WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell polarity keeping

  1. Integrins and epithelial cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica L; Streuli, Charles H

    2014-08-01

    Cell polarity is characterised by differences in structure, composition and function between at least two poles of a cell. In epithelial cells, these spatial differences allow for the formation of defined apical and basal membranes. It has been increasingly recognised that cell-matrix interactions and integrins play an essential role in creating epithelial cell polarity, although key gaps in our knowledge remain. This Commentary will discuss the mounting evidence for the role of integrins in polarising epithelial cells. We build a model in which both inside-out signals to polarise basement membrane assembly at the basal surface, and outside-in signals to control microtubule apical-basal orientation and vesicular trafficking are required for establishing and maintaining the orientation of epithelial cell polarity. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the basal integrin polarity axis to cancer. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Epithelial cell polarity, stem cells and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Belmonte, Fernando; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2011-01-01

    After years of extensive scientific discovery much has been learned about the networks that regulate epithelial homeostasis. Loss of expression or functional activity of cell adhesion and cell polarity proteins (including the PAR, crumbs (CRB) and scribble (SCRIB) complexes) is intricately related......, deregulation of adhesion and polarity proteins can cause misoriented cell divisions and increased self-renewal of adult epithelial stem cells. In this Review, we highlight some advances in the understanding of how loss of epithelial cell polarity contributes to tumorigenesis....

  3. Merkel cells and neurons keep in touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seung-Hyun; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2014-01-01

    The Merkel cell-neurite complex is a unique vertebrate touch receptor comprising two distinct cell types in the skin. Its presence in touch-sensitive skin areas was recognized more than a century ago, but the functions of each cell type in sensory transduction have been unclear. Three recent studies demonstrate that Merkel cells are mechanosensitive cells that function in touch transduction via Piezo2. One study concludes that Merkel cells rather than sensory neurons are principal sites of mechanotransduction, whereas the other two studies report that both Merkel cells and neurons encode mechanical inputs. Together, these studies settle a longstanding debate on whether Merkel cells are mechanosensory cells, and enable future investigations of how these skin cells communicate with neurons. PMID:25480024

  4. Keeping the Rhythm : Cardiac Pacemaker Cell Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burkhard, Silja

    2017-01-01

    The heart is the first organ to form and function in the developing vertebrate embryo. Its proper morphogenesis and function is crucial for survival. Here we focus on the development and characterization of a highly specialized subset of cardiac cells, the pacemaker cells. In the mammalian heart,

  5. Regulation of cell polarity by cell adhesion receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebnet, Klaus; Kummer, Daniel; Steinbacher, Tim; Singh, Amrita; Nakayama, Masanori; Matis, Maja

    2017-07-22

    The ability of cells to polarize is an intrinsic property of almost all cells and is required for the devlopment of most multicellular organisms. To develop cell polarity, cells integrate various signals derived from intrinsic as well as extrinsic sources. In the recent years, cell-cell adhesion receptors have turned out as important regulators of cellular polarization. By interacting with conserved cell polarity proteins, they regulate the recruitment of polarity complexes to specific sites of cell-cell adhesion. By initiating intracellular signaling cascades at those sites, they trigger their specific subcellular activation. Not surprisingly, cell-cell adhesion receptors regulate diverse aspects of cell polarity, including apico-basal polarity in epithelial and endothelial cells, front-to-rear polarity in collectively migrating cells, and planar cell polarity during organ development. Here, we review the recent developments highlighting the central roles of cell-cell adhesion molecules in the development of cell polarity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Novel Keep Zero as Zero Polar Correlation Technique for Mobile Robot Localization using LIDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIDHARTHAN, R. K.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sensor fusion based localization techniques often need accurate estimate of the fast and uncertain scene change in environment. To determine the scene change from two consecutive LIDAR scans, this paper proposes a novel technique called 'keep zero as zero' polar correlation. As it name implies any zero in the scan data is kept isolated from scene change estimation as it do not carry any information about scene change. Unlike existing techniques, the proposed methodology employs minimization of selective horizontal and vertically shifted sum of difference between the scans to estimate scene change in terms of rotation and translation. Minimization of the proposed correlation function across the specified search space can guarantee an accurate estimate of scene change without any ambiguity. The performance of the proposed method is tested experimentally on a mobile robot in two modes depending on the scene change. In the first mode, scene change is detected using dynamic LIDAR, whereas static LIDAR is used in the second mode. The proposed methodology is found to be more robust to environmental uncertainties with a reliable level of localization accuracy.

  7. Coronavirus infection of polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Horzinek, M C; Rottier, P J

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cells are the first host cells to be infected by incoming c oronaviruses. Recent observations in vitro show that coronaviruses are released from a specific side of these polarized cells, and this polarized release might be important for the spread of the infection in vivo. Mechanisms for

  8. [Cell polarity in the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, C; Kübler, W

    1999-05-01

    The importance of cell polarity as a fundamental biological principle is increasingly recognized in the cardiovascular system. Polar cell mechanisms underlie not only the development of the heart and blood vessels, but also play a major role in the adult organism for polarized endothelial functions such as the separation of the intra- and extravascular compartment and the vectorial exchange of substances between these compartments. Endothelial cells are connected through intercellular junctions which separate the functionally and structurally distinct luminal and abluminal cell surfaces. The luminal plasma membrane is in contact with the blood and takes part in the regulation of hemostasis. The abluminal cell membrane connects the endothelial cell with the basement membrane and modulates blood flow through the release of vasoactive substances. Results from epithelial model systems have shown that the polarized cell phenotype is generated by specific protein sorting and regulated protein trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the cell surface. The polarized distribution of cell membrane proteins is maintained by anchorage with the cytoskeleton and limitation of lateral diffusion by tight junctions. Disturbances of cell polarity may contribute to the pathogenesis of disease states, including ischemic and radiocontrast-induced acute renal failure and carcinomas. Recent results have demonstrated the importance of cholesterol for protein traffic from the trans-Golgi network to the apical cell membrane. This novel intracellular function of cholesterol could point to a connection between cell polarity and the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. The polarity of the endothelium also has to be taken into account when developing gene-therapeutic strategies, since therapeutic success will not only depend on the efficient expression of the desired gene product, but also on its correct cellular location or secretion into the correct extracellular compartment. These

  9. Symmetry breaking signaling mechanisms during cell polarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruurs, LJM

    2017-01-01

    Breaking of cellular symmetry in order to establish an apico-basal polarity axis initiates de novo formation of cell polarity. However, symmetry breaking provides a formidable challenge from a signaling perspective, because by definition no spatial cues are present to instruct axis establishment.

  10. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Abdelrahman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments.

  11. Coronaviruses in polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J. W.; Bekker, C. P.; Voorhout, W. F.; Horzinek, M. C.; van der Ende, A.; Strous, G. J.; Rottier, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    Coronaviruses have a marked tropism for epithelial cells. In this paper the interactions of the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV-A59) with epithelial cells are compared. Porcine (LLC-PK1) and murine (mTAL) epithelial cells were grown on permeable

  12. Does an NSAID a Day Keep Satellite Cells at Bay?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail L

    2013-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed among athletes worldwide, despite growing evidence for a negative influence on the adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise, at least in young healthy individuals. This review focuses on the potential of NSAIDs to alter...... the activity of satellite cells, the muscle stem cell responsible for repair and maintenance of skeletal muscle. The signaling pathways that are potentially modified by NSAID exposure are also considered. Growth factors as well as inflammatory cells and connective tissue appear to be key factors...... in the response of muscle under conditions where cyclooxygenase and prostaglandin activity are blocked through NSAID ingestion or infusion. Discrepancies in the literature regarding the response of young and old individuals are addressed, where it appears that the elderly may benefit from NSAID ingestion...

  13. Keeping Stem Cells in Check: A Hippo Balancing Act

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Knowing when to stop proliferation is crucial for any regenerative process. In a recent issue of Nature, Barry et al. (2012) report that the Hippo pathway component YAP negatively regulates Wnt signaling, thereby preventing stem cell overpopulation after a regenerative response in the intestine

  14. Classical cadherins control nucleus and centrosome position and cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, Isabelle; Camand, Emeline; Etienne-Manneville, Sandrine

    2009-06-01

    Control of cell polarity is crucial during tissue morphogenesis and renewal, and depends on spatial cues provided by the extracellular environment. Using micropatterned substrates to impose reproducible cell-cell interactions, we show that in the absence of other polarizing cues, cell-cell contacts are the main regulator of nucleus and centrosome positioning, and intracellular polarized organization. In a variety of cell types, including astrocytes, epithelial cells, and endothelial cells, calcium-dependent cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions induce nucleus and centrosome off-centering toward cell-cell contacts, and promote orientation of the nucleus-centrosome axis toward free cell edges. Nucleus and centrosome off-centering is controlled by N-cadherin through the regulation of cell interactions with the extracellular matrix, whereas the orientation of the nucleus-centrosome axis is determined by the geometry of N-cadherin-mediated contacts. Our results demonstrate that in addition to the specific function of E-cadherin in regulating baso-apical epithelial polarity, classical cadherins control cell polarization in otherwise nonpolarized cells.

