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Sample records for cell populations reveals

  1. Calcium Imaging Reveals Coordinated Simple Spike Pauses in Populations of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

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    Jorge E. Ramirez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain’s control of movement is thought to involve coordinated activity between cerebellar Purkinje cells. The results reported here demonstrate that somatic Ca2+ imaging is a faithful reporter of Na+-dependent “simple spike” pauses and enables us to optically record changes in firing rates in populations of Purkinje cells in brain slices and in vivo. This simultaneous calcium imaging of populations of Purkinje cells reveals a striking spatial organization of pauses in Purkinje cell activity between neighboring cells. The source of this organization is shown to be the presynaptic gamma-Aminobutyric acid producing (GABAergic network, and blocking ionotropic gamma-Aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAARs abolishes the synchrony. These data suggest that presynaptic interneurons synchronize (inactivity between neighboring Purkinje cells, and thereby maximize their effect on downstream targets in the deep cerebellar nuclei.

  2. Study on sickle cell disease haplotypes reveals the African origin of Amapá's population

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    Natália de Morais Castelo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Sickle cell disease (SCD is a hereditary, hematologic, multifactorial disease, with high prevalence worldwide; its cause is a mutation in the sixth codon of the beta globin gene (βs.Objective:To identify the haplotypes present in people with SCD in Amapá, and relate them to African descent.Methods:We analyzed, by molecular techniques, 46 blood samples from people with SCD in Macapá, the capital of Amapá, with the purpose of obtaining information about haplotype frequency distribution, which helps understand the ethnic background of Amapá's population.Results:Our study revealed that the most frequent haplotype is Bantu (61.2%, followed by Benin (26.6% and Senegal (12.2%. Results showed statistical differences from studies conducted in other regions. A high frequency of the Senegal haplotype stands out, in comparison with some Brazilian studies.Conclusion:Amapá's results exhibit unique characteristics when compared to haplotypes in other regions, with high frequency of Senegal and Benin haplotypes, absence of atypical, Cameroon and Saudi, confirming that Brazil shows ethnic background diversity, as well as different haplotype frequencies.

  3. Stem cell-like differentiation potentials of endometrial side population cells as revealed by a newly developed in vivo endometrial stem cell assay.

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    Kaoru Miyazaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endometrial stem/progenitor cells contribute to the cyclical regeneration of human endometrium throughout a woman's reproductive life. Although the candidate cell populations have been extensively studied, no consensus exists regarding which endometrial population represents the stem/progenitor cell fraction in terms of in vivo stem cell activity. We have previously reported that human endometrial side population cells (ESP, but not endometrial main population cells (EMP, exhibit stem cell-like properties, including in vivo reconstitution of endometrium-like tissues when xenotransplanted into immunodeficient mice. The reconstitution efficiency, however, was low presumably because ESP cells alone could not provide a sufficient microenvironment (niche to support their stem cell activity. The objective of this study was to establish a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay employing cell tracking and tissue reconstitution systems and to examine the stem cell properties of ESP through use of this assay. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ESP and EMP cells isolated from whole endometrial cells were infected with lentivirus to express tandem Tomato (TdTom, a red fluorescent protein. They were mixed with unlabeled whole endometrial cells and then transplanted under the kidney capsule of ovariectomized immunodeficient mice. These mice were treated with estradiol and progesterone for eight weeks and nephrectomized. All of the grafts reconstituted endometrium-like tissues under the kidney capsules. Immunofluorescence revealed that TdTom-positive cells were significantly more abundant in the glandular, stromal, and endothelial cells of the reconstituted endometrium in mice transplanted with TdTom-labeled ESP cells than those with TdTom-labeled EMP cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have established a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay in which multi-potential differentiation can be identified through cell tracking during in vivo

  4. Distinct populations of innate CD8+ T cells revealed in a CXCR3 reporter mouse.

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    Oghumu, Steve; Dong, Ran; Varikuti, Sanjay; Shawler, Todd; Kampfrath, Thomas; Terrazas, Cesar A; Lezama-Davila, Claudio; Ahmer, Brian M M; Whitacre, Caroline C; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Locksley, Richard; Sharpe, Arlene H; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2013-03-01

    CXCR3, expressed mainly on activated T and NK cells, is implicated in a host of immunological conditions and can contribute either to disease resolution or pathology. We report the generation and characterization of a novel CXCR3 internal ribosome entry site bicistronic enhanced GFP reporter (CIBER) mouse in which enhanced GFP expression correlates with surface levels of CXCR3. Using CIBER mice, we identified two distinct populations of innate CD8(+) T cells based on constitutive expression of CXCR3. We demonstrate that CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells preferentially express higher levels of Ly6C and CD122, but lower levels of CCR9 compared with CXCR3(-) innate CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, we show that CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells express higher transcript levels of antiapoptotic but lower levels of proapoptotic factors, respond more robustly to IL-2 and IL-15, and produce significantly more IFN-γ and granzyme B. Interestingly, CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells do not respond to IL-12 or IL-18 alone, but produce significant amounts of IFN-γ on stimulation with a combination of these cytokines. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that CXCR3(+) and CXCR3(-) innate CD8(+) T cells are phenotypically and functionally distinct. These newly generated CIBER mice provide a novel tool for studying the role of CXCR3 and CXCR3-expressing cells in vivo.

  5. Systematic analysis of reportedly distinct populations of multipotent bone marrow-derived stem cells reveals a lack of distinction.

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    Lodie, Tracey A; Blickarz, Courtney E; Devarakonda, Tara J; He, Chufa; Dash, Ajeeta B; Clarke, Jennifer; Gleneck, Kristen; Shihabuddin, Lamya; Tubo, Ross

    2002-10-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells, having the ability to differentiate into cells of multiple lineages, have been isolated and propagated by varied protocols, including positive (CD105(+))/negative (CD45(-)GlyA(-)) selection with immunomagnetic beads, or direct plating into selective culture media. Each substratum-adherent cell population was subjected to a systematic analysis of their cell surface markers and differentiation potential. In the initial stages of culture, each cell population proliferated slowly, reaching confluence in 10-14 days. Adherent cells proliferated at similar rates whether cultured in serum-free medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor, medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS) supplemented with epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, or medium containing 10% FBS alone. Cell surface marker analysis revealed that more than 95% of the cells were positive for CD105/endoglin, a putative mesenchymal stem cell marker, and negative for CD34, CD31, and CD133, markers of hematopoietic, endothelial, and neural stem cells, respectively, regardless of cell isolation and propagation method. CD44 expression was variable, apparently dependent on serum concentration. Functional similarity of the stem cell populations was also observed, with each different cell population expressing the cell type-specific markers beta-tubulin, type II collagen, and desmin, and demonstrating endothelial tube formation when cultured under conditions favoring neural, cartilage, muscle, and endothelial cell differentiation, respectively. On the basis of these data, adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells cultured in adherent monolayer are virtually indistinguishable, both physically and functionally, regardless of the method of isolation or proliferative expansion.

  6. Metabolic diversity and ecological niches of Achromatium populations revealed with single-cell genomic sequencing

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    Muammar eMansor

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Large, sulfur-cycling, calcite-precipitating bacteria in the genus Achromatium represent a significant proportion of bacterial communities near sediment-water interfaces throughout the world. Our understanding of their potentially crucial roles in calcium, carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, and iron cycling is limited because they have not been cultured or sequenced using environmental genomics approaches to date. We utilized single-cell genomic sequencing to obtain one incomplete and two nearly complete draft genomes for Achromatium collected at Warm Mineral Springs, FL. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the three cells represent distinct and relatively distant Achromatium populations (91-92% identity. The draft genomes encode key genes involved in sulfur and hydrogen oxidation; oxygen, nitrogen and polysulfide respiration; carbon and nitrogen fixation; organic carbon assimilation and storage; chemotaxis; twitching motility; antibiotic resistance; and membrane transport. Known genes for iron and manganese energy metabolism were not detected. The presence of pyrophosphatase and vacuolar (V-type ATPases, which are generally rare in bacterial genomes, suggests a role for these enzymes in calcium transport, proton pumping, and/or energy generation in the membranes of calcite-containing inclusions.

  7. A mammary stem cell population identified and characterized in late embryogenesis reveals similarities to human breast cancer.

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    Spike, Benjamin T; Engle, Dannielle D; Lin, Jennifer C; Cheung, Samantha K; La, Justin; Wahl, Geoffrey M

    2012-02-03

    Gene expression signatures relating mammary stem cell populations to breast cancers have focused on adult tissue. Here, we identify, isolate, and characterize the fetal mammary stem cell (fMaSC) state since the invasive and proliferative processes of mammogenesis resemble phases of cancer progression. fMaSC frequency peaks late in embryogenesis, enabling more extensive stem cell purification than achieved with adult tissue. fMaSCs are self-renewing, multipotent, and coexpress multiple mammary lineage markers. Gene expression, transplantation, and in vitro analyses reveal putative autocrine and paracrine regulatory mechanisms, including ErbB and FGF signaling pathways impinging on fMaSC growth. Expression profiles from fMaSCs and associated stroma exhibit significant similarities to basal-like and Her2+ intrinsic breast cancer subtypes. Our results reveal links between development and cancer and provide resources to identify new candidates for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy.

  8. Biomarker screening of oral cancer cell lines revealed sub-populations of CD133-, CD44-, CD24- and ALDH1- positive cancer stem cells

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    Kendall K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC ranks sixth worldwide for cancer-related mortality. For the past several decades the mainstay of treatment for HNSCC has been surgery and external beam radiation, although more recent trials combining chemotherapy and radiation have demonstrated improvements. However, cancer recurrence and treatment failures continue to occur in a significant percentage of patients. Recent advances in tumor biology have led to the discovery that many cancers, including HNSCC, may contain subpopulations of cells with stem cell-like properties that may explain relapse and recurrence. The objective of this study was to screen existing oral cancer cell lines for biomarkers specific for cells with stem cell-like properties. RNA was isolated for RT-PCR screening using primers for specific mRNA of the biomarkers: CD44, CD24, CD133, NANOG, Nestin, ALDH1, and ABCG2 in CAL27, SCC25 and SCC15 cells. This analysis revealed that some oral cancer cell lines (CAL27 and SCC25 may contain small subpopulations of adhesion- and contact-independent cells (AiDC that also express tumor stem cell markers, including CD44, CD133, and CD24. In addition, CAL27 cells also expressed the intracellular tumor stem cell markers, ALDH1 and ABCG2. Isolation and culture of the adhesion- and contact-independent cells from CAL27 and SCC25 populations revealed differential proliferation rates and more robust inhibition by the MEK inhibitor PD98059, as well as the chemotherapeutic agents Cisplatin and Paclitaxel, within the AiDC CAL27 cells. At least one oral cancer cell line (CAL27 contained subpopulations of cells that express specific biomarkers associated with tumor stem cells which were morphologically and phenotypically distinct from other cells within this cell line.

  9. Mapping the Cell-Surface N-Glycoproteome of Human Hepatocytes Reveals Markers for Selecting a Homogeneous Population of iPSC-Derived Hepatocytes.

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    Mallanna, Sunil K; Cayo, Max A; Twaroski, Kirk; Gundry, Rebekah L; Duncan, Stephen A

    2016-09-13

    When comparing hepatic phenotypes between iPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells from different liver disease patients, cell heterogeneity can confound interpretation. We proposed that homogeneous cell populations could be generated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Using cell-surface capture proteomics, we identified a total of 300 glycoproteins on hepatocytes. Analyses of the expression profiles during the differentiation of iPSCs revealed that SLC10A1, CLRN3, and AADAC were highly enriched during the final stages of hepatocyte differentiation. FACS purification of hepatocyte-like cells expressing SLC10A1, CLRN3, or AADAC demonstrated enrichment of cells with hepatocyte characteristics. Moreover, transcriptome analyses revealed that cells expressing the liver gene regulatory network were enriched while cells expressing a pluripotent stem cell network were depleted. In conclusion, we report an extensive catalog of cell-surface N-linked glycoproteins expressed in primary hepatocytes and identify cell-surface proteins that facilitate the purification of homogeneous populations of iPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells.

  10. Mapping the Cell-Surface N-Glycoproteome of Human Hepatocytes Reveals Markers for Selecting a Homogeneous Population of iPSC-Derived Hepatocytes

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    Sunil K. Mallanna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available When comparing hepatic phenotypes between iPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells from different liver disease patients, cell heterogeneity can confound interpretation. We proposed that homogeneous cell populations could be generated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Using cell-surface capture proteomics, we identified a total of 300 glycoproteins on hepatocytes. Analyses of the expression profiles during the differentiation of iPSCs revealed that SLC10A1, CLRN3, and AADAC were highly enriched during the final stages of hepatocyte differentiation. FACS purification of hepatocyte-like cells expressing SLC10A1, CLRN3, or AADAC demonstrated enrichment of cells with hepatocyte characteristics. Moreover, transcriptome analyses revealed that cells expressing the liver gene regulatory network were enriched while cells expressing a pluripotent stem cell network were depleted. In conclusion, we report an extensive catalog of cell-surface N-linked glycoproteins expressed in primary hepatocytes and identify cell-surface proteins that facilitate the purification of homogeneous populations of iPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells.

  11. CD4-Transgenic Zebrafish Reveal Tissue-Resident Th2- and Regulatory T Cell-like Populations and Diverse Mononuclear Phagocytes.

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    Dee, Christopher T; Nagaraju, Raghavendar T; Athanasiadis, Emmanouil I; Gray, Caroline; Fernandez Del Ama, Laura; Johnston, Simon A; Secombes, Christopher J; Cvejic, Ana; Hurlstone, Adam F L

    2016-11-01

    CD4(+) T cells are at the nexus of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. However, little is known about the evolutionary history of CD4(+) T cells, and it is unclear whether their differentiation into specialized subsets is conserved in early vertebrates. In this study, we have created transgenic zebrafish with vibrantly labeled CD4(+) cells allowing us to scrutinize the development and specialization of teleost CD4(+) leukocytes in vivo. We provide further evidence that CD4(+) macrophages have an ancient origin and had already emerged in bony fish. We demonstrate the utility of this zebrafish resource for interrogating the complex behavior of immune cells at cellular resolution by the imaging of intimate contacts between teleost CD4(+) T cells and mononuclear phagocytes. Most importantly, we reveal the conserved subspecialization of teleost CD4(+) T cells in vivo. We demonstrate that the ancient and specialized tissues of the gills contain a resident population of il-4/13b-expressing Th2-like cells, which do not coexpress il-4/13a Additionally, we identify a contrasting population of regulatory T cell-like cells resident in the zebrafish gut mucosa, in marked similarity to that found in the intestine of mammals. Finally, we show that, as in mammals, zebrafish CD4(+) T cells will infiltrate melanoma tumors and obtain a phenotype consistent with a type 2 immune microenvironment. We anticipate that this unique resource will prove invaluable for future investigation of T cell function in biomedical research, the development of vaccination and health management in aquaculture, and for further research into the evolution of adaptive immunity.

  12. Identification of a distinct small cell population from human bone marrow reveals its multipotency in vivo and in vitro.

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    James Wang

    Full Text Available Small stem cells, such as spore-like cells, blastomere-like stem cells (BLSCs, and very-small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs have been described in recent studies, although their multipotency in human tissues has not yet been confirmed. Here, we report the discovery of adult multipotent stem cells derived from human bone marrow, which we call StemBios (SB cells. These isolated SB cells are smaller than 6 ìm and are DAPI+ and Lgr5+ (Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing G Protein-Coupled Receptor 5. Because Lgr5 has been characterized as a stem cell marker in the intestine, we hypothesized that SB cells may have a similar function. In vivo cell tracking assays confirmed that SB cells give rise to three types of cells, and in vitro studies demonstrated that SB cells cultured in proprietary media are able to grow to 6-25 ìm in size. Once the SB cells have attached to the wells, they differentiate into different cell lineages upon exposure to specific differentiation media. We are the first to demonstrate that stem cells smaller than 6 ìm can differentiate both in vivo and in vitro. In the future, we hope that SB cells will be used therapeutically to cure degenerative diseases.

  13. Superposition of Individual Activities: Urea-Mediated Suppression of Nitrate Uptake in the Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum Revealed at the Population and Single-Cell Levels

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    Matantseva, Olga; Skarlato, Sergei; Vogts, Angela; Pozdnyakov, Ilya; Liskow, Iris; Schubert, Hendrik; Voss, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Dinoflagellates readily use diverse inorganic and organic compounds as nitrogen sources, which is advantageous in eutrophied coastal areas exposed to high loads of anthropogenic nutrients, e.g., urea, one of the most abundant organic nitrogen substrates in seawater. Cell-to-cell variability in nutritional physiology can further enhance the diversity of metabolic strategies among dinoflagellates of the same species, but it has not been studied in free-living microalgae. We applied stable isotope tracers, isotope ratio mass spectrometry and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) to investigate the response of cultured nitrate-acclimated dinoflagellates Prorocentrum minimum to a sudden input of urea and the effect of urea on the concurrent nitrate uptake at the population and single-cell levels. We demonstrate that inputs of urea lead to suppression of nitrate uptake by P. minimum, and urea uptake exceeds the concurrent uptake of nitrate. Individual dinoflagellate cells within a population display significant heterogeneity in the rates of nutrient uptake and extent of the urea-mediated inhibition of the nitrate uptake, thus forming several groups characterized by different modes of nutrition. We conclude that urea originating from sporadic sources is rapidly utilized by dinoflagellates and can be used in biosynthesis or stored intracellularly depending on the nutrient status; therefore, sudden urea inputs can represent one of the factors triggering or supporting harmful algal blooms. Significant physiological heterogeneity revealed at the single-cell level is likely to play a role in alleviation of intra-population competition for resources and can affect the dynamics of phytoplankton populations and their maintenance in natural environments. PMID:27610101

  14. Stem cell heterogeneity revealed

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    Andersen, Marianne S; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    The skin forms a protective, water-impermeable barrier consisting of heavily crosslinked epithelial cells. However, the specific role of stem cells in sustaining this barrier remains a contentious issue. A detailed analysis of the interfollicular epidermis now proposes a model for how a composite...... of cells with different properties are involved in its maintenance....

  15. Hospital population screening reveals overrepresentation of CD5(-) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of IgM type.

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    Voigtlaender, Minna; Vogler, Birthe; Trepel, Martin; Panse, Jens; Jung, Roman; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Bacher, Ulrike; Binder, Mascha

    2015-09-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) result from clonal expansions of mature B or plasma cells. Here, we set out to determine the immunophenotypic/monoclonal immunoglobulin (M protein) features and co-prevalence of MBL and MGUS in a hospital-based cohort of 1909 non-hematooncological patients. Of the evaluable cases, 3.8 % showed evidence for MBL by immunophenotyping, while 9.8 % were screened positive for M protein by immunofixation. With six concomitant cases (0.4 %), MBL and MGUS were not statistically associated. At least in two of these coincident cases, MBL and MGUS were of different clonal origin since both clones had divergent light chain restriction. CD5(-) MBL (57.1 %) and IgM+ MGUS (24.7 %) were strikingly overrepresented compared to population-based screenings and did not progress to overt lymphoma or myeloma during the observation period (mean follow-up of 117 weeks or 110 weeks, respectively). Prevalence and phenotypes suggest that a substantial proportion of incidental MBL and MGUS in hospitalized patients may be attributed to transiently expanded B-cell clones in the context of disease-related immune stimulation rather than reflecting veritable precursors of clonal B-cell malignancies.

  16. Transcriptome sequencing from diverse human populations reveals differentiated regulatory architecture.

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    Alicia R Martin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale sequencing efforts have documented extensive genetic variation within the human genome. However, our understanding of the origins, global distribution, and functional consequences of this variation is far from complete. While regulatory variation influencing gene expression has been studied within a handful of populations, the breadth of transcriptome differences across diverse human populations has not been systematically analyzed. To better understand the spectrum of gene expression variation, alternative splicing, and the population genetics of regulatory variation in humans, we have sequenced the genomes, exomes, and transcriptomes of EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 45 individuals in the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP. The populations sampled span the geographic breadth of human migration history and include Namibian San, Mbuti Pygmies of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Algerian Mozabites, Pathan of Pakistan, Cambodians of East Asia, Yakut of Siberia, and Mayans of Mexico. We discover that approximately 25.0% of the variation in gene expression found amongst individuals can be attributed to population differences. However, we find few genes that are systematically differentially expressed among populations. Of this population-specific variation, 75.5% is due to expression rather than splicing variability, and we find few genes with strong evidence for differential splicing across populations. Allelic expression analyses indicate that previously mapped common regulatory variants identified in eight populations from the International Haplotype Map Phase 3 project have similar effects in our seven sampled HGDP populations, suggesting that the cellular effects of common variants are shared across diverse populations. Together, these results provide a resource for studies analyzing functional differences across populations by estimating the degree of shared gene expression, alternative splicing, and

  17. Ethiopian population dermatoglyphic study reveals linguistic stratification of diversity.

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    Seile Yohannes

    Full Text Available The manifestation of ethnic, blood type, & gender-wise population variations regarding Dermatoglyphic manifestations are of interest to assess intra-group diversity and differentiation. The present study reports on the analysis of qualitaive and quantitative finger Dermatoglyphic traits of 382 individuals cross-sectionally sampled from an administrative region of Ethiopia, consisting of five ethnic cohorts from the Afro-Asiatic & Nilo-Saharan affiliations. These Dermatoglyphic parameters were then applied in the assessment of diversity & differentiation, including Heterozygosity, Fixation, Panmixia, Wahlund's variance, Nei's measure of genetic diversity, and thumb & finger pattern genotypes, which were inturn used in homology inferences as summarized by a Neighbour-Joining tree constructed from Nei's standard genetic distance. Results revealed significant correlation between Dermatoglyphics & population parameters that were further found to be in concordance with the historical accounts of the ethnic groups. Such inductions as the ancient north-eastern presence and subsequent admixure events of the Oromos (PII= 15.01, the high diversity of the Amharas (H= 0.1978, F= 0.6453, and P= 0.4144, and the Nilo-Saharan origin of the Berta group (PII= 10.66 are evidences to this. The study has further tested the possibility of applying Dermatoglyphics in population genetic & anthropologic research, highlighting on the prospect of developing a method to trace back population origins & ancient movement patterns. Additionally, linguistic clustering was deemed significant for the Ethiopian population, coinciding with recent genome wide studies that have ascertained that linguistic clustering as to being more crucial than the geographical patterning in the Ethiopian context. Finally, Dermatoglyphic markers have been proven to be endowed with a strong potential as non-invasive preliminary tools applicable prior to genetic studies to analyze ethnically sub

  18. Ethiopian population dermatoglyphic study reveals linguistic stratification of diversity.

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    Yohannes, Seile; Bekele, Endashaw

    2015-01-01

    The manifestation of ethnic, blood type, & gender-wise population variations regarding Dermatoglyphic manifestations are of interest to assess intra-group diversity and differentiation. The present study reports on the analysis of qualitaive and quantitative finger Dermatoglyphic traits of 382 individuals cross-sectionally sampled from an administrative region of Ethiopia, consisting of five ethnic cohorts from the Afro-Asiatic & Nilo-Saharan affiliations. These Dermatoglyphic parameters were then applied in the assessment of diversity & differentiation, including Heterozygosity, Fixation, Panmixia, Wahlund's variance, Nei's measure of genetic diversity, and thumb & finger pattern genotypes, which were inturn used in homology inferences as summarized by a Neighbour-Joining tree constructed from Nei's standard genetic distance. Results revealed significant correlation between Dermatoglyphics & population parameters that were further found to be in concordance with the historical accounts of the ethnic groups. Such inductions as the ancient north-eastern presence and subsequent admixure events of the Oromos (PII= 15.01), the high diversity of the Amharas (H= 0.1978, F= 0.6453, and P= 0.4144), and the Nilo-Saharan origin of the Berta group (PII= 10.66) are evidences to this. The study has further tested the possibility of applying Dermatoglyphics in population genetic & anthropologic research, highlighting on the prospect of developing a method to trace back population origins & ancient movement patterns. Additionally, linguistic clustering was deemed significant for the Ethiopian population, coinciding with recent genome wide studies that have ascertained that linguistic clustering as to being more crucial than the geographical patterning in the Ethiopian context. Finally, Dermatoglyphic markers have been proven to be endowed with a strong potential as non-invasive preliminary tools applicable prior to genetic studies to analyze ethnically sub-divided populations and

  19. Genetic substructure of Kuwaiti population reveals migration history.

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    Osama Alsmadi

    Full Text Available The State of Kuwait is characterized by settlers from Saudi Arabia, Iran, and other regions of the Arabian Peninsula. The settlements and subsequent admixtures have shaped the genetics of Kuwait. High prevalence of recessive disorders and metabolic syndromes (that increase risk of diabetes is seen in the peninsula. Understanding the genetic structure of its population will aid studies designed to decipher the underlying causes of these disorders. In this study, we analyzed 572,366 SNP markers from 273 Kuwaiti natives genotyped using the illumina HumanOmniExpress BeadChip. Model-based clustering identified three genetic subgroups with different levels of admixture. A high level of concordance (Mantel test, p=0.0001 for 9999 repeats was observed between the derived genetic clusters and the surname-based ancestries. Use of Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP data to understand admixtures in each group reveals the following: the first group (Kuwait P is largely of West Asian ancestry, representing Persians with European admixture; the second group (Kuwait S is predominantly of city-dwelling Saudi Arabian tribe ancestry, and the third group (Kuwait B includes most of the tent-dwelling Bedouin surnames and is characterized by the presence of 17% African ancestry. Identity by Descent and Homozygosity analyses find Kuwait's population to be heterogeneous (placed between populations that have large amount of ROH and the ones with low ROH with Kuwait S as highly endogamous, and Kuwait B as diverse. Population differentiation FST estimates place Kuwait P near Asian populations, Kuwait S near Negev Bedouin tribes, and Kuwait B near the Mozabite population. FST distances between the groups are in the range of 0.005 to 0.008; distances of this magnitude are known to cause false positives in disease association studies. Results of analysis for genetic features such as linkage disequilibrium decay patterns conform to Kuwait's geographical location at the nexus

  20. The heterogeneity of human CD127(+) innate lymphoid cells revealed by single-cell RNA sequencing.

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    Björklund, Åsa K; Forkel, Marianne; Picelli, Simone; Konya, Viktoria; Theorell, Jakob; Friberg, Danielle; Sandberg, Rickard; Mjösberg, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly appreciated as important participants in homeostasis and inflammation. Substantial plasticity and heterogeneity among ILC populations have been reported. Here we have delineated the heterogeneity of human ILCs through single-cell RNA sequencing of several hundreds of individual tonsil CD127(+) ILCs and natural killer (NK) cells. Unbiased transcriptional clustering revealed four distinct populations, corresponding to ILC1 cells, ILC2 cells, ILC3 cells and NK cells, with their respective transcriptomes recapitulating known as well as unknown transcriptional profiles. The single-cell resolution additionally divulged three transcriptionally and functionally diverse subpopulations of ILC3 cells. Our systematic comparison of single-cell transcriptional variation within and between ILC populations provides new insight into ILC biology during homeostasis, with additional implications for dysregulation of the immune system.

  1. The Young Stellar Population in M17 Revealed by Chandra

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    Broos, Patrick S.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Wang, Junfeng; Garmire, Gordon P.; Jiang, Zhibo; Tsuboi, Yohko

    2007-04-01

    We report here results from a Chandra ACIS observation of the stellar populations in and around the M17 H II region. The field reveals 886 sources with observed X-ray luminosities (uncorrected for absorption) between ˜29.3 ergs s-1tables of X-ray source properties, several results are presented: 1. The X-ray luminosity function is calibrated to that of the Orion Nebula Cluster population to infer a total population of roughly 8000-10,000 stars in M17, one-third lying in the central NGC 6618 cluster. 2. About 40% of the ACIS sources are heavily obscured with AV>10 mag. Some are concentrated around well-studied star-forming regions -- IRS 5/UC1, the Kleinmann-Wright Object, and M17-North -- but most are distributed across the field. As previously shown, star formation appears to be widely distributed in the molecular clouds. X-ray emission is detected from 64 of the hundreds of Class I protostar candidates that can be identified by near- and mid-infrared colors. These constitute the most likely protostar candidates known in M17. 3. The spatial distribution of X-ray stars is complex: in addition to the central NGC 6618 cluster and well-known embedded groups, we find a new embedded cluster (designated M17-X), a 2 pc long arc of young stars along the southwest edge of the M17 H II region, and 0.1 pc substructure within various populations. These structures may indicate that the populations are dynamically young. 4. All (14/14) of the known O stars but only about half (19/34) of the known B0-B3 stars in the M17 field are detected. These stars exhibit the long-reported correlation between X-ray and bolometric luminosities of LX˜10-7Lbol. While many O and early-B stars show the soft X-ray emission expected from microshocks in their winds or moderately hard emission that could be caused by magnetically channeled wind shocks, six of these stars exhibit very hard thermal plasma components (kT>4 keV) that may be due to colliding wind binaries. More than 100 candidate new OB

  2. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers.

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    Bénédicte Coupat-Goutaland

    Full Text Available Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM. Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis. They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains.

  3. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupat-Goutaland, Bénédicte; Régoudis, Estelle; Besseyrias, Matthieu; Mularoni, Angélique; Binet, Marie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis). They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains.

  4. Historical sampling reveals dramatic demographic changes in western gorilla populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guschanski Katerina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today many large mammals live in small, fragmented populations, but it is often unclear whether this subdivision is the result of long-term or recent events. Demographic modeling using genetic data can estimate changes in long-term population sizes while temporal sampling provides a way to compare genetic variation present today with that sampled in the past. In order to better understand the dynamics associated with the divergences of great ape populations, these analytical approaches were applied to western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and in particular to the isolated and Critically Endangered Cross River gorilla subspecies (G. g. diehli. Results We used microsatellite genotypes from museum specimens and contemporary samples of Cross River gorillas to infer both the long-term and recent population history. We find that Cross River gorillas diverged from the ancestral western gorilla population ~17,800 years ago (95% HDI: 760, 63,245 years. However, gene flow ceased only ~420 years ago (95% HDI: 200, 16,256 years, followed by a bottleneck beginning ~320 years ago (95% HDI: 200, 2,825 years that caused a 60-fold decrease in the effective population size of Cross River gorillas. Direct comparison of heterozygosity estimates from museum and contemporary samples suggests a loss of genetic variation over the last 100 years. Conclusions The composite history of western gorillas could plausibly be explained by climatic oscillations inducing environmental changes in western equatorial Africa that would have allowed gorilla populations to expand over time but ultimately isolate the Cross River gorillas, which thereafter exhibited a dramatic population size reduction. The recent decrease in the Cross River population is accordingly most likely attributable to increasing anthropogenic pressure over the last several hundred years. Isolation of diverging populations with prolonged concomitant gene flow, but not secondary admixture, appears

  5. Revealing components of the galaxy population through nonparametric techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bamford, Steven P; Nichol, Robert C; Miller, Christopher J; Wasserman, Larry; Genovese, Christopher R; Freeman, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    The distributions of galaxy properties vary with environment, and are often multimodal, suggesting that the galaxy population may be a combination of multiple components. The behaviour of these components versus environment holds details about the processes of galaxy development. To release this information we apply a novel, nonparametric statistical technique, identifying four components present in the distribution of galaxy H$\\alpha$ emission-line equivalent-widths. We interpret these components as passive, star-forming, and two varieties of active galactic nuclei. Independent of this interpretation, the properties of each component are remarkably constant as a function of environment. Only their relative proportions display substantial variation. The galaxy population thus appears to comprise distinct components which are individually independent of environment, with galaxies rapidly transitioning between components as they move into denser environments.

  6. Alu polymorphic insertions reveal genetic structure of north Indian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Manorama; Tripathi, Piyush; Chauhan, Ugam Kumari; Herrera, Rene J; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2008-10-01

    The Indian subcontinent is characterized by the ancestral and cultural diversity of its people. Genetic input from several unique source populations and from the unique social architecture provided by the caste system has shaped the current genetic landscape of India. In the present study 200 individuals each from three upper-caste and four middle-caste Hindu groups and from two Muslim populations in North India were examined for 10 polymorphic Alu insertions (PAIs). The investigated PAIs exhibit high levels of polymorphism and average heterozygosity. Limited interpopulation variance and genetic flow in the present study suggest admixture. The results of this study demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, the caste system has not provided an impermeable barrier to genetic exchange among Indian groups.

  7. Association between Y haplogroups and autosomal AIMs reveals intra-population substructure in Bolivian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Carlos; Gomes, Verónica; Romanini, Carola; Oliveira, Andréa M; Rocabado, Omar; Aquino, Juliana; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor

    2015-07-01

    For the correct evaluation of the weight of genetic evidence in a forensic context, databases must reflect the structure of the population, with all possible groups being represented. Countries with a recent history of admixture between strongly differentiated populations are usually highly heterogeneous and sub-structured. Bolivia is one of these countries, with a high diversity of ethnic groups and different levels of admixture (among Native Americans, Europeans and Africans) across the territory. For a better characterization of the male lineages in Bolivia, 17 Y-STR and 42 Y-SNP loci were genotyped in samples from La Paz and Chuquisaca. Only European and Native American Y-haplogroups were detected, and no sub-Saharan African chromosomes were found. Significant differences were observed between the two samples, with a higher frequency of European lineages in Chuquisaca than in La Paz. A sample belonging to haplogroup Q1a3a1a1-M19 was detected in La Paz, in a haplotype background different from those previously found in Argentina. This result supports an old M19 North-south dispersion in South America, possibly via two routes. When comparing the ancestry of each individual assessed through his Y chromosome with the one estimated using autosomal AIMs, (a) increased European ancestry in individuals with European Y chromosomes and (b) higher Native American ancestry in the carriers of Native American Y-haplogroups were observed, revealing an association between autosomal and Y-chromosomal markers. The results of this study demonstrate that a sub-structure does exist in Bolivia at both inter- and intrapopulation levels, a fact which must be taken into account in the evaluation of forensic genetic evidence.

  8. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  9. Ultrastructural and molecular distinctions between the porcine inner cell mass and epiblast reveal unique pluripotent cell states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, V. J.; Jacobsen, Janus Valentin; Rasmussen, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of the pluripotent cell populations within the porcine embryo is essential for understanding pluripotency and self-renewal regulation in the inner cell mass (ICM) and epiblast. In this study, we perform detailed ultrastructural and molecular characterization of the developing...... pluripotent cell population as it develops from the ICM to the late epiblast. The ultrastructural observations revealed that the outer cells of the ICM have a high nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio but are transcriptionally inactive and contain mitochondria with few cristae. In contrast, the epiblast cells have...

  10. Phylogeography of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus reveals substantially reduced population differentiation at northern latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmands, S

    2001-07-01

    Previous studies of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus revealed one of the highest levels of mitochondrial DNA differentiation ever reported among conspecific populations. The present study extends the geographical sampling northward, adding populations from northern California to south-east Alaska. The mitochondrial phylogeny for the entire species range, based on cytochrome oxidase I sequences for a total of 49 individuals from 27 populations, again shows extreme differentiation among populations (up to 23%). However, populations from Oregon northwards appear to be derived and have interpopulation divergences five times lower than those between southern populations. Furthermore, although few individuals were sequenced from each locality, populations from Puget Sound northward had significantly reduced levels of within-population variation. These patterns are hypothesized to result from the contraction and expansion of populations driven by recent ice ages.

  11. Modelling Spread of Oncolytic Viruses in Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2014-03-01

    One of the most promising areas in current cancer research and treatment is the use of viruses to attack cancer cells. A number of oncolytic viruses have been identified to date that possess the ability to destroy or neutralize cancer cells while inflicting minimal damage upon healthy cells. Formulation of predictive models that correctly describe the evolution of infected tumor systems is critical to the successful application of oncolytic virus therapy. A number of different models have been proposed for analysis of the oncolytic virus-infected tumor system, with approaches ranging from traditional coupled differential equations such as the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models, to contemporary modeling frameworks based on neural networks and cellular automata. Existing models are focused on tumor cells and the effects of virus infection, and offer the potential for improvement by including effects upon normal cells. We have recently extended the traditional framework to a 2-cell model addressing the full cellular system including tumor cells, normal cells, and the impacts of viral infection upon both populations. Analysis of the new framework reveals complex interaction between the populations and potential inability to simultaneously eliminate the virus and tumor populations.

  12. Cell cycle synchronization reveals greater G2/M-phase accumulation of lung epithelial cells exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Reyes, Estefany I; Bucio-López, Laura; Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; García-Cuéllar, Claudia M; Morales-Bárcenas, Rocío; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2015-03-01

    Titanium dioxide has been classified in the 2B group as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and amid concerns of its exposure, cell cycle alterations are an important one. However, several studies show inconclusive effects, mainly because it is difficult to compare cell cycle effects caused by TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) exposure between different shapes and sizes of NP, cell culture types, and time of exposure. In addition, cell cycle is frequently analyzed without cell cycle synchronization, which may also mask some effects. We hypothesized that synchronization after TiO2 NP exposure could reveal dissimilar cell cycle progression when compared with unsynchronized cell population. To test our hypothesis, we exposed lung epithelial cells to 1 and 10 μg/cm(2) TiO2 NPs for 7 days and one population was synchronized by serum starvation and inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase using hydroxyurea. Another cell population was exposed to TiO2 NPs under the same experimental conditions, but after treatments, cell cycle was analyzed without synchronization. Our results showed that TiO2 NP-exposed cells without synchronization had no changes in cell cycle distribution; however, cell population synchronized after 1 and 10 μg/cm(2) TiO2 NP treatment showed a 1.5-fold and 1.66-fold increase, respectively, in proliferation. Synchronized cells also reveal a faster capability of TiO2 NP-exposed cells to increase cell population in the G2/M phase in the following 9 h after synchronization. We conclude that synchronization discloses a greater percentage of cells in the G2/M phase and higher proliferation than TiO2 NP-synchronized cells.

  13. Genetic diversity and structure of natural fragmented Chamaecyparis obtusa populations as revealed by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Asako; Uchida, Kohji; Taguchi, Yuriko; Tani, Naoki; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2010-09-01

    The genetic diversity and population structure of hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) in Japan were investigated by examining the distribution of alleles at 13 microsatellite loci in 25 natural populations from Iwaki in northern Japan to Yakushima Island in southern Japan. On average, 26.9 alleles per locus were identified across all populations and 4.0% of the genetic variation was retained among populations (G(ST) = 0.040). According to linkage disequilibrium analysis, estimates of effective population size and detected evidence of bottleneck events, the genetic diversity of some populations may have declined as a result of fragmentation and/or over-exploitation. The central populations located in the Chubu district appear to have relatively large effective population sizes, while marginal populations, such as the Yakushima, Kobayashi and Iwaki populations, have smaller effective population sizes and are isolated from the other populations. Microsatellite analysis revealed the genetic uniqueness of the Yakushima population. Although genetic differentiation between populations was low, we detected a gradual cline in the genetic structure and found that locus Cos2619 may be non-neutral with respect to natural selection.

  14. Identification of a population of epidermal squamous cell carcinoma cells with enhanced potential for tumor formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Adhikary

    Full Text Available Epidermal squamous cell carcinoma is among the most common cancers in humans. These tumors are comprised of phenotypically diverse populations of cells that display varying potential for proliferation and differentiation. An important goal is identifying cells from this population that drive tumor formation. To enrich for tumor-forming cells, cancer cells were grown as spheroids in non-attached conditions. We show that spheroid-selected cells form faster growing and larger tumors in immune-compromised mice as compared to non-selected cells. Moreover, spheroid-selected cells gave rise to tumors following injection of as few as one hundred cells, suggesting these cells have enhanced tumor-forming potential. Cells isolated from spheroid-selected tumors retain an enhanced ability to grow as spheroids when grown in non-attached culture conditions. Thus, these tumor-forming cells retain their phenotype following in vivo passage as tumors. Detailed analysis reveals that spheroid-selected cultures are highly enriched for expression of epidermal stem cell and embryonic stem cell markers, including aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, keratin 15, CD200, keratin 19, Oct4, Bmi-1, Ezh2 and trimethylated histone H3. These studies indicate that a subpopulation of cells that possess stem cell-like properties and express stem cell markers can be derived from human epidermal cancer cells and that these cells display enhanced ability to drive tumor formation.

  15. Population dynamics of two antilisterial cheese surface consortia revealed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasler Madlen

    2010-03-01

    . Conclusions This work reports the first population dynamics study of complex smear ecosystems exhibiting in situ antilisterial activity. TTGE revealed the presence of marine lactic acid bacteria that are likely related to the strong Listeria inhibition, as their early development in the smear occurred simultaneously with a decrease in Listeria cell count.

  16. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Tom E C; Faas, Marijke M; Scherjon, Sicco A; Prins, Jelmer R

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the constitution, size and activation status of peripheral human memory T-lymphocyte populations. Effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) T-lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry of peripheral blood from 14 nulligravid, 12 primigravid and 15 parous women that were on average 18 months postpartum. The short term effects were shown by the significantly higher CD4+ EM cell and activated CD4+ memory cell proportions in primigravid women compared to nulligravid women. The persistent effects found in this study were the significantly higher proportions of CD4+ EM, CD4+ CM and activated memory T cells in parous women compared to nulligravid women. In contrast to CD4+ cells, activation status of CD8+ memory cells did not differ between the groups. This study shows that pregnancy persistently affects the pre-pregnancy CD4+ memory cell pool in human peripheral blood. During pregnancy, CD4+ T-lymphocytes might differentiate into EM cells followed by persistent higher proportions of CD4+ CM and EM cells postpartum. The persistent effects of pregnancy on memory T cells found in this study support the hypothesis that memory T cells are generated during pregnancy and that these cells could be involved in the lower complication risks in multiparous pregnancies in humans.

  17. A Structured Population Model of Cell Differentiation

    CERN Document Server

    Doumic, Marie; Perthame, Benoit; Zubelli, Jorge P

    2010-01-01

    We introduce and analyze several aspects of a new model for cell differentiation. It assumes that differentiation of progenitor cells is a continuous process. From the mathematical point of view, it is based on partial differential equations of transport type. Specifically, it consists of a structured population equation with a nonlinear feedback loop. This models the signaling process due to cytokines, which regulate the differentiation and proliferation process. We compare the continuous model to its discrete counterpart, a multi-compartmental model of a discrete collection of cell subpopulations recently proposed by Marciniak-Czochra et al. in 2009 to investigate the dynamics of the hematopoietic system. We obtain uniform bounds for the solutions, characterize steady state solutions, and analyze their linearized stability. We show how persistence or extinction might occur according to values of parameters that characterize the stem cells self-renewal. We also perform numerical simulations and discuss the q...

  18. Circadian rhythm and cell population growth

    CERN Document Server

    Clairambault, Jean; Lepoutre, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Molecular circadian clocks, that are found in all nucleated cells of mammals, are known to dictate rhythms of approximately 24 hours (circa diem) to many physiological processes. This includes metabolism (e.g., temperature, hormonal blood levels) and cell proliferation. It has been observed in tumor-bearing laboratory rodents that a severe disruption of these physiological rhythms results in accelerated tumor growth. The question of accurately representing the control exerted by circadian clocks on healthy and tumour tissue proliferation to explain this phenomenon has given rise to mathematical developments, which we review. The main goal of these previous works was to examine the influence of a periodic control on the cell division cycle in physiologically structured cell populations, comparing the effects of periodic control with no control, and of different periodic controls between them. We state here a general convexity result that may give a theoretical justification to the concept of cancer chronothera...

  19. High-resolution deep sequencing reveals biodiversity, population structure, and persistence of HIV-1 quasispecies within host ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sequencing provides the basis for analysis of biodiversity of taxonomically similar organisms in an environment. While extensively applied to microbiome studies, population genetics studies of viruses are limited. To define the scope of HIV-1 population biodiversity within infected individuals, a suite of phylogenetic and population genetic algorithms was applied to HIV-1 envelope hypervariable domain 3 (Env V3 within peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a group of perinatally HIV-1 subtype B infected, therapy-naïve children. Results Biodiversity of HIV-1 Env V3 quasispecies ranged from about 70 to 270 unique sequence clusters across individuals. Viral population structure was organized into a limited number of clusters that included the dominant variants combined with multiple clusters of low frequency variants. Next generation viral quasispecies evolved from low frequency variants at earlier time points through multiple non-synonymous changes in lineages within the evolutionary landscape. Minor V3 variants detected as long as four years after infection co-localized in phylogenetic reconstructions with early transmitting viruses or with subsequent plasma virus circulating two years later. Conclusions Deep sequencing defines HIV-1 population complexity and structure, reveals the ebb and flow of dominant and rare viral variants in the host ecosystem, and identifies an evolutionary record of low-frequency cell-associated viral V3 variants that persist for years. Bioinformatics pipeline developed for HIV-1 can be applied for biodiversity studies of virome populations in human, animal, or plant ecosystems.

  20. Genetic structure of Tibetan populations in Gansu revealed by forensic STR loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong-Bing; Wang, Chuan-Chao; Wang, Jiang; Tao, Xiaolan; Shang, Lei; Wen, Shao-Qing; Du, Qiajun; Deng, Qiongying; Xu, Bingying; Huang, Ying; Wang, Hong-Dan; Li, Shujin; Bin Cong; Ma, Liying; Jin, Li; Krause, Johannes; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The origin and diversification of Sino-Tibetan speaking populations have been long-standing hot debates. However, the limited genetic information of Tibetan populations keeps this topic far from clear. In the present study, we genotyped 15 forensic autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) from 803 unrelated Tibetan individuals from Gansu Province (635 from Gannan and 168 from Tianzhu) in northwest China. We combined these data with published dataset to infer a detailed population affinities and genetic substructure of Sino-Tibetan populations. Our results revealed Tibetan populations in Gannan and Tianzhu are genetically very similar with Tibetans from other regions. The Tibetans in Tianzhu have received more genetic influence from surrounding lowland populations. The genetic structure of Sino-Tibetan populations was strongly correlated with linguistic affiliations. Although the among-population variances are relatively small, the genetic components for Tibetan, Lolo-Burmese, and Han Chinese were quite distinctive, especially for the Deng, Nu, and Derung of Lolo-Burmese. Han Chinese but not Tibetans are suggested to share substantial genetic component with southern natives, such as Tai-Kadai and Hmong-Mien speaking populations, and with other lowland East Asian populations, which implies there might be extensive gene flow between those lowland groups and Han Chinese after Han Chinese were separated from Tibetans. The dataset generated in present study is also valuable for forensic identification and paternity tests in China. PMID:28112227

  1. Adult mouse cortical cell taxonomy revealed by single cell transcriptomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T; Sorensen, Staci A; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-02-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. We constructed a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice on the basis of single-cell RNA sequencing. We identified 49 transcriptomic cell types, including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and 7 non-neuronal types. We also analyzed cell type-specific mRNA processing and characterized genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we found that some of our transcriptomic cell types displayed specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single-cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties.

  2. Spinal cord injury reveals multilineage differentiation of ependymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meletis, Konstantinos; Barnabé-Heider, Fanie; Carlén, Marie; Evergren, Emma; Tomilin, Nikolay; Shupliakov, Oleg; Frisén, Jonas

    2008-07-22

    Spinal cord injury often results in permanent functional impairment. Neural stem cells present in the adult spinal cord can be expanded in vitro and improve recovery when transplanted to the injured spinal cord, demonstrating the presence of cells that can promote regeneration but that normally fail to do so efficiently. Using genetic fate mapping, we show that close to all in vitro neural stem cell potential in the adult spinal cord resides within the population of ependymal cells lining the central canal. These cells are recruited by spinal cord injury and produce not only scar-forming glial cells, but also, to a lesser degree, oligodendrocytes. Modulating the fate of ependymal progeny after spinal cord injury may offer an alternative to cell transplantation for cell replacement therapies in spinal cord injury.

  3. Spinal cord injury reveals multilineage differentiation of ependymal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Meletis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury often results in permanent functional impairment. Neural stem cells present in the adult spinal cord can be expanded in vitro and improve recovery when transplanted to the injured spinal cord, demonstrating the presence of cells that can promote regeneration but that normally fail to do so efficiently. Using genetic fate mapping, we show that close to all in vitro neural stem cell potential in the adult spinal cord resides within the population of ependymal cells lining the central canal. These cells are recruited by spinal cord injury and produce not only scar-forming glial cells, but also, to a lesser degree, oligodendrocytes. Modulating the fate of ependymal progeny after spinal cord injury may offer an alternative to cell transplantation for cell replacement therapies in spinal cord injury.

  4. Cell-specific information processing in segregating populations of Eph receptor ephrin-expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Sherman, Andrew; Chen, Ginny I;

    2009-01-01

    Cells have self-organizing properties that control their behavior in complex tissues. Contact between cells expressing either B-type Eph receptors or their transmembrane ephrin ligands initiates bidirectional signals that regulate cell positioning. However, simultaneously investigating how...... information is processed in two interacting cell types remains a challenge. We implemented a proteomic strategy to systematically determine cell-specific signaling networks underlying EphB2- and ephrin-B1-controlled cell sorting. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of mixed populations of EphB2......- and ephrin-B1-expressing cells that were labeled with different isotopes revealed cell-specific tyrosine phosphorylation events. Functional associations between these phosphotyrosine signaling networks and cell sorting were established with small interfering RNA screening. Data-driven network modeling...

  5. Quantitative single cell analysis of cell population dynamics during submandibular salivary gland development and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre A. Nelson

    2013-04-01

    Epithelial organ morphogenesis involves reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cell types to balance progenitor cell retention and expansion with cell differentiation for evolution of tissue architecture. Underlying submandibular salivary gland branching morphogenesis is the regulated proliferation and differentiation of perhaps several progenitor cell populations, which have not been characterized throughout development, and yet are critical for understanding organ development, regeneration, and disease. Here we applied a serial multiplexed fluorescent immunohistochemistry technology to map the progressive refinement of the epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations throughout development from embryonic day 14 through postnatal day 20. Using computational single cell analysis methods, we simultaneously mapped the evolving temporal and spatial location of epithelial cells expressing subsets of differentiation and progenitor markers throughout salivary gland development. We mapped epithelial cell differentiation markers, including aquaporin 5, PSP, SABPA, and mucin 10 (acinar cells; cytokeratin 7 (ductal cells; and smooth muscle α-actin (myoepithelial cells and epithelial progenitor cell markers, cytokeratin 5 and c-kit. We used pairwise correlation and visual mapping of the cells in multiplexed images to quantify the number of single- and double-positive cells expressing these differentiation and progenitor markers at each developmental stage. We identified smooth muscle α-actin as a putative early myoepithelial progenitor marker that is expressed in cytokeratin 5-negative cells. Additionally, our results reveal dynamic expansion and redistributions of c-kit- and K5-positive progenitor cell populations throughout development and in postnatal glands. The data suggest that there are temporally and spatially discreet progenitor populations that contribute to salivary gland development and homeostasis.

  6. The Streptococcus milleri population of a cystic fibrosis clinic reveals patient specificity and intraspecies diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Christopher D; Sibley, Kristen A; Leong, Tara A; Grinwis, Margot E; Parkins, Michael D; Rabin, Harvey R; Surette, Michael G

    2010-07-01

    The genetic relatedness of Streptococcus milleri group isolates from the airways of cystic fibrosis patients was determined by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. This study reveals no evidence for patient-to-patient transmission in our patient population; however, within individual patients, complex inter- and intraspecies diversity and dynamics can be observed.

  7. Targeting population heterogeneity for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Carlqvist, Magnus; Helmark, S.

    analysis, and thereby created the possibility to map population heterogeneity. A factorial design with pH, glucose concentration and oxygen level was performed in batch cultivations using the growth reporter strains to evaluate the effect of those environmental factors on heterogeneity level and amount...... of living cells. A highly dynamic behavior with regard to subpopulation distribution during the different growth stages was seen for the batch cultivations. Moreover, it could be demonstrated that the glucose concentration had a clear influence on the heterogeneity. The results from the factorial design...

  8. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMahon, Katherine D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.

    2014-06-18

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model’ of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  9. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMcahon, Katherine D.; Mamlstrom, Rex R.

    2014-05-12

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ecotype model? of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  10. Single-cell protein dynamics reproduce universal fluctuations in cell populations

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Naama; Rotella, James S; Salman, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Protein fluctuations in cell populations have recently been shown to exhibit a universal distribution shape under a broad range of biological realizations. Here, measuring protein content in individual bacteria continuously over ~70 generations, we show that single-cell trajectories fluctuate around their average with the same distribution shape as the population, i.e. their relative fluctuations are ergodic. Analysis of these temporal trajectories reveals that one effective random variable, sampled once each cell cycle, suffices to reconstruct the distribution from the trajectory. This in turn implies that cellular microscopic processes are strongly buffered and population-level protein distributions are insensitive to details of the intracellular dynamics. Probing them thus requires searching for novel universality-breaking experimental perturbations.

  11. Identification of side population cells in chicken embryonic gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, Elodie; Raucci, Franca; Montillet, Guillaume; Pain, Bertrand

    2015-02-01

    The side population (SP) phenotype, defined by the ability of a cell to efflux fluorescent dyes such as Hoechst, is common to several stem/progenitor cell types. In avian species, SP phenotype has been identified in pubertal and adult testes, but nothing is known about its expression during prenatal development of a male gonad. In this study, we characterized the Hoechst SP phenotype via the cytofluorimetric analysis of disaggregated testes on different days of chicken embryonic development. Male prenatal gonads contained a fraction of SP cells at each stage analyzed. At least two main SP fractions, named P3 and P4, were identified. The percentage of P3 fraction decreased as development proceeds, whereas P4 cell number was not affected by gonad growth. Functional inhibition of BCRP1 channel membrane using Verapamil and/or Ko143 showed that P3, but not P4 phenotype, was dependent on BCRP1 activity. Molecular analysis of both P3- and P4-sorted fractions revealed a differential RNA expression pattern, indicating that P3 cells mainly contained germinal stem cell markers, whereas P4 was preferentially composed of both Sertoli and Leydig cell progenitor markers. Finally, these findings provided evidence that the SP phenotype is a common feature of both germ and somatic cells detected in chicken developing testis.

  12. Traumatic brain injury reveals novel cell lineage relationships within the subventricular zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen M. Thomsen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The acute response of the rodent subventricular zone (SVZ to traumatic brain injury (TBI involves a physical expansion through increased cell proliferation. However, the cellular underpinnings of these changes are not well understood. Our analyses have revealed that there are two distinct transit-amplifying cell populations that respond in opposite ways to injury. Mash1+ transit-amplifying cells are the primary SVZ cell type that is stimulated to divide following TBI. In contrast, the EGFR+ population, which has been considered to be a functionally equivalent progenitor population to Mash1+ cells in the uninjured brain, becomes significantly less proliferative after injury. Although normally quiescent GFAP+ stem cells are stimulated to divide in SVZ ablation models, we found that the GFAP+ stem cells do not divide more after TBI. We found, instead, that TBI results in increased numbers of GFAP+/EGFR+ stem cells via non-proliferative means—potentially through the dedifferentiation of progenitor cells. EGFR+ progenitors from injured brains only were competent to revert to a stem cell state following brief exposure to growth factors. Thus, our results demonstrate previously unknown changes in lineage relationships that differ from conventional models and likely reflect an adaptive response of the SVZ to maintain endogenous brain repair after TBI.

  13. Outlier SNP markers reveal fine-scale genetic structuring across European hake populations (Merluccius merluccius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Ilaria; Babbucci, Massimiliano; Cariani, Alessia; Atanassova, Miroslava; Bekkevold, Dorte; Carvalho, Gary R; Espiñeira, Montserrat; Fiorentino, Fabio; Garofalo, Germana; Geffen, Audrey J; Hansen, Jakob H; Helyar, Sarah J; Nielsen, Einar E; Ogden, Rob; Patarnello, Tomaso; Stagioni, Marco; Tinti, Fausto; Bargelloni, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Shallow population structure is generally reported for most marine fish and explained as a consequence of high dispersal, connectivity and large population size. Targeted gene analyses and more recently genome-wide studies have challenged such view, suggesting that adaptive divergence might occur even when neutral markers provide genetic homogeneity across populations. Here, 381 SNPs located in transcribed regions were used to assess large- and fine-scale population structure in the European hake (Merluccius merluccius), a widely distributed demersal species of high priority for the European fishery. Analysis of 850 individuals from 19 locations across the entire distribution range showed evidence for several outlier loci, with significantly higher resolving power. While 299 putatively neutral SNPs confirmed the genetic break between basins (F(CT) = 0.016) and weak differentiation within basins, outlier loci revealed a dramatic divergence between Atlantic and Mediterranean populations (F(CT) range 0.275-0.705) and fine-scale significant population structure. Outlier loci separated North Sea and Northern Portugal populations from all other Atlantic samples and revealed a strong differentiation among Western, Central and Eastern Mediterranean geographical samples. Significant correlation of allele frequencies at outlier loci with seawater surface temperature and salinity supported the hypothesis that populations might be adapted to local conditions. Such evidence highlights the importance of integrating information from neutral and adaptive evolutionary patterns towards a better assessment of genetic diversity. Accordingly, the generated outlier SNP data could be used for tackling illegal practices in hake fishing and commercialization as well as to develop explicit spatial models for defining management units and stock boundaries.

  14. Fish population dynamics revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale acoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratilal, Purnima; Symonds, Deanelle; Makris, Nicholas C.; Nero, Redwood

    2005-04-01

    Video images of fish population densities over vast areas of the New Jersey continental shelf have been produced from acoustic data collected on a long range bistatic sonar system during the Acoustic Clutter 2003 experiment. Areal fish population densities were obtained after correcting the acoustic data for two-way transmission loss modeled using the range-dependent parabolic equation, spatially varying beampattern of the array, source level and mean target strength per fish. The wide-area fish density images reveal the temporal evolution of fish school distributions, their migration, as well as shoal formation and fragmentation at 50 s interval. Time series of the fish population within various density thresholds were made over the period of a day in an area containing millions of fish that at some instances formed a massive shoal extending over 12 km. The analysis shows that fish population in the area can be decomposed into a stable ambient population from lower-fish-density regions and a time-varying population composed from higher-density regions. Estimates of the differential speed between population centers of various shoals show that the average speed is on the order of a slow-moving surface vessel or submarine.

  15. Microsatellite variability reveals high genetic diversity and low genetic differentiation in a critical giant panda population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiandong YANG; Zhihe ZHANG; Fujun SHEN; Xuyu YANG; Liang ZHANG; Limin CHEN; Wenping ZHANG; Qing ZHU; Rong HOU

    2011-01-01

    Understanding present patterns of genetic diversity is critical in order to design effective conservation and management strategies for endangered species.Tangjiahe Nature Reserve (NR) is one of the most important national reserves for giant pandas Ailuropoda melanoleuca in China.Previous studies have shown that giant pandas in Tangjiahe NR may be threatened by population decline and fragmentation.Here we used 10 microsatellite DNA markers to assess the genetic variability in the Tangjiahe population.The results indicate a low level of genetic differentiation between the Hongshihe and Motianling subpopulations in the reserve.Assignment tests using the Bayesian clustering method in STRUCTURE identified one genetic cluster from 42 individuals of the two subpopulations.All individuals from the same subpopulation were assigned to one cluster.This indicates high gene flow between subpopulations.F statistic analyses revealed a low Fls-value of 0.024 in the total population and implies a randomly mating population in Tangjiahe NR.Additionally,our data show a high level of genetic diversity for the Tangjiahe population.Mean allele number (A),Allelic richness (AR) and mean expected heterozygosity (HE) for the Tangiiahe population was 5.9,5.173 and 0.703,respectively.This wild giant panda population can be restored through concerted effort [Current Zoology 57 (6):717-724,2011].

  16. First genealogy for a wild marine fish population reveals multigenerational philopatry

    KAUST Repository

    Salles, Océane C.

    2016-11-01

    Natal philopatry, the return of individuals to their natal area for reproduction, has advantages and disadvantages for animal populations. Natal philopatry may generate local genetic adaptation, but it may also increase the probability of inbreeding that can compromise persistence. Although natal philopatry is well documented in anadromous fishes, marine fish may also return to their birth site to spawn. How philopatry shapes wild fish populations is, however, unclear because it requires constructing multigenerational pedigrees that are currently lacking for marine fishes. Here we present the first multigenerational pedigree for a marine fish population by repeatedly genotyping all individuals in a population of the orange clownfish (Amphiprion percula) at Kimbe Island (Papua New Guinea) during a 10-y period. Based on 2927 individuals, our pedigree analysis revealed that longitudinal philopatry was recurrent over five generations. Progeny tended to settle close to their parents, with related individuals often sharing the same colony. However, successful inbreeding was rare, and genetic diversity remained high, suggesting occasional inbreeding does not impair local population persistence. Local reproductive success was dependent on the habitat larvae settled into, rather than the habitat they came from. Our study suggests that longitudinal philopatry can influence both population replenishment and local adaptation of marine fishes. Resolving multigenerational pedigrees during a relatively short period, as we present here, provides a framework for assessing the ability of marine populations to persist and adapt to accelerating climate change.

