show larger silicon contents at the ends of the tungsten filament, as compared to the middle, due to a lower filament temperature. This effect is insignificant for a tantalum filament. Deposition time dependent measurements show an increase in silicon content of the tungsten filament with time, while the silicon content on the tantalum filament saturates

  2. New tools to study biophysical properties of single molecules and single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio S. Rocha

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a review on two new tools to study biophysical properties of single molecules and single cells. A laser incident through a high numerical aperture microscope objective can trap small dielectric particles near the focus. This arrangement is named optical tweezers. This technique has the advantage to permit manipulation of a single individual object. We use optical tweezers to measure the entropic elasticity of a single DNA molecule and its interaction with the drug Psoralen. Optical tweezers are also used to hold a kidney cell MDCK away from the substrate to allow precise volume measurements of this single cell during an osmotic shock. This procedure allows us to obtain information about membrane water permeability and regulatory volume increase. Defocusing microscopy is a recent technique invented in our laboratory, which allows the observation of transparent objects, by simply defocusing the microscope in a controlled way. Our physical model of a defocused microscope shows that the image contrast observed in this case is proportional to the defocus distance and to the curvature of the transparent object. Defocusing microscopy is very useful to study motility and mechanical properties of cells. We show here the application of defocusing microscopy to measurements of macrophage surface fluctuations and their influence on phagocytosis.Apresentamos uma revisão de duas novas técnicas para estudar propriedades biofísicas de moléculas únicas e células únicas. Um laser incidindo em uma objetiva de microscópio de grande abertura numérica é capaz de aprisionar pequenas partículas dielétricas na região próxima ao foco. Este aparato é chamado de pinça óptica. Esta técnica tem a grande vantagem de permitir a manipulação de um objeto individual. Usamos a pinça óptica para medir a elasticidade entrópica de uma molécula única de DNA em sua interação com o fármaco Psoralen. A pinça óptica também é usada para segurar

  3. Evaluation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule as a Biomarker for Breast Cancer in Egyptian Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, serum activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) levels were evaluated in 41 primary breast cancer patients and 20 healthy females, and its diagnostic value was quantified, and compared with those of carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Also, its prognostic value was examined. Serum ALCAM levels were also evaluated before and after surgical treatment. Serum levels of ALCAM and CA 15-3 were significantly higher in breast cancer patients than healthy controls (P=0.002, P=0.043 respectively), but the difference in serum CEA levels did not reach statistical significance. Serum ALCAM levels had significant area under the curve (AUC) (P=0.002), but serum levels of CA 15-3 and CEA had nonsignificant AUCs, and various combinations between them did not result in any improvement. A significant association was found between serum levels of ALCAM and CEA with age and menopausal status in breast cancer patients. Non-significant difference was shown in serum levels of ALCAM, CA 15-3 and CEA before and after surgical treatment. In conclusion, this study suggests that serum ALCAM may represent a novel diagnostic bio marker for breast cancer

  4. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 polymorphism in patients with bronchial asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Nadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is considered as a chronic inflammatory airway disease and defined as increased tracheobronchial responsiveness to variety of stimuli. Edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in airway is observed in the asthmatic patients. One of the essential changes in inflammation is adhesion of leukocyte to endothelium and transmigration of leukocytes to the sites of inflammation. Unfortunately, little is known about the role of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 polymorphism in asthma inflammatory process. The purpose of this study was to determine whether PECAM-1 polymorphisms affect the risk of asthma or not.Forty-five asthmatic patients (including 27 men and 18 women and 45 healthy volunteers (11 men and 34 women were studied. To determine the severity of the asthmas situation, a questionnaire was prepared asking the following information: age, sex, clinical signs and symptoms and past medical history. All subjects were genotyped for PECAM-1 polymorphism by using amplification refractory mutation system -polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR. The genotype distribution of PECAM-1 80 Val/Met polymorphism in all asthmatic patients were Val/Val while non asthmatic controls were 95.6% Val/Val and 4.4% Val/Met. However, these differences were not statistically significant (p<0.05. The allele and genotype frequencies of PECAM-1 125 Val/Leu polymorphism were significantly different between asthmatic patients and controls. On the other hand, the presence of 125 Leu allele was associated with an increasing risk of asthma with an odds ratio of 2.8 (95% CI; 1.5-5.3, p=0.002. Our findings suggest that the PECAM-1 125 Val/leu polymorphism might be a genetic factor that may be associated with asthma.

  5. Molecular cloning of a human Ca2+-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule homologous to mouse placental cadherin: its low expression in human placental tissues

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    P-cadherin is a subclass of Ca2+-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecules present in mouse placenta, where its localization suggests a function of connecting the embryo to the uterus (Nose, A., and M. Takeichi. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:2649-2658). We recently identified a human cadherin detected by an mAb capable of disrupting cell-cell adhesion of A-431 cells, and found that it was closely related immunochemically to mouse P-cadherin. Curiously, this cadherin was undetectable in human placenta ...

  6. Single-molecule optical study of cholesterol-mediated dimerization process of EGFRs in different cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien Yu; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2015-03-01

    A growing body of data reveals that the membrane cholesterol molecules can alter the signaling pathways of living cells. However, the understanding about how membrane cholesterol modulates receptor proteins remains lacking. In this study we applies single-molecule optical tracking on ligand-induced dimerization process of EGFRs in the plasma membranes of several cancer and normal cell lines. We tracked individual EGFR and dual correlated receptors in the plasma membranes of live cells. We developed an energetic model based on the generalized Langevin equation and the Cahn-Hilliard equation to help extracting information from single-molecule trajectories. From the study, we discovered that ligand-bound EGFRs move from non-raft areas into lipid raft domains. This ligand-induced motion is a common behavior for all cell lines under study. By manipulating the total amount of cholesterol with methyl- β-cyclodextrin and the local concentration of cholesterol with nystatin, we found that the amount of cholesterol can affect the stability of EGFR dimers. The EGFR dimers in the plasma membrane of normal cells are more sensitive to the local concentration changes of cholesterol than EGFR dimers in the cancer cells.

  7. Glutamine Supplementation Attenuates Expressions of Adhesion Molecules and Chemokine Receptors on T Cells in a Murine Model of Acute Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Migration of T cells into the colon plays a major role in the pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease. This study investigated the effects of glutamine (Gln supplementation on chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules expressed by T cells in mice with dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS- induced colitis. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a standard diet or a Gln diet replacing 25% of the total nitrogen. After being fed the diets for 5 days, half of the mice from both groups were given 1.5% DSS in drinking water to induce colitis. Mice were killed after 5 days of DSS exposure. Results. DSS colitis resulted in higher expression levels of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand- (PSGL- 1, leukocyte function-associated antigen- (LFA- 1, and C-C chemokine receptor type 9 (CCR9 by T helper (Th and cytotoxic T (Tc cells, and mRNA levels of endothelial adhesion molecules in colons were upregulated. Gln supplementation decreased expressions of PSGL-1, LFA-1, and CCR9 by Th cells. Colonic gene expressions of endothelial adhesion molecules were also lower in Gln-colitis mice. Histological finding showed that colon infiltrating Th cells were less in the DSS group with Gln administration. Conclusions. Gln supplementation may ameliorate the inflammation of colitis possibly via suppression of T cell migration.

  8. A study of the cell adhesions molecules, E-Cadherin and C-CAM, and the intermediate filaments, nestin, in craniofacial and tooth development

    OpenAIRE

    Terling, Catharina

    1998-01-01

    A STUDY OF THE CELL ADHESION MOLECULES, E-CADHERIN AND C-CAM AND THE INTERMEDIATE FILAMENT NESTIN IN CRANIOFACIAL AND TOOTH DEVELOPMENT. Catharina Terling The Department of Basic Oral Sciences, The Center of Oral Biology, Novum Research Park and The Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Medical Nobel Institute, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are involved in cell migration, morphogenesis, and cell differentiation within the embryo, and ...