  15. Retracing the path of planar cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkelaars, Quentin; Fierro-Constain, Laura; Renard, Emmanuelle; Borchiellini, Carole

    2016-04-02

    The Planar Cell Polarity pathway (PCP) has been described as the main feature involved in patterning cell orientation in bilaterian tissues. Recently, a similar phenomenon was revealed in cnidarians, in which the inhibition of this pathway results in the absence of cilia orientation in larvae, consequently proving the functional conservation of PCP signaling between Cnidaria and Bilateria. Nevertheless, despite the growing accumulation of databases concerning basal lineages of metazoans, very few information concerning the existence of PCP components have been gathered outside of Bilateria and Cnidaria. Thus, the origin of this module or its prevalence in early emerging metazoans has yet to be elucidated. The present study addresses this question by investigating the genomes and transcriptomes from all poriferan lineages in addition to Trichoplax (Placozoa) and Mnemiopsis (Ctenophora) genomes for the presence of the core components of this pathway. Our results confirm that several PCP components are metazoan innovations. In addition, we show that all members of the PCP pathway, including a bona fide Strabismus ortholog (Van gogh), are retrieved only in one sponge lineage (Homoscleromorpha) out of four. This highly suggests that the full PCP pathway dates back at least to the emergence of homoscleromorph sponges. Consequently, several secondary gene losses would have occurred in the three other poriferan lineages including Amphimedon queenslandica (Demospongiae). Several proteins were not retrieved either in placozoans or ctenophores leading us to discuss the difficulties to predict orthologous proteins in basally branching animals. Finally, we reveal how the study of multigene families may be helpful to unravel the relationships at the base of the metazoan tree. The PCP pathway antedates the radiation of Porifera and may have arisen in the last common ancestor of animals. Oscarella species now appear as key organisms to understand the ancestral function of PCP

  16. The polarized double cell target of the SMC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.; Adeva, B.; Arik, E.; Arvidson, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballintijn, M.K.; Bardin, G.; Baum, G.; Berglund, P.; Betev, L.; Bird, I.G.; Birsa, R.; Bjoerkholm, P.; Bonner, B.E.; Botton, N. de; Boutemeur, M.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Bueltmann, S.; Burtin, E.; Cavata, C.; Crabb, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Cuhadar, T.; Torre, S. Dalla; Dantzig, R. van; Derro, B.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Dulya, C.; Dyring, A.; Eichblatt, S.; Faivre, J.C.; Fasching, D.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandez, C.; Forthmann, S.; Frois, B.; Gallas, A.; Garzon, J.A.; Gaussiran, T.; Gilly, H.; Giorgi, M.; Goeler, E. von; Goertz, S.; Gracia, G.; Groot, N. de; Perdekamp, M. Grosse; Guelmez, E.; Haft, K.; Harrach, D. von; Hasegawa, T.; Hautle, P.; Hayashi, N.; Heusch, C.A.; Horikawa, N.; Hughes, V.W.; Igo, G.; Ishimoto, S.; Iwata, T.; Kabuss, E.M.; Kageya, T.; Karev, A.; Kessler, H.J.; Ketel, T.J.; Kiryluk, J.; Kishi, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klostermann, L.; Kraemer, D.; Krivokhijine, V.; Kroeger, W.; Kurek, K.; Kyynaeraeinen, J.; Lamanna, M.; Landgraf, U.; Layda, T.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lehar, F.; Lesquen, A. de; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lindqvist, T.; Litmaath, M.; Lowe, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Marie, F.; Martin, A.; Martino, J.; Matsuda, T.; Mayes, B.; McCarthy, J.S.; Medved, K.; Meyer, W.; Middelkoop, G. van; Miller, D.; Miyachi, Y.; Mori, K.; Moromisato, J.; Nassalski, J.; Naumann, L.; Neganov, B.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Oberski, J.E.J.; Ogawa, A.; Ozben, C.; Parks, D.P.; Pereira, H.; Penzo, A.; Perrot-Kunne, F.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piegaia, R.; Pinsky, L.; Platchkov, S.; Plo, M.; Pose, D.; Postma, H. E-mail: hpostma@dataweb.nl; Pretz, J.; Pussieux, T.; Pyrlik, J.; Raedel, G.; Reyhancan, I.; Reicherz, G.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.; Roberts, J.B.; Rock, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Rondio, E.; Rosado, A.; Roscherr, B.; Sabo, I.; Saborido, J.; Sandacz, A.; Savin, I.; Schiavon, P.; Schiller, A.; Schueler, K.P.; Segel, R.; Seitz, R.; Semertzidis, Y.; Sever, F.; Shanahan, P.; Sichtermann, E.P.; Simeoni, F. [and others

    1999-11-11

    The polarized target of the Spin Muon Collaboration at CERN was used for deep inelastic muon scattering experiments during 1993-1996 with a polarized muon beam to investigate the spin structure of the nucleon. Most of the experiments were carried out with longitudinal target polarization and 190 GeV muons, and some were done with transverse polarization and 100 GeV muons. Protons as well as deuterons were polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in three kinds of solid materials -- butanol, ammonia, and deuterated butanol -- with maximum degrees of polarization of 94%, 91% and 60%, respectively. Considerable attention was paid to the accuracies of the NMR polarization measurements and their analyses, the accuracies achieved were between 2.0% and 3.2%. The SMC target system with two cells of opposite polarizations, each cell 65 cm long and 5 cm in diameter, constitutes the largest polarized target system ever built and facilitates accurate spin asymmetry measurements. The design considerations, construction and performance of the target are reviewed.

  17. The polarized double cell target of the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Arik, E; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Ballintijn, M K; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Bird, I G; Birsa, R; Björkholm, P; Bonner, B E; De Botton, N R; Boutemeur, M; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Cavata, C; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Dyring, A; Eichblatt, S; Faivre, Jean-Claude; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gaussiran, T; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Gülmez, E; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kishi, A; Kiselev, Yu F; Klostermann, L; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Layda, T; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Lindqvist, T; Litmaath, M; Loewe, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Neganov, B S; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Parks, D P; Pereira, H; Penzo, Aldo L; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Pussieux, T; Pyrlik, J; Rädel, G; Reyhancan, I; Reicherz, G; Rijllart, A; Roberts, J B; Rock, S E; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Rosado, A; Roscherr, B; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Schüler, K P; Segel, R E; Seitz, R; Semertzidis, Y K; Sever, F; Shanahan, P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Teichert, K M; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Trentalange, S; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Weinstein, R; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1999-01-01

    The polarized target of the Spin Muon Collaboration at CERN was used for deep inelastic muon scattering experiments during 1993 to 1996 with a polarized muon beam to investigate the spin structure of the nucleon. Most of the experiments were carried out with longitudinal target polarization and 190 GeV muons, and some were done with transverse polarization and 100 GeV muons. Protons as well as deuterons were polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in three kinds of solid materials $-$ butanol, ammonia, and deuterated butanol, with maximum degrees of polarization of 94, 91, and 60 \\%, respectively. Considerable attention was paid to the accuracies of the NMR polarization measurements and their analyses. The achieved accuracies were between 2.0 and 3.2 \\%. The SMC target system with two cells of opposite polarizations, each cell 65 cm long and 5 cm in diameter, constitutes the largest polarized target system ever built and facilitates accurate spin asymmetry measurements. The design considerations, the ...

  18. Polymer photovoltaic cells sensitive to the circular polarization of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilot, Jan; Abbel, Robert; Lakhwani, Girish; Meijer, E.W.; Schenning, Albertus P.H.J.; Meskers, Stefan C.J. [Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2010-05-25

    Chiral conjugated polymer is used to construct a photovoltaic cell whose response depends on the circular polarization of the incoming light. The selectivity for left and right polarized light as a function of the thickness of the polymer layer is accounted for by modeling of the optical properties of all layers inside the device. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Positive Feedback Keeps Duration of Mitosis Temporally Insulated from Upstream Cell-Cycle Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Ana Rita; Gelens, Lendert; Sheriff, Rahuman S M; Santos, Silvia D M

    2016-10-20

    Cell division is characterized by a sequence of events by which a cell gives rise to two daughter cells. Quantitative measurements of cell-cycle dynamics in single cells showed that despite variability in G1-, S-, and G2 phases, duration of mitosis is short and remarkably constant. Surprisingly, there is no correlation between cell-cycle length and mitotic duration, suggesting that mitosis is temporally insulated from variability in earlier cell-cycle phases. By combining live cell imaging and computational modeling, we showed that positive feedback is the molecular mechanism underlying the temporal insulation of mitosis. Perturbing positive feedback gave rise to a sluggish, variable entry and progression through mitosis and uncoupled duration of mitosis from variability in cell cycle length. We show that positive feedback is important to keep mitosis short, constant, and temporally insulated and anticipate it might be a commonly used regulatory strategy to create modularity in other biological systems. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Gravity-Responsive Time-Keeping Protein of the Plant and Animal Cell Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James

    2003-01-01

    The hypothesis under investigation was that a ubiquinol (NADH) oxidase protein of the cell surface with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity (= NOX protein) is a plant and animal time-keeping ultradian (period of less than 24 h) driver of both cell enlargement and the biological clock that responds to gravity. Despite considerable work in a large number of laboratories spanning several decades, this is, to my knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a time-keeping biochemical reaction that is both gravity-responsive and growth-related and that has been shown to determine circadian periodicity. As such, the NOX protein may represent both the long-sought biological gravity receptor and the core oscillator of the cellular biological clock. Completed studies have resulted in 12 publications and two issued NASA-owned patents of the clock activity. The gravity response and autoentrainment were characterized in cultured mammalian cells and in two plant systems together with entrainment by light and small molecules (melatonin). The molecular basis of the oscillatory behavior was investigated using spectroscopic methods (Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroism) and high resolution electron microscopy. We have also applied these findings to an understanding of the response to hypergravity. Statistical methods for analysis of time series phenomena were developed (Foster et al., 2003).

  1. Comparing national home-keeping and the regulation of translational stem cell applications: An international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret; Chekar, Choon Key; Faulkner, Alex; Heitmeyer, Carolyn; Marouda, Marina; Rosemann, Achim; Chaisinthop, Nattaka; Chang, Hung-Chieh Jessica; Ely, Adrian; Kato, Masae; Patra, Prasanna K; Su, Yeyang; Sui, Suli; Suzuki, Wakana; Zhang, Xinqing

    2016-03-01

    A very large grey area exists between translational stem cell research and applications that comply with the ideals of randomised control trials and good laboratory and clinical practice and what is often referred to as snake-oil trade. We identify a discrepancy between international research and ethics regulation and the ways in which regulatory instruments in the stem cell field are developed in practice. We examine this discrepancy using the notion of 'national home-keeping', referring to the way governments articulate international standards and regulation with conflicting demands on local players at home. Identifying particular dimensions of regulatory tools - authority, permissions, space and acceleration - as crucial to national home-keeping in Asia, Europe and the USA, we show how local regulation works to enable development of the field, notwithstanding international (i.e. principally 'western') regulation. Triangulating regulation with empirical data and archival research between 2012 and 2015 has helped us to shed light on how countries and organisations adapt and resist internationally dominant regulation through the manipulation of regulatory tools (contingent upon country size, the state's ability to accumulate resources, healthcare demands, established traditions of scientific governance, and economic and scientific ambitions). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Studies on optical pumping cells (OPC) to polarize 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutanu, V.; Rupp, A.