  17. Voluntary angler logbooks reveal long-term changes in a lentic pike, Esox lucius, population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Teunis; Arlinghaus, R.; Als, Thomas Damm;

    2013-01-01

    of annual record trophy pike captured by anglers, conrmed the negative impact of commercial pike shing and revealed a positive inuence of air temperature. It is concluded that high-quality angler logbooks that record effort and catch can be a cost-effective tool to inform lake fisheries management......Sixty-two years of voluntarily collected angling logbook data from a large natural Danish lake were used to 2 study variation in pike, Esox lucius L., CPUE (expressed as no. of captured per boat trip) as an index of stock size. Pike CPUE was positively related to pike release rate by anglers...... by revealing long-term population trends. Further, state space modelling, a statistical technique not yet seen in recreational fisheries science, is recommended as a tool to model proxies for population dynamics from angler logbook data...

  18. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  19. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria malaccensis revealed potential for future conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pradeep; Nag, Akshay; Parmar, Rajni; Ghosh, Sneha; Bhau, Brijmohan Singh; Sharma, Ram Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The endangered Aquilaria malaccensis,is an important plant with high economic values. Characterization of genetic diversity and population structure is receiving tremendous attention for effective conservation of genetic resources. Considering important repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A. malaccensis accessions from 10 home gardens of three states of northeast India were assessed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Of the 1153 fragments amplified with four AFLP primer combinations, 916 (79.4%) were found to be polymorphic. Polymorphic information content (PIC) and marker index (MI) of each primer combination correlate significantly with the number of genotypes resolved. Overall, a high genetic diversity (avg. 71.85%) was recorded. Further, high gene flow (Nm: 3.37), low genetic differentiation (FST: 0.069) and high within population genetic variation (93%) suggests that most of the genetic diversity is restricted within population. Neighbour joining (NJ), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and Bayesian-based STRUCTURE grouped all the accessions in two clusters with significant intermixing between populations, therefore, revealed that two genetically distinct gene pools are operating in the A. malaccensis populations cultivated in home gardens. Based on the various diversity inferences, five diverse populations (JOH, FN, HLF, DHM and ITN) were identified, which can be potentially exploited to develop conservation strategies for A. malaccensis.

  20. Allelic diversity and population structure of Bacillus sphaericus as revealed by multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yong; Hu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Dasheng; Wu, Yiming; Yuan, Zhiming

    2011-08-01

    The genetic diversity of 35 Bacillus sphaericus strains was analyzed by a newly developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme, toxin gene pool survey, and mosquito bioassay. The results demonstrated that strains assigned to the same sequence type (ST) had the same occurrence of toxin genes. Further sequence analysis revealed that toxic strains presented a nearly clonal population structure, whereas nontoxic strains had a high level of heterogeneity and were significantly distinct from toxic strains.

  1. Investigations of fine-scale phylogeography in Tigriopus californicus reveal historical patterns of population divergence

    OpenAIRE

    Ladner Jason T; Willett Christopher S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus is a model for studying the process of genetic divergence in allopatry and for probing the nature of genetic changes that lead to reproductive isolation. Although previous studies have revealed a pattern of remarkably high levels of genetic divergence between the populations of this species at several spatial scales, it is not clear what types of historical processes are responsible. Particularly lacking are data that can yield...

  2. Whole genome resequencing of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni reveals population history and effects of selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crellen, Thomas; Allan, Fiona; David, Sophia; Durrant, Caroline; Huckvale, Thomas; Holroyd, Nancy; Emery, Aidan M.; Rollinson, David; Aanensen, David M.; Berriman, Matthew; Webster, Joanne P.; Cotton, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is a parasitic fluke that infects millions of people in the developing world. This study presents the first application of population genomics to S. mansoni based on high-coverage resequencing data from 10 global isolates and an isolate of the closely-related Schistosoma rodhaini, which infects rodents. Using population genetic tests, we document genes under directional and balancing selection in S. mansoni that may facilitate adaptation to the human host. Coalescence modeling reveals the speciation of S. mansoni and S. rodhaini as 107.5–147.6KYA, a period which overlaps with the earliest archaeological evidence for fishing in Africa. Our results indicate that S. mansoni originated in East Africa and experienced a decline in effective population size 20–90KYA, before dispersing across the continent during the Holocene. In addition, we find strong evidence that S. mansoni migrated to the New World with the 16–19th Century Atlantic Slave Trade. PMID:26879532

  3. Individual and population variation in invertebrates revealed by Inter-simple Sequence Repeats (ISSRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Abbot

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available PCR-based molecular markers are well suited for questions requiring large scale surveys of plant and animal populations. Inter-simple Sequence Repeats or ISSRs are analyzed by a recently developed technique based on the amplification of the regions between inverse-oriented microsatellite loci with oligonucleotides anchored in microsatellites themselves. ISSRs have shown much promise for the study of the population biology of plants, but have not yet been explored for similar studies of animals. The value of ISSRs is demonstrated for the study of animal species with low levels of within-population variation. Sets of primers are identified which reveal variation in two aphid species, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Pemphigus obesinymphae, in the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti, and in a rotifer in the genus Philodina.

  4. Distribution of CD133 reveals glioma stem cells self-renew through symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathia, J D; Hitomi, M; Gallagher, J; Gadani, S P; Adkins, J; Vasanji, A; Liu, L; Eyler, C E; Heddleston, J M; Wu, Q; Minhas, S; Soeda, A; Hoeppner, D J; Ravin, R; McKay, R D G; McLendon, R E; Corbeil, D; Chenn, A; Hjelmeland, A B; Park, D M; Rich, J N

    2011-09-01

    Malignant gliomas contain a population of self-renewing tumorigenic stem-like cells; however, it remains unclear how these glioma stem cells (GSCs) self-renew or generate cellular diversity at the single-cell level. Asymmetric cell division is a proposed mechanism to maintain cancer stem cells, yet the modes of cell division that GSCs utilize remain undetermined. Here, we used single-cell analyses to evaluate the cell division behavior of GSCs. Lineage-tracing analysis revealed that the majority of GSCs were generated through expansive symmetric cell division and not through asymmetric cell division. The majority of differentiated progeny was generated through symmetric pro-commitment divisions under expansion conditions and in the absence of growth factors, occurred mainly through asymmetric cell divisions. Mitotic pair analysis detected asymmetric CD133 segregation and not any other GSC marker in a fraction of mitoses, some of which were associated with Numb asymmetry. Under growth factor withdrawal conditions, the proportion of asymmetric CD133 divisions increased, congruent with the increase in asymmetric cell divisions observed in the lineage-tracing studies. Using single-cell-based observation, we provide definitive evidence that GSCs are capable of different modes of cell division and that the generation of cellular diversity occurs mainly through symmetric cell division, not through asymmetric cell division.

  5. Population genetics of Sargassum horneri (Fucales,Phaeophyta) in China revealed by ISSR and SRAP markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Shenhui; CHONG Zhuo; ZHAO Fengjuan; YAO Jianting; DUAN Delin

    2013-01-01

    Sargassum horneri is a common brown macro-alga that is found in the inter-tidal ecosystems of China.To investigate the current status of seaweed resources and provide basic data for its sustainable development,ISSR (inter simple sequence repeat) and SRAP (sequence related amplified polymorphism)markers were used to analyze the population genetics among nine natural populations of S.horneri.The nine studied populations were distributed over 2 000 km from northeast to south China.The percentage of polymorphic loci P% (ISSR,99.44%; SRAP,100.00%),Nei's genetic diversity H(ISSR,0.107-0.199; SRAP,0.100-0.153),and Shannon's information index I (ISSR,0.157-0.291; SRAP,0.148-0.219) indicated a fair amount of genetic variability among the nine populations.Moreover,the high degree of gene differentiation Gst (ISSR,0.654; SRAP,0.718) and low gene flow Nm (ISSR,0.265; SRAP,0.196) implied that there was significant among-population differentiation,possibly as a result of habitat fragmentation.The matrices of genetic distances and fixation indices (Fst) among the populations correlated well with their geographical distribution (Mantel test R=0.541 5,0.541 8; P=0.005 0,0.002 0 and R=0.728 6,0.641 2; P=0.001 0,0.001 0,respectively); the Rongcheng population in the Shandong peninsula was the only exception.Overall,the genetic differentiation agreed with the geographic isolation.The fair amount of genetic diversity that was revealed in the S.horneri populations in China indicated that the seaweed resources had not been seriously affected by external factors.

  6. Ovarian cancer stem cells are enriched in side population and aldehyde dehydrogenase bright overlapping population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyo Yasuda

    Full Text Available Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs/cancer-initiaiting cells (CICs are defined as a small population of cancer cells that have self-renewal capacity, differentiation potential and high tumor-initiating ability. CSCs/CICs of ovarian cancer have been isolated by side population (SP analysis, ALDEFLUOR assay and using cell surface markers. However, these approaches are not definitive markers for CSCs/CICs, and it is necessary to refine recent methods for identifying more highly purified CSCs/CICs. In this study, we analyzed SP cells and aldehyde dehydrogenese bright (ALDH(Br cells from ovarian cancer cells. Both SP cells and ALDH(Br cells exhibited higher tumor-initiating ability and higher expression level of a stem cell marker, sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2, than those of main population (MP cells and ALDH(Low cells, respectively. We analyzed an SP and ALDH(Br overlapping population (SP/ALDH(Br, and the SP/ALDH(Br population exhibited higher tumor-initiating ability than that of SP cells or ALDH(Br cells, enabling initiation of tumor with as few as 10(2 cells. Furthermore, SP/ADLH(Br population showed higher sphere-forming ability, cisplatin resistance, adipocyte differentiation ability and expression of SOX2 than those of SP/ALDH(Low, MP/ALDH(Br and MP/ALDH(Low cells. Gene knockdown of SOX2 suppressed the tumor-initiation of ovarian cancer cells. An SP/ALDH(Br population was detected in several gynecological cancer cells with ratios of 0.1% for HEC-1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma cells to 1% for MCAS ovary mucinous adenocarcinoma cells. Taken together, use of the SP and ALDH(Br overlapping population is a promising approach to isolate highly purified CSCs/CICs and SOX2 might be a novel functional marker for ovarian CSCs/CICs.

  7. Biophysical characteristics reveal neural stem cell differentiation potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima H Labeed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Distinguishing human neural stem/progenitor cell (huNSPC populations that will predominantly generate neurons from those that produce glia is currently hampered by a lack of sufficient cell type-specific surface markers predictive of fate potential. This limits investigation of lineage-biased progenitors and their potential use as therapeutic agents. A live-cell biophysical and label-free measure of fate potential would solve this problem by obviating the need for specific cell surface markers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used dielectrophoresis (DEP to analyze the biophysical, specifically electrophysiological, properties of cortical human and mouse NSPCs that vary in differentiation potential. Our data demonstrate that the electrophysiological property membrane capacitance inversely correlates with the neurogenic potential of NSPCs. Furthermore, as huNSPCs are continually passaged they decrease neuron generation and increase membrane capacitance, confirming that this parameter dynamically predicts and negatively correlates with neurogenic potential. In contrast, differences in membrane conductance between NSPCs do not consistently correlate with the ability of the cells to generate neurons. DEP crossover frequency, which is a quantitative measure of cell behavior in DEP, directly correlates with neuron generation of NSPCs, indicating a potential mechanism to separate stem cells biased to particular differentiated cell fates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show here that whole cell membrane capacitance, but not membrane conductance, reflects and predicts the neurogenic potential of human and mouse NSPCs. Stem cell biophysical characteristics therefore provide a completely novel and quantitative measure of stem cell fate potential and a label-free means to identify neuron- or glial-biased progenitors.

  8. Macroscopic law of conservation revealed in the population dynamics of Toll-like receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvarajoo Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stimulating the receptors of a single cell generates stochastic intracellular signaling. The fluctuating response has been attributed to the low abundance of signaling molecules and the spatio-temporal effects of diffusion and crowding. At population level, however, cells are able to execute well-defined deterministic biological processes such as growth, division, differentiation and immune response. These data reflect biology as a system possessing microscopic and macroscopic dynamics. This commentary discusses the average population response of the Toll-like receptor (TLR 3 and 4 signaling. Without requiring detailed experimental data, linear response equations together with the fundamental law of information conservation have been used to decipher novel network features such as unknown intermediates, processes and cross-talk mechanisms. For single cell response, however, such simplicity seems far from reality. Thus, as observed in any other complex systems, biology can be considered to possess order and disorder, inheriting a mixture of predictable population level and unpredictable single cell outcomes.

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome sequencing reveals novel haplotypes in a Polynesian population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles Benton

    Full Text Available The high risk of metabolic disease traits in Polynesians may be partly explained by elevated prevalence of genetic variants involved in energy metabolism. The genetics of Polynesian populations has been shaped by island hoping migration events which have possibly favoured thrifty genes. The aim of this study was to sequence the mitochondrial genome in a group of Maoris in an effort to characterise genome variation in this Polynesian population for use in future disease association studies. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of 20 non-admixed Maori subjects using Affymetrix technology. DNA diversity analyses showed the Maori group exhibited reduced mitochondrial genome diversity compared to other worldwide populations, which is consistent with historical bottleneck and founder effects. Global phylogenetic analysis positioned these Maori subjects specifically within mitochondrial haplogroup--B4a1a1. Interestingly, we identified several novel variants that collectively form new and unique Maori motifs--B4a1a1c, B4a1a1a3 and B4a1a1a5. Compared to ancestral populations we observed an increased frequency of non-synonymous coding variants of several mitochondrial genes in the Maori group, which may be a result of positive selection and/or genetic drift effects. In conclusion, this study reports the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence data for a Maori population. Overall, these new data reveal novel mitochondrial genome signatures in this Polynesian population and enhance the phylogenetic picture of maternal ancestry in Oceania. The increased frequency of several mitochondrial coding variants makes them good candidates for future studies aimed at assessment of metabolic disease risk in Polynesian populations.

  10. Rangewide genetic analysis of Lesser Prairie-Chicken reveals population structure, range expansion, and possible introgression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; DeYoung, Randall W; Fike, Jennifer; Hagen, Christian A.; Johnson, Jeff A.; Larsson, Lena C; Patten, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) has been markedly reduced due to loss and fragmentation of habitat. Portions of the historical range, however, have been recolonized and even expanded due to planting of conservation reserve program (CRP) fields that provide favorable vegetation structure for Lesser Prairie-Chickens. The source population(s) feeding the range expansion is unknown, yet has resulted in overlap between Lesser and Greater Prairie-Chickens (T. cupido) increasing the potential for hybridization. Our objectives were to characterize connectivity and genetic diversity among populations, identify source population(s) of recent range expansion, and examine hybridization with the Greater Prairie-Chicken. We analyzed 640 samples from across the range using 13 microsatellites. We identified three to four populations corresponding largely to ecoregions. The Shinnery Oak Prairie and Sand Sagebrush Prairie represented genetically distinct populations (F ST > 0.034 and F ST > 0.023 respectively). The Shortgrass/CRP Mosaic and Mixed Grass ecoregions appeared admixed (F ST = 0.009). Genetic diversity was similar among ecoregions and N e ranged from 142 (95 % CI 99–236) for the Shortgrass/CRP Mosaic to 296 (95 % CI 233–396) in the Mixed Grass Prairie. No recent migration was detected among ecoregions, except asymmetric dispersal from both the Mixed Grass Prairie and to a lesser extent the Sand Sagebrush Prairie north into adjacent Shortgrass/CRP Mosaic (m = 0.207, 95 % CI 0.116–0.298, m = 0.097, 95 % CI 0.010–0.183, respectively). Indices investigating potential hybridization in the Shortgrass/CRP Mosaic revealed that six of the 13 individuals with hybrid phenotypes were significantly admixed suggesting hybridization. Continued monitoring of diversity within and among ecoregions is warranted as are actions promoting genetic connectivity and range expansion.

  11. Population Structure of UK Biobank and Ancient Eurasians Reveals Adaptation at Genes Influencing Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, Kevin J; Loh, Po-Ru; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick J; Price, Alkes L

    2016-11-03

    Analyzing genetic differences between closely related populations can be a powerful way to detect recent adaptation. The very large sample size of the UK Biobank is ideal for using population differentiation to detect selection and enables an analysis of the UK population structure at fine resolution. In this study, analyses of 113,851 UK Biobank samples showed that population structure in the UK is dominated by five principal components (PCs) spanning six clusters: Northern Ireland, Scotland, northern England, southern England, and two Welsh clusters. Analyses of ancient Eurasians revealed that populations in the northern UK have higher levels of Steppe ancestry and that UK population structure cannot be explained as a simple mixture of Celts and Saxons. A scan for unusual population differentiation along the top PCs identified a genome-wide-significant signal of selection at the coding variant rs601338 in FUT2 (p = 9.16 × 10(-9)). In addition, by combining evidence of unusual differentiation within the UK with evidence from ancient Eurasians, we identified genome-wide-significant (p = 5 × 10(-8)) signals of recent selection at two additional loci: CYP1A2-CSK and F12. We detected strong associations between diastolic blood pressure in the UK Biobank and both the variants with selection signals at CYP1A2-CSK (p = 1.10 × 10(-19)) and the variants with ancient Eurasian selection signals at the ATXN2-SH2B3 locus (p = 8.00 × 10(-33)), implicating recent adaptation related to blood pressure.

  12. T Regulatory Cells Support Plasma Cell Populations in the Bone Marrow

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    Arielle Glatman Zaretsky

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-lived plasma cells (PCs in the bone marrow (BM are a critical source of antibodies after infection or vaccination, but questions remain about the factors that control PCs. We found that systemic infection alters the BM, greatly reducing PCs and regulatory T (Treg cells, a population that contributes to immune privilege in the BM. The use of intravital imaging revealed that BM Treg cells display a distinct behavior characterized by sustained co-localization with PCs and CD11c-YFP+ cells. Gene expression profiling indicated that BM Treg cells express high levels of Treg effector molecules, and CTLA-4 deletion in these cells resulted in elevated PCs. Furthermore, preservation of Treg cells during systemic infection prevents PC loss, while Treg cell depletion in uninfected mice reduced PC populations. These studies suggest a role for Treg cells in PC biology and provide a potential target for the modulation of PCs during vaccine-induced humoral responses or autoimmunity.

  13. Single-Cell Transcript Profiles Reveal Multilineage Priming in Early Progenitors Derived from Lgr5+ Intestinal Stem Cells

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    Tae-Hee Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells (ISCs drive epithelial self-renewal, and their immediate progeny—intestinal bipotential progenitors—produce absorptive and secretory lineages via lateral inhibition. To define features of early transit from the ISC compartment, we used a microfluidics approach to measure selected stem- and lineage-specific transcripts in single Lgr5+ cells. We identified two distinct cell populations, one that expresses known ISC markers and a second, abundant population that simultaneously expresses markers of stem and mature absorptive and secretory cells. Single-molecule mRNA in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence verified expression of lineage-restricted genes in a subset of Lgr5+ cells in vivo. Transcriptional network analysis revealed that one group of Lgr5+ cells arises from the other and displays characteristics expected of bipotential progenitors, including activation of Notch ligand and cell-cycle-inhibitor genes. These findings define the earliest steps in ISC differentiation and reveal multilineage gene priming as a fundamental property of the process.

  14. Lin28a is a putative factor in regulating cancer stem cell-like properties in side population cells of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, S.; Tanaka, J.; Okada, S.; Isobe, T.; Yamamoto, G.; Yasuhara, R.; Irie, T.; Akiyama, C.; Kohno, Y.; Tachikawa, T.; Mishima, K., E-mail: mishima-k@dent.showa-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are among the target cells of cancer therapy because they are uniquely involved in both cancer progression and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. We identified side population (SP) cells, which are known to be an enriched population of CSC, in five oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC9, SCC25, TOSCC7, TOSCC17, and TOSCC23). The percentages of SP cells ranged from 0% to 3.3%, with TOSCC23 cells showing the highest percentages of SP cells (3.3% of the total cell population). The SP cells isolated from TOSCC23 cells also showed greater cell proliferation and invasion compared to non-SP (MP) cells. Therefore, our initial findings suggested that SP cells were enriched for CSC-like cells. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of cell proliferation-related and anti-apoptotic genes was greater in SP cells compared to MP cells. We focused on Lin28a, which showed the highest expression (approximately 22-fold) among the upregulated genes. The overexpression of Lin28a in TOSCC23 cells increased their proliferation, colony formation, and invasion. These findings suggest that Lin28a is an appropriate CSC target molecule for OSCC treatment - Highlights: ► Lin28a is a SP cell-specific factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. ► SP cells in OSCC cells show cancer stem cell-like properties. ► Lin28a regulates OSCC proliferative and invasive activities.

  15. A microarray analysis of two distinct lymphatic endothelial cell populations

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    Bernhard Schweighofer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have recently identified lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs to form two morphologically different populations, exhibiting significantly different surface protein expression levels of podoplanin, a major surface marker for this cell type. In vitro shockwave treatment (IVSWT of LECs resulted in enrichment of the podoplaninhigh cell population and was accompanied by markedly increased cell proliferation, as well as 2D and 3D migration. Gene expression profiles of these distinct populations were established using Affymetrix microarray analyses. Here we provide additional details about our dataset (NCBI GEO accession number GSE62510 and describe how we analyzed the data to identify differently expressed genes in these two LEC populations.

  16. Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus Mitochondrial Population Genomics Reveals Structure, Divergence, and Evidence for Heteroplasmy.

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    Yvette A Halley

    Full Text Available Herein, we evaluated the concordance of population inferences and conclusions resulting from the analysis of short mitochondrial fragments (i.e., partial or complete D-Loop nucleotide sequences versus complete mitogenome sequences for 53 bobwhites representing six ecoregions across TX and OK (USA. Median joining (MJ haplotype networks demonstrated that analyses performed using small mitochondrial fragments were insufficient for estimating the true (i.e., complete mitogenome haplotype structure, corresponding levels of divergence, and maternal population history of our samples. Notably, discordant demographic inferences were observed when mismatch distributions of partial (i.e., partial D-Loop versus complete mitogenome sequences were compared, with the reduction in mitochondrial genomic information content observed to encourage spurious inferences in our samples. A probabilistic approach to variant prediction for the complete bobwhite mitogenomes revealed 344 segregating sites corresponding to 347 total mutations, including 49 putative nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs distributed across 12 protein coding genes. Evidence of gross heteroplasmy was observed for 13 bobwhites, with 10 of the 13 heteroplasmies involving one moderate to high frequency SNV. Haplotype network and phylogenetic analyses for the complete bobwhite mitogenome sequences revealed two divergent maternal lineages (dXY = 0.00731; FST = 0.849; P < 0.05, thereby supporting the potential for two putative subspecies. However, the diverged lineage (n = 103 variants almost exclusively involved bobwhites geographically classified as Colinus virginianus texanus, which is discordant with the expectations of previous geographic subspecies designations. Tests of adaptive evolution for functional divergence (MKT, frequency distribution tests (D, FS and phylogenetic analyses (RAxML provide no evidence for positive selection or hybridization with the sympatric scaled quail

  17. A quorum-sensing factor in vegetative Dictyostelium discoideum cells revealed by quantitative migration analysis.

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    Laurent Golé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many cells communicate through the production of diffusible signaling molecules that accumulate and once a critical concentration has been reached, can activate or repress a number of target genes in a process termed quorum sensing (QS. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, QS plays an important role during development. However little is known about its effect on cell migration especially in the growth phase. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To investigate the role of cell density on cell migration in the growth phase, we use multisite timelapse microscopy and automated cell tracking. This analysis reveals a high heterogeneity within a given cell population, and the necessity to use large data sets to draw reliable conclusions on cell motion. In average, motion is persistent for short periods of time (t ≤ 5 min, but normal diffusive behavior is recovered over longer time periods. The persistence times are positively correlated with the migrated distances. Interestingly, the migrated distance decreases as well with cell density. The adaptation of cell migration to cell density highlights the role of a secreted quorum sensing factor (QSF on cell migration. Using a simple model describing the balance between the rate of QSF generation and the rate of QSF dilution, we were able to gather all experimental results into a single master curve, showing a sharp cell transition between high and low motile behaviors with increasing QSF. CONCLUSION: This study unambiguously demonstrates the central role played by QSF on amoeboid motion in the growth phase.

  18. Sickle cell disease in the Kurdish population of northern Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Allawi, Nasir A S; Jalal, Sana D; Nerwey, Farida F; Al-Sayan, Galawezh O O; Al-Zebari, Sahima S M; Alshingaly, Awny A; Markous, Raji D; Jubrael, Jaladet M S; Hamamy, Hanan

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that sickle cell disease patients are clustered in two geographical areas in Iraq, one among the Arabs in the extreme south, another among the Kurdish population in the extreme north, where they constitute major health problems. However, no studies have focused on the genotypes responsible for sickle cell disease or the β-globin gene haplotypes associated with it. For the latter purpose, a total of 103 unrelated Kurdish sickle cell disease patients were evaluated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for the sickle cell mutation, followed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse hybridization for β- and α-thalassemia (β- and α-thal) mutations, whenever indicated. Results showed that the most common genotype was sickle cell anemia (68.0%) followed by Hb S/β(0)-thal and Hb S/β(+)-thal at frequencies of 24.2 and 7.8%, respectively. Eight β-thal mutations were associated with the latter two genotypes including: IVS-II-1 (G>A), IVS-I-110 (G>A), codon 8 (-AA), codon 44 (-C), codon 22 (-7 bp), IVS-I-1 (G>A), codon 30 (G>C) and IVS-I-6 (T>C). In Hb SS patients, the -α(3.7) deletion was documented in 10.0% and was the only α-thal mutation detected. Furthermore, 5' β-globin gene cluster haplotyping of 128 β(S) chromosomes revealed that the most common haplotype seen in 69.5% was the Benin haplotype, followed by the Arab-Indian haplotype in 12.5%. These latter findings closely resemble reports from neighboring Turkey, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Mediterranean countries, suggesting a possible common origin, but are in contrast to findings from the Eastern Arabian Peninsula and Iran.

  19. Phase resetting reveals network dynamics underlying a bacterial cell cycle.

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    Yihan Lin

    Full Text Available Genomic and proteomic methods yield networks of biological regulatory interactions but do not provide direct insight into how those interactions are organized into functional modules, or how information flows from one module to another. In this work we introduce an approach that provides this complementary information and apply it to the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, a paradigm for cell-cycle control. Operationally, we use an inducible promoter to express the essential transcriptional regulatory gene ctrA in a periodic, pulsed fashion. This chemical perturbation causes the population of cells to divide synchronously, and we use the resulting advance or delay of the division times of single cells to construct a phase resetting curve. We find that delay is strongly favored over advance. This finding is surprising since it does not follow from the temporal expression profile of CtrA and, in turn, simulations of existing network models. We propose a phenomenological model that suggests that the cell-cycle network comprises two distinct functional modules that oscillate autonomously and couple in a highly asymmetric fashion. These features collectively provide a new mechanism for tight temporal control of the cell cycle in C. crescentus. We discuss how the procedure can serve as the basis for a general approach for probing network dynamics, which we term chemical perturbation spectroscopy (CPS.

  20. Genetic diversity and population structure of Sepia officinalis from the Tunisian cost revealed by mitochondrial COI sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriam, Tir; Wafa, Tombari; Khawla, Telahigue; Tarek, Hajji; Abdeljelil, Ghram; Mhamed, Elcafsi

    2015-01-01

    Population substructure of Sepia officinalis sampled along the Tunisian coastline was studied. We have scored the genetic variation of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase 1. A total of 20 specimens from four sampling sites were analysed and revealed 12 different haplotypes. Haplotype diversity showed a decreasing north to south gradient which may be explained by the hydrogeography of the study area. The overall estimate of genetic divergence (FST) revealed significant genetic differentiation between the pair-wise population comparisons supported by the AMOVA analysis which reveals significant genetic divergence. Finally, populations showed an excess of rare haplotypes. The mismatch distribution and several population genetic statistics indicate that the excess of rare variants is due to a recent expansion for Djerba and Kelibia populations. For Rades and Bizerte populations a constant population size was detected. These findings are important for fisheries management to preserve this marine resource for long-term utilization.

  1. Natural Populations of Drosophila melanogaster Reveal Features of an Uncharacterized Circadian Property: The Lower Temperature Limit of Rhythmicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Sarah E; Schmidt, Paul S; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-06-01

    Most cyclic biological processes are under control of a circadian molecular timing system that synchronizes these phenomena to the 24-h day. One generic property of circadian-controlled processes is that they operate within a specific temperature range, below which the manifestation of rhythm ceases. Little is known about the evolutionary relevance of the lower temperature limit of rhythmicity or about the mechanism underlying the loss of overt circadian behavior below this lower limit, especially in one model organism of chronobiology, Drosophila melanogaster. Natural populations of Drosophila are evolving under divergent selection pressures and so provide a source of diversity necessary to address these issues. Using lines derived from African populations, we find that there is natural variation in the expression of rhythmic behavior under low-temperature conditions. We found evidence that this variability is evolutionarily relevant at extremely low temperature (12 °C) because high-altitude populations exhibit selection for locally adapted genomes that contribute to rhythmic behavior. Lines resistant to 15 °C show an additional layer of diversity in their response to temperature extremes because some lines are resistant to low temperature (15 °C) only, whereas others are cross-resistant to high and low temperature (15 °C and 30 °C). Genetic analysis of one cold-resistant circadian line at 15 °C reveals that the phenotype maps to the X-chromosome but not to the core clock genes, per and sgg. Analysis of the central clock cells of this line reveals that maintenance of rhythm is associated with robust clock function, which is compromised in a standard laboratory strain. These data indicate that the cold-resistant circadian phenotype is clock based. This study highlights the importance of using natural populations to inform us of the basic features of circadian traits, especially those that might be under temperature-based selection.

  2. Functional heterogeneity of embryonic stem cells revealed through translational amplification of an early endodermal transcript.

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    Maurice A Canham

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available ES cells are defined as self-renewing, pluripotent cell lines derived from early embryos. Cultures of ES cells are also characterized by the expression of certain markers thought to represent the pluripotent state. However, despite the widespread expression of key markers such as Oct4 and the appearance of a characteristic undifferentiated morphology, functional ES cells may represent only a small fraction of the cultures grown under self-renewing conditions. Thus phenotypically "undifferentiated" cells may consist of a heterogeneous population of functionally distinct cell types. Here we use a transgenic allele designed to detect low level transcription in the primitive endoderm lineage as a tool to identify an immediate early endoderm-like ES cell state. This reporter employs a tandem array of internal ribosomal entry sites to drive translation of an enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (Venus from the transcript that normally encodes for the early endodermal marker Hex. Expression of this Venus transgene reports on single cells with low Hex transcript levels and reveals the existence of distinct populations of Oct4 positive undifferentiated ES cells. One of these cells types, characterized by both the expression of the Venus transgene and the ES cells marker SSEA-1 (V(+S(+, appears to represent an early step in primitive endoderm specification. We show that the fraction of cells present within this state is influenced by factors that both promote and suppress primitive endoderm differentiation, but conditions that support ES cell self-renewal prevent their progression into differentiation and support an equilibrium between this state and at least one other that resembles the Nanog positive inner cell mass of the mammalian blastocysts. Interestingly, while these subpopulations are equivalently and clonally interconvertible under self-renewing conditions, when induced to differentiate both in vivo and in vitro they exhibit different behaviours

  3. Functional Heterogeneity of Embryonic Stem Cells Revealed through Translational Amplification of an Early Endodermal Transcript

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canham, Maurice A.; Sharov, Alexei A.; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Brickman, Joshua M.

    2010-01-01

    ES cells are defined as self-renewing, pluripotent cell lines derived from early embryos. Cultures of ES cells are also characterized by the expression of certain markers thought to represent the pluripotent state. However, despite the widespread expression of key markers such as Oct4 and the appearance of a characteristic undifferentiated morphology, functional ES cells may represent only a small fraction of the cultures grown under self-renewing conditions. Thus phenotypically “undifferentiated” cells may consist of a heterogeneous population of functionally distinct cell types. Here we use a transgenic allele designed to detect low level transcription in the primitive endoderm lineage as a tool to identify an immediate early endoderm-like ES cell state. This reporter employs a tandem array of internal ribosomal entry sites to drive translation of an enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (Venus) from the transcript that normally encodes for the early endodermal marker Hex. Expression of this Venus transgene reports on single cells with low Hex transcript levels and reveals the existence of distinct populations of Oct4 positive undifferentiated ES cells. One of these cells types, characterized by both the expression of the Venus transgene and the ES cells marker SSEA-1 (V+S+), appears to represent an early step in primitive endoderm specification. We show that the fraction of cells present within this state is influenced by factors that both promote and suppress primitive endoderm differentiation, but conditions that support ES cell self-renewal prevent their progression into differentiation and support an equilibrium between this state and at least one other that resembles the Nanog positive inner cell mass of the mammalian blastocysts. Interestingly, while these subpopulations are equivalently and clonally interconvertible under self-renewing conditions, when induced to differentiate both in vivo and in vitro they exhibit different behaviours. Most strikingly

  4. Investigations of fine-scale phylogeography in Tigriopus californicus reveal historical patterns of population divergence

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    Ladner Jason T

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus is a model for studying the process of genetic divergence in allopatry and for probing the nature of genetic changes that lead to reproductive isolation. Although previous studies have revealed a pattern of remarkably high levels of genetic divergence between the populations of this species at several spatial scales, it is not clear what types of historical processes are responsible. Particularly lacking are data that can yield insights into population history from the finest scales of geographic resolution. Results Sequence variation in both cytochrome b (CYTB, mtDNA and the rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP, nuclear are examined at a fine scale within four different regions for populations of T. californicus. High levels of genetic divergence are seen for both genes at the broader scale, and genetic subdivision is apparent at nearly all scales in these populations for these two genes. Patterns of polymorphism and divergence in both CYTB and RISP suggest that selection may be leading to non-neutral evolution of these genes in several cases but a pervasive pattern of neither selection nor coadaptation is seen for these markers. Conclusion The use of sequence data at a fine-scale of resolution in this species has provided novel insights into the processes that have resulted in the accumulation of genetic divergence among populations. This divergence is likely to result from an interplay between a limited dispersal ability for this copepod and the temporal instability of copepod habitat. Both shorter-term processes such as the extinction/recolonization dynamics of copepod pools and longer-term processes such as geological uplift of coastline and sea level changes appear to have impacted the patterns of differentiation. Some patterns of sequence variation are consistent with selection acting upon the loci used in this study; however, it appears that most phylogeographic patterns are

  5. Genetic Diversity Caused by Environmental Stress in Natural Populations of Niupidujuan as Revealed by RAPD Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Ying-da; XING Ming; YANG Zhi-yong; LIU Yan-fei; CHEN Xia

    2011-01-01

    Multiplex environmental factors are generally expected to have significant effects on genetic diversity of plant populations.In this study,randomly amplified polymorphic DNA(RAPD) technique was used to reveal the genetic diversity in the same species of four populations collected from Niupidujuan(Rhododendron chrysanthum) at different altitudes,an endangered species,endemic to Northeast China.Initially,twenty informative and reproducible primers were chosen for final RAPD analysis.A total of 152 clear bands were obtained,including 143 polymorphic ones.With the help of POPGENE software,the poly rate was calculated to be 94.07% and the evenness of amplified bands for every primer was 6.8.Additionally,the mean observed number of alleles was 1.7265 with an effective number of 1.3608.An examination of the gene indicated a diversity of 0.2162 with an information diversity index of 0.3313.For these data,the clustering blurred analysis was performed with the aid of NTSYS-pc software to define the Nei's gene diversity and the Shannon information diversity index of the four plant populations.The relationships between the genetic diversity indexes on the one hand and the geographic and climatic factors on the other hand were estimated by the Pearson correlation with SPSS 11.0 software.The results of the correlation analysis show that there were significant(P<0.05) or highly significant(P<0.01) correlations between each of the genetic diversity indexes and the different temperature which were mainly caused by the altitude different populations located.These data highlight the importance of native populations in shaping the spatial genetic structure in Niupidujuan.

  6. Biometric variability of goat populations revealed by means of principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Luanna Chácara; Machado, Théa M Medeiros; Araújo, Adriana Mello; Olson, Timothy A; da Silva, João Batista Lopes; Torres, Robledo Almeida; Costa, Márcio da Silva

    2012-12-01

    The aim was to analyze variation in 12 Brazilian and Moroccan goat populations, and, through principal component analysis (PCA), check the importance of body measures and their indices as a means of distinguishing among individuals and populations. The biometric measurements were wither height (WH), brisket height (BH) and ear length (EL). Thorax depth (WH-BH) and the three indices, TD/WH, EL/TD and EL/WH, were also calculated. Of the seven components extracted, the first three principal components were sufficient to explain 99.5% of the total variance of the data. Graphical dispersion by genetic groups revealed that European dairy breeds clustered together. The Moroccan breeds were separated into two groups, one comprising the Drâa and the other the Zagora and Rhâali breeds. Whereas, on the one side, the Anglo-Nubian and undefined breeds were the closest to one another the goats of the Azul were observed to have the highest variation of all the breeds. The Anglo-Nubian and Boer breeds were similar to each other. The Nambi-type goats remained distinct from all the other populations. In general, the use of graphical representation of PCA values allowed to distinguish genetic groups.

  7. Biometric variability of goat populations revealed by means of principal component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luanna Chácara Pires

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to analyze variation in 12 Brazilian and Moroccan goat populations, and, through principal component analysis (PCA, check the importance of body measures and their indices as a means of distinguishing among individuals and populations. The biometric measurements were wither height (WH, brisket height (BH and ear length (EL. Thorax depth (WH-BH and the three indices, TD/WH, EL/TD and EL/WH, were also calculated. Of the seven components extracted, the first three principal components were sufficient to explain 99.5% of the total variance of the data. Graphical dispersion by genetic groups revealed that European dairy breeds clustered together. The Moroccan breeds were separated into two groups, one comprising the Drâa and the other the Zagora and Rhâali breeds. Whereas, on the one side, the Anglo-Nubian and undefined breeds were the closest to one another the goats of the Azul were observed to have the highest variation of all the breeds. The Anglo-Nubian and Boer breeds were similar to each other. The Nambi-type goats remained distinct from all the other populations. In general, the use of graphical representation of PCA values allowed to distinguish genetic groups.

  8. Genome divergence during evolutionary diversification as revealed in replicate lake-stream stickleback population pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesti, Marius; Hendry, Andrew P; Salzburger, Walter; Berner, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Evolutionary diversification is often initiated by adaptive divergence between populations occupying ecologically distinct environments while still exchanging genes. The genetic foundations of this divergence process are largely unknown and are here explored through genome scans in multiple independent lake-stream population pairs of threespine stickleback. We find that across the pairs, overall genomic divergence is associated with the magnitude of divergence in phenotypes known to be under divergent selection. Along this same axis of increasing diversification, genomic divergence becomes increasingly biased towards the centre of chromosomes as opposed to the peripheries. We explain this pattern by within-chromosome variation in the physical extent of hitchhiking, as recombination is greatly reduced in chromosome centres. Correcting for this effect suggests that a great number of genes distributed widely across the genome are involved in the divergence into lake vs. stream habitats. Analyzing additional allopatric population pairs, however, reveals that strong divergence in some genomic regions has been driven by selection unrelated to lake-stream ecology. Our study highlights a major contribution of large-scale variation in recombination rate to generating heterogeneous genomic divergence and indicates that elucidating the genetic basis of adaptive divergence might be more challenging than currently recognized.

  9. Cell dualism: presence of cells with alternative membrane potentials in growing populations of bacteria and yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Volodymyr; Rezaeinejad, Saeid; Chu, Jian

    2013-10-01

    It is considered that all growing cells, for exception of acidophilic bacteria, have negatively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁻-cells). Here we show that growing populations of microbial cells contain a small portion of cells with positively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁺-cells). These cells were detected after simultaneous application of the fluorescent probes for positive membrane potential (anionic dye DIBAC⁻) and membrane integrity (propidium iodide, PI). We found in exponentially growing cell populations of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae that the content of live Δψ⁻-cells was 93.6 ± 1.8 % for bacteria and 90.4 ± 4.0 % for yeasts and the content of live Δψ⁺-cells was 0.9 ± 0.3 % for bacteria and 2.4 ± 0.7 % for yeasts. Hypothetically, existence of Δψ⁺-cells could be due to short-term, about 1 min for bacteria and 5 min for yeasts, change of membrane potential from negative to positive value during the cell cycle. This change has been shown by the reversions of K⁺, Na⁺, and Ca²⁺ ions fluxes across the cell membrane during synchronous yeast culture. The transformation of Δψ(⁻-cells to Δψ⁺-cells can be explained by slow influx of K⁺ ions into Δψ⁻-cell to the trigger level of K⁺ concentration ("compression of potassium spring"), which is forming "alternative" Δψ⁺-cell for a short period, following with fast efflux of K⁺ ions out of Δψ⁺-cell ("release of potassium spring") returning cell to normal Δψ⁻ state. We anticipate our results to be a starting point to reveal the biological role of cell dualism in form of Δψ⁻- and Δψ⁺- cells.

  10. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in CD133+ population in human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-Qiang; Tan, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Bao-Wei; Wu, Tao; Liu, Ping; Sun, Shao-Jun; Cao, Yin-Guang

    2016-03-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the role of 3-bromopyruvate in inhibition of CD133+ U87 human glioma cell population growth. The results demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate inhibited the viability of both CD133+ and parental cells derived from U87 human glioma cell line. However, the 3-bromopyruvate-induced inhibition in viability was more prominent in CD133+ cells at 10 μM concentration after 48 h. Treatment of CD133+ cells with 3-bromopyruvate caused reduction in cell population and cell size, membrane bubbling, and degradation of cell membranes. Hoechst 33258 staining showed condensation of chromatin material and fragmentation of DNA in treated CD133+ cells after 48 h. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited the migration rate of CD133+ cells significantly compared to the parental cells. Flow cytometry revealed that exposure of CD133+ cells to 3-bromopyruvate increased the cell population in S phase from 24.5 to 37.9 % with increase in time from 12 to 48 h. In addition, 3-bromopyruvate significantly enhanced the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3 in CD133+ cells compared to the parental cells. Therefore, 3-bromopyruvate is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of glioma by targeting stem cells selectively.

  11. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of cancer stem-like side population cells in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Long; Wu, Jian-Bing; Yi, Feng-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies in cancer biology suggest that chemotherapeutic drug resistance and tumor relapse are driven by cells within a tumor termed 'cancer stem cells'. In the present study, a Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion technique was used to identify cancer stem‑like side population (SP) cells in colon carcinoma, which accounted for 3.4% of the total cell population. Following treatment with verapamil, the population of SP cells was reduced to 0.6%. In addition, the sorted SP cells exhibited marked multidrug resistance and enhanced cell survival rates compared with non‑SP cells. The SP cells were able to generate more tumor spheres and were CD133 positive. Subsequent biochemical analysis revealed that the levels of the adenosine triphosphate‑binding cassette sub‑family G member 2 transporter protein, B‑cell lymphoma anti‑apoptotic factor and autocrine production of interleukin‑4 were significantly enhanced in the colon cancer SP cells, which contributed to drug resistance, protection of the cells from apoptosis and tumor recurrence. Therefore, the findings suggested that treatment failure and colon tumorigenesis is dictated by a small population of SP cells, which indicate a potential target in future therapies.

  12. Gene expression heterogeneities in embryonic stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Arias, Alfonso; Brickman, Joshua M

    2011-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells are populations of cells that retain the capacity to populate specific lineages and to transit this capacity through cell division. However, attempts to define markers for stem cells have met with limited success. Here we consider whether this limited success reflects...... an intrinsic requirement for heterogeneity with stem cell populations. We focus on Embryonic Stem (ES) cells, in vitro derived cell lines from the early embryo that are considered both pluripotent (able to generate all the lineages of the future embryo) and indefinitely self renewing. We examine the relevance...... of recently reported heterogeneities in ES cells and whether these heterogeneities themselves are inherent requirements of functional potency and self renewal....

  13. A stochastic model of a cell population with quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Peter

    2008-10-01

    A cell population in which cells are allowed to enter a quiescent (nonproliferating) phase is analyzed using a stochastic approach. A general branching process is used to model the population which, under very mild conditions, exhibits balanced exponential growth. A formula is given for the asymptotic fraction of quiescent cells, and a numerical example illustrates how convergence toward the asymptotic fraction exhibits a typical oscillatory pattern. The model is compared with deterministic models based on semigroup analysis of systems of differential equations.

  14. Visualization of multivalent histone modification in a single cell reveals highly concerted epigenetic changes on differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattori, Naoko; Niwa, Tohru; Kimura, Kana;

    2013-01-01

    Combinations of histone modifications have significant biological roles, such as maintenance of pluripotency and cancer development, but cannot be analyzed at the single cell level. Here, we visualized a combination of histone modifications by applying the in situ proximity ligation assay, which....... Bivalent modification was clearly visualized by iChmo in wild-type embryonic stem cells (ESCs) known to have it, whereas rarely in Suz12 knockout ESCs and mouse embryonic fibroblasts known to have little of it. iChmo was applied to analysis of epigenetic and phenotypic changes of heterogeneous cell...... population, namely, ESCs at an early stage of differentiation, and this revealed that the bivalent modification disappeared in a highly concerted manner, whereas phenotypic differentiation proceeded with large variations among cells. Also, using this method, we were able to visualize a combination...

  15. An integrated cell purification and genomics strategy reveals multiple regulators of pancreas development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecil M Benitez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory logic underlying global transcriptional programs controlling development of visceral organs like the pancreas remains undiscovered. Here, we profiled gene expression in 12 purified populations of fetal and adult pancreatic epithelial cells representing crucial progenitor cell subsets, and their endocrine or exocrine progeny. Using probabilistic models to decode the general programs organizing gene expression, we identified co-expressed gene sets in cell subsets that revealed patterns and processes governing progenitor cell development, lineage specification, and endocrine cell maturation. Purification of Neurog3 mutant cells and module network analysis linked established regulators such as Neurog3 to unrecognized gene targets and roles in pancreas development. Iterative module network analysis nominated and prioritized transcriptional regulators, including diabetes risk genes. Functional validation of a subset of candidate regulators with corresponding mutant mice revealed that the transcription factors Etv1, Prdm16, Runx1t1 and Bcl11a are essential for pancreas development. Our integrated approach provides a unique framework for identifying regulatory genes and functional gene sets underlying pancreas development and associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus.

  16. An integrated cell purification and genomics strategy reveals multiple regulators of pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Cecil M; Qu, Kun; Sugiyama, Takuya; Pauerstein, Philip T; Liu, Yinghua; Tsai, Jennifer; Gu, Xueying; Ghodasara, Amar; Arda, H Efsun; Zhang, Jiajing; Dekker, Joseph D; Tucker, Haley O; Chang, Howard Y; Kim, Seung K

    2014-10-01

    The regulatory logic underlying global transcriptional programs controlling development of visceral organs like the pancreas remains undiscovered. Here, we profiled gene expression in 12 purified populations of fetal and adult pancreatic epithelial cells representing crucial progenitor cell subsets, and their endocrine or exocrine progeny. Using probabilistic models to decode the general programs organizing gene expression, we identified co-expressed gene sets in cell subsets that revealed patterns and processes governing progenitor cell development, lineage specification, and endocrine cell maturation. Purification of Neurog3 mutant cells and module network analysis linked established regulators such as Neurog3 to unrecognized gene targets and roles in pancreas development. Iterative module network analysis nominated and prioritized transcriptional regulators, including diabetes risk genes. Functional validation of a subset of candidate regulators with corresponding mutant mice revealed that the transcription factors Etv1, Prdm16, Runx1t1 and Bcl11a are essential for pancreas development. Our integrated approach provides a unique framework for identifying regulatory genes and functional gene sets underlying pancreas development and associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus.

  17. Colonization and persistence of urban ant populations as revealed by joint estimation of kinship and population genetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Junpei; Uchida, Kei; Takami, Yasuoki

    2013-01-01

    The decrease in biodiversity due to increasing urbanization has been well documented, but the processes of colonization and maintenance of wildlife populations in urban areas remain poorly understood. We address this issue using 462 individuals from 10 urban populations of the ant Formica japonica in Kobe City, Japan. We sampled workers regardless of colony identity, genotyped them using 6 microsatellite loci, and estimated allele frequencies and genotypes of reproductive individuals, together with other population genetic parameters, by estimating kinship structure using a likelihood method. Estimated genetic diversity and effective size of populations were not associated with environmental parameters, suggesting that populations are unaffected by urbanization. However, effective population sizes were small, and frequent population bottlenecks were detected. These results suggest that urban F. japonica populations are unstable, and the possibility of frequent extinctions and recolonizations in urban habitats. Populations were moderately differentiated without isolation by distance, suggesting a strong dispersal ability that enables colonization of urban habitats. Dispersal was male biased. Collectively, F. japonica was regarded as an urban adapter, which can colonize urban habitats by virtue of its preference for open ground and high dispersal ability but can persist in urban populations for only a short time, showing a tendency as a temporary urban inhabitant.

  18. Genomic analysis reveals the molecular basis for capsule loss in the group B Streptococcus population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rosini

    Full Text Available The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl transferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity.

  19. Multilocus Sex Determination Revealed in Two Populations of Gynodioecious Wild Strawberry, Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashman, Tia-Lynn; Tennessen, Jacob A; Dalton, Rebecca M; Govindarajulu, Rajanikanth; Koski, Matthew H; Liston, Aaron

    2015-10-19

    Gynodioecy, the coexistence of females and hermaphrodites, occurs in 20% of angiosperm families and often enables transitions between hermaphroditism and dioecy. Clarifying mechanisms of sex determination in gynodioecious species can thus illuminate sexual system evolution. Genetic determination of gynodioecy, however, can be complex and is not fully characterized in any wild species. We used targeted sequence capture to genetically map a novel nuclear contributor to male sterility in a self-pollinated hermaphrodite of Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata from the southern portion of its range. To understand its interaction with another identified locus and possibly additional loci, we performed crosses within and between two populations separated by 2000 km, phenotyped the progeny and sequenced candidate markers at both sex-determining loci. The newly mapped locus contains a high density of pentatricopeptide repeat genes, a class commonly involved in restoration of fertility caused by cytoplasmic male sterility. Examination of all crosses revealed three unlinked epistatically interacting loci that determine sexual phenotype and vary in frequency between populations. Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata represents the first wild gynodioecious species with genomic evidence of both cytoplasmic and nuclear genes in sex determination. We propose a model for the interactions between these loci and new hypotheses for the evolution of sex determining chromosomes in the subdioecious and dioecious Fragaria.

  20. Bayesian coalescent inference reveals high evolutionary rates and diversification of Zika virus populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Alvaro; Soñora, Martín; Moreno, Pilar; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Cristina, Juan

    2016-10-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a member of the family Flaviviridae. In 2015, ZIKV triggered an epidemic in Brazil and spread across Latin America. By May of 2016, the World Health Organization warns over spread of ZIKV beyond this region. Detailed studies on the mode of evolution of ZIKV strains are extremely important for our understanding of the emergence and spread of ZIKV populations. In order to gain insight into these matters, a Bayesian coalescent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of complete genome sequences of recently isolated ZIKV strains was performed. The results of these studies revealed a mean rate of evolution of 1.20 × 10(-3) nucleotide substitutions per site per year (s/s/y) for ZIKV strains enrolled in this study. Several variants isolated in China are grouped together with all strains isolated in Latin America. Another genetic group composed exclusively by Chinese strains were also observed, suggesting the co-circulation of different genetic lineages in China. These findings indicate a high level of diversification of ZIKV populations. Strains isolated from microcephaly cases do not share amino acid substitutions, suggesting that other factors besides viral genetic differences may play a role for the proposed pathogenesis caused by ZIKV infection. J. Med. Virol. 88:1672-1676, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Genomic analysis reveals the molecular basis for capsule loss in the group B Streptococcus population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl transferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity.

  2. Uniparental Markers of Contemporary Italian Population Reveals Details on Its Pre-Roman Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Fondevila, Manuel; Blanco-Verea, Alejandro; Carracedo, Ángel; Pascali, Vincenzo L.; Capelli, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Background According to archaeological records and historical documentation, Italy has been a melting point for populations of different geographical and ethnic matrices. Although Italy has been a favorite subject for numerous population genetic studies, genetic patterns have never been analyzed comprehensively, including uniparental and autosomal markers throughout the country. Methods/Principal Findings A total of 583 individuals were sampled from across the Italian Peninsula, from ten distant (if homogeneous by language) ethnic communities — and from two linguistic isolates (Ladins, Grecani Salentini). All samples were first typed for the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and selected coding region SNPs (mtSNPs). This data was pooled for analysis with 3,778 mtDNA control-region profiles collected from the literature. Secondly, a set of Y-chromosome SNPs and STRs were also analyzed in 479 individuals together with a panel of autosomal ancestry informative markers (AIMs) from 441 samples. The resulting genetic record reveals clines of genetic frequencies laid according to the latitude slant along continental Italy – probably generated by demographical events dating back to the Neolithic. The Ladins showed distinctive, if more recent structure. The Neolithic contribution was estimated for the Y-chromosome as 14.5% and for mtDNA as 10.5%. Y-chromosome data showed larger differentiation between North, Center and South than mtDNA. AIMs detected a minor sub-Saharan component; this is however higher than for other European non-Mediterranean populations. The same signal of sub-Saharan heritage was also evident in uniparental markers. Conclusions/Significance Italy shows patterns of molecular variation mirroring other European countries, although some heterogeneity exists based on different analysis and molecular markers. From North to South, Italy shows clinal patterns that were most likely modulated during Neolithic times. PMID:23251386

  3. Single cell motility and trail formation in populations of microglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Jin

    2009-03-01

    Microglia are a special type of glia cell in brain that has immune responses. They constitute about 20 % of the total glia population within the brain. Compared to other glia cells, microglia are very motile, constantly moving to destroy pathogens and to remove dead neurons. While doing so, they exhibit interesting body shapes, have cell-to-cell communications, and have chemotatic responses to each other. Interestingly, our recent in vitro studies show that their unusual motile behaviors can self-organize to form trails, similar to those in populations of ants. We have studied the changes in the physical properties of these trails by varying the cell population density and by changing the degree of spatial inhomogeneities (``pathogens''). Our experimental observations can be quite faithfully reproduced by a simple mathematical model involving many motile cells whose mechanical motion are driven by actin polymerization and depolymerization process within the individual cell body and by external chemical gradients.

  4. Chick embryo xenograft model reveals a novel perineural niche for human adipose-derived stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid R. Cordeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSC are a heterogeneous cell population that contains adult multipotent stem cells. Although it is well established that hADSC have skeletal potential in vivo in adult organisms, in vitro assays suggest further differentiation capacity, such as into glia. Thus, we propose that grafting hADSC into the embryo can provide them with a much more instructive microenvironment, allowing the human cells to adopt diverse fates or niches. Here, hADSC spheroids were grafted into either the presumptive presomitic mesoderm or the first branchial arch (BA1 regions of chick embryos. Cells were identified without previous manipulations via human-specific Alu probes, which allows efficient long-term tracing of heterogeneous primary cultures. When grafted into the trunk, in contrast to previous studies, hADSC were not found in chondrogenic or osteogenic territories up to E8. Surprisingly, 82.5% of the hADSC were associated with HNK1+ tissues, such as peripheral nerves. Human skin fibroblasts showed a smaller tropism for nerves. In line with other studies, hADSC also adopted perivascular locations. When grafted into the presumptive BA1, 74.6% of the cells were in the outflow tract, the final goal of cardiac neural crest cells, and were also associated with peripheral nerves. This is the first study showing that hADSC could adopt a perineural niche in vivo and were able to recognize cues for neural crest cell migration of the host. Therefore, we propose that xenografts of human cells into chick embryos can reveal novel behaviors of heterogeneous cell populations, such as response to migration cues.

  5. Imbalance of placental regulatory T cell and Th17 cell population dynamics in the FIV-infected pregnant cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudreaux Crystal E

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An appropriate balance in placental regulatory T cells (Tregs, an immunosuppressive cell population, and Th17 cells, a pro-inflammatory cell population, is essential in allowing tolerance of the semi-allogeneic fetus. TGF-β and IL-6 are cytokines that promote differentiation of Tregs and Th17 cells from a common progenitor; aberrant expression of the cytokines may perturb the balance in the two cell populations. We previously reported a pro-inflammatory placental environment with decreased levels of FoxP3, a Treg marker, and increased levels of IL-6 in the placentas of FIV-infected cats at early pregnancy. Thus, we hypothesized that FIV infection in the pregnant cat causes altered placental Treg and Th17 cell populations, possibly resulting in placental inflammation. Methods We examined the effect of FIV infection on Treg and Th17 populations in placentas at early pregnancy using quantitative confocal microscopy to measure FoxP3 or RORγ, a Th17 marker, and qPCR to quantify expression of the key cytokines TGF-β and IL-6. Results FoxP3 and RORγ were positively correlated in FIV-infected placentas at early pregnancy, but not placentas from normal cats, indicating virus-induced alteration in the balance of these cell populations. In control cats the expression of IL-6 and RORγ was positively correlated as predicted, but this relationship was disrupted in infected animals. TGF-β was reduced in infected queens, an occurrence that could dysregulate both Treg and Th17 cell populations. Co-expression analyses revealed a highly significant positive correlation between IL-6 and TGF-β expression in control animals that did not occur in infected animals. Conclusion Collectively, these data point toward potential disruption in the balance of Treg and Th17 cell populations that may contribute to FIV-induced inflammation in the feline placenta.

  6. On interfaces between cell populations with different mobilities

    KAUST Repository

    Lorenzi, Tommaso

    2016-11-18

    Partial differential equations describing the dynamics of cell population densities from a fluid mechanical perspective can model the growth of avascular tumours. In this framework, we consider a system of equations that describes the interaction between a population of dividing cells and a population of non-dividing cells. The two cell populations are characterised by different mobilities. We present the results of numerical simulations displaying two-dimensional spherical waves with sharp interfaces between dividing and non-dividing cells. Furthermore, we numerically observe how different ratios between the mobilities change the morphology of the interfaces, and lead to the emergence of finger-like patterns of invasion above a threshold. Motivated by these simulations, we study the existence of one-dimensional travelling wave solutions.

  7. How does cell size regulation affect population growth?

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of a growing microbial colony is well characterized by the population growth rate. However, at the single-cell level, isogenic cells often exhibit different cell-cycle durations. For evolutionary dynamics, it is thus important to establish the connection between the population growth rate and the heterogeneous single-cell generation time. Existing theories often make the assumption that the generation times of mother and daughter cells are independent. However, it has been shown that to maintain a bounded cell size distribution, cells that grow exponentially at the single-cell level need to adopt cell size regulation, leading to a negative correlation of mother-daughter generation time. In this work, we construct a general framework to describe the population growth in the presence of size regulation. We derive a formula for the population growth rate, which only depends on the variability of single-cell growth rate, independent of other sources of noises. Our work shows that a population ca...

  8. A microfluidic platform reveals differential response of regulatory T cells to micropatterned costimulation arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joung-Hyun; Dustin, Michael L; Kam, Lance C

    2015-11-01

    T cells are key mediators of adaptive immunity. However, the overall immune response is often directed by minor subpopulations of this heterogeneous family of cells, owing to specificity of activation and amplification of functional response. Knowledge of differences in signaling and function between T cell subtypes is far from complete, but is clearly needed for understanding and ultimately leveraging this branch of the adaptive immune response. This report investigates differences in cell response to micropatterned surfaces by conventional and regulatory T cells. Specifically, the ability of cells to respond to the microscale geometry of TCR/CD3 and CD28 engagement is made possible using a magnetic-microfluidic device that overcomes limitations in imaging efficiency associated with conventional microscopy equipment. This device can be readily assembled onto micropatterned surfaces while maintaining the activity of proteins and other biomolecules necessary for such studies. In operation, a target population of cells is tagged using paramagnetic beads, and then trapped in a divergent magnetic field within the chamber. Following washing, the target cells are released to interact with a designated surface. Characterization of this system with mouse CD4(+) T cells demonstrated a 50-fold increase in target-to-background cell purity, with an 80% collection efficiency. Applying this approach to CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, it is then demonstrated that these rare cells respond less selectively to micro-scale features of anti-CD3 antibodies than CD4(+)CD25(-) conventional T cells, revealing a difference in balance between TCR/CD3 and LFA-1-based adhesion. PKC-θ localized to the distal pole of regulatory T cells, away from the cell-substrate interface, suggests a mechanism for differential regulation of TCR/LFA-1-based adhesion. Moreover, specificity of cell adhesion to anti-CD3 features was dependent on the relative position of anti-CD28 signaling within the cell

  9. Single-Cell Expression Profiling Reveals a Dynamic State of Cardiac Precursor Cells in the Early Mouse Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinopoulos, Ioannis; Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Ruchaya, Prashant; Cabrera, Claudia; Struebig, Monika; Barnes, Michael; Terry, Anna; Kaneko, Masahiro; Shintani, Yasunori; Coppen, Steven; Shiratori, Hidetaka; Ameen, Torath; Mein, Charles; Hamada, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ken; Yashiro, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    In the early vertebrate embryo, cardiac progenitor/precursor cells (CPs) give rise to cardiac structures. Better understanding their biological character is critical to understand the heart development and to apply CPs for the clinical arena. However, our knowledge remains incomplete. With the use of single-cell expression profiling, we have now revealed rapid and dynamic changes in gene expression profiles of the embryonic CPs during the early phase after their segregation from the cardiac mesoderm. Progressively, the nascent mesodermal gene Mesp1 terminated, and Nkx2-5+/Tbx5+ population rapidly replaced the Tbx5low+ population as the expression of the cardiac genes Tbx5 and Nkx2-5 increased. At the Early Headfold stage, Tbx5-expressing CPs gradually showed a unique molecular signature with signs of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Lineage-tracing revealed a developmentally distinct characteristic of this population. They underwent progressive differentiation only towards the cardiomyocyte lineage corresponding to the first heart field rather than being maintained as a progenitor pool. More importantly, Tbx5 likely plays an important role in a transcriptional network to regulate the distinct character of the FHF via a positive feedback loop to activate the robust expression of Tbx5 in CPs. These data expands our knowledge on the behavior of CPs during the early phase of cardiac development, subsequently providing a platform for further study.