  9. Morphological study on small molecule acceptor-based organic solar cells with efficiencies beyond 7% (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Yan, He

    2015-10-01

    Despite the essential role of fullerenes in achieving best-performance organic solar cells (OSCs), fullerene acceptors have several drawbacks including poor light absorption, high-cost production and purification. For this reason, small molecule acceptor (SMA)-based OSCs have attracted much attention due to the easy tunability of electronic and optical properties of SMA materials. In this study, polymers with temperature dependent aggregation behaviors are combined with various small molecule acceptor materials, which lead to impressive power conversion efficiencies of up to 7.3%. The morphological and aggregation properties of the polymer:small molecule blends are studied in details. It is found that the temperature-dependent aggregation behavior of polymers allows for the processing of the polymer solutions at moderately elevated temperature, and more importantly, controlled aggregation and strong crystallization of the polymer during the film cooling and drying process. This results in a well-controlled and near-ideal polymer:small molecule morphology that is controlled by polymer aggregation during warm casting and thus insensitive to the choice of small molecules. As a result, several cases of highly efficient (PCE between 6-7.3%) SMA OSCs are achieved. The second part of this presentation will describe the morphology of a new small molecule acceptor with a unique 3D structure. The relationship between molecular structure and morphology is revealed.

  10. Differential Expression of Osteo-Modulatory Molecules in Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells in Response to Modified Titanium Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed differential gene expression of signaling molecules involved in osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs subjected to different titanium (Ti surface types. PDLSCs were cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS, and four types of Ti discs (PT, SLA, hydrophilic PT (pmodPT, and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA with no osteoinductive factor and then osteogenic activity, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mRNA expression of runt-related gene 2, osterix, FOSB, FRA1, and protein levels of osteopontin and collagen type IA, were examined. The highest osteogenic activity appeared in PDLSCs cultured on SLA, compared with the TCPS and other Ti surfaces. The role of surface properties in affecting signaling molecules to modulate PDLSC behavior was determined by examining the regulation of Wnt pathways. mRNA expression of the canonical Wnt signaling molecules, Wnt3a and β-catenin, was higher on SLA and modSLA than on smooth surfaces, but gene expression of the calcium-dependent Wnt signaling molecules Wnt5a, calmodulin, and NFATc1 was increased significantly on PT and pmodPT. Moreover, integrin α2/β1, sonic hedgehog, and Notch signaling molecules were affected differently by each surface modification. In conclusion, surface roughness and hydrophilicity can affect differential Wnt pathways and signaling molecules, targeting the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs.

  11. INVOLVEMENT OF PEPTIDOGLYCAN RECOGNITION PROTEIN L6 IN ACTIVATION OF IMMUNE DEFICIENCY PATHWAY IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSIVE SILKWORM CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromitsu; Sagisaka, Aki

    2016-06-01

    The immune deficiency (Imd) signaling pathway is activated by Gram-negative bacteria for producing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In Drosophila melanogaster, the activation of this pathway is initiated by the recognition of Gram-negative bacteria by peptidoglycan (PGN) recognition proteins (PGRPs), PGRP-LC and PGRP-LE. In this study, we found that the Imd pathway is involved in enhancing the promoter activity of AMP gene in response to Gram-negative bacteria or diaminopimelic (DAP) type PGNs derived from Gram-negative bacteria in an immune responsive silkworm cell line, Bm-NIAS-aff3. Using gene knockdown experiments, we further demonstrated that silkworm PGRP L6 (BmPGRP-L6) is involved in the activation of E. coli or E. coli-PGN mediated AMP promoter activation. Domain analysis revealed that BmPGRP-L6 contained a conserved PGRP domain, transmembrane domain, and RIP homotypic interaction motif like motif but lacked signal peptide sequences. BmPGRP-L6 overexpression enhances AMP promoter activity through the Imd pathway. BmPGRP-L6 binds to DAP-type PGNs, although it also binds to lysine-type PGNs that activate another immune signal pathway, the Toll pathway in Drosophila. These results indicate that BmPGRP-L6 is a key PGRP for activating the Imd pathway in immune responsive silkworm cells. PMID:26991439

  12. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian

  13. Improved localization of cellular membrane receptors using combined fluorescence microscopy and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duman, M; Pfleger, M; Chtcheglova, L A; Neundlinger, I; Bozna, B L; Ebner, A; Schuetz, G J; Hinterdorfer, P [Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Zhu, R; Mayer, B [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rankl, C; Moertelmaier, M; Kada, G; Kienberger, F [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Salio, M; Shepherd, D; Polzella, P; Cerundolo, V [Cancer Research UK Tumor Immunology Group, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Dieudonne, M, E-mail: ferry_kienberger@agilent.com [Agilent Technologies Belgium, Wingepark 51, Rotselaar, AN B-3110 (Belgium)

    2010-03-19

    The combination of fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy has a great potential in single-molecule-detection applications, overcoming many of the limitations coming from each individual technique. Here we present a new platform of combined fluorescence and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) for improved localization of cellular receptors. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled human sodium-glucose cotransporter (hSGLT1) expressed Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and endothelial cells (MyEnd) from mouse myocardium stained with phalloidin-rhodamine were used as cell systems to study AFM topography and fluorescence microscopy on the same surface area. Topographical AFM images revealed membrane features such as lamellipodia, cytoskeleton fibers, F-actin filaments and small globular structures with heights ranging from 20 to 30 nm. Combined fluorescence and TREC imaging was applied to detect density, distribution and localization of YFP-labeled CD1d molecules on {alpha}-galactosylceramide ({alpha}GalCer)-loaded THP1 cells. While the expression level, distribution and localization of CD1d molecules on THP1 cells were detected with fluorescence microscopy, the nanoscale distribution of binding sites was investigated with molecular recognition imaging by using a chemically modified AFM tip. Using TREC on the inverted light microscope, the recognition sites of cell receptors were detected in recognition images with domain sizes ranging from {approx} 25 to {approx} 160 nm, with the smaller domains corresponding to a single CD1d molecule.

  14. Cellular size as a means of tracking mTOR activity and cell fate of CD4+ T cells upon antigen recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Pollizzi

    Full Text Available mTOR is a central integrator of metabolic and immunological stimuli, dictating immune cell activation, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we demonstrate that within a clonal population of activated T cells, there exist both mTORhi and mTORlo cells exhibiting highly divergent metabolic and immunologic functions. By taking advantage of the role of mTOR activation in controlling cellular size, we demonstrate that upon antigen recognition, mTORhi CD4+ T cells are destined to become highly glycolytic effector cells. Conversely, mTORlo T cells preferentially develop into long-lived cells that express high levels of Bcl-2, CD25, and CD62L. Furthermore, mTORlo T cells have a greater propensity to differentiate into suppressive Foxp3+ T regulatory cells, and this paradigm was also observed in human CD4+ T cells. Overall, these studies provide the opportunity to track the development of effector and memory T cells from naïve precursors, as well as facilitate the interrogation of immunologic and metabolic programs that inform these fates.

  15. Structural Basis of the CD8[alpha beta]/MHC Class I Interaction: Focused Recognition Orients CD8[beta] to a T Cell Proximal Position[superscript 1,2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rui; Natarajan, Kannan; Margulies, David H.; (NIH)

    2009-09-18

    In the immune system, B cells, dendritic cells, NK cells, and T lymphocytes all respond to signals received via ligand binding to receptors and coreceptors. Although the specificity of T cell recognition is determined by the interaction of T cell receptors with MHC/peptide complexes, the development of T cells in the thymus and their sensitivity to Ag are also dependent on coreceptor molecules CD8 (for MHC class I (MHCI)) and CD4 (for MHCII). The CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer is a potent coreceptor for T cell activation, but efforts to understand its function fully have been hampered by ignorance of the structural details of its interactions with MHCI. In this study we describe the structure of CD8{alpha}{beta} in complex with the murine MHCI molecule H-2D{sup d} at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The focus of the CD8{alpha}{beta} interaction is the acidic loop (residues 222-228) of the {alpha}3 domain of H-2D{sup d}. The {beta} subunit occupies a T cell membrane proximal position, defining the relative positions of the CD8{alpha} and CD8{beta} subunits. Unlike the CD8{alpha}{alpha} homodimer, CD8{alpha}{beta} does not contact the MHCI {alpha}{sub 2}- or {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin domains. Movements of the CD8{alpha} CDR2 and CD8{beta} CDR1 and CDR2 loops as well as the flexibility of the H-2D{sup d} CD loop facilitate the monovalent interaction. The structure resolves inconclusive data on the topology of the CD8{alpha}{beta}/MHCI interaction, indicates that CD8{beta} is crucial in orienting the CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer, provides a framework for understanding the mechanistic role of CD8{alpha}{beta} in lymphoid cell signaling, and offers a tangible context for design of structurally altered coreceptors for tumor and viral immunotherapy.