    2004-01-01

    The technique applied at HMI to obtain nuclear-spin-polarized 3 He, used in neutron spin filters (NSFs), is metastability-exchange optical pumping. To prepare efficient NSF, one must highly polarize 3 He nuclei in the optical pumping volume (OPV) and reduce the polarization losses during the compression phase. Great progress has been achieved in reducing of depolarization due to the recent development of both, large polarization preserving piston compressors and long relaxation time filter cells. It is even more important to significantly enhance the 3 He polarization rate during optical pumping in order to increase NSF efficiency. Different cells materials were tested, such as Duran and quartz glass. In order to use the laser light more efficiently and to decrease the risk of 3 He depolarization due to unfavorable reflections, antireflection (AR) coatings were used on cell windows made of quartz glass. They were compared with the ones without coating, made of quartz, Duran and BK7 glass. The comparison of various techniques to mount the windows such as blowing, gluing or molecular diffusion was also conducted. It indicated that the molecular diffusion is the most suitable technique because of a better purity of the gas in the cell and the preservation of the optical flatness of the windows. Cells, for practical reasons each entirely made from the same material (Duran, Quartz glass) with windows mounted using this method, showed the best polarization performance

  3. Llgl1 Connects Cell Polarity with Cell-Cell Adhesion in Embryonic Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossin, Yves; Lee, Minhui; Klezovitch, Olga; Kon, Elif; Cossard, Alexia; Lien, Wen-Hui; Fernandez, Tania E; Cooper, Jonathan A; Vasioukhin, Valera

    2017-06-05

    Malformations of the cerebral cortex (MCCs) are devastating developmental disorders. We report here that mice with embryonic neural stem-cell-specific deletion of Llgl1 (Nestin-Cre/Llgl1 fl/fl ), a mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila cell polarity gene lgl, exhibit MCCs resembling severe periventricular heterotopia (PH). Immunohistochemical analyses and live cortical imaging of PH formation revealed that disruption of apical junctional complexes (AJCs) was responsible for PH in Nestin-Cre/Llgl1 fl/fl brains. While it is well known that cell polarity proteins govern the formation of AJCs, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. We show that LLGL1 directly binds to and promotes internalization of N-cadherin, and N-cadherin/LLGL1 interaction is inhibited by atypical protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of LLGL1, restricting the accumulation of AJCs to the basolateral-apical boundary. Disruption of the N-cadherin-LLGL1 interaction during cortical development in vivo is sufficient for PH. These findings reveal a mechanism responsible for the physical and functional connection between cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion machineries in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthetic spatially graded Rac activation drives cell polarization and movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Benjamin; Holmes, William R; Wang, C Joanne; Ueno, Tasuku; Harwell, Andrew; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah; Inoue, Takanari; Levchenko, Andre

    2012-12-26

    Migrating cells possess intracellular gradients of active Rho GTPases, which serve as central hubs in transducing signals from extracellular receptors to cytoskeletal and adhesive machinery. However, it is unknown whether shallow exogenously induced intracellular gradients of Rho GTPases are sufficient to drive cell polarity and motility. Here, we use microfluidic control to generate gradients of a small molecule and thereby directly induce linear gradients of active, endogenous Rac without activation of chemotactic receptors. Gradients as low as 15% were sufficient not only to trigger cell migration up the chemical gradient but to induce both cell polarization and repolarization. Cellular response times were inversely proportional to the steepness of Rac inducer gradient in agreement with a mathematical model, suggesting a function for chemoattractant gradient amplification upstream of Rac. Increases in activated Rac levels beyond a well-defined threshold augmented polarization and decreased sensitivity to the imposed gradient. The threshold was governed by initial cell polarity and PI3K activity, supporting a role for both in defining responsiveness to Rac activation. Our results reveal that Rac can serve as a starting point in defining cell polarity. Furthermore, our methodology may serve as a template to investigate processes regulated by intracellular signaling gradients.

  5. Blended learning fitting algorithm for polarization curves of fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fengxiang; Ji, Guangji; Zhang, Chuansheng [School of Automotive Studies of Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Zhou, Su [School of Automotive Studies of Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); CDHK of Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Sundmacher, Kai [Max-Planck-Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Magdeburg 39106 (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Fuel cell polarization curves, characterized by nonlinear models and the parameters of which are time-consuming to be identified, can represent fuel cell performance but will alter as the fuel cell degrades. For getting the information on degradation in time, a less time-consuming and an easily programmed algorithm, based on blended learning technique and linear least square estimation (LSE), is proposed to fit polarization curves obtained from the fuel cell systems. Simulations show that the proposed algorithm, compared with classical nonlinear LSE algorithms, converges much faster, features better extrapolation and less average quadratic error, and is easy to be programmed by C language. Therefore, the algorithm is a good option not only for fitting the polarization curves but also for implementation in embedded systems. (author)

  6. Defective planar cell polarity in polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Evelyne; Legue, Emilie; Doyen, Antonia; Nato, Faridabano; Nicolas, Jean-François; Torres, Vicente; Yaniv, Moshe; Pontoglio, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Morphogenesis involves coordinated proliferation, differentiation and spatial distribution of cells. We show that lengthening of renal tubules is associated with mitotic orientation of cells along the tubule axis, demonstrating intrinsic planar cell polarization, and we demonstrate that mitotic orientations are significantly distorted in rodent polycystic kidney models. These results suggest that oriented cell division dictates the maintenance of constant tubule diameter during tubular lengthening and that defects in this process trigger renal tubular enlargement and cyst formation.

  7. FijiWingsPolarity: An open source toolkit for semi-automated detection of cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobens, Leonard L; Shipman, Anna; Axelrod, Jeffrey D

    2017-12-22

    Epithelial cells are defined by apical-basal and planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling, the latter of which establishes an orthogonal plane of polarity in the epithelial sheet. PCP signaling is required for normal cell migration, differentiation, stem cell generation and tissue repair, and defects in PCP have been associated with developmental abnormalities, neuropathologies and cancers. While the molecular mechanism of PCP is incompletely understood, the deepest insights have come from Drosophila, where PCP is manifest in hairs and bristles across the adult cuticle and organization of the ommatidia in the eye. Fly wing cells are marked by actin-rich trichome structures produced at the distal edge of each cell in the developing wing epithelium and in a mature wing the trichomes orient collectively in the distal direction. Genetic screens have identified key PCP signaling pathway components that disrupt trichome orientation, which has been measured manually in a tedious and error prone process. Here we describe a set of image processing and pattern-recognition macros that can quantify trichome arrangements in micrographs and mark these directly by color, arrow or colored arrow to indicate trichome location, length and orientation. Nearest neighbor calculations are made to exploit local differences in orientation to better and more reliably detect and highlight local defects in trichome polarity. We demonstrate the use of these tools on trichomes in adult wing preps and on actin-rich developing trichomes in pupal wing epithelia stained with phalloidin. FijiWingsPolarity is freely available and will be of interest to a broad community of fly geneticists studying the effect of gene function on PCP.

  8. High Throughput Method to Quantify Anterior-Posterior Polarity of T-Cells and Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Marriott

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The virologic synapse (VS, which is formed between a virus-infected and uninfected cell, plays a central role in the transmission of certain viruses, such as HIV and HTLV-1. During VS formation, HTLV-1-infected T-cells polarize cellular and viral proteins toward the uninfected T-cell. This polarization resembles anterior-posterior cell polarity induced by immunological synapse (IS formation, which is more extensively characterized than VS formation and occurs when a T-cell interacts with an antigen-presenting cell. One measure of cell polarity induced by both IS or VS formation is the repositioning of the microtubule organizing center (MTOC relative to the contact point with the interacting cell. Here we describe an automated, high throughput system to score repositioning of the MTOC and thereby cell polarity establishment. The method rapidly and accurately calculates the angle between the MTOC and the IS for thousands of cells. We also show that the system can be adapted to score anterior-posterior polarity establishment of epithelial cells. This general approach represents a significant advancement over manual cell polarity scoring, which is subject to experimenter bias and requires more time and effort to evaluate large numbers of cells.

  9. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortijo, Cedric; Gouzi, Mathieu; Tissir, Fadel

    2012-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.5 synch...... that tridimensional organization and collective communication of cells are needed in the pancreatic epithelium in order to generate appropriate numbers of endocrine cells....

  10. Structure of polarization-resolved conoscopic patterns of planar oriented liquid crystal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, A. D.; Vovk, R. G.

    2010-05-01

    The geometry of distributions of the polarization of light in conoscopic patterns of planar oriented nematic and cholesteric liquid crystal (LC) cells is described in terms of the polarization singularities including C-points (points of circular polarization) and L lines (lines of linear polarization). Conditions for the formation of polarization singularities ( C-points) in an ensemble of conoscopic patterns parametrized by the polarization azimuth and ellipticity of the incident light wave have been studied. A characteristic feature of these conditions is selectivity with respect to the polarization parameters of the incident light wave. The polarization azimuth and ellipticity are determining parameters for nematic and cholesteric LC cells, respectively.

  11. Cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gandalovičová, A.; Vomastek, Tomáš; Rosel, D.; Brábek, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 18 (2016), s. 25022-25049 ISSN 1949-2553 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06405S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : polarity * invasion * plasticity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.168, year: 2016

  12. Prion infection of epithelial Rov cells is a polarized event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Sophie; Sabuncu, Elifsu; Delaunay, Jean-Louis; Laude, Hubert; Vilette, Didier

    2004-07-01

    During prion infections, the cellular glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein PrP is converted into a conformational isoform. This abnormal conformer is thought to recruit and convert the normal cellular PrP into a likeness of itself and is proposed to be the infectious agent. We investigated the distribution of the PrP protein on the surface of Rov cells, an epithelial cell line highly permissive to prion multiplication, and we found that PrP is primarily expressed on the apical side. We further show that prion transmission to Rov cells is much more efficient if infectivity contacts the apical side, indicating that the apical and basolateral sides of Rov cells are not equally competent for prion infection and adding prions to the list of the conventional infectious agents (viruses and bacteria) that infect epithelial cells in a polarized manner. These data raise the possibility that apically expressed PrP may be involved in this polarized process of infection. This would add further support for a crucial role of PrP at the cell surface in prion infection of target cells.

  13. Centrosome polarization in T cells: a task for formins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAndrés-Delgado

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available T-cell antigen receptor (TCR engagement triggers the rapid reorientation of the centrosome, which is associated with the secretory machinery, towards the immunological synapse (IS for polarized protein trafficking. Recent evidence indicates that upon TCR triggering the INF2 formin, together with the formins DIA1 and FMNL1, promotes the formation of a specialized array of stable detyrosinated MTs that breaks the symmetrical organization of the T-cell microtubule (MT cytoskeleton. The detyrosinated MT array and TCR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation should coincide for centrosome polarization. We propose that the pushing forces produced by the detyrosinated MT array, which modify the position of the centrosome, in concert with Src kinase dependent TCR signaling, which provide the reference frame with respect to which the centrosome reorients, result in the repositioning of the centrosome to the IS.