  10. Single-Cell Expression Profiling Reveals a Dynamic State of Cardiac Precursor Cells in the Early Mouse Embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Kokkinopoulos

    Full Text Available In the early vertebrate embryo, cardiac progenitor/precursor cells (CPs give rise to cardiac structures. Better understanding their biological character is critical to understand the heart development and to apply CPs for the clinical arena. However, our knowledge remains incomplete. With the use of single-cell expression profiling, we have now revealed rapid and dynamic changes in gene expression profiles of the embryonic CPs during the early phase after their segregation from the cardiac mesoderm. Progressively, the nascent mesodermal gene Mesp1 terminated, and Nkx2-5+/Tbx5+ population rapidly replaced the Tbx5low+ population as the expression of the cardiac genes Tbx5 and Nkx2-5 increased. At the Early Headfold stage, Tbx5-expressing CPs gradually showed a unique molecular signature with signs of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Lineage-tracing revealed a developmentally distinct characteristic of this population. They underwent progressive differentiation only towards the cardiomyocyte lineage corresponding to the first heart field rather than being maintained as a progenitor pool. More importantly, Tbx5 likely plays an important role in a transcriptional network to regulate the distinct character of the FHF via a positive feedback loop to activate the robust expression of Tbx5 in CPs. These data expands our knowledge on the behavior of CPs during the early phase of cardiac development, subsequently providing a platform for further study.

  11. Metagenomics reveals pervasive bacterial populations and reduced community diversity across the Alaska tundra ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Robert Johnston

    2016-04-01

    , our results revealed that Alaska tundra microbial communities are less diverse and more homogenous across spatial scales than previously anticipated, and provided DNA sequences of abundant populations and genes that would be relevant for future studies of the effects of environmental change on tundra ecosystems.

  12. Tissue-resident adult stem cell populations of rapidly self-renewing organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Bartfeld, S.; Clevers, H.

    2010-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine, stomach, and skin is continuously exposed to environmental assault, imposing a requirement for regular self-renewal. Resident adult stem cell populations drive this renewal, and much effort has been invested in revealing their identity. Reliable adult stem cel

  13. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-29

    The 'neural plate border' of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure.

  14. Population-based metagenomics analysis reveals markers for gut microbiome composition and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhernakova, Alexandra; Kurilshikov, Alexander; Bonder, Marc Jan; Tigchelaar, Ettje F; Schirmer, Melanie; Vatanen, Tommi; Mujagic, Zlatan; Vila, Arnau Vich; Falony, Gwen; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Wang, Jun; Imhann, Floris; Brandsma, Eelke; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Joossens, Marie; Cenit, Maria Carmen; Deelen, Patrick; Swertz, Morris A; Weersma, Rinse K; Feskens, Edith J M; Netea, Mihai G; Gevers, Dirk; Jonkers, Daisy; Franke, Lude; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Huttenhower, Curtis; Raes, Jeroen; Hofker, Marten H; Xavier, Ramnik J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Fu, Jingyuan

    2016-04-29

    Deep sequencing of the gut microbiomes of 1135 participants from a Dutch population-based cohort shows relations between the microbiome and 126 exogenous and intrinsic host factors, including 31 intrinsic factors, 12 diseases, 19 drug groups, 4 smoking categories, and 60 dietary factors. These factors collectively explain 18.7% of the variation seen in the interindividual distance of microbial composition. We could associate 110 factors to 125 species and observed that fecal chromogranin A (CgA), a protein secreted by enteroendocrine cells, was exclusively associated with 61 microbial species whose abundance collectively accounted for 53% of microbial composition. Low CgA concentrations were seen in individuals with a more diverse microbiome. These results are an important step toward a better understanding of environment-diet-microbe-host interactions.

  15. Population genetics of Phytophthora infestans in Denmark reveals dominantly clonal populations and specific alleles linked to metalaxyl-M resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, Melanie Sarah; Nielsen, B.J.; Schmidt, S.G.;

    2016-01-01

    population of P. infestans was characterized over the course of the 2013 growing season, as was the population genetic structure, using simple sequence repeat (SSR) genotypes and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based mitochondrial haplotyping of over 80 isolates. Both mating types A1 and A2 were present......Control of the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans relies heavily on chemicals. The fungicide metalaxyl-M (Mefenoxam) has played an important role in controlling the disease, but insensitivity to the fungicide in certain isolates is now of major concern. A genetic basis...... for resistance to metalaxyl suggests the possibility for linking resistance phenotypes to specific population genetic markers, but in order to do this, the population genetic structure and mode of reproduction in a population must first be well described. The dynamics of metalaxyl-M resistance in the Danish...

  16. Autosomal resequence data reveal Late Stone Age signals of population expansion in sub-Saharan African foraging and farming populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray P Cox

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A major unanswered question in the evolution of Homo sapiens is when anatomically modern human populations began to expand: was demographic growth associated with the invention of particular technologies or behavioral innovations by hunter-gatherers in the Late Pleistocene, or with the acquisition of farming in the Neolithic? METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigate the timing of human population expansion by performing a multilocus analysis of > or = 20 unlinked autosomal noncoding regions, each consisting of approximately 6 kilobases, resequenced in approximately 184 individuals from 7 human populations. We test the hypothesis that the autosomal polymorphism data fit a simple two-phase growth model, and when the hypothesis is not rejected, we fit parameters of this model to our data using approximate Bayesian computation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data from the three surveyed non-African populations (French Basque, Chinese Han, and Melanesians are inconsistent with the simple growth model, presumably because they reflect more complex demographic histories. In contrast, data from all four sub-Saharan African populations fit the two-phase growth model, and a range of onset times and growth rates is inferred for each population. Interestingly, both hunter-gatherers (San and Biaka and food-producers (Mandenka and Yorubans best fit models with population growth beginning in the Late Pleistocene. Moreover, our hunter-gatherer populations show a tendency towards slightly older and stronger growth (approximately 41 thousand years ago, approximately 13-fold than our food-producing populations (approximately 31 thousand years ago, approximately 7-fold. These dates are concurrent with the appearance of the Late Stone Age in Africa, supporting the hypothesis that population growth played a significant role in the evolution of Late Pleistocene human cultures.

  17. Controlling the diversity of cell populations in a stem cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  18. Influence of molecular noise on the growth of single cells and bacterial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mischa Schmidt

    Full Text Available During the last decades experimental studies have revealed that single cells of a growing bacterial population are significantly exposed to molecular noise. Important sources for noise are low levels of metabolites and enzymes that cause significant statistical variations in the outcome of biochemical reactions. In this way molecular noise affects biological processes such as nutrient uptake, chemotactic tumbling behavior, or gene expression of genetically identical cells. These processes give rise to significant cell-to-cell variations of many directly observable quantities such as protein levels, cell sizes or individual doubling times. In this study we theoretically explore if there are evolutionary benefits of noise for a growing population of bacteria. We analyze different situations where noise is either suppressed or where it affects single cell behavior. We consider two specific examples that have been experimentally observed in wild-type Escherichia coli cells: (i the precision of division site placement (at which molecular noise is highly suppressed and (ii the occurrence of noise-induced phenotypic variations in fluctuating environments. Surprisingly, our analysis reveals that in these specific situations both regulatory schemes [i.e. suppression of noise in example (i and allowance of noise in example (ii] do not lead to an increased growth rate of the population. Assuming that the observed regulatory schemes are indeed caused by the presence of noise our findings indicate that the evolutionary benefits of noise are more subtle than a simple growth advantage for a bacterial population in nutrient rich conditions.

  19. Emergence of cytotoxic resistance in cancer cell populations: Single-cell mechanisms and population-level consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Tommaso; Chisholm, Rebecca H.; Lorz, Alexander; Larsen, Annette K.; de Almeida, Luís Neves; Escargueil, Alexandre; Clairambault, Jean

    2016-06-01

    We formulate an individual-based model and a population model of phenotypic evolution, under cytotoxic drugs, in a cancer cell population structured by the expression levels of survival-potential and proliferation-potential. We apply these models to a recently studied experimental system. Our results suggest that mechanisms based on fundamental laws of biology can reversibly push an actively-proliferating, and drug-sensitive, cell population to transition into a weakly-proliferative and drug-tolerant state, which will eventually facilitate the emergence of more potent, proliferating and drug-tolerant cells.

  20. A focus on parietal cells as a renewing cell population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sherif; M; Karam

    2010-01-01

    The fact that the acidsecreting parietal cells undergo continuous renewal has been ignored by many gastroenterologists and cell biologists. In the past, it was thought that these cells were static. However, by using 3Hthymidine radioautography in combination with electron microscopy, it was possible to demonstrate that parietal cells belong to a continuously renewing epithelial cell lineage. In the gastric glands, stem cells anchored in the isthmus region are responsible for the production of parietal cells...

  1. In vivo epigenomic profiling of germ cells reveals germ cell molecular signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jia-Hui; Kumar, Vibhor; Muratani, Masafumi; Kraus, Petra; Yeo, Jia-Chi; Yaw, Lai-Ping; Xue, Kun; Lufkin, Thomas; Prabhakar, Shyam; Ng, Huck-Hui

    2013-02-11

    The limited number of in vivo germ cells poses an impediment to genome-wide studies. Here, we applied a small-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) method on purified mouse fetal germ cells to generate genome-wide maps of four histone modifications (H3K4me3, H3K27me3, H3K27ac, and H2BK20ac). Comparison of active chromatin state between somatic, embryonic stem, and germ cells revealed promoters and enhancers needed for stem cell maintenance and germ cell development. We found the nuclear receptor Nr5a2 motif to be enriched at a subset of germ cell cis-regulatory regions, and our results implicate Nr5a2 in germ cell biology. Interestingly, in germ cells, the H3K27me3 histone modification occurs more frequently at regions that are enriched for retrotransposons and MHC genes, indicating that these loci are specifically silenced in germ cells. Together, our study provides genome-wide histone modification maps of in vivo germ cells and reveals the molecular chromatin signatures of germ cells.

  2. Compartmental genomics in living cells revealed by single-cell nanobiopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Paolo; Maalouf, Michelle M; Kim, Hyunsung John; Lohith, Akshar; Vilozny, Boaz; Seger, R Adam; Pourmand, Nader

    2014-01-28

    The ability to study the molecular biology of living single cells in heterogeneous cell populations is essential for next generation analysis of cellular circuitry and function. Here, we developed a single-cell nanobiopsy platform based on scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) for continuous sampling of intracellular content from individual cells. The nanobiopsy platform uses electrowetting within a nanopipette to extract cellular material from living cells with minimal disruption of the cellular milieu. We demonstrate the subcellular resolution of the nanobiopsy platform by isolating small subpopulations of mitochondria from single living cells, and quantify mutant mitochondrial genomes in those single cells with high throughput sequencing technology. These findings may provide the foundation for dynamic subcellular genomic analysis.

  3. Multilocus genotyping reveals high heterogeneity and strong local population structure of the Plasmodium vivax population in the Peruvian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez Hugo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peru is one of the Latin American countries with the highest malaria burden, mainly due to Plasmodium vivax infections. However, little is known about P. vivax transmission dynamics in the Peruvian Amazon, where most malaria cases occur. The genetic diversity and population structure of P. vivax isolates collected in different communities around Iquitos city, the capital of the Peruvian Amazon, was determined. Methods Plasmodium vivax population structure was determined by multilocus genotyping with 16 microsatellites on 159 P. vivax infected blood samples (mono-infections collected in four sites around Iquitos city. The population characteristics were assessed only in samples with monoclonal infections (n = 94, and the genetic diversity was determined by calculating the expected heterozygosity and allelic richness. Both linkage disequilibrium and the genetic differentiation (θ were estimated. Results The proportion of polyclonal infections varied substantially by site (11% - 70%, with the expected heterozygosity ranging between 0.44 and 0.69; no haplotypes were shared between the different populations. Linkage disequilibrium was present in all populations (IAS 0.14 - 0.61 but was higher in those with fewer polyclonal infections, suggesting inbreeding and a clonal population structure. Strong population differentiation (θ = 0.45 was found and the Bayesian inference cluster analysis identified six clusters based on distinctive allele frequencies. Conclusion The P. vivax populations circulating in the Peruvian Amazon basin are genetically diverse, strongly differentiated and they have a low effective recombination rate. These results are in line with the low and clustered pattern of malaria transmission observed in the region around Iquitos city.

  4. Tumorigenicity of hypoxic respiring cancer cells revealed by a hypoxia–cell cycle dual reporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Anne; Stine, Zachary E.; Nguyen, Christopher; Afzal, Junaid; Sun, Peng; Hamaker, Max; Siegel, Nicholas M.; Gouw, Arvin M.; Kang, Byung-hak; Yu, Shu-Han; Cochran, Rory L.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Song, Hongjun; Dang, Chi V.

    2014-01-01

    Although aerobic glycolysis provides an advantage in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment, some cancer cells can also respire via oxidative phosphorylation. These respiring (“non-Warburg”) cells were previously thought not to play a key role in tumorigenesis and thus fell from favor in the literature. We sought to determine whether subpopulations of hypoxic cancer cells have different metabolic phenotypes and gene-expression profiles that could influence tumorigenicity and therapeutic response, and we therefore developed a dual fluorescent protein reporter, HypoxCR, that detects hypoxic [hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) active] and/or cycling cells. Using HEK293T cells as a model, we identified four distinct hypoxic cell populations by flow cytometry. The non-HIF/noncycling cell population expressed a unique set of genes involved in mitochondrial function. Relative to the other subpopulations, these hypoxic “non-Warburg” cells had highest oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial capacity consistent with increased mitochondrial respiration. We found that these respiring cells were unexpectedly tumorigenic, suggesting that continued respiration under limiting oxygen conditions may be required for tumorigenicity. PMID:25114222

  5. Concise Review: Stem Cell Population Biology: Insights from Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Adam L; Lo Celso, Cristina; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are fundamental to human life and offer great therapeutic potential, yet their biology remains incompletely-or in cases even poorly-understood. The field of stem cell biology has grown substantially in recent years due to a combination of experimental and theoretical contributions: the experimental branch of this work provides data in an ever-increasing number of dimensions, while the theoretical branch seeks to determine suitable models of the fundamental stem cell processes that these data describe. The application of population dynamics to biology is amongst the oldest applications of mathematics to biology, and the population dynamics perspective continues to offer much today. Here we describe the impact that such a perspective has made in the field of stem cell biology. Using hematopoietic stem cells as our model system, we discuss the approaches that have been used to study their key properties, such as capacity for self-renewal, differentiation, and cell fate lineage choice. We will also discuss the relevance of population dynamics in models of stem cells and cancer, where competition naturally emerges as an influential factor on the temporal evolution of cell populations. Stem Cells 2017;35:80-88.

  6. Nonequilibrium population dynamics of phenotype conversion of cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Xu Zhou

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is a dynamic biological process that involves distinct cancer cell subpopulations proliferating at different rates and interconverting between them. In this paper we proposed a mathematical framework of population dynamics that considers both distinctive growth rates and intercellular transitions between cancer cell populations. Our mathematical framework showed that both growth and transition influence the ratio of cancer cell subpopulations but the latter is more significant. We derived the condition that different cancer cell types can maintain distinctive subpopulations and we also explain why there always exists a stable fixed ratio after cell sorting based on putative surface markers. The cell fraction ratio can be shifted by changing either the growth rates of the subpopulations (Darwinism selection or by environment-instructed transitions (Lamarckism induction. This insight can help us to understand the dynamics of the heterogeneity of cancer cells and lead us to new strategies to overcome cancer drug resistance.

  7. Human embryonic stem cell lines derived from the Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Fu FANG; Fan JIN; Hui GAI; Ying CHEN; Li WU; Ai Lian LIU; Bin CHEN; Hui Zhen SHENG

    2005-01-01

    Six human embryonic stem cell lines were established from surplus blastocysts. The cell lines expressed alkaline phosphatase and molecules typical of primate embryonic stem cells, including Oct-4, Nanog, TDGF1, Sox2, EBAF,Thy-1, FGF4, Rex-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81. Five of the six lines formed embryoid bodies that expressed markers of a variety of cell types; four of them formed teratomas with tissue types representative of all three embryonic germ layers. These human embryonic stem cells are capable of producing clones of undifferentiated morphology, and one of them was propagated to become a subline. Human embryonic stem cell lines from the Chinese population should facilitate stem cell research and may be valuable in studies of population genetics and ecology.

  8. Changes in the population of perivascular cells in the bone tissue remodeling zones under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkova, Olena; Rodionova, Natalia; Shevel, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Microgravity and long-term hypokinesia induce reduction both in bone mass and mineral saturation, which can lead to the development of osteoporosis and osteopenia. (Oganov, 2003). Reorganizations and adaptive remodeling processes in the skeleton bones occur in the topographical interconnection with blood capillaries and perivascular cells. Radioautographic studies with 3H- thymidine (Kimmel, Fee, 1980; Rodionova, 1989, 2006) have shown that in osteogenesis zones there is sequential differentiation process of the perivascular cells into osteogenic. Hence the study of populations of perivascular stromal cells in areas of destructive changes is actual. Perivascular cells from metaphysis of the rat femoral bones under conditions of modeling microgravity were studied using electron microscopy and cytochemistry (hindlimb unloading, 28 days duration) and biosatellite «Bion-M1» (duration of flight from April 19 till May 19, 2013 on C57, black mice). It was revealed that both control and test groups populations of the perivascular cells are not homogeneous in remodeling adaptive zones. These populations comprise of adjacent to endothelium poorly differentiated forms and isolated cells with signs of differentiation (specific increased volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm). Majority of the perivascular cells in the control group (modeling microgravity) reveals reaction to alkaline phosphatase (marker of the osteogenic differentiation). In poorly differentiated cells this reaction is registered in nucleolus, nucleous and cytoplasm. In differentiating cells activity of the alkaline phosphatase is also detected on the outer surface of the cellular membrane. Unlike the control group in the bones of experimental animals reaction to the alkaline phosphatase is registered not in all cells of perivascular population. Part of the differentiating perivascular cells does not contain a product of the reaction. Under microgravity some poorly differentiated perivascular

  9. Modelling of Yeast Mating Reveals Robustness Strategies for Cell-Cell Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitao Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mating of budding yeast cells is a model system for studying cell-cell interactions. Haploid yeast cells secrete mating pheromones that are sensed by the partner which responds by growing a mating projection toward the source. The two projections meet and fuse to form the diploid. Successful mating relies on precise coordination of dynamic extracellular signals, signaling pathways, and cell shape changes in a noisy background. It remains elusive how cells mate accurately and efficiently in a natural multi-cell environment. Here we present the first stochastic model of multiple mating cells whose morphologies are driven by pheromone gradients and intracellular signals. Our novel computational framework encompassed a moving boundary method for modeling both a-cells and α-cells and their cell shape changes, the extracellular diffusion of mating pheromones dynamically coupled with cell polarization, and both external and internal noise. Quantification of mating efficiency was developed and tested for different model parameters. Computer simulations revealed important robustness strategies for mating in the presence of noise. These strategies included the polarized secretion of pheromone, the presence of the α-factor protease Bar1, and the regulation of sensing sensitivity; all were consistent with data in the literature. In addition, we investigated mating discrimination, the ability of an a-cell to distinguish between α-cells either making or not making α-factor, and mating competition, in which multiple a-cells compete to mate with one α-cell. Our simulations were consistent with previous experimental results. Moreover, we performed a combination of simulations and experiments to estimate the diffusion rate of the pheromone a-factor. In summary, we constructed a framework for simulating yeast mating with multiple cells in a noisy environment, and used this framework to reproduce mating behaviors and to identify strategies for robust cell-cell

  10. Genetic divergence of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) populations in Serbia revealed by RAPD

    OpenAIRE

    Lučić A.; Isajev V.; Rakonjac L.; Ristić Danijela; Kostadinović Marija; Babić Vojka; Nikolić Ana

    2011-01-01

    The ability of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to distinguish among Scots pine populations from Serbia was evaluated. Sixteen arbitrary 10-mer primers employed in the analysis produced 54 fragments of which 21 were polymorphic (38.89%). Certain rare and genotype-specific bands were identified which could be effectively used to distinguish between the populations. Polymorphism in RAPD markers among P. sylvestris populations was high and sufficient to distinguish each of the popul...

  11. Emergence of cytotoxic resistance in cancer cell populations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzi Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We formulate an individual-based model and an integro-differential model of phenotypic evolution, under cytotoxic drugs, in a cancer cell population structured by the expression levels of survival-potential and proliferation-potential. We apply these models to a recently studied experimental system. Our results suggest that mechanisms based on fundamental laws of biology can reversibly push an actively-proliferating, and drug-sensitive, cell population to transition into a weakly-proliferative and drug-tolerant state, which will eventually facilitate the emergence of more potent, proliferating and drug-tolerant cells.

  12. Population-based resequencing of experimentally evolved populations reveals the genetic basis of body size variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Thomas L Turner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Body size is a classic quantitative trait with evolutionarily significant variation within many species. Locating the alleles responsible for this variation would help understand the maintenance of variation in body size in particular, as well as quantitative traits in general. However, successful genome-wide association of genotype and phenotype may require very large sample sizes if alleles have low population frequencies or modest effects. As a complementary approach, we propose that population-based resequencing of experimentally evolved populations allows for considerable power to map functional variation. Here, we use this technique to investigate the genetic basis of natural variation in body size in Drosophila melanogaster. Significant differentiation of hundreds of loci in replicate selection populations supports the hypothesis that the genetic basis of body size variation is very polygenic in D. melanogaster. Significantly differentiated variants are limited to single genes at some loci, allowing precise hypotheses to be formed regarding causal polymorphisms, while other significant regions are large and contain many genes. By using significantly associated polymorphisms as a priori candidates in follow-up studies, these data are expected to provide considerable power to determine the genetic basis of natural variation in body size.

  13. Genetic sub-structure in western Mediterranean populations revealed by 12 Y-chromosome STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez, V; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Sánchez, J J;

    2008-01-01

    .9988 +/- 0.0002. These Y-STRs markers showed a low capacity of discrimination (56.3%) in the Ibiza population probably due to genetic drift. Comparisons between the populations studied and other neighbouring populations showed a clear genetic sub-structure in the western Mediterranean area....

  14. Long non-coding RNA profiling of human lymphoid progenitor cells reveals transcriptional divergence of B cell and T cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casero, David; Sandoval, Salemiz; Seet, Christopher S; Scholes, Jessica; Zhu, Yuhua; Ha, Vi Luan; Luong, Annie; Parekh, Chintan; Crooks, Gay M

    2015-12-01

    To elucidate the transcriptional 'landscape' that regulates human lymphoid commitment during postnatal life, we used RNA sequencing to assemble the long non-coding transcriptome across human bone marrow and thymic progenitor cells spanning the earliest stages of B lymphoid and T lymphoid specification. Over 3,000 genes encoding previously unknown long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were revealed through the analysis of these rare populations. Lymphoid commitment was characterized by lncRNA expression patterns that were highly stage specific and were more lineage specific than those of protein-coding genes. Protein-coding genes co-expressed with neighboring lncRNA genes showed enrichment for ontologies related to lymphoid differentiation. The exquisite cell-type specificity of global lncRNA expression patterns independently revealed new developmental relationships among the earliest progenitor cells in the human bone marrow and thymus.

  15. Genetic divergence of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. populations in Serbia revealed by RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lučić A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD to distinguish among Scots pine populations from Serbia was evaluated. Sixteen arbitrary 10-mer primers employed in the analysis produced 54 fragments of which 21 were polymorphic (38.89%. Certain rare and genotype-specific bands were identified which could be effectively used to distinguish between the populations. Polymorphism in RAPD markers among P. sylvestris populations was high and sufficient to distinguish each of the populations. The results obtained suggest that RAPD markers are valuable for the genetic divergence estimation in Pinus sylvestris and for the study of divergence among populations.

  16. Analytical cell adhesion chromatography reveals impaired persistence of metastatic cell rolling adhesion to P-selectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaeho; Edwards, Erin E; McClatchey, P Mason; Thomas, Susan N

    2015-10-15

    Selectins facilitate the recruitment of circulating cells from the bloodstream by mediating rolling adhesion, which initiates the cell-cell signaling that directs extravasation into surrounding tissues. To measure the relative efficiency of cell adhesion in shear flow for in vitro drug screening, we designed and implemented a microfluidic-based analytical cell adhesion chromatography system. The juxtaposition of instantaneous rolling velocities with elution times revealed that human metastatic cancer cells, but not human leukocytes, had a reduced capacity to sustain rolling adhesion with P-selectin. We define a new parameter, termed adhesion persistence, which is conceptually similar to migration persistence in the context of chemotaxis, but instead describes the capacity of cells to resist the influence of shear flow and sustain rolling interactions with an adhesive substrate that might modulate the probability of extravasation. Among cell types assayed, adhesion persistence to P-selectin was specifically reduced in metastatic but not leukocyte-like cells in response to a low dose of heparin. In conclusion, we demonstrate this as an effective methodology to identify selectin adhesion antagonist doses that modulate homing cell adhesion and engraftment in a cell-subtype-selective manner.

  17. Population genomics reveals that an anthropophilic population of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in West Africa recently gave rise to American and Asian populations of this major disease vector

    KAUST Repository

    Crawford, Jacob E.

    2017-02-20

    BackgroundThe mosquito Aedes aegypti is the main vector of dengue, Zika, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. This major disease vector is thought to have arisen when the African subspecies Ae. aegypti formosus evolved from being zoophilic and living in forest habitats into a form that specialises on humans and resides near human population centres. The resulting domestic subspecies, Ae. aegypti aegypti, is found throughout the tropics and largely blood-feeds on humans.ResultsTo understand this transition, we have sequenced the exomes of mosquitoes collected from five populations from around the world. We found that Ae. aegypti specimens from an urban population in Senegal in West Africa were more closely related to populations in Mexico and Sri Lanka than they were to a nearby forest population. We estimate that the populations in Senegal and Mexico split just a few hundred years ago, and we found no evidence of Ae. aegypti aegypti mosquitoes migrating back to Africa from elsewhere in the tropics. The out-of-Africa migration was accompanied by a dramatic reduction in effective population size, resulting in a loss of genetic diversity and rare genetic variants.ConclusionsWe conclude that a domestic population of Ae. aegypti in Senegal and domestic populations on other continents are more closely related to each other than to other African populations. This suggests that an ancestral population of Ae. aegypti evolved to become a human specialist in Africa, giving rise to the subspecies Ae. aegypti aegypti. The descendants of this population are still found in West Africa today, and the rest of the world was colonised when mosquitoes from this population migrated out of Africa. This is the first report of an African population of Ae. aegypti aegypti mosquitoes that is closely related to Asian and American populations. As the two subspecies differ in their ability to vector disease, their existence side by side in West Africa may have important implications for

  18. Quantification of cell edge velocities and traction forces reveals distinct motility modules during cell spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Dubin-Thaler

    Full Text Available Actin-based cell motility and force generation are central to immune response, tissue development, and cancer metastasis, and understanding actin cytoskeleton regulation is a major goal of cell biologists. Cell spreading is a commonly used model system for motility experiments -- spreading fibroblasts exhibit stereotypic, spatially-isotropic edge dynamics during a reproducible sequence of functional phases: 1 During early spreading, cells form initial contacts with the surface. 2 The middle spreading phase exhibits rapidly increasing attachment area. 3 Late spreading is characterized by periodic contractions and stable adhesions formation. While differences in cytoskeletal regulation between phases are known, a global analysis of the spatial and temporal coordination of motility and force generation is missing. Implementing improved algorithms for analyzing edge dynamics over the entire cell periphery, we observed that a single domain of homogeneous cytoskeletal dynamics dominated each of the three phases of spreading. These domains exhibited a unique combination of biophysical and biochemical parameters -- a motility module. Biophysical characterization of the motility modules revealed that the early phase was dominated by periodic, rapid membrane blebbing; the middle phase exhibited continuous protrusion with very low traction force generation; and the late phase was characterized by global periodic contractions and high force generation. Biochemically, each motility module exhibited a different distribution of the actin-related protein VASP, while inhibition of actin polymerization revealed different dependencies on barbed-end polymerization. In addition, our whole-cell analysis revealed that many cells exhibited heterogeneous combinations of motility modules in neighboring regions of the cell edge. Together, these observations support a model of motility in which regions of the cell edge exhibit one of a limited number of motility modules

  19. Post-bottleneck genetic diversity of elephant populations in South Africa, revealed using microsatellite analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, A M; Harley, E H

    2001-09-01

    Widespread hunting had fragmented and severely reduced elephant populations in South Africa by 1900. Elephant numbers increased during the 1900s, although rates of recovery of individual populations varied. The Kruger National Park elephant population increased rapidly, to more than 6000 by 1967, with recruitment boosted by immigration from Mozambique. The Addo Elephant National Park population was reduced to 11 elephants in 1931 and remains relatively small (n = 325). Loss of genetic variation is expected to occur whenever a population goes through a bottleneck, especially when post-bottleneck recovery is slow. Variation at nine polymorphic microsatellite loci was analysed for Kruger and Addo elephants, as well as museum specimens of Addo elephants shot prior to the population bottleneck. Significantly reduced genetic variation and heterozygosity were observed in Addo in comparison to Kruger (mean alleles/locus and H(E): Addo 1.89, 0.18; Kruger 3.89, 0.44). Two alleles not present in the current Addo population were observed in the museum specimens. Addo elephants represent a genetic subset of the Kruger population, with high levels of genetic differentiation resulting from rapid genetic drift. The Kruger population is low in genetic diversity in comparison to East African elephants, confirming this population also suffered an appreciable bottleneck.

  20. Population genetic studies revealed local adaptation in a high gene-flow marine fish, the small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Wang

    Full Text Available The genetic differentiation of many marine fish species is low. Yet local adaptation may be common in marine fish species as the vast and changing marine environment provides more chances for natural selection. Here, we used anonymous as well as known protein gene linked microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA to detect the population structure of the small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis in the Northwest Pacific marginal seas. Among these loci, we detected at least two microsatellites, anonymous H16 and HSP27 to be clearly under diversifying selection in outlier tests. Sequence cloning and analysis revealed that H16 was located in the intron of BAHCC1 gene. Landscape genetic analysis showed that H16 mutations were significantly associated with temperature, which further supported the diversifying selection at this locus. These marker types presented different patterns of population structure: (i mitochondrial DNA phylogeny showed no evidence of genetic divergence and demonstrated only one glacial linage; (ii population differentiation using putatively neutral microsatellites presented a pattern of high gene flow in the L. polyactis. In addition, several genetic barriers were identified; (iii the population differentiation pattern revealed by loci under diversifying selection was rather different from that revealed by putatively neutral loci. The results above suggest local adaptation in the small yellow croaker. In summary, population genetic studies based on different marker types disentangle the effects of demographic history, migration, genetic drift and local adaptation on population structure and also provide valuable new insights for the design of management strategies in L. polyactis.

  1. Reproducible isolation of lymph node stromal cells reveals site-dependent differences in fibroblastic reticular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L Fletcher

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Within lymph nodes, non-hematopoietic stromal cells organize and interact with leukocytes in an immunologically important manner. In addition to organizing T and B cell segregation and expressing lymphocyte survival factors, several recent studies have shown that lymph node stromal cells shape the naïve T cell repertoire, expressing self-antigens which delete self-reactive T cells in a unique and non-redundant fashion. A fundamental role in peripheral tolerance, in addition to an otherwise extensive functional portfolio, necessitates closer study of lymph node stromal cell subsets using modern immunological techniques; however this has not routinely been possible in the field, due to difficulties reproducibly isolating these rare subsets. Techniques were therefore developed for successful ex vivo and in vitro manipulation and characterization of lymph node stroma. Here we discuss and validate these techniques in mice and humans, and apply them to address several unanswered questions regarding lymph node composition. We explored the steady-state stromal composition of lymph nodes isolated from mice and humans, and found that marginal reticular cells and lymphatic endothelial cells required lymphocytes for their normal maturation in mice. We also report alterations in the proportion and number of fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs between skin-draining and mesenteric lymph nodes. Similarly, transcriptional profiling of FRCs revealed changes in cytokine production from these sites. Together, these methods permit highly reproducible stromal cell isolation, sorting, and culture.

  2. Moroccan Leishmania infantum: genetic diversity and population structure as revealed by multi-locus microsatellite typing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Amro

    Full Text Available Leishmania infantum causes Visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis in northern Morocco. It predominantly affects children under 5 years with incidence of 150 cases/year. Genetic variability and population structure have been investigated for 33 strains isolated from infected dogs and humans in Morocco. A multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT approach was used in which a MLMtype based on size variation in 14 independent microsatellite markers was compiled for each strain. MLMT profiles of 10 Tunisian, 10 Algerian and 21 European strains which belonged to zymodeme MON-1 and non-MON-1 according to multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE were included for comparison. A Bayesian model-based approach and phylogenetic analysis inferred two L.infantum sub-populations; Sub-population A consists of 13 Moroccan strains grouped with all European strains of MON-1 type; and sub-population B consists of 15 Moroccan strains grouped with the Tunisian and Algerian MON-1 strains. Theses sub-populations were significantly different from each other and from the Tunisian, Algerian and European non MON-1 strains which constructed one separate population. The presence of these two sub-populations co-existing in Moroccan endemics suggests multiple introduction of L. infantum from/to Morocco; (1 Introduction from/to the neighboring North African countries, (2 Introduction from/to the Europe. These scenarios are supported by the presence of sub-population B and sub-population A respectively. Gene flow was noticed between sub-populations A and B. Five strains showed mixed A/B genotypes indicating possible recombination between the two populations. MLMT has proven to be a powerful tool for eco-epidemiological and population genetic investigations of Leishmania.

  3. Different populations of Wnt-containing vesicles are individually released from polarized epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuhong; Takada, Ritsuko; Noda, Chiyo; Kobayashi, Satoru; Takada, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that exosomes are heterogeneous in molecular composition and physical properties. Here we examined whether epithelial cells secrete a heterogeneous population of exosomes, and if that is the case, whether epithelial cell polarity affects release of different populations of exosomes, especially that of those carrying Wnt. Sucrose-density ultracentrifugation and molecular marker analysis revealed that different populations of exosomes or exosome-like vesicles were released from MDCK cells depending on the cell polarity. Wnt3a associated with these vesicles were detectable in culture media collected from both apical and basolateral sides of the cells. Basolaterally secreted Wnt3a were co-fractionated with a typical exosomal protein TSG101 in fractions having typical exosome densities. In contrast, most of apically secreted Wnt3a, as well as Wnt11, were co-fractionated with CD63 and Hsp70, which are also common to the most exosomes, but recovered in higher density fractions. Wnt3a exhibiting similar floatation behavior to the apically secreted ones were also detectable in the culture media of Wnt3a-expressing L and HEK293 cells. The lipidation of Wnt3a was required for its basolateral secretion in exosomes but was dispensable for the apical one. Thus, epithelial cells release Wnt via distinct populations of vesicles differing in secretion polarity and lipidation dependency. PMID:27765945

  4. Genetic analysis reveals demographic fragmentation of grizzly bears yielding vulnerably small populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Michael F; McLellan, Bruce N; Strobeck, Curtis; Barclay, Robert M R

    2005-11-22

    Ecosystem conservation requires the presence of native carnivores, yet in North America, the distributions of many larger carnivores have contracted. Large carnivores live at low densities and require large areas to thrive at the population level. Therefore, if human-dominated landscapes fragment remaining carnivore populations, small and demographically vulnerable populations may result. Grizzly bear range contraction in the conterminous USA has left four fragmented populations, three of which remain along the Canada-USA border. A tenet of grizzly bear conservation is that the viability of these populations requires demographic linkage (i.e. inter-population movement of both sexes) to Canadian bears. Using individual-based genetic analysis, our results suggest this demographic connection has been severed across their entire range in southern Canada by a highway and associated settlements, limiting female and reducing male movement. Two resulting populations are vulnerably small (bear populations may be more threatened than previously thought and that conservation efforts must expand to include international connectivity management. They also demonstrate the ability of genetic analysis to detect gender-specific demographic population fragmentation in recently disturbed systems, a traditionally intractable yet increasingly important ecological measurement worldwide.

  5. Multiple sex-associated regions and a putative sex chromosome in zebrafish revealed by RAD mapping and population genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Anderson

    Full Text Available Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio, neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate, the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F(2 offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome.

  6. Multiple sex-associated regions and a putative sex chromosome in zebrafish revealed by RAD mapping and population genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jennifer L; Rodríguez Marí, Adriana; Braasch, Ingo; Amores, Angel; Hohenlohe, Paul; Batzel, Peter; Postlethwait, John H

    2012-01-01

    Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate), the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F(2) offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA) wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag) markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome.

  7. Characterization of immune cell populations in oral mucosal tissue of healthy adult cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, R; Gruffydd-Jones, T J; Day, M J

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the leucocyte subsets present in the oral mucosa of healthy cats. Immunohistochemical labelling and computer-assisted morphometric analysis was used to identify expression of MHC class II, CD3, CD79a, IgG, IgM, IgA, and leucocyte antigen L1 (L1) by cells in sections from 19 cats, and expression of CD4 and CD8 by cells in sections from 17 cats. Mast cells were detected by toluidine blue staining. In the epithelial compartment, CD3(+) intraepithelial lymphocytes were detected, and CD8(+) cells were more common than CD4(+) cells. MHC class II labelling revealed intraepithelial and subepithelial cells with a characteristic dendritic morphology. In some sections these dendritic cells were closely associated with subepithelial clusters of CD3(+) T cells containing both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. In the lamina propria and submucosal compartments, the cells most commonly identified were mast cells. CD3(+) T-lymphocytes were also observed, and CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells were detected in similar numbers. L1(+) and CD79(+) cells were detected least frequently. The few plasma cells present were generally found to be either IgG(+) or IgA(+). Within the stroma surrounding the salivary glands, CD79a(+) and IgA(+) cells predominated. Slight epithelial labelling for L1 was seen in some sections. The normal feline oral mucosa clearly contains a range of immune cell populations.

  8. Comparative population genomics of fusarium graminearum reveals adaptive divergence among cereal head blight pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the last decade, a combination of molecular surveillance and population genetic analyses have significantly altered our understanding of Fusarium graminearum, the major FHB pathogen in North America. In addition to the native NA1 population (largely 15ADON toxin type) and the invasive NA2 pop...

  9. Landscape genetics of alpine Sierra Nevada salamanders reveal extreme population subdivision in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Wesley K; Fremier, Alexander K; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2010-08-01

    Quantifying the influence of the landscape on the genetic structure of natural populations remains an important empirical challenge, particularly for poorly studied, ecologically cryptic species. We conducted an extensive microsatellite analysis to examine the population genetics of the southern long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum sigillatum) in a naturally complex landscape. Using spatially explicit modelling, we investigated the influence of the Sierra Nevada topography on potential dispersal corridors between sampled populations. Our results indicate very high-genetic divergence among populations, high within-deme relatedness, and little evidence of recent migration or population admixture. We also discovered unexpectedly high between-year genetic differentiation (F(ST)) for breeding sites, suggesting that breeding groups vary over localized space and time. While environmental factors associated with high-elevation montane habitats apparently play an important role in shaping population differentiation, additional, species-specific biological processes must also be operating to account for observed deviations from temporal, among-year panmixia. Our study emphasizes the population-level insights that can be gained from high-density sampling in space and time, and the highly substructured population biology that may characterize amphibians in extreme montane habitats.

  10. Fundamental limits to collective concentration sensing in cell populations

    CERN Document Server

    Fancher, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The precision of concentration sensing is improved when cells communicate. Here we derive the physical limits to concentration sensing for cells that communicate over short distances by directly exchanging small molecules (juxtacrine signaling), or over longer distances by secreting and sensing a diffusive messenger molecule (autocrine signaling). In the latter case, we find that the optimal cell spacing can be large, due to a tradeoff between maintaining communication strength and reducing signal cross-correlations. This leads to the surprising result that autocrine signaling allows more precise sensing than juxtacrine signaling for sufficiently large populations. We compare our results to data from a wide variety of communicating cell types.

  11. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    The ‘neural plate border’ of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21620.001 PMID:28355135

  12. Evidence of distinct tumour-propagating cell populations with different properties in primary human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Colombo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Increasing evidence that a number of malignancies are characterised by tumour cell heterogeneity has recently been published, but there is still a lack of data concerning liver cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate and characterise tumour-propagating cell (TPC compartments within human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. METHODS: After long-term culture, we identified three morphologically different tumour cell populations in a single HCC specimen, and extensively characterised them by means of flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, karyotyping and microarray analyses, single cell cloning, and xenotransplantation in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ/⁻ mice. RESULTS: The primary cell populations (hcc-1, -2 and -3 and two clones generated by means of limiting dilutions from hcc-1 (clone-1/7 and -1/8 differently expressed a number of tumour-associated stem cell markers, including EpCAM, CD49f, CD44, CD133, CD56, Thy-1, ALDH and CK19, and also showed different doubling times, drug resistance and tumorigenic potential. Moreover, we found that ALDH expression, in combination with CD44 or Thy-1 negativity or CD56 positivity identified subpopulations with a higher clonogenic potential within hcc-1, hcc-2 and hcc-3 primary cell populations, respectively. Karyotyping revealed the clonal evolution of the cell populations and clones within the primary tumour. Importantly, the primary tumour cell population with the greatest tumorigenic potential and drug resistance showed more chromosomal alterations than the others and contained clones with epithelial and mesenchymal features. CONCLUSIONS: Individual HCCs can harbor different self-renewing tumorigenic cell types expressing a variety of morphological and phenotypical markers, karyotypic evolution and different gene expression profiles. This suggests that the models of hepatic carcinogenesis should take into account TPC heterogeneity due to intratumour clonal evolution.

  13. Morphological differences between Pinus mugo Turra populations from the Tatra Mts. revealed by cone traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Bobowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-year-old cones were collected from 388 dwarf mountain pine (Pinus mugo Turra plants of ten populations of this species from the Tatra Mts. - five of them from calcareous and five from calcium-free undersoil. Their 14 morphological traits are described. The data served for performing multivariate analysis of variance and testing of statistical hypotheses, for discriminate analysis. for calculating Mahalanobis distances between populations and plotting a dendrite based on the shortest Mahalanobis distances and for agglomerative clustering by the method of nearest neighbourhood. Wide differences in the populations were found as regards all the studied traits and the existence of two groups in the population, which, do not, however, correlate with the substrate type. The "calcareous and calcium-free" populations show statistically significant differences in six of the 14 studied traits.

  14. Genetic Variation of Three Populations of Indian Frog (Hoplobatrachus tigerinus Revealed by Allozyme Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Belal Hossain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Indian bullfrog, Hoplobatrachus tigerinus plays a significant role in maintaining the natural balance in the ecosystems. It plays an important role in controlling the various agricultural pests because of its omnivorous feeding habit. The aim of the present study is to know the genetic variation of H. tigerinus in three natural habitats. Samples collected from three districts of Bangladesh were analyzed with five enzymes (MDH, LDH, GPI, PGM and EST in CA 6.1 buffer system for their genetic variation. Four polymorphic loci (Mdh-1, Est-1, Gpi-1 and Pgm were interpretable in muscle with starch gel electrophoresis. Among the 5 presumptive loci, the mean proportion of polymorphic loci was observed 80, 80 and 60% in Rangpur, Khulna and Mymensingh populations, respectively. The highest mean number of allele per locus and mean proportion of heterozygous loci per individual were observed in the Rangpur population. The average observed heterozygosity (Ho was 0.163 and expected heterozygosity (He was 0.469. In pair-wise analysis, comparatively higher Nm value (5.507 was estimated between the Rangpur and Khulna populations corresponding lower level of FST value (0.043. The UPGMA dendrogram showed two clusters among the three Indian bullfrog populations. Rangpur and Khulna populations formed one cluster while Mymensingh population formed another cluster. The Mymensingh population separated from Rangpur and Khulna by a genetic distance of 0.177 whereas, the Khulna population is different from the Rangpur population by the genetic distance of 0.052. The results suggested that the considerable genetic variation is maintained among the natural H. tigerinus populations.

  15. Spatial genetic analyses reveal cryptic population structure and migration patterns in a continuously harvested grey wolf (Canis lupus population in north-eastern Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maris Hindrikson

    Full Text Available Spatial genetics is a relatively new field in wildlife and conservation biology that is becoming an essential tool for unravelling the complexities of animal population processes, and for designing effective strategies for conservation and management. Conceptual and methodological developments in this field are therefore critical. Here we present two novel methodological approaches that further the analytical possibilities of STRUCTURE and DResD. Using these approaches we analyse structure and migrations in a grey wolf (Canislupus population in north-eastern Europe. We genotyped 16 microsatellite loci in 166 individuals sampled from the wolf population in Estonia and Latvia that has been under strong and continuous hunting pressure for decades. Our analysis demonstrated that this relatively small wolf population is represented by four genetic groups. We also used a novel methodological approach that uses linear interpolation to statistically test the spatial separation of genetic groups. The new method, which is capable of using program STRUCTURE output, can be applied widely in population genetics to reveal both core areas and areas of low significance for genetic groups. We also used a recently developed spatially explicit individual-based method DResD, and applied it for the first time to microsatellite data, revealing a migration corridor and barriers, and several contact zones.

  16. Ultrastructural observations reveal the presence of channels between cork cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Rita Teresa; Pereira, Helena

    2009-12-01

    The ultrastructure of phellem cells of Quercus suber L. (cork oak) and Calotropis procera (Ait) R. Br. were analyzed using electron transmission microscopy to determine the presence or absence of plasmodesmata (PD). Different types of Q. suber cork samples were studied: one year shoots; virgin cork (first periderm), reproduction cork (traumatic periderm), and wet cork. The channel structures of PD were found in all the samples crossing adjacent cell walls through the suberin layer of the secondary wall. Calotropis phellem also showed PD crossing the cell walls of adjacent cells but in fewer numbers compared to Q. suber. In one year stems of cork oak, it was possible to follow the physiologically active PD with ribosomic accumulation next to the aperture of the channel seen in the phellogen cells to the completely obstructed channels in the dead cells that characterize the phellem tissue.

  17. Local population structure in Arabian Peninsula revealed by Y-STR diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshamali, Farida; Pereira, Luísa; Budowle, Bruce; Poloni, Estella S; Currat, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Genetic studies have been underway on Arabian Peninsula populations because of their pivotal geographic location for population migration and times of occurrence. To assist in better understanding population dynamics in this region, evidence is presented herein on local population structure in the Arabian Peninsula, based on Y-STR characterisation in four Arabian samples and its comparison in a broad geographical scale. Our results demonstrate that geography played an important role in shaping the genetic structure of the region around the Near-East. Populations are grouped regionally but none of these groups is significantly differentiated from others and all groups merge in the Near-East, in keeping with this important migration corridor for the human species. Focusing on the Arabian Peninsula, we show that Dubai and Oman share genetic affinities with other Near-Eastern populations, while Saudi Arabia and Yemen show a relative distinctive isolated background. Those two populations may have been kept relatively separated from migration routes, maybe due to their location in a desert area.

  18. Ultra Deep Sequencing of a Baculovirus Population Reveals Widespread Genomic Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Chateigner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses rely on widespread genetic variation and large population size for adaptation. Large DNA virus populations are thought to harbor little variation though natural populations may be polymorphic. To measure the genetic variation present in a dsDNA virus population, we deep sequenced a natural strain of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus. With 124,221X average genome coverage of our 133,926 bp long consensus, we could detect low frequency mutations (0.025%. K-means clustering was used to classify the mutations in four categories according to their frequency in the population. We found 60 high frequency non-synonymous mutations under balancing selection distributed in all functional classes. These mutants could alter viral adaptation dynamics, either through competitive or synergistic processes. Lastly, we developed a technique for the delimitation of large deletions in next generation sequencing data. We found that large deletions occur along the entire viral genome, with hotspots located in homologous repeat regions (hrs. Present in 25.4% of the genomes, these deletion mutants presumably require functional complementation to complete their infection cycle. They might thus have a large impact on the fitness of the baculovirus population. Altogether, we found a wide breadth of genomic variation in the baculovirus population, suggesting it has high adaptive potential.

  19. Molecular markers reveal limited population genetic structure in a North American corvid, Clark's nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohms, Kimberly M; Burg, Theresa M

    2013-01-01

    The genetic impact of barriers and Pleistocene glaciations on high latitude resident species has not been widely investigated. The Clark's nutcracker is an endemic North American corvid closely associated with Pinus-dominated forests. The nutcracker's encompasses known barriers to dispersal for other species, and glaciated and unglaciated areas. Clark's nutcrackers also irruptively disperse long distances in search of pine seed crops, creating the potential for gene flow among populations. Using the highly variable mitochondrial DNA control region, seven microsatellite loci, and species distribution modeling, we examined the effects of glaciations and dispersal barriers on population genetic patterns and population structure of nutcrackers. We sequenced 900 bp of mitochondrial control region for 169 individuals from 15 populations and analysed seven polymorphic microsatellite loci for 13 populations across the Clark's nutcracker range. We used species distribution modeling and a range of phylogeographic analyses to examine evolutionary history. Clark's nutcracker populations are not highly differentiated throughout their range, suggesting high levels of gene flow among populations, though we did find some evidence of isolation by distance and peripheral isolation. Our analyses suggested expansion from a single refugium after the last glacial maximum, but patterns of genetic diversity and paleodistribution modeling of suitable habitat were inconclusive as to the location of this refugium. Potential barriers to dispersal (e.g. mountain ranges) do not appear to restrict gene flow in Clark's nutcracker, and postglacial expansion likely occurred quickly from a single refugium located south of the ice sheets.

  20. Molecular markers reveal limited population genetic structure in a North American corvid, Clark's nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M Dohms

    Full Text Available The genetic impact of barriers and Pleistocene glaciations on high latitude resident species has not been widely investigated. The Clark's nutcracker is an endemic North American corvid closely associated with Pinus-dominated forests. The nutcracker's encompasses known barriers to dispersal for other species, and glaciated and unglaciated areas. Clark's nutcrackers also irruptively disperse long distances in search of pine seed crops, creating the potential for gene flow among populations. Using the highly variable mitochondrial DNA control region, seven microsatellite loci, and species distribution modeling, we examined the effects of glaciations and dispersal barriers on population genetic patterns and population structure of nutcrackers. We sequenced 900 bp of mitochondrial control region for 169 individuals from 15 populations and analysed seven polymorphic microsatellite loci for 13 populations across the Clark's nutcracker range. We used species distribution modeling and a range of phylogeographic analyses to examine evolutionary history. Clark's nutcracker populations are not highly differentiated throughout their range, suggesting high levels of gene flow among populations, though we did find some evidence of isolation by distance and peripheral isolation. Our analyses suggested expansion from a single refugium after the last glacial maximum, but patterns of genetic diversity and paleodistribution modeling of suitable habitat were inconclusive as to the location of this refugium. Potential barriers to dispersal (e.g. mountain ranges do not appear to restrict gene flow in Clark's nutcracker, and postglacial expansion likely occurred quickly from a single refugium located south of the ice sheets.

  1. Spinal cord injury reveals multilineage differentiation of ependymal cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Meletis; Fanie Barnabé-Heider; Marie Carlén; Emma Evergren; Nikolay Tomilin; Oleg Shupliakov; Jonas Frisén

    2008-01-01

    Author Summary Spinal cord injuries occur in more than 30.000 individuals each year worldwide and result in significant morbidity, with patients requiring long physical and medical care. The recent identification of resident stem cells in the adult spinal cord has opened up for the possibility of pharmacological manipulation of these cells to produce cell types promoting recovery after injury. We have employed genetic tools to specifically address the identity and reaction to injury of a spin...

  2. A probabilistic model for cell population phenotyping using HCS data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Pauwels

    Full Text Available High Content Screening (HCS platforms allow screening living cells under a wide range of experimental conditions and give access to a whole panel of cellular responses to a specific treatment. The outcome is a series of cell population images. Within these images, the heterogeneity of cellular response to the same treatment leads to a whole range of observed values for the recorded cellular features. Consequently, it is difficult to compare and interpret experiments. Moreover, the definition of phenotypic classes at a cell population level remains an open question, although this would ease experiments analyses. In the present work, we tackle these two questions. The input of the method is a series of cell population images for which segmentation and cellular phenotype classification has already been performed. We propose a probabilistic model to represent and later compare cell populations. The model is able to fully exploit the HCS-specific information: "dependence structure of population descriptors" and "within-population variability". The experiments we carried out illustrate how our model accounts for this specific information, as well as the fact that the model benefits from considering them. We underline that these features allow richer HCS data analysis than simpler methods based on single cellular feature values averaged over each well. We validate an HCS data analysis method based on control experiments. It accounts for HCS specificities that were not taken into account by previous methods but have a sound biological meaning. Biological validation of previously unknown outputs of the method constitutes a future line of work.

  3. Genetic models reveal historical patterns of sea lamprey population fluctuations within Lake Champlain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy C. D’Aloia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The origin of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus in Lake Champlain has been heavily debated over the past decade. Given the lack of historical documentation, two competing hypotheses have emerged in the literature. First, it has been argued that the relatively recent population size increase and concomitant rise in wounding rates on prey populations are indicative of an invasive population that entered the lake through the Champlain Canal. Second, recent genetic evidence suggests a post-glacial colonization at the end of the Pleistocene, approximately 11,000 years ago. One limitation to resolving the origin of sea lamprey in Lake Champlain is a lack of historical and current measures of population size. In this study, the issue of population size was explicitly addressed using nuclear (nDNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA markers to estimate historical demography with genetic models. Haplotype network analysis, mismatch analysis, and summary statistics based on mtDNA noncoding sequences for NCI (479 bp and NCII (173 bp all indicate a recent population expansion. Coalescent models based on mtDNA and nDNA identified two potential demographic events: a population decline followed by a very recent population expansion. The decline in effective population size may correlate with land-use and fishing pressure changes post-European settlement, while the recent expansion may be associated with the implementation of the salmonid stocking program in the 1970s. These results are most consistent with the hypothesis that sea lamprey are native to Lake Champlain; however, the credibility intervals around parameter estimates demonstrate that there is uncertainty regarding the magnitude and timing of past demographic events.

  4. Poroelasticity of cell nuclei revealed through atomic force microscopy characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fanan; Lan, Fei; Liu, Bin; Liu, Lianqing; Li, Guangyong

    2016-11-01

    With great potential in precision medical application, cell biomechanics is rising as a hot topic in biology. Cell nucleus, as the largest component within cell, not only contributes greatly to the cell's mechanical behavior, but also serves as the most vital component within cell. However, cell nucleus' mechanics is still far from unambiguous up to now. In this paper, we attempted to characterize and evaluate the mechanical property of isolated cell nuclei using Atomic Force Microscopy with a tipless probe. As indicated from typical indentation, changing loading rate and stress relaxation experiment results, cell nuclei showed significant dynamically mechanical property, i.e., time-dependent mechanics. Furthermore, through theoretical analysis, finite element simulation and stress relaxation experiment, the nature of nucleus' mechanics was better described by poroelasticity, rather than viscoelasticity. Therefore, the essence of nucleus' mechanics was clarified to be poroelastic through a sophisticated analysis. Finally, we estimated the poroelastic parameters for nuclei of two types of cells through a combination of experimental data and finite element simulation.

  5. Biomimetic emulsions reveal the effect of homeostatic pressure on cell-cell adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Viasnoff, Virgile; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts in tissues are continuously subject to mechanical forces due to homeostatic pressure and active cytoskeleton dynamics. While much is known about the molecular pathways of adhesion, the role of mechanics is less well understood. To isolate the role of pressure we present a dense packing of functionalized emulsion droplets in which surface interactions are tuned to mimic those of real cells. By visualizing the microstructure in 3D we find that a threshold compression force is necessary to overcome electrostatic repulsion and surface elasticity and establish protein-mediated adhesion. Varying the droplet interaction potential maps out a phase diagram for adhesion as a function of force and salt concentration. Remarkably, fitting the data with our theoretical model predicts binder concentrations in the adhesion areas that are similar to those found in real cells. Moreover, we quantify the adhesion size dependence on the applied force and thus reveal adhesion strengthening with increasing homeos...

  6. Genetic diversity of alfalfa domesticated varietal populations from Libyan genbank revealed by RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsyee Salem R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. is an important forage legume in Libya. The genetic diversity of nine alfalfa domesticated varietal populations was studied using thirteen RAPD primer combinations. The number of polymorphic fragments detected per primer combination ranged from 8 to 46 bands with an average of 24 bands. The number of polymorphic bands detected was from 6 (Atalia population to 37 (Gabsia population. The lowest genetic distance was 0.058 and the highest was 0.655. The average genetic distance was (0.356. The dendrogram based on Ward’s minimum variance clustering method grouped the nine populations into the two main clusters. The first group included Fazania, Atalia, Masratia, Zawia, Denamo Ferade and Arezona. The second group was composed of Tagoria, Gabsia and Wade Alrabeh. The simplicity of RAPD assays for detection of genetic polymorphisms is confirmed in our study, and results can be utilized in breeding practice.

  7. Molecules and morphology reveal overlooked populations of two presumed extinct Australian sea snakes (Aipysurus: Hydrophiinae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Kate Laura; Schroeder, Tina; Guinea, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The critically endangered leaf-scaled (Aipysurus foliosquamaI) and short-nosed (A. apraefrontalis) sea snakes are currently recognised only from Ashmore and Hibernia reefs ~600km off the northwest Australian coast. Steep population declines in both species were documented over 15 years and neither...... variation between coastal and offshore specimens, suggest that the coastal specimens are not vagrants as previously suspected, but instead represent separate breeding populations. The newly recognised populations present another chance for leaf scaled and short-nosed sea snakes, but coastal habitats...... in northwest Australia are widely threatened by infrastructure developments and sea snakes are presently omitted from environmental impact assessments for industry. Further studies are urgently needed to assess these species’ remaining distributions, population structure, and extent of occurrence in protected...

  8. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA reveals isolation of imperilled grey nurse shark populations (Carcharias taurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, H; Harcourt, R G; Stow, A J

    2009-11-01

    Loss of sharks and other upper-trophic marine predators has sparked worldwide concern for the stability of ocean ecosystems. The grey nurse (ragged-tooth or sand tiger) shark (Carcharias taurus) is Vulnerable on a global scale, Critically Endangered in Australia and presumed extinct in parts of its historical range. We used 193 muscle and fin samples collected from six extant populations to assess global mtDNA and microsatellite diversity and the degree of global population genetic structure. Control region mtDNA diversity was low in every population, and two populations (eastern Australia and Japan) contained only a single mtDNA haplotype. Genetic signatures of recent losses of genetic variation were not yet apparent at microsatellite loci, indicating that this low mtDNA variation is not a result of anthropogenic population declines. Population differentiation was substantial between each population pair except Brazil and South Africa, F(ST) values ranged from 0.050 to 0.699 and 0.100 to 1.00 for microsatellite and mitochondrial data respectively. Bayesian analysis clearly partitioned individuals into five of the populations from which they were sampled. Our data imply a low frequency of immigrant exchange among each of these regions and we suggest that each be recognized as a distinct evolutionary significant unit. In contrast to pelagic species such as whale shark and white shark that may cross ocean basins and where cooperative international efforts are necessary for conservation, grey nurse shark, like many coastal species, need to be managed regionally.