  16. Toward Additive-Free Small-Molecule Organic Solar Cells: Roles of the Donor Crystallization Pathway and Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelsamie, Maged

    2015-09-29

    The ease with which small-molecule donors crystallize during solution processing is directly linked to the need for solvent additives. Donor molecules that get trapped in disordered (H1) or liquid crystalline (T1) mesophases require additive processing to promote crystallization, phase separation, and efficient light harvesting. A donor material (X2) that crystallizes directly from solution yields additive-free solar cells with an efficiency of 7.6%. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Immunogenicity and T cell recognition in swine of foot-and-mouth disease virus polymerase 3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunization of domestic pigs with a vaccinia virus (VV) recombinant expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 3D protein conferred partial protection against challenge with infectious virus. The severity reduction of the clinical symptoms developed by the challenged animals occurred in the absence of significant levels of anti-3D circulating antibodies. This observation suggested that the partial protection observed was mediated by the induction of a 3D-specific cellular immune response. To gain information on the T cell recognition of FMDV 3D protein, we conducted in vitro proliferative assays using lymphocytes from outbred pigs experimentally infected with FMDV and 90 overlapping peptides spanning the complete 3D sequence. The use of pools of two to three peptides allowed the identification of T cell epitopes that were efficiently recognized by lymphocytes from at least four of the five animals analyzed. This recognition was heterotypic because anti-peptide responses increased upon reinfection of animals with a FMDV isolate from a different serotype. The results obtained with individual peptides confirmed the antigenicity observed with peptide pools. Detection of cytokine mRNAs by RT-PCR in lymphocytes stimulated in vitro by individual 3D peptides revealed that IFN-γ mRNA was the most consistently induced, suggesting that the activated T cells belong to the Th 1 subset. These results indicate that 3D protein contains epitopes that can be efficiently recognized by porcine T lymphocytes from different infected animals, both upon primary and secondary (heterotypic) FMDV infection. These epitopes can extend the repertoire of viral T cell epitopes to be included in subunit and synthetic FMD vaccines

  18. Resolving protein interactions and organization downstream the T cell antigen receptor using single-molecule localization microscopy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Eilon

    2016-06-01

    Signal transduction is mediated by heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes. Such complexes play a critical role in diverse cell functions, with the important example of T cell activation. Biochemical studies of signalling complexes and their imaging by diffraction limited microscopy have resulted in an intricate network of interactions downstream the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). However, in spite of their crucial roles in T cell activation, much remains to be learned about these signalling complexes, including their heterogeneous contents and size distribution, their complex arrangements in the PM, and the molecular requirements for their formation. Here, we review how recent advancements in single molecule localization microscopy have helped to shed new light on the organization of signalling complexes in single molecule detail in intact T cells. From these studies emerges a picture where cells extensively employ hierarchical and dynamic patterns of nano-scale organization to control the local concentration of interacting molecular species. These patterns are suggested to play a critical role in cell decision making. The combination of SMLM with more traditional techniques is expected to continue and critically contribute to our understanding of multimolecular protein complexes and their significance to cell function.

  19. Sulfamethoxazole induces a switch mechanism in T cell receptors containing TCRVβ20-1, altering pHLA recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Watkins

    Full Text Available T cell receptors (TCR containing Vβ20-1 have been implicated in a wide range of T cell mediated disease and allergic reactions, making it a target for understanding these. Mechanics of T cell receptors are largely unexplained by static structures available from x-ray crystallographic studies. A small number of molecular dynamic simulations have been conducted on TCR, however are currently lacking either portions of the receptor or explanations for differences between binding and non-binding TCR recognition of respective peptide-HLA. We performed molecular dynamic simulations of a TCR containing variable domain Vβ20-1, sequenced from drug responsive T cells. These were initially from a patient showing maculopapular eruptions in response to the sulfanilamide-antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SMX. The CDR2β domain of this TCR was found to dock SMX with high affinity. Using this compound as a perturbation, overall mechanisms involved in responses mediated by this receptor were explored, showing a chemical action on the TCR free from HLA or peptide interaction. Our simulations show two completely separate modes of binding cognate peptide-HLA complexes, with an increased affinity induced by SMX bound to the Vβ20-1. Overall binding of the TCR is mediated through a primary recognition by either the variable β or α domain, and a switch in recognition within these across TCR loops contacting the peptide and HLA occurs when SMX is present in the CDR2β loop. Large binding affinity differences are induced by summed small amino acid changes primarily by SMX modifying only three critical CDR2β loop amino acid positions. These residues, TYRβ57, ASPβ64, and LYSβ65 initially hold hydrogen bonds from the CDR2β to adjacent CDR loops. Effects from SMX binding are amplified and traverse longer distances through internal TCR hydrogen bonding networks, controlling the overall TCR conformation. Thus, the CDR2β of Vβ20-1 acts as a ligand controlled switch

  20. CD26 surface molecule involvement in T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis in rheumatoid and other inflammatory synovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerli, R; Muscat, C; Bertotto, A; Bistoni, O; Agea, E; Tognellini, R; Fiorucci, G; Cesarotti, M; Bombardieri, S

    1996-07-01

    T cell surface expression and the functional role of CD26 antigen (Ag), a surface ectoenzyme involved in T cell activation and migration across the extracellular matrix, were analyzed in the peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) from patients with inflammatory arthritides. CD26 membrane expression on T cells was detected by cytofluorometry using two different monoclonal antibodies, anti-Ta1 and anti-1F7, while cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma production were evaluated in anti-CD3- or anti-CD2-stimulated cell cultures after Ag surface modulation with anti-1F7. The results showed that Ta1 and 1F7 Ag expression were increased on T cells from PB of patients with active, but not inactive, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most SF T cells from RA or other inflammatory arthritides displayed the memory marker CD45R0 and the Ta1 Ag, but lacked the 1F7 molecule. In addition, in vitro 1F7 modulation, which enhanced RA PB T cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma synthesis, did not synergize with anti-CD3 or anti-CD2 in inducing IL-2-dependent activation of SF T cells, but reduced IFN-gamma production. A spontaneous reappearance of 1F7 Ag on the SF T cell surface was seen after 2-5 days in culture. Phorbol myristate acetate, able to accelerate its reexpression, also restored a normal response of SF T cells to anti-1F7 comitogenic effects. These data confirm a role of the CD26 surface molecule in regulating T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis. This observation may have important implications in the regulation of T cell activity at the joint level during chronic inflammatory processes. PMID:8674237

  1. Isolation and characterization of antigen-Ia complexes involved in T cell recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M;

    1986-01-01

    Using equilibrium dialysis, it has been previously demonstrated that immunogenic peptides bind specifically to the Ia molecules serving as restriction elements in the immune response to these antigens. Using gel filtration to study the formation of ovalbumin (OVA) peptide-I-Ad complexes, it is...

  2. Comparative effect of genistein and daidzein on the expression of MCP-1, eNOS, and cell adhesion molecules in TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Hye Yeon; Park, Chung Mu; Kim, Mi Jeong; Chinzorig, Radnaabazar; Cho, Chung Won; Song, Young Sun

    2011-01-01

    We compared the effects of genistein and daidzein on the expression of chemokines, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-stimulated human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). TNF-α exposure significantly increased expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Genistein significantly decreased MCP-1 and VCAM-1 production in a do...