  14. Heme and non-heme iron transporters in non-polarized and polarized cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui Yumiko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heme and non-heme iron from diet, and recycled iron from hemoglobin are important products of the synthesis of iron-containing molecules. In excess, iron is potentially toxic because it can produce reactive oxygen species through the Fenton reaction. Humans can absorb, transport, store, and recycle iron without an excretory system to remove excess iron. Two candidate heme transporters and two iron transporters have been reported thus far. Heme incorporated into cells is degraded by heme oxygenases (HOs, and the iron product is reutilized by the body. To specify the processes of heme uptake and degradation, and the reutilization of iron, we determined the subcellular localizations of these transporters and HOs. Results In this study, we analyzed the subcellular localizations of 2 isoenzymes of HOs, 4 isoforms of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1, and 2 candidate heme transporters--heme carrier protein 1 (HCP1 and heme responsive gene-1 (HRG-1--in non-polarized and polarized cells. In non-polarized cells, HCP1, HRG-1, and DMT1A-I are located in the plasma membrane. In polarized cells, they show distinct localizations: HCP1 and DMT1A-I are located in the apical membrane, whereas HRG-1 is located in the basolateral membrane and lysosome. 16Leu at DMT1A-I N-terminal cytosolic domain was found to be crucial for plasma membrane localization. HOs are located in smooth endoplasmic reticulum and colocalize with NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. Conclusions HCP1 and DMT1A-I are localized to the apical membrane, and HRG-1 to the basolateral membrane and lysosome. These findings suggest that HCP1 and DMT1A-I have functions in the uptake of dietary heme and non-heme iron. HRG-1 can transport endocytosed heme from the lysosome into the cytosol. These localization studies support a model in which cytosolic heme can be degraded by HOs, and the resulting iron is exported into tissue fluids via the iron transporter ferroportin 1, which is

  15. Polarization-resolved angular patterns of nematic liquid crystal cells: Topological events driven by incident light polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Vovk, Roman G.; Egorov, Roman I.; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2008-09-01

    We study the angular structure of polarization of light transmitted through a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell by analyzing the polarization state as a function of the incidence angles and the polarization of the incident wave. The polarization-resolved angular (conoscopic) patterns emerging after the NLC cell illuminated by the convergent light beam are described in terms of the polarization singularities such as C points (points of circular polarization) and L lines (lines of linear polarization). For the homeotropically aligned cell, the Stokes polarimetry technique is used to measure the polarization resolved conoscopic patterns at different values of the ellipticity of the incident light, γell(inc) , impinging onto the cell. Using the exact analytical expressions for the transfer matrix we show that variations of the ellipticity, γell(inc) , induce transformations of the angular pattern exhibiting the effect of avoided L -line crossings and characterized by topological events such as creation and annihilation of the C points. The predictions of the theory are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Appearance of differentiated cells derived from polar body nuclei in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki eSakai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn Bombyx mori, polar body nuclei are observed until 9h after egg lying, however, the fate of polar body nuclei remains unclear. To examine the fate of polar body nuclei, we employed a mutation of serosal cell pigmentation, pink-eyed white egg (pe. The heterozygous pe/+pe females produced black serosal cells in white eggs, while pe/pe females did not produce black serosal cells in white eggs. These results suggest that the appearance of black serosal cells in white eggs depends on the genotype (pe/ +pe of the mother. Because the polar body nuclei had +pe genes in the white eggs laid by a pe/ +pe female, polar body nuclei participate in development and differentiate into functional cell (serosal cells. Analyses of serosal cells pigmentation indicated that approximately 30% of the eggs contained polar-body-nucleus-derived cells. These results demonstrate that polar-body-nucleus-derived cells appeared at a high frequency under natural conditions. Approximately 80% of polar-body-nucleus-derived cells appeared near the anterior pole and the dorsal side, which is opposite to where embryogenesis occurs. The number of cells derived from the polar body nuclei was very low. Approximately 26 % of these eggs contained only one black serosal cell. PCR-based analysis revealed that the polar-body-nucleus-derived cells disappeared in late embryonic stages (stage 25. Overall, polar-body-nuclei-derived cells were unlikely to contribute to embryos.

  17. Actin polymerization drives polar growth in Arabidopsis root hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Luis Alfredo Bañuelos; Sanchez, Rosana; Hernandez-Barrera, Alejandra; Zepeda-Jazo, Isaac; Sánchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen; Torres, Luis Cárdenas

    2014-01-01

    In plants, the actin cytoskeleton is a prime regulator of cell polarity, growth, and cytoplasmic streaming. Tip growth, as observed in root hairs, caulonema, and pollen tubes, is governed by many factors, including calcium gradients, exocytosis and endocytosis, reactive oxygen species, and the cytoskeleton. Several studies indicate that the polymerization of G-actin into F-actin also contributes to tip growth. The structure and function of F-actin within the apical dome is variable, ranging from a dense meshwork to sparse single filaments. The presence of multiple F-actin structures in the elongating apices of tip-growing cells suggests that this cytoskeletal array is tightly regulated. We recently reported that sublethal concentrations of fluorescently labeled cytochalasin could be used to visualize the distribution of microfilament plus ends using fluorescence microscopy, and found that the tip region of the growing root hair cells of a legume plant exhibits a clear response to the nodulation factors secreted by Rhizobium. (1) In this current work, we expanded our analysis using confocal microscopy and demonstrated the existence of highly dynamic fluorescent foci along Arabidopsis root hair cells. Furthermore, we show that the strongest fluorescence signal accumulates in the tip dome of the growing root hair and seems to be in close proximity to the apical plasma membrane. Based on these findings, we propose that actin polymerization within the dome of growing root hair cells regulates polar growth.

  18. T-helper 17 cell polarization in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautefort, Aurélie; Girerd, Barbara; Montani, David; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Price, Laura; Lambrecht, Bart N; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation may contribute to the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Deciphering the PAH fingerprint on the inflammation orchestrated by dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells, key driver and effector cells, respectively, of the immune system, may allow the identification of immunopathologic approaches to PAH management. Using flow cytometry, we performed immunophenotyping of monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and circulating lymphocytes from patients with idiopathic PAH and control subjects. With the same technique, we performed cytokine profiling of both populations following stimulation, coculture, or both. We tested the immunomodulatory effects of a glucocorticoid (dexamethasone [Dex]) on this immunophenotype and cytokine profile. Using an epigenetic approach, we confirmed the immune polarization in blood DNA of patients with PAH. The profile of membrane costimulatory molecules of PAH MoDCs was similar to that of control subjects. However, PAH MoDCs retained higher levels of the T-cell activating molecules CD86 and CD40 after Dex pretreatment than did control MoDCs. This was associated with an increased expression of IL-12p40 and a reduced migration toward chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21. Moreover, both with and without Dex, PAH MoDCs induced a higher activation and proliferation of CD4+ T cells, associated with a reduced expression of IL-4 (T helper 2 response) and a higher expression of IL-17 (T helper 17 response). Purified PAH CD4+ T cells expressed a higher level of IL-17 after activation than did those of control subjects. Lastly, there was significant hypomethylation of the IL-17 promoter in the PAH blood DNA as compared with the control blood. We have highlighted T helper 17 cell immune polarization in patients with PAH, as has been previously demonstrated in other chronic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions.

  19. The first cell-fate decision of mouse preimplantation embryo development: integrating cell position and polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihajlović, Aleksandar I; Bruce, Alexander W

    2017-11-01

    During the first cell-fate decision of mouse preimplantation embryo development, a population of outer-residing polar cells is segregated from a second population of inner apolar cells to form two distinct cell lineages: the trophectoderm and the inner cell mass (ICM), respectively. Historically, two models have been proposed to explain how the initial differences between these two cell populations originate and ultimately define them as the two stated early blastocyst stage cell lineages. The 'positional' model proposes that cells acquire distinct fates based on differences in their relative position within the developing embryo, while the 'polarity' model proposes that the differences driving the lineage segregation arise as a consequence of the differential inheritance of factors, which exhibit polarized subcellular localizations, upon asymmetric cell divisions. Although these two models have traditionally been considered separately, a growing body of evidence, collected over recent years, suggests the existence of a large degree of compatibility. Accordingly, the main aim of this review is to summarize the major historical and more contemporarily identified events that define the first cell-fate decision and to place them in the context of both the originally proposed positional and polarity models, thus highlighting their functional complementarity in describing distinct aspects of the developmental programme underpinning the first cell-fate decision in mouse embryogenesis. © 2017 The Authors.

  20. Cell polarity, cell adhesion, and spermatogenesis: role of cytoskeletons [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxi Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the rat testis, studies have shown that cell polarity, in particular spermatid polarity, to support spermatogenesis is conferred by the coordinated efforts of the Par-, Crumbs-, and Scribble-based polarity complexes in the seminiferous epithelium. Furthermore, planar cell polarity (PCP is conferred by PCP proteins such as Van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2 in the testis. On the other hand, cell junctions at the Sertoli cell–spermatid (steps 8–19 interface are exclusively supported by adhesion protein complexes (for example, α6β1-integrin-laminin-α3,β3,γ3 and nectin-3-afadin at the actin-rich apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES since the apical ES is the only anchoring device in step 8–19 spermatids. For cell junctions at the Sertoli cell–cell interface, they are supported by adhesion complexes at the actin-based basal ES (for example, N-cadherin-β-catenin and nectin-2-afadin, tight junction (occludin-ZO-1 and claudin 11-ZO-1, and gap junction (connexin 43-plakophilin-2 and also intermediate filament-based desmosome (for example, desmoglein-2-desmocollin-2. In short, the testis-specific actin-rich anchoring device known as ES is crucial to support spermatid and Sertoli cell adhesion. Accumulating evidence has shown that the Par-, Crumbs-, and Scribble-based polarity complexes and the PCP Vangl2 are working in concert with actin- or microtubule-based cytoskeletons (or both and these polarity (or PCP protein complexes exert their effects through changes in the organization of the cytoskeletal elements across the seminiferous epithelium of adult rat testes. As such, there is an intimate relationship between cell polarity, cell adhesion, and cytoskeletal function in the testis. Herein, we critically evaluate these recent findings based on studies on different animal models. We also suggest some crucial future studies to be performed.

  1. Role of the epithelial cell-specific clathrin adaptor complex AP-1B in cell polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fölsch, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells are important for organ development and function. To this end, they polarize their plasma membrane into biochemically and physically distinct membrane domains. The apical membrane faces the luminal site of an organ and the basolateral domain is in contact with the basement membrane and neighboring cells. To establish and maintain this polarity it is important that newly synthesized and endocytic cargos are correctly sorted according to their final destinations at either membrane. Sorting takes place at one of 2 major sorting stations in the cells, the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and recycling endosomes (REs). Polarized sorting may involve epithelial cell-specific sorting adaptors like the AP-1B clathrin adaptor complex. AP-1B facilitates basolateral sorting from REs. This review will discuss various aspects of basolateral sorting in epithelial cells with a special emphasis on AP-1B. PMID:27057418

  2. Topological events in polarization resolved angular patterns of nematic liquid crystal cells at varying ellipticity of incident wave

    OpenAIRE

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Vovk, Roman G.