  9. Gene pair signatures in cell type transcriptomes reveal lineage control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinäniemi, Merja; Nykter, Matti; Kramer, Roger; Wienecke-Baldacchino, Anke; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Zhou, Joseph Xu; Kreisberg, Richard; Kauffman, Stuart A.; Huang, Sui; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    The distinct cell types of multicellular organisms arise due to constraints imposed by gene regulatory networks on the collective change of gene expression across the genome, creating self-stabilizing expression states, or attractors. We compiled a resource of curated human expression data comprising 166 cell types and 2,602 transcription regulating genes and developed a data driven method built around the concept of expression reversal defined at the level of gene pairs, such as those participating in toggle switch circuits. This approach allows us to organize the cell types into their ontogenetic lineage-relationships and to reflect regulatory relationships among genes that explain their ability to function as determinants of cell fate. We show that this method identifies genes belonging to regulatory circuits that control neuronal fate, pluripotency and blood cell differentiation, thus offering a novel large-scale perspective on lineage specification. PMID:23603899

  10. Dynamic changes in brewing yeast cells in culture revealed by statistical analyses of yeast morphological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Enomoto, Kenichi; Yoshimoto, Hiroyuki; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2014-03-01

    The vitality of brewing yeasts has been used to monitor their physiological state during fermentation. To investigate the fermentation process, we used the image processing software, CalMorph, which generates morphological data on yeast mother cells and bud shape, nuclear shape and location, and actin distribution. We found that 248 parameters changed significantly during fermentation. Successive use of principal component analysis (PCA) revealed several important features of yeast, providing insight into the dynamic changes in the yeast population. First, PCA indicated that much of the observed variability in the experiment was summarized in just two components: a change with a peak and a change over time. Second, PCA indicated the independent and important morphological features responsible for dynamic changes: budding ratio, nucleus position, neck position, and actin organization. Thus, the large amount of data provided by imaging analysis can be used to monitor the fermentation processes involved in beer and bioethanol production.

  11. The metabolome of induced pluripotent stem cells reveals metabolic changes occurring in somatic cell reprogramming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Athanasia D Panopoulos; Margaret Lutz; W Travis Berggren; Kun Zhang; Ronald M Evans; Gary Siuzdak; Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte; Oscar Yanes; SergioRuiz; Yasuyuki S Kida; Dinh Diep; Ralf Tautenhahn; Aida Herrerias; Erika M Batchelder; Nongluk Plongthongkum

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism is vital to every aspect of cell function,yet the metabolome of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)remains largely unexplored.Here we report,using an untargeted metabolomics approach,that human iPSCs share a pluripotent metabolomic signature with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that is distinct from their parental cells,and that is characterized by changes in metabolites involved in cellular respiration.Examination of cellular bioenergetics corroborated with our metabolomic analysis,and demonstrated that somatic cells convert from an oxidative state to a glycolytic state in pluripotency.Interestingly,the bioenergetics of various somatic cells correlated with their reprogramming efficiencies.We further identified metabolites that differ between iPSCs and ESCs,which revealed novel metabolic pathways that play a critical role in regulating somatic cell reprogramming.Our findings are the first to globally analyze the metabolome of iPSCs,and provide mechanistic insight into a new layer of regulation involved in inducing pluripotency,and in evaluating iPSC and ESC equivalence.

  12. Revealed: The spy who regulates neuroblastoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Parvez; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K

    2014-11-30

    Neuroblastoma (NB), an embryonal tumour of the sympathetic nervous system, is thought to originate from undifferentiated neural crest cells and is known to exhibit extremely heterogeneous biological and clinical behaviors. Occurring in very young children, the median age at diagnosis is 17 months and it accounts for 10% of all pediatric cancer mortalities. The standard treatment regimen for patients with high-risk NB includes induction and surgery followed by isotretinoin or Accutane (13-cis retinoic acid) treatment, which is shown to induce terminal differentiation of NB cells. However, molecular regulators that maintain an undifferentiated phenotype in NB cells are still poorly understood.

  13. Subpopulation genetic structure of a plant panmictic population of Castanea sequinii as revealed by microsatellite markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying; KANG Ming; HUANG Hongwen

    2007-01-01

    Castanea squinii Dode,an endemic tree widely distributed in China,plays an important role both in chestnut breeding and forest ecosystem function.The spatial genetic structure within and among populations is an important part of the evolutionary and ecological genetic dynamics of natural populations,and can provide insights into effective conservation of genetic resources.In the present study,the spatial genetic structure of a panmictic natural population of C.sequinii in the Dabie Mountain region was investigated using microsatellite markers.Nine prescreened microsatellite loci generated 29-33 alleles each,and were used for spatial autocorrelation analysis.Based on Moran's I coefficient,a panmictic population of C.sequinii in the Dabie Mountain region was found to be lacking a spatial genetic structure.These results suggest that a high pollen-mediated gene flow among subpopulations counteract genetic drift and/or genetic differentiation and plays an important role in maintaining a random and panmictic population structure in C.sequinii populations.Further,a spatial genetic structure was detected in each subpopulation's scale (0.228 km),with all three subpopulations showing significant fine-scale structure.The genetic variation was found to be nonrandomly distributed within 61 m in each subpopulation (Moran's I positive values).Although Moran's I values varied among the different subpopulations,Moran's I in all the three subpopulations reached the expected values with an increase in distances,suggesting a generally patchy distribution in the subpopulations.The fine-scale structure seems to reflect restricted seed dispersal and microenvironment selection in C.sequinii.These results have important implications for understanding the evolutionary history and ecological process of the natural population of C.sequinii and provide baseline data for formulating a conservation strategy of Castanea species.

  14. Viral small RNAs reveal the genomic variations of three grapevine vein clearing virus quasispecies populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Susanne; Qiu, Wenping

    2017-02-02

    Viral small RNAs (vsRNAs) include viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) that are initiators and products of RNA silencing, and small RNAs that are derived from viral RNAs with function still unknown. Sequencing of vsRNAs allows assembling of viral genomes and revelation of viral population variations at genomic levels. Grapevine vein clearing virus (GVCV) is a new member of the family Caulimoviridae whose DNA genome is replicated by reverse transcription of pre-genomic RNA molecules. In this short report, three genomic sequences of GVCV were assembled from vsRNAs that were isolated and sequenced from three individual grapevines in commercial vineyards and compared to the GVCV-CHA reference genome. Profiles of single nucleotide polymorphism among three viral populations indicated a closer relatedness between two populations in different grape cultivars at the same location than those in the same grape cultivar at different locations, suggesting the spread of GVCV populations among vineyards of close proximity. Classic types of vsiRNAs (21-nt, 22-nt, and 24-nt) were found in the three GVCV vsiRNA populations, but these did not produce alignment hotspots on the GVCV-CHA reference genome. The number of 36-nt reads is the highest among vsRNAs, the role of these vsRNAs remains unclear. The analysis of vsRNAs provides a first holistic picture of genomic variations among GVCV viral quasispecies populations that help monitor epidemics and evolution of GVCV populations, an emerging virus that is becoming a threat to grape production in the Midwest region of the USA.

  15. Metabolic profiling of hypoxic cells revealed a catabolic signature required for cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Frezza

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is one of the features of poorly vascularised areas of solid tumours but cancer cells can survive in these areas despite the low oxygen tension. The adaptation to hypoxia requires both biochemical and genetic responses that culminate in a metabolic rearrangement to counter-balance the decrease in energy supply from mitochondrial respiration. The understanding of metabolic adaptations under hypoxia could reveal novel pathways that, if targeted, would lead to specific death of hypoxic regions. In this study, we developed biochemical and metabolomic analyses to assess the effects of hypoxia on cellular metabolism of HCT116 cancer cell line. We utilized an oxygen fluorescent probe in anaerobic cuvettes to study oxygen consumption rates under hypoxic conditions without the need to re-oxygenate the cells and demonstrated that hypoxic cells can maintain active, though diminished, oxidative phosphorylation even at 1% oxygen. These results were further supported by in situ microscopy analysis of mitochondrial NADH oxidation under hypoxia. We then used metabolomic methodologies, utilizing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, to determine the metabolic profile of hypoxic cells. This approach revealed the importance of synchronized and regulated catabolism as a mechanism of adaptation to bioenergetic stress. We then confirmed the presence of autophagy under hypoxic conditions and demonstrated that the inhibition of this catabolic process dramatically reduced the ATP levels in hypoxic cells and stimulated hypoxia-induced cell death. These results suggest that under hypoxia, autophagy is required to support ATP production, in addition to glycolysis, and that the inhibition of autophagy might be used to selectively target hypoxic regions of tumours, the most notoriously resistant areas of solid tumours.

  16. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  17. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M Cramer

    Full Text Available The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  18. Análise dos haplótipos da anemia falciforme em Fortaleza revela as origens étnicas da população cearense Analysis of sickle cell anemia haplotypes in Fortaleza reveals the ethnic origins of Ceará state population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilianne Brito da Silva

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Os haplótipos ligados ao gene da βS-globina foram analisados em uma amostra de 68 cromossomos de pacientes de Fortaleza, capital do Ceará, com anemia falciforme (AF, com a finalidade de fornecer informações sobre a distribuição das frequências dos haplótipos, contribuindo para o estudo das origens da formação étnica da população cearense. A distribuição dos haplótipos do gene da βS-globina foi 66,2% do tipo Bantu, 22% do Benin e 11,8% do atípico. Houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre o presente estudo e os resultados de outros pesquisadores no Ceará. A distribuição das frequências dos haplótipos do gene da βS-globina no presente estudo está condizente com a história da formação da população brasileira. Conforme dados históricos sobre as origens da população negra trazida ao Ceará, o haplótipo Bantu seria o mais prevalente, seguido pelo Benin e Senegal. Estes resultados são relevantes para o estudo das rotas de tráfico dos escravos no Brasil e para entendermos as origens étnicas da população brasileira.In a sample of 68 chromosomes from sickle cell anemia patients from the population of Fortaleza, capital of Ceará State - Brazil, the haplotypes connected with βS-globin gene were analyzed with the aim to provide further information on haplotype frequency distribution, which ultimately contributed to the investigation into the ethnic origins of the state's population. The haplotype distribution of βS-globin gene was 66.2% Bantu type, 22% Benin type and 11.8% atypical. There was a significant statistical difference between the results of the present study and those achieved by other researchers in Ceará. The distribution of haplotype frequencies of βS-globin gene in the present study is consistent with the history of the Brazilian population origins. According to historical data on the origins of the slave population brought to Ceará State, Bantu haplotype would be the most prevalent

  19. CD4-Transgenic Zebrafish Reveal Tissue-Resident Th2- and Regulatory T Cell–like Populations and Diverse Mononuclear Phagocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Christopher T.; Nagaraju, Raghavendar T.; Athanasiadis, Emmanouil I.; Gray, Caroline; Fernandez del Ama, Laura; Johnston, Simon A.; Secombes, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are at the nexus of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. However, little is known about the evolutionary history of CD4+ T cells, and it is unclear whether their differentiation into specialized subsets is conserved in early vertebrates. In this study, we have created transgenic zebrafish with vibrantly labeled CD4+ cells allowing us to scrutinize the development and specialization of teleost CD4+ leukocytes in vivo. We provide further evidence that CD4+ macrophages have an ancient origin and had already emerged in bony fish. We demonstrate the utility of this zebrafish resource for interrogating the complex behavior of immune cells at cellular resolution by the imaging of intimate contacts between teleost CD4+ T cells and mononuclear phagocytes. Most importantly, we reveal the conserved subspecialization of teleost CD4+ T cells in vivo. We demonstrate that the ancient and specialized tissues of the gills contain a resident population of il-4/13b–expressing Th2-like cells, which do not coexpress il-4/13a. Additionally, we identify a contrasting population of regulatory T cell–like cells resident in the zebrafish gut mucosa, in marked similarity to that found in the intestine of mammals. Finally, we show that, as in mammals, zebrafish CD4+ T cells will infiltrate melanoma tumors and obtain a phenotype consistent with a type 2 immune microenvironment. We anticipate that this unique resource will prove invaluable for future investigation of T cell function in biomedical research, the development of vaccination and health management in aquaculture, and for further research into the evolution of adaptive immunity. PMID:27694495

  20. The genome of a Mongolian individual reveals the genetic imprints of Mongolians on modern human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Haihua; Guo, Xiaosen; Zhang, Dong; Narisu, Narisu; Bu, Junjie; Jirimutu, Jirimutu; Liang, Fan; Zhao, Xiang; Xing, Yanping; Wang, Dingzhu; Li, Tongda; Zhang, Yanru; Guan, Baozhu; Yang, Xukui; Yang, Zili; Shuangshan, Shuangshan; Su, Zhe; Wu, Huiguang; Li, Wenjing; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Shilin; Bayinnamula, Bayinnamula; Chang, Yuqi; Gao, Ying; Lan, Tianming; Suyalatu, Suyalatu; Huang, Hui; Su, Yan; Chen, Yujie; Li, Wenqi; Yang, Xu; Feng, Qiang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Wu, Qizhu; Yin, Ye; Zhou, Huanmin

    2014-11-05

    Mongolians have played a significant role in modern human evolution, especially after the rise of Genghis Khan (1162[?]-1227). Although the social cultural impacts of Genghis Khan and the Mongolian population have been well documented, explorations of their genome structure and genetic imprints on other human populations have been lacking. We here present the genome of a Mongolian male individual. The genome was de novo assembled using a total of 130.8-fold genomic data produced from massively parallel whole-genome sequencing. We identified high-confidence variation sets, including 3.7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 756,234 short insertions and deletions. Functional SNP analysis predicted that the individual has a pathogenic risk for carnitine deficiency. We located the patrilineal inheritance of the Mongolian genome to the lineage D3a through Y haplogroup analysis and inferred that the individual has a common patrilineal ancestor with Tibeto-Burman populations and is likely to be the progeny of the earliest settlers in East Asia. We finally investigated the genetic imprints of Mongolians on other human populations using different approaches. We found varying degrees of gene flows between Mongolians and populations living in Europe, South/Central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent. The analyses demonstrate that the genetic impacts of Mongolians likely resulted from the expansion of the Mongolian Empire in the 13th century. The genome will be of great help in further explorations of modern human evolution and genetic causes of diseases/traits specific to Mongolians.

  1. Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1 based sequence typing reveals phylogenetically distinct Ascaris population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic differentiation among morphologically identical Ascaris species is a debatable scientific issue in the context of Ascariasis epidemiology. To explain the disease epidemiology and also the taxonomic position of different Ascaris species, genome information of infecting strains from endemic areas throughout the world is certainly crucial. Ascaris population from human has been genetically characterized based on the widely used genetic marker, internal transcribed spacer1 (ITS1. Along with previously reported and prevalent genotype G1, 8 new sequence variants of ITS1 have been identified. Genotype G1 was significantly present among female patients aged between 10 to 15 years. Intragenic linkage disequilibrium (LD analysis at target locus within our study population has identified an incomplete LD value with potential recombination events. A separate cluster of Indian isolates with high bootstrap value indicate their distinct phylogenetic position in comparison to the global Ascaris population. Genetic shuffling through recombination could be a possible reason for high population diversity and frequent emergence of new sequence variants, identified in present and other previous studies. This study explores the genetic organization of Indian Ascaris population for the first time which certainly includes some fundamental information on the molecular epidemiology of Ascariasis.

  2. Human lymphocyte sub-populations and K cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandilands, G; Gray, K; Cooney, A; Froebel, K; Anderson, J R

    1976-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 19 normal subjects were examined for surface Ig (SIg) and capacity to form rosettes with normal and neuraminidase-treated sheep erythrocytes and with chicken erythrocytes sensitised with IgG antibody. Information on the relationship between the presence of SIg and capacity to form rosettes was obtained by combined tests and depletion experiments. By these means, a population of lymphocytes with Fc receptors, but lacking SIg (mean 14.6%) was defined and shown to correlate closely with cytotoxic activity for antibody-sensitised target cells. Indirect evidence was also obtained that these lymphocytes, which are regarded as the major population of antibody-dependent cytotoxic cells, are capable of forming rosettes with normal and neuraminidase-treated sheep erythrocytes. The nature of these cells is briefly discussed.

  3. Mountain gorilla genomes reveal the impact of long-term population decline and inbreeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yali; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Sudmant, Peter H; Narasimhan, Vagheesh; Ayub, Qasim; Szpak, Michal; Frandsen, Peter; Chen, Yuan; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Cooper, David N; de Manuel, Marc; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Lobon, Irene; Siegismund, Hans R; Pagani, Luca; Quail, Michael A; Hvilsom, Christina; Mudakikwa, Antoine; Eichler, Evan E; Cranfield, Michael R; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Scally, Aylwyn

    2015-04-10

    Mountain gorillas are an endangered great ape subspecies and a prominent focus for conservation, yet we know little about their genomic diversity and evolutionary past. We sequenced whole genomes from multiple wild individuals and compared the genomes of all four Gorilla subspecies. We found that the two eastern subspecies have experienced a prolonged population decline over the past 100,000 years, resulting in very low genetic diversity and an increased overall burden of deleterious variation. A further recent decline in the mountain gorilla population has led to extensive inbreeding, such that individuals are typically homozygous at 34% of their sequence, leading to the purging of severely deleterious recessive mutations from the population. We discuss the causes of their decline and the consequences for their future survival.

  4. Genetic admixture, relatedness, and structure patterns among Mexican populations revealed by the Y-chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Villalobos, H; Muñoz-Valle, J F; González-Martín, A; Gorostiza, A; Magaña, M T; Páez-Riberos, L A

    2008-04-01

    Y-linked markers are suitable loci to analyze genetic diversity of human populations, offering knowledge of medical, forensic, and anthropological interest. In a population sample of 206 Mestizo males from western Mexico, we analyzed two binary loci (M3 and YAP) and six Y-STRs, adding to the analysis data of Mexican Mestizos and Amerindians, and relevant worldwide populations. The paternal ancestry estimated in western Mexican-Mestizos was mainly European (60-64%), followed by Amerindian (25-21%), and African ( approximately 15%). Significant genetic heterogeneity was established between Mestizos from western (Jalisco State) and northern Mexico (Chihuahua State) compared with Mexicans from the center of the Mexican Republic (Mexico City), this attributable to higher European ancestry in western and northern than in central and southeast populations, where higher Amerindian ancestry was inferred. This genetic structure has important implications for medical and forensic purposes. Two different Pre-Hispanic evolutionary processes were evident. In Mesoamerican region, populations presented higher migration rate (N(m) = 24.76), promoting genetic homogeneity. Conversely, isolated groups from the mountains and canyons of the Western and Northern Sierra Madre (Huichols and Tarahumaras, respectively) presented a lower migration rate (N(m) = 10.27) and stronger genetic differentiation processes (founder effect and/or genetic drift), constituting a Pre-Hispanic population substructure. Additionally, Tarahumaras presented a higher frequency of Y-chromosomes without Q3 that was explained by paternal European admixture (15%) and, more interestingly, by a distinctive Native-American ancestry. In Purepechas, a special admixture process involving preferential integration of non-Purepecha women in their communities could explain contrary genetic evidences (autosomal vs. Y-chromosome) for this tribe.

  5. Outlier SNP markers reveal fine-scale genetic structuring across European hake populations (Merluccius merluccius)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milano, I.; Babbucci, M.; Cariani, A.;

    2014-01-01

    of integrating information from neutral and adaptive evolutionary patterns towards a better assessment of genetic diversity. Accordingly, the generated outlier SNP data could be used for tackling illegal practices in hake fishing and commercialization as well as to develop explicit spatial models for defining......Shallow population structure is generally reported for most marine fish and explained as a consequence of high dispersal, connectivity and large population size. Targeted gene analyses and more recently genome-wide studies have challenged such view, suggesting that adaptive divergence might occur...

  6. Mountain gorilla genomes reveal the impact of long-term population decline and inbreeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Yali; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Sudmant, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Mountain gorillas are an endangered great ape subspecies and a prominent focus for conservation, yet we know little about their genomic diversity and evolutionary past. We sequenced whole genomes from multiple wild individuals and compared the genomes of all four Gorilla subspecies. We found...... that the two eastern subspecies have experienced a prolonged population decline over the past 100,000 years, resulting in very low genetic diversity and an increased overall burden of deleterious variation. A further recent decline in the mountain gorilla population has led to extensive inbreeding...

  7. Population genetic structure and historical demography of Oratosquilla oratoria revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D; Ding, Ge; Ge, B; Zhang, H; Tang, B

    2012-12-01

    Genetic diversity, population genetic structure and molecular phylogeographic pattern of mantis shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria in Bohai Sea and South China Sea were analyzed by mitochondrial DNA sequences. Nucleotide and haplotype diversities were 0.00409-0.00669 and 0.894-0.953 respectively. Neighbor-Joining phylogenetic tree clustered two distinct lineages. Both phylogenetic tree and median-joining network showed the consistent genetic structure corresponding to geographical distribution. Mismatch distributions, negative neutral test and "star-like" network supported a sudden population expansion event. And the time was estimated about 44000 and 50000 years ago.

  8. Single-cell mass spectrometry reveals small molecules that affect cell fates in the 16-cell embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onjiko, Rosemary M; Moody, Sally A; Nemes, Peter

    2015-05-26

    Spatial and temporal changes in molecular expression are essential to embryonic development, and their characterization is critical to understand mechanisms by which cells acquire different phenotypes. Although technological advances have made it possible to quantify expression of large molecules during embryogenesis, little information is available on metabolites, the ultimate indicator of physiological activity of the cell. Here, we demonstrate that single-cell capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is able to test whether differential expression of the genome translates to the domain of metabolites between single embryonic cells. Dissection of three different cell types with distinct tissue fates from 16-cell embryos of the South African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) and microextraction of their metabolomes enabled the identification of 40 metabolites that anchored interconnected central metabolic networks. Relative quantitation revealed that several metabolites were differentially active between the cell types in the wild-type, unperturbed embryos. Altering postfertilization cytoplasmic movements that perturb dorsal development confirmed that these three cells have characteristic small-molecular activity already at cleavage stages as a result of cell type and not differences in pigmentation, yolk content, cell size, or position in the embryo. Changing the metabolite concentration caused changes in cell movements at gastrulation that also altered the tissue fates of these cells, demonstrating that the metabolome affects cell phenotypes in the embryo.

  9. Modeling circadian clock-cell cycle interaction effects on cell population growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Cheikh, R; Bernard, S; El Khatib, N

    2014-12-21

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are two tightly coupled oscillators. Recent analytical studies have shown counter-intuitive effects of circadian gating of the cell cycle on growth rates of proliferating cells which cannot be explained by a molecular model or a population model alone. In this work, we present a combined molecular-population model that studies how coupling the circadian clock to the cell cycle, through the protein WEE1, affects a proliferating cell population. We show that the cell cycle can entrain to the circadian clock with different rational period ratios and characterize multiple domains of entrainment. We show that coupling increases the growth rate for autonomous periods of the cell cycle around 24 h and above 48 h. We study the effect of mutation of circadian genes on the growth rate of cells and show that disruption of the circadian clock can lead to abnormal proliferation. Particularly, we show that Cry 1, Cry 2 mutations decrease the growth rate of cells, Per 2 mutation enhances it and Bmal 1 knockout increases it for autonomous periods of the cell cycle less than 21 h and decreases it elsewhere. Combining a molecular model to a population model offers new insight on the influence of the circadian clock on the growth of a cell population. This can help chronotherapy which takes benefits of physiological rhythms to improve anti-cancer efficacy and tolerance to drugs by administering treatments at a specific time of the day.

  10. Microscale oxygraphy reveals OXPHOS impairment in MRC mutant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, F; D'Amato, I; Jensen, P B; Ravaglia, S; Zeviani, M; Tiranti, V

    2012-03-01

    Given the complexity of the respiratory chain structure, assembly and regulation, the diagnostic workout for the identification of defects of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is a major challenge. Spectrophotometric assays, that measure the activity of individual respiratory complexes in tissue and cell homogenates or isolated mitochondria, are highly specific, but their utilization is limited by the availability of sufficient biological material and intrinsic sensitivity. A further limitation is tissue specificity, which usually determines attenuation, or disappearance, in cultured fibroblasts, of defects detected in muscle or liver. We used numerous fibroblast cell lines derived from patients with OXPHOS deficiencies to set up experimental protocols required for the direct readout of cellular respiration using the Seahorse XF96 apparatus, which measures oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and extra-cellular acidification rate (ECAR) in 96 well plates. Results demonstrate that first level screening based on microscale oxygraphy is more sensitive, cheaper and rapid than spectrophotometry for the biochemical evaluation of cells from patients with suspected mitochondrial disorders.

  11. Single-Cell Analysis of SMN Reveals Its Broader Role in Neuromuscular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Rodriguez-Muela

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying selective motor neuron (MN death remains an essential question in the MN disease field. The MN disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is attributable to reduced levels of the ubiquitous protein SMN. Here, we report that SMN levels are widely variable in MNs within a single genetic background and that this heterogeneity is seen not only in SMA MNs but also in MNs derived from controls and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients. Furthermore, cells with low SMN are more susceptible to cell death. These findings raise the important clinical implication that some SMN-elevating therapeutics might be effective in MN diseases besides SMA. Supporting this, we found that increasing SMN across all MN populations using an Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor promotes survival in both SMA and ALS-derived MNs. Altogether, our work demonstrates that examination of human neurons at the single-cell level can reveal alternative strategies to be explored in the treatment of degenerative diseases.

  12. Molecules and Morphology Reveal Overlooked Populations of Two Presumed Extinct Australian Sea Snakes (Aipysurus: Hydrophiinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kate L.; Schroeder, Tina; Guinea, Michael L.; Rasmussen, Arne R.

    2015-01-01

    The critically endangered leaf-scaled (Aipysurus foliosquamaI) and short-nosed (A. apraefrontalis) sea snakes are currently recognised only from Ashmore and Hibernia reefs ~600km off the northwest Australian coast. Steep population declines in both species were documented over 15 years and neither has been sighted on dedicated surveys of Ashmore and Hibernia since 2001. We examine specimens of these species that were collected from coastal northwest Australian habitats up until 2010 (A.foliosquama) and 2012 (A. apraefrontalis) and were either overlooked or treated as vagrants in conservation assessments. Morphological variation and mitochondrial sequence data confirm the assignment of these coastal specimens to A. foliosquama (Barrow Island, and offshore from Port Hedland) and A.apraefrontalis (Exmouth Gulf, and offshore from Roebourne and Broome). Collection dates, and molecular and morphological variation between coastal and offshore specimens, suggest that the coastal specimens are not vagrants as previously suspected, but instead represent separate breeding populations. The newly recognised populations present another chance for leaf-scaled and short-nosed sea snakes, but coastal habitats in northwest Australia are widely threatened by infrastructure developments and sea snakes are presently omitted from environmental impact assessments for industry. Further studies are urgently needed to assess these species’ remaining distributions, population structure, and extent of occurrence in protected areas. PMID:25671608

  13. Population-based metagenomics analysis reveals markers for gut microbiome composition and diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhernakova, Alexandra; Kurilshikov, Alexander; Bonder, Marc Jan; Tigchelaar, Ettje F; Schirmer, Melanie; Vatanen, Tommi; Mujagic, Zlatan; Vila, Arnau Vich; Falony, Gwen; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Wang, Jun; Imhann, Floris; Brandsma, Eelke; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Joossens, Marie; Cenit, Maria Carmen; Deelen, Patrick; Swertz, Morris A; Weersma, Rinse K; Feskens, Edith J M; Netea, Mihai G; Gevers, Dirk; Jonkers, Daisy; Franke, Lude; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Huttenhower, Curtis; Raes, Jeroen; Hofker, Marten H; Xavier, Ramnik J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Fu, Jingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Deep sequencing of the gut microbiomes of 1135 participants from a Dutch population-based cohort shows relations between the microbiome and 126 exogenous and intrinsic host factors, including 31 intrinsic factors, 12 diseases, 19 drug groups, 4 smoking categories, and 60 dietary factors. These facto

  14. Population genomics reveal recent speciation and rapid evolutionary adaptation in polar bears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Shiping; Lorenzen, Eline D.; Fumagalli, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Polar bears are uniquely adapted to life in the High Arctic and have undergone drastic physiological changes in response to Arctic climates and a hyperlipid diet of primarily marine mammal prey. We analyzed 89 complete genomes of polar bear and brown bear using population genomic modeling and show...

  15. AFLP analysis reveals a clonal population of Phytophthora pinifolia in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Alvaro; Gryzenhout, Marieka; Drenth, André; Slippers, Bernard; Ahumada, Rodrigo; Wingfield, Brenda D; Wingfield, Michael J

    2010-09-01

    Phytophthora pinifolia is the causal agent of the recently discovered needle disease of Pinus radiata in Chile, referred to as "Daño Foliar del Pino" (DFP). The genetic structure of the pathogen population is unknown, which hinders our understanding of its appearance and spread in Chile since 2004. In this study, a population of 88 cultures of P. pinifolia isolated from P. radiata at several localities in Chile was evaluated for genotypic diversity using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). Results of the AFLP analyses showed that the P. pinifolia population in Chile consists of two near identical genotypes but with no genetic differentiation based on geography, year of isolation or the part of the tree from which the isolates were obtained. Mating experiments did not lead to the production of gametangia suggesting that the organism is sterile. The fact that a single clonal genotype dominates the population of P. pinifolia in Chile supports the hypothesis that P. pinifolia was recently introduced into this country and that its impact is due to a new and susceptible host encounter.

  16. Genome-wide association study reveals regions associated with gestation length in two pig populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidalgo, A.M.; Lopes, M.S.; Harlizius, B.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    Reproduction traits, such as gestation length (GLE), play an important role in dam line breeding in pigs. The objective of our study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with GLE in two pig populations. Genotypes and deregressed breeding values were available

  17. Reconstruction of endometrium from human endometrial side population cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cervelló

    Full Text Available Endometrial regeneration is mediated, at least in part, by the existence of a specialized somatic stem cell (SSC population recently identified by several groups using the side population (SP technique. We previously demonstrated that endometrial SP displays genotypic, phenotypic and the functional capability to develop human endometrium after subcutaneous injection in NOD-SCID mice. We have now established seven human endometrial SP (hESP cell lines (ICE 1-7: four from the epithelial and three from the stromal fraction, respectively. SP cell lines were generated under hypoxic conditions based on their cloning efficiency ability, cultured for 12-15 passages (20 weeks and cryopreserved. Cell lines displayed normal 46XX karyotype, intermediate telomerase activity pattern and expressed mRNAs encoding proteins that are considered characteristic of undifferentiated cells (Oct-4, GDF3, DNMT3B, Nanog, GABR3 and those of mesodermal origin (WT1, Cardiac Actin, Enolase, Globin, REN. Phenotype analysis corroborated their epithelial (CD9+ or stromal (vimentin+ cell origin and mesenchymal (CD90+, CD73+ and CD45⁻ attributes. Markers considered characteristic of ectoderm or endoderm were not detected. Cells did not express either estrogen receptor alpha (ERα or progesterone receptor (PR. The hESP cell lines were able to differentiate in vitro into adipocytes and osteocytes, which confirmed their mesenchymal origin. Finally, we demonstrated their ability to generate human endometrium when transplanted beneath the renal capsule of NOD-SCID mice. These findings confirm that SP cells exhibit key features of human endometrial SSC and open up new possibilities for the understanding of gynecological disorders such as endometriosis or Asherman syndrome. Our cell lines can be a valuable model to investigate new targets for endometrium proliferation in endometriosis.

  18. Cell mass and cell cycle dynamics of an asynchronous budding yeast population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Carlquist, Magnus; Lundin, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    consumption observed during batch cultivation. The good agreement between the proposed multi-scale model (a population balance model [PBM] coupled to an unstructured model) and experimental data (both the overall physiology and cell size and cell cycle distributions) indicates that a mechanistic model...... of model predictions for cell property distributions against experimental data is scarce. This study focuses on the experimental and mathematical description of the dynamics of cell size and cell cycle position distributions, of a population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in response to the substrate......Despite traditionally regarded as identical, cells in a microbial cultivation present a distribution of phenotypic traits, forming a heterogeneous cell population. Moreover, the degree of heterogeneity is notably enhanced by changes in micro-environmental conditions. A major development...

  19. Genetic diversity of Bemisia tabaci (Genn. Populations in Brazil revealed by RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.H.C. Lima

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bemisia tabaci (Genn. was considered a secondary pest in Brazil until 1990, despite being an efficient geminivirus vector in beans and soybean. In 1991, a new biotype, known as B. tabaci B biotype (=B. argentifolii was detected attacking weed plants and causing phytotoxic problems in Cucurbitaceae. Nowadays, B. tabaci is considered one of the most damaging whitefly pests in agricultural systems worldwide that transmits more than 60 different plant viruses. Little is known about the genetic variability of these populations in Brazil. Knowledge of the genetic variation within whitefly populations is necessary for their efficient control and management. The objectives of the present study were to use RAPD markers (1 to estimate the genetic diversity of B. tabaci populations, (2 to study the genetic relationships among B. tabaci biotypes and two other whitefly species and (3 to discriminate between B. tabaci biotypes. A sample of 109 B. tabaci female individuals obtained from 12 populations in Brazil were analyzed and compared to the A biotype from Arizona (USA and B biotype from California (USA and Paraguay. Trialeurodes vaporariorum and Aleurodicus cocois samples were also included. A total of 72 markers were generated by five RAPD primers and used in the analysis. All primers produced RAPD patterns that clearly distinguished the Bemisia biotypes and the two other whitefly species. Results also showed that populations of the B biotype have considerable genetic variability. An average Jaccard similarity of 0.73 was observed among the B biotype individuals analyzed. Cluster analysis demonstrated that, in general, Brazilian biotype B individuals are scattered independently in the localities where samples were collected. Nevertheless, some clusters were evident, joining individuals according to the host plants. AMOVA showed that most of the total genetic variation is found within populations (56.70%, but a significant portion of the variation is found

  20. Gene admixture in ethnic populations in upper part of Silk Road revealed by mtDNA polymorphism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG LiuQi; TAN SiJie; YU HaiJing; ZHENG BingRong; QIAO EnFa; DONG YongLi; ZAN RuiGuang; XIAO ChunJie

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the gene admixture on the current genetic landscape in Gansu Corridor (GC) in China, the upper part of the ancient Silk Road which connects the Eastern and Central Asia, we examined mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms of five ethnic populations in this study. Using PCR-RFLP and sequencing, we analyzed mtDNA haplotypes in 242 unrelated samples in three ethnic populations from the GC region and two ethnic populations from the adjacent Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. We analyzed the data in comparison with the previously reported data from Eastern, Central and Western Asia and Europe. We found that both European-specific haplogroups and Eastern Asian-specific haplogroups exist in the Gansu Corridor populations, while a modest matrilineal gene flow from Europeans to this region was revealed. The Gansu Corridor populations are genetically located between Eastern Asians and Central Asians, both of who contributed significantly to the maternal lineages of the GC populations. This study made the landscape of the gene flow and admixture along the Silk Road from Europe, through Central Asia, to the upper part of the Silk Road more complete.

  1. Inverse approach to estimating larval dispersal reveals limited population connectivity along 700 km of wave-swept open coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Sarah O; White, J Wilson; Miller, Seth H; Nickols, Kerry J; Morgan, Steven G

    2016-06-29

    Demographic connectivity is fundamental to the persistence and resilience of metapopulations, but our understanding of the link between reproduction and recruitment is notoriously poor in open-coast marine populations. We provide the first evidence of high local retention and limited connectivity among populations spanning 700 km along an open coast in an upwelling system. Using extensive field measurements of fecundity, population size and settlement in concert with a Bayesian inverse modelling approach, we estimated that, on average, Petrolisthes cinctipes larvae disperse only 6.9 km (±25.0 km s.d.) from natal populations, despite spending approximately six weeks in an open-coast system that was once assumed to be broadly dispersive. This estimate differed substantially from our prior dispersal estimate (153.9 km) based on currents and larval duration and behaviour, revealing the importance of employing demographic data in larval dispersal estimates. Based on this estimate, we predict that demographic connectivity occurs predominantly among neighbouring populations less than 30 km apart. Comprehensive studies of larval production, settlement and connectivity are needed to advance an understanding of the ecology and evolution of life in the sea as well as to conserve ecosystems. Our novel approach provides a tractable framework for addressing these questions for species occurring in discrete coastal populations.

  2. TRIM28 multi-domain protein regulates cancer stem cell population in breast tumor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwińska, Patrycja; Shah, Parantu K.; Tomczak, Katarzyna; Klimczak, Marta; Mazurek, Sylwia; Sozańska, Barbara; Biecek, Przemysław; Korski, Konstanty; Filas, Violetta; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Andersen, Jannik N.; Wiznerowicz, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    The expression of Tripartite motif-containing protein 28 (TRIM28)/Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-associated protein 1 (KAP1), is elevated in at least 14 tumor types, including solid and hematopoietic tumors. High level of TRIM28 is associated with triple-negative subtype of breast cancer (TNBC), which shows higher aggressiveness and lower survival rates. Interestingly, TRIM28 is essential for maintaining the pluripotent phenotype in embryonic stem cells. Following on that finding, we evaluated the role of TRIM28 protein in the regulation of breast cancer stem cells (CSC) populations and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of TRIM28 expression in xenografts led to deceased expression of pluripotency and mesenchymal markers, as well as inhibition of signaling pathways involved in the complex mechanism of CSC maintenance. Moreover, TRIM28 depletion reduced the ability of cancer cells to induce tumor growth when subcutaneously injected in limiting dilutions. Our data demonstrate that the downregulation of TRIM28 gene expression reduced the ability of CSCs to self-renew that resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth. Loss of function of TRIM28 leads to dysregulation of cell cycle, cellular response to stress, cancer cell metabolism, and inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. All these mechanisms directly regulate maintenance of CSC population. Our original results revealed the role of the TRIM28 in regulating the CSC population in breast cancer. These findings may pave the way to novel and more effective therapies targeting cancer stem cells in breast tumors. PMID:27845900

  3. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and pro...

  4. Stem cell populations in the heart and the role of Isl1 positive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Di Felice

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac progenitor cells are multipotent stem cells isolated from both embryonic and adult hearts in several species and are able to differentiate at least into smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. The embryonic origin of these cells has not yet been demonstrated, but it has been suggested that these cells may derive from the first and secondary heart fields and from the neural crest. In the last decade, two diffe-rent populations of cardiac progenitor or stem cells have been identified and isolated, i.e., the Islet1 positive (Isl1+ and c-Kit positive (c-Kit+/Stem Cell Antigen-1 positive (Sca-1+ cells. Until 2012, these two populations have been considered two separate entities with different roles and a different origin, but new evidence now suggests a con-nection between the two populations and that the two populations may represent two subpopulations of a unique pool of cardiac stem cells, derived from a common immature primitive cell. To find a common consensus on this concept is very important in furthe-ring the application of stem cells to cardiac tissue engineering.

  5. Stem cell populations in the heart and the role of Isl1 positive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Felice, V; Zummo, G

    2013-05-09

    Cardiac progenitor cells are multipotent stem cells isolated from both embryonic and adult hearts in several species and are able to differentiate at least into smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. The embryonic origin of these cells has not yet been demonstrated, but it has been suggested that these cells may derive from the first and secondary heart fields and from the neural crest. In the last decade, two diffe-rent populations of cardiac progenitor or stem cells have been identified and isolated, i.e., the Islet1 positive (Isl1+) and c-Kit positive (c-Kit+)/Stem Cell Antigen-1 positive (Sca-1+) cells. Until 2012, these two populations have been considered two separate entities with different roles and a different origin, but new evidence now suggests a con-nection between the two populations and that the two populations may represent two subpopulations of a unique pool of cardiac stem cells, derived from a common immature primitive cell. To find a common consensus on this concept is very important in furthe-ring the application of stem cells to cardiac tissue engineering.

  6. Functional malignant cell heterogeneity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors revealed by targeting of PDGF-DD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Eliane; Gladh, Hanna; Braun, Sebastian; Bocci, Matteo; Cordero, Eugenia; Björkström, Niklas K; Miyazaki, Hideki; Michael, Iacovos P; Eriksson, Ulf; Folestad, Erika; Pietras, Kristian

    2016-02-16

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most human cancers and has profound implications for cancer therapy. As a result, there is an emergent need to explore previously unmapped mechanisms regulating distinct subpopulations of tumor cells and to understand their contribution to tumor progression and treatment response. Aberrant platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) signaling in cancer has motivated the development of several antagonists currently in clinical use, including imatinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib. The discovery of a novel ligand for PDGFRβ, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-DD, opened the possibility of a previously unidentified signaling pathway involved in tumor development. However, the precise function of PDGF-DD in tumor growth and invasion remains elusive. Here, making use of a newly generated Pdgfd knockout mouse, we reveal a functionally important malignant cell heterogeneity modulated by PDGF-DD signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET). Our analyses demonstrate that tumor growth was delayed in the absence of signaling by PDGF-DD. Surprisingly, ablation of PDGF-DD did not affect the vasculature or stroma of PanNET; instead, we found that PDGF-DD stimulated bulk tumor cell proliferation by induction of paracrine mitogenic signaling between heterogeneous malignant cell clones, some of which expressed PDGFRβ. The presence of a subclonal population of tumor cells characterized by PDGFRβ expression was further validated in a cohort of human PanNET. In conclusion, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized heterogeneity in PanNET characterized by signaling through the PDGF-DD/PDGFRβ axis.

  7. Clustering of 770,000 genomes reveals post-colonial population structure of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eunjung; Carbonetto, Peter; Curtis, Ross E.; Wang, Yong; Granka, Julie M.; Byrnes, Jake; Noto, Keith; Kermany, Amir R.; Myres, Natalie M.; Barber, Mathew J.; Rand, Kristin A.; Song, Shiya; Roman, Theodore; Battat, Erin; Elyashiv, Eyal; Guturu, Harendra; Hong, Eurie L.; Chahine, Kenneth G.; Ball, Catherine A.

    2017-02-01

    Despite strides in characterizing human history from genetic polymorphism data, progress in identifying genetic signatures of recent demography has been limited. Here we identify very recent fine-scale population structure in North America from a network of over 500 million genetic (identity-by-descent, IBD) connections among 770,000 genotyped individuals of US origin. We detect densely connected clusters within the network and annotate these clusters using a database of over 20 million genealogical records. Recent population patterns captured by IBD clustering include immigrants such as Scandinavians and French Canadians; groups with continental admixture such as Puerto Ricans; settlers such as the Amish and Appalachians who experienced geographic or cultural isolation; and broad historical trends, including reduced north-south gene flow. Our results yield a detailed historical portrait of North America after European settlement and support substantial genetic heterogeneity in the United States beyond that uncovered by previous studies.

  8. Identification of selective sweeps reveals divergent selection between Chinese Holstein and Simmental cattle populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Minhui; Pan, Dunfei; Ren, Hongyan;

    2016-01-01

    , including LRH, XP-EHH and FST, based on the Illumina 770K high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, to enable more comprehensive detection. RESULTS: We successfully constructed profiles of selective signals in both cattle populations. To further annotate these regions, we identified a set......-minor allele frequency bin, we found a higher proportion of low-FST SNPs in the exons of the bovine genome, which indicates strong purifying selection of the exons. CONCLUSIONS: The selection signatures identified in these two populations demonstrated positive selection pressure on a set of important genes...... with potential functions that are involved in many biological processes. We also demonstrated that in the bovine genome, exons were under strong purifying selection. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms of artificial selection and will facilitate follow-up functional studies of potential candidate...

  9. Yak whole-genome resequencing reveals domestication signatures and prehistoric population expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qiang; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Kun; Yang, Yongzhi; Ma, Tao; Wang, Zefu; Zhang, Xiao; Ni, Zhengqiang; Hou, Fujiang; Long, Ruijun; Abbott, Richard; Lenstra, Johannes; Liu, Jianquan

    2015-12-22

    Yak domestication represents an important episode in the early human occupation of the high-altitude Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP). The precise timing of domestication is debated and little is known about the underlying genetic changes that occurred during the process. Here we investigate genome variation of wild and domestic yaks. We detect signals of selection in 209 genes of domestic yaks, several of which relate to behaviour and tameness. We date yak domestication to 7,300 years before present (yr BP), most likely by nomadic people, and an estimated sixfold increase in yak population size by 3,600 yr BP. These dates coincide with two early human population expansions on the QTP during the early-Neolithic age and the late-Holocene, respectively. Our findings add to an understanding of yak domestication and its importance in the early human occupation of the QTP.

  10. Identification of a novel population of human cord blood cells with hematopoietic and chondrocytic potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karen E JAY; Anne ROULEAU; T Michael UNDERHILL; Mickie BHATIA

    2004-01-01

    With the exception of mature erythrocytes, cells within the human hematopoietic system are characterized by the cell surface expression of the pan-leukocyte receptor CD45. Here, we identify a novel subset among mononuclear cord blood cells depleted of lineage commitment markers (Lin-) that are devoid of CD45 expression. Surprisingly, functional examination of Lin-CD45- cells also lacking cell surface CD34 revealed they were capable of multipotential hematopoietic progenitor capacity. Co-culture with mouse embryonic limb bud cells demonstrated that Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were capable of contributing to cartilage nodules and differentiating into human chondrocytes. BMP-4, a mesodermal factor known to promote chondrogenesis, significantly augmented Lin-CD45-CD34- differentiation into chondrocytes.Moreover, unlike CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells, Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were unable to proliferate or survive in liquid cultures, whereas single Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were able to chimerize the inner cell mass (ICM) of murine blastocysts and proliferate in this embryonic environment. Our study identifies a novel population of Lin-CD45-CD34-cells capable of commitment into both hematopoietic and chondrocytic lineages, suggesting that human cord blood may provide a more ubiquitous source of tissue with broader developmental potential than previously appreciated.

  11. Male behaviors reveal multiple pherotypes within vine mealybug Planococcus ficus (Signoret) (Hemiptera; Pseudococcidae) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kol-Maimon, Hofit; Levi-Zada, Anat; Franco, José Carlos; Dunkelblum, Ezra; Protasov, Alex; Eliyaho, Miriam; Mendel, Zvi

    2010-12-01

    The vine mealybug (VM) females collected in Israel produce two sex pheromone compounds: lavandulyl senecioate (LS) and (S)-lavandulyl isovalerate (LI). The males display ambiguous behavior to LI: repulsion in the vineyard and attraction of laboratory-reared males. We addressed the question of individual male behavior, i.e., do males respond to both LS and LI, or might they display a distinct response to each of the two pheromone compounds. We compared male pherotype frequencies between wild-caught and laboratory-reared populations. Then, we examined the relationship between pherotype composition and male capture rates in pheromone traps. Finally, we addressed the heredity of the pherotypes. The Israeli VM populations contain nine different male pherotypes, as defined according to the male behavior to pheromone compounds. The studied Portuguese populations included five of the nine pherotypes; none of the Portuguese males were attracted to LI. It seems that the high frequency of males that were attracted to LI is related to dense VM populations. It is hypothesized that selection for the male pherotypes, I males, those that respond to LI, occur under high-density rearing conditions. This may result from shorter development times of males and females that produce more I male pherotypes. The lower relative frequency of trapping of males in LI-baited traps than expected from the percentage determined in a Petri dish arena suggests that males that respond solely to LS (S males) are better fliers. The results also suggest that the pherotype trait is inherited by both sexes of the VM.

  12. Dual African origins of global Aedes aegypti s.l. populations revealed by mitochondrial DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Moore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aedes aegypti is the primary global vector to humans of yellow fever and dengue flaviviruses. Over the past 50 years, many population genetic studies have documented large genetic differences among global populations of this species. These studies initially used morphological polymorphisms, followed later by allozymes, and most recently various molecular genetic markers including microsatellites and mitochondrial markers. In particular, since 2000, fourteen publications and four unpublished datasets have used sequence data from the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 mitochondrial gene to compare Ae. aegypti collections and collectively 95 unique mtDNA haplotypes have been found. Phylogenetic analyses in these many studies consistently resolved two clades but no comprehensive study of mtDNA haplotypes have been made in Africa, the continent in which the species originated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: ND4 haplotypes were sequenced in 426 Ae. aegypti s.l. from Senegal, West Africa and Kenya, East Africa. In Senegal 15 and in Kenya 7 new haplotypes were discovered. When added to the 95 published haplotypes and including 6 African Aedes species as outgroups, phylogenetic analyses showed that all but one Senegal haplotype occurred in a basal clade while most East African haplotypes occurred in a second clade arising from the basal clade. Globally distributed haplotypes occurred in both clades demonstrating that populations outside Africa consist of mixtures of mosquitoes from both clades. CONCLUSIONS: Populations of Ae. aegypti outside Africa consist of mosquitoes arising from one of two ancestral clades. One clade is basal and primarily associated with West Africa while the second arises from the first and contains primarily mosquitoes from East Africa.

  13. Asynchrony adaptation reveals neural population code for audio-visual timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Neil W; Heron, James; Whitaker, David; McGraw, Paul V

    2011-05-01

    The relative timing of auditory and visual stimuli is a critical cue for determining whether sensory signals relate to a common source and for making inferences about causality. However, the way in which the brain represents temporal relationships remains poorly understood. Recent studies indicate that our perception of multisensory timing is flexible--adaptation to a regular inter-modal delay alters the point at which subsequent stimuli are judged to be simultaneous. Here, we measure the effect of audio-visual asynchrony adaptation on the perception of a wide range of sub-second temporal relationships. We find distinctive patterns of induced biases that are inconsistent with the previous explanations based on changes in perceptual latency. Instead, our results can be well accounted for by a neural population coding model in which: (i) relative audio-visual timing is represented by the distributed activity across a relatively small number of neurons tuned to different delays; (ii) the algorithm for reading out this population code is efficient, but subject to biases owing to under-sampling; and (iii) the effect of adaptation is to modify neuronal response gain. These results suggest that multisensory timing information is represented by a dedicated population code and that shifts in perceived simultaneity following asynchrony adaptation arise from analogous neural processes to well-known perceptual after-effects.

  14. Fishery-independent data reveal negative effect of human population density on Caribbean predatory fish communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Stallings

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the current status of predatory fish communities, and the effects fishing has on them, is vitally important information for management. However, data are often insufficient at region-wide scales to assess the effects of extraction in coral reef ecosystems of developing nations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, I overcome this difficulty by using a publicly accessible, fisheries-independent database to provide a broad scale, comprehensive analysis of human impacts on predatory reef fish communities across the greater Caribbean region. Specifically, this study analyzed presence and diversity of predatory reef fishes over a gradient of human population density. Across the region, as human population density increases, presence of large-bodied fishes declines, and fish communities become dominated by a few smaller-bodied species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Complete disappearance of several large-bodied fishes indicates ecological and local extinctions have occurred in some densely populated areas. These findings fill a fundamentally important gap in our knowledge of the ecosystem effects of artisanal fisheries in developing nations, and provide support for multiple approaches to data collection where they are commonly unavailable.

  15. Microsatellites loci reveal heterozygosis and population structure in vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Nava, Claudia; León-Paniagua, Livia; Ortega, Jorge

    2014-06-01

    A limited number of studies have focused on the population genetic structure of vampire bats (Desmous rotundus) in America. This medium-sized bat is distributed in tropical areas of the continent with high prevalence in forested livestock areas. The aim of this work was to characterize the vampire population structure and their genetic differentiation. For this, we followed standard methods by which live vampires (caught by mist-netting) and preserved material from scientific collections, were obtained for a total of 15 different locations, ranging from Chihuahua (North) to Quintana Roo (Southeast). Tissue samples were obtained from both live and collected animals, and the genetic differentiation, within and among localities, was assessed by the use of seven microsatellite loci. Our results showed that all loci were polymorphic and no private alleles were detected. High levels of heterozygosis were detected when the proportion of alleles in each locus were compared. Pairwise (ST) and R(ST) detected significant genetic differentiation among individuals from different localities. Our population structure results indicate the presence of eleven clusters, with a high percentage of assigned individuals to some specific collecting site.

  16. Variation of phlorotannins among three populations of Fucus vesiculosus as revealed by HPLC and colorimetric quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivikko, R; Eränen, J K; Loponen, J; Jormalainen, V

    2008-01-01

    In ecological studies, phlorotannins have conventionally been quantified as a group with similar functionality. Since this group consists of oligo- and polymers, the quantification of their pooled contents alone may not sufficiently describe the variation of these metabolites. Genetic variation, plastic responses to environment, and the ecological functions of separate phlorotannin oligo- and polymers may differ. Two analyses, i.e., the colorimetric Folin-Ciocalteu assay and a normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method were used to study genetic and environmental variation in phlorotannins of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus (L.). The colorimetric method provides the total phlorotannin content, the latter a profile of 14 separate traces from the phenolic extract that represent an individual or groups of phlorotannins. We reared the algae that originated from three separate populations in a common garden for 3 months under ambient and enriched-nutrient availability and found that they differed in both their total phlorotannin content and in phlorotannin profiles. Some individual traces of the profiles separated the populations more clearly than the colorimetric assay. Although nutrient enrichment decreased total phlorotannin content, it did not show a significant influence on the phlorotannin profile. This implies that plastic responses of compounds other than phlorotannins may interfere with the determination of total phlorotannins. However, the phlorotannin profile and the total content showed genetic variation among local populations of F. vesiculosus; therefore, phlorotannins may respond to natural selection and evolve both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  17. Genome-wide association study reveals regions associated with gestation length in two pig populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, A M; Lopes, M S; Harlizius, B; Bastiaansen, J W M

    2016-04-01

    Reproduction traits, such as gestation length (GLE), play an important role in dam line breeding in pigs. The objective of our study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with GLE in two pig populations. Genotypes and deregressed breeding values were available for 2081 Dutch Landrace-based (DL) and 2301 Large White-based (LW) pigs. We identified two QTL regions for GLE, one in each population. For DL, three associated SNPs were detected in one QTL region spanning 0.52 Mbp on Sus scrofa chromosome (SSC) 2. For LW, four associated SNPs were detected in one region of 0.14 Mbp on SSC5. The region on SSC2 contains the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF) gene, which promotes embryo implantation and has been described to be involved in embryo survival throughout gestation. The associated SNP can be used for marker-assisted selection in the studied populations, and further studies of the HBEGF gene are warranted to investigate its role in GLE.

  18. Microscale oxygraphy reveals OXPHOS impairment in MRC mutant cells

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Given the complexity of the respiratory chain structure, assembly and regulation, the diagnostic workout for the identification of defects of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is a major challenge. Spectrophotometric assays, that measure the activity of individual respiratory complexes in tissue and cell homogenates or isolated mitochondria, are highly specific, but their utilization is limited by the availability of sufficient biological material and intrinsic sensitivity. A further limitat...

  19. EDARV370A associated facial characteristics in Uyghur population revealing further pleiotropic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qianqian; Li, Jinxi; Tan, Jingze; Yang, Yajun; Zhang, Manfei; Wu, Sijie; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Juan; Qin, Pengfei; Guan, Yaqun; Jiao, Yi; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Sabeti, Pardis C; Tang, Kun; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li; Wang, Sijia

    2016-01-01

    An adaptive variant of human Ectodysplasin receptor, EDARV370A, had undergone strong positive selection in East Asia. In mice and humans, EDARV370A was found to affect ectodermal-derived characteristics, including hair thickness, hair shape, active sweat gland density and teeth formation. Facial characteristics are also largely ectodermal derived. In this study, taking advantage of an admixed population of East Asian and European ancestry-the Uyghur, we aim to test whether EDARV370A is affecting facial characteristics and to investigate its pleiotropic nature and genetic model. In a sample of 1027 Uyghurs, we discover that EDARV370A is significantly associated with several facial characteristics, in particular shape of earlobe (P = 3.64 × 10 (-6) ) and type of chin (P = 9.23 × 10 (-5) ), with successful replication in other East Asian populations. Additionally, in this Uyghur population, we replicate previous association findings of incisors shoveling (P = 1.02 × 10 (-7) ), double incisors shoveling (P = 1.86 × 10 (-12) ) and hair straightness (P = 3.99 × 10 (-16) ), providing strong evidence supporting an additive model for the EDARV370A associations. Partial least square path model confirms EDARV370A systematically affect these weakly related ectodermal-derived characteristics, suggesting the pleiotropic effect of EDARV370A mainly plays roles in early embryo development. This study extends our knowledge about the pleiotropic nature of EDARV370A and provides potential clues to its adaptation fitness in human evolution.

  20. Electronic tagging of green sturgeon reveals population structure and movement among estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, S.T.; Erickson, D.L.; Moser, M.L.; Williams, G.; Langness, O.P.; McCovey, B.W.; Belchik, M.; Vogel, D.; Pinnix, W.; Kelly, J.T.; Heublein, J.C.; Klimley, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Green sturgeon Acipenser medirostris spend much of their lives outside of their natal rivers, but the details of their migrations and habitat use are poorly known, which limits our understanding of how this species might be affected by human activities and habitat degradation.We tagged 355 green sturgeon with acoustic transmitters on their spawning grounds and in known nonspawning aggregation sites and examined their movement among these sites and other potentially important locations using automated data-logging hydrophones. We found that green sturgeon inhabit a number of estuarine and coastal sites over the summer, including the Columbia River estuary, Willapa Bay, Grays Harbor, and the estuaries of certain smaller rivers in Oregon, especially the Umpqua River estuary. Green sturgeon from different natal rivers exhibited different patterns of habitat use; most notably, San Francisco Bay was used only by Sacramento River fish, while the Umpqua River estuary was used mostly by fish from the Klamath and Rogue rivers. Earlier work, based on analysis of microsatellite markers, suggested that the Columbia River mixed stock was mainly composed of fish from the Sacramento River, but our results indicate that fish from the Rogue and Klamath River populations frequently use the Columbia River as well. We also found evidence for the existence of migratory contingentswithin spawning populations.Our findings have significant implications for the management of the threatened Sacramento River population of green sturgeon, which migrates to inland waters outside of California where anthropogenic impacts, including fisheries bycatch and water pollution, may be a concern. Our results also illustrate the utility of acoustic tracking to elucidate the migratory behavior of animals that are otherwise difficult to observe. ?? American Fisheries Society 2011.

  1. Genetic diversity in a natural population of the halophytic legume Prosopis strombulifera revealed by AFLP fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analia Llanes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Prosopis strombulifera (Lam. Benth. is a spiny shrub with the maximum tolerance limits reported for halophytic plants. This species is frequently found in the salinized areas in south-western of Córdoba and San Luis provinces, Argentina. Little is known about the genetic diversity within this species in a native population. Genetic diversity in 60 plants of P. strombulifera in south-western San Luis was investigated using AFLP analysis. Polymorphism was found among the samples tested. Four combinations of primers led to the identification of an average of 250 polymorphic bands and the data were used for cluster analysis. P. strombulifera genotypes are clearly separated in subclusters and reflect the diversity within the collection area. This study is a contribution to describe the intra-specific diversity in a natural population of P. strombulifera, and the polymorphism obtained is comparable with other populations of Prosopis species. Results demonstrate the importance of identifying different intra-population genotypes as components of a gene bank of P. strombulifera.Diversidad genética en una población natural de la leguminosa halófita Prosopis strombulifera revelado por el análisis de AFLP. Prosopis strombulifera (Lam. Benth. es un subarbusto espinoso con limites máximos de tolerancia informado para especies halófitas. P. strombulifera se encuentra en los suelos salinizados del Sur-Oeste de las provincias de Córdoba y San Luis, Argentina. El conocimiento sobre la diversidad genética en poblaciones nativas de esta especie es escaso. En este trabajo se investigó la diversidad genética en 60 plantas de P. strombulifera mediante el análisis por AFLP. Se observó polimorfismo entre las muestras analizadas, cuatro combinaciones de cebadores identificaron un promedio de 250 bandas polimorficas, las que fueron utilizadas para análisis de agrupamientos. Los genotipos de P. strombulifera fueron separados en subgrupos reflejando la

  2. PopulationProfiler: A Tool for Population Analysis and Visualization of Image-Based Cell Screening Data

    OpenAIRE

    Matuszewski, Damian J.; Carolina Wählby; Jordi Carreras Puigvert; Ida-Maria Sintorn

    2016-01-01

    Image-based screening typically produces quantitative measurements of cell appearance. Large-scale screens involving tens of thousands of images, each containing hundreds of cells described by hundreds of measurements, result in overwhelming amounts of data. Reducing per-cell measurements to the averages across the image(s) for each treatment leads to loss of potentially valuable information on population variability. We present PopulationProfiler-a new software tool that reduces per-cell mea...