  3. Expression of cell adhesion molecule CD44 in gastric adenocarcinoma and its prognostic importance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamran Ghaffarzadehgan; Mostafa Jafarzadeh; Hamid Reza Raziee; Harold Reza Sima; Ehsan Esmaili-Shandiz; Hanieh Hosseinnezhad; Ail Taghizadeh Kermani; Omeed Moaven; Maryam Bahrani

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the relation of cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) expression with clinicopathological features of gastric adenocarcinoma, and also its effect on prognosis with an emphasis on the differences between intestinal and diffuse types. METHODS: From 2000 to 2006, 100 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma, who had undergone total or subtotal gastrectomy without any prior treatment, were studied. Haematoxylin & eosin (HE) staining was used for histological evaluation, including the type (Lauren's classification) and grading of the tumor. The expression of CD44 in the gastric adenocarcinoma mucosa and the adjacent mucosa were determined by immunohistochemistry. The survival analysis was obtained using the Kaplan-Meier test. RESULTS: Of 100 patients, 74 (74%) patients were male. The tumors were categorized as intestinal type (78%) or diffuse type (22%). Sixty-five percent of patients were CD44-positive. CD44 expression was not detected in normal gastric mucosa. Rather, CD44 was more commonly expressed in the intestinal subtype (P = 0.002). A significant relation was seen between the grade of tumor and the expression of CD44 (P=0.014). The survival analysis showed a poor prognosis of patients with CD44-positive tumors (P = 0.008); and this was more prominent in the intestinal (P = 0.001) rather than diffuse type. CONCLUSION: Cell adhesion molecule CD44 is highly expressed in gastric adenocarcinoma. CD44 expression is correlated with a poor prognosis in patients with the intestinal type of gastric adenocarcinoma. CD44 can, therefore, be utilized as a prognostic marker for this group of patients.

  4. Interaction of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen With DNA at the Single Molecule Level

    KAUST Repository

    Raducanu, Vlad-Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key factor involved in Eukaryotic DNA replication and repair, as well as other cellular pathways. Its importance comes mainly from two aspects: the large numbers of interacting partners and the mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA. The large numbers of interacting partners makes PCNA a necessary factor to consider when studying DNA replication, either in vitro or in vivo. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA, i.e. sliding along the duplex, reduces the six degrees of freedom of the molecule, three degrees of freedom of translation and three degrees of freedom of rotation, to only two, translation along the duplex and rotational tracking of the helix. Through this mechanism PCNA can recruit its partner proteins and localize them to the right spot on the DNA, maybe in the right spatial orientation, more effectively and in coordination with other proteins. Passive loading of the closed PCNA ring on the DNA without free ends is a topologically forbidden process. Replication factor C (RFC) uses energy of ATP hydrolysis to mechanically open the PCNA ring and load it on the dsDNA. The first half of the introduction gives overview of PCNA and RFC and the loading mechanism of PCNA on dsDNA. The second half is dedicated to a diffusion model and to an algorithm for analyzing PCNA sliding. PCNA and RFC were successfully purified, simulations and a mean squared displacement analysis algorithm were run and showed good stability and experimental PCNA sliding data was analyzed and led to parameters similar to the ones in literature.

  5. p70S6 kinase signals cell survival as well as growth, inactivating the pro-apoptotic molecule BAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harada, H; Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M;

    2001-01-01

    Cytokines often deliver simultaneous, yet distinct, cell growth and cell survival signals. The 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) is known to regulate cell growth by inducing protein synthesis components. We purified membrane-based p70S6K as a kinase responsible for site......-specific phosphorylation of BAD, which inactivates this proapoptotic molecule. Rapamycin inhibited mitochondrial-based p70S6K, which prevented phosphorylation of Ser-136 on BAD and blocked cell survival induced by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Moreover, IGF-1-induced phosphorylation of BAD Ser-136 was abolished in...... p70S6K-deficient cells. Thus, p70S6K is itself a dual pathway kinase, signaling cell survival as well as growth through differential substrates which include mitochondrial BAD and the ribosomal subunit S6, respectively....

  6. Inhibition of receptor tyrosine kinase signalling by small molecule agonist of T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP/TC45) is a ubiquitously expressed intra-cellular non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in the negative regulation of several cancer relevant cellular signalling pathways. We have previously shown that interaction between the α-cytoplasmic tail of α1β1 integrin and TCPTP activates TCPTP by disrupting an inhibitory intra-molecular bond in TCPTP. Thus, inhibition of the regulatory interaction in TCPTP is a desirable strategy for TCPTP activation and attenuation of oncogenic RTK signalling. However, this is challenging with low molecular weight compounds. We developed a high-throughput compatible assay to analyse activity of recombinant TCPTP in vitro. Using this assay we have screened 64280 small molecules to identify novel agonists for TCPTP. Dose-dependent response to TCPTP agonist was performed using the in vitro assay. Inhibition effects and specificity of TCPTP agonists were evaluated using TCPTP expressing and null mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate attenuation of PDGFRβ and EGFR phosphorylation. Inhibition of VEGF signalling was analysed with VEGF-induced endothelial cell sprouting assays. From the screen we identified six TCPTP agonists. Two compounds competed with α1-cytoplasmic domain for binding to TCPTP, suggesting that they activate TCPTP similar to α1-cyt by disrupting the intra-molecular bond in TCPTP. Importantly, one of the compounds (spermidine) displayed specificity towards TCPTP in cells, since TCPTP -/- cells were 43-fold more resistant to the compound than TCPTP expressing cells. This compound attenuates PDGFRβ and VEGFR2 signalling in cells in a TCPTP-dependent manner and functions as a negative regulator of EGFR phosphorylation in cancer cells. In this study we showed that small molecules mimicking TCPTP-α1 interaction can be used as TCPTP agonists. These data provide the first proof-of-concept description of the use of high-throughput screening

  7. Involvement of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Up-Regulation in Bradykinin Promotes Cell Motility in Human Prostate Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsin Tang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in men and shows a predilection for metastasis to distant organs. Bradykinin (BK is an inflammatory mediator and has recently been shown to mediate tumor growth and metastasis. The adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 plays a critical role during tumor metastasis. The aim of this study was to examine whether BK promotes prostate cancer cell migration via ICAM-1 expression. The motility of cancer cells was increased following BK treatment. Stimulation of prostate cancer cells with BK induced mRNA and protein expression of ICAM-1. Transfection of cells with ICAM-1 small interfering RNA reduced BK-increased cell migration. Pretreatment of prostate cancer cells with B2 receptor, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, Akt, and activator protein 1 (AP-1 inhibitors or mutants abolished BK-promoted migration and ICAM-1 expression. In addition, treatment with a B2 receptor, PI3K, or Akt inhibitor also reduced BK-mediated AP-1 activation. Our results indicate that BK enhances the migration of prostate cancer cells by increasing ICAM-1 expression through a signal transduction pathway that involves the B2 receptor, PI3K, Akt, and AP-1. Thus, BK represents a promising new target for treating prostate cancer metastasis.

  8. Separate Roles for Antigen Recognition and Lymph Node Inflammation in CD8+ Memory T Cell Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Fransen, Marieke F.; van Stipdonk, Marianne J.; Sluijter, Marjolein; Schoenberger, Stephen P.; Melief, Cornelis J; Offringa, Rienk

    2010-01-01

    Priming of naive CD8+ T cells by pathogens or vaccines generally involves their interaction with Ag-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) in the context of an inflamed lymph node. Lymph node activation fosters DC and T cell encounters and subsequently provides newly primed T cells with nurturing conditions. We dissected these two aspects by infusing in vitro primed CD8+ T cells into naive recipient mice harboring a single activated lymph node and comparing the fate of these T cells with those infused ...

  9. Babesia bovis: expression of adhesion molecules in bovine umbilical endothelial cells stimulated with plasma from infected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene I. Vargas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ten male, 12-month-old Jersey with intact spleens, serologically and parasitologically free from Babesia were housed individually in an arthropod-free isolation system from birth and throughout entire experiment. The animals were randomly divided into two groups. Five animals (group A were intravenously inoculated with 6.6 X10(7 red blood cells parasitized with pathogenic sample of Babesia bovis (passage 7 BboUFV-1, for the subsequent "ex vivo" determination of the expression of adhesion molecules. Five non-inoculated animals (group B were used as the negative control. The expression of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM, PECAM-1 E-selectin and thrombospondin (TSP was measured in bovine umbilical vein endothelial cells (BUVECs. The endothelial cells stimulated with a pool of plasma from animals infected with the BboUFV-1 7th passage sample had a much more intense immunostaining of ICAM-1, VCAM, PECAM-1 E-selectin and TSP, compared to the cells which did not received the stimulus. The results suggest that proinflammatory cytokines released in the acute phase of babesiosis may be involved in the expression of adhesion molecules thereby implicating them in the pathophysiology of babesiosis caused by B. bovis.