    2008-01-01

    We study the angular structure of polarization of light transmitted through a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell by analyzing the polarization state as a function of the incidence angles and the polarization of the incident wave. The polarization resolved angular patterns emerging after the NLC cell illuminated by the convergent light beam are described in terms of the polarization singularities such as C-points (points of circular polarization) and L-lines (lines of linear polarization). For ...

  3. The cell polarity determinant CDC42 controls division symmetry to block leukemia cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukawa, Benjamin; O'Brien, Eric; Moreira, Daniel C; Wunderlich, Mark; Hochstetler, Cindy L; Duan, Xin; Liu, Wei; Orr, Emily; Grimes, H Leighton; Mulloy, James C; Zheng, Yi

    2017-09-14

    As a central regulator of cell polarity, the activity of CDC42 GTPase is tightly controlled in maintaining normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC/P) functions. We found that transformation of HSC/P to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with increased CDC42 expression and activity in leukemia cells. In a mouse model of AML, the loss of Cdc42 abrogates MLL-AF9 -induced AML development. Furthermore, genetic ablation of CDC42 in both murine and human MLL-AF9 (MA9) cells decreased survival and induced differentiation of the clonogenic leukemia-initiating cells. We show that MLL-AF9 leukemia cells maintain cell polarity in the context of elevated Cdc42-guanosine triphosphate activity, similar to nonmalignant, young HSC/Ps. The loss of Cdc42 resulted in a shift to depolarized AML cells that is associated with a decrease in the frequency of symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions producing daughter cells capable of self-renewal. Importantly, we demonstrate that inducible CDC42 suppression in primary human AML cells blocks leukemia progression in a xenograft model. Thus, CDC42 loss suppresses AML cell polarity and division asymmetry, and CDC42 constitutes a useful target to alter leukemia-initiating cell fate for differentiation therapy. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    since, in the absence of such knowledge, the development of effective therapeutic interventions to target CSCs and prevent cancer progression and...yes) (2) Presentations: a. 2016 Keystone Symposia- Stem Cells & Cancer, Breckenridge, “Epigenetic regulation promotes obesity related breast

  5. Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    stably express miR-200c (pCDH- miR200c) and MCF7 cells with knock- down of miR-200c (pZIP-miR200c) (Months 1-2) Completed! We have successfully...established BT549-pCDH-miR200c and MCF7 - pZIP-miR200c and examined the protein expression levels as described in subtask 2 (Fig. 1). Subtask 2...Determine expression levels of PKCζ and phospho-NUMB (p- NUMB), by re-expressing PKCζ in BT549-pCDH-miR200c cells and knocking-down PKCζ in MCF7

  6. Angular structure of light polarization and singularities in transmittance of nematic liquid crystal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Vovk, Roman G.; Buinyi, Igor O.; Soskin, Marat S.

    2007-06-01

    We study the angular structure of polarization of light transmitted through a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell by analyzing the polarization state as a function of the incidence angles. Our theoretical results are obtained by evaluating the Stokes parameters that characterize the polarization state of plane waves propagating through the NLC layer at varying direction of incidence. Using the Stokes polarimetry technique we carried out the measurements of the polarization resolved conoscopic patterns emerging after the homeotropically aligned NLC cell illuminated by the convergent light beam. The resulting polarization resolved angular patterns are described both theoretically and experimentally in terms of the polarization singularities such as C-points (points of circular polarization) and L-lines (lines of linear polarization). When the ellipticity of the incident light varies, the angular patterns are found to undergo transformations involving the processes of creation and annihilation of the C-points.

  7. Muscle Stem Cell Fate Is Controlled by the Cell-Polarity Protein Scrib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ono

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cells are resident skeletal muscle stem cells that supply myonuclei for homeostasis, hypertrophy, and repair in adult muscle. Scrib is one of the major cell-polarity proteins, acting as a potent tumor suppressor in epithelial cells. Here, we show that Scrib also controls satellite-cell-fate decisions in adult mice. Scrib is undetectable in quiescent cells but becomes expressed during activation. Scrib is asymmetrically distributed in dividing daughter cells, with robust accumulation in cells committed to myogenic differentiation. Low Scrib expression is associated with the proliferative state and preventing self-renewal, whereas high Scrib levels reduce satellite cell proliferation. Satellite-cell-specific knockout of Scrib in mice causes a drastic and insurmountable defect in muscle regeneration. Thus, Scrib is a regulator of tissue stem cells, controlling population expansion and self-renewal with Scrib expression dynamics directing satellite cell fate.

  8. Polarity in plant asymmetric cell division: Division orientation and cell fate differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wanchen; Dong, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is universally required for the development of multicellular organisms. Unlike animal cells, plant cells have a rigid cellulosic extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which provides physical support and forms communication routes. This fundamental difference leads to some unique mechanisms in plants for generating asymmetries during cell division. However, plants also utilize intrinsically polarized proteins to regulate asymmetric signaling and cell division, a strategy similar to the differentiation mechanism found in animals. Current progress suggests that common regulatory modes, i.e. protein spontaneous clustering and cytoskeleton reorganization, underlie protein polarization in both animal and plant cells. Despite these commonalities, it is important to note that intrinsic mechanisms in plants are heavily influenced by extrinsic cues. To control physical asymmetry in cell division, although our understanding is fragmentary thus far, plants might have evolved novel polarization strategies to orientate cell division plane. Recent studies also suggest that the phytohormone auxin, one of the most pivotal small molecules in plant development, regulates ACD in plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Planar cell polarity breaks bilateral symmetry by controlling ciliary positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hai; Hu, Jianxin; Chen, Wen; Elliott, Gene; Andre, Philipp; Gao, Bo; Yang, Yingzi

    2010-07-15

    Defining the three body axes is a central event of vertebrate morphogenesis. Establishment of left-right (L-R) asymmetry in development follows the determination of dorsal-ventral and anterior-posterior (A-P) body axes, although the molecular mechanism underlying precise L-R symmetry breaking in reference to the other two axes is still poorly understood. Here, by removing both Vangl1 and Vangl2, the two mouse homologues of a Drosophila core planar cell polarity (PCP) gene Van Gogh (Vang), we reveal a previously unrecognized function of PCP in the initial breaking of lateral symmetry. The leftward nodal flow across the posterior notochord (PNC) has been identified as the earliest event in the de novo formation of L-R asymmetry. We show that PCP is essential in interpreting the A-P patterning information and linking it to L-R asymmetry. In the absence of Vangl1 and Vangl2, cilia are positioned randomly around the centre of the PNC cells and nodal flow is turbulent, which results in disrupted L-R asymmetry. PCP in mouse, unlike what has been implicated in other vertebrate species, is not required for ciliogenesis, cilium motility, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling or apical docking of basal bodies in ciliated tracheal epithelial cells. Our data suggest that PCP acts earlier than the unidirectional nodal flow during bilateral symmetry breaking in vertebrates and provide insight into the functional mechanism of PCP in organizing the vertebrate tissues in development.

  10. Mechanistic Framework for Establishment, Maintenance, and Alteration of Cell Polarity in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Dhonukshe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell polarity establishment, maintenance, and alteration are central to the developmental and response programs of nearly all organisms and are often implicated in abnormalities ranging from patterning defects to cancer. By residing at the distinct plasma membrane domains polar cargoes mark the identities of those domains, and execute localized functions. Polar cargoes are recruited to the specialized membrane domains by directional secretion and/or directional endocytic recycling. In plants, auxin efflux carrier PIN proteins display polar localizations in various cell types and play major roles in directional cell-to-cell transport of signaling molecule auxin that is vital for plant patterning and response programs. Recent advanced microscopy studies applied to single cells in intact plants reveal subcellular PIN dynamics. They uncover the PIN polarity generation mechanism and identified important roles of AGC kinases for polar PIN localization. AGC kinase family members PINOID, WAG1, and WAG2, belonging to the AGC-3 subclass predominantly influence the polar localization of PINs. The emerging mechanism for AGC-3 kinases action suggests that kinases phosphorylate PINs mainly at the plasma membrane after initial symmetric PIN secretion for eventual PIN internalization and PIN sorting into distinct ARF-GEF-regulated polar recycling pathways. Thus phosphorylation status directs PIN translocation to different cell sides. Based on these findings a mechanistic framework evolves that suggests existence of cell side-specific recycling pathways in plants and implicates AGC3 kinases for differential PIN recruitment among them for eventual PIN polarity establishment, maintenance, and alteration.

  11. Dystroglycan is required for polarizing the epithelial cells and the oocyte in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Wu-Min; Schneider, Martina; Frock, Richard

    2003-01-01

    , and plays a role in linking the ECM to the actin cytoskeleton; however, how these interactions are regulated and their basic cellular functions are poorly understood. Using mosaic analysis and RNAi in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, we show that Dystroglycan is required cell......-autonomously for cellular polarity in two different cell types, the epithelial cells (apicobasal polarity) and the oocyte (anteroposterior polarity). Loss of Dystroglycan function in follicle and disc epithelia results in expansion of apical markers to the basal side of cells and overexpression results in a reduced apical...... localization of these same markers. In Dystroglycan germline clones early oocyte polarity markers fail to be localized to the posterior, and oocyte cortical F-actin organization is abnormal. Dystroglycan is also required non-cell-autonomously to organize the planar polarity of basal actin in follicle cells...