  3. Mathematical determination of cell population doubling times for multiple cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daukste, Liene; Basse, Britta; Baguley, Bruce C; Wall, David J N

    2012-10-01

    Cell cycle times are vital parameters in cancer research, and short cell cycle times are often related to poor survival of cancer patients. A method for experimental estimation of cell cycle times, or doubling times of cultured cancer cell populations, based on addition of paclitaxel (an inhibitor of cell division) has been proposed in literature. We use a mathematical model to investigate relationships between essential parameters of the cell division cycle following inhibition of cell division. The reduction in the number of cells engaged in DNA replication reaches a plateau as the concentration of paclitaxel is increased; this can be determined experimentally. From our model we have derived a plateau log reduction formula for proliferating cells and established that there are linear relationships between the plateau log reduction values and the reciprocal of doubling times (i.e. growth rates of the populations). We have therefore provided theoretical justification of an important experimental technique to determine cell doubling times. Furthermore, we have applied Monte Carlo experiments to justify the suggested linear relationships used to estimate doubling time from 5-day cell culture assays. We show that our results are applicable to cancer cell populations with cell loss present.

  4. Population genomics reveals a possible history of backcrossing and recombination in the gynogenetic fish Poecilia formosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberici da Barbiano, Laura; Gompert, Zachariah; Aspbury, Andrea S; Gabor, Caitlin R; Nice, Chris C

    2013-08-20

    Unisexual sperm-dependent vertebrates are of hybrid origins, rare, and predicted to be short-lived as a result of several challenges arising from their mode of reproduction. In particular, because of a lack of recombination, clonal species are predicted to have a low potential to respond to natural selection. However, many unisexual sperm-dependent species persist, and assessing the genetic diversity present in these species is fundamental to understanding how they avoid extinction. We used population genomic methods to assess genotypic variation within the unisexual fish Poecilia formosa. Measures of admixture and population differentiation, as well as clustering analyses, indicate that the genomes of individuals of P. formosa are admixed and intermediate between Poecilia latipinna and Poecilia mexicana, consistent with the hypothesis of their hybrid origins. Bayesian genomic cline analyses indicate that about 12% of sampled loci exhibit patterns consistent with inheritance from only one parent. The estimation of observed heterozygosity clearly suggests that P. formosa is not comprised of direct descendants of a single nonrecombining asexual F1 hybrid individual. Additionally, the estimation of observed heterozygosity provides support for the hypothesis that the history of this unisexual species has included backcrossing with the parent species before the onset of gynogenesis. We also document high levels of variation among asexual individuals, which is attributable to recombination (historical or ongoing) and the accumulation of mutations. The high genetic variation suggests that this unisexual vertebrate has more potential to respond to natural selection than if they were frozen F1 hybrids.

  5. Multilocus sequence typing analysis reveals that Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans is a recombinant population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogliati, Massimo; Zani, Alberto; Rickerts, Volker; McCormick, Ilka; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Velegraki, Aristea; Escandon, Patricia; Ichikawa, Tomoe; Ikeda, Reiko; Bienvenue, Anne-Lise; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Tore, Okan; Akcaglar, Sevim; Lockhart, Shawn; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Varma, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans (serotype D) represents about 30% of the clinical isolates in Europe and is present less frequently in the other continents. It is the prevalent etiological agent in primary cutaneous cryptococcosis as well as in cryptococcal skin lesions of disseminated cryptococcosis. Very little is known about the genotypic diversity of this Cryptococcus subtype. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotypic diversity among a set of clinical and environmental C. neoformans var. neoformans isolates and to evaluate the relationship between genotypes, geographical origin and clinical manifestations. A total of 83 globally collected C. neoformans var. neoformans isolates from Italy, Germany, France, Belgium, Denmark, Greece, Turkey, Thailand, Japan, Colombia, and the USA, recovered from different sources (primary and secondary cutaneous cryptococcosis, disseminated cryptococcosis, the environment, and animals), were included in the study. All isolates were confirmed to belong to genotype VNIV by molecular typing and they were further investigated by MLST analysis. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic as well as network analysis strongly suggested the existence of a recombinant rather than a clonal population structure. Geographical origin and source of isolation were not correlated with a specific MLST genotype. The comparison with a set of outgroup C. neoformans var. grubii isolates provided clear evidence that the two varieties have different population structures. PMID:26768709

  6. Pronounced genetic differentiation and recent secondary contact in the mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa revealed by population genomic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianfang; Yang, Yuchen; Chen, Qipian; Fang, Lu; He, Ziwen; Guo, Wuxia; Qiao, Sitan; Wang, Zhengzhen; Guo, Miaomiao; Zhong, Cairong; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Systematically investigating the impacts of Pleistocene sea-level fluctuations on mangrove plants may provide a better understanding of their demographic history and useful information for their conservation. Therefore, we conducted population genomic analyses of 88 nuclear genes to explore the population dynamics of a mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa across the Indo-West Pacific region. Our results revealed pronounced genetic differentiation in this species between the populations from the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, which may be attributable to the long-term isolation between the western and eastern coasts of the Malay Peninsula during sea-level drops in the Pleistocene glacial periods. The mixing of haplotypes from the two highly divergent groups was identified in a Cambodian population at almost all 88 nuclear genes, suggesting genetic admixture of the two lineages at the boundary region. Similar genetic admixture was also found in other populations from Southeast Asia based on the Bayesian clustering analysis of six nuclear genes, which suggests extensive and recent secondary contact of the two divergent lineages in Southeast Asia. Computer simulations indicated substantial migration from the Indian Ocean towards the South China Sea, which likely results in the genetic admixture in Southeast Asia. PMID:27380895

  7. Population genetic patterns revealed by microsatellite data challenge the mitochondrial DNA based taxonomy of Astyanax in Mexico (Characidae, Teleostei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorf, Bernhard; Wilkens, Horst; Strecker, Ulrike

    2011-07-01

    Astyanax has become an important model system for evolutionary studies of cave animals. We investigated correlations of population genetic patterns revealed by microsatellite data and phylogeographic patterns shown by mitochondrial DNA sequences in Mexican cave and surface fish of the genus Astyanax (Characidae, Teleostei) to improve the understanding of the colonization history of this neotropical fish in Central and North America and to assess a recent taxonomic classification. The distribution of nuclear genotypes is not congruent with that of the mitochondrial clades. Admixture analyses suggest there has been nuclear gene flow between populations defined by different mitochondrial clades. The microsatellite data indicate that there was mitochondrial capture of a cave population from adjacent populations. Furthermore, gene flow also occurred between populations belonging to different nuclear genotypic clusters. This indicates that neither the nuclear genotypic clusters nor the mitochondrial clades represent independent evolutionary units, although the mitochondrial divergences are high and in a range usually characteristic for different fish species. This conclusion is supported by the presence of morphologically intermediate forms. Our analyses show that the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt limited gene flow, but has been crossed by Astyanax several times. In Yucatán, where obvious geographic barriers are missing, the incongruence between the distribution of nuclear and mitochondrial markers reflects random colonization events caused by inundations or marine transgressions resulting in random phylogeographic breaks. Thus, conclusions about the phylogeographic history and even more about the delimitation of species should not be based on single genetic markers.

  8. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  9. Side population sorting separates subfractions of cycling and non-cycling intestinal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. von Furstenberg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report here that side population (SP sorting allows for the simultaneous isolation of two intestinal stem cell (ISC subsets from wild-type (WT mice which are phenotypically different and represent cycling and non-cycling pools of cells. Following 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU injection, in the upper side population (USP the percentage of EdU+ was 36% showing this fraction to be highly proliferative. In the lower side population (LSP, only 0.4% of cells were EdU+, indicating this fraction to be predominantly non-cycling. Using Lgr5-EGFP mice, we show that Lgr5-EGFPhi cells, representing actively cycling ISCs, are essentially exclusive to the USP. In contrast, using histone 2B-YFP mice, SP analysis revealed YFP label retaining cells (LRCs in both the USP and the LSP. Correspondingly, evaluation of the SP fractions for mRNA markers by qRT-PCR showed that the USP was enriched in transcripts associated with both quiescent and active ISCs. In contrast, the LSP expressed mRNA markers of quiescent ISCs while being de-enriched for those of the active ISC. Both the USP and LSP are capable of generating enteroids in culture which include the four intestinal lineages. We conclude that sorting of USP and LSP fractions represents a novel isolation of cycling and non-cycling ISCs from WT mice.

  10. Ancient DNA reveals prehistoric gene-flow from siberia in the complex human population history of North East Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Balanovsky, Oleg; Brandt, Guido; Khartanovich, Valery; Buzhilova, Alexandra; Koshel, Sergey; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Gronenborn, Detlef; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Kolpakov, Eugen; Shumkin, Vladimir; Alt, Kurt W; Balanovska, Elena; Cooper, Alan; Haak, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better understand the dynamics that have shaped the gene pool of North East Europeans, we generated and analyzed 34 mitochondrial genotypes from the skeletal remains of three archaeological sites in northwest Russia. These sites were dated to the Mesolithic and the Early Metal Age (7,500 and 3,500 uncalibrated years Before Present). We applied a suite of population genetic analyses (principal component analysis, genetic distance mapping, haplotype sharing analyses) and compared past demographic models through coalescent simulations using Bayesian Serial SimCoal and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Comparisons of genetic data from ancient and modern-day populations revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial makeup of North East Europeans through time. Mesolithic foragers showed high frequencies and diversity of haplogroups U (U2e, U4, U5a), a pattern observed previously in European hunter-gatherers from Iberia to Scandinavia. In contrast, the presence of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups C, D, and Z in Early Metal Age individuals suggested discontinuity with Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and genetic influx from central/eastern Siberia. We identified remarkable genetic dissimilarities between prehistoric and modern-day North East Europeans/Saami, which suggests an important role of post-Mesolithic migrations from Western Europe and subsequent population replacement/extinctions. This work demonstrates how ancient DNA can improve our understanding of human population movements across

  11. Ancient DNA reveals prehistoric gene-flow from siberia in the complex human population history of North East Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clio Der Sarkissian

    Full Text Available North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better understand the dynamics that have shaped the gene pool of North East Europeans, we generated and analyzed 34 mitochondrial genotypes from the skeletal remains of three archaeological sites in northwest Russia. These sites were dated to the Mesolithic and the Early Metal Age (7,500 and 3,500 uncalibrated years Before Present. We applied a suite of population genetic analyses (principal component analysis, genetic distance mapping, haplotype sharing analyses and compared past demographic models through coalescent simulations using Bayesian Serial SimCoal and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Comparisons of genetic data from ancient and modern-day populations revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial makeup of North East Europeans through time. Mesolithic foragers showed high frequencies and diversity of haplogroups U (U2e, U4, U5a, a pattern observed previously in European hunter-gatherers from Iberia to Scandinavia. In contrast, the presence of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups C, D, and Z in Early Metal Age individuals suggested discontinuity with Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and genetic influx from central/eastern Siberia. We identified remarkable genetic dissimilarities between prehistoric and modern-day North East Europeans/Saami, which suggests an important role of post-Mesolithic migrations from Western Europe and subsequent population replacement/extinctions. This work demonstrates how ancient DNA can improve our understanding of human population

  12. Ascl3 knockout and cell ablation models reveal complexity of salivary gland maintenance and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arany, Szilvia; Catalán, Marcelo A; Roztocil, Elisa; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2011-05-15

    Expression of the transcription factor, Ascl3, marks a population of adult progenitor cells, which can give rise to both acinar and duct cell types in the murine salivary glands. Using a previously reported Ascl3(EGFP-Cre/+) knock-in strain, we demonstrate that Ascl3-expressing cells represent a molecularly distinct, and proliferating population of progenitor cells located in salivary gland ducts. To investigate both the role of the Ascl3 transcription factor, and the role of the cells in which it is expressed, we generated knockout and cell-specific ablation models. Ascl3 knockout mice develop smaller salivary glands than wild type littermates, but secrete saliva normally. They display a lower level of cell proliferation, consistent with their smaller size. In the absence of Ascl3, the cells maintain their progenitor function and continue to generate both acinar and duct cells. To directly test the role of the progenitor cells, themselves, in salivary gland development and regeneration, we used Cre-activated expression of diphtheria toxin (DTA) in the Ascl3-expressing (Ascl3+) cell population, resulting in specific cell ablation of Ascl3+ cells. In the absence of the Ascl3+ progenitor cells, the mice developed morphologically normal, albeit smaller, salivary glands able to secrete saliva. Furthermore, in a ductal ligation model of salivary gland injury, the glands of these mice were able to regenerate acinar cells. Our results indicate that Ascl3+ cells are active proliferating progenitors, but they are not the only precursors for salivary gland development or regeneration. We conclude that maintenance of tissue homeostasis in the salivary gland must involve more than one progenitor cell population.

  13. Meta-Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Reveals Several Population Bottlenecks during Worldwide Migrations of Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes A. Lenstra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have investigated the differentiation of mitochondrial DNA in Eurasian, African and American cattle as well as archaeological bovine material. A global survey of these studies shows that haplogroup distributions are more stable in time than in space. All major migrations of cattle have shifted the haplogroup distributions considerably with a reduction of the number of haplogroups and/or an expansion of haplotypes that are rare or absent in the ancestral populations. The most extreme case is the almost exclusive colonization of Africa by the T1 haplogroup, which is rare in Southwest Asian cattle. In contrast, ancient samples invariably show continuity with present-day cattle from the same location. These findings indicate strong maternal founder effects followed by limited maternal gene flow when new territories are colonized. However, effects of adaptation to new environments may also play a role.

  14. The Population Genomics of Sunflowers and Genomic Determinants of Protein Evolution Revealed by RNAseq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren H. Rieseberg

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated the causes of evolutionary rate variation among plant nuclear genes, especially in recently diverged species still capable of hybridizing in the wild. The recent advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS permits investigation of genome wide rates of protein evolution and the role of selection in generating and maintaining divergence. Here, we use individual whole-transcriptome sequencing (RNAseq to refine our understanding of the population genomics of wild species of sunflowers (Helianthus spp. and the factors that affect rates of protein evolution. We aligned 35 GB of transcriptome sequencing data and identified 433,257 polymorphic sites (SNPs in a reference transcriptome comprising 16,312 genes. Using SNP markers, we identified strong population clustering largely corresponding to the three species analyzed here (Helianthus annuus, H. petiolaris, H. debilis, with one distinct early generation hybrid. Then, we calculated the proportions of adaptive substitution fixed by selection (alpha and identified gene ontology categories with elevated values of alpha. The “response to biotic stimulus” category had the highest mean alpha across the three interspecific comparisons, implying that natural selection imposed by other organisms plays an important role in driving protein evolution in wild sunflowers. Finally, we examined the relationship between protein evolution (dN/dS ratio and several genomic factors predicted to co-vary with protein evolution (gene expression level, divergence and specificity, genetic divergence [FST], and nucleotide diversity pi. We find that variation in rates of protein divergence was correlated with gene expression level and specificity, consistent with results from a broad range of taxa and timescales. This would in turn imply that these factors govern protein evolution both at a microevolutionary and macroevolutionary timescale. Our results contribute to a general understanding of the

  15. Population genetics inside a cell: Mutations and mitochondrial genome maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Sidhartha; Shraiman, Boris; Gottschling, Dan

    2012-02-01

    In realistic ecological and evolutionary systems natural selection acts on multiple levels, i.e. it acts on individuals as well as on collection of individuals. An understanding of evolutionary dynamics of such systems is limited in large part due to the lack of experimental systems that can challenge theoretical models. Mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) are subjected to selection acting on cellular as well as organelle levels. It is well accepted that mtDNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unstable and can degrade over time scales comparable to yeast cell division time. We utilize a recent technology designed in Gottschling lab to extract DNA from populations of aged yeast cells and deep sequencing to characterize mtDNA variation in a population of young and old cells. In tandem, we developed a stochastic model that includes the essential features of mitochondrial biology that provides a null model for expected mtDNA variation. Overall, we find approximately 2% of the polymorphic loci that show significant increase in frequency as cells age providing direct evidence for organelle level selection. Such quantitative study of mtDNA dynamics is absolutely essential to understand the propagation of mtDNA mutations linked to a spectrum of age-related diseases in humans.

  16. Comparative transcriptome analysis in induced neural stem cells reveals defined neural cell identities in vitro and after transplantation into the adult rodent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Anna-Lena; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Zerfass, Christina; Senner, Volker; Ehrlich, Marc; Psathaki, Olympia E; Han, Dong Wook; Tapia, Natalia; Zaehres, Holm; Schöler, Hans R; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Hargus, Gunnar

    2016-05-01

    Reprogramming technology enables the production of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from somatic cells by direct transdifferentiation. However, little is known on how neural programs in these induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) differ from those of alternative stem cell populations in vitro and in vivo. Here, we performed transcriptome analyses on murine iNSCs in comparison to brain-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and pluripotent stem cell-derived NPCs, which revealed distinct global, neural, metabolic and cell cycle-associated marks in these populations. iNSCs carried a hindbrain/posterior cell identity, which could be shifted towards caudal, partially to rostral but not towards ventral fates in vitro. iNSCs survived after transplantation into the rodent brain and exhibited in vivo-characteristics, neural and metabolic programs similar to transplanted NSCs. However, iNSCs vastly retained caudal identities demonstrating cell-autonomy of regional programs in vivo. These data could have significant implications for a variety of in vitro- and in vivo-applications using iNSCs.

  17. Microfabricated microbial fuel cell arrays reveal electrochemically active microbes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijie Hou

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are remarkable "green energy" devices that exploit microbes to generate electricity from organic compounds. MFC devices currently being used and studied do not generate sufficient power to support widespread and cost-effective applications. Hence, research has focused on strategies to enhance the power output of the MFC devices, including exploring more electrochemically active microbes to expand the few already known electricigen families. However, most of the MFC devices are not compatible with high throughput screening for finding microbes with higher electricity generation capabilities. Here, we describe the development of a microfabricated MFC array, a compact and user-friendly platform for the identification and characterization of electrochemically active microbes. The MFC array consists of 24 integrated anode and cathode chambers, which function as 24 independent miniature MFCs and support direct and parallel comparisons of microbial electrochemical activities. The electricity generation profiles of spatially distinct MFC chambers on the array loaded with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 differed by less than 8%. A screen of environmental microbes using the array identified an isolate that was related to Shewanella putrefaciens IR-1 and Shewanella sp. MR-7, and displayed 2.3-fold higher power output than the S. oneidensis MR-1 reference strain. Therefore, the utility of the MFC array was demonstrated.

  18. Characterization of Side Cell Populations Obtained from Human Amnion Mesenchymal Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; PIAO Zhengfu; Mamoru Kobayashi; Koji Sasaki; DING Shu-qin; Aiko Kikuchi; Isao Kamo; Norio Sakuragawa

    2009-01-01

    Human amnion mesenchymal cells (AMCs) contain multipotent cells. To enrich such multipotent stem cells, we applied to AMCs the new method for the isolation of side population (SP) cells used for the enrichment of multipotent stem cells from many tissues. We succeeded in obtaining SP cells from AMCs (AMC-SP cells). AMC-SP cells were found in 0.2% of AMCs, irrespective of the length of pregnant period, ranging from 37 to 40 weeks. Cell cycle analyses uggested that AMC-SP cells belonged to a cell population that proliferated very slowly and/or was in a quiescent state in the amniotic membrane. Upon culturing, they proliferated with 40 to 80 cell doublings. However, they did not form colonies in a soft agarose culture, whereas HepG2 cells, representative human hepatoma cells formed many large colonies. These results suggest that AMC-SP cells that have considerable value for the use of regenerative medicine can be managed safely in vitro.

  19. Cell population structure prior to bifurcation predicts efficiency of directed differentiation in human induced pluripotent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargaje, Rhishikesh; Trachana, Kalliopi; Shelton, Martin N.; McGinnis, Christopher S.; Zhou, Joseph X.; Chadick, Cora; Cook, Savannah; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Huang, Sui; Hood, Leroy

    2017-01-01

    Steering the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) toward specific cell types is crucial for patient-specific disease modeling and drug testing. This effort requires the capacity to predict and control when and how multipotent progenitor cells commit to the desired cell fate. Cell fate commitment represents a critical state transition or “tipping point” at which complex systems undergo a sudden qualitative shift. To characterize such transitions during iPSC to cardiomyocyte differentiation, we analyzed the gene expression patterns of 96 developmental genes at single-cell resolution. We identified a bifurcation event early in the trajectory when a primitive streak-like cell population segregated into the mesodermal and endodermal lineages. Before this branching point, we could detect the signature of an imminent critical transition: increase in cell heterogeneity and coordination of gene expression. Correlation analysis of gene expression profiles at the tipping point indicates transcription factors that drive the state transition toward each alternative cell fate and their relationships with specific phenotypic readouts. The latter helps us to facilitate small molecule screening for differentiation efficiency. To this end, we set up an analysis of cell population structure at the tipping point after systematic variation of the protocol to bias the differentiation toward mesodermal or endodermal cell lineage. We were able to predict the proportion of cardiomyocytes many days before cells manifest the differentiated phenotype. The analysis of cell populations undergoing a critical state transition thus affords a tool to forecast cell fate outcomes and can be used to optimize differentiation protocols to obtain desired cell populations. PMID:28167799

  20. Extracellular matrix stiffness modulates VEGF calcium signaling in endothelial cells: individual cell and population analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derricks, Kelsey E; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Nugent, Matthew A

    2015-09-01

    Vascular disease and its associated complications are the number one cause of death in the Western world. Both extracellular matrix stiffening and dysfunctional endothelial cells contribute to vascular disease. We examined endothelial cell calcium signaling in response to VEGF as a function of extracellular matrix stiffness. We developed a new analytical tool to analyze both population based and individual cell responses. Endothelial cells on soft substrates, 4 kPa, were the most responsive to VEGF, whereas cells on the 125 kPa substrates exhibited an attenuated response. Magnitude of activation, not the quantity of cells responding or the number of local maximums each cell experienced distinguished the responses. Individual cell analysis, across all treatments, identified two unique cell clusters. One cluster, containing most of the cells, exhibited minimal or slow calcium release. The remaining cell cluster had a rapid, high magnitude VEGF activation that ultimately defined the population based average calcium response. Interestingly, at low doses of VEGF, the high responding cell cluster contained smaller cells on average, suggesting that cell shape and size may be indicative of VEGF-sensitive endothelial cells. This study provides a new analytical tool to quantitatively analyze individual cell signaling response kinetics, that we have used to help uncover outcomes that are hidden within the average. The ability to selectively identify highly VEGF responsive cells within a population may lead to a better understanding of the specific phenotypic characteristics that define cell responsiveness, which could provide new insight for the development of targeted anti- and pro-angiogenic therapies.

  1. Identification of Lygus hesperus by DNA barcoding reveals insignificant levels of genetic structure among distant and habitat diverse populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The western tarnished plant bug Lygus hesperus is an economically important pest that belongs to a complex of morphologically similar species that makes identification problematic. The present study provides evidence for the use of DNA barcodes from populations of L. hesperus from the western United States of America for accurate identification. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study reports DNA barcodes for 134 individuals of the western tarnished plant bug from alfalfa and strawberry agricultural fields in the western United States of America. Sequence divergence estimates of <3% reveal that morphologically variable individuals presumed to be L. hesperus were accurately identified. Paired estimates of F(st and subsequent estimates of gene flow show that geographically distinct populations of L. hesperus are genetically similar. Therefore, our results support and reinforce the relatively recent (<100 years migration of the western tarnished plant bug into agricultural habitats across the western United States. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study reveals that despite wide host plant usage and phenotypically plastic morphological traits, the commonly recognized western tarnished plant bug belongs to a single species, Lygus hesperus. In addition, no significant genetic structure was found for the geographically diverse populations of western tarnished plant bug used in this study.

  2. PopulationProfiler: A Tool for Population Analysis and Visualization of Image-Based Cell Screening Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Matuszewski

    Full Text Available Image-based screening typically produces quantitative measurements of cell appearance. Large-scale screens involving tens of thousands of images, each containing hundreds of cells described by hundreds of measurements, result in overwhelming amounts of data. Reducing per-cell measurements to the averages across the image(s for each treatment leads to loss of potentially valuable information on population variability. We present PopulationProfiler-a new software tool that reduces per-cell measurements to population statistics. The software imports measurements from a simple text file, visualizes population distributions in a compact and comprehensive way, and can create gates for subpopulation classes based on control samples. We validate the tool by showing how PopulationProfiler can be used to analyze the effect of drugs that disturb the cell cycle, and compare the results to those obtained with flow cytometry.

  3. PopulationProfiler: A Tool for Population Analysis and Visualization of Image-Based Cell Screening Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewski, Damian J; Wählby, Carolina; Puigvert, Jordi Carreras; Sintorn, Ida-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Image-based screening typically produces quantitative measurements of cell appearance. Large-scale screens involving tens of thousands of images, each containing hundreds of cells described by hundreds of measurements, result in overwhelming amounts of data. Reducing per-cell measurements to the averages across the image(s) for each treatment leads to loss of potentially valuable information on population variability. We present PopulationProfiler-a new software tool that reduces per-cell measurements to population statistics. The software imports measurements from a simple text file, visualizes population distributions in a compact and comprehensive way, and can create gates for subpopulation classes based on control samples. We validate the tool by showing how PopulationProfiler can be used to analyze the effect of drugs that disturb the cell cycle, and compare the results to those obtained with flow cytometry.

  4. Naturally death-resistant precursor cells revealed as the origin of retinoblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Emmanuelle; Lazzerini Denchi, Eros; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms and the cell-of-origin leading to retinoblastoma are not well defined. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Bremner and colleagues describe the first inheritable model of retinoblastoma, revealing that loss of the pocket proteins pRb and p107 deregulates cell cycle exit in retin...

  5. Muscle Interstitial Cells: A Brief Field Guide to Non-satellite Cell Populations in Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Moyle, Louise A; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is mainly enabled by a population of adult stem cells known as satellite cells. Satellite cells have been shown to be indispensable for adult skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last two decades, other stem/progenitor cell populations resident in the skeletal muscle interstitium have been identified as "collaborators" of satellite cells during regeneration. They also appear to have a key role in replacing skeletal muscle with adipose, fibrous, or bone tissue in pathological conditions. Here, we review the role and known functions of these different interstitial skeletal muscle cell types and discuss their role in skeletal muscle tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and disease, including their therapeutic potential for cell transplantation protocols.

  6. Excess of mutational jackpot events in expanding populations revealed by spatial Luria-Delbrück experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Diana; Gralka, Matti; Kayser, Jona; Anderson, Alex; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2016-10-03

    The genetic diversity of growing cellular populations, such as biofilms, solid tumours or developing embryos, is thought to be dominated by rare, exceptionally large mutant clones. Yet, the emergence of these mutational jackpot events is only understood in well-mixed populations, where they stem from mutations that arise during the first few cell divisions. To study jackpot events in spatially structured populations, we track mutant clones in microbial populations using fluorescence microscopy and population sequencing. High-frequency mutations are found to be massively enriched in microbial colonies compared with well-shaken liquid cultures, as a result of late-occurring mutations surfing at the edge of range expansions. Thus, jackpot events can be generated not only when mutations arise early but also when they occur at favourable locations, which exacerbates their role in adaptation and disease. In particular, because spatial competition with the wild type keeps most mutant clones in a quiescent state, strong selection pressures that kill the wild type promote drug resistance.

  7. Amelogenin test abnormalities revealed in Belarusian population during forensic DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovko, Sergey; Shyla, Alena; Korban, Victorya; Borovko, Alexandra

    2015-03-01

    Study of gender markers is a part of routine forensic genetic examination of crime scene and reference samples, paternity testing and personal identification. Amelogenin locus as a gender marker is included in majority of forensic STR kits of different manufacturers. In current study we report 11 cases of amelogenin abnormalities identified in males of Belarusian origin: 9 cases of AMELY dropout and 2 cases of AMELX dropout. Cases were obtained from forensic casework (n=9) and paternity testing (n=2) groups. In 4 out of 9 AMELY-negative cases deletion of AMELY was associated with the loss of DYS458 marker. In addition, we identified 3 males with SRY-positive XX male syndrome. Deletion of the long arm of the Y-chromosome was detected in two XX males. Loss of the major part of the Y-chromosome was identified in the third XX male. The presence of two X-chromosomes in XX males was confirmed with the use of Mentype(®) Argus X-8 PCR Amplification Kit. AMELY null allele observed in 2 out of 9 cases with AMELY dropout can be caused by mutation in the primer-binding site of AMELY allele. Primer-binding site mutations of AMELX can result in AMELX dropout identified in 2 cases with amplification failure of AMELX. Our study represents the first report and molecular genetic investigation of amelogenin abnormalities in the Belarusian population.

  8. The nature of the Class I population in Ophiuchus as revealed through gas and dust mapping

    CERN Document Server

    van Kempen, T A; Salter, D M; Hogerheijde, M R; Jørgensen, J K; Boogert, A C A

    2009-01-01

    The Ophiuchus clouds, in particular L~1688, are an excellent region to study the embedded phases of star formation, due to the relatively large number of protostars. However, the standard method of finding and characterizing embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) through just their infrared spectral slope does not yield a reliable sample. This may affect the age determinations, often derived from the statistics on the total number of embedded YSOs and pre-main sequence stars within a cloud.Our aim is to characterize the structure of protostellar envelopes on an individual basis and to correctly identify the embedded YSO population of L1688. Spectral maps of the HCO+ J=4--3 and C18O J=3--2 lines using the HARP-B array on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and SCUBA 850 micron dust maps are obtained of all sources in the L1688 region with infrared spectral slopes consistent with, or close to, that of embedded YSOs. Selected 350 micron maps obtained with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory are presented as well....

  9. Genetic variation in Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Kemunting) populations from Malaysia as revealed by inter-simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, T S; Abdullah, T L; Abdullah, N A P; Sinniah, U R

    2015-12-14

    Kemunting (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) from the Myrtaceae family, is native to Malaysia. It is widely used in traditional medicine to treat various illnesses and possesses significant antibacterial properties. In addition, it has great potential as ornamental in landscape design. Genetic variability studies are important for the rational management and conservation of genetic material. In the present study, inter-simple sequence repeat markers were used to assess the genetic diversity of 18 R. tomentosa populations collected from ten states of Peninsular Malaysia. The 11 primers selected generated 173 bands that ranged in size from 1.6 kb to 130 bp, which corresponded to an average of 15.73 bands per primer. Of these bands, 97.69% (169 in total) were polymorphic. High genetic diversity was documented at the species level (H(T) = 0.2705; I = 0.3973; PPB = 97.69%) but there was a low diversity at population level (H(S) = 0.0073; I = 0 .1085; PPB = 20.14%). The high level of genetic differentiation revealed by G(ST) (73%) and analysis of molecular variance (63%), together with the limited gene flow among population (N(m) = 0.1851), suggests that the populations examined are isolated. Results from an unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram and principal coordinate analysis clearly grouped the populations into two geographic groups. This clear grouping can also be demonstrated by the significant Mantel test (r = 0.581, P = 0.001). We recommend that all the R. tomentosa populations be preserved in conservation program.

  10. Complex interactions of the Eastern and Western Slavic populations with other European groups as revealed by mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Tomasz; Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava V; Perkova, Maria A; Bednarek, Jarosław; Woźniak, Marcin

    2007-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation was examined by the control region sequencing (HVS I and HVS II) and RFLP analysis of haplogroup-diagnostic coding region sites in 570 individuals from four regional populations of Poles and two Russian groups from northwestern part of the country. Additionally, sequences of complete mitochondrial genomes representing K1a1b1a subclade in Polish and Polish Roma populations have been determined. Haplogroup frequency patterns revealed in Poles and Russians are similar to those characteristic of other Europeans. However, there are several features of Slavic mtDNA pools seen on the level of regional populations which are helpful in the understanding of complex interactions of the Eastern and Western Slavic populations with other European groups. One of the most important is the presence of subhaplogroups U5b1b1, D5, Z1 and U8a with simultaneous scarcity of haplogroup K in populations of northwestern Russia suggesting the participation of Finno-Ugrian tribes in the formation of mtDNA pools of Russians from this region. The results of genetic structure analyses suggest that Russians from Velikii Novgorod area (northwestern Russia) and Poles from Suwalszczyzna (northeastern Poland) differ from all remaining Polish and Russian samples. Simultaneously, northwestern Russians and northeastern Poles bear some similarities to Baltic (Latvians) and Finno-Ugrian groups (Estonians) of northeastern Europe, especially on the level of U5 haplogroup frequencies. The occurrence of K1a1b1a subcluster in Poles and Polish Roma is one of the first direct proofs of the presence of Ashkenazi-specific mtDNA lineages in non-Jewish European populations.

  11. Possible Source Populations of the White-backed Planthopper in the Greater Mekong Subregion Revealed by Mitochondrial DNA Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yong; Chu, Dong; Yin, Yan-Qiong; Zhao, Xue-Qing; Chen, Ai-Dong; Khay, Sathya; Douangboupha, Bounneuang; Kyaw, Mu Mu; Kongchuensin, Manita; Ngo, Vien Vinh; Nguyen, Chung Huy

    2016-12-01

    The white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), is a serious pest of rice in Asia. However, little is known regarding the migration of this pest insect from the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) including Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, and Vietnam, into China’s Yunnan Province. To determine the migration patterns of S. furcifera in the GMS and putative secondary immigration inside China’s Yunnan Province, we investigated the population genetic diversity, genetic structure, and gene flow of 42 S. furcifera populations across the six countries in the GMS by intensive sampling using mitochondrial genes. Our study revealed the potential emigration of S. furcifera from the GMS consists primarily of three major sources: 1) the S. furcifera from Laos and Vietnam migrate into south and southeast Yunnan, where they proceed to further migrate into northeast and central Yunnan; 2) the S. furcifera from Myanmar migrate into west Yunnan, and/or central Yunnan, and/or northeast Yunnan; 3) the S. furcifera from Cambodia migrate into southwest Yunnan, where the populations can migrate further into central Yunnan. The new data will not only be helpful in predicting population dynamics of the planthopper, but will also aid in regional control programs for this economically important pest insect.

  12. Muscle side population cells from dystrophic or injured muscle adopt a fibro-adipogenic fate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Penton

    Full Text Available Muscle side population (SP cells are rare multipotent stem cells that can participate in myogenesis and muscle regeneration upon transplantation. While they have been primarily studied for the development of cell-based therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, little is known regarding their non-muscle lineage choices or whether the dystrophic muscle environment affects their ability to repair muscle. Unfortunately, the study of muscle SP cells has been challenged by their low abundance and the absence of specific SP cell markers. To address these issues, we developed culture conditions for the propagation and spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation of muscle SP cells. Using this approach, we show that SP cells from wild type muscle robustly differentiate into satellite cells and form myotubes without requiring co-culture with myogenic cells. Furthermore, this myogenic activity is associated with SP cells negative for immune (CD45 and vascular (CD31 markers but positive for Pax7, Sca1, and the mesenchymal progenitor marker PDGFRα. Additionally, our studies revealed that SP cells isolated from dystrophic or cardiotoxin-injured muscle fail to undergo myogenesis. Instead, these SP cells rapidly expand giving rise to fibroblast and adipocyte progenitors (FAPs and to their differentiated progeny, fibroblasts and adipocytes. Our findings indicate that muscle damage affects the lineage choices of muscle SP cells, promoting their differentiation along fibro-adipogenic lineages while inhibiting myogenesis. These results have implications for a possible role of muscle SP cells in fibrosis and fat deposition in muscular dystrophy. In addition, our studies provide a useful in vitro system to analyze SP cell biology in both normal and pathological conditions.

  13. Malignant behaviorial characteristics of CD133(+/-) glioblastoma cells from a Northern Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozhi; Chen, Lei; Jiang, Zhongmin; Wang, Junfei; Su, Zhiguo; Li, Gang; Yu, Shizhu; Liu, Zhenlin

    2013-01-01

    Following emergence of the tumor stem cell theory, the increasing number of related studies demonstrates the theory's growing importance in cancer research and its potential for clinical applications. Few studies have addressed the in vitro or in vivo properties of glioma stem cells from a Han Chinese population. In the present study, surgically obtained glioblastoma tissue was classified into two subtypes, CD133(+) and CD133(-). The hierarchy, invasiveness, growth tolerance under low nutrient conditions and colony forming abilities of the tissue samples were analyzed. Additionally, the characteristics of tumor cells transplanted subcutaneously or re-transplanted into nude mice were observed. The results demonstrated that CD133(+) glioblastoma cells derived from Han Chinese glioma specimens were more prone to primitive cell differentiation and more invasive than CD133(-) glioblastoma cells, leading to increased tumor malignancy compared with CD133(-) cells. The tumor formation rates of CD133(+) and CD133(-) cells in mice were 26/30 and 2/30, respectively. A comparison of tumor subtypes demonstrated that CD133(+) glioblastoma cells had a lower incidence of cell apoptosis in the tumor tissue and higher protein expression levels of Oct4, Sox2, PCNA, EGFR, Ang2, MMP2 and MMP9 compared with CD133(-) cells. Flow cytometry revealed that in the CD133(+) and CD133(-) glioblastoma cell-induced tumors, the percentage of CD133(+) cells was 2.47±0.67 and 0.44±0.14%, respectively. The tumor formation rates following the re-transplantation of CD133(+) or CD133(-) tumors into nude mice were 10/10 and 4/10, respectively. These findings suggest that the CD133(+) glioblastoma cell subpopulation has a stronger malignant cell phenotype than the CD133(-) subpopulation and that its recurrence rate is increased compared with the primitive tumorigenic rate following in vivo transplantation.

  14. Transcriptome population genomics reveals severe bottleneck and domestication cost in the African rice (Oryza glaberrima).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabholz, Benoit; Sarah, Gautier; Sabot, François; Ruiz, Manuel; Adam, Hélène; Nidelet, Sabine; Ghesquière, Alain; Santoni, Sylvain; David, Jacques; Glémin, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    The African cultivated rice (Oryza glaberrima) was domesticated in West Africa 3000 years ago. Although less cultivated than the Asian rice (O. sativa), O. glaberrima landraces often display interesting adaptation to rustic environment (e.g. drought). Here, using RNA-seq technology, we were able to compare more than 12,000 transcripts between 9 O. glaberrima, 10 wild O. barthii and one O. meridionalis individuals. With a synonymous nucleotide diversity πs = 0.0006 per site, O. glaberrima appears as the least genetically diverse crop grass ever documented. Using approximate Bayesian computation, we estimated that O. glaberrima experienced a severe bottleneck during domestication. This demographic scenario almost fully accounts for the pattern of genetic diversity across O. glaberrima genome as we detected very few outliers regions where positive selection may have further impacted genetic diversity. Moreover, the large excess of derived nonsynonymous substitution that we detected suggests that the O. glaberrima population suffered from the 'cost of domestication'. In addition, we used this genome-scale data set to demonstrate that (i) O. barthii genetic diversity is positively correlated with recombination rate and negatively with gene density, (ii) expression level is negatively correlated with evolutionary constraint, and (iii) one region on chromosome 5 (position 4-6 Mb) exhibits a clear signature of introgression with a yet unidentified Oryza species. This work represents the first genome-wide survey of the African rice genetic diversity and paves the way for further comparison between the African and the Asian rice, notably regarding the genetics underlying domestication traits.

  15. Visualizing allele-specific expression in single cells reveals epigenetic mosaicism in an H19 loss-of-imprinting mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginart, Paul; Kalish, Jennifer M; Jiang, Connie L; Yu, Alice C; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Raj, Arjun

    2016-03-01

    Imprinting is a classic mammalian epigenetic phenomenon that results in expression from a single parental allele. Imprinting defects can lead to inappropriate expression from the normally silenced allele, but it remains unclear whether every cell in a mutant organism follows the population average, which would have profound implications for human imprinting disorders. Here, we apply a new fluorescence in situ hybridization method that measures allele-specific expression in single cells to address this question in mutants exhibiting aberrant H19/Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) imprinting. We show that mutant primary embryonic mouse fibroblasts are comprised of two subpopulations: one expressing both H19 alleles and another expressing only the maternal copy. Only in the latter cell population is Igf2 expression detected. Furthermore, the two subpopulations are stable in that cells do not interconvert between the two expression patterns. Combined small input methylation analysis and transcriptional imaging revealed that these two mutant subpopulations exhibit distinct methylation patterns at their imprinting control regions. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of DNA methylation reduced the proportion of monoallelic cells. Importantly, we observed that the same two subpopulations are also present in vivo within murine cardiac tissue. Our results establish that imprinting disorders can display striking single-cell heterogeneity in their molecular phenotypes and suggest that such heterogeneity may underlie epigenetic mosaicism in human imprinting disorders.

  16. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-04-26

    Abstract Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression.

  17. A quantitative proteomics analysis of MCF7 breast cancer stem and progenitor cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Song; McDermott, Sean P; Deol, Yadwinder; Tan, Zhijing; Wicha, Max S; Lubman, David M

    2015-11-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that breast cancers are initiated and develop from a small population of stem-like cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). These cells are hypothesized to mediate tumor metastasis and contribute to therapeutic resistance. However, the molecular regulatory networks responsible for maintaining CSCs in an undifferentiated state have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we used CSC markers to isolate pure breast CSCs fractions (ALDH+ and CD44+CD24- cell populations) and the mature luminal cells (CD49f-EpCAM+) from the MCF7 cell line. Proteomic analysis was performed on these samples and a total of 3304 proteins were identified. A label-free quantitative method was applied to analyze differentially expressed proteins. Using the criteria of greater than twofold changes and p value analysis of differentially expressed proteins by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) revealed potential molecular regulatory networks that may regulate CSCs. Selected differential proteins were validated by Western blot assay and immunohistochemical staining. The use of proteomics analysis may increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of breast CSCs. This may be of importance in the future development of anti-CSC therapeutics.

  18. A STUDY OF THE DIVERSE T DWARF POPULATION REVEALED BY WISE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, Gregory N.; Wright, Edward L.; McLean, Ian S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Davy Kirkpatrick, J.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Mix, Katholeen; Beichman, Charles A.; Lowrance, Patrick J. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cushing, Michael C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS 111, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft St., Toledo, OH 43606-3328 (United States); Skrutskie, Michael F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Marsh, Kenneth A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Eisenhardt, Peter R. [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Thompson, Maggie A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Bailey, Vanessa; Hinz, Philip M.; Knox, Russell P. [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bloom, Joshua S. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Burgasser, Adam J. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J., E-mail: gmace@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); and others

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of 87 new T dwarfs uncovered with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and 3 brown dwarfs with extremely red near-infrared colors that exhibit characteristics of both L and T dwarfs. Two of the new T dwarfs are likely binaries with L7 {+-} 1 primaries and mid-type T secondaries. In addition, our follow-up program has confirmed 10 previously identified T dwarfs and 4 photometrically selected L and T dwarf candidates in the literature. This sample, along with the previous WISE discoveries, triples the number of known brown dwarfs with spectral types later than T5. Using the WISE All-Sky Source Catalog we present updated color-color and color-type diagrams for all the WISE-discovered T and Y dwarfs. Near-infrared spectra of the new discoveries are presented along with spectral classifications. To accommodate later T dwarfs we have modified the integrated flux method of determining spectral indices to instead use the median flux. Furthermore, a newly defined J-narrow index differentiates the early-type Y dwarfs from late-type T dwarfs based on the J-band continuum slope. The K/J indices for this expanded sample show that 32% of late-type T dwarfs have suppressed K-band flux and are blue relative to the spectral standards, while only 11% are redder than the standards. Comparison of the Y/J and K/J index to models suggests diverse atmospheric conditions and supports the possible re-emergence of clouds after the L/T transition. We also discuss peculiar brown dwarfs and candidates that were found not to be substellar, including two young stellar objects and two active galactic nuclei. The substantial increase in the number of known late-type T dwarfs provides a population that will be used to test models of cold atmospheres and star formation. The coolest WISE-discovered brown dwarfs are the closest of their type and will remain the only sample of their kind for many years to come.

  19. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  20. Diversity of Fusarium head blight populations and trichothecene toxin types reveals regional differences in pathogen composition and temporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Amy C; Clear, Randall M; O'Donnell, Kerry; McCormick, Susan; Turkington, T Kelly; Tekauz, Andy; Gilbert, Jeannie; Kistler, H Corby; Busman, Mark; Ward, Todd J

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of genetic diversity, trichothecene genotype composition, and population structure were conducted using 4086 Fusarium graminearum isolates collected from wheat in eight Canadian provinces over a three year period between 2005 and 2007. The results revealed substantial regional differences in Fusarium head blight pathogen composition and temporal population dynamics. The 3ADON trichothecene type consistently predominated in Maritime provinces (91%) over the sampled years, and increased significantly (P<0.05) between 2005 and 2007 in western Canada, accounting for 66% of the isolates in Manitoba by the end of the sampling period. In contrast, 3ADON frequency was lower (22%, P<0.001) in the eastern Canadian provinces of Ontario and Québec and did not change significantly between 2005 and 2007, resulting in two distinct longitudinal clines in 3ADON frequency across Canada. Overall, genetic structure was correlated with toxin type, as the endemic population (NA1) was dominated by 15ADON isolates (86%), whereas a second population (NA2) consisted largely of 3ADON isolates (88%). However, the percentage of isolates with trichothecene genotypes that were not predictive of their genetic population assignment (recombinant genotypes) increased from 10% in 2005 to 17% in 2007, indicating that trichothecene type became an increasingly unreliable marker of population identity over time. In addition, there were substantial regional differences in the composition of recombinant genotypes. In western and maritime provinces, NA2 isolates with 15ADON genotypes were significantly more common than NA1 isolates with 3ADON genotypes (P<0.001), and the reverse was true in the eastern provinces of Québec and Ontario. Temporal trends in recombinant genotype composition also varied regionally, as the percentage of 15ADON isolates with NA2 genetic backgrounds increased approximately three fold in western and Maritime provinces, while the opposite trends were observed in Québec and

  1. Comparative Analysis Between Flaviviruses Reveals Specific Neural Stem Cell Tropism for Zika Virus in the Mouse Developing Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Brault

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent Zika outbreak in South America and French Polynesia was associated with an epidemic of microcephaly, a disease characterized by a reduced size of the cerebral cortex. Other members of the Flavivirus genus, including West Nile virus (WNV, can cause encephalitis but were not demonstrated to cause microcephaly. It remains unclear whether Zika virus (ZIKV and other flaviviruses may infect different cell populations in the developing neocortex and lead to distinct developmental defects. Here, we describe an assay to infect mouse E15 embryonic brain slices with ZIKV, WNV and dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4. We show that this tissue is able to support viral replication of ZIKV and WNV, but not DENV-4. Cell fate analysis reveals a remarkable tropism of ZIKV infection for neural stem cells. Closely related WNV displays a very different tropism of infection, with a bias towards neurons. We further show that ZIKV infection, but not WNV infection, impairs cell cycle progression of neural stem cells. Both viruses inhibited apoptosis at early stages of infection. This work establishes a powerful comparative approach to identify ZIKV-specific alterations in the developing neocortex and reveals specific preferential infection of neural stem cells by ZIKV.

  2. Comparative Analysis Between Flaviviruses Reveals Specific Neural Stem Cell Tropism for Zika Virus in the Mouse Developing Neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Jean-Baptiste; Khou, Cécile; Basset, Justine; Coquand, Laure; Fraisier, Vincent; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Goud, Bruno; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Pardigon, Nathalie; Baffet, Alexandre D

    2016-08-01

    The recent Zika outbreak in South America and French Polynesia was associated with an epidemic of microcephaly, a disease characterized by a reduced size of the cerebral cortex. Other members of the Flavivirus genus, including West Nile virus (WNV), can cause encephalitis but were not demonstrated to cause microcephaly. It remains unclear whether Zika virus (ZIKV) and other flaviviruses may infect different cell populations in the developing neocortex and lead to distinct developmental defects. Here, we describe an assay to infect mouse E15 embryonic brain slices with ZIKV, WNV and dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4). We show that this tissue is able to support viral replication of ZIKV and WNV, but not DENV-4. Cell fate analysis reveals a remarkable tropism of ZIKV infection for neural stem cells. Closely related WNV displays a very different tropism of infection, with a bias towards neurons. We further show that ZIKV infection, but not WNV infection, impairs cell cycle progression of neural stem cells. Both viruses inhibited apoptosis at early stages of infection. This work establishes a powerful comparative approach to identify ZIKV-specific alterations in the developing neocortex and reveals specific preferential infection of neural stem cells by ZIKV.

  3. Spectral Distribution of Transport Operator Arising in Growing Cell Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transport equation with partly smooth boundary conditions arising in growing cell populations is studied in Lp  (1

  4. Multi-population model of a microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, R P; Srinivasan, B; Escapa, A; Tartakovsky, B

    2011-06-01

    This work presents a multi-population dynamic model of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). The model describes the growth and metabolic activity of fermentative, electricigenic, methanogenic acetoclastic, and methanogenic hydrogenophilic microorganisms and is capable of simulating hydrogen production in a MEC fed with complex organic matter, such as wastewater. The model parameters were estimated with the experimental results obtained in continuous flow MECs fed with acetate or synthetic wastewater. Following successful model validation with an independent data set, the model was used to analyze and discuss the influence of applied voltage and organic load on hydrogen production and COD removal.

  5. Synchronization of glycolytic oscillations in a yeast cell population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dano, S.; Hynne, F.; De Monte, Silvia

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of active phase synchronization in a suspension of oscillatory yeast cells has remained a puzzle for almost half a century. The difficulty of the problem stems from the fact that the synchronization phenomenon involves the entire metabolic network of glycolysis and fermentation......, and consequently it cannot be addressed at the level of a single enzyme or a single chemical species. In this paper it is shown how this system in a CSTR (continuous flow stirred tank reactor) can be modelled quantitatively as a population of Stuart-Landau oscillators interacting by exchange of metabolites through...

  6. Identification of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the reactive stroma of a prostate cancer xenograft by side population analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamaria-Martinez, Albert [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Barquinero, Jordi [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Banc de Sang i Teixits, Barcelona (Spain); Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hurtado, Antoni; Pinos, Tomas [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Seoane, Joan [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Medical Oncology program, Vall d' Hebron Institute of Oncology, Barcelona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Poupon, Marie-France [Institut Curie, Paris (France); Morote, Joan [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Servei d' Urologia. Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Reventos, Jaume [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Munell, Francina, E-mail: fmunell@ir.vhebron.net [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    Cancer stem cells are a distinct cellular population that is believed to be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Recent data suggest that solid tumors also contain another type of stem cells, the mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which contribute to the formation of tumor-associated stroma. The Hoechst 33342 efflux assay has proved useful to identify a rare cellular fraction, named Side Population (SP), enriched in cells with stem-like properties. Using this assay, we identified SP cells in a prostate cancer xenograft containing human prostate cancer cells and mouse stromal cells. The SP isolation, subculture and sequential sorting allowed the generation of single-cell-derived clones of murine origin that were recognized as MSC by their morphology, plastic adherence, proliferative potential, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability and immunophenotype (CD45{sup -}, CD81{sup +} and Sca-1{sup +}). We also demonstrated that SP clonal cells secrete transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and that their inhibition reduces proliferation and accelerates differentiation. These results reveal the existence of SP cells in the stroma of a cancer xenograft, and provide evidence supporting their MSC nature and the role of TGF-{beta}1 in maintaining their proliferation and undifferentiated status. Our data also reveal the usefulness of the SP assay to identify and isolate MSC cells from carcinomas.

  7. Clonal, self-renewing and differentiating human and porcine urothelial cells, a novel stem cell population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans M Larsson

    Full Text Available Although urothelial progenitor-like cells have been described in the human urinary tract, the existence of stem cells remains to be proven. Using a culture system that favors clonogenic epithelial cell growth, we evaluated and characterized clonal human urothelial cells. We isolated human urothelial cells that were clonogenic, capable of self-renewal and could develop into fully differentiated urothelium once re-implanted into the subcapsular space of nude mice. In addition to final urothelial cell differentiation, spontaneous formation of bladder-like microstructures was observed. By examining an epithelial stem cell signature marker, we found p63 to correlate with the self-renewal capacity of the isolated human urothelial clonal populations. Since a clinically relevant, long-term model for functional reconstitution of human cells does not exist, we sought to establish a culture method for porcine urothelial cells in a clinically relevant porcine model. We isolated cells from porcine ureter, urethra and bladder that were clonogenic and capable of self-renewal and differentiation into fully mature urothelium. In conclusion, we could isolate human and porcine cell populations, behaving as urothelial stem cells and showing clonogenicity, self-renewal and, once re-implanted, morphological differentiation.

  8. Isolation of Side Population Cells and Detection of ABCG2 from SW480

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hai-guang; PAN Yi-fei; GUO Gui-long; HU Xiao-qu; HUANG Ka-te; ZHANG Xiao-hua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Side population cells (SP cells) are a new type of stem cells. They mainly express ABCG2/BCRP1 and have the ability to eliminate DNA dye Hoechst33342. Many studies showed that side population cells were able of self-renewal, differentiation and carcinogenesis in cancers. Our investigation aimed at isolation of side population cells and ABCG2 positive subpopulation from colon cancer cell line SW480 and identification of their characteristics of cancer stem cells. Methods: side population cells and non-side population cells of colon cancer cell line SW480 were isolated with DNA dye Hoechst33342 and their cell cycles were measured by flow cytometry. Expression of ABCG2 of SW480 was measured by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, and its proportion was measured by flow cytometry. Results: SW480 contained 2.29% side population cells. The fraction of side population cells decreased greatly to 0.40% by treatment with verapamil. The fraction of side population cells in S-G2M cell cycle was 16.14%, which was much lower than the fraction (34.05%) of non-side population cells in S-G2M. In SW480, ABCG2 positive cells, which proportion was 9.66%, were small, circular or oval, lack of psuedopods, similar to poor differentiation. On the contrary, the ABCG2 negative cells were large, polygonal, with many psuedopods, similar to high differentiation. Conclusion: our assay identified that side population cells did exist in SW480 and had a quiescence characteristic of stem cells. ABCG2 positive subpopulation occupied about 9.66% of SW480 and may have the ability to promote cell self-renewal and inhibit cell differentiation. Therefore, to isolate ABCG2 positive subpopulation from side population cells may be an alternative to study colorectal cancer stem cells.

  9. Lattice Boltzmann method with the cell-population equilibrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Xiao-Yang; Cheng Bing; Shi Bao-Chang

    2008-01-01

    The central problem of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is to construct a discrete equilibrium.In this paper,a multi-speed 1D cell-model of Boltzmann equation is proposed,in which the cell-population equilibrium,a direct nonnegative approximation to the continuous Maxwellian distribution,plays an important part.By applying the explicit one-order Chapman-Enskog distribution,the model reduces the transportation and collision,two basic evolution steps in LBM,to the transportation of the non-equilibrium distribution.Furthermore,1D dam-break problem is performed and the numerical results agree well with the analytic solutions.

  10. Raman spectrum reveals Mesenchymal stem cells inhibiting HL60 cells growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xin; Fang, Shaoyin; Zhang, Daosen; Zhang, Qinnan; Lu, Xiaoxu; Tian, Jindong; Fan, Jinping; LiyunZhong

    2017-04-01

    Though some research results reveals that Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability of inhibiting tumor cells proliferation, it remains controversial about the precise interaction mechanism during MSCs and tumor cells co-culture. In this study, combing Raman spectroscopic data and principle component analysis (PCA), the biochemical changes of MSCs or Human promyelocytic leukemia (HL60) cells during their co-culture were presented. The obtained results showed that some main Raman peaks of HL60 assigned to nucleic acids or proteins were greatly higher in intensity in the late stage of co-culture than those in the early stage of co-culture while they were still lower relative to the control group, implicating that the effect of MSCs inhibiting HL60 proliferation appeared in the early stage but gradually lost the inhibiting ability in the late stage of co-culture. Moreover, some other peaks of HL60 assigned to proteins were decreased in intensity in the early stage of co-culture relative to the control group but rebounded to the level similar to the control group in the late stage, showing that the content and structure changes of these proteins might be generated in the early stage but returned to the original state in the late stage of co-culture. As a result, in the early stage of MSCs-HL60 co-culture, along with the level of Akt phosphorylation of HL60 was lowered relative to its control group, the proliferation rate of HL60 cells was decreased. And in the late stage of co-culture, along with the level of Akt phosphorylation was rebounded, the reverse transfer of Raman peaks within 875-880 cm- 1 appeared, thus MSCs lost the ability to inhibit HL60 growth and HL60 proliferation was increased. In addition, it was observed that the peak at 811 cm- 1, which is a marker of RNA, was higher in intensity in the late stage than that in the control group, indicating that MSCs might be differentiated into myofibroblast-like MSCs. In addition, PCA results also exhibited

  11. Combined DNA and lipid analyses of sediments reveal changes in Holocene haptophyte and diatom populations in an Antarctic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Marco J. L.; Muyzer, Gerard; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Schouten, Stefan; Volkman, John K.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2004-06-01

    Preserved ribosomal DNA of planktonic phototrophic algae was recovered from Holocene anoxic sediments of Ace Lake (Antarctica), and the ancient community members were identified based on comparative sequence analysis. The similar concentration profiles of DNA of haptophytes and their traditional lipid biomarkers (alkenones and alkenoates) revealed that fossil rDNA also served as quantitative biomarkers in this environment. The DNA data clearly revealed the presence of six novel phylotypes related to known alkenone and alkenoate-biosynthesizing haptophytes with Isochrysis galbana UIO 102 as their closest relative. The relative abundance of these phylotypes changed as the lake chemistry, particularly salinity, evolved over time. Changes in the alkenone distributions reflect these population changes rather than a physiological response to salinity by a single haptophyte. Using this novel paleo-ecological approach of combining data from lipid biomarkers and preserved DNA, we showed that the post-glacial development of Ace Lake from freshwater basin to marine inlet and the present-day lacustrine saline system caused major qualitative and quantitative changes in the biodiversity of the planktonic populations over time.

  12. Intestinal crypt homeostasis revealed at single-stem-cell level by in vivo live imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritsma, Laila; Ellenbroek, Saskia I. J.; Zomer, Anoek; Snippert, Hugo J.; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Simons, Benjamin D.; Clevers, Hans; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-03-01

    The rapid turnover of the mammalian intestinal epithelium is supported by stem cells located around the base of the crypt. In addition to the Lgr5 marker, intestinal stem cells have been associated with other markers that are expressed heterogeneously within the crypt base region. Previous quantitative clonal fate analyses have led to the proposal that homeostasis occurs as the consequence of neutral competition between dividing stem cells. However, the short-term behaviour of individual Lgr5+ cells positioned at different locations within the crypt base compartment has not been resolved. Here we establish the short-term dynamics of intestinal stem cells using the novel approach of continuous intravital imaging of Lgr5-Confetti mice. We find that Lgr5+ cells in the upper part of the niche (termed `border cells') can be passively displaced into the transit-amplifying domain, after the division of proximate cells, implying that the determination of stem-cell fate can be uncoupled from division. Through quantitative analysis of individual clonal lineages, we show that stem cells at the crypt base, termed `central cells', experience a survival advantage over border stem cells. However, through the transfer of stem cells between the border and central regions, all Lgr5+ cells are endowed with long-term self-renewal potential. These findings establish a novel paradigm for stem-cell maintenance in which a dynamically heterogeneous cell population is able to function long term as a single stem-cell pool.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Side Population Cells in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma SPC-A1 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-liang Zhu; Long-bang Chen; Jing-hua Wang; Xin-yi Xia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There has been an increasing interest in recent years in the role of stem cells.With an extensive understanding of their biology,a major role for stem cells in the malignant process has been proposed and the existence of cancer stem cells(CSCs) has been confirmed in hematopoietic malignancies and solid organ malignancies including brain cancer,breast,prostate,colon,and pancreatic cancer.Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in most large cities of China.It is possible that lung cancer contains cancer stem cells responsible for its malignancy.The aim of this study is to identify,characterize and enrich the CSC population that drives and maintains lung adenocarcinoma growth and metastasis.Methods: Side population(SP) cell analysis and sorting were applied on human lung adenocarcinoma cell line and an attempt to further enrich them by preliminary serum-free culture before fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was done.Stem cell properties of SP cells were evaluated by their proliferative index,colony-forming efficiency,tumorigenic potential,bi-differentiation capacity and the expression of common stem cell surface markers.Results: Lung cancer cells could grow in a serum-free Medium(SFM) as non-adherent spheres similar to neurospheres or mammospheres.The proportion of SP cells in cell spheres was significantly higher than that in cells grown as monolayers.SP cells had a greater proliferative index,a higher colony-forming efficiency and a greater ability to form tumor in vivo.SP cells were both CCA positive and SP-C positive while non-SP cells were only SP-C positive.Flow cytometric analysis of cell phenotype showed that SP cells expressed CD133 and CD44,the common cell surface markers of cancer stem cells,while non-SP cells only expressed CD44.Conclusion: SP cells existed in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and they could be further enriched by preliminary serum-free culture before FACS sorting.SP cells possessed the properties of

  14. Identification and Characterization of Side Population Cells in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma SPC-A1 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-liang Zhu; Long-bang Chen; Jing-hua Wang; Xin-yi Xia

    2010-01-01

    Objective:There has been an increasing interest in recent years in the role of stem cells.With an extensive understanding of their biology,a major role for stem cells in the malignant process has been proposed and the existence of cancer stem cells(CSCs)has been confirmed in hematopoietic malignancies and solid organ malignancies including brain cancer,breast,prostate,colon,and pancreatic cancer.Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in most large cities of China.It is possible that lung cancer contains cancer stem cells responsible for its malignancy.The aim of this study is to identify,characterize and enrich the CSC population that drives and maintains lung adenocarcinoma growth and metastasis.Methods:Side population(SP)cell analysis and sorting were applied on human lung adenocarcinoma cell line and an attempt to further enrich them by preliminary serum-free culture before fluorescence activated cell sorting(FACS)was done.Stem cell properties of SP cells were evaluated by their proliferative index,colony-forming efficiency,tumorigenic potential,bi-differentiation capacity and the expression of common stem cell surface markers.Results:Lung cancer cells could grow in a serum-free Medium(SFM)as non-adherent spheres similar to neurospheres or mammospheres.The proportion of SP cells in cell spheres was significantly higher than that in cells grown as monolayers.SP cells had a greater proliferative index,a higher colony-forming efficiency and a greater ability to form tumor in vivo.SP cells were both CCA positive and SP-C positive while non-SP cells were only SP-C positive.Flow cytometric analysis of cell phenotype showed that SP cells expressed CD133 and CD44,the common cell surface markers of cancer stem cells,while non-SP cells only expressed CD44.Conclusion:SP cells existed in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and they could be further enriched by preliminary serum-free culture before FACS sorting.SP cells possessed the properties of cancer stem

  15. Dynamic equilibrium of reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Quigley, John

    2010-12-01

    Clonal dominance in hematopoietic stem cell populations is an important question of interest but not one we can directly answer. Any estimates are based on indirect measurement. For marked populations, we can equate empirical and theoretical moments for binomial sampling, in particular we can use the well-known formula for the sampling variation of a binomial proportion. The empirical variance itself cannot always be reliably estimated and some caution is needed. We describe the difficulties here and identify ready solutions which only require appropriate use of variance-stabilizing transformations. From these we obtain estimators for the steady state, or dynamic equilibrium, of the number of hematopoietic stem cells involved in repopulating the marrow. The calculations themselves are not too involved. We give the distribution theory for the estimator as well as simple approximations for practical application. As an illustration, we rework on data recently gathered to address the question as to whether or not reconstitution of marrow grafts in the clinical setting might be considered to be oligoclonal.