  10. Delayed Recognition of Disorders of Sex Development (DSD: A Missed Opportunity for Early Diagnosis of Malignant Germ Cell Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remko Hersmus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of sex development (DSD are defined as a congenital condition in which development of chromosomal, gonadal or anatomical sex is atypical. DSD patients with gonadal dysgenesis or hypovirilization, containing part of the Y chromosome (GBY, have an increased risk for malignant type II germ cell tumors (GCTs: seminomas and nonseminomas. DSD may be diagnosed in newborns (e.g., ambiguous genitalia, or later in life, even at or after puberty. Here we describe three independent male patients with a GCT; two were retrospectively recognized as DSD, based on the histological identification of both carcinoma in situ and gonadoblastoma in a single gonad as the cancer precursor. Hypospadias and cryptorchidism in their history are consistent with this conclusion. The power of recognition of these parameters is demonstrated by the third patient, in which the precursor lesion was diagnosed before progression to invasiveness. Early recognition based on these clinical parameters could have prevented development of (metastatic cancer, to be treated by systemic therapy. All three patients showed a normal male 46,XY karyotype, without obvious genetic rearrangements by high-resolution whole-genome copy number analysis. These cases demonstrate overlap between DSD and the so-called testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS, of significant relevance for identification of individuals at increased risk for development of a malignant GCT.

  11. The cell adhesion molecules Echinoid and Friend of Echinoid coordinate cell adhesion and cell signaling to regulate the fidelity of ommatidial rotation in the Drosophila eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetting, Jennifer L; Spencer, Susan A; Wolff, Tanya

    2009-10-01

    Directed cellular movements are a universal feature of morphogenesis in multicellular organisms. Differential adhesion between the stationary and motile cells promotes these cellular movements to effect spatial patterning of cells. A prominent feature of Drosophila eye development is the 90 degrees rotational movement of the multicellular ommatidial precursors within a matrix of stationary cells. We demonstrate that the cell adhesion molecules Echinoid (Ed) and Friend of Echinoid (Fred) act throughout ommatidial rotation to modulate the degree of ommatidial precursor movement. We propose that differential levels of Ed and Fred between stationary and rotating cells at the initiation of rotation create a permissive environment for cell movement, and that uniform levels in these two populations later contribute to stopping the movement. Based on genetic data, we propose that ed and fred impart a second, independent, ;brake-like' contribution to this process via Egfr signaling. Ed and Fred are localized in largely distinct and dynamic patterns throughout rotation. However, ed and fred are required in only a subset of cells - photoreceptors R1, R7 and R6 - for normal rotation, cells that have only recently been linked to a role in planar cell polarity (PCP). This work also provides the first demonstration of a requirement for cone cells in the ommatidial rotation aspect of PCP. ed and fred also genetically interact with the PCP genes, but affect only the degree-of-rotation aspect of the PCP phenotype. Significantly, we demonstrate that at least one PCP protein, Stbm, is required in R7 to control the degree of ommatidial rotation. PMID:19736327

  12. Proliferation and survival molecules implicated in the inhibition of BRAF pathway in thyroid cancer cells harbouring different genetic mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid carcinomas show a high prevalence of mutations in the oncogene BRAF which are inversely associated with RAS or RET/PTC oncogenic activation. The possibility of using inhibitors on the BRAF pathway as became an interesting therapeutic approach. In thyroid cancer cells the target molecules, implicated on the cellular effects, mediated by inhibition of BRAF are not well established. In order to fill this lack of knowledge we studied the proliferation and survival pathways and associated molecules induced by BRAF inhibition in thyroid carcinoma cell lines harbouring distinct genetic backgrounds. Suppression of BRAF pathway in thyroid cancer cell lines (8505C, TPC1 and C643) was achieved using RNA interference (RNAi) for BRAF and the kinase inhibitor, sorafenib. Proliferation analysis was performed by BrdU incorporation and apoptosis was accessed by TUNEL assay. Levels of protein expression were analysed by western-blot. Both BRAF RNAi and sorafenib inhibited proliferation in all the cell lines independently of the genetic background, mostly in cells with BRAFV600E mutation. In BRAFV600E mutated cells inhibition of BRAF pathway lead to a decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 levels and an increase in p27Kip1. Specific inhibition of BRAF by RNAi in cells with BRAFV600E mutation had no effect on apoptosis. In the case of sorafenib treatment, cells harbouring BRAFV600E mutation showed increase levels of apoptosis due to a balance of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2. Our results in thyroid cancer cells, namely those harbouring BRAFV600Emutation showed that BRAF signalling pathway provides important proliferation signals. We have shown that in thyroid cancer cells sorafenib induces apoptosis by affecting Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 in BRAFV600E mutated cells which was independent of BRAF. These results suggest that sorafenib may prove useful in the treatment of thyroid carcinomas, particularly those refractory to conventional treatment and harbouring BRAF

  13. NADPH oxidase and lipid raft-associated redox signaling are required for PCB153-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules in human brain endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), can lead to chronic inflammation and the development of vascular diseases. Because cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the cerebrovascular endothelium regulate infiltration of inflammatory cells into the brain, we have explored the molecular mechanisms by which ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), such as PCB153, can upregulate CAMs in brain endothelial cells. Exposure to PCB153 increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as well as elevated adhesion of leukocytes to brain endothelial cells. These effects were impeded by inhibitors of EGFR, JAKs, or Src activity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase or disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depleting agents blocked PCB153-induced phosphorylation of JAK and Src kinases and upregulation of CAMs. In contrast, silencing of caveolin-1 by siRNA interference did not affect upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells stimulated by PCB153. Results of the present study indicate that lipid raft-dependent NADPH oxidase/JAK/EGFR signaling mechanisms regulate the expression of CAMs in brain endothelial cells and adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial monolayers. Due to its role in leukocyte infiltration, induction of CAMs may contribute to PCB-induced cerebrovascular disorders and neurotoxic effects in the CNS.

  14. Cell-type specific recognition of human Metapneumoviruses by RIG-I and TLR7 and viral interference of RIG-I ligand recognition by HMPVB1 Phosphoprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Goutagny, Nadege; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Tian, Jane; Parroche, Peggy; Schlicki, Jeanne; Monks, Brian G; Ulbrandt, Nancy; Ji, Hong; Kiener, Peter; Coyle, Anthony J.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Human Metapneumoviruses (HMPV) are recently identified Paramyxoviridae that contribute to respiratory tract infections in children. No effective treatments or vaccines are available. Successful defense against virus infection relies on early detection by germline encoded pattern recognition receptors and activation of cytokine and type I interferon genes. Recently, the RNA helicase Retinoic acid inducible gene (RIG-I) has been shown to sense HMPV. In this study, we investigated the ability of...

  15. Functional role of HLA class I cell-surface molecules in human T-lymphocyte activation and proliferation.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, D S; Nowell, P C; Kornbluth, J

    1986-01-01

    This investigation addressed the role of major histocompatibility complex-encoded class I molecules in the activation and proliferation of human lymphocytes. We studied the effect of antibodies specific for HLA-A and HLA-B locus gene products on mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subpopulations. Three individually derived, well-characterized anti-HLA class I monoclonal antibodies were demonstrated to inhibit the proliferation of human PBMC stimulated by either OKT3 or...

  16. Neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) domains and intracellular signaling pathways involved in the inhibition of astrocyte proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Krushel, Leslie A.; Tai, Ming-Hong; Cunningham, Bruce A.; Edelman, Gerald M.; Crossin, Kathryn L.

    1998-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) inhibits astrocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and this effect is partially reversed by the glucocorticoid antagonist RU-486. The present studies have tested the hypothesis that N-CAM-mediated inhibition of astrocyte proliferation is caused by homophilic binding and involves the activation of glucocorticoid receptors. It was observed that all N-CAM Ig domains inhibited astrocyte proliferation in parallel with their ability to influence N-CAM b...