  12. Sequential development of apical-basal and planar polarities in aggregating epitheliomuscular cells of Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, Anna; Salvenmoser, Willi; Hobmayer, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Apical-basal and planar cell polarities are hallmarks of metazoan epithelia required to separate internal and external environments and to regulate trans- and intracellular transport, cytoskeletal organization, and morphogenesis. Mechanisms of cell polarization have been intensively studied in bilaterian model organisms, particularly in early embryos and cultured cells, while cell polarity in pre-bilaterian tissues is poorly understood. Here, we have studied apical-basal and planar polarization in regenerating (aggregating) clusters of epitheliomuscular cells of Hydra, a simple representative of the ancestral, pre-bilaterian phylum Cnidaria. Immediately after dissociation, single epitheliomuscular cells do not exhibit cellular polarity, but they polarize de novo during aggregation. Reestablishment of the Hydra-specific epithelial bilayer is a result of short-range cell sorting. In the early phase of aggregation, apical-basal polarization starts with an enlargement of the epithelial apical-basal diameter and by the development of belt-like apical septate junctions. Specification of the basal pole of epithelial cells occurs shortly later and is linked to synthesis of mesoglea, development of hemidesmosome-like junctions, and formation of desmosome-like junctions connecting the basal myonemes of neighbouring cells. Planar polarization starts, while apical-basal polarization is already ongoing. It is executed gradually starting with cell-autonomous formation, parallelization, and condensation of myonemes at the basal end of each epithelial cell and continuing with a final planar alignment of epitheliomuscular cells at the tissue level. Our findings reveal that epithelial polarization in Hydra aggregates occurs in defined steps well accessible by histological and ultrastructural techniques and they will provide a basis for future molecular studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Phenotype and polarization of autologous T cells by biomaterial-treated dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyung; Gerber, Michael H; Babensee, Julia E

    2015-01-01

    Given the central role of dendritic cells (DCs) in directing T-cell phenotypes, the ability of biomaterial-treated DCs to dictate autologous T-cell phenotype was investigated. In this study, we demonstrate that differentially biomaterial-treated DCs differentially directed autologous T-cell phenotype and polarization, depending on the biomaterial used to pretreat the DCs. Immature DCs (iDCs) were derived from human peripheral blood monocytes and treated with biomaterial films of alginate, agarose, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, or 75:25 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), followed by co-culture of these biomaterial-treated DCs and autologous T cells. When autologous T cells were co-cultured with DCs treated with biomaterial film/antigen (ovalbumin, OVA) combinations, different biomaterial films induced differential levels of T-cell marker (CD4, CD8, CD25, CD69) expression, as well as differential cytokine profiles [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-12p70, IL-10, IL-4] in the polarization of T helper (Th) types. Dendritic cells treated with agarose films/OVA induced CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (T regulatory cells) expression, comparable to untreated iDCs, on autologous T cells in the DC-T co-culture system. Furthermore, in this co-culture, agarose treatment induced release of IL-12p70 and IL-10 at higher levels as compared with DC treatment with other biomaterial films/OVA, suggesting Th1 and Th2 polarization, respectively. Dendritic cells treated with PLGA film/OVA treatment induced release of IFN-γ at higher levels compared with that observed for co-cultures with iDCs or DCs treated with all other biomaterial films. These results indicate that DC treatment with different biomaterial films has potential as a tool for immunomodulation by directing autologous T-cell responses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A polarized cell model for Chikungunya virus infection: entry and egress of virus occurs at the apical domain of polarized cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Jin Lim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV has resulted in several outbreaks in the past six decades. The clinical symptoms of Chikungunya infection include fever, skin rash, arthralgia, and an increasing incidence of encephalitis. The re-emergence of CHIKV with more severe pathogenesis highlights its potential threat on our human health. In this study, polarized HBMEC, polarized Vero C1008 and non-polarized Vero cells grown on cell culture inserts were infected with CHIKV apically or basolaterally. Plaque assays, viral binding assays and immunofluorescence assays demonstrated apical entry and release of CHIKV in polarized HBMEC and Vero C1008. Drug treatment studies were performed to elucidate both host cell and viral factors involved in the sorting and release of CHIKV at the apical domain of polarized cells. Disruption of host cell myosin II, microtubule and microfilament networks did not disrupt the polarized release of CHIKV. However, treatment with tunicamycin resulted in a bi-directional release of CHIKV, suggesting that N-glycans of CHIKV envelope glycoproteins could serve as apical sorting signals.

  15. Keeping the intracellular vitamin C at a physiologically relevant level in endothelial cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Henriette Rønne; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the addition of vitamin C to cell culture medium improves cell growth. However, once added, the vitamin C concentration declines rapidly. This situation differs from the in vivo environment where the endothelium is constantly supplied with ascorbate from the blood....... With a focus on intracellular vitamin C, we simulated constant supply of ascorbate by the hourly addition of freshly prepared medium containing 75 lM ascorbate and subsequently compared it with more practical regimens using combinations of ascorbate and 2-phosphoascorbate. We found that a single supplement...... of ascorbate and 2-phosphoascorbate adequately maintains intracellular vitamin C at physiological levels for up to 72 h....

  16. The keratin-binding protein Albatross regulates polarization of epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sugimoto, Masahiko; Inoko, Akihito; Shiromizu, Takashi; Nakayama, Masanori; Zou, Peng; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hayashi, Yuko; Izawa, Ichiro; Sasoh, Mikio; Uji, Yukitaka; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Kiyono, Tohru; Inagaki, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    The keratin intermediate filament network is abundant in epithelial cells, but its function in the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity is unclear. Here, we show that Albatross complexes with Par3 to regulate formation of the apical junctional complex (AJC) and maintain lateral membrane identity. In nonpolarized epithelial cells, Albatross localizes with keratin filaments, whereas in polarized epithelial cells, Albatross is primarily localized in the vicinity of the AJC. Knockdown o...

  17. Aglycemia keeps mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation under hypoxic conditions in HepG2 cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Ježek, Jan; Ježek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 6 (2015), s. 467-476 ISSN 0145-479X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-02033S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11055 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cancer mitochondria * non-canonical response to hypoxia * hypoxia- inducible factor * glutaminolysis * HepG2 cells Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor : 2.080, year: 2015

  18. Flotillins are involved in the polarization of primitive and mature hematopoietic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Rajendran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migration of mature and immature leukocytes in response to chemokines is not only essential during inflammation and host defense, but also during development of the hematopoietic system. Many molecules implicated in migratory polarity show uniform cellular distribution under non-activated conditions, but acquire a polarized localization upon exposure to migratory cues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we present evidence that raft-associated endocytic proteins (flotillins are pre-assembled in lymphoid, myeloid and primitive hematopoietic cells and accumulate in the uropod during migration. Furthermore, flotillins display a polarized distribution during immunological synapse formation. Employing the membrane lipid-order sensitive probe Laurdan, we show that flotillin accumulation in the immunological synapse is concomittant with membrane ordering in these regions. CONCLUSIONS: Together with the observation that flotillin polarization does not occur in other polarized cell types such as polarized epithelial cells, our results suggest a specific role for flotillins in hematopoietic cell polarization. Based on our results, we propose that in hematopoietic cells, flotillins provide intrinsic cues that govern segregation of certain microdomain-associated molecules during immune cell polarization.

  19. Polarization resolved conoscopic patterns in nematic cells: effects induced by the incident light ellipticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buinyi, Igor O.; Soskin, Marat S.; Vovk, Roman G.

    2008-05-01

    Topological structure of the polarization resolved conoscopic patterns, calculated theoretically and measured experimentally for nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cells, is described in terms of polarization singularities, saddle points and bifurcation lines. The parametric dynamics of the topological network, induced by the variation of the incident light ellipticity, is analyzed for the nematic cells with uniform and non-uniform director configuration. Different stages of similar dynamics are observed for homeotropically oriented NLC cell. Non-uniform director configuration within the cell results in broken central symmentry in the arrangement of the topological network. Main features of the experimentally obtained polarization resolved conoscopic patterns are the same to the theoretically predicted ones.

  20. Topological structure in polarization resolved conoscopic patterns for nematic liquid crystal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buinyi, Igor O.; Denisenko, Vladimir G.; Soskin, Marat S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the polarization structure of coherent light, produced by a convergent light beam transmitted through nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cells with different director configurations. Employing solutions to the transmission problem for the case when plane wave propagates through an anisotropic layer, we analyze the arrangement of the topological elements, such as polarization singularities (C points with circular polarization and L lines with linear polarization), saddle points and extrema of polarization azimuth. We observe transformations of the topological structure under the variation of the incident light ellipticity and represent it by corresponding trajectories of topological elements in three-dimensional space. For the cells with uniform and non-uniform director configuration we describe the processes of creation/annihilation of C point pairs, which can be controlled precisely in the case of the cell with non-uniform director. Our experimental measurements for the homeotropically oriented NLC cells are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  1. Monitoring single-channel water permeability in polarized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhova, Liudmila; Horner, Andreas; Kügler, Philipp; Pohl, Peter

    2011-11-18

    So far the determination of unitary permeability (p(f)) of water channels that are expressed in polarized cells is subject to large errors because the opening of a single water channel does not noticeably increase the water permeability of a membrane patch above the background. That is, in contrast to the patch clamp technique, where the single ion channel conductance may be derived from a single experiment, two experiments separated in time and/or space are required to obtain the single-channel water permeability p(f) as a function of the incremental water permeability (P(f,c)) and the number (n) of water channels that contributed to P(f,c). Although the unitary conductance of ion channels is measured in the native environment of the channel, p(f) is so far derived from reconstituted channels or channels expressed in oocytes. To determine the p(f) of channels from live epithelial monolayers, we exploit the fact that osmotic volume flow alters the concentration of aqueous reporter dyes adjacent to the epithelia. We measure these changes by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, which allows the calculation of both P(f,c) and osmolyte dilution within the unstirred layer. Shifting the focus of the laser from the aqueous solution to the apical and basolateral membranes allowed the FCS-based determination of n. Here we validate the new technique by determining the p(f) of aquaporin 5 in Madin-Darby canine kidney cell monolayers. Because inhibition and subsequent activity rescue are monitored on the same sample, drug effects on exocytosis or endocytosis can be dissected from those on p(f).

  2. Tests of a polarized source of hydrogen and deuterium based on spin-exchange optical pumping and a storage cell for polarized deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.; Gilman, R.; Kinney, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    A novel laser-driven polarized source of hydrogen and deuterium which is based on the principle of spin-exchange optical pumping has been developed at Argonne. The advantages of this method over conventional polarized sources for internal target experiments is discussed. At present, the laser-driven polarized source delivers hydrogen 8 x 10 16 atoms/s with a polarization of 24% and deuterium at 6 x 10 16 atoms/s with a polarization of 25%. A passive storage cell for polarized deuterium was tested in the VEPP-3 electron storage ring. The storage cell was found to increase the target thickness by approximately a factor of three and no loss in polarization was observed. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  3. A Localized Complex of Two Protein Oligomers Controls the Orientation of Cell Polarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Perez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Signaling hubs at bacterial cell poles establish cell polarity in the absence of membrane-bound compartments. In the asymmetrically dividing bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell polarity stems from the cell cycle-regulated localization and turnover of signaling protein complexes in these hubs, and yet the mechanisms that establish the identity of the two cell poles have not been established. Here, we recapitulate the tripartite assembly of a cell fate signaling complex that forms during the G1-S transition. Using in vivo and in vitro analyses of dynamic polar protein complex formation, we show that a polymeric cell polarity protein, SpmX, serves as a direct bridge between the PopZ polymeric network and the cell fate-directing DivJ histidine kinase. We demonstrate the direct binding between these three proteins and show that a polar microdomain spontaneously assembles when the three proteins are coexpressed heterologously in an Escherichia coli test system. The relative copy numbers of these proteins are essential for complex formation, as overexpression of SpmX in Caulobacter reorganizes the polarity of the cell, generating ectopic cell poles containing PopZ and DivJ. Hierarchical formation of higher-order SpmX oligomers nucleates new PopZ microdomain assemblies at the incipient lateral cell poles, driving localized outgrowth. By comparison to self-assembling protein networks and polar cell growth mechanisms in other bacterial species, we suggest that the cooligomeric PopZ-SpmX protein complex in Caulobacter illustrates a paradigm for coupling cell cycle progression to the controlled geometry of cell pole establishment.