  16. Genome re-sequencing of semi-wild soybean reveals a complex Soja population structure and deep introgression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Qiu

    Full Text Available Semi-wild soybean is a unique type of soybean that retains both wild and domesticated characteristics, which provides an important intermediate type for understanding the evolution of the subgenus Soja population in the Glycine genus. In this study, a semi-wild soybean line (Maliaodou and a wild line (Lanxi 1 collected from the lower Yangtze regions were deeply sequenced while nine other semi-wild lines were sequenced to a 3-fold genome coverage. Sequence analysis revealed that (1 no independent phylogenetic branch covering all 10 semi-wild lines was observed in the Soja phylogenetic tree; (2 besides two distinct subpopulations of wild and cultivated soybean in the Soja population structure, all semi-wild lines were mixed with some wild lines into a subpopulation rather than an independent one or an intermediate transition type of soybean domestication; (3 high heterozygous rates (0.19-0.49 were observed in several semi-wild lines; and (4 over 100 putative selective regions were identified by selective sweep analysis, including those related to the development of seed size. Our results suggested a hybridization origin for the semi-wild soybean, which makes a complex Soja population structure.

  17. Genome re-sequencing of semi-wild soybean reveals a complex Soja population structure and deep introgression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jie; Wang, Yu; Wu, Sanling; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ye, Chu-Yu; Bai, Xuefei; Li, Zefeng; Yan, Chenghai; Wang, Weidi; Wang, Ziqiang; Shu, Qingyao; Xie, Jiahua; Lee, Suk-Ha; Fan, Longjiang

    2014-01-01

    Semi-wild soybean is a unique type of soybean that retains both wild and domesticated characteristics, which provides an important intermediate type for understanding the evolution of the subgenus Soja population in the Glycine genus. In this study, a semi-wild soybean line (Maliaodou) and a wild line (Lanxi 1) collected from the lower Yangtze regions were deeply sequenced while nine other semi-wild lines were sequenced to a 3-fold genome coverage. Sequence analysis revealed that (1) no independent phylogenetic branch covering all 10 semi-wild lines was observed in the Soja phylogenetic tree; (2) besides two distinct subpopulations of wild and cultivated soybean in the Soja population structure, all semi-wild lines were mixed with some wild lines into a subpopulation rather than an independent one or an intermediate transition type of soybean domestication; (3) high heterozygous rates (0.19-0.49) were observed in several semi-wild lines; and (4) over 100 putative selective regions were identified by selective sweep analysis, including those related to the development of seed size. Our results suggested a hybridization origin for the semi-wild soybean, which makes a complex Soja population structure.

  18. [Th17 cells, a novel proinflammatory effector CD4 T cell population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung-Theung-Long, Stéphane; Guerder, Sylvie

    2008-11-01

    After more than 20 years of hegemony, the Th1-Th2 paradigm was recently shaken by the discovery of a novel population of CD4 effector T cells, the Th17 cells. Th17 effector cells produce IL-17 and IL-22 and thus have pro-inflammatory properties notably favoring neutrophils recruitment and thus control of extracellular bacteria mainly at the epithelium surface. Th17 cells appear also as the major inducer of organ specific autoimmune pathologies such as EAE or rheumatoid arthritis, a function previously attributed to Th1 effector cells. The discovery of Th17 cells further supports the notion that effector CD4 T cells responses are diverse in vivo and that fine tuning of these different effector cells is critical to maintain tissue integrity.

  19. Single cell time-lapse analysis reveals that podoplanin enhances cell survival and colony formation capacity of squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Higuchi, Youichi; Kojima, Motohiro; Ochiai, Atsushi; Ishii, Genichiro

    2017-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) are characterized by high clonal expansion capacity. We previously reported that podoplanin is a TIC-specific marker for the human squamous cell carcinoma cell line A431. The aim of this study is to explore the molecular mechanism underlying the high clonal expansion potential of podoplanin-positive A431cells using Fucci imaging. Single podoplanin-positive cells created large colonies at a significantly higher frequency than single podoplanin-negative cells, whereas no difference was observed between the two types of cells with respect to cell cycle status. Conversely, the cell death ratio of progenies derived from podoplanin-positive single cell was significantly lower than that of cells derived from podoplanin-negative cells. Single A431 cells, whose podoplanin expression was suppressed by RNA interference, exhibited increased cell death ratios and decreased frequency of large colony forming. Moreover, the frequency of large colony forming decreased significantly when podoplanin-positive single cells was treated with a ROCK (Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase) inhibitor, whereas no difference was observed in single podoplanin-negative cells. Our current study cleared that high clonal expansion capacity of podoplanin-positive TICs populations was the result of reduced cell death by podoplanin-mediated signaling. Therefore, podoplanin activity may be a therapeutic target in the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:28059107

  20. Population genetics of cancer cell clones: possible implications of cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naugler Christopher T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population dynamics of the various clones of cancer cells existing within a tumour is complex and still poorly understood. Cancer cell clones can be conceptualized as sympatric asexual species, and as such, the application of theoretical population genetics as it pertains to asexual species may provide additional insights. Results The number of generations of tumour cells within a cancer has been estimated at a minimum of 40, but high cancer cell mortality rates suggest that the number of cell generations may actually be in the hundreds. Such a large number of generations would easily allow natural selection to drive clonal evolution assuming that selective advantages of individual clones are within the range reported for free-living animal species. Tumour cell clonal evolution could also be driven by variation in the intrinsic rates of increase of different clones or by genetic drift. In every scenario examined, the presence of cancer stem cells would require lower selection pressure or less variation in intrinsic rates of increase. Conclusions The presence of cancer stem cells may result in more rapid clonal evolution. Specific predictions from theoretical population genetics may lead to a greater understanding of this process.

  1. Isolation of a mesenchymal cell population from murine dermis that contains progenitors of multiple cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crigler, Lauren; Kazhanie, Amita; Yoon, Tae-Jin; Zakhari, Julia; Anders, Joanna; Taylor, Barbara; Virador, Victoria M

    2007-07-01

    The skin contains two known subpopulations of stem cells/epidermal progenitors: a basal keratinocyte population found in the interfollicular epithelium and cells residing in the bulge region of the hair follicle. The major role of the interfollicular basal keratinocyte population may be epidermal renewal, whereas the bulge population may only be activated and recruited to form a cutaneous epithelium in case of trauma. Using 3-dimensional cultures of murine skin under stress conditions in which only reserve epithelial cells would be expected to survive and expand, we demonstrate that a mesenchymal population resident in neonatal murine dermis has the unique potential to develop an epidermis in vitro. In monolayer culture, this dermal subpopulation has long-term survival capabilities in restricted serum and an inducible capacity to evolve into multiple cell lineages, both epithelial and mesenchymal, depending on culture conditions. When grafted subcutaneously, this dermal subpopulation gave rise to fusiform structures, reminiscent of disorganized muscle, that stained positive for smooth muscle actin and desmin; on typical epidermal grafts, abundant melanocytes appeared throughout the dermis that were not associated with hair follicles. The multipotential cells can be repeatedly isolated from neonatal murine dermis by a sequence of differential centrifugation and selective culture conditions. These results suggest that progenitors capable of epidermal differentiation exist in the mesenchymal compartment of an abundant tissue source and may have a function in mesenchymal-epithelial transition upon insult. Moreover, these cells could be available in sufficient quantities for lineage determination or tissue engineering applications.

  2. Cytochrome b gene reveals panmixia among Japanese Threadfin Bream, Nemipterus japonicus (Bloch, 1791) populations along the coasts of Peninsular Malaysia and provides evidence of a cryptic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hong-Chiun; Ahmad, Abu Talib; Nuruddin, Ahmad Adnan; Mohd Nor, Siti Azizah

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated genetic differentiation among ten presumed Japanese threadfin bream, Nemipterus japonicus populations along the coast of Peninsular Malaysia based on the partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (982 bp). Genetic divergences (Kimura-2 parameter) ranged from 0.5% to 0.8% among nine of the ten populations while these nine populations were 4.4% to 4.6% diverged from the Kuala Besar population located at the Northeast coast. The constructed Neighbour Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees based on haplotypes showed the Kuala Besar population forming an isolated cluster. The Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) of the ten populations a priori assigned into four regions, revealed that most of the variation occurred within population with a fairly low but significant level of regional differentiation (FST = 0.07, p 0.05 and FCT = 0.07, p population. p Value after Bonferroni correction revealed that only pairwise FST values involving the Kuala Besar population with the other nine populations were significant. Thus, this study revealed that the N. japonicus populations off Peninsular Malaysia were panmictic. However, the Kuala Besar population, although morphologically identical was composed of a genetically discrete taxon from the rest. These findings are important contributions in formulating sustainable fishery management policies for this important fishery in Peninsular Malaysia.

  3. CCAST: a model-based gating strategy to isolate homogeneous subpopulations in a heterogeneous population of single cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict Anchang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A model-based gating strategy is developed for sorting cells and analyzing populations of single cells. The strategy, named CCAST, for Clustering, Classification and Sorting Tree, identifies a gating strategy for isolating homogeneous subpopulations from a heterogeneous population of single cells using a data-derived decision tree representation that can be applied to cell sorting. Because CCAST does not rely on expert knowledge, it removes human bias and variability when determining the gating strategy. It combines any clustering algorithm with silhouette measures to identify underlying homogeneous subpopulations, then applies recursive partitioning techniques to generate a decision tree that defines the gating strategy. CCAST produces an optimal strategy for cell sorting by automating the selection of gating markers, the corresponding gating thresholds and gating sequence; all of these parameters are typically manually defined. Even though CCAST is optimized for cell sorting, it can be applied for the identification and analysis of homogeneous subpopulations among heterogeneous single cell data. We apply CCAST on single cell data from both breast cancer cell lines and normal human bone marrow. On the SUM159 breast cancer cell line data, CCAST indicates at least five distinct cell states based on two surface markers (CD24 and EPCAM and provides a gating sorting strategy that produces more homogeneous subpopulations than previously reported. When applied to normal bone marrow data, CCAST reveals an efficient strategy for gating T-cells without prior knowledge of the major T-cell subtypes and the markers that best define them. On the normal bone marrow data, CCAST also reveals two major mature B-cell subtypes, namely CD123+ and CD123- cells, which were not revealed by manual gating but show distinct intracellular signaling responses. More generally, the CCAST framework could be used on other biological and non-biological high dimensional data

  4. Confocal Fluorescence Imaging Enables Noninvasive Quantitative Assessment of Host Cell Populations In Vivo Following Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Mitra, Oleg Mironov, Thomas H. Foster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the use of optical imaging strategies to noninvasively examine photosensitizer distribution and physiological and host responses to 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2 devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT of EMT6 tumors established in the ears of BALB/c mice. 24 h following intravenous (IV administration of 1 μmol kg-1 HPPH, wide-field fluorescence imaging reveals tumor selectivity with an approximately 2-3-fold differential between tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Confocal microscopy demonstrates a relatively homogeneous intratumor HPPH distribution. Labeling of host cells using fluorophore-conjugated antibodies allowed the visualization of Gr1+/CD11b+ leukocytes and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II+ cells in vivo. Imaging of the treated site at different time-points following irradiation shows significant and rapid increases in Gr1+ cells in response to therapy. The maximum accumulation of Gr1+ cells is found at 24 h post-irradiation, followed by a decrease at the 48 h time-point. Using IV-injected FITC-conjugated dextran as a fluorescent perfusion marker, we imaged tissue perfusion at different times post-irradiation and found that the reduced Gr1+ cell density at 48 h correlated strongly with functional damage to the vasculature as reported via decreased perfusion status. Dual color confocal imaging experiments demonstrates that about 90% of the anti-Gr1 cell population co-localized with anti-CD11b labeling, thus indicating that majority of the Gr1-labeled cells were neutrophils. At 24 h post-PDT, an approximately 2-fold increase in MHC-II+ cells relative to untreated control is also observed. Co-localization analysis reveals an increase in the fraction of Gr1+ cells expressing MHC-II, suggesting that HPPH-PDT is stimulating neutrophils to express an antigen-presenting phenotype.

  5. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells in the side population cells of human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-hong ZHANG; Ai-zhen CAI; Xue-ming WEI; Li DING; Feng-zhi LI; Ai-ming ZHENG; Da-jiang DAI

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer.Many kinds of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells,including several gastric cancer cell lines.This study is aimed to identify the cancer stem-like cells in the SP of gastric cancer cell line MKN-45.Methods:We used fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort SP cells in the human gastric carcinoma cell line MKN-45 (cells labeled with Hoechst 33342) and then characterized the cancer stem-like properties of SP cells.Results:This study found that the SP cells had higher clone formation efficiency than major population (MP) cells.Five stemness-related gene expression profiles,including OCT-4,SOX-2,NANOG,CD44,and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters gene ABCG2,were tested in SP and MP cells using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Western blot was used to show the difference of protein expression between SP and MP cells.Both results show that there was significantly higher protein expression in SP cells than in MP cells.When inoculated into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice,SP cells show higher tumorigenesis tendency than MP cells.Conclusions:These results indicate that SP cells possess cancer stem cell properties and prove that SP cells from MKN-45 are gastric cancer stem-like cells.

  6. Dielectrophoretic capture of low abundance cell population using thick electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchalot, Julien; Chateaux, Jean-François; Faivre, Magalie; Mertani, Hichem C.; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment of rare cell populations such as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) is a critical step before performing analysis. This paper presents a polymeric microfluidic device with integrated thick Carbon-PolyDimethylSiloxane composite (C-PDMS) electrodes designed to carry out dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of low abundance biological cells. Such conductive composite material presents advantages over metallic structures. Indeed, as it combines properties of both the matrix and doping particles, C-PDMS allows the easy and fast integration of conductive microstructures using a soft-lithography approach while preserving O2 plasma bonding properties of PDMS substrate and avoiding a cumbersome alignment procedure. Here, we first performed numerical simulations to demonstrate the advantage of such thick C-PDMS electrodes over a coplanar electrode configuration. It is well established that dielectrophoretic force (FDEP) decreases quickly as the distance from the electrode surface increases resulting in coplanar configuration to a low trapping efficiency at high flow rate. Here, we showed quantitatively that by using electrodes as thick as a microchannel height, it is possible to extend the DEP force influence in the whole volume of the channel compared to coplanar electrode configuration and maintaining high trapping efficiency while increasing the throughput. This model was then used to numerically optimize a thick C-PDMS electrode configuration in terms of trapping efficiency. Then, optimized microfluidic configurations were fabricated and tested at various flow rates for the trapping of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We reached trapping efficiencies of 97% at 20 μl/h and 78.7% at 80 μl/h, for 100 μm thick electrodes. Finally, we applied our device to the separation and localized trapping of CTCs (MDA-MB-231) from a red blood cells sample (concentration ratio of 1:10). PMID:26392836

  7. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young-Do [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won-Bong [Division of Natural Science, Seoul Women' s University, Seoul 139-774 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing [Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gil Hong, E-mail: ghpark@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ho, E-mail: khlee@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. {yields} The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. {yields} The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. {yields} P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. {yields} Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC{sup -/-} cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC{sup -/-} clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  8. Side Population Cells as Prototype of Chemoresistant, Tumor-Initiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinitha Richard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Classically, isolation of CSCs from tumors exploits the detection of cell surface markers associated with normal stem cells. Invariable expression of these cell surface markers in almost all proliferating tumor cells that albeit impart specific functionality, the universality, and clinical credibility of CSC phenotype based on markers is still dubious. Side Population (SP cells, as defined by Hoechst dye exclusion in flow cytometry, have been identified in many solid tumors and cell lines and the SP phenotype can be considered as an enriched source of stem cells as well as an alternative source for the isolation of cancer stem cells especially when molecular markers for stem cells are unknown. SP cells may be responsible for the maintenance and propagation of tumors and the proportion of SP cells may be a predictor of patient outcome. Several of these markers used in cell sorting have emerged as prognostic markers of disease progression though it is seen that the development of new CSC-targeted strategies is often hindered by poor understanding of their regulatory networks and functions. This review intends to appraise the experimental progress towards enhanced isolation and drug screening based on property of acquired chemoresistance of cancer stem cells.

  9. Selective isolation and differentiation of a stromal population of human embryonic stem cells with osteogenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda M; Mahmood, Amer; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    The derivation of osteogenic cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) has been hampered by the absence of easy and reproducible protocols. hESC grown in feeder-free conditions, often show a sub population of fibroblast-like, stromal cells growing between the colonies. Thus, we examined...... the possibility that these cells represent a population of stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hESC-stromal). Two in house derived hES cell lines (Odense3 and KMEB3) as well as an externally derived cell line (Hues8) were transitioned to feeder-free conditions. A sub population of fibroblast-like cells established...

  10. Cellular Taxonomy of the Mouse Striatum as Revealed by Single-Cell RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Ozgun; Stanley, Geoffrey M; Treutlein, Barbara; Neff, Norma F; Camp, J Gray; Malenka, Robert C; Rothwell, Patrick E; Fuccillo, Marc V; Südhof, Thomas C; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-07-26

    The striatum contributes to many cognitive processes and disorders, but its cell types are incompletely characterized. We show that microfluidic and FACS-based single-cell RNA sequencing of mouse striatum provides a well-resolved classification of striatal cell type diversity. Transcriptome analysis revealed ten differentiated, distinct cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal, immune, and vascular cells, and enabled the discovery of numerous marker genes. Furthermore, we identified two discrete subtypes of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that have specific markers and that overexpress genes linked to cognitive disorders and addiction. We also describe continuous cellular identities, which increase heterogeneity within discrete cell types. Finally, we identified cell type-specific transcription and splicing factors that shape cellular identities by regulating splicing and expression patterns. Our findings suggest that functional diversity within a complex tissue arises from a small number of discrete cell types, which can exist in a continuous spectrum of functional states.

  11. Cellular Taxonomy of the Mouse Striatum as Revealed by Single-Cell RNA-Seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgun Gokce

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The striatum contributes to many cognitive processes and disorders, but its cell types are incompletely characterized. We show that microfluidic and FACS-based single-cell RNA sequencing of mouse striatum provides a well-resolved classification of striatal cell type diversity. Transcriptome analysis revealed ten differentiated, distinct cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal, immune, and vascular cells, and enabled the discovery of numerous marker genes. Furthermore, we identified two discrete subtypes of medium spiny neurons (MSNs that have specific markers and that overexpress genes linked to cognitive disorders and addiction. We also describe continuous cellular identities, which increase heterogeneity within discrete cell types. Finally, we identified cell type-specific transcription and splicing factors that shape cellular identities by regulating splicing and expression patterns. Our findings suggest that functional diversity within a complex tissue arises from a small number of discrete cell types, which can exist in a continuous spectrum of functional states.

  12. Cells Respond to Distinct Nanoparticle Properties with Multiple Strategies As Revealed by Single-Cell RNA-Seq

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Hugh D.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Chrisler, William B.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Xie, Yumei; Melby, Eric S.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Taylor, Ronald C.; Grate, Eva K.; Cooley, Scott K.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Orr, Galya

    2016-11-22

    The impact of distinct nanoparticle (NP) properties on cellular response and ultimately human health is unclear. This gap is partially due to experimental difficulties in achieving uniform NP loads in the studied cells, creating heterogeneous populations with some cells “overloaded” while other cells are loaded with few or no NPs. Yet gene expression studies have been conducted in the population as a whole, identifying generic responses, while missing unique responses due to signal averaging across many cells, each carrying different loads. Here we applied single-cell RNA-Seq to alveolar epithelial cells carrying defined loads of aminated or carboxylated quantum dots (QDs), showing higher or lower toxicity, respectively. Interestingly, cells carrying lower loads responded with multiple strategies, mostly with upregulated processes, which were nonetheless coherent and unique to each QD type. In contrast, cells carrying higher loads responded more uniformly, with mostly downregulated processes that were shared across QD types. Strategies unique to aminated QDs showed strong upregulation of stress responses, coupled in some cases with regulation of cell cycle, protein synthesis and organelle activities. In contrast, strategies unique to carboxylated QDs showed upregulation of DNA repair and RNA activities, and decreased regulation of cell division, coupled in some cases with upregulation of stress responses and ATP related functions. Together, our studies suggest scenarios where higher NP loads lock cells into uniform responses, mostly shutdown of cellular processes, whereas lower loads allow for unique responses to each NP type that are more diversified, proactive defenses or repairs of the NP insults.

  13. Microsatellite DNA reveals population genetic differentiation among sprat (Sprattus sprattus) sampled throughout the Northeast Atlantic, including Norwegian fjords

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glover, Kevin A.; Skaala, Øystein; Limborg, Morten;

    2011-01-01

    Glover, K. A., Skaala, Ø., Limborg, M., Kvamme, C., and Torstensen, E. Microsatellite DNA reveals population genetic differentiation among sprat (Sprattus sprattus) sampled throughout the Northeast Atlantic, including Norwegian fjords. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 68: 2145–2151. Sprat...... (Sprattus sprattus), small pelagic shoaling fish, were sampled from the Celtic, North, and Baltic seas, and 10 Norwegian fjords. Significant overall genetic differentiation was observed among samples when analysed with eight microsatellite DNA loci (Global FST = 0.0065, p ... differences were observed between the Baltic and all other samples (largest pairwise FST = 0.043, p sample from the Celtic Sea (CEL) and the North Sea (NSEA; FST = 0.001, p = 0.16), but variable levels of genetic differentiation were...

  14. FGFR signaling maintains a drug persistent cell population following epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Wells S; Akhand, Saeed Salehin; Wendt, Michael K

    2016-12-13

    An emerging characteristic of drug resistance in cancer is the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the mechanisms of EMT-mediated drug resistance remain poorly defined. Therefore, we conducted long-term treatments of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her2)-transformed breast cancer cells with either the EGFR/Her2 kinase inhibitor, Lapatinib or TGF-β, a known physiological inducer of EMT. Both of these treatment regimes resulted in robust EMT phenotypes, but upon withdrawal a subpopulation of TGF-β induced cells readily underwent mesenchymal-epithelial transition, where as Lapatinib-induced cells failed to reestablish an epithelial population. The mesenchymal population that remained following TGF-β stimulation and withdrawal was quickly selected for during subsequent Lapatinib treatment, manifesting in inherent drug resistance. The Nanostring cancer progression gene panel revealed a dramatic upregulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and its cognate ligand FGF2 in both acquired and inherent resistance. Mechanistically, FGF:Erk1/2 signaling functions to stabilize the EMT transcription factor Twist and thus maintain the mesenchymal and drug resistant phenotype. Finally, Lapatinib resistant cells could be readily eliminated using recently characterized covalent inhibitors of FGFR. Overall our data demonstrate that next-generation targeting of FGFR can be used in combination with Her2-targeted therapies to overcome resistance in this breast cancer subtype.

  15. Mechanisms of cell cycle control revealed by a systematic and quantitative overexpression screen in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Niu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of cell cycle progression is fundamental to cell health and reproduction, and failures in this process are associated with many human diseases. Much of our knowledge of cell cycle regulators derives from loss-of-function studies. To reveal new cell cycle regulatory genes that are difficult to identify in loss-of-function studies, we performed a near-genome-wide flow cytometry assay of yeast gene overexpression-induced cell cycle delay phenotypes. We identified 108 genes whose overexpression significantly delayed the progression of the yeast cell cycle at a specific stage. Many of the genes are newly implicated in cell cycle progression, for example SKO1, RFA1, and YPR015C. The overexpression of RFA1 or YPR015C delayed the cell cycle at G2/M phases by disrupting spindle attachment to chromosomes and activating the DNA damage checkpoint, respectively. In contrast, overexpression of the transcription factor SKO1 arrests cells at G1 phase by activating the pheromone response pathway, revealing new cross-talk between osmotic sensing and mating. More generally, 92%-94% of the genes exhibit distinct phenotypes when overexpressed as compared to their corresponding deletion mutants, supporting the notion that many genes may gain functions upon overexpression. This work thus implicates new genes in cell cycle progression, complements previous screens, and lays the foundation for future experiments to define more precisely roles for these genes in cell cycle progression.

  16. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chansavath Phetsouphanh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  17. Genetic diversity of Pinus nigra Arn. populations in Southern Spain and Northern Morocco revealed by inter-simple sequence repeat profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Candel-Perez, David; Lucas-Borja, Manuel E; Tiscar, Pedro A; Viñegla, Benjamin; Linares, Juan C; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes; Ahrazem, Oussama

    2012-01-01

    Eight Pinus nigra Arn. populations from Southern Spain and Northern Morocco were examined using inter-simple sequence repeat markers to characterize the genetic variability amongst populations. Pair-wise population genetic distance ranged from 0.031 to 0.283, with a mean of 0.150 between populations. The highest inter-population average distance was between PaCU from Cuenca and YeCA from Cazorla, while the lowest distance was between TaMO from Morocco and MA Sierra Mágina populations. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and Nei's genetic diversity analyses revealed higher genetic variation within the same population than among different populations. Genetic differentiation (Gst) was 0.233. Cuenca showed the highest Nei's genetic diversity followed by the Moroccan region, Sierra Mágina, and Cazorla region. However, clustering of populations was not in accordance with their geographical locations. Principal component analysis showed the presence of two major groups-Group 1 contained all populations from Cuenca while Group 2 contained populations from Cazorla, Sierra Mágina and Morocco-while Bayesian analysis revealed the presence of three clusters. The low genetic diversity observed in PaCU and YeCA is probably a consequence of inappropriate management since no estimation of genetic variability was performed before the silvicultural treatments. Data indicates that the inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) method is sufficiently informative and powerful to assess genetic variability among populations of P. nigra.

  18. Population structure of North American beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) based on nuclear DNA microsatellite variation and contrasted with the population structure revealed by mitochondrial DNA variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden; Ferguson; Friesen; Clayton

    1999-03-01

    Beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) in North American waters migrate seasonally between wintering areas in broken pack ice and summering locations in estuaries and other open water areas in the Arctic and sub-Arctic. Results from our previous investigation of beluga whale mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) revealed genetic heterogeneity among beluga from different summering locations that was interpreted as representing a high degree of summering site philopatry. However, mtDNA is maternally inherited and does not reflect mating that may occur among beluga from different summering locations in wintering areas or during annual migrations. To test the possibility that breeding occurs among beluga from different summering locations, genetic variability at five nuclear DNA (nDNA) microsatellite loci was examined in the same animals tested in the mtDNA study. Beluga samples (n = 640) were collected between 1984 and 1994 from 24 sites across North America, mostly during the summer. Whales from the various sites were categorized into eight summering locations as identified by mtDNA analysis, as well as four hypothesized wintering areas: Bering Sea, Hudson Strait (Hudson Strait, Labrador Sea, southwest Davis Strait), Baffin Bay (North Water, east Davis Strait), and St Lawrence River. Microsatellite allele frequencies indicated genetic homogeneity among animals from summering sites believed to winter together but differentiation among whales from some of the wintering areas. In particular, beluga from western North America (Bering Sea) were clearly distinguished from beluga from eastern North America (Hudson Strait, Baffin Bay, and St Lawrence River). Based upon the combined data set, the population of North American beluga whales was divided into two evolutionarily significant units. However, the population may be further subdivided into management units to reflect distinct groups of beluga at summering locations.

  19. Multilocus sequence analysis of Thermoanaerobacter isolates reveals recombining, but differentiated, populations from geothermal springs of the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Isaac D.; Varghese, Litty B.; Hemme, Christopher L.; Wiegel, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Thermal environments have island-like characteristics and provide a unique opportunity to study population structure and diversity patterns of microbial taxa inhabiting these sites. Strains having ≥98% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the obligately anaerobic Firmicutes Thermoanaerobacter uzonensis were isolated from seven geothermal springs, separated by up to 1600 m, within the Uzon Caldera (Kamchatka, Russian Far East). The intraspecies variation and spatial patterns of diversity for this taxon were assessed by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of 106 strains. Analysis of eight protein-coding loci (gyrB, lepA, leuS, pyrG, recA, recG, rplB, and rpoB) revealed that all loci were polymorphic and that nucleotide substitutions were mostly synonymous. There were 148 variable nucleotide sites across 8003 bp concatenates of the protein-coding loci. While pairwise FST values indicated a small but significant level of genetic differentiation between most subpopulations, there was a negligible relationship between genetic divergence and spatial separation. Strains with the same allelic profile were only isolated from the same hot spring, occasionally from consecutive years, and single locus variant (SLV) sequence types were usually derived from the same spring. While recombination occurred, there was an “epidemic” population structure in which a particular T. uzonensis sequence type rose in frequency relative to the rest of the population. These results demonstrate spatial diversity patterns for an anaerobic bacterial species in a relative small geographic location and reinforce the view that terrestrial geothermal springs are excellent places to look for biogeographic diversity patterns regardless of the involved distances. PMID:23801987

  20. Effect of Bcl-2 and Bax on survival of side population cells from hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To understand the role and significance of side population (SP) cells from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in hepatocarcinogenesis, development, relapse and metastasis, we simulated the denutrition conditions that cancer cells experience in clinical therapy, observed the different anti-apoptosis ability of SP cells and non-SP cells under such conditions, and established the possible effects of P53, Bcl-2 and Bax on survival of SP cells.METHODS: We used flow cytometry to analyze and sort the SP and non-SP cells in established HCC lines MHCC97and hHCC. We evaluated cell proliferation by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and investigated the expression of p53, bd-2 and bax genes during denutrition,by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining.RESULTS: The percentage of SP cells in the two established HCC lines was 0.25% and 0.5%, respectively.SP cells had greater anti-apoptosis and proliferation ability than non-SP cells. Expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in SP and non-SP cells differed during denutrition. The former was up-regulated in SP cells, and the latter was up-regulated in non-SP cells.CONCLUSION: It may be that different upstream molecules acted and led to different expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax in these two cell lines. There was a direct relationship between up-regulation of Bcl-2 and down-regulation of Bax and higher anti-apoptosis ability in SP cells. It may be that the existence and activity of SP cells are partly responsible for some of the clinical phenomena which are seen in HCC, such as relapse or metastasis. Further research on SP cells may have potential applications in the field of anticancer therapy.

  1. The regularity of sustained firing reveals two populations of slowly adapting touch receptors in mouse hairy skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellnitz, Scott A; Lesniak, Daine R; Gerling, Gregory J; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2010-06-01

    Touch is initiated by diverse somatosensory afferents that innervate the skin. The ability to manipulate and classify receptor subtypes is prerequisite for elucidating sensory mechanisms. Merkel cell-neurite complexes, which distinguish shapes and textures, are experimentally tractable mammalian touch receptors that mediate slowly adapting type I (SAI) responses. The assessment of SAI function in mutant mice has been hindered because previous studies did not distinguish SAI responses from slowly adapting type II (SAII) responses, which are thought to arise from different end organs, such as Ruffini endings. Thus we sought methods to discriminate these afferent types. We developed an epidermis-up ex vivo skin-nerve chamber to record action potentials from afferents while imaging Merkel cells in intact receptive fields. Using model-based cluster analysis, we found that two types of slowly adapting receptors were readily distinguished based on the regularity of touch-evoked firing patterns. We identified these clusters as SAI (coefficient of variation = 0.78 +/- 0.09) and SAII responses (0.21 +/- 0.09). The identity of SAI afferents was confirmed by recording from transgenic mice with green fluorescent protein-expressing Merkel cells. SAI receptive fields always contained fluorescent Merkel cells (n = 10), whereas SAII receptive fields lacked these cells (n = 5). Consistent with reports from other vertebrates, mouse SAI and SAII responses arise from afferents exhibiting similar conduction velocities, receptive field sizes, mechanical thresholds, and firing rates. These results demonstrate that mice, like other vertebrates, have two classes of slowly adapting light-touch receptors, identify a simple method to distinguish these populations, and extend the utility of skin-nerve recordings for genetic dissection of touch receptor mechanisms.

  2. Preface of the "Symposium on Mathematical Models and Methods to investigate Heterogeneity in Cell and Cell Population Biology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairambault, Jean

    2016-06-01

    This session investigates hot topics related to mathematical representations of cell and cell population dynamics in biology and medicine, in particular, but not only, with applications to cancer. Methods in mathematical modelling and analysis, and in statistical inference using single-cell and cell population data, should contribute to focus this session on heterogeneity in cell populations. Among other methods are proposed: a) Intracellular protein dynamics and gene regulatory networks using ordinary/partial/delay differential equations (ODEs, PDEs, DDEs); b) Representation of cell population dynamics using agent-based models (ABMs) and/or PDEs; c) Hybrid models and multiscale models to integrate single-cell dynamics into cell population behaviour; d) Structured cell population dynamics and asymptotic evolution w.r.t. relevant traits; e) Heterogeneity in cancer cell populations: origin, evolution, phylogeny and methods of reconstruction; f) Drug resistance as an evolutionary phenotype: predicting and overcoming it in therapeutics; g) Theoretical therapeutic optimisation of combined drug treatments in cancer cell populations and in populations of other organisms, such as bacteria.

  3. Temporal dynamics of distinct CA1 cell populations during unconscious state induced by ketamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Kuang

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a widely used dissociative anesthetic which can induce some psychotic-like symptoms and memory deficits in some patients during the post-operative period. To understand its effects on neural population dynamics in the brain, we employed large-scale in vivo ensemble recording techniques to monitor the activity patterns of simultaneously recorded hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells and various interneurons during several conscious and unconscious states such as awake rest, running, slow wave sleep, and ketamine-induced anesthesia. Our analyses reveal that ketamine induces distinct oscillatory dynamics not only in pyramidal cells but also in at least seven different types of CA1 interneurons including putative basket cells, chandelier cells, bistratified cells, and O-LM cells. These emergent unique oscillatory dynamics may very well reflect the intrinsic temporal relationships within the CA1 circuit. It is conceivable that systematic characterization of network dynamics may eventually lead to better understanding of how ketamine induces unconsciousness and consequently alters the conscious mind.

  4. Metabolomics reveals mycoplasma contamination interferes with the metabolism of PANC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Wang, Yongtao; Zhang, Huizhen; Johnson, Caroline H; Jiang, Yiming; Li, Xiangjun; Wu, Zeming; Liu, Tian; Krausz, Kristopher W; Yu, Aiming; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2016-06-01

    Mycoplasma contamination is a common problem in cell culture and can alter cellular functions. Since cell metabolism is either directly or indirectly involved in every aspect of cell function, it is important to detect changes to the cellular metabolome after mycoplasma infection. In this study, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based metabolomics was used to investigate the effect of mycoplasma contamination on the cellular metabolism of human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that mycoplasma contamination induced significant metabolic changes in PANC-1 cells. Twenty-three metabolites were identified and found to be involved in arginine and purine metabolism and energy supply. This study demonstrates that mycoplasma contamination significantly alters cellular metabolite levels, confirming the compelling need for routine checking of cell cultures for mycoplasma contamination, particularly when used for metabolomics studies. Graphical abstract Metabolomics reveals mycoplasma contamination changes the metabolome of PANC-1 cells.

  5. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  6. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  7. Side population rather than CD133+ cells distinguishes enriched tumorigenicity in hTERT-immortalized primary prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolcott Karen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subpopulations of cancer cells with the capacity of generating solid tumors have been characterized. In various cancer types, including prostate cancer cells, a side population (SP and CD133-expressing cells have been proposed as containing a population cancer cells with stem-like ability. Therefore the aim of this work was to determine, in prostate cancer cell lines, the frequency and tumorigenic potential of SP and CD133+ cells. Results In vitro 2D colony-forming assay and sphere-forming assay, Flow cytometry analysis and magnetic cell sorting were utilized to sort CD133+, CD133- and Side population (SP cells. Our findings indicate that CD44 and integrin α-6 are uniformly expressed in the hTERT cell lines; however, CD133 is expressed only in a small population (in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, for the hTERT cells, SP rather than CD133 expression showed an 8-fold enhanced tumorigenic potential. The data suggest that SP cells, rather than those with CD133 marker, contain the rare population of CSC capable of producing prostate tumors. Conclusion Collectively, our data suggest that although CD133 is expressed only in a small population of hTERT-immortalized prostate cancer cells, it is not likely to be associated with stem cells, as CD133- and CD133+ cells exhibited similar tumorigenicity. However, SP isolated cells, appear to be enriched with tumorigenic stem-like cells capable of generating palpable tumors.

  8. Autonomy and Non-autonomy of Angiogenic Cell Movements Revealed by Experiment-Driven Mathematical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Sugihara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a multicellular phenomenon driven by morphogenetic cell movements. We recently reported morphogenetic vascular endothelial cell (EC behaviors to be dynamic and complex. However, the principal mechanisms orchestrating individual EC movements in angiogenic morphogenesis remain largely unknown. Here we present an experiment-driven mathematical model that enables us to systematically dissect cellular mechanisms in branch elongation. We found that cell-autonomous and coordinated actions governed these multicellular behaviors, and a cell-autonomous process sufficiently illustrated essential features of the morphogenetic EC dynamics at both the single-cell and cell-population levels. Through refining our model and experimental verification, we further identified a coordinated mode of tip EC behaviors regulated via a spatial relationship between tip and follower ECs, which facilitates the forward motility of tip ECs. These findings provide insights that enhance our mechanistic understanding of not only angiogenic morphogenesis, but also other types of multicellular phenomenon.

  9. Circadian gating of the cell cycle revealed in single cyanobacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiong; Pando, Bernardo F; Dong, Guogang; Golden, Susan S; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2010-03-19

    Although major progress has been made in uncovering the machinery that underlies individual biological clocks, much less is known about how multiple clocks coordinate their oscillations. We simultaneously tracked cell division events and circadian phases of individual cells of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus and fit the data to a model to determine when cell cycle progression slows as a function of circadian and cell cycle phases. We infer that cell cycle progression in cyanobacteria slows during a specific circadian interval but is uniform across cell cycle phases. Our model is applicable to the quantification of the coupling between biological oscillators in other organisms.

  10. Abcg2-Labeled Cells Contribute to Different Cell Populations in the Embryonic and Adult Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Michelle J.; Maher, Travis J.; Li, Qinglu; Garry, Mary G.; Sorrentino, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily G member 2 (Abcg2)-expressing cardiac-side population cells have been identified in the developing and adult heart, although the role they play in mammalian heart growth and regeneration remains unclear. In this study, we use genetic lineage tracing to follow the cell fate of Abcg2-expressing cells in the embryonic and adult heart. During cardiac embryogenesis, the Abcg2 lineage gives rise to multiple cardiovascular cell types, including cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells. This capacity for Abcg2-expressing cells to contribute to cardiomyocytes decreases rapidly during the postnatal period. We further tested the role of the Abcg2 lineage following myocardial injury. One month following ischemia reperfusion injury, Abcg2-expressing cells contributed significantly to the endothelial cell lineage, however, there was no contribution to regenerated cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, consistent with previous results showing that Abcg2 plays an important cytoprotective role during oxidative stress, we show an increase in Abcg2 labeling of the vasculature, a decrease in the scar area, and a moderate improvement in cardiac function following myocardial injury. We have uncovered a difference in the capacity of Abcg2-expressing cells to generate the cardiovascular lineages during embryogenesis, postnatal growth, and cardiac regeneration. PMID:26573225

  11. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human...... kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified...... to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially...

  12. Functional Sphere Profiling Reveals the Complexity of Neuroblastoma Tumor-Initiating Cell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Coulon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB is a neural crest-derived childhood tumor characterized by a remarkable phenotypic diversity, ranging from spontaneous regression to fatal metastatic disease. Although the cancer stem cell (CSC model provides a trail to characterize the cells responsible for tumor onset, the NB tumor-initiating cell (TIC has not been identified. In this study, the relevance of the CSC model in NB was investigated by taking advantage of typical functional stem cell characteristics. A predictive association was established between self-renewal, as assessed by serial sphere formation, and clinical aggressiveness in primary tumors. Moreover, cell subsets gradually selected during serial sphere culture harbored increased in vivo tumorigenicity, only highlighted in an orthotopic microenvironment. A microarray time course analysis of serial spheres passages from metastatic cells allowed us to specifically “profile” the NB stem cell-like phenotype and to identify CD133, ABC transporter, and WNT and NOTCH genes as spheres markers. On the basis of combined sphere markers expression, at least two distinct tumorigenic cell subpopulations were identified, also shown to preexist in primary NB. However, sphere markers-mediated cell sorting of parental tumor failed to recapitulate the TIC phenotype in the orthotopic model, highlighting the complexity of the CSC model. Our data support the NB stem-like cells as a dynamic and heterogeneous cell population strongly dependent on microenvironmental signals and add novel candidate genes as potential therapeutic targets in the control of high-risk NB.

  13. Genome Wide Expression Profiling of Cancer Cell Lines Cultured in Microgravity Reveals Significant Dysregulation of Cell Cycle and MicroRNA Gene Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Vidyasekar

    Full Text Available Zero gravity causes several changes in metabolic and functional aspects of the human body and experiments in space flight have demonstrated alterations in cancer growth and progression. This study reports the genome wide expression profiling of a colorectal cancer cell line-DLD-1, and a lymphoblast leukemic cell line-MOLT-4, under simulated microgravity in an effort to understand central processes and cellular functions that are dysregulated among both cell lines. Altered cell morphology, reduced cell viability and an aberrant cell cycle profile in comparison to their static controls were observed in both cell lines under microgravity. The process of cell cycle in DLD-1 cells was markedly affected with reduced viability, reduced colony forming ability, an apoptotic population and dysregulation of cell cycle genes, oncogenes, and cancer progression and prognostic markers. DNA microarray analysis revealed 1801 (upregulated and 2542 (downregulated genes (>2 fold in DLD-1 cultures under microgravity while MOLT-4 cultures differentially expressed 349 (upregulated and 444 (downregulated genes (>2 fold under microgravity. The loss in cell proliferative capacity was corroborated with the downregulation of the cell cycle process as demonstrated by functional clustering of DNA microarray data using gene ontology terms. The genome wide expression profile also showed significant dysregulation of post transcriptional gene silencing machinery and multiple microRNA host genes that are potential tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes including MIR22HG, MIR17HG and MIR21HG. The MIR22HG, a tumor-suppressor gene was one of the highest upregulated genes in the microarray data showing a 4.4 log fold upregulation under microgravity. Real time PCR validated the dysregulation in the host gene by demonstrating a 4.18 log fold upregulation of the miR-22 microRNA. Microarray data also showed dysregulation of direct targets of miR-22, SP1, CDK6 and CCNA2.

  14. Optomechanical properties of cancer cells revealed by light-induced deformation and quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastl, Lena; Budde, Björn; Isbach, Michael; Rommel, Christina; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    There is a growing interest in cell biology and clinical diagnostics in label-free, optical techniques as the interaction with the sample is minimized and substances like dyes or fixatives do not affect the investigated cells. Such techniques include digital holographic microscopy (DHM) and the optical stretching by fiber optical two beam traps. DHM enables quantitative phase contrast imaging and thereby the determination of the cellular refractive index, dry mass and the volume, whereas optical cell stretching reveals the deformability of cells. Since optical stretching strongly depends on the optical properties and the shape of the investigated material we combined the usage of fiber optical stretching and DHM for the characterization of pancreatic tumor cells. The risk of tumors is their potential to metastasize, spread through the bloodstream and build distal tumors/metastases. The grade of dedifferentiation in which the cells lose their cell type specific properties is a measure for this metastatic potential. The less differentiated the cells are, the higher is their risk to metastasize. Our results demonstrate that pancreatic tumor cells, which are from the same tumor but vary in their grade of differentiation, show significant differences in their deformability. The retrieved data show that differentiated cells have a higher stiffness than less differentiated cells of the same tumor. Even cells that differ only in the expression of a single tumor suppressor gene which is responsible for cell-cell adhesions can be distinguished by their mechanical properties. Additionally, results from DHM measurements yield that the refractive index shows only few variations, indicating that it does not significantly influence optical cell stretching. The obtained results show a promising new approach for the phenotyping of different cell types, especially in tumor cell characterization and cancer diagnostics.

  15. A Nonlocal Model for Contact Attraction and Repulsion in Heterogeneous Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, K J; Bloomfield, J M; Sherratt, J A; Gerisch, A

    2015-06-01

    Instructing others to move is fundamental for many populations, whether animal or cellular. In many instances, these commands are transmitted by contact, such that an instruction is relayed directly (e.g. by touch) from signaller to receiver: for cells, this can occur via receptor-ligand mediated interactions at their membranes, potentially at a distance if a cell extends long filopodia. Given that commands ranging from attractive to repelling can be transmitted over variable distances and between cells of the same (homotypic) or different (heterotypic) type, these mechanisms can clearly have a significant impact on the organisation of a tissue. In this paper, we extend a system of nonlocal partial differential equations (integrodifferential equations) to provide a general modelling framework to explore these processes, performing linear stability and numerical analyses to reveal its capacity to trigger the self-organisation of tissues. We demonstrate the potential of the framework via two illustrative applications: the contact-mediated dispersal of neural crest populations and the self-organisation of pigmentation patterns in zebrafish.

  16. Cell population kinetics of collagen scaffolds in ex vivo oral wound repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Agis

    Full Text Available Biodegradable collagen scaffolds are used clinically for oral soft tissue augmentation to support wound healing. This study sought to provide a novel ex vivo model for analyzing healing kinetics and gene expression of primary human gingival fibroblasts (hGF within collagen scaffolds. Sponge type and gel type scaffolds with and without platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF were assessed in an hGF containing matrix. Morphology was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy, and hGF metabolic activity using MTT. We quantitated the population kinetics within the scaffolds based on cell density and distance from the scaffold border of DiI-labled hGFs over a two-week observation period. Gene expression was evaluated with gene array and qPCR. The sponge type scaffolds showed a porous morphology. Absolute cell number and distance was higher in sponge type scaffolds when compared to gel type scaffolds, in particular during the first week of observation. PDGF incorporated scaffolds increased cell numbers, distance, and formazan formation in the MTT assay. Gene expression dynamics revealed the induction of key genes associated with the generation of oral tissue. DKK1, CYR61, CTGF, TGFBR1 levels were increased and integrin ITGA2 levels were decreased in the sponge type scaffolds compared to the gel type scaffold. The results suggest that this novel model of oral wound healing provides insights into population kinetics and gene expression dynamics of biodegradable scaffolds.

  17. Cell population kinetics of collagen scaffolds in ex vivo oral wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agis, Hermann; Collins, Amy; Taut, Andrei D; Jin, Qiming; Kruger, Laura; Görlach, Christoph; Giannobile, William V

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable collagen scaffolds are used clinically for oral soft tissue augmentation to support wound healing. This study sought to provide a novel ex vivo model for analyzing healing kinetics and gene expression of primary human gingival fibroblasts (hGF) within collagen scaffolds. Sponge type and gel type scaffolds with and without platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF) were assessed in an hGF containing matrix. Morphology was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy, and hGF metabolic activity using MTT. We quantitated the population kinetics within the scaffolds based on cell density and distance from the scaffold border of DiI-labled hGFs over a two-week observation period. Gene expression was evaluated with gene array and qPCR. The sponge type scaffolds showed a porous morphology. Absolute cell number and distance was higher in sponge type scaffolds when compared to gel type scaffolds, in particular during the first week of observation. PDGF incorporated scaffolds increased cell numbers, distance, and formazan formation in the MTT assay. Gene expression dynamics revealed the induction of key genes associated with the generation of oral tissue. DKK1, CYR61, CTGF, TGFBR1 levels were increased and integrin ITGA2 levels were decreased in the sponge type scaffolds compared to the gel type scaffold. The results suggest that this novel model of oral wound healing provides insights into population kinetics and gene expression dynamics of biodegradable scaffolds.

  18. Dual-Reporter Mycobacteriophages (Φ2DRMs) Reveal Preexisting Mycobacterium tuberculosis Persistent Cells in Human Sputum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Paras; Weinrick, Brian C.; Kalivoda, Eric J.; Yang, Hui; Munsamy, Vanisha; Vilcheze, Catherine; Weisbrod, Torin R.; Larsen, Michelle H.; O’Donnell, Max R.; Pym, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Persisters are the minor subpopulation of bacterial cells that lack alleles conferring resistance to a specific bactericidal antibiotic but can survive otherwise lethal concentrations of that antibiotic. In infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, such persisters underlie the need for long-term antibiotic therapy and contribute to treatment failure in tuberculosis cases. Here, we demonstrate the value of dual-reporter mycobacteriophages (Φ2DRMs) for characterizing M. tuberculosis persisters. The addition of isoniazid (INH) to exponentially growing M. tuberculosis cells consistently resulted in a 2- to 3-log decrease in CFU within 4 days, and the remaining ≤1% of cells, which survived despite being INH sensitive, were INH-tolerant persisters with a distinct transcriptional profile. We fused the promoters of several genes upregulated in persisters to the red fluorescent protein tdTomato gene in Φ2GFP10, a mycobacteriophage constitutively expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), thus generating Φ2DRMs. A population enriched in INH persisters exhibited strong red fluorescence, by microscopy and flow cytometry, using a Φ2DRM with tdTomato controlled from the dnaK promoter. Interestingly, we demonstrated that, prior to INH exposure, a population primed for persistence existed in M. tuberculosis cells from both cultures and human sputa and that this population was highly enriched following INH exposure. We conclude that Φ2DRMs provide a new tool to identify and quantitate M. tuberculosis persister cells.

  19. Programming strategy for efficient modeling of dynamics in a population of heterogeneous cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Hendriksen, Morten; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity is a ubiquitous property of biological systems. Even in a genetically identical population of a single cell type, cell-to-cell differences are observed. Although the functional behavior of a given population is generally robust, the consequences of heterogeneity are fairly unpredict...

  20. Balanced transcription of cell division genes in Bacillus subtilis as revealed by single cell analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, Erik Nico; Veening, Jan-Willem; Stewart, Eric J.; Errington, Jeff; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria is carried out by a set of conserved proteins that all have to function at the correct place and time. A cell cycle-dependent transcriptional programme drives cell division in bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus. Whether such a programme exists in the Gram-positive mode

  1. Intraspecific genetic variability in a population of Moroccan Leishmania infantum revealed by PCR-RFLP of kDNA minicircles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hamouchi, Adil; Ejghal, Rajaa; Hida, Moustapha; Lemrani, Meryem

    2017-05-01

    In Morocco, Leishmania infantum is the main etiologic agent of human and canine visceral leishmaniasis (VL). This species has been proven to be an opportunistic agent in HIV+ patients and is also responsible of sporadic cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL).This work aims to evaluate the genetic variability of Moroccan L. infantum strains based on PCR-RFLP analysis of the kinetoplastid DNA (kDNA) minicircles. A total of 75 DNA samples extracted from positive Giemsa-stained smears (n=32) and from L. infantum cultures (n=43) was studied. The samples have been taken from VL patients infected (n=7) or not (n=56) by HIV, patients with CL (n=2) and finally from infected dogs (n=10). An hypervariable region of kDNA was amplified using the primers MC1 and MC2; the PCR products were digested separately by a panel of nine restriction enzymes. The presence or absence of restriction fragments was scored in a binary matrix and the SplitsTree4 software was used for the construction of a Neighbor-Net network. Moroccan L. infantum population showed an important level of variability with the identification of 6 genotypes. For each genotype a PCR product was sequenced, confirming the presence of all the expected restriction sites. The predominant profile was the genotype B. A new genotype, named Q was detected for the first time, whereas the four other genotypes (G, K, N and O) were reported sporadically in the Mediterranean basin. The Neighbor-Net network segregates our L. infantum population into 3 clusters: Cluster I includes genotype B, cluster II grouping the genotypes O, Q and G and finally the cluster III contains the genotype N. The kDNA-PCR-RFLP assay is suitable for use directly on biological samples; it reveals an important degree of genetic variability among L. infantum strains even those belonging to the same zymodeme what is of great epidemiological interest.

  2. Immunoprofiling reveals unique cell-specific patterns of wall epitopes in the expanding Arabidopsis stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Hardy C; Cheung, Jingling; Ellis, Brian E

    2013-04-01

    The Arabidopsis inflorescence stem undergoes rapid directional growth, requiring massive axial cell-wall extension in all its tissues, but, at maturity, these tissues are composed of cell types that exhibit markedly different cell-wall structures. It is not clear whether the cell-wall compositions of these cell types diverge rapidly following axial growth cessation, or whether compositional divergence occurs at earlier stages in differentiation, despite the common requirement for cell-wall extensibility. To examine this question, seven cell types were assayed for the abundance and distribution of 18 major cell-wall glycan classes at three developmental stages along the developing inflorescence stem, using a high-throughput immunolabelling strategy. These stages represent a phase of juvenile growth, a phase displaying the maximum rate of stem extension, and a phase in which extension growth is ceasing. The immunolabelling patterns detected demonstrate that the cell-wall composition of most stem tissues undergoes pronounced changes both during and after rapid extension growth. Hierarchical clustering of the immunolabelling signals identified cell-specific binding patterns for some antibodies, including a sub-group of arabinogalactan side chain-directed antibodies whose epitope targets are specifically associated with the inter-fascicular fibre region during the rapid cell expansion phase. The data reveal dynamic, cell type-specific changes in cell-wall chemistry across diverse cell types during cell-wall expansion and maturation in the Arabidopsis inflorescence stem, and highlight the paradox between this structural diversity and the uniform anisotropic cell expansion taking place across all tissues during stem growth.

  3. Mouse adipose tissue stromal cells give rise to skeletal and cardiomyogenic cell sub-populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile eDromard

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that adipose tissue could generate cardiomyocyte-like cells from crude stromal vascular fraction (SVF in vitro that improved cardiac function in a myocardial infarction context. However, it is not clear whether these adipose-derived cardiomyogenic cells (AD-CMG constitute a homogenous population and if AD-CMG progenitors could be isolated as a pure population from the SVF of adipose tissue. This study aims to characterize the different cell types that constitute myogenic clusters and identify the earliest AD-CMG progenitors in vitro for establishing a complete phenotype and use it to sort AD-CMG progenitors from crude SVF. Here, we report cell heterogeneity among adipose-derived clusters during their course of maturation and highlighted sub-populations that exhibit original mixed cardiac/skeletal muscle phenotypes with a progressive loss of cardiac phenotype with time in liquid culture conditions. Moreover, we completed the phenotype of AD-CMG progenitors but we failed to sort them from the stromal vascular fraction. We demonstrated that micro-environment is required for the maturation of myogenic phenotype by co-culture experiments. These findings bring complementary data on AD-CMG and suggest that their emergence results from in vitro events.

  4. Mouse adipose tissue stromal cells give rise to skeletal and cardiomyogenic cell sub-populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dromard, Cécile; Barreau, Corinne; André, Mireille; Berger-Müller, Sandra; Casteilla, Louis; Planat-Benard, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that adipose tissue could generate cardiomyocyte-like cells from crude stromal vascular fraction (SVF) in vitro that improved cardiac function in a myocardial infarction context. However, it is not clear whether these adipose-derived cardiomyogenic cells (AD-CMG) constitute a homogenous population and if AD-CMG progenitors could be isolated as a pure population from the SVF of adipose tissue. This study aims to characterize the different cell types that constitute myogenic clusters and identify the earliest AD-CMG progenitors in vitro for establishing a complete phenotype and use it to sort AD-CMG progenitors from crude SVF. Here, we report cell heterogeneity among adipose-derived clusters during their course of maturation and highlighted sub-populations that exhibit original mixed cardiac/skeletal muscle phenotypes with a progressive loss of cardiac phenotype with time in liquid culture conditions. Moreover, we completed the phenotype of AD-CMG progenitors but we failed to sort them from the SVF. We demonstrated that micro-environment is required for the maturation of myogenic phenotype by co-culture experiments. These findings bring complementary data on AD-CMG and suggest that their emergence results from in vitro events.

  5. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Critically Endangered Yangtze Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis as Revealed by Mitochondrial and Microsatellite DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minmin Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecological surveys have indicated that the population of the critically endangered Yangtze finless porpoise (YFP, Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis is becoming increasingly small and fragmented, and will be at high risk of extinction in the near future. Genetic conservation of this population will be an important component of the long-term conservation effort. We used a 597 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control region and 11 microsatellite loci to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of the YFP. The analysis of both mtDNA and microsatellite loci suggested that the genetic diversity of the YFP will possibly decrease in the future if the population keeps declining at a rapid rate, even though these two types of markers revealed different levels of genetic diversity. In addition, mtDNA revealed strong genetic differentiation between one local population, Xingchang–Shishou (XCSS, and the other five downstream local populations; furthermore, microsatellite DNA unveiled fine but significant genetic differentiation between three of the local populations (not only XCSS but also Poyang Lake (PY and Tongling (TL and the other local populations. With an increasing number of distribution gaps appearing in the Yangtze main steam, the genetic differentiation of local populations will likely intensify in the future. The YFP is becoming a genetically fragmented population. Therefore, we recommend attention should be paid to the genetic conservation of the YFP.

  6. A Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Surface N-Glycoproteome Resource Reveals Markers, Extracellular Epitopes, and Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Boheler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Detailed knowledge of cell-surface proteins for isolating well-defined populations of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs would significantly enhance their characterization and translational potential. Through a chemoproteomic approach, we developed a cell-surface proteome inventory containing 496 N-linked glycoproteins on human embryonic (hESCs and induced PSCs (hiPSCs. Against a backdrop of human fibroblasts and 50 other cell types, >100 surface proteins of interest for hPSCs were revealed. The >30 positive and negative markers verified here by orthogonal approaches provide experimental justification for the rational selection of pluripotency and lineage markers, epitopes for cell isolation, and reagents for the characterization of putative hiPSC lines. Comparative differences between the chemoproteomic-defined surfaceome and the transcriptome-predicted surfaceome directly led to the discovery that STF-31, a reported GLUT-1 inhibitor, is toxic to hPSCs and efficient for selective elimination of hPSCs from mixed cultures.