  17. The Drosophila cell adhesion molecule Klingon is required for long-term memory formation and is regulated by Notch

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuno, Motomi; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Tully, Tim; Saitoe, Minoru

    2008-01-01

    The ruslan (rus) mutant was previously identified in a behavioral screen for mutants defective in long-lasting memory, which consists of two consolidated memory types, anesthesia-resistant memory, and protein synthesis-dependent long-term memory (LTM). We demonstrate here that rus is a new allele of klingon (klg), which encodes a homophilic cell adhesion molecule. Klg is acutely required for LTM but not anesthesia-resistant memory formation, and Klg expression increases upon LTM induction. LT...

  18. Efficient Non-Viral Reprogramming of Myoblasts to Stemness with a Single Small Molecule to Generate Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pasha, Zeeshan; Haider, Husnain Kh; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    The current protocols for generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells involve genome integrating viral vectors which may induce tumorgenesis. The aim of this study was to develop and optimize a non-viral method without genetic manipulation for reprogramming of skeletal myoblasts (SMs) using small molecules. Methods and Results SMs from young male Oct3/4-GFP+ transgenic mouse were treated with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, RG108. Two weeks later, GFP+ colonies of SM derived iP...

  19. Label-free and turn-on aptamer strategy for cancer cells detection based on a DNA-silver nanocluster fluorescence upon recognition-induced hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jinjin; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Shangguan, Jingfang; He, Dinggeng; Shi, Hui

    2013-12-17

    We present here a label-free and turn-on aptamer strategy for cancer cell detection based on the recognition-induced conformation alteration of aptamer and hybridization-induced fluorescence enhancement effect of DNA-silver nanoclusters (DNA-Ag NCs) in proximity of guanine-rich DNA sequences. In this strategy, two tailored DNA probes were involved. One is designed as a hairpin-shaped structure consisting of a target specific aptamer sequence at the 3'-end, a guanine-rich DNA sequence, and an arm segment at the 5'-end (denote as recognition probe). The other, serving as a signal probe, contains a sequence for Ag NCs templated synthesis and a link sequence complementary to the arm segment of the recognition probe. Recognizing and binding of the aptamer to cancer cells enforces the recognition probe to undergo a conformational alteration and then initiates hybridization between the arm segment of the recognition probe and the link sequence of the signal probe. The Ag NCs are then close to the guanine-rich DNA, leading to an enhanced fluorescence readout. As proof-of-concept, the CCRF-CEM cancer cell detection were performed by using the specific aptamer, sgc8c. It was demonstrated that this strategy could specially image the CCRF-CEM cells. Determination by flow cytometry allowed for detection of as low as 150 CCRF-CEM cells in 200 μL binding buffer. The general applicability of the strategy is also achieved in the successful detection of Ramos cells. These results implied that this strategy holds considerable potential for simple, sensitive, universal, and specific cancer cell detection with no required washing and separation steps. PMID:24266455

  20. New biomedical devices with selective peptide recognition properties. Part 1: Characterization and cytotoxicity of molecularly imprinted polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Rechichi, A; Cristallini, C; Vitale, U; Ciardelli, G; Barbani, N; Vozzi, G; Giusti, P.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Molecular imprinting is a technique for the synthesis of polymers capable to bind target molecules selectively. The imprinting of large proteins, such as cell adhesion proteins or cell receptors, opens the way to important and innovative biomedical applications. However, such molecules can incur into important conformational changes during the preparation of the imprinted polymer impairing the specificity of the recognition cavities. The “epitope approach” can overcome this limit by ...

  1. Direct binding of autoimmune disease related T cell epitopes to purified Lewis rat MHC class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joosten, I; Wauben, M H; Holewijn, M C;

    1994-01-01

    New strategies applied in the treatment of experimental autoimmune disease models involve blocking or modulation of MHC-peptide-TCR interactions either at the level of peptide-MHC interaction or, alternatively, at the level of T cell recognition. In order to identify useful competitor peptides one...... must be able to assess peptide-MHC interactions. Several well described autoimmune disease models exist in the Lewis rat and thus this particular rat strain provides a good model system to study the effect of competitor peptides. So far no information has been available on the peptide binding...... chemiluminescence. The assay is sensitive and specific. We have used this assay to determine the binding characteristics of several disease associated T cell determinants and their sequence analogues in the Lewis rat. Notably, most of the autoimmune disease associated peptide sequences tested were found to be...

  2. Evaluation of EML4-ALK Fusion Proteins in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Small Molecule Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The echinoderm microtubule–associated protein-like 4–anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK fusion gene resulting from an inversion within chromosome 2p occurs in approximately 5% of non–small cell lung cancer and is mu-tually exclusive with Ras and EGFR mutations. In this study, we have used a potent and selective ALK small molecule inhibitor, NPV-TAE684, to assess the oncogenic role of EML4-ALK in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We show here that TAE684 inhibits proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and tumor regression in two NSCLC models that harbor EML4-ALK fusions. TAE684 inhibits EML4-ALK activation and its downstream signaling including ERK, AKT, and STAT3. We used microarray analysis to carry out targeted pathway studies of gene expression changes in H2228 NSCLC xenograft model after TAE684 treatment and identified a gene signature of EML4-ALK inhibition. The gene signature represents 1210 known human genes, and the top biologic processes represented by these genes are cell cycle, DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cell death. We also compared the effect of TAE684 with PF2341066, a c-Met and ALK small molecule inhibitor currently in clinical trial in cancers harboring ALK fusions, and demonstrated that TAE684 is a much more potent inhibitor of EML4-ALK. Our data demonstrate that EML4-ALK plays an important role in the pathogenesis of a subset of NSCLC and provides insight into the mech-anism of EML4-ALK inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor.

  3. Structural characteristics of an antigen required for its interaction with Ia and recognition by T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S;

    1987-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the residues within an immunogenic peptide that endow it with the capacity to interact with Ia and to be recognized by T cells is presented. Ia interacts with only a few of the peptide residues and overall exhibits a very broad specificity. Some residues appear to interact...... both with Ia and with T cells, leading to a model in which a peptide antigen is 'sandwiched' between Ia and the T-cell receptor....

  4. Recognition of rabies and rabies-related viruses by T cells derived from human vaccine recipients.

    OpenAIRE

    Celis, E; Ou, D; Dietzschold, B.; Koprowski, H

    1988-01-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and T-cell lines and clones from individuals immunized with rabies PM vaccine were tested for the ability to recognize antigenic determinants in rabies and rabies-related viruses in an antigen-induced proliferation assay. Some, but not all, of the T cells from these individuals cross-reacted with various laboratory strains of rabies virus with rabies-related viruses such as Duvenhage and Mokola. In addition, these T cells were shown to react with epito...

  5. Adenovirus viral interleukin-10 inhibits adhesion molecule expressions induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation in cerebrovascular endothelial cells1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui KANG; Peng-yuan YANG; Yao-cheng RUI

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of recombinant adenovirus encoding viral interleukin-10 (vIL-10), a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, on adhesion mol-ecule expressions and the adhesion rates of leukocytes to endothelial cells in cerebrovascular endothelial cells injured by hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). Methods: A recombinant adenovirus expressing vIL-10 (Ad/vIL-10 (or the green fluorescent protein (Ad/GFP) gene was constructed. A cerebrovascular endothe-lial cell line bend.3 was pretreated with a different multiplicity of infection (MOI) of Ad/vIL-10 or Ad/GFP and then exposed to hypoxia for 9 h followed by reoxygenation for 12 h. The culture supernatants were tested for the expression of vIL-10 and endogenous murine IL-10 (mIL-10) by ELISA. The effects of Ad/vIL-10 on monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion were represented as the adhesion rate. Subsequently, the expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1(VCAM-1) in the endothelial cells after treat-ment with Ad/vIL-10 and H/R were analyzed by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Results: vIL-10 was expressed in cultured bEnd.3 after Ad/vIL-10 transfec-tion and was significantly increased by H/R. Ad/vIL-10 or Ad/GFP did not affect the mlL-10 level. H/R increased the mIL-10 expression, but insignificantly. Mono-cyte-endothelial cell adhesion induced by H/R was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with Ad/vIL-10 (MOI: 80). ICAM-I, and VCAM-1 in bEnd.3 and were significantly increased after H/R, while pretreatment with Ad/vIL-10 (MOI: 80) significantly inhibited their expressions. Ad/GFP did not markedly affect mono-cyte-endothelial adhesion and the expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 induced by H/R. Conclusion: Ad/vIL-10 significantly inhibits the upregulation of endot-helial adhesion molecule expressions and the increase of adhesion of monocytes-endothelial cells induced by H/R, indicating that vIL-10 gene transfer is of far-reaching significance in the therapy of

  6. Interferon-gamma-like molecule induces Ia antigens on cultured mast cell progenitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, G H; Clark-lewis, I.; McKimm-Breschkin, J L; Schrader, J W

    1982-01-01

    Persisting (P) cells (murine cells that resemble mast cells and grow continuously in vitro for prolonged periods in the presence of a specific growth factor) did not express detectable levels of Ia antigens (murine class II major histocompatibility antigens) when their growth was supported by partially purified P cell-stimulating factor. However, when these Ia-negative P cells were transferred to medium conditioned by concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells, Ia antigens appeared within 24 hr. ...