  4. Polarity governed selective amplification of through plane proton shuttling in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Manu; Chattanahalli Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Raja Kottaichamy, Alagar; Pottachola Shafi, Shahid; Gaikwad, Pramod; Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh, Harish; Ottakam Thotiyl, Musthafa

    2017-03-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) anisotropically conducts protons with directional dominance of in plane ionic transport (σ IP) over the through plane (σ TP). In a typical H 2 -O 2 fuel cell, since the proton conduction occurs through the plane during its generation at the fuel electrode, it is indeed inevitable to selectively accelerate GO's σ TP for advancement towards a potential fuel cell membrane. We successfully achieved ∼7 times selective amplification of GO's σ TP by tuning the polarity of the dopant molecule in its nanoporous matrix. The coexistence of strongly non-polar and polar domains in the dopant demonstrated a synergistic effect towards σ TP with the former decreasing the number of water molecules coordinated to protons by ∼3 times, diminishing the effects of electroosmotic drag exerted on ionic movements, and the latter selectively accelerating σ TP across the catalytic layers by bridging the individual GO planes via extensive host guest H-bonding interactions. When they are decoupled, the dopant with mainly non-polar or polar features only marginally enhances the σ TP, revealing that polarity factors contribute to fuel cell relevant transport properties of GO membranes only when they coexist. Fuel cell polarization and kinetic analyses revealed that these multitask dopants increased the fuel cell performance metrics of the power and current densities by ∼3 times compared to the pure GO membranes, suggesting that the functional group factors of the dopants are of utmost importance in GO-based proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  5. Hierarchy of mechanisms involved in generating Na/K-ATPase polarity in MDCK epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mays, R.W.; Siemers, K.A.; Fritz, B.A.; Lowe, A.W.; van Meer, G.; Nelson, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied mechanisms involved in generating a polarized distribution of Na/K-ATPase in the basal-lateral membrane of two clones of MDCK II cells. Both clones exhibit polarized distributions of marker proteins of the apical and basal-lateral membranes, including Na/K-ATPase, at steady state.

  6. Mathematical analysis of steady-state solutions in compartment and continuum models of cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhenzhen; Chou, Ching-Shan; Yi, Tau-Mu; Nie, Qing

    2011-10-01

    Cell polarization, in which substances previously uniformly distributed become asymmetric due to external or/and internal stimulation, is a fundamental process underlying cell mobility, cell division, and other polarized functions. The yeast cell S. cerevisiae has been a model system to study cell polarization. During mating, yeast cells sense shallow external spatial gradients and respond by creating steeper internal gradients of protein aligned with the external cue. The complex spatial dynamics during yeast mating polarization consists of positive feedback, degradation, global negative feedback control, and cooperative effects in protein synthesis. Understanding such complex regulations and interactions is critical to studying many important characteristics in cell polarization including signal amplification, tracking dynamic signals, and potential trade-off between achieving both objectives in a robust fashion. In this paper, we study some of these questions by analyzing several models with different spatial complexity: two compartments, three compartments, and continuum in space. The step-wise approach allows detailed characterization of properties of the steady state of the system, providing more insights for biological regulations during cell polarization. For cases without membrane diffusion, our study reveals that increasing the number of spatial compartments results in an increase in the number of steady-state solutions, in particular, the number of stable steady-state solutions, with the continuum models possessing infinitely many steady-state solutions. Through both analysis and simulations, we find that stronger positive feedback, reduced diffusion, and a shallower ligand gradient all result in more steady-state solutions, although most of these are not optimally aligned with the gradient. We explore in the different settings the relationship between the number of steady-state solutions and the extent and accuracy of the polarization. Taken together

  7. Networking for proteins : A yeast two-hybrid and RNAi profiling approach to uncover C. elegans cell polarity regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorman, T.

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity is a near universal trait of life and guides many aspects of animal development. Although a number of key polarity proteins have been identified, many interactions with proteins acting downstream likely remain to be elucidated. Mutations in polarity proteins or deregulation of polarity

  8. Airway epithelial cell-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 triggers skewed CD8(+) T cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian-Yong; Huang, Shao-hong; Li, Yun; Chen, Hui-guo; Rong, Jian; Ye, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Skewed CD8(+) T cell responses are important in airway inflammation. This study investigates the role of the airway epithelial cell-derived insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) in contributing to CD8(+) T cell polarization. Expression of IGF1 in the airway epithelial cell line, RPMI2650 cells, was assessed by quantitative real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The role of IGF1 in regulating CD8(+) T cell activation was observed by coculture of mite allergen-primed RPMI2650 cells and naïve CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cell polarization was assessed by the carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester-dilution assay and the determination of cytotoxic cytokine levels in the culture medium. Exposure to mite allergen, Der p1, increased the expression of IGF1 by RPMI2650 cells. The epithelial cell-derived IGF1 prevented the activation-induced cell death by inducing the p53 gene hypermethylation. Mite allergen-primed RPMI2650 cells induced an antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell polarization. We conclude that mite allergens induce airway epithelial cell line, RPMI2650 cells, to produce IGF1; the latter contributes to antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell polarization. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  9. Cell shape, spreading symmetry, and the polarization of stress-fibers in cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemel, A [Institute of Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dental Medicine, and the Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, 91120 (Israel); Rehfeldt, F [III. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universitaet, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Brown, A E X [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Discher, D E [Graduate Group of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Safran, S A [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-05-19

    The active regulation of cellular forces during cell adhesion plays an important role in the determination of cell size, shape, and internal structure. While on flat, homogeneous and isotropic substrates some cells spread isotropically, others spread anisotropically and assume elongated structures. In addition, in their native environment as well as in vitro experiments, the cell shape and spreading asymmetry can be modulated by the local distribution of adhesive molecules and topography of the environment. We present a simple elastic model and experiments on stem cells to explain the variation of cell size with the matrix rigidity. In addition, we predict the experimental consequences of two mechanisms of acto-myosin polarization and focus here on the effect of the cell spreading asymmetry on the regulation of the stress-fiber alignment in the cytoskeleton. We show that when cell spreading is sufficiently asymmetric the alignment of acto-myosin forces in the cell increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity; however, in general this alignment is non-monotonic, as shown previously. These results highlight the importance of the symmetry characteristics of cell spreading in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and suggest a mechanism by which different cell types may acquire different morphologies and internal structures in different mechanical environments.

  10. Polarization splitting phenomenon of photonic crystals constructed by two-fold rotationally symmetric unit-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasa, U. G.; Giden, I. H.; Turduev, M.; Kurt, H.

    2017-09-01

    We present an intrinsic polarization splitting characteristic of low-symmetric photonic crystals (PCs) formed by unit-cells with C 2 rotational symmetry. This behavior emerges from the polarization sensitive self-collimation effect for both transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) modes depending on the rotational orientations of the unit-cell elements. Numerical analyzes are performed in both frequency and time domains for different types of square lattice two-fold rotational symmetric PC structures. At incident wavelength of λ = 1550 nm, high polarization extinction ratios with ˜26 dB (for TE polarization) and ˜22 dB (for TM polarization) are obtained with an operating bandwidth of 59 nm. Moreover, fabrication feasibilities of the designed structure are analyzed to evaluate their robustness in terms of the unit-cell orientation: for the selected PC unit-cell composition, corresponding extinction ratios for both polarizations still remain to be over 18 dB for the unit-cell rotation interval of θ = [40°-55°]. Taking all these advantages, two-fold rotationally symmetric PCs could be considered as an essential component in photonic integrated circuits for polarization control of light.

  11. MCAM contributes to the establishment of cell autonomous polarity in myogenic and chondrogenic differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artal Moreno-Fortuny

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell polarity has a fundamental role in shaping the morphology of cells and growing tissues. Polarity is commonly thought to be established in response to extracellular signals. Here we used a minimal in vitro assay that enabled us to monitor the determination of cell polarity in myogenic and chondrogenic differentiation in the absence of external signalling gradients. We demonstrate that the initiation of cell polarity is regulated by melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM. We found highly polarized localization of MCAM, Moesin (MSN, Scribble (SCRIB and Van-Gogh-like 2 (VANGL2 at the distal end of elongating myotubes. Knockout of MCAM or elimination of its endocytosis motif does not impair the initiation of myogenesis or myoblast fusion, but prevents myotube elongation. MSN, SCRIB and VANGL2 remain uniformly distributed in MCAM knockout cells. We show that MCAM is also required at early stages of chondrogenic differentiation. In both myogenic and chondrogenic differentiation MCAM knockout leads to transcriptional downregulation of Scrib and enhanced MAP kinase activity. Our data demonstrates the importance of cell autonomous polarity in differentiation.