  7. Characterization of distinct mesenchymal-like cell populations from human skeletal muscle in situ and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecourt, Severine, E-mail: severine.lecourt@sls.aphp.fr [UPMC/AIM UMR S 974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); INSERM U974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); CNRS UMR 7215, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Marolleau, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: Marolleau.Jean-Pierre@chu-amiens.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); CHU Amiens Hopital Sud, Service d' Hematologie Clinique, UPJV, Amiens (France); Fromigue, Olivia, E-mail: olivia.fromigue@larib.inserm.fr [INSERM U606, Universite Paris 07, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Vauchez, Karine, E-mail: k.vauchez@institut-myologie.org [UPMC/AIM UMR S 974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); INSERM U974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); CNRS UMR 7215, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Genzyme S.A.S., Saint-Germain en Laye (France); Andriamanalijaona, Rina, E-mail: rinandria@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie des Tissus Conjonctifs, Faculte de Medecine, Caen (France); Ternaux, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.ternaux@orange.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Lacassagne, Marie-Noelle, E-mail: mnlacassagne@free.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Robert, Isabelle, E-mail: isa-robert@hotmail.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Boumediene, Karim, E-mail: karim.boumediene@unicaen.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie des Tissus Conjonctifs, Faculte de Medecine, Caen (France); Chereau, Frederic, E-mail: fchereau@pervasistx.com [Myosix S.A., Saint-Germain en Laye (France); Marie, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.marie@larib.inserm.fr [INSERM U606, Universite Paris 07, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); and others

    2010-09-10

    Human skeletal muscle is an essential source of various cellular progenitors with potential therapeutic perspectives. We first used extracellular markers to identify in situ the main cell types located in a satellite position or in the endomysium of the skeletal muscle. Immunohistology revealed labeling of cells by markers of mesenchymal (CD13, CD29, CD44, CD47, CD49, CD62, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146, and CD15 in this study), myogenic (CD56), angiogenic (CD31, CD34, CD106, CD146), hematopoietic (CD10, CD15, CD34) lineages. We then analysed cell phenotypes and fates in short- and long-term cultures of dissociated muscle biopsies in a proliferation medium favouring the expansion of myogenic cells. While CD56{sup +} cells grew rapidly, a population of CD15{sup +} cells emerged, partly from CD56{sup +} cells, and became individualized. Both populations expressed mesenchymal markers similar to that harboured by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In differentiation media, both CD56{sup +} and CD15{sup +} cells shared osteogenic and chondrogenic abilities, while CD56{sup +} cells presented a myogenic capacity and CD15{sup +} cells presented an adipogenic capacity. An important proportion of cells expressed the CD34 antigen in situ and immediately after muscle dissociation. However, CD34 antigen did not persist in culture and this initial population gave rise to adipogenic cells. These results underline the diversity of human muscle cells, and the shared or restricted commitment abilities of the main lineages under defined conditions.

  8. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  9. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  10. Revealing the Differences Between Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Donohoe, Byron; Ciesielski, Peter; Nill, Jennifer; McKinney, Kellene; Mittal, Ashutosh; Katahira, Rui; Himmel, Michael; Biddy, Mary; Beckham, Gregg; Decker, Steve

    2014-09-08

    Enzymatic depolymerization of polysaccharides is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, and discovery of synergistic biomass-degrading enzyme paradigms will enable improved conversion processes. Historically, revealing insights into enzymatic saccharification mechanisms on plant cell walls has been hindered by uncharacterized substrates and low resolution.

  11. Myf5 haploinsufficiency reveals distinct cell fate potentials for adult skeletal muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Chrétien, Fabrice; Jory, Aurélie; Sambasivan, Ramkumar; Negroni, Elisa; Flamant, Patricia; Soubigou, Guillaume; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Di Santo, James; Cumano, Ana; Mouly, Vincent; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2012-04-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cell fate in adult mice is regulated by crucial transcription factors, including the determination genes Myf5 and Myod. The precise role of Myf5 in regulating quiescent muscle stem cells has remained elusive. Here we show that most, but not all, quiescent satellite cells express Myf5 protein, but at varying levels, and that resident Myf5 heterozygous muscle stem cells are more primed for myogenic commitment compared with wild-type satellite cells. Paradoxically however, heterotypic transplantation of Myf5 heterozygous cells into regenerating muscles results in higher self-renewal capacity compared with wild-type stem cells, whereas myofibre regenerative capacity is not altered. By contrast, Pax7 haploinsufficiency does not show major modifications by transcriptome analysis. These observations provide a mechanism linking Myf5 levels to muscle stem cell heterogeneity and fate by exposing two distinct and opposing phenotypes associated with Myf5 haploinsufficiency. These findings have important implications for how stem cell fates can be modulated by crucial transcription factors while generating a pool of responsive heterogeneous cells.

  12. Principles of Bacterial Cell-Size Determination Revealed by Cell-Wall Synthesis Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Tropini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although bacterial cell morphology is tightly controlled, the principles of size regulation remain elusive. In Escherichia coli, perturbation of cell-wall synthesis often results in similar morphologies, making it difficult to deconvolve the complex genotype-phenotype relationships underlying morphogenesis. Here we modulated cell width through heterologous expression of sequences encoding the essential enzyme PBP2 and through sublethal treatments with drugs that inhibit PBP2 and the MreB cytoskeleton. We quantified the biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell wall across a wide range of cell sizes. We find that, although cell-wall chemical composition is unaltered, MreB dynamics, cell twisting, and cellular mechanics exhibit systematic large-scale changes consistent with altered chirality and a more isotropic cell wall. This multiscale analysis enabled identification of distinct roles for MreB and PBP2, despite having similar morphological effects when depleted. Altogether, our results highlight the robustness of cell-wall synthesis and physical principles dictating cell-size control.

  13. Nuclear motility in glioma cells reveals a cell-line dependent role of various cytoskeletal components.

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    Alexa Kiss

    Full Text Available Nuclear migration is a general term for the movement of the nucleus towards a specific site in the cell. These movements are involved in a number of fundamental biological processes, such as fertilization, cell division, and embryonic development. Despite of its importance, the mechanism of nuclear migration is still poorly understood in mammalian cells. In order to shed light on the mechanical processes underlying nuclear movements, we adapted a micro-patterning based assay. C6 rat and U87 human glioma cells seeded on fibronectin patterns--thereby forced into a bipolar morphology--displayed oscillatory movements of the nucleus or the whole cell, respectively. We found that both the actomyosin system and microtubules are involved in the nuclear/cellular movements of both cell lines, but their contributions are cell-/migration-type specific. Dynein activity was necessary for nuclear migration of C6 cells but active myosin-II was dispensable. On the other hand, coupled nuclear and cellular movements of U87 cells were driven by actomyosin contraction. We explain these cell-line dependent effects by the intrinsic differences in the overall mechanical tension due to the various cytoskeletal elements inside the cell. Our observations showed that the movements of the nucleus and the centrosome are strongly correlated and display large variation, indicating a tight but flexible coupling between them. The data also indicate that the forces responsible for nuclear movements are not acting directly via the centrosome. Based on our observations, we propose a new model for nuclear oscillations in C6 cells in which dynein and microtubule dynamics are the main drivers of nuclear movements. This mechanism is similar to the meiotic nuclear oscillations of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and may be evolutionary conserved.

  14. Single gene-based distinction of individual microbial genomes from a mixed population of microbial cells

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    Manu Valtteri Tamminen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in environmental microbiology has revealed vast populations of microbes in any given habitat that cannot be detected by conventional culturing strategies. The use of sensitive genetic detection methods such as CARD-FISH and in situ PCR have been limited by the cell wall permeabilization requirement that cannot be performed similarly on all cell types without lysing some and leaving some unpermeabilized. Furthermore, the detection of low copy targets such as genes present in single copies in the microbial genomes, has remained problematic. We describe an emulsion-based procedure to trap individual microbial cells into picoliter-volume polyacrylamide droplets that provide a rigid support for genetic material and therefore allow complete degradation of cellular material to expose the individual genomes. The polyacrylamide droplets are subsequently converted into picoliter-scale reactors for genome amplification. The amplified genomes are labelled based on the presence of a target gene and differentiated from those that do not contain the gene by flow cytometry. Using the Escherichia coli strains XL1 and MC1061, which differ with respect to the presence (XL1 or absence (MC1061 of a single copy of a tetracycline resistance gene per genome, we demonstrate that XL1 genomes present at 0.1% of MC1061 genomes can be differentiated using this method. Using a spiked sediment microbial sample, we demonstrate that the method is applicable to highly complex environmental microbial communities as a target gene-based screen for individual microbes. The method provides a novel tool for enumerating functional cell populations in complex microbial communities. We envision that the method could be optimized for fluorescence-activated cell sorting to enrich genetic material of interest from complex environmental samples.

  15. Development of a novel cell sorting method that samples population diversity in flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Geoffrey W; Andersen, Stacey B; Battye, Francis L

    2015-11-01

    Flow cytometry based electrostatic cell sorting is an important tool in the separation of cell populations. Existing instruments can sort single cells into multi-well collection plates, and keep track of cell of origin and sorted well location. However currently single sorted cell results reflect the population distribution and fail to capture the population diversity. Software was designed that implements a novel sorting approach, "Slice and Dice Sorting," that links a graphical representation of a multi-well plate to logic that ensures that single cells are sampled and sorted from all areas defined by the sort region/s. Therefore the diversity of the total population is captured, and the more frequently occurring or rarer cell types are all sampled. The sorting approach was tested computationally, and using functional cell based assays. Computationally we demonstrate that conventional single cell sorting can sample as little as 50% of the population diversity dependant on the population distribution, and that Slice and Dice sorting samples much more of the variety present within a cell population. We then show by sorting single cells into wells using the Slice and Dice sorting method that there are cells sorted using this method that would be either rarely sorted, or not sorted at all using conventional single cell sorting approaches. The present study demonstrates a novel single cell sorting method that samples much more of the population diversity than current methods. It has implications in clonal selection, stem cell sorting, single cell sequencing and any areas where population heterogeneity is of importance.

  16. Tendon repair augmented with a novel circulating stem cell population.

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    Daher, Robert J; Chahine, Nadeen O; Razzano, Pasquale; Patwa, Sohum A; Sgaglione, Nicholas J; Grande, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Tendon ruptures are common sports-related injuries that are often treated surgically by the use of sutures followed by immobilization. However, tendon repair by standard technique is associated with long healing time and often suboptimal repair. Methods to enhance tendon repair time as well as the quality of repair are currently unmet clinical needs. Our hypothesis is that the introduction of a unique stem cell population at the site of tendon transection would result in an improved rate and quality of repair. Achilles tendons of fifty-one Sprague-Dawley rats were transected and suture-repaired. In half of the rats, a biodegradable scaffold seeded with allogenic circulating stem cells was placed as an onlay to the defect site in addition to the suture repair. The other half was treated with suture alone to serve as the control group. Animals were randomized to a two-, four-, or six-week time group. At the time of necropsy, tendons were harvested and prepared for either biomechanical or histological analysis. Histological slides were evaluated in a blinded fashion with the use of a grading scale. By two weeks, the experimental group demonstrated a significant improvement in repair compared to controls with no failures. Average histological scores of 0.6 and 2.6 were observed for the experimental and control group respectively. The experimental group demonstrated complete bridging of the transection site with parallel collagen fiber arrangement. By four weeks, both groups showed a continuing trend of healing, with the scaffold group exceeding the histological quality of the tissue repaired with suture alone. Biomechanically, the experimental group had a decreasing cross-sectional area with time which was also associated with a significant increase in the ultimate tensile strength of the tendons, reaching 4.2MPa by six weeks. The experimental group also achieved a significantly higher elastic toughness by six weeks and saw an increase in the tensile modulus, reaching

  17. Distinct population of highly malignant cells in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line established by xenograft model

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    Jan Chia-Ing

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The progression and metastasis of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC, have been related to the behavior of a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells. Here, we have established a highly malignant HNSCC cell line, SASVO3, from primary tumors using three sequential rounds of xenotransplantation. SASVO3 possesses enhanced tumorigenic ability both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, SASVO3 exhibits properties of cancer stem cells, including that increased the abilities of sphere-forming, the number of side population cells, the potential of transplanted tumor growth and elevated expression of the stem cell marker Bmi1. Injection of SASVO3 into the tail vein of nude mice resulted in lung metastases. These results are consistent with the postulate that the malignant and/or metastasis potential of HNSCC cells may reside in a stem-like subpopulation.

  18. T Cell Epitope Immunotherapy Induces a CD4+ T Cell Population with Regulatory Activity

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    Verhoef Adrienne

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Synthetic peptides, representing CD4+ T cell epitopes, derived from the primary sequence of allergen molecules have been used to down-regulate allergic inflammation in sensitised individuals. Treatment of allergic diseases with peptides may offer substantial advantages over treatment with native allergen molecules because of the reduced potential for cross-linking IgE bound to the surface of mast cells and basophils. Methods and Findings In this study we address the mechanism of action of peptide immunotherapy (PIT in cat-allergic, asthmatic patients. Cell-division-tracking dyes, cell-mixing experiments, surface phenotyping, and cytokine measurements were used to investigate immunomodulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs after therapy. Proliferative responses of PBMCs to allergen extract were significantly reduced after PIT. This was associated with modified cytokine profiles generally characterised by an increase in interleukin-10 and a decrease in interleukin-5 production. CD4+ cells isolated after PIT were able to actively suppress allergen-specific proliferative responses of pretreatment CD4neg PBMCs in co-culture experiments. PIT was associated with a significant increase in surface expression of CD5 on both CD4+ and CD8+ PBMCs. Conclusion This study provides evidence for the induction of a population of CD4+ T cells with suppressor/regulatory activity following PIT. Furthermore, up-regulation of cell surface levels of CD5 may contribute to reduced reactivity to allergen.

  19. Human endometrial side population cells exhibit genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of somatic stem cells.

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    Irene Cervelló

    Full Text Available During reproductive life, the human endometrium undergoes around 480 cycles of growth, breakdown and regeneration should pregnancy not be achieved. This outstanding regenerative capacity is the basis for women's cycling and its dysfunction may be involved in the etiology of pathological disorders. Therefore, the human endometrial tissue must rely on a remarkable endometrial somatic stem cells (SSC population. Here we explore the hypothesis that human endometrial side population (SP cells correspond to somatic stem cells. We isolated, identified and characterized the SP corresponding to the stromal and epithelial compartments using endometrial SP genes signature, immunophenotyping and characteristic telomerase pattern. We analyzed the clonogenic activity of SP cells under hypoxic conditions and the differentiation capacity in vitro to adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Finally, we demonstrated the functional capability of endometrial SP to develop human endometrium after subcutaneous injection in NOD-SCID mice. Briefly, SP cells of human endometrium from epithelial and stromal compartments display genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of SSC.

  20. Single-cell NF-kappaB dynamics reveal digital activation and analogue information processing.

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    Tay, Savaş; Hughey, Jacob J; Lee, Timothy K; Lipniacki, Tomasz; Quake, Stephen R; Covert, Markus W

    2010-07-08

    Cells operate in dynamic environments using extraordinary communication capabilities that emerge from the interactions of genetic circuitry. The mammalian immune response is a striking example of the coordination of different cell types. Cell-to-cell communication is primarily mediated by signalling molecules that form spatiotemporal concentration gradients, requiring cells to respond to a wide range of signal intensities. Here we use high-throughput microfluidic cell culture and fluorescence microscopy, quantitative gene expression analysis and mathematical modelling to investigate how single mammalian cells respond to different concentrations of the signalling molecule tumour-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and relay information to the gene expression programs by means of the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB. We measured NF-kappaB activity in thousands of live cells under TNF-alpha doses covering four orders of magnitude. We find, in contrast to population-level studies with bulk assays, that the activation is heterogeneous and is a digital process at the single-cell level with fewer cells responding at lower doses. Cells also encode a subtle set of analogue parameters to modulate the outcome; these parameters include NF-kappaB peak intensity, response time and number of oscillations. We developed a stochastic mathematical model that reproduces both the digital and analogue dynamics as well as most gene expression profiles at all measured conditions, constituting a broadly applicable model for TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB signalling in various types of cells. These results highlight the value of high-throughput quantitative measurements with single-cell resolution in understanding how biological systems operate.

  1. The cell-stretcher: A novel device for the mechanical stimulation of cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seriani, S.; Del Favero, G.; Mahaffey, J.; Marko, D.; Gallina, P.; Long, C. S.; Mestroni, L.; Sbaizero, O.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation appears to be a critical modulator for many aspects of biology, both of living tissue and cells. The cell-stretcher, a novel device for the mechanical uniaxial stimulation of populations of cells, is described. The system is based on a variable stroke cam-lever-tappet mechanism which allows the delivery of cyclic stimuli with frequencies of up to 10 Hz and deformation between 1% and 20%. The kinematics is presented and a simulation of the dynamics of the system is shown, in order to compute the contact forces in the mechanism. The cells, following cultivation and preparation, are plated on an ad hoc polydimethylsiloxane membrane which is then loaded on the clamps of the cell-stretcher via force-adjustable magnetic couplings. In order to show the viability of the experimentation and biocompatibility of the cell-stretcher, a set of two in vitro tests were performed. Human epithelial carcinoma cell line A431 and Adult Mouse Ventricular Fibroblasts (AMVFs) from a dual reporter mouse were subject to 0.5 Hz, 24 h cyclic stretching at 15% strain, and to 48 h stimulation at 0.5 Hz and 15% strain, respectively. Visual analysis was performed on A431, showing definite morphological changes in the form of cellular extroflections in the direction of stimulation compared to an unstimulated control. A cytometric analysis was performed on the AMVF population. Results show a post-stimulation live-dead ratio deviance of less than 6% compared to control, which proves that the environment created by the cell-stretcher is suitable for in vitro experimentation.

  2. Live Cell Imaging Reveals Structural Associations between the Actin and Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis [W] [OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Lindeboom, Jelmer J.; Debolt, Seth; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ehrhardt, David W.; Ketelaar, Tijs; Persson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks are dynamic structures that organize intracellular processes and facilitate their rapid reorganization. In plant cells, actin filaments (AFs) and MTs are essential for cell growth and morphogenesis. However, dynamic interactions between these two essential components in live cells have not been explored. Here, we use spinning-disc confocal microscopy to dissect interaction and cooperation between cortical AFs and MTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, utilizing fluorescent reporter constructs for both components. Quantitative analyses revealed altered AF dynamics associated with the positions and orientations of cortical MTs. Reorganization and reassembly of the AF array was dependent on the MTs following drug-induced depolymerization, whereby short AFs initially appeared colocalized with MTs, and displayed motility along MTs. We also observed that light-induced reorganization of MTs occurred in concert with changes in AF behavior. Our results indicate dynamic interaction between the cortical actin and MT cytoskeletons in interphase plant cells. PMID:21693695

  3. Transcriptional networks in single perivascular cells sorted from human adipose tissue reveal a hierarchy of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, W Reef; Moldovan, Nicanor I; Moldovan, Leni; Livak, Kenneth J; Datta; Goswami, Chirayu; Corselli, Mirko; Traktuev, Dmitry O; Murray, Iain R; Péault, Bruno; March, Keith

    2017-02-24

    Adipose tissue is a rich source of multipotent mesenchymal stem-like cells, located in the perivascular niche. Based on their surface markers, these have been assigned to two main categories: CD34+CD31-CD45-CD146- cells (adventitial stromal/stem cells, ASCs), and CD146+CD31-CD34-CD45- cells (pericytes, PCs). These populations display heterogeneity of unknown significance. We hypothesized that aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, a functional marker of primitivity, could help to better define ASC and PC subclasses. To this end, the stromal vascular fraction from a human lipoaspirate was simultaneously stained with fluorescent antibodies to CD31, CD45, CD34, and CD146 antigens and the ALDH substrate Aldefluor®, then sorted by FACS. Individual ASCs (n=67) and PCs (n=73) selected from the extremities of the ALDH-staining spectrum were transcriptionally profiled by Fluidigm single-cell quantitative PCR for a predefined set (n=429) of marker genes. To these single-cell data, we applied differential expression and principal component and clustering analysis, as well as an original gene co-expression network reconstruction algorithm. Despite the stochasticity at the single-cell level, covariation gene expression analysis yielded multiple network connectivity parameters suggesting that these perivascular progenitor cell subclasses possess the following order of maturity: i) ALDH(br) ASC (most primitive); ii) ALDH(dim) ASC; iii) ALDH(br) PC; iv) ALDH(dim) PC (least primitive). This order was independently supported by specific combinations of class-specific expressed genes and further confirmed by the analysis of associated signaling pathways. In conclusion, single-cell transcriptional analysis of four populations isolated from fat by surface markers and enzyme activity suggests a developmental hierarchy among perivascular mesenchymal stem cells supported by markers and co-expression networks. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Power-Law Modeling of Cancer Cell Fates Driven by Signaling Data to Reveal Drug Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Min; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular signals are captured and transmitted by signaling proteins inside a cell. An important type of cellular responses to the signals is the cell fate decision, e.g., apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanisms of cell fate regulation are still unclear, thus comprehensive and detailed kinetic models are not yet available. Alternatively, data-driven models are promising to bridge signaling data with the phenotypic measurements of cell fates. The traditional linear model for data-driven modeling of signaling pathways has its limitations because it assumes that the a cell fate is proportional to the activities of signaling proteins, which is unlikely in the complex biological systems. Therefore, we propose a power-law model to relate the activities of all the measured signaling proteins to the probabilities of cell fates. In our experiments, we compared our nonlinear power-law model with the linear model on three cancer datasets with phosphoproteomics and cell fate measurements, which demonstrated that the nonlinear model has superior performance on cell fates prediction. By in silico simulation of virtual protein knock-down, the proposed model is able to reveal drug effects which can complement traditional approaches such as binding affinity analysis. Moreover, our model is able to capture cell line specific information to distinguish one cell line from another in cell fate prediction. Our results show that the power-law data-driven model is able to perform better in cell fate prediction and provide more insights into the signaling pathways for cancer cell fates than the linear model. PMID:27764199

  5. The Molecular Architecture of Cell Adhesion: Dynamic Remodeling Revealed by Videonanoscopy

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    Arnauld eSergé

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane delimits the cell, which is the basic unit of living organisms, and is also a privileged site for cell communication with the environment. Cell adhesion can occur through cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts. Adhesion proteins such as integrins and cadherins also constitute receptors for inside-out and outside-in signaling within proteolipidic platforms. Adhesion molecule targeting and stabilization relies on specific features such as preferential segregation by the sub-membrane cytoskeleton meshwork and within membrane proteolipidic microdomains. This review presents an overview of the recent insights brought by the latest developments in microscopy, to unravel the molecular remodeling occurring at cell contacts. The dynamic aspect of cell adhesion was recently highlighted by super-resolution videomicroscopy, also named videonanoscopy. By circumventing the diffraction limit of light, nanoscopy has allowed the monitoring of molecular localization and behavior at the single-molecule level, on fixed and living cells. Accessing molecular-resolution details such as quantitatively monitoring components entering and leaving cell contacts by lateral diffusion and reversible association has revealed an unexpected plasticity. Adhesion structures can be highly specialized, such as focal adhesion in motile cells, as well as immune and neuronal synapses. Spatiotemporal reorganization of adhesion molecules, receptors and adaptors directly relates to structure/function modulation. Assembly of these supramolecular complexes is continuously balanced by dynamic events, remodeling adhesions on various timescales, notably by molecular conformation switches, lateral diffusion within the membrane and endo/exocytosis. Pathological alterations in cell adhesion are involved in cancer evolution, through cancer stem cell interaction with stromal niches, growth, extravasation and metastasis.

  6. The Molecular Architecture of Cell Adhesion: Dynamic Remodeling Revealed by Videonanoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergé, Arnauld

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane delimits the cell, which is the basic unit of living organisms, and is also a privileged site for cell communication with the environment. Cell adhesion can occur through cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts. Adhesion proteins such as integrins and cadherins also constitute receptors for inside-out and outside-in signaling within proteolipidic platforms. Adhesion molecule targeting and stabilization relies on specific features such as preferential segregation by the sub-membrane cytoskeleton meshwork and within membrane proteolipidic microdomains. This review presents an overview of the recent insights brought by the latest developments in microscopy, to unravel the molecular remodeling occurring at cell contacts. The dynamic aspect of cell adhesion was recently highlighted by super-resolution videomicroscopy, also named videonanoscopy. By circumventing the diffraction limit of light, nanoscopy has allowed the monitoring of molecular localization and behavior at the single-molecule level, on fixed and living cells. Accessing molecular-resolution details such as quantitatively monitoring components entering and leaving cell contacts by lateral diffusion and reversible association has revealed an unexpected plasticity. Adhesion structures can be highly specialized, such as focal adhesion in motile cells, as well as immune and neuronal synapses. Spatiotemporal reorganization of adhesion molecules, receptors, and adaptors directly relates to structure/function modulation. Assembly of these supramolecular complexes is continuously balanced by dynamic events, remodeling adhesions on various timescales, notably by molecular conformation switches, lateral diffusion within the membrane and endo/exocytosis. Pathological alterations in cell adhesion are involved in cancer evolution, through cancer stem cell interaction with stromal niches, growth, extravasation, and metastasis.

  7. Effect of the surfactant tween 80 on the detachment and dispersal of Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson single cells and aggregates from cilantro leaves as revealed by image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Maria T; Huynh, Steven

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella enterica has the ability to form biofilms and large aggregates on produce surfaces, including on cilantro leaves. Aggregates of S. enterica serovar Thompson that remained attached to cilantro leaves after rigorous washing and that were present free or bound to dislodged leaf tissue in the wash suspension were observed by confocal microscopy. Measurement of S. Thompson population sizes in the leaf washes by plate counts failed to show an effect of 0.05% Tween 80 on the removal of the pathogen from cilantro leaves 2 and 6 days after inoculation. On the contrary, digital image analysis of micrographs of single cells and aggregates of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-S. Thompson present in cilantro leaf washes revealed that single cells represented 13.7% of the cell assemblages in leaf washes containing Tween 80, versus 9.3% in those without the surfactant. Moreover, Tween 80 decreased the percentage of the total S. Thompson cell population located in aggregates equal to or larger than 64 cells from 9.8% to 4.4% (P Tween 80 showed that the surfactant promoted the dispersal of cells from large aggregates into smaller ones and into single cells (P < 0.05). Our study underlines the importance of investigating bacterial behavior at the scale of single cells in order to uncover trends undetectable at the population level by bacterial plate counts. Such an approach may provide valuable information to devise strategies aimed at enhancing the efficacy of produce sanitization treatments.

  8. Cellular heterogeneity in the mouse esophagus implicates the presence of a nonquiescent epithelial stem cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWard, Aaron D; Cramer, Julie; Lagasse, Eric

    2014-10-23

    Because the esophageal epithelium lacks a defined stem cell niche, it is unclear whether all basal epithelial cells in the adult esophagus are functionally equivalent. In this study, we showed that basal cells in the mouse esophagus contained a heterogeneous population of epithelial cells, similar to other rapidly cycling tissues such as the intestine or skin. Using a combination of cell-surface markers, we separated primary esophageal tissue into distinct cell populations that harbored differences in stem cell potential. We also used an in vitro 3D organoid assay to demonstrate that Sox2, Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein signaling regulate esophageal self-renewal. Finally, we labeled proliferating basal epithelial cells in vivo to show differing cell-cycle profiles and proliferation kinetics. Based on our results, we propose that a nonquiescent stem cell population resides in the basal epithelium of the mouse esophagus.

  9. Cellular Heterogeneity in the Mouse Esophagus Implicates the Presence of a Nonquiescent Epithelial Stem Cell Population

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    Aaron D. DeWard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Because the esophageal epithelium lacks a defined stem cell niche, it is unclear whether all basal epithelial cells in the adult esophagus are functionally equivalent. In this study, we showed that basal cells in the mouse esophagus contained a heterogeneous population of epithelial cells, similar to other rapidly cycling tissues such as the intestine or skin. Using a combination of cell-surface markers, we separated primary esophageal tissue into distinct cell populations that harbored differences in stem cell potential. We also used an in vitro 3D organoid assay to demonstrate that Sox2, Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein signaling regulate esophageal self-renewal. Finally, we labeled proliferating basal epithelial cells in vivo to show differing cell-cycle profiles and proliferation kinetics. Based on our results, we propose that a nonquiescent stem cell population resides in the basal epithelium of the mouse esophagus.

  10. Live cell imaging of SOS and prophage dynamics in isogenic bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Stefan; Pfeifer, Eugen; Krämer, Christina; Sachs, Christian Carsten; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Nöh, Katharina; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Almost all bacterial genomes contain DNA of viral origin, including functional prophages or degenerated phage elements. A frequent but often unnoted phenomenon is the spontaneous induction of prophage elements (SPI) even in the absence of an external stimulus. In this study, we have analyzed SPI of the large, degenerated prophage CGP3 (187 kbp), which is integrated into the genome of the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fluorescent reporter strains grown in microfluidic chips revealed the sporadic induction of the SOS response as a prominent trigger of CGP3 SPI but also displayed a considerable fraction (∼30%) of RecA-independent SPI. Whereas approx. 20% of SOS-induced cells recovered from this stress and resumed growth, the spontaneous induction of CGP3 always led to a stop of growth and likely cell death. A carbon source starvation experiment clearly emphasized that SPI only occurs in actively proliferating cells, whereas sporadic SOS induction was still observed in resting cells. These data highlight the impact of sporadic DNA damage on the activity of prophage elements and provide a time-resolved, quantitative description of SPI as general phenomenon of bacterial populations.

  11. Single-Cell Analyses of ESCs Reveal Alternative Pluripotent Cell States and Molecular Mechanisms that Control Self-Renewal

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    Dmitri Papatsenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of gene expression in single mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs cultured in serum and LIF revealed the presence of two distinct cell subpopulations with individual gene expression signatures. Comparisons with published data revealed that cells in the first subpopulation are phenotypically similar to cells isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM. In contrast, cells in the second subpopulation appear to be more mature. Pluripotency Gene Regulatory Network (PGRN reconstruction based on single-cell data and published data suggested antagonistic roles for Oct4 and Nanog in the maintenance of pluripotency states. Integrated analyses of published genomic binding (ChIP data strongly supported this observation. Certain target genes alternatively regulated by OCT4 and NANOG, such as Sall4 and Zscan10, feed back into the top hierarchical regulator Oct4. Analyses of such incoherent feedforward loops with feedback (iFFL-FB suggest a dynamic model for the maintenance of mESC pluripotency and self-renewal.

  12. GAGA: A New Algorithm for Genomic Inference of Geographic Ancestry Reveals Fine Level Population Substructure in Europeans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); F. Liu (Fan); A. Wollstein (Andreas); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAttempts to detect genetic population substructure in humans are troubled by the fact that the vast majority of the total amount of observed genetic variation is present within populations rather than between populations. Here we introduce a new algorithm for transforming a genetic dista

  13. Satellite cell heterogeneity revealed by G-Tool, an open algorithm to quantify myogenesis through colony-forming assays

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    Ippolito Joseph

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle growth and repair is accomplished by the satellite cell pool, a self-renewing population of myogenic progenitors. Functional heterogeneity within the satellite cell compartment and changes in potential with experimental intervention can be revealed by in vitro colony-forming cell (CFC assays, however large numbers of colonies need to be assayed to give meaningful data, and manually quantifying nuclei and scoring markers of differentiation is experimentally limiting. Methods We present G-Tool, a multiplatform (Java open-source algorithm that analyzes an ensemble of fluorescent micrographs of satellite cell-derived colonies to provide quantitative and statistically meaningful metrics of myogenic potential, including proliferation capacity and propensity to differentiate. Results We demonstrate the utility of G-Tool in two applications: first, we quantify the response of satellite cells to oxygen concentration. Compared to 3% oxygen which approximates tissue levels, we find that 21% oxygen, the ambient level, markedly limits the proliferative potential of transit amplifying progeny but at the same time inhibits the rate of terminal myogenic differentiation. We also test whether satellite cells from different muscles have intrinsic differences that can be read out in vitro. Compared to masseter, dorsi, forelimb and hindlimb muscles, we find that the diaphragm satellite cells have significantly increased proliferative potential and a reduced propensity to spontaneously differentiate. These features may be related to the unique always-active status of the diaphragm. Conclusions G-Tool facilitates consistent and reproducible CFC analysis between experiments and individuals. It is released under an open-source license that enables further development by interested members of the community.

  14. Single cell cytometry of protein function in RNAi treated cells and in native populations

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    Hill Andrew

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High Content Screening has been shown to improve results of RNAi and other perturbations, however significant intra-sample heterogeneity is common and can complicate some analyses. Single cell cytometry can extract important information from subpopulations within these samples. Such approaches are important for immune cells analyzed by flow cytometry, but have not been broadly available for adherent cells that are critical to the study of solid-tumor cancers and other disease models. Results We have directly quantitated the effect of resolving RNAi treatments at the single cell level in experimental systems for both exogenous and endogenous targets. Analyzing the effect of an siRNA that targets GFP at the single cell level permits a stronger measure of the absolute function of the siRNA by gating to eliminate background levels of GFP intensities. Extending these methods to endogenous proteins, we have shown that well-level results of the knockdown of PTEN results in an increase in phospho-S6 levels, but at the single cell level, the correlation reveals the role of other inputs into the pathway. In a third example, reduction of STAT3 levels by siRNA causes an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, but does not induce apoptosis or necrosis when compared to control cells that express the same levels of STAT3. In a final example, the effect of reduced p53 levels on increased adriamycin sensitivity for colon carcinoma cells was demonstrated at the whole-well level using siRNA knockdown and in control and untreated cells at the single cell level. Conclusion We find that single cell analysis methods are generally applicable to a wide range of experiments in adherent cells using technology that is becoming increasingly available to most laboratories. It is well-suited to emerging models of signaling dysfunction, such as oncogene addition and oncogenic shock. Single cell cytometry can demonstrate effects on cell

  15. Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals molecular and functional platelet bias of aged haematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Amit; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Thongjuea, Supat; Carrelha, Joana; Giustacchini, Alice; Gambardella, Adriana; Macaulay, Iain; Mancini, Elena; Luis, Tiago C; Mead, Adam; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Nerlov, Claus

    2016-03-24

    Aged haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate more myeloid cells and fewer lymphoid cells compared with young HSCs, contributing to decreased adaptive immunity in aged individuals. However, it is not known how intrinsic changes to HSCs and shifts in the balance between biased HSC subsets each contribute to the altered lineage output. Here, by analysing HSC transcriptomes and HSC function at the single-cell level, we identify increased molecular platelet priming and functional platelet bias as the predominant age-dependent change to HSCs, including a significant increase in a previously unrecognized class of HSCs that exclusively produce platelets. Depletion of HSC platelet programming through loss of the FOG-1 transcription factor is accompanied by increased lymphoid output. Therefore, increased platelet bias may contribute to the age-associated decrease in lymphopoiesis.

  16. Genetic Diversity of Pinus nigra Arn. Populations in Southern Spain and Northern Morocco Revealed By Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oussama Ahrazem

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Eight Pinus nigra Arn. populations from Southern Spain and Northern Morocco were examined using inter-simple sequence repeat markers to characterize the genetic variability amongst populations. Pair-wise population genetic distance ranged from 0.031 to 0.283, with a mean of 0.150 between populations. The highest inter-population average distance was between PaCU from Cuenca and YeCA from Cazorla, while the lowest distance was between TaMO from Morocco and MA Sierra Mágina populations. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA and Nei’s genetic diversity analyses revealed higher genetic variation within the same population than among different populations. Genetic differentiation (Gst was 0.233. Cuenca showed the highest Nei’s genetic diversity followed by the Moroccan region, Sierra Mágina, and Cazorla region. However, clustering of populations was not in accordance with their geographical locations. Principal component analysis showed the presence of two major groups—Group 1 contained all populations from Cuenca while Group 2 contained populations from Cazorla, Sierra Mágina and Morocco—while Bayesian analysis revealed the presence of three clusters. The low genetic diversity observed in PaCU and YeCA is probably a consequence of inappropriate management since no estimation of genetic variability was performed before the silvicultural treatments. Data indicates that the inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR method is sufficiently informative and powerful to assess genetic variability among populations of P. nigra.

  17. The cytokines interleukin 27 and interferon-γ promote distinct Treg cell populations required to limit infection-induced pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Aisling O'Hara; Beiting, Daniel P; Tato, Cristina; John, Beena; Oldenhove, Guillaume; Lombana, Claudia Gonzalez; Pritchard, Gretchen Harms; Silver, Jonathan S; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Stumhofer, Jason S; Harris, Tajie H; Grainger, John; Wojno, Elia D Tait; Wagage, Sagie; Roos, David S; Scott, Philip; Turka, Laurence A; Cherry, Sara; Reiner, Steven L; Cua, Daniel; Belkaid, Yasmine; Elloso, M Merle; Hunter, Christopher A

    2012-09-21

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) promotes a population of T-bet(+) CXCR3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells that limit T helper 1 (Th1) cell-mediated pathology. Our studies demonstrate that interleukin-27 (IL-27) also promoted expression of T-bet and CXCR3 in Treg cells. During infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a similar population emerged that limited T cell responses and was dependent on IFN-γ in the periphery but on IL-27 at mucosal sites. Transfer of Treg cells ameliorated the infection-induced pathology observed in Il27(-/-) mice, and this was dependent on their ability to produce IL-10. Microarray analysis revealed that Treg cells exposed to either IFN-γ or IL-27 have distinct transcriptional profiles. Thus, IFN-γ and IL-27 have different roles in Treg cell biology and IL-27 is a key cytokine that promotes the development of Treg cells specialized to control Th1 cell-mediated immunity at local sites of inflammation.

  18. Integrated metabolomics and transcriptomics reveal enhanced specialized metabolism in Medicago truncatula root border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Bonnie S; Bedair, Mohamed F; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Huhman, David V; Yang, Dong Sik; Allen, Stacy N; Li, Wensheng; Tang, Yuhong; Sumner, Lloyd W

    2015-04-01

    Integrated metabolomics and transcriptomics of Medicago truncatula seedling border cells and root tips revealed substantial metabolic differences between these distinct and spatially segregated root regions. Large differential increases in oxylipin-pathway lipoxygenases and auxin-responsive transcript levels in border cells corresponded to differences in phytohormone and volatile levels compared with adjacent root tips. Morphological examinations of border cells revealed the presence of significant starch deposits that serve as critical energy and carbon reserves, as documented through increased β-amylase transcript levels and associated starch hydrolysis metabolites. A substantial proportion of primary metabolism transcripts were decreased in border cells, while many flavonoid- and triterpenoid-related metabolite and transcript levels were increased dramatically. The cumulative data provide compounding evidence that primary and secondary metabolism are differentially programmed in border cells relative to root tips. Metabolic resources normally destined for growth and development are redirected toward elevated accumulation of specialized metabolites in border cells, resulting in constitutively elevated defense and signaling compounds needed to protect the delicate root cap and signal motile rhizobia required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Elevated levels of 7,4'-dihydroxyflavone were further increased in border cells of roots exposed to cotton root rot (Phymatotrichopsis omnivora), and the value of 7,4'-dihydroxyflavone as an antimicrobial compound was demonstrated using in vitro growth inhibition assays. The cumulative and pathway-specific data provide key insights into the metabolic programming of border cells that strongly implicate a more prominent mechanistic role for border cells in plant-microbe signaling, defense, and interactions than envisioned previously.

  19. RNAi screen reveals an Abl kinase-dependent host cell pathway involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa internalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia F Pielage

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Internalization of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by non-phagocytic cells is promoted by rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, but the host pathways usurped by this bacterium are not clearly understood. We used RNAi-mediated gene inactivation of approximately 80 genes known to regulate the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila S2 cells to identify host molecules essential for entry of P. aeruginosa. This work revealed Abl tyrosine kinase, the adaptor protein Crk, the small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42, and p21-activated kinase as components of a host signaling pathway that leads to internalization of P. aeruginosa. Using a variety of complementary approaches, we validated the role of this pathway in mammalian cells. Remarkably, ExoS and ExoT, type III secreted toxins of P. aeruginosa, target this pathway by interfering with GTPase function and, in the case of ExoT, by abrogating P. aeruginosa-induced Abl-dependent Crk phosphorylation. Altogether, this work reveals that P. aeruginosa utilizes the Abl pathway for entering host cells and reveals unexpected complexity by which the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system modulates this internalization pathway. Our results furthermore demonstrate the applicability of using RNAi screens to identify host signaling cascades usurped by microbial pathogens that may be potential targets for novel therapies directed against treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections.

  20. The new anti-actin agent dihydrohalichondramide reveals fenestrae-forming centers in hepatic endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menu Eline

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs react to different anti-actin agents by increasing their number of fenestrae. A new structure related to fenestrae formation could be observed when LSECs were treated with misakinolide. In this study, we investigated the effects of two new actin-binding agents on fenestrae dynamics. High-resolution microscopy, including immunocytochemistry and a combination of fluorescence- and scanning electron microscopy was applied. Results Halichondramide and dihydrohalichondramide disrupt microfilaments within 10 minutes and double the number of fenestrae in 30 minutes. Dihydrohalichondramide induces fenestrae-forming centers, whereas halichondramide only revealed fenestrae-forming centers without attached rows of fenestrae with increasing diameter. Correlative microscopy showed the absence of actin filaments (F-actin in sieve plates and fenestrae-forming centers. Comparable experiments on umbilical vein endothelial cells and bone marrow sinusoidal endothelial cells revealed cell contraction without the appearance of fenestrae or fenestrae-forming centers. Conclusion (I A comparison of all anti-actin agents tested so far, revealed that the only activity that misakinolide and dihydrohalichondramide have in common is their barbed end capping activity; (II this activity seems to slow down the process of fenestrae formation to such extent that it becomes possible to resolve fenestrae-forming centers; (III fenestrae formation resulting from microfilament disruption is probably unique to LSECs.

  1. Lassa Virus Cell Entry Reveals New Aspects of Virus-Host Cell Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriani, Giulia; Galan-Navarro, Clara; Kunz, Stefan

    2017-02-15

    Viral entry represents the first step of every viral infection and is a determinant for the host range and disease potential of a virus. Here, we review the latest developments on cell entry of the highly pathogenic Old World arenavirus Lassa virus, providing novel insights into the complex virus-host cell interaction of this important human pathogen. We will cover new discoveries on the molecular mechanisms of receptor recognition, endocytosis, and the use of late endosomal entry factors.

  2. Human Lymphoid Tissues Harbor a Distinct CD69+CXCR6+ NK Cell Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugthart, Gertjan; Melsen, Janine E; Vervat, Carly; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, Monique M; Corver, Willem E; Roelen, Dave L; van Bergen, Jeroen; van Tol, Maarten J D; Lankester, Arjan C; Schilham, Marco W

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of human NK cells is based primarily on conventional CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from blood. However, most cellular immune interactions occur in lymphoid organs. Based on the coexpression of CD69 and CXCR6, we identified a third major NK cell subset in lymphoid tissues. This population represents 30-60% of NK cells in marrow, spleen, and lymph node but is absent from blood. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells have an intermediate expression of CD56 and high expression of NKp46 and ICAM-1. In contrast to circulating NK cells, they have a bimodal expression of the activating receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells do not express the early markers c-kit and IL-7Rα, nor killer cell Ig-like receptors or other late-differentiation markers. After cytokine stimulation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells produce IFN-γ at levels comparable to CD56(dim) NK cells. They constitutively express perforin but require preactivation to express granzyme B and exert cytotoxicity. After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells do not exhibit the hyperexpansion observed for both conventional NK cell populations. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells constitute a separate NK cell population with a distinct phenotype and function. The identification of this NK cell population in lymphoid tissues provides tools to further evaluate the cellular interactions and role of NK cells in human immunity.

  3. In vivo fluorescence imaging reveals the promotion of mammary tumorigenesis by mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Ke

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent adult stem cells which are recruited to the tumor microenvironment (TME and influence tumor progression through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we examined the effects of MSCs on the tunmorigenic capacity of 4T1 murine mammary cancer cells. It was found that MSC-conditioned medium increased the proliferation, migration, and efficiency of mammosphere formation of 4T1 cells in vitro. When co-injected with MSCs into the mouse mammary fat pad, 4T1 cells showed enhanced tumor growth and generated increased spontaneous lung metastasis. Using in vivo fluorescence color-coded imaging, the interaction between GFP-expressing MSCs and RFP-expressing 4T1 cells was monitored. As few as five 4T1 cells could give rise to tumor formation when co-injected with MSCs into the mouse mammary fat pad, but no tumor was formed when five or ten 4T1 cells were implanted alone. The elevation of tumorigenic potential was further supported by gene expression analysis, which showed that when 4T1 cells were in contact with MSCs, several oncogenes, cancer markers, and tumor promoters were upregulated. Moreover, in vivo longitudinal fluorescence imaging of tumorigenesis revealed that MSCs created a vascularized environment which enhances the ability of 4T1 cells to colonize and proliferate. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the promotion of mammary cancer progression by MSCs was achieved through the generation of a cancer-enhancing microenvironment to increase tumorigenic potential. These findings also suggest the potential risk of enhancing tumor progression in clinical cell therapy using MSCs. Attention has to be paid to patients with high risk of breast cancer when considering cell therapy with MSCs.

  4. The role and modulation of CCR6+ Th17 cell populations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulissen, Sandra M J; van Hamburg, Jan Piet; Dankers, Wendy; Lubberts, Erik

    2015-07-01

    The IL-17A producing T-helper-17 (Th17) cell population plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and has gained wide interest as treatment target. IL-17A expressing Th cells are characterized by the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6 and the transcription factor RORC. In RA, CCR6+ Th cells were identified in peripheral blood, synovial fluid and inflamed synovial tissue. CCR6+ Th cells might drive the progression of an early inflammation towards a persistent arthritis. The CCR6+ Th cell population is heterogeneous and several subpopulations can be distinguished, including Th17, Th22, Th17.1 (also called non-classic Th1 cells), and unclassified or intermediate populations. Interestingly, some of these populations produce low levels of IL-17A but are still very pathogenic. Furthermore, the CCR6+ Th cells phenotype is unstable and plasticity exists between CCR6+ Th cells and T-regulatory (Treg) cells and within the CCR6+ Th cell subpopulations. In this review, characteristics of the different CCR6+ Th cell populations, their plasticity, and their potential impact on rheumatoid arthritis are discussed. Moreover, current approaches to target CCR6+ Th cells and future directions of research to find specific CCR6+ Th cell targets in the treatment of patients with RA and other CCR6+ Th cell mediated autoimmune diseases are highlighted.

  5. Up-regulation of lymphocyte antigen 6 complex expression in side-population cells derived from a human trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Tetsunori; Kusunoki, Soshi; Tabu, Kouichi; Okabe, Hitomi; Yamada, Izumi; Taga, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Akemi; Makino, Shintaro; Takeda, Satoru; Kato, Kiyoko

    2016-01-01

    The continual proliferation and differentiation of trophoblasts are critical for the maintenance of pregnancy. It is well known that the tissue stem cells are associated with the development of tissues and pathologies. It has been demonstrated that side-population (SP) cells identified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) are enriched with stem cells. The SP cells in HTR-8/SVneo cells derived from human primary trophoblast cells were isolated by FACS. HTR-8/SVneo-SP cell cultures generated both SP and non-SP (NSP) subpopulations. In contrast, NSP cell cultures produced NSP cells and failed to produce SP cells. These SP cells showed self-renewal capability by serial colony-forming assay. Microarray expression analysis using a set of HTR-8/SVneo-SP and -NSP cells revealed that SP cells overexpressed several stemness genes including caudal type homeobox2 (CDX2) and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs), and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus D (LY6D) gene was the most highly up-regulated in HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. LY6D gene reduced its expression in the course of a 7-day cultivation in differentiation medium. SP cells tended to reduce its fraction by treatment of LY6D siRNA indicating that LY6D had potential to maintain cell proliferation of HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. On ontology analysis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway was involved in the up-regulated genes on microarray analysis. HTR-SVneo-SP cells showed enhanced migration. This is the first report that LY6D was important for the maintenance of HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. EMT was associated with the phenotype of these SP cells.

  6. Optogenetic toolkit reveals the role of Ca2+ sparklets in coordinated cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Man; Lee, Minji; Kim, Nury; Heo, Won Do

    2016-05-24

    Cell migration is controlled by various Ca(2+) signals. Local Ca(2+) signals, in particular, have been identified as versatile modulators of cell migration because of their spatiotemporal diversity. However, little is known about how local Ca(2+) signals coordinate between the front and rear regions in directionally migrating cells. Here, we elucidate the spatial role of local Ca(2+) signals in directed cell migration through combinatorial application of an optogenetic toolkit. An optically guided cell migration approach revealed the existence of Ca(2+) sparklets mediated by L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in the rear part of migrating cells. Notably, we found that this locally concentrated Ca(2+) influx acts as an essential transducer in establishing a global front-to-rear increasing Ca(2+) gradient. This asymmetrical Ca(2+) gradient is crucial for maintaining front-rear morphological polarity by restricting spontaneous lamellipodia formation in the rear part of migrating cells. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a clear link between local Ca(2+) sparklets and front-rear coordination during directed cell migration.

  7. Systematic Perturbation of Cytoskeletal Function Reveals a Linear Scaling Relationship between Cell Geometry and Fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell D. Monds

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diversification of cell size is hypothesized to have occurred through a process of evolutionary optimization, but direct demonstrations of causal relationships between cell geometry and fitness are lacking. Here, we identify a mutation from a laboratory-evolved bacterium that dramatically increases cell size through cytoskeletal perturbation and confers a large fitness advantage. We engineer a library of cytoskeletal mutants of different sizes and show that fitness scales linearly with respect to cell size over a wide physiological range. Quantification of the growth rates of single cells during the exit from stationary phase reveals that transitions between “feast-or-famine” growth regimes are a key determinant of cell-size-dependent fitness effects. We also uncover environments that suppress the fitness advantage of larger cells, indicating that cell-size-dependent fitness effects are subject to both biophysical and metabolic constraints. Together, our results highlight laboratory-based evolution as a powerful framework for studying the quantitative relationships between morphology and fitness.

  8. Dichotomy of cellular inhibition by small-molecule inhibitors revealed by single-cell analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Robert M.; Erez, Amir; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in drug development, a quantitative and physiological understanding of how small-molecule inhibitors act on cells is lacking. Here, we measure the signalling and proliferative response of individual primary T-lymphocytes to a combination of antigen, cytokine and drug. We uncover two distinct modes of signalling inhibition: digital inhibition (the activated fraction of cells diminishes upon drug treatment, but active cells appear unperturbed), versus analogue inhibition (the activated fraction is unperturbed whereas activation response is diminished). We introduce a computational model of the signalling cascade that accounts for such inhibition dichotomy, and test the model predictions for the phenotypic variability of cellular responses. Finally, we demonstrate that the digital/analogue dichotomy of cellular response as revealed on short (signal transduction) timescales, translates into similar dichotomy on longer (proliferation) timescales. Our single-cell analysis of drug action illustrates the strength of quantitative approaches to translate in vitro pharmacology into functionally relevant cellular settings. PMID:27687249

  9. A cell sorting protocol for selecting high-producing sub-populations of Sf9 and High Five™ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidigal, João; Dias, Mafalda M; Fernandes, Fabiana; Patrone, Marco; Bispo, Cláudia; Andrade, Cláudia; Gardner, Rui; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Teixeira, Ana P

    2013-12-01

    Insect cell lines such as Sf9 and High Five™ have been widely used to produce recombinant proteins mostly by the lytic baculovirus vector system. We have recently established an expression platform in Sf9 cells using a fluorescence-based recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) strategy which has similar development timelines but avoids baculovirus infection. To expedite cell engineering efforts, a robust fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) protocol optimized for insect cells was developed here. The standard sorting conditions used for mammalian cells proved to be unsuitable, resulting in post-sorting viabilities below 10% for both cell lines. We found that the extreme sensitivity to the shear stress displayed by Sf9 and High Five™ cells was the limiting factor, and using Pluronic F-68 in the cell suspension could increase post-sorting viabilities in a dose dependent manner. The newly developed protocol was then used to sort stable populations of both cell lines tagged with a DsRed-expressing cassette. Before sorting, the average fluorescence intensity of the Sf9 cell population was 3-fold higher than that of the High Five™ cell population. By enriching with the 10% strongest DsRed-fluorescent cells, the productivity of both cell populations could be successfully improved. The established sorting protocol potentiates the use of RMCE technology for recombinant protein production in insect cells.

  10. Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Differences in Site-specific Cell Fate Determination in Mammalian Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan eErtaylan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis - the generation of new neurons - is an ongoing process that persists in the adult mammalian brain of several species, including humans. In this work we analyze two discrete brain regions: the subventricular zone (SVZ lining the walls of the lateral ventricles; and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in mice and shed light on the SVZ and SGZ specific neurogenesis. We propose a computational model that relies on the construction and analysis of region specific gene regulatory networks from the publicly available data on these two regions. Using this model a number of putative factors involved in neuronal stem cell (NSC identity and maintenance were identified. We also demonstrate potential gender and niche-derived differences based on cell surface and nuclear receptors via Ar, Hif1a and Nr3c1.We have also conducted cell fate determinant analysis for SVZ NSC populations to Olfactory Bulb interneurons and SGZ NSC populations to the granule cells of the Granular Cell Layer. We report thirty-one candidate cell fate determinant gene pairs, ready to be validated. We focus on Ar - Pax6 in SVZ and Sox2 - Ncor1 in SGZ. Both pairs are expressed and localized in the suggested anatomical structures as shown by in situ hybridization and found to physically interact.Finally, we conclude that there are fundamental differences between SGZ and SVZ neurogenesis. We argue that these regulatory mechanisms are linked to the observed differential neurogenic potential of these regions. The presence of nuclear and cell surface receptors in the region specific regulatory circuits indicate the significance of niche derived extracellular factors, hormones and region specific factors such as the oxygen sensitivity, dictating SGZ and SVZ specific neurogenesis.

  11. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous h......MSC population. METHODS: Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high......-content analysis and additionally for their ability to differentiate toward osteogenesis in vitro and form bone in vivo, and their migrational ability in vivo and in vitro was investigated. RESULTS: In vitro, the two cell populations exhibited similar growth rate and differentiation capacity to osteoblasts...

  12. Single-cell RNA sequencing: revealing human pre-implantation development, pluripotency and germline development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, S; Panula, S P; Schell, J P; Lanner, F

    2016-09-01

    Early human development is a dynamic, heterogeneous, complex and multidimensional process. During the first week, the single-cell zygote undergoes eight to nine rounds of cell division generating the multicellular blastocyst, which consists of hundreds of cells forming spatially organized embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues. At the level of transcription, degradation of maternal RNA commences at around the two-cell stage, coinciding with embryonic genome activation. Although numerous efforts have recently focused on delineating this process in humans, many questions still remain as thorough investigation has been limited by ethical issues, scarce availability of human embryos and the presence of minute amounts of DNA and RNA. In vitro cultures of embryonic stem cells provide some insight into early human development, but such studies have been confounded by analysis on a population level failing to appreciate cellular heterogeneity. Recent technical developments in single-cell RNA sequencing have provided a novel and powerful tool to explore the early human embryo in a systematic manner. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the techniques utilized to specifically investigate human development and consider how the technology has yielded new insights into pre-implantation development, embryonic stem cells and the establishment of the germ line.

  13. Population differences in the rate of proliferation of international HapMap cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Amy L; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Tong; O'Donnell, Peter H; Beiswanger, Christine M; Huang, R Stephanie; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, M Eileen

    2010-12-10

    The International HapMap Project is a resource for researchers containing genotype, sequencing, and expression information for EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from populations across the world. The expansion of the HapMap beyond the four initial populations of Phase 2, referred to as Phase 3, has increased the sample number and ethnic diversity available for investigation. However, differences in the rate of cellular proliferation between the populations can serve as confounders in phenotype-genotype studies using these cell lines. Within the Phase 2 populations, the JPT and CHB cell lines grow faster (p HapMap panels into discovery and replication sets must take this into consideration.

  14. Single-cell analysis of population context advances RNAi screening at multiple levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Berend; Sacher, Raphael; Rämö, Pauli; Liberali, Prisca; Mench, Karin; Wolfrum, Nina; Burleigh, Laura; Scott, Cameron C; Verheije, Monique H; Mercer, Jason; Moese, Stefan; Heger, Thomas; Theusner, Kristina; Jurgeit, Andreas; Lamparter, David; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Schelhaas, Mario; De Haan, Cornelis A M; Marjomäki, Varpu; Hyypiä, Timo; Rottier, Peter J M; Sodeik, Beate; Marsh, Mark; Gruenberg, Jean; Amara, Ali; Greber, Urs; Helenius, Ari; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Isogenic cells in culture show strong variability, which arises from dynamic adaptations to the microenvironment of individual cells. Here we study the influence of the cell population context, which determines a single cell's microenvironment, in image-based RNAi screens. We developed a comprehensi

  15. Identification of various testicular cell populations in pubertal and adult cockerels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precise identification of the male germinal stem cell population is important for their practical use in programs dedicated to the integration of exogenous genetic material in testicular tissues. In the present study, our aim was to identify germinal cell populations in the testes of pubertal and ad...

  16. Medullospheres from DAOY, UW228 and ONS-76 cells: increased stem cell population and proteomic modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Zanini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Medulloblastoma (MB is an aggressive pediatric tumor of the Central Nervous System (CNS usually treated according to a refined risk stratification. The study of cancer stem cells (CSC in MB is a promising approach aimed at finding new treatment strategies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The CSC compartment was studied in three characterized MB cell lines (DAOY, UW228 and ONS-76 grown in standard adhesion as well as being grown as spheres, which enables expansion of the CSC population. MB cell lines, grown in adherence and as spheres, were subjected to morphologic analysis at the light and electron microscopic level, as well as cytofluorimetric determinations. Medullospheres (MBS were shown to express increasingly immature features, along with the stem cells markers: CD133, Nestin and β-catenin. Proteomic analysis highlighted the differences between MB cell lines, demonstrating a unique protein profile for each cell line, and minor differences when grown as spheres. In MBS, MALDI-TOF also identified some proteins, that have been linked to tumor progression and resistance, such as Nucleophosmin (NPM. In addition, immunocytochemistry detected Sox-2 as a stemness marker of MBS, as well as confirming high NPM expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Culture conditioning based on low attachment flasks and specialized medium may provide new data on the staminal compartment of CNS tumors, although a proteomic profile of CSC is still elusive for MB.

  17. Multiple SNP markers reveal fine-scale population and deep phylogeographic structure in European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus L.).

    KAUST Repository

    Zarraonaindia, Iratxe

    2012-07-30

    Geographic surveys of allozymes, microsatellites, nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have detected several genetic subdivisions among European anchovy populations. However, these studies have been limited in their power to detect some aspects of population structure by the use of a single or a few molecular markers, or by limited geographic sampling. We use a multi-marker approach, 47 nDNA and 15 mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), to analyze 626 European anchovies from the whole range of the species to resolve shallow and deep levels of population structure. Nuclear SNPs define 10 genetic entities within two larger genetically distinctive groups associated with oceanic variables and different life-history traits. MtDNA SNPs define two deep phylogroups that reflect ancient dispersals and colonizations. These markers define two ecological groups. One major group of Iberian-Atlantic populations is associated with upwelling areas on narrow continental shelves and includes populations spawning and overwintering in coastal areas. A second major group includes northern populations in the North East (NE) Atlantic (including the Bay of Biscay) and the Mediterranean and is associated with wide continental shelves with local larval retention currents. This group tends to spawn and overwinter in oceanic areas. These two groups encompass ten populations that differ from previously defined management stocks in the Alboran Sea, Iberian-Atlantic and Bay of Biscay regions. In addition, a new North Sea-English Channel stock is defined. SNPs indicate that some populations in the Bay of Biscay are genetically closer to North Western (NW) Mediterranean populations than to other populations in the NE Atlantic, likely due to colonizations of the Bay of Biscay and NW Mediterranean by migrants from a common ancestral population. Northern NE Atlantic populations were subsequently established by migrants from the Bay of Biscay. Populations along the Iberian

  18. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling reveals microRNA-correlated genes and biological processes in human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expression level of many genes shows abundant natural variation in human populations. The variations in gene expression are believed to contribute to phenotypic differences. Emerging evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs are one of the key regulators of gene expression. However, past studies have focused on the miRNA target genes and used loss- or gain-of-function approach that may not reflect natural association between miRNA and mRNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine miRNA regulatory effect on global gene expression under endogenous condition, we performed pair-wise correlation coefficient analysis on expression levels of 366 miRNAs and 14,174 messenger RNAs (mRNAs in 90 immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines, and observed significant correlations between the two species of RNA transcripts. We identified a total of 7,207 significantly correlated miRNA-mRNA pairs (false discovery rate q<0.01. Of those, 4,085 pairs showed positive correlations while 3,122 pairs showed negative correlations. Gene ontology analyses on the miRNA-correlated genes revealed significant enrichments in several biological processes related to cell cycle, cell communication and signal transduction. Individually, each of three miRNAs (miR-331, -98 and -33b demonstrated significant correlation with the genes in cell cycle-related biological processes, which is consistent with important role of miRNAs in cell cycle regulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates feasibility of using naturally expressed transcript profiles to identify endogenous correlation between miRNA and miRNA. By applying this genome-wide approach, we have identified thousands of miRNA-correlated genes and revealed potential role of miRNAs in several important cellular functions. The study results along with accompanying data sets will provide a wealth of high-throughput data to further evaluate the miRNA-regulated genes and eventually in phenotypic variations of

  19. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  20. Revealing the Molecular Portrait of Triple Negative Breast Tumors in an Understudied Population through Omics Analysis of Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaca-Paniagua, Felipe; Alvarez-Gomez, Rosa María; Maldonado-Martínez, Hector Aquiles; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Fragoso-Ontiveros, Veronica; Lasa-Gonsebatt, Federico; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Cantú, David; Bargallo-Rocha, Enrique; Mohar, Alejandro; Durand, Geoffroy; Forey, Nathalie; Voegele, Catherine; Vallée, Maxime; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; McKay, James; Ardin, Maude; Villar, Stéphanie; Zavadil, Jiri; Olivier, Magali

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), defined by the lack of expression of the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal receptor 2, is an aggressive form of breast cancer that is more prevalent in certain populations, in particular in low- and middle-income regions. The detailed molecular features of TNBC in these regions remain unexplored as samples are mostly accessible as formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) archived tissues, a challenging material for advanced genomic and transcriptomic studies. Using dedicated reagents and analysis pipelines, we performed whole exome sequencing and miRNA and mRNA profiling of 12 FFPE tumor tissues collected from pathological archives in Mexico. Sequencing analyses of the tumor tissues and their blood pairs identified TP53 and RB1 genes as the most frequently mutated genes, with a somatic mutation load of 1.7 mutations/exome Mb on average. Transcriptional analyses revealed an overexpression of growth-promoting signals (EGFR, PDGFR, VEGF, PIK3CA, FOXM1), a repression of cell cycle control pathways (TP53, RB1), a deregulation of DNA-repair pathways, and alterations in epigenetic modifiers through miRNA:mRNA network de-regulation. The molecular programs identified were typical of those described in basal-like tumors in other populations. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using archived clinical samples for advanced integrated genomics analyses. It thus opens up opportunities for investigating molecular features of tumors from regions where only FFPE tissues are available, allowing retrospective studies on the search for treatment strategies or on the exploration of the geographic diversity of breast cancer. PMID:25961742

  1. Revealing the Molecular Portrait of Triple Negative Breast Tumors in an Understudied Population through Omics Analysis of Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Vaca-Paniagua

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC, defined by the lack of expression of the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal receptor 2, is an aggressive form of breast cancer that is more prevalent in certain populations, in particular in low- and middle-income regions. The detailed molecular features of TNBC in these regions remain unexplored as samples are mostly accessible as formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE archived tissues, a challenging material for advanced genomic and transcriptomic studies. Using dedicated reagents and analysis pipelines, we performed whole exome sequencing and miRNA and mRNA profiling of 12 FFPE tumor tissues collected from pathological archives in Mexico. Sequencing analyses of the tumor tissues and their blood pairs identified TP53 and RB1 genes as the most frequently mutated genes, with a somatic mutation load of 1.7 mutations/exome Mb on average. Transcriptional analyses revealed an overexpression of growth-promoting signals (EGFR, PDGFR, VEGF, PIK3CA, FOXM1, a repression of cell cycle control pathways (TP53, RB1, a deregulation of DNA-repair pathways, and alterations in epigenetic modifiers through miRNA:mRNA network de-regulation. The molecular programs identified were typical of those described in basal-like tumors in other populations. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using archived clinical samples for advanced integrated genomics analyses. It thus opens up opportunities for investigating molecular features of tumors from regions where only FFPE tissues are available, allowing retrospective studies on the search for treatment strategies or on the exploration of the geographic diversity of breast cancer.