  7. T cells expressing CD19-specific Engager Molecules for the Immunotherapy of CD19-positive Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Mireya Paulina Velasquez; David Torres; Kota Iwahori; Sunitha Kakarla; Caroline Arber; Tania Rodriguez-Cruz; Arpad Szoor; Bonifant, Challice L.; Claudia Gerken; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Xiao-Tong Song; Stephen Gottschalk

    2016-01-01

    T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or the infusion of bispecific T-cell engagers (BITEs) have shown antitumor activity in humans for CD19-positive malignancies. While BITEs redirect the large reservoir of resident T cells to tumors, CAR T cells rely on significant in vivo expansion to exert antitumor activity. We have shown that it is feasible to modify T cells to secrete solid tumor antigen-specific BITEs, enabling T cells to redirect resident T cells to tumor cells. To ada...

  8. Chinese herb related molecules of cancer-cell-apoptosis: a minireview of progress between Kanglaite injection and related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Qian

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many kinds of Chinese herb had been confirmed to have the character of anti-tumor, clinical reports about anti-tumor effects of Chinese herb had also been found in recent years, but most of the reports were focused on the clinical treatment of effectiveness for Chinese herb, on the other hand, review about Chinese herbal related with molecules on cancer-cell-apoptosis was seldom, many scientists could not believe such kinds of clinical describes about anti-tumor effects for Chinese herb, because these describes were lack of molecular biology evidence. Kanglaite(KLT injection is an anti-tumor new drug which extracts from Chinese medicine-coix seed with modern advanced pharmaceutical technology, it is also a new biphase extended-spectrum anticancer medicine, the food and drug administration(FDA of United States also approved a phase II trial of KLT to test its efficacy in treating non-small-cell lung cancer. Some studies show it could inhibit some anti-apoptotic gene and activate some pro-apoptotic gene, its injection solution is one of the new anticancer medicine that can significantly inhibit a various kinds of tumor cells, so it has become the core of research that how to further explore KLT injection to promote tumor cell apoptosis by impacting on related genes. In this review, the relationship between KLT and some tumor cell apoptosis molecules had been discussed and reviewed generally.

  9. Chinese herb related molecules of cancer-cell-apoptosis: a minireview of progress between Kanglaite injection and related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun; Li, Chang-Sheng; Dong, Qian

    2008-01-01

    Many kinds of Chinese herb had been confirmed to have the character of anti-tumor, clinical reports about anti-tumor effects of Chinese herb had also been found in recent years, but most of the reports were focused on the clinical treatment of effectiveness for Chinese herb, on the other hand, review about Chinese herbal related with molecules on cancer-cell-apoptosis was seldom, many scientists could not believe such kinds of clinical describes about anti-tumor effects for Chinese herb, because these describes were lack of molecular biology evidence. Kanglaite(KLT) injection is an anti-tumor new drug which extracts from Chinese medicine-coix seed with modern advanced pharmaceutical technology, it is also a new biphase extended-spectrum anticancer medicine, the food and drug administration(FDA) of United States also approved a phase II trial of KLT to test its efficacy in treating non-small-cell lung cancer. Some studies show it could inhibit some anti-apoptotic gene and activate some pro-apoptotic gene, its injection solution is one of the new anticancer medicine that can significantly inhibit a various kinds of tumor cells, so it has become the core of research that how to further explore KLT injection to promote tumor cell apoptosis by impacting on related genes. In this review, the relationship between KLT and some tumor cell apoptosis molecules had been discussed and reviewed generally. PMID:18718024

  10. Face Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Haugen, Liv Merete; Olavsbråten, Inge

    2007-01-01

    Machine based face recognition has been a popular research area for several years, and has numerous applications. This technology has now reached a point where there already exists good algorithms for recognition for standardized still images - which have little variation in e.g. lighting, facial expression and pose. We are however in lack of good algorithms that are able to do recognition from live video. The low quality of most surveillance cameras, together with non-standardized imaging c...

  11. An optically transparent thin-layer electrochemical cell for the study of vibrational circular dichroism of chiral redox-active molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Sérgio R; Luyten, Henk; van Anrooij, Fred; Sanders, Hans J; Bakker, Bert H; Buma, Wybren J; Hartl, František; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-03-01

    An optically transparent thin-layer electrochemical (OTTLE) cell with a locally extended optical path has been developed in order to perform vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy on chiral molecules prepared in specific oxidation states by means of electrochemical reduction or oxidation. The new design of the electrochemical cell successfully addresses the technical challenges involved in achieving sufficient infrared absorption. The VCD-OTTLE cell proves to be a valuable tool for the investigation of chiral redox-active molecules. PMID:23556803

  12. An optically transparent thin-layer electrochemical cell for the study of vibrational circular dichroism of chiral redox-active molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Sérgio R.; Luyten, Henk; van Anrooij, Fred; Sanders, Hans J.; Bakker, Bert H.; Buma, Wybren J.; Hartl, František; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-03-01

    An optically transparent thin-layer electrochemical (OTTLE) cell with a locally extended optical path has been developed in order to perform vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy on chiral molecules prepared in specific oxidation states by means of electrochemical reduction or oxidation. The new design of the electrochemical cell successfully addresses the technical challenges involved in achieving sufficient infrared absorption. The VCD-OTTLE cell proves to be a valuable tool for the investigation of chiral redox-active molecules.

  13. Influence of vitamin D on cell cycle, apoptosis, and some apoptosis related molecules in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafise Tabasi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Genetic and environmental factors are involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Autoreactive lymphocytes are cleared through apoptosis and any disturbance in the apoptosis or clearance of apoptotic cells may disturb tolerance and lead to autoimmunity. Vitamin D has anti-proliferative effects and controls cell cycle progression. In this study we investigated the effects of vitamin D on cell cycle and apoptosis induction in lupus patients. Materials and Methods:Isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 25 SLE patients were cultured in the presence of 50 nM of 1,25(OH2D3; then one part of the cells were stained with FITC labeled Annexin V and PI and were analyzed for apoptosis determination. For gene expression assessment of FasL, Bcl-2 and Bax, RNA was extracted from one another part of the cells, cDNA was synthesized and gene expression analysis was performed using Real time PCR. An additional part of the cells were treated with PI and the cell cycle was analyzed using flowcytometer. Results: The mean number of early apoptotic cells in vitamin D treated cells decreased significantly (18.48±7.9% compared to untreated cells (22.02±9.4% (P=0.008. Cell cycle analysis showed a significant increase in G1 phase in vitamin D treated cells (67.33±5.2% compared to non treated ones (60.77±5.7% (P =0.02. Vitamin D up-regulated the expression levels of Bcl-2 by (18.87 fold increase, and down-regulated expression of Bax (23% and FasL (25%. Conclusion:Vitamin D has regulatory effects on cell cycle progression, apoptosis and apoptosis related molecules in lupus patients.