  12. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Leon J.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we

  13. Concomitant use of polarization and positive phase contrast microscopy for the study of microbial cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk; Gabriel, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 6 (2015), s. 545-550 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : polarization microscopy * microbial cells * positive phase contrast Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.335, year: 2015

  14. Zebrafish models of non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity signalling: fishing for valuable insight into vertebrate polarized cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jussila, Maria; Ciruna, Brian

    2017-05-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) coordinates the uniform orientation, structure and movement of cells within the plane of a tissue or organ system. It is beautifully illustrated in the polarized arrangement of bristles and hairs that project from specialized cell surfaces of the insect abdomen and wings, and pioneering genetic studies using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, have defined a core signalling network underlying PCP. This core PCP/non-canonical Wnt signalling pathway is evolutionarily conserved, and studies in zebrafish have helped transform our understanding of PCP from a peculiarity of polarized epithelia to a more universal cellular property that orchestrates a diverse suite of polarized cell behaviors that are required for normal vertebrate development. Furthermore, application of powerful genetics, embryonic cell-transplantation, and live-imaging capabilities afforded by the zebrafish model have yielded novel insights into the establishment and maintenance of vertebrate PCP, over the course of complex and dynamic morphogenetic events like gastrulation and neural tube morphogenesis. Although key questions regarding vertebrate PCP remain, with the emergence of new genome-editing technologies and the promise of endogenous labeling and Cre/LoxP conditional targeting strategies, zebrafish remains poised to deliver fundamental new insights into the function and molecular dynamic regulation of PCP signalling from embryonic development through to late-onset phenotypes and adult disease states. WIREs Dev Biol 2017, 6:e267. doi: 10.1002/wdev.267 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunder, Leon J; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D

    2017-07-05

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we highlight recent advances with regard to the molecular mechanisms of cell polarity-controlled epithelial homeostasis and immunity in the human intestine. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. Porcine aminopeptidase N mediated polarized infection by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in target cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Yingying; Li, Xiaoxue; Bai, Yunyun [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); Lv, Xiaonan [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); CAS Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience & Technology of China, Beijing 100090 (China); Herrler, Georg [Institute for Virology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover D-30559 (Germany); Enjuanes, Luis [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CNB-CSIC), Campus Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Zhou, Xingdong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); Qu, Bo [Faculty of Life Sciences, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); Meng, Fandan [Institute for Virology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover D-30559 (Germany); Cong, Chengcheng [College Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Medicine, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110161 (China); Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxing [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was characterized. Indirect immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed PEDV can be successfully propagated in immortalized swine small intestine epithelial cells (IECs). Infection involved porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN), a reported cellular receptor for PEDV, transient expression of pAPN and siRNA targeted pAPN increased and decreased the infectivity of PEDV in IECs, respectively. Subsequently, polarized entry into and release from both Vero E6 and IECs was analyzed. PEDV entry into polarized cells and pAPN grown on membrane inserts occurs via apical membrane. The progeny virus released into the medium was also quantified which demonstrated that PEDV is preferentially released from the apical membrane. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pAPN, the cellular receptor for PEDV, mediates polarized PEDV infection. These results imply the possibility that PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in intestinal epithelial cells. - Highlights: • PEDV infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was characterized. • Porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN) facilitated PEDV infection in IECs. • PEDV entry into and release from polarized cell via its apical membrane. • PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in IECs.

  17. The viral spike protein is not involved in the polarized sorting of coronaviruses in epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Rossen, J.W.A.; Beer, R. de; Godeke, G.J.; Raamsman, M.J.; Vennema, H.; Rottier, P.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Coronaviruses are assembled by budding into a pre-Golgi compartment from which they are transported along the secretory pathway to leave the cell. In cultured epithelial cells, they are released in a polarized fashion; depending on the virus and cell type, they are sorted preferentially either to

  18. Anti-inflammatory effect of stem cells against spinal cord injury via regulating macrophage polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng ZJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Zhijian Cheng, Xijing He Department of Orthopedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Spinal cord injury (SCI is a traumatic event that involves not just an acute physical injury but also inflammation-driven secondary injury. Macrophages play a very important role in secondary injury. The effects of macrophages on tissue damage and repair after SCI are related to macrophage polarization. Stem cell transplantation has been studied as a promising treatment for SCI. Recently, increasing evidence shows that stem cells, including mesenchymal stem, neural stem/progenitor, and embryonic stem cells, have an anti-inflammatory capacity and promote functional recovery after SCI by inducing macrophages M1/M2 phenotype transformation. In this review, we will discuss the role of stem cells on macrophage polarization and its role in stem cell-based therapies for SCI. Keywords: stem cells, macrophages, spinal cord injury, polarization

  19. Kif3a regulates planar polarization of auditory hair cells through both ciliary and non-ciliary mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipe, Conor W.; Lu, Xiaowei

    2011-01-01

    Auditory hair cells represent one of the most prominent examples of epithelial planar polarity. In the auditory sensory epithelium, planar polarity of individual hair cells is defined by their V-shaped hair bundle, the mechanotransduction organelle located on the apical surface. At the tissue level, all hair cells display uniform planar polarity across the epithelium. Although it is known that tissue planar polarity is controlled by non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling, the hair cell-intrinsic polarity machinery that establishes the V-shape of the hair bundle is poorly understood. Here, we show that the microtubule motor subunit Kif3a regulates hair cell polarization through both ciliary and non-ciliary mechanisms. Disruption of Kif3a in the inner ear led to absence of the kinocilium, a shortened cochlear duct and flattened hair bundle morphology. Moreover, basal bodies are mispositioned along both the apicobasal and planar polarity axes of mutant hair cells, and hair bundle orientation was uncoupled from the basal body position. We show that a non-ciliary function of Kif3a regulates localized cortical activity of p21-activated kinases (PAK), which in turn controls basal body positioning in hair cells. Our results demonstrate that Kif3a-PAK signaling coordinates planar polarization of the hair bundle and the basal body in hair cells, and establish Kif3a as a key component of the hair cell-intrinsic polarity machinery, which acts in concert with the tissue polarity pathway. PMID:21752934

  20. Plasma membrane protein polarity and trafficking in RPE cells: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Guillermo L.; Benedicto, Ignacio; Philp, Nancy J.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) comprises a monolayer of polarized pigmented epithelial cells that is strategically interposed between the neural retina and the fenestrated choroid capillaries. The RPE performs a variety of vectorial transport functions (water, ions, metabolites, nutrients and waste products) that regulate the composition of the subretinal space and support the functions of photoreceptors (PRs) and other cells in the neural retina. To this end, RPE cells display a polarized distribution of channels, transporters and receptors in their plasma membrane (PM) that is remarkably different from that found in conventional extra-ocular epithelia, e.g. intestine, kidney, and gall bladder. This characteristic PM protein polarity of RPE cells depends on the interplay of sorting signals in the RPE PM proteins and sorting mechanisms and biosynthetic/recycling trafficking routes in the RPE cell. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the RPE trafficking machinery, most available data have been obtained from immortalized RPE cell lines that only partially maintain the RPE phenotype and by extrapolation of data obtained in the prototype Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. The increasing availability of RPE cell cultures that more closely resemble the RPE in vivo together with the advent of advanced live imaging microscopy techniques provides a platform and an opportunity to rapidly expand our understanding of how polarized protein trafficking contributes to RPE PM polarity. PMID:25152359

  1. n3 PUFAs reduce mouse CD4+ T-cell ex vivo polarization into Th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Jennifer M; Hou, Tim Y; Turk, Harmony F; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about the impact of n3 (ω3) PUFAs on polarization of CD4(+) T cells into effector subsets other than Th1 and Th2. We assessed the effects of dietary fat [corn oil (CO) vs. fish oil (FO)] and fermentable fiber [cellulose (C) vs. pectin (P)] (2 × 2 design) in male C57BL/6 mice fed CO-C, CO-P, FO-C, or FO-P diets for 3 wk on the ex vivo polarization of purified splenic CD4(+) T cells (using magnetic microbeads) into regulatory T cells [Tregs; forkhead box P3 (Foxp3(+)) cells] or Th17 cells [interleukin (IL)-17A(+) and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR) γτ(+) cells] by flow cytometry. Treg polarization was unaffected by diet; however, FO independently reduced the percentage of both CD4(+) IL-17A(+) (P diets enriched in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or DHA + EPA similarly reduced Th17-cell polarization in comparison to CO by reducing expression of the Th17-cell signature cytokine (IL-17A; P = 0.0015) and transcription factor (RORγτ P = 0.02), whereas Treg polarization was unaffected. Collectively, these data show that n3 PUFAs exert a direct effect on the development of Th17 cells in healthy mice, implicating a novel n3 PUFA-dependent, anti-inflammatory mechanism of action via the suppression of the initial development of this inflammatory T-cell subset.

  2. Differential effects of Mycobacterium bovis - derived polar and apolar lipid fractions on bovine innate immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirson Chris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mycobacterial lipids have long been known to modulate the function of a variety of cells of the innate immune system. Here, we report the extraction and characterisation of polar and apolar free lipids from Mycobacterium bovis AF 2122/97 and identify the major lipids present in these fractions. Lipids found included trehalose dimycolate (TDM and trehalose monomycolate (TMM, the apolar phthiocerol dimycocersates (PDIMs, triacyl glycerol (TAG, pentacyl trehalose (PAT, phenolic glycolipid (PGL, and mono-mycolyl glycerol (MMG. Polar lipids identified included glucose monomycolate (GMM, diphosphatidyl glycerol (DPG, phenylethanolamine (PE and a range of mono- and di-acylated phosphatidyl inositol mannosides (PIMs. These lipid fractions are capable of altering the cytokine profile produced by fresh and cultured bovine monocytes as well as monocyte derived dendritic cells. Significant increases in the production of IL-10, IL-12, MIP-1β, TNFα and IL-6 were seen after exposure of antigen presenting cells to the polar lipid fraction. Phenotypic characterisation of the cells was performed by flow cytometry and significant decreases in the expression of MHCII, CD86 and CD1b were found after exposure to the polar lipid fraction. Polar lipids also significantly increased the levels of CD40 expressed by monocytes and cultured monocytes but no effect was seen on the constitutively high expression of CD40 on MDDC or on the levels of CD80 expressed by any of the cells. Finally, the capacity of polar fraction treated cells to stimulate alloreactive lymphocytes was assessed. Significant reduction in proliferative activity was seen after stimulation of PBMC by polar fraction treated cultured monocytes whilst no effect was seen after lipid treatment of MDDC. These data demonstrate that pathogenic mycobacterial polar lipids may significantly hamper the ability of the host APCs to induce an appropriate immune response to an invading pathogen.

  3. The keratin-binding protein Albatross regulates polarization of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Masahiko; Inoko, Akihito; Shiromizu, Takashi; Nakayama, Masanori; Zou, Peng; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hayashi, Yuko; Izawa, Ichiro; Sasoh, Mikio; Uji, Yukitaka; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Kiyono, Tohru; Inagaki, Masaki

    2008-10-06

    The keratin intermediate filament network is abundant in epithelial cells, but its function in the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity is unclear. Here, we show that Albatross complexes with Par3 to regulate formation of the apical junctional complex (AJC) and maintain lateral membrane identity. In nonpolarized epithelial cells, Albatross localizes with keratin filaments, whereas in polarized epithelial cells, Albatross is primarily localized in the vicinity of the AJC. Knockdown of Albatross in polarized cells causes a disappearance of key components of the AJC at cell-cell borders and keratin filament reorganization. Lateral proteins E-cadherin and desmoglein 2 were mislocalized even on the apical side. Although Albatross promotes localization of Par3 to the AJC, Par3 and ezrin are still retained at