  2. Molecular analysis of the beta-globin gene cluster in the Niokholo Mandenka population reveals a recent origin of the beta(S) Senegal mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currat, Mathias; Trabuchet, Guy; Rees, David; Perrin, Pascale; Harding, Rosalind M; Clegg, John B; Langaney, André; Excoffier, Laurent

    2002-01-01

    A large and ethnically well-defined Mandenka sample from eastern Senegal was analyzed for the polymorphism of the beta-globin gene cluster on chromosome 11. Five RFLP sites of the 5' region were investigated in 193 individuals revealing the presence of 10 different haplotypes. The frequency of the sickle-cell anemia causing mutation (beta(S)) in the Mandenka estimated from this sample is 11.7%. This mutation was found strictly associated with the single Senegal haplotype. Approximately 600 bp of the upstream region of the beta-globin gene were sequenced for a subset of 94 chromosomes, showing the presence of four transversions, five transitions, and a composite microsatellite polymorphism. The sequence of 22 beta(S) chromosomes was also identical to the previously defined Senegal haplotype, suggesting that this mutation is very recent. Monte Carlo simulations (allowing for a specific balancing selection model, a logistic growth of the population, and variable initial frequencies of the Senegal haplotype) were used to estimate the age of the beta(S) mutation. Resulting maximum-likelihood estimates are 45-70 generations (1,350-2,100 years) for very different demographic scenarios. Smallest confidence intervals (25-690 generations) are obtained under the hypothesis that the Mandenka population is large (N(e) >5,000) and stationary or that it has undergone a rapid demographic expansion to a current size of >5,000 reproducing individuals, which is quite likely in view of the great diversity found on beta(A) chromosomes.

  3. IGF1 stimulates crypt expansion via differential activation of 2 intestinal stem cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Santoro, M Agostina; Mah, Amanda T; Krebs, Adrienne E; Dehmer, Jeffrey J; McNaughton, Kirk K; Helmrath, Michael A; Magness, Scott T; Lund, P Kay

    2015-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has potent trophic effects on normal or injured intestinal epithelium, but specific effects on intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are undefined. We used Sox9-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter mice that permit analyses of both actively cycling ISCs (Sox9-EGFP(Low)) and reserve/facultative ISCs (Sox9-EGFP(High)) to study IGF1 action on ISCs in normal intestine or during crypt regeneration after high-dose radiation-induced injury. We hypothesized that IGF1 differentially regulates proliferation and gene expression in actively cycling and reserve/facultative ISCs. IGF1 was delivered for 5 days using subcutaneously implanted mini-pumps in uninjured mice or after 14 Gy abdominal radiation. ISC numbers, proliferation, and transcriptome were assessed. IGF1 increased epithelial growth in nonirradiated mice and enhanced crypt regeneration after radiation. In uninjured and regenerating intestines, IGF1 increased total numbers of Sox9-EGFP(Low) ISCs and percentage of these cells in M-phase. IGF1 increased percentages of Sox9-EGFP(High) ISCs in S-phase but did not expand this population. Microarray revealed that IGF1 activated distinct gene expression signatures in the 2 Sox9-EGFP ISC populations. In vitro IGF1 enhanced enteroid formation by Sox9-EGFP(High) facultative ISCs but not Sox9-EGFP(Low) actively cycling ISCs. Our data provide new evidence that IGF1 activates 2 ISC populations via distinct regulatory pathways to promote growth of normal intestinal epithelium and crypt regeneration after irradiation.

  4. Computational Image Analysis Reveals Intrinsic Multigenerational Differences between Anterior and Posterior Cerebral Cortex Neural Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Winter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Time-lapse microscopy can capture patterns of development through multiple divisions for an entire clone of proliferating cells. Images are taken every few minutes over many days, generating data too vast to process completely by hand. Computational analysis of this data can benefit from occasional human guidance. Here we combine improved automated algorithms with minimized human validation to produce fully corrected segmentation, tracking, and lineaging results with dramatic reduction in effort. A web-based viewer provides access to data and results. The improved approach allows efficient analysis of large numbers of clones. Using this method, we studied populations of progenitor cells derived from the anterior and posterior embryonic mouse cerebral cortex, each growing in a standardized culture environment. Progenitors from the anterior cortex were smaller, less motile, and produced smaller clones compared to those from the posterior cortex, demonstrating cell-intrinsic differences that may contribute to the areal organization of the cerebral cortex.

  5. Long-Term Data Reveal a Population Decline of the Tropical Lizard Anolis apletophallus, and a Negative Affect of El Nino Years on Population Growth Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Stapley, Jessica; Garcia, Milton; Andrews, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change threatens biodiversity worldwide, however predicting how particular species will respond is difficult because climate varies spatially, complex factors regulate population abundance, and species vary in their susceptibility to climate change. Studies need to incorporate these factors with long-term data in order to link climate change to population abundance. We used 40 years of lizard abundance data and local climate data from Barro Colorado Island to ask how climate, total li...

  6. Proteomics Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues Reveals Drug Resistance-associated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRUZ*, ISA N.; COLEY*, HELEN M.; KRAMER, HOLGER B.; MADHURI, THUMULURU KAVITAH; SAFUWAN, NUR A.M.; ANGELINO, ANA RITA; YANG, MIN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carboplatin and paclitaxel form the cornerstone of chemotherapy for epithelial ovarian cancer, however, drug resistance to these agents continues to present challenges. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms underlying this resistance remain unclear. Materials and Methods: A 2D-gel proteomics method was used to analyze protein expression levels of three human ovarian cancer cell lines and five biopsy samples. Representative proteins identified were validated via western immunoblotting. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed metabolomic pathway changes. Results: A total of 189 proteins were identified with restricted criteria. Combined treatment targeting the proteasome-ubiquitin pathway resulted in re-sensitisation of drug-resistant cells. In addition, examination of five surgical biopsies of ovarian tissues revealed α-enolase (ENOA), elongation factor Tu, mitochondrial (EFTU), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3P), stress-70 protein, mitochondrial (GRP75), apolipoprotein A-1 (APOA1), peroxiredoxin (PRDX2) and annexin A (ANXA) as candidate biomarkers of drug-resistant disease. Conclusion: Proteomics combined with pathway analysis provided information for an effective combined treatment approach overcoming drug resistance. Analysis of cell lines and tissues revealed potential prognostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer. *These Authors contributed equally to this study. PMID:28031236

  7. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals the Activation Dynamics of Intracellular Protein Smad3 on Cell Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Yang, Yong; He, Kangmin; Zhang, Fayun; Zhao, Libo; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Jinghe; Liang, Wei; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    Smad3 is an intracellular protein that plays a key role in propagating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signals from cell membrane to nucleus. However whether the transient process of Smad3 activation occurs on cell membrane and how it is regulated remains elusive. Using advanced live-cell single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image and track fluorescent protein-labeled Smad3, we observed and quantified, for the first time, the dynamics of individual Smad3 molecules docking to and activation on the cell membrane. It was found that Smad3 docked to cell membrane in both unstimulated and stimulated cells, but with different diffusion rates and dissociation kinetics. The change in its membrane docking dynamics can be used to study the activation of Smad3. Our results reveal that Smad3 binds with type I TGF-β receptor (TRI) even in unstimulated cells. Its activation is regulated by TRI phosphorylation but independent of receptor endocytosis. This study offers new information on TGF-β/Smad signaling, as well as a new approach to investigate the activation of intracellular signaling proteins for a better understanding of their functions in signal transduction.

  8. Vibrio cholerae biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Sharo, Andrew G; Stone, Howard A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities that are crucial in nature and during infection. Despite extensive work to identify biofilm components and to discover how they are regulated, little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. Here, we use state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to enable live single-cell resolution imaging of a Vibrio cholerae biofilm as it develops from one single founder cell to a mature biofilm of 10,000 cells, and to discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a 2D branched morphology to a dense, ordered 3D cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture in V. cholerae biofilms, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene, rbmA Competition analyses reveal that the dense growth mode has the advantage of providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. Our single-cell technology can broadly link genes to biofilm fine structure and provides a route to assessing cell-to-cell heterogeneity in response to external stimuli.

  9. Fundamental Limits to Collective Concentration Sensing in Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancher, Sean; Mugler, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    The precision of concentration sensing is improved when cells communicate. Here we derive the physical limits to concentration sensing for cells that communicate over short distances by directly exchanging small molecules (juxtacrine signaling), or over longer distances by secreting and sensing a diffusive messenger molecule (autocrine signaling). In the latter case, we find that the optimal cell spacing can be large, due to a trade-off between maintaining communication strength and reducing signal cross-correlations. This leads to the surprising result that sparsely packed communicating cells sense concentrations more precisely than densely packed communicating cells. We compare our results to data from a wide variety of communicating cell types.

  10. Long-term data reveal a population decline of the tropical lizard Anolis apletophallus, and a negative affect of el nino years on population growth rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Stapley

    Full Text Available Climate change threatens biodiversity worldwide, however predicting how particular species will respond is difficult because climate varies spatially, complex factors regulate population abundance, and species vary in their susceptibility to climate change. Studies need to incorporate these factors with long-term data in order to link climate change to population abundance. We used 40 years of lizard abundance data and local climate data from Barro Colorado Island to ask how climate, total lizard abundance and cohort-specific abundance have changed over time, and how total and cohort-specific abundance relate to climate variables including those predicted to make the species vulnerable to climate change (i.e. temperatures exceeding preferred body temperature. We documented a decrease in lizard abundance over the last 40 years, and changes in the local climate. Population growth rate was related to the previous years' southern oscillation index; increasing following cooler-wetter, la niña years, decreasing following warmer-drier, el nino years. Within-year recruitment was negatively related to rainfall and minimum temperature. This study simultaneously identified climatic factors driving long-term population fluctuations and climate variables influencing short-term annual recruitment, both of which may be contributing to the population decline and influence the population's future persistence.

  11. Functional single-cell analyses: flow cytometry and cell sorting of microbial populations and communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Susann; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    The still poorly explored world of microbial functioning is about to be uncovered by a combined application of old and new technologies. Bacteria, especially, are still in the dark with respect to their phylogenetic affiliations as well as their metabolic capabilities and functions. However, with the advent of sophisticated flow cytometric and cell sorting technologies in microbiological labs, there is now the possibility to gain this knowledge at the single-cell level without cumbersome cultivation approaches. Cytometry also facilitates the understanding of physiological diversity in seemingly likewise acting populations. Both individuality and diversity lead to the complex and concerted actions of microbial consortia. This review provides an overview of the state of the art in the field. It deals with the handling of microorganisms from the very beginning (i.e. sampling, and detachment and fixation procedures) and goes on to discuss the pitfalls and problems in analysing cells without any further treatment. If information cannot be gained by specific staining procedures, phylogenetic technologies, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches may be options for achieving advanced insights. All in all, flow cytometry will be a mediator technology to gain a deeper insight into the heterogeneity of populations and the functioning of microbial communities.

  12. Early transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of CD8(+) T cell differentiation revealed by single-cell RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaradov, Boyko; Arsenio, Janilyn; Widjaja, Christella E; He, Zhaoren; Aigner, Stefan; Metz, Patrick J; Yu, Bingfei; Wehrens, Ellen J; Lopez, Justine; Kim, Stephanie H; Zuniga, Elina I; Goldrath, Ananda W; Chang, John T; Yeo, Gene W

    2017-04-01

    During microbial infection, responding CD8(+) T lymphocytes differentiate into heterogeneous subsets that together provide immediate and durable protection. To elucidate the dynamic transcriptional changes that underlie this process, we applied a single-cell RNA-sequencing approach and analyzed individual CD8(+) T lymphocytes sequentially throughout the course of a viral infection in vivo. Our analyses revealed a striking transcriptional divergence among cells that had undergone their first division and identified previously unknown molecular determinants that controlled the fate specification of CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Our findings suggest a model for the differentiation of terminal effector cells initiated by an early burst of transcriptional activity and subsequently refined by epigenetic silencing of transcripts associated with memory lymphocytes, which highlights the power and necessity of single-cell approaches.

  13. Intracellular CHO cell metabolite profiling reveals steady-state dependent metabolic fingerprints in perfusion culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, Daniel J; Steinhoff, Robert; Kopp, Marie R G; Serra, Elisa; Soos, Miroslav; Zenobi, Renato; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-12-20

    Perfusion cell culture processes allow the steady-state culture of mammalian cells at high viable cell density, which is beneficial for overall product yields and homogeneity of product quality in the manufacturing of therapeutic proteins. In this study, the extent of metabolic steady state and the change of the metabolite profile between different steady states of an industrial Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line producing a monoclonal antibody (mAb) was investigated in stirred tank perfusion bioreactors. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) of daily cell extracts revealed more than a hundred peaks, among which 76 metabolites were identified by tandem MS (MS/MS) and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) MS. Nucleotide ratios (Uridine (U)-ratio, Nucleotide triphosphate (NTP)-ratio and energy charge (EC)) and multivariate analysis of all features indicated a consistent metabolite profile for a stable culture performed at 40 × 10(6) cells/mL over 26 days of culture. On the other hand the reactor was operated continuously so as to reach three distinct steady states one after the other at 20, 60 and 40 × 10(6) cells/mL. In each case, a stable metabolite profile was achieved after an initial transient phase of approximately three days at constant cell density when varying between these set points. Clear clustering according to cell density was observed by principal component analysis, indicating steady state dependent metabolite profiles. In particular, varying levels of nucleotides, nucleotide sugar and lipid precursors explained most of the variance between the different cell density set points. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Establishment and characterization of primary lung cancer cell lines from Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao ZHENG; Yi-hua SUN; Xiao-lei YE; Hai-quan CHEN; Hong-bin JI

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To establish and characterize primary lung cancer cell lines from Chinese population.Methods: Lung cancer specimens or pleural effusions were collected from Chinese lung cancer patients and cultured in vitro with ACL4 medium (for non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC)) or HITES medium (for small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC)) supplemented with 5%FBS. All cell lines were maintained in culture for more than 25 passages. Most of these cell lines were further analyzed for oncogenic mutations, karyotype, cell growth kinetics, and tumorigenicity in nude mice.Results: Eight primary cell lines from Chinese lung cancer patients were established and characterized, including seven NSCLC cell lines and one SCLC cell line. Five NSCLC cell lines were found to harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain mutations.Conclusion: These well-characterized primary lung cancer cell lines from Chinese population provide a unique platform for future studies of the ethnic differences in lung cancer biology and drug response.

  15. Soluble factor cross-talk between human bone marrow-derived hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells enhances in vitro CFU-F and CFU-O growth and reveals heterogeneity in the mesenchymal progenitor cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksh, Dolores; Davies, John E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2005-11-01

    The homeostatic adult bone marrow (BM) is a complex tissue wherein physical and biochemical interactions serve to maintain a balance between the hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartments. To focus on soluble factor interactions occurring between mesenchymal and hematopoietic cells, a serum-free adhesion-independent culture system was developed that allows manipulation of the growth of both mesenchymal and hematopoietic human BM-derived progenitors and the balance between these compartments. Factorial experiments demonstrated a role for stem cell factor (SCF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3) in the concomitant growth of hematopoietic (CD45+) and nonhematopoietic (CD45-) cells, as well as their derivatives. Kinetic tracking of IL-3alpha receptor (CD123) and SCF receptor (CD117) expression on a sorted CD45- cell population revealed the emergence of CD45-CD123+ cells capable of osteogenesis. Of the total fibroblast colony-forming units (CFU-Fs) and osteoblast colony-forming units (CFU-O), approximately 24% of CFU-Fs and about 22% of CFU-Os were recovered from this population. Cell-sorting experiments demonstrated that the CD45+ cell population secreted soluble factors that positively affect the survival and proliferation of CFU-Fs and CFU-Os generated from the CD45- cells. Together, our results provide insight into the intercellular cytokine network between hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells and provide a strategy to mutually culture both mesenchymal and hematopoietic cells in a defined scalable bioprocess.

  16. Y-chromosome and mtDNA genetics reveal significant contrasts in affinities of modern Middle Eastern populations with European and African populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle A Badro

    Full Text Available The Middle East was a funnel of human expansion out of Africa, a staging area for the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution, and the home to some of the earliest world empires. Post LGM expansions into the region and subsequent population movements created a striking genetic mosaic with distinct sex-based genetic differentiation. While prior studies have examined the mtDNA and Y-chromosome contrast in focal populations in the Middle East, none have undertaken a broad-spectrum survey including North and sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and Middle Eastern populations. In this study 5,174 mtDNA and 4,658 Y-chromosome samples were investigated using PCA, MDS, mean-linkage clustering, AMOVA, and Fisher exact tests of F(ST's, R(ST's, and haplogroup frequencies. Geographic differentiation in affinities of Middle Eastern populations with Africa and Europe showed distinct contrasts between mtDNA and Y-chromosome data. Specifically, Lebanon's mtDNA shows a very strong association to Europe, while Yemen shows very strong affinity with Egypt and North and East Africa. Previous Y-chromosome results showed a Levantine coastal-inland contrast marked by J1 and J2, and a very strong North African component was evident throughout the Middle East. Neither of these patterns were observed in the mtDNA. While J2 has penetrated into Europe, the pattern of Y-chromosome diversity in Lebanon does not show the widespread affinities with Europe indicated by the mtDNA data. Lastly, while each population shows evidence of connections with expansions that now define the Middle East, Africa, and Europe, many of the populations in the Middle East show distinctive mtDNA and Y-haplogroup characteristics that indicate long standing settlement with relatively little impact from and movement into other populations.

  17. Transcriptional activity around bacterial cell death reveals molecular biomarkers for cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuren Frank H

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteriology, the ability to grow in selective media and to form colonies on nutrient agar plates is routinely used as a retrospective criterion for the detection of living bacteria. However, the utilization of indicators for bacterial viability-such as the presence of specific transcripts or membrane integrity-would overcome bias introduced by cultivation and reduces the time span of analysis from initiation to read out. Therefore, we investigated the correlation between transcriptional activity, membrane integrity and cultivation-based viability in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Results We present microbiological, cytological and molecular analyses of the physiological response to lethal heat stress under accurately defined conditions through systematic sampling of bacteria from a single culture exposed to gradually increasing temperatures. We identified a coherent transcriptional program including known heat shock responses as well as the rapid expression of a small number of sporulation and competence genes, the latter only known to be active in the stationary growth phase. Conclusion The observed coordinated gene expression continued even after cell death, in other words after all bacteria permanently lost their ability to reproduce. Transcription of a very limited number of genes correlated with cell viability under the applied killing regime. The transcripts of the expressed genes in living bacteria – but silent in dead bacteria-include those of essential genes encoding chaperones of the protein folding machinery and can serve as molecular biomarkers for bacterial cell viability.

  18. Mammary-Stem-Cell-Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomics has provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs. By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study has established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and has discovered functional breast cancer mutations.

  19. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Cashman

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS, which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and

  20. Single-cell transcriptomes identify human islet cell signatures and reveal cell-type–specific expression changes in type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Mohan; Kursawe, Romy; Sun, Lili; Sivakamasundari, V.; Kycia, Ina

    2017-01-01

    Blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by the coordinated action of at least four cell types constituting pancreatic islets. Changes in the proportion and/or function of these cells are associated with genetic and molecular pathophysiology of monogenic, type 1, and type 2 (T2D) diabetes. Cellular heterogeneity impedes precise understanding of the molecular components of each islet cell type that govern islet (dys)function, particularly the less abundant delta and gamma/pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cells. Here, we report single-cell transcriptomes for 638 cells from nondiabetic (ND) and T2D human islet samples. Analyses of ND single-cell transcriptomes identified distinct alpha, beta, delta, and PP/gamma cell-type signatures. Genes linked to rare and common forms of islet dysfunction and diabetes were expressed in the delta and PP/gamma cell types. Moreover, this study revealed that delta cells specifically express receptors that receive and coordinate systemic cues from the leptin, ghrelin, and dopamine signaling pathways implicating them as integrators of central and peripheral metabolic signals into the pancreatic islet. Finally, single-cell transcriptome profiling revealed genes differentially regulated between T2D and ND alpha, beta, and delta cells that were undetectable in paired whole islet analyses. This study thus identifies fundamental cell-type–specific features of pancreatic islet (dys)function and provides a critical resource for comprehensive understanding of islet biology and diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:27864352

  1. Cell-type independent MYC target genes reveal a primordial signature involved in biomass accumulation.

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    Hongkai Ji

    Full Text Available The functions of key oncogenic transcription factors independent of context have not been fully delineated despite our richer understanding of the genetic alterations in human cancers. The MYC oncogene, which produces the Myc transcription factor, is frequently altered in human cancer and is a major regulatory hub for many cancers. In this regard, we sought to unravel the primordial signature of Myc function by using high-throughput genomic approaches to identify the cell-type independent core Myc target gene signature. Using a model of human B lymphoma cells bearing inducible MYC, we identified a stringent set of direct Myc target genes via chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, global nuclear run-on assay, and changes in mRNA levels. We also identified direct Myc targets in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs. We further document that a Myc core signature (MCS set of target genes is shared in mouse and human ESCs as well as in four other human cancer cell types. Remarkably, the expression of the MCS correlates with MYC expression in a cell-type independent manner across 8,129 microarray samples, which include 312 cell and tissue types. Furthermore, the expression of the MCS is elevated in vivo in Eμ-Myc transgenic murine lymphoma cells as compared with premalignant or normal B lymphocytes. Expression of the MCS in human B cell lymphomas, acute leukemia, lung cancers or Ewing sarcomas has the highest correlation with MYC expression. Annotation of this gene signature reveals Myc's primordial function in RNA processing, ribosome biogenesis and biomass accumulation as its key roles in cancer and stem cells.

  2. The impact of selection on population genetic structure in the clam Meretrix petechialis revealed by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xia; Wang, Hongxia; Li, Yan; Liu, Baozhong

    2016-02-01

    The aim of our work is to evaluate the impact of mass selection on genetic structure in artificially closed populations of the clam Meretrix petechialis. In the present study, we performed mass selection over four generations (from 2004 to 2010) on two clam populations [shell features of purple lines (SP) and black dots (SB)] and analyzed their temporal genetic variation and structure using microsatellite makers. The two closed populations originated from the natural Shandong population (SD); thus, a natural SD population (10SD) was used to detect the current genetic structure after 6 years of natural selection. The results showed that the genetic diversity of the four generations of SB and SP was gradually reduced but remained at relatively high levels (SB, A = 18.9.4-16.8, Ho = 0.7389-0.6971, and He = 0.8897-0.8591; SP, A = 20.0-17.8, Ho = 0.7512-0.7043, and He = 0.8938-0.8625), which has not been reduced compared with that of the 10SD population (A = 17.8, Ho = 0.6803, and He = 0.8302). The Ne estimates for the two populations were almost at the same levels as the actual numbers of parental individuals. In addition, a low inbreeding coefficient was detected in the two populations (SB, 0.00201-0.00639; SP, 0.00176-0.00541). Based on the results, the present mass selection has not made a large impact on the population genetic structure of the closed populations. The present investigation provides important information for the development of management strategies for genetic breeding of the clam.

  3. Count trends for migratory Bald Eagles reveal differences between two populations at a spring site along the Lake Ontario shoreline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kyle R

    2016-01-01

    The recovery of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucophalus), after DDT and other organochlorine insecticides were banned in the United States, can be regarded as one of the most iconic success stories resulting from the Endangered Species Act. Interest remains high in the recovery and growth of the Bald Eagle population. Common to evaluating growth and recovery rates are counts at nesting sites and analyses of individuals fledged per season. But this is merely one snapshot that ignores survival rates as eagles grow to maturity. By analyzing indices from migration counts, we get a different snapshot better reflecting the survival of young birds. Different populations of Bald Eagles breed at different sites at different times of the year. Typical migration count analyses do not separate the populations. A separation of two distinct populations can be achieved at spring count sites by taking advantage of the tendency for northern summer breeding birds to migrate north in spring earlier than southern winter breeding birds who disperse north later in spring. In this paper I analyze migratory indices at a spring site along Lake Ontario. The analysis shows that eagles considered to be primarily of the northern summer breeding population showed an estimated growth rate of 5.3 ± 0.85% (SE) per year with 49% of eagles tallied in adult plumage, whereas the migrants considered to be primarily of the southern breeding population had an estimated growth rate of 14.0 ± 1.79% with only 22% in adult plumage. Together these results argue that the populations of southern breeding Bald Eagles are growing at a substantially higher rate than northern breeding eagles. These findings suggest that aggregate population indices for a species at migration counting sites can sometimes obscure important differences among separate populations at any given site and that separating counts by time period can be a useful way to check for differences among sub-populations.

  4. Human stem cells from single blastomeres reveal pathways of embryonic or trophoblast fate specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdravkovic, Tamara; Nazor, Kristopher L; Larocque, Nicholas; Gormley, Matthew; Donne, Matthew; Hunkapillar, Nathan; Giritharan, Gnanaratnam; Bernstein, Harold S; Wei, Grace; Hebrok, Matthias; Zeng, Xianmin; Genbacev, Olga; Mattis, Aras; McMaster, Michael T; Krtolica, Ana; Valbuena, Diana; Simón, Carlos; Laurent, Louise C; Loring, Jeanne F; Fisher, Susan J

    2015-12-01

    Mechanisms of initial cell fate decisions differ among species. To gain insights into lineage allocation in humans, we derived ten human embryonic stem cell lines (designated UCSFB1-10) from single blastomeres of four 8-cell embryos and one 12-cell embryo from a single couple. Compared with numerous conventional lines from blastocysts, they had unique gene expression and DNA methylation patterns that were, in part, indicative of trophoblast competence. At a transcriptional level, UCSFB lines from different embryos were often more closely related than those from the same embryo. As predicted by the transcriptomic data, immunolocalization of EOMES, T brachyury, GDF15 and active β-catenin revealed differential expression among blastomeres of 8- to 10-cell human embryos. The UCSFB lines formed derivatives of the three germ layers and CDX2-positive progeny, from which we derived the first human trophoblast stem cell line. Our data suggest heterogeneity among early-stage blastomeres and that the UCSFB lines have unique properties, indicative of a more immature state than conventional lines.

  5. Revealing the sequence of interactions of PuroA peptide with Candida albicans cells by live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the mechanism(s) of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) it is desirable to provide details of their interaction kinetics with cellular, sub-cellular and molecular targets. The synthetic peptide, PuroA, displays potent antimicrobial activities which have been attributed to peptide-induced membrane destabilization, or intracellular mechanisms of action (DNA-binding) or both. We used time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to directly monitor the localization and interaction kinetics of a FITC- PuroA peptide on single Candida albicans cells in real time. Our results reveal the sequence of events leading to cell death. Within 1 minute, FITC-PuroA was observed to interact with SYTO-labelled nucleic acids, resulting in a noticeable quenching in the fluorescence lifetime of the peptide label at the nucleus of yeast cells, and cell-cycle arrest. A propidium iodide (PI) influx assay confirmed that peptide translocation itself did not disrupt the cell membrane integrity; however, PI entry occurred 25–45 minutes later, which correlated with an increase in fractional fluorescence of pores and an overall loss of cell size. Our results clarify that membrane disruption appears to be the mechanism by which the C. albicans cells are killed and this occurs after FITC-PuroA translocation and binding to intracellular targets. PMID:28252014

  6. Analysing the Influence of the Spontaneous Aneuploidy Frequency on the Cell Population System Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Nefedov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a qualitative analysis of M.S. Vinogradova's nonlinear model for dynamics of the cell population system. This system describes the stem cells cultivation in vitro under resource constraints. The system consists of two populations, namely: population of normal cells and population of abnormal cells. Resource constraints are considered as linear dependences of mitosis parameters on the normalized densities of each population.One of the key parameters that effects on the realization of the system evolution scenarios is a parameter that determines a share of the normal cells, which pass, when dividing, into population of the abnormal cells. The paper analyses both the existence conditions of the rest points and the changes of the evolution scenarios of population system with changing abovementioned parameter and other system parameters held fixed. It is shown that there is a saddle-node bifurcation in the system; the bifurcation value of the parameter is found. The paper shows the interval of parameter values in which the favorable scenarios of population system evolution are implemented. It also presents results of mathematical modeling.

  7. High-throughput sequencing reveals an altered T cell repertoire in X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Manish; Simchoni, Noa; Hamm, David; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-12-01

    To examine the T cell receptor structure in the absence of B cells, the TCR β CDR3 was sequenced from DNA of 15 X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) subjects and 18 male controls, using the Illumina HiSeq platform and the ImmunoSEQ analyzer. V gene usage and the V-J combinations, derived from both productive and non-productive sequences, were significantly different between XLA samples and controls. Although the CDR3 length was similar for XLA and control samples, the CDR3 region of the XLA T cell receptor contained significantly fewer deletions and insertions in V, D, and J gene segments, differences intrinsic to the V(D)J recombination process and not due to peripheral T cell selection. XLA CDR3s demonstrated fewer charged amino acid residues, more sharing of CDR3 sequences, and almost completely lacked a population of highly modified Vβ gene segments found in control DNA, suggesting both a skewed and contracted T cell repertoire in XLA.

  8. T Cell Receptor Vβ Staining Identifies the Malignant Clone in Adult T cell Leukemia and Reveals Killing of Leukemia Cells by Autologous CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Aileen G; Witkover, Aviva; Melamed, Anat; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Cook, Lucy B M; Fields, Paul; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-11-01

    There is growing evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses can contribute to long-term remission of many malignancies. The etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), contains highly immunogenic CTL epitopes, but ATL patients typically have low frequencies of cytokine-producing HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cells in the circulation. It remains unclear whether patients with ATL possess CTLs that can kill the malignant HTLV-1 infected clone. Here we used flow cytometric staining of TCRVβ and cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1) to identify monoclonal populations of HTLV-1-infected T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with ATL. Thus, we quantified the rate of CD8+-mediated killing of the putative malignant clone in ex vivo blood samples. We observed that CD8+ cells from ATL patients were unable to lyse autologous ATL clones when tested directly ex vivo. However, short in vitro culture restored the ability of CD8+ cells to kill ex vivo ATL clones in some donors. The capacity of CD8+ cells to lyse HTLV-1 infected cells which expressed the viral sense strand gene products was significantly enhanced after in vitro culture, and donors with an ATL clone that expressed the HTLV-1 Tax gene were most likely to make a detectable lytic CD8+ response to the ATL cells. We conclude that some patients with ATL possess functional tumour-specific CTLs which could be exploited to contribute to control of the disease.

  9. Calls reveal population structure of blue whales across the southeast Indian Ocean and the southwest Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcazar, Naysa E; Tripovich, Joy S; Klinck, Holger; Nieukirk, Sharon L; Mellinger, David K; Dziak, Robert P; Rogers, Tracey L

    2015-11-24

    For effective species management, understanding population structure and distribution is critical. However, quantifying population structure is not always straightforward. Within the Southern Hemisphere, the blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) complex is extremely diverse but difficult to study. Using automated detector methods, we identified "acoustic populations" of whales producing region-specific call types. We examined blue whale call types in passive acoustic data at sites spanning over 7,370 km across the southeast Indian Ocean and southwest Pacific Ocean (SWPO) from 2009 to 2012. In the absence of genetic resolution, these acoustic populations offer unique information about the blue whale population complex. We found that the Australian continent acts as a geographic boundary, separating Australia and New Zealand blue whale acoustic populations at the junction of the Indian and Pacific Ocean basins. We located blue whales in previously undocumented locations, including the far SWPO, in the Tasman Sea off the east coast of Australia, and along the Lau Basin near Tonga. Our understanding of population dynamics across this broad scale has significant implications to recovery and conservation management for this endangered species, at a regional and global scale.

  10. Microsatellites reveal a strong subdivision of genetic structure in Chinese populations of the mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae

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    Sun Jing-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two colour forms of the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch coexist in China: a red (carmine form, which is considered to be native and a green form which is considered to be invasive. The population genetic diversity and population genetic structure of this organism were unclear in China, and there is a controversy over whether they constitute distinct species. To address these issues, we genotyped a total of 1,055 individuals from 18 red populations and 7 green populations in China using eight microsatellite loci. Results We identified 109 alleles. We found a highly significant genetic differentiation among the 25 populations (global FST = 0.506, global FST {ENA} = 0.473 and a low genetic diversity in each population. In addition, genetic diversity of the red form mites was found to be higher than the green form. Pearson correlations between statistics of variation (AR and HE and geographic coordinates (latitude and longitude showed that the genetic diversity of the red form was correlated with latitude. Using Bayesian clustering, we divided the Chinese mite populations into five clades which were well congruent with their geographic distributions. Conclusions Spider mites possess low levels of genetic diversity, limit gene flow between populations and significant and IBD (isolation by distance effect. These factors in turn contribute to the strong subdivision of genetic structure. In addition, population genetic structure results don't support the separation of the two forms of spider mite into two species. The morphological differences between the two forms of mites may be a result of epigenetic effects.

  11. Prominin-1 (CD133 defines both stem and non-stem cell populations in CNS development and gliomas.

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    Karl Holmberg Olausson

    Full Text Available Prominin-1 (CD133 is a commonly used cancer stem cell marker in central nervous system (CNS tumors including glioblastoma (GBM. Expression of Prom1 in cancer is thought to parallel expression and function in normal stem cells. Using RNA in situ hybridization and antibody tools capable of detecting multiple isoforms of Prom1, we find evidence for two distinct Prom1 cell populations in mouse brain. Prom1 RNA is first expressed in stem/progenitor cells of the ventricular zone in embryonic brain. Conversely, in adult mouse brain Prom1 RNA is low in SVZ/SGZ stem cell zones but high in a rare but widely distributed cell population (Prom1(hi. Lineage marker analysis reveals Prom1(hi cells are Olig2+Sox2+ glia but Olig1/2 knockout mice lacking oligodendroglia retain Prom1(hi cells. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling identifies Prom1(hi as slow-dividing distributed progenitors distinct from NG2+Olig2+ oligodendrocyte progenitors. In adult human brain, PROM1 cells are rarely positive for OLIG2, but express astroglial markers GFAP and SOX2. Variability of PROM1 expression levels in human GBM and patient-derived xenografts (PDX - from no expression to strong, uniform expression--highlights that PROM1 may not always be associated with or restricted to cancer stem cells. TCGA and PDX data show that high expression of PROM1 correlates with poor overall survival. Within proneural subclass tumors, high PROM1 expression correlates inversely with IDH1 (R132H mutation. These findings support PROM1 as a tumor cell-intrinsic marker related to GBM survival, independent of its stem cell properties, and highlight potentially divergent roles for this protein in normal mouse and human glia.

  12. Population stratification in Argentina strongly influences likelihood ratio estimates in paternity testing as revealed by a simulation-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscanini, Ulises; Salas, Antonio; García-Magariños, Manuel; Gusmão, Leonor; Raimondi, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    A simulation-based analysis was carried out to investigate the potential effects of population substructure in paternity testing in Argentina. The study was performed by evaluating paternity indexes (PI) calculated from different simulated pedigree scenarios and using 15 autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) from eight Argentinean databases. The results show important statistically significant differences between PI values depending on the dataset employed. These differences are more dramatic when considering Native American versus urban populations. This study also indicates that the use of Fst to correct for the effect of population stratification on PI might be inappropriate because it cannot account for the particularities of single paternity cases.

  13. High-resolution analysis of Y-chromosomal polymorphisms reveals signatures of population movements from Central Asia and West Asia into India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Namita Mukherjee; Almut Nebel; Ariella Oppenheim; Partha P. Majumder

    2001-12-01

    Linguistic evidence suggests that West Asia and Central Asia have been the two major geographical sources of genes in the contemporary Indian gene pool. To test the nature and extent of similarities in the gene pools of these regions we have collected DNA samples from four ethnic populations of northern India, and have screened these samples for a set of 18 Y-chromosome polymorphic markers (12 unique event polymorphisms and six short tandem repeats). These data from Indian populations have been analysed in conjunction with published data from several West Asian and Central Asian populations. Our analyses have revealed traces of population movement from Central Asia and West Asia into India. Two haplogroups, HG-3 and HG-9, which are known to have arisen in the Central Asian region, are found in reasonably high frequencies (41.7% and 14.3% respectively) in the study populations. The ages estimated for these two haplogroups are less in the Indian populations than those estimated from data on Middle Eastern populations. A neighbour-joining tree based on Y-haplogroup frequencies shows that the North Indians are genetically placed between the West Asian and Central Asian populations. This is consistent with gene flow from West Asia and Central Asia into India.

  14. Axonal transmission in the retina introduces a small dispersion of relative timing in the ganglion cell population response.

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    Günther Zeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual stimuli elicit action potentials in tens of different retinal ganglion cells. Each ganglion cell type responds with a different latency to a given stimulus, thus transforming the high-dimensional input into a temporal neural code. The timing of the first spikes between different retinal projection neurons cells may further change along axonal transmission. The purpose of this study is to investigate if intraretinal conduction velocity leads to a synchronization or dispersion of the population signal leaving the eye. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We 'imaged' the initiation and transmission of light-evoked action potentials along individual axons in the rabbit retina at micron-scale resolution using a high-density multi-transistor array. We measured unimodal conduction velocity distributions (1.3±0.3 m/sec, mean ± SD for axonal populations at all retinal eccentricities with the exception of the central part that contains myelinated axons. The velocity variance within each piece of retina is caused by ganglion cell types that show narrower and slightly different average velocity tuning. Ganglion cells of the same type respond with similar latency to spatially homogenous stimuli and conduct with similar velocity. For ganglion cells of different type intraretinal conduction velocity and response latency to flashed stimuli are negatively correlated, indicating that differences in first spike timing increase (up to 10 msec. Similarly, the analysis of pair-wise correlated activity in response to white-noise stimuli reveals that conduction velocity and response latency are negatively correlated. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Intraretinal conduction does not change the relative spike timing between ganglion cells of the same type but increases spike timing differences among ganglion cells of different type. The fastest retinal ganglion cells therefore act as indicators of new stimuli for postsynaptic neurons. The intraretinal dispersion

  15. Mapping of PARK2 and PACRG overlapping regulatory region reveals LD structure and functional variants in association with leprosy in unrelated indian population groups.

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    Rupali Chopra

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium Leprae, where the host genetic background plays an important role toward the disease pathogenesis. Various studies have identified a number of human genes in association with leprosy or its clinical forms. However, non-replication of results has hinted at the heterogeneity among associations between different population groups, which could be due to differently evolved LD structures and differential frequencies of SNPs within the studied regions of the genome. A need for systematic and saturated mapping of the associated regions with the disease is warranted to unravel the observed heterogeneity in different populations. Mapping of the PARK2 and PACRG gene regulatory region with 96 SNPs, with a resolution of 1 SNP per 1 Kb for PARK2 gene regulatory region in a North Indian population, showed an involvement of 11 SNPs in determining the susceptibility towards leprosy. The association was replicated in a geographically distinct and unrelated population from Orissa in eastern India. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the two significantly associated SNPs, located 63.8 kb upstream of PARK2 gene and represented in a single BIN of 8 SNPs, influenced the gene expression. A comparison of BINs between Indian and Vietnamese populations revealed differences in the BIN structures, explaining the heterogeneity and also the reason for non-replication of the associated genomic region in different populations.

  16. Mapping of PARK2 and PACRG Overlapping Regulatory Region Reveals LD Structure and Functional Variants in Association with Leprosy in Unrelated Indian Population Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Rupali; Aggarwal, Shweta; Kumar, Bhupender; Manvati, Siddharth; Kalaiarasan, Ponnusamy; Jena, Mamta; Garg, Vijay K.; Bhattacharya, Sambit N.; Bamezai, Rameshwar N. K.

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium Leprae, where the host genetic background plays an important role toward the disease pathogenesis. Various studies have identified a number of human genes in association with leprosy or its clinical forms. However, non-replication of results has hinted at the heterogeneity among associations between different population groups, which could be due to differently evolved LD structures and differential frequencies of SNPs within the studied regions of the genome. A need for systematic and saturated mapping of the associated regions with the disease is warranted to unravel the observed heterogeneity in different populations. Mapping of the PARK2 and PACRG gene regulatory region with 96 SNPs, with a resolution of 1 SNP per 1 Kb for PARK2 gene regulatory region in a North Indian population, showed an involvement of 11 SNPs in determining the susceptibility towards leprosy. The association was replicated in a geographically distinct and unrelated population from Orissa in eastern India. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the two significantly associated SNPs, located 63.8 kb upstream of PARK2 gene and represented in a single BIN of 8 SNPs, influenced the gene expression. A comparison of BINs between Indian and Vietnamese populations revealed differences in the BIN structures, explaining the heterogeneity and also the reason for non-replication of the associated genomic region in different populations. PMID:23861666

  17. Robustness and adaptation reveal plausible cell cycle controlling subnetwork in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiun-Yan; Huang, Chi-Wei; Kao, Kuo-Ching; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2013-04-10

    Biological systems are often organized spatially and temporally by multi-scale functional subsystems (modules). A specific subcellular process often corresponds to a subsystem composed of some of these interconnected modules. Accurate identification of system-level modularity organization from the large scale networks can provide valuable information on subsystem models of subcellular processes or physiological phenomena. Computational identification of functional modules from the large scale network is the key approach to solve the complexity of modularity in the past decade, but the overlapping and multi-scale nature of modules often renders unsatisfactory results in these methods. Most current methods for modularity detection are optimization-based and suffered from the drawback of size resolution limit. It is difficult to trace the origin of the unsatisfactory results, which may be due to poor data, inappropriate objective function selection or simply resulted from natural evolution, and hence no system-level accurate modular models for subcellular processes can be offered. Motivated by the idea of evolution with robustness and adaption as guiding principles, we propose a novel approach that can identify significant multi-scale overlapping modules that are sufficiently accurate at the system and subsystem levels, giving biological insights for subcellular processes. The success of our evolution strategy method is demonstrated by applying to the yeast protein-protein interaction network. Functional subsystems of important physiological phenomena can be revealed. In particular, the cell cycle controlling network is selected for detailed discussion. The cell cycle subcellular processes in yeast can be successfully dissected into functional modules of cell cycle control, cell size check point, spindle assembly checkpoint, and DNA damage check point in G2/M and S phases. The interconnections between check points and cell cycle control modules provide clues on the

  18. Evolution of cell populations in vitro: peculiarities, driving forces, mechanisms and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunakh V. A.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review outlines the major features and distinctions of cell populations, types and directions of selection in such populations. Population-genetic basis for cell adaptation to growth conditions in vitro is elucidated; in particular, peculiarities of genome evolution in the course of cell dedifferentiation and further cell adaptation to growth conditions in passaged culture are evaluated. Main factors of variation and selection in cell populations in vitro, influence of growth conditions on structure of cell populations and some regularities of cultured cells and regenerated plants are considered. Details of creation of stable cell lines-producers of biologically active substances are presented. Views and suppositions of author resulting from analysis of both literature data and own multiyear studies on cell population genetics are set forth. Among others are substantiated such key statements: cell culture in vitro presents dynamically-heterogeneous biological system, clone population, which is developing (evolving as a result of major driving factors of evolution – variation, heredity, selection and drift of genes (genotypes; interaction between these processes determines the biological characteristics of each particular cell line grown in specific conditions; in adaptation of cells to growth conditions in vitro one can single out three periods: the initial population of isolated cells, the period of strain (cell line formation and the established strain. The division into periods is determined by the type, direction and intensity of «natural» selection that acts in cell population. The formed (adapted to growth in vitro strains are genetically heterogeneous, they are characterized by the presence of physiological and genetic homeostasis, which are mostly caused by the action of stabilizing selection; cultured cells of higher plants are able to synthesize practically all classes of secondary (specialized compounds (alkaloids, steroids

  19. Dynamic chromatin states in human ES cells reveal potential regulatory sequences and genes involved in pluripotency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R David Hawkins; Zhen Ye; Samantha Kuan; Pengzhi Yu; Hui Liu; Xinmin Zhang; Roland D Green; Victor V Lobanenkov; Ron Stewart; James A Thomson; Bing Ren; Gary C Hon; Chuhu Yang; Jessica E Antosiewicz-Bourget; LeonardKLee; Que-Minh Ngo; Sarit Klugman; Keith A Ching; Lee E Edsall

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotency,the ability of a cell to differentiate and give rise to all embryonic lineages,defines a small number of mammalian cell types such as embryonic stem (ES) cells.While it has been generally held that pluripotency is the product of a transcriptional regulatory network that activates and maintains the expression of key stem cell genes,accumulating evidence is pointing to a critical role for epigenetic processes in establishing and safeguarding the pluripotency of ES cells,as well as maintaining the identity of differentiated cell types.In order to better understand the role of epigenetic mechanisms in pluripotency,we have examined the dynamics of chromatin modifications genomewide in human ES cells (hESCs) undergoing differentiation into a mesendodermal lineage.We found that chromatin modifications at promoters remain largely invariant during differentiation,except at a small number of promoters where a dynamic switch between acetylation and methylation at H3K27 marks the transition between activation and silencing of gene expression,suggesting a hierarchy in cell fate commitment over most differentially expressed genes.We also mapped over 50 000 potential enhancers,and observed much greater dynamics in chromatin modifications,especially H3K4mel and H3K27ac,which correlate with expression of their potential target genes.Further analysis of these enhancers revealed potentially key transcriptional regulators of pluripotency and a chromatin signature indicative of a poised state that may confer developmental competence in hESCs.Our results provide new evidence supporting the role of chromatin modifications in defining enhancers and pluripotency.

  20. Single Cell Dynamics Causes Pareto-Like Effect in Stimulated T Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosette, Jérémie; Moussy, Alice; Onodi, Fanny; Auffret-Cariou, Adrien; Neildez-Nguyen, Thi My Anh; Paldi, Andras; Stockholm, Daniel

    2015-12-09

    Cell fate choice during the process of differentiation may obey to deterministic or stochastic rules. In order to discriminate between these two strategies we used time-lapse microscopy of individual murine CD4 + T cells that allows investigating the dynamics of proliferation and fate commitment. We observed highly heterogeneous division and death rates between individual clones resulting in a Pareto-like dominance of a few clones at the end of the experiment. Commitment to the Treg fate was monitored using the expression of a GFP reporter gene under the control of the endogenous Foxp3 promoter. All possible combinations of proliferation and differentiation were observed and resulted in exclusively GFP-, GFP+ or mixed phenotype clones of very different population sizes. We simulated the process of proliferation and differentiation using a simple mathematical model of stochastic decision-making based on the experimentally observed parameters. The simulations show that a stochastic scenario is fully compatible with the observed Pareto-like imbalance in the final population.

  1. Dysregulation of B Cell Repertoire Formation in Myasthenia Gravis Patients Revealed through Deep Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Heiden, Jason A; Stathopoulos, Panos; Zhou, Julian Q; Chen, Luan; Gilbert, Tamara J; Bolen, Christopher R; Barohn, Richard J; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Ciafaloni, Emma; Broering, Teresa J; Vigneault, Francois; Nowak, Richard J; Kleinstein, Steven H; O'Connor, Kevin C

    2017-02-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a prototypical B cell-mediated autoimmune disease affecting 20-50 people per 100,000. The majority of patients fall into two clinically distinguishable types based on whether they produce autoantibodies targeting the acetylcholine receptor (AChR-MG) or muscle specific kinase (MuSK-MG). The autoantibodies are pathogenic, but whether their generation is associated with broader defects in the B cell repertoire is unknown. To address this question, we performed deep sequencing of the BCR repertoire of AChR-MG, MuSK-MG, and healthy subjects to generate ∼518,000 unique VH and VL sequences from sorted naive and memory B cell populations. AChR-MG and MuSK-MG subjects displayed distinct gene segment usage biases in both VH and VL sequences within the naive and memory compartments. The memory compartment of AChR-MG was further characterized by reduced positive selection of somatic mutations in the VH CDR and altered VH CDR3 physicochemical properties. The VL repertoire of MuSK-MG was specifically characterized by reduced V-J segment distance in recombined sequences, suggesting diminished VL receptor editing during B cell development. Our results identify large-scale abnormalities in both the naive and memory B cell repertoires. Particular abnormalities were unique to either AChR-MG or MuSK-MG, indicating that the repertoires reflect the distinct properties of the subtypes. These repertoire abnormalities are consistent with previously observed defects in B cell tolerance checkpoints in MG, thereby offering additional insight regarding the impact of tolerance defects on peripheral autoimmune repertoires. These collective findings point toward a deformed B cell repertoire as a fundamental component of MG.

  2. Index sorting resolves heterogeneous murine hematopoietic stem cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Reiner; Wilson, Nicola K.; Prick, Janine C.M.; Cossetti, Chiara; Maj, Michal K.; Gottgens, Berthold; Kent, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the cellular and molecular biology of single stem cells have uncovered significant heterogeneity in the functional properties of stem cell populations. This has prompted the development of approaches to study single cells in isolation, often performed using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, many stem cell populations are too rare to test all possible cell surface marker combinations, and virtually nothing is known about functional differences associated with varying intensities of such markers. Here we describe the use of index sorting for further resolution of the flow cytometric isolation of single murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Specifically, we associate single-cell functional assay outcomes with distinct cell surface marker expression intensities. High levels of both CD150 and EPCR associate with delayed kinetics of cell division and low levels of differentiation. Moreover, cells that do not form single HSC-derived clones appear in the 7AADdim fraction, suggesting that even low levels of 7AAD staining are indicative of less healthy cell populations. These data indicate that when used in combination with single-cell functional assays, index sorting is a powerful tool for refining cell isolation strategies. This approach can be broadly applied to other single-cell systems, both to improve isolation and to acquire additional cell surface marker information. PMID:26051918

  3. HOX and TALE signatures specify human stromal stem cell populations from different sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchi, Jacopo; Trombi, Luisa; Spugnesi, Laura; Barachini, Serena; Maroni, Giorgia; Brodano, Giovanni Barbanti; Boriani, Stefano; Valtieri, Mauro; Petrini, Mario; Magli, Maria Cristina

    2013-04-01

    Human stromal stem cell populations reside in different tissues and anatomical sites, however a critical question related to their efficient use in regenerative medicine is whether they exhibit equivalent biological properties. Here, we compared cellular and molecular characteristics of stromal stem cells derived from the bone marrow, at different body sites (iliac crest, sternum, and vertebrae) and other tissues (dental pulp and colon). In particular, we investigated whether homeobox genes of the HOX and TALE subfamilies might provide suitable markers to identify distinct stromal cell populations, as HOX proteins control cell positional identity and, together with their co-factors TALE, are involved in orchestrating differentiation of adult tissues. Our results show that stromal populations from different sources, although immunophenotypically similar, display distinct HOX and TALE signatures, as well as different growth and differentiation abilities. Stromal stem cells from different tissues are characterized by specific HOX profiles, differing in the number and type of active genes, as well as in their level of expression. Conversely, bone marrow-derived cell populations can be essentially distinguished for the expression levels of specific HOX members, strongly suggesting that quantitative differences in HOX activity may be crucial. Taken together, our data indicate that the HOX and TALE profiles provide positional, embryological and hierarchical identity of human stromal stem cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that cell populations derived from different body sites may not represent equivalent cell sources for cell-based therapeutical strategies for regeneration and repair of specific tissues.

  4. Revealing the role of predator interference in a predator-prey system with disease in prey population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Subhendu; Kooi, B.W.; Biswas, B.

    2015-01-01

    on infected populations can have both positive and negative influences on disease in prey populations. Here, we present a predator-prey system where the prey population is subjected to an infectious disease to explore the impact of predator on disease dynamics. Specifically, we investigate how...... the interference among predators affects the dynamics and structure of the predator-prey community. We perform a detailed numerical bifurcation analysis and find an unusually large variety of complex dynamics, such as, bistability, torus and chaos, in the presence of predators. We show that, depending...... on the strength of interference among predators, predators enhance or control disease outbreaks and population persistence. Moreover, the presence of multistable regimes makes the system very sensitive to perturbations and facilitates a number of regime shifts. Since, the habitat structure and the choice...

  5. Population dynamics and genetic changes of Picea abies in the South Carpathians revealed by pollen and ancient DNA analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Mihály

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on allele length polymorphism designate several glacial refugia for Norway spruce (Picea abies in the South Carpathian Mountains, but infer only limited expansion from these refugia after the last glaciation. To better understand the genetic dynamics of a South Carpathian spruce lineage, we compared ancient DNA from 10,700 and 11,000-year-old spruce pollen and macrofossils retrieved from Holocene lake sediment in the Retezat Mountains with DNA extracted from extant material from the same site. We used eight primer pairs that amplified short and variable regions of the spruce cpDNA. In addition, from the same lake sediment we obtained a 15,000-years-long pollen accumulation rate (PAR record for spruce that helped us to infer changes in population size at this site. Results We obtained successful amplifications for Norway spruce from 17 out of 462 pollen grains tested, while the macrofossil material provided 22 DNA sequences. Two fossil sequences were found to be unique to the ancient material. Population genetic statistics showed higher genetic diversity in the ancient individuals compared to the extant ones. Similarly, statistically significant Ks and Kst values showed a considerable level of differentiation between extant and ancient populations at the same loci. Lateglacial and Holocene PAR values suggested that population size of the ancient population was small, in the range of 1/10 or 1/5 of the extant population. PAR analysis also detected two periods of rapid population growths (from ca. 11,100 and 3900 calibrated years before present (cal yr BP and three bottlenecks (around 9180, 7200 and 2200 cal yr BP, likely triggered by climatic change and human impact. Conclusion Our results suggest that the paternal lineages observed today in the Retezat Mountains persisted at this site at least since the early Holocene. Combination of the results from the genetic and the PAR analyses furthermore suggests that the higher

  6. Charge transport in CdTe solar cells revealed by conductive tomographic atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Justin; Kutes, Yasemin; Moore, Andrew; Zhang, Lihua; Stach, Eric A.; Huey, Bryan D.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of microstructural defects on the device properties in CdTe remains largely unknown. This is partly because characterization techniques have been unable to image electrical pathways throughout three-dimensional grains and grain boundaries with nanoscale resolution. Here, we employ a conductive and tomographic variation of atomic force microscopy to study charge transport at the nanoscale in a functioning thin-film solar cell with 12.3% efficiency. Images of electric current collected through the device thickness reveal spatially dependent short-circuit and open-circuit performance, and confirm that grain boundaries are preferential pathways for electron transport. Results on samples with and without cadmium chloride treatment reveal little difference in grain structure at the microscale, with samples without treatment showing almost no photocurrent either at planar defects or at grain boundaries. Our results supports an energetically orthogonal transport system of grain boundaries and interconnected planar defects as contributing to optimal solar cell performance, contrary to the conventional wisdom of the deleterious role of planar defects on polycrystalline thin-film solar cells.

  7. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric... public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations.'' The purpose... therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders regarding best practices related to cell and...

  8. Population structure of the Atlantic sand fiddler crab Uca pugilator along the eastern coast of US revealed by molecular data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. WEESE

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Atlantic sand fiddler crab Uca pugilator, is an extremely abundant crab found along the eastern coast of the United States. Fiddler crabs have a life cycle with an obligatory planktonic larval phase of 30–90 days, which might be expected to lead to widespread larval dispersal and consequent genetic homogeneity over considerable distances. However, a large amount of morphological and behavioral variation is found between northern and southern populations along the eastern coast. This study was undertaken to determine the population genetic structure of U.pugilator and to determine whether these differences may have a genetic basis. The population structure of the fiddler crab was analyzed using 472 individuals collected from 12 sites along the eastern coast. PCR-based single stand conformation polymorphism (SSCP was used to investigate between-site variation in the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene of these individuals. Analysis of genetic variation indicated frequent gene flow between nearby localities, but much reduced levels between populations separated by larger geographic distances. Thus, despite the potential for high dispersal by planktonic larvae, population differentiation and isolation by distance is evident between northern and southern populations of U.pugilator. A high amount of genetic differentiation (FST = 0.3468 was found between northern and southern regions suggesting that the morphological and behavioral differences between these two regions have a genetic basis and may represent subspecies.

  9. Population structure of the Atlantic sand fiddler crab Uca pugilator along the eastern coast of US revealed by molecular data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David A.WEESE; Denson K.MCLAIN; Ann E.PRATT; Quentin Q.FANG

    2009-01-01

    The Atlantic sand fiddler crab Uca pugilator is an extremely abundant crab found along the eastern coast of the United States. Fiddler crabs have a life cycle with an obligatory planktonic larval phase of 30-90 days, which might be expected to lead to widespread larval dispersal and consequent genetic homogeneity over considerable distances. However, a large amount of morphological and behavioral variation is found between northern and southern populations along the eastern coast. This study was undertaken to determine the population genetic structure of U.pugilator and to determine whether these differences may have a genetic basis. The population structure of the fiddler crab was analyzed using 472 individuals collected from 12 sites along the eastern coast. PCR-based single stand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) was used to investigate between-site variation in the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene of these individuals. Analysis of genetic variation indicated frequent gene flow between nearby localities, but much reduced levels between populations separated by larger geographic distances. Thus, despite the potential for high dispersal by planktonic larvae, population differentiation and isolation by distance is evident between northern and southern populations of U.pugilator. A high amount of genetic differentiation (FST=0.3468) was found between northern and southern regions suggesting that the morphological and behavioral differences between these two regions have a genetic basis and may represent subspecies [Current Zoology 55(2):150-157,2009].

  10. Ancient DNA reveals substantial genetic diversity in the California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus) prior to a population bottleneck

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, Jesse; Haig, Susan M.; Mullins, Thomas D.; Miller, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Critically endangered species that have undergone severe population bottlenecks often have little remaining genetic variation, making it difficult to reconstruct population histories to apply in reintroduction and recovery strategies. By using ancient DNA techniques, it is possible to combine genetic evidence from the historical population with contemporary samples to provide a more complete picture of a species' genetic variation across its historical range and through time. Applying this approach, we examined changes in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (526 base pairs) of the endangered California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus). Results showed a >80% reduction in unique haplotypes over