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi recognition by macrophages and muscle cells: perspectives after a 15-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania C. de Araujo-Jorge

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages and muscle cells are the main targets for invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi. Ultrastructural studies of this phenomenon in vitro showed that invasion occurs by endocytosis, with attachment and internalization being mediated by different components capable of recognizing epi-or trypomastigotes (TRY. A parasitophorus vacuole was formed in both cell types, thereafter fusing with lysosomes. Then, the mechanism of T. cruzi invasion of host cells (HC is essentially similar (during a primary infection in the abscence of a specific immune response, regardless of wether the target cell is a professional or a non-professional phagocytic cell. Using sugars, lectins, glycosidases, proteinases and proteinase inhibitors, we observed that the relative balance between exposed sialic acid and galactose/N-acetyl galactosamine (GAL residues on the TRY surface, determines the parasite's capacity to invade HC, and that lectin-mediated phagocytosis with GAL specificity is important for internalization of T. cruzi into macrophages. On the other hand, GAL on the surface to heart muscle cells participate on TRY adhesion. TRY need to process proteolytically both the HC and their own surface, to expose the necessary ligands and receptors that allow binding to, and internalization in the host cell. The diverse range of molecular mechanisms which the parasite could use to invade the host cell may correspond to differences in the available "receptors"on the surface of each specific cell type. Acute phase components, with lectin or proteinase inhibitory activities (a-macroglobulins, may also be involved in T. cruzi-host cell interaction.

  15. The carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CORM-3) inhibits expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin independently of haem oxygenase-1 expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, H.; Bergstrasser, C.; Rafat, N.; Hoeger, S.; Schmidt, M.; Endres, N.; Goebeler, M.; Hillebrands, J. L.; Brigelius-Flohe, R.; Banning, A.; Beck, G.; Loesel, R.; Yard, B. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Although carbon monoxide (CO) can modulate inflammatory processes, the influence of CO on adhesion molecules is less clear. This might be due to the limited amount of CO generated by haem degradation. We therefore tested the ability of a CO releasing molecule (CORM-3), used i

  16. C646, a selective small molecule inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase p300, radiosensitizes lung cancer cells by enhancing mitotic catastrophe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Chromatin remodeling through histone modifications, including acetylation, plays an important role in the appropriate response to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR). Here we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of C646, a selective small molecule inhibitor of p300 histone acetyltransferase, and explored the underlying mechanisms. Materials and methods: A549, H157 and H460 human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells, and HFL-III human lung fibroblasts were assessed by clonogenic survival assay. Apoptosis and necrosis were assessed by annexin V staining. Senescence was assessed by Senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Mitotic catastrophe was assessed by evaluating nuclear morphology with DAPI staining. Cell cycle profiles were analyzed by flow cytometry. Protein expression was analyzed by immunoblotting. Results: C646 sensitized A549, H460 and H157 cells to IR with a dose enhancement ratio at 10% surviving fraction of 1.4, 1.2 and 1.2, respectively. C646 did not radiosensitize HFL-III cells. In A549 cells, but not in HFL-III cells, C646 (i) enhanced mitotic catastrophe but not apoptosis, necrosis, or senescence after IR; (ii) increased the hyperploid cell population after IR; and (iii) suppressed the phosphorylation of CHK1 after IR. Conclusions: C646 radiosensitizes NSCLC cells by enhancing mitotic catastrophe through the abrogation of G2 checkpoint maintenance

  17. Biological and Molecular Effects of Small Molecule Kinase Inhibitors on Low-Passage Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Lange

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-passage cancer cell lines are versatile tools to study tumor cell biology. Here, we have employed four such cell lines, established from primary tumors of colorectal cancer (CRC patients, to evaluate effects of the small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMI vemurafenib, trametinib, perifosine, and regorafenib in an in vitro setting. The mutant BRAF (V600E/V600K inhibitor vemurafenib, but also the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib efficiently inhibited DNA synthesis, signaling through ERK1/2 and expression of genes downstream of ERK1/2 in BRAF mutant cells only. In case of the AKT inhibitor perifosine, three cell lines showed a high or intermediate responsiveness to the drug while one cell line was resistant. The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib inhibited proliferation of all CRC lines with similar efficiency and independent of the presence or absence of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 mutations. Regorafenib action was associated with broad-range inhibitory effects at the level of gene expression but not with a general inhibition of AKT or MEK/ERK signaling. In vemurafenib-sensitive cells, the antiproliferative effect of vemurafenib was enhanced by the other SMI. Together, our results provide insights into the determinants of SMI efficiencies in CRC cells and encourage the further use of low-passage CRC cell lines as preclinical models.

  18. Cyclosporine A affects the in vitro expression of T cell activation-related molecules and cytokines in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellman, C L; Stokes, J V; Archer, T M; Pinchuk, L M; Lunsford, K V; Mackin, A J

    2011-04-15

    Cyclosporine is a powerful immunosuppressive drug that is being used with increasing frequency to treat a wide range of immune-mediated diseases in the dog. To date, ideal dosing protocols that will achieve immunosuppression with cyclosporine in dogs remain unclear, and standard methods that can measure effectiveness of immunosuppression have not been established. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of in vitro cyclosporine exposure on a panel of molecules expressed by activated T cells to ascertain their potential as biomarkers of immunosuppression in dogs. Blood was drawn from six healthy dogs, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and activated. Half of the cells were incubated with 200 ng/mL cyclosporine prior to activation, and the other half were not exposed to cyclosporine. Samples were analyzed using flow cytometry, and the expression of intracellular cytokines IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-γ was evaluated after 6, 12, and 24h of drug exposure. Each cytokine exhibited a time-dependent suppression profile, and all but two samples activated in the presence of cyclosporine showed lower cytokine expression than untreated controls. We also evaluated the expression of the surface T cell activation molecules CD25 and CD95 by flow cytometry after 36 h of drug exposure. Expression of these surface molecules decreased significantly when activated in the presence of cyclosporine. Our results suggest that suppressed expression of the markers related to T cell activation could potentially be utilized as an indicator of the efficacy of cyclosporine therapy in dogs. PMID:21227512

  19. Omentin inhibits TNF-α-induced expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells via ERK/NF-κB pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Omentin inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. ► Omentin reduces expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 induced by TNF-α in HUVECs. ► Omentin inhibits TNF-α-induced ERK and NF-κB activation in HUVECs. ► Omentin supreeses TNF-α-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 via ERK/NF-κB pathway. -- Abstract: In the present study, we investigated whether omentin affected the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our data showed that omentin decreased TNF-α-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in HUVECs. In addition, omentin inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Further, we found that omentin inhibited TNF-α-activated signal pathway of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by preventing NF-κB inhibitory protein (IκBα) degradation and NF-κB/DNA binding activity. Omentin pretreatment significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced ERK activity and ERK phosphorylation in HUVECs. Pretreatment with PD98059 suppressed TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity. Omentin, NF-kB inhibitor (BAY11-7082) and ERK inhibitor (PD98059) reduced the up-regulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 induced by TNF-α. These results suggest that omentin may inhibit TNF-α-induced expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells via blocking ERK/NF-κB pathway.

  20. Immune targeting of fibroblast activation protein triggers recognition of multipotent bone marrow stromal cells and cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Yu, Zhiya; Morgan, Richard A.; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a candidate universal target antigen because it has been reported to be selectively expressed in nearly all solid tumors by a subset of immunosuppressive tumor stromal fibroblasts. We verified that 18/18 human tumors of various histologies contained pronounced stromal elements staining strongly for FAP, and hypothesized that targeting tumor stroma with FAP-reactive T cells would inhibit tumor growth in cancer-bearing hosts. T cells genetically engineered with FAP-reactive chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) specifically degranulated and produced effector cytokines upon stimulation with FAP or FAP-expressing cell lines. However, adoptive transfer of FAP-reactive T cells into mice bearing a variety of subcutaneous tumors mediated limited antitumor effects and induced significant cachexia and lethal bone toxicities in two mouse strains. We found that FAP was robustly expressed on PDGFR-α+, Sca-1+ multipotent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in mice, as well as on well-characterized, clinical-grade multipotent human BMSCs. Accordingly, both mouse and human multipotent BMSCs were recognized by FAP-reactive T cells. The lethal bone toxicity and cachexia observed after cell-based immunotherapy targeting FAP cautions against its use as a universal target. Moreover, the expression of FAP by multipotent BMSCs may point toward the cellular origins of tumor stromal fibroblasts. PMID:23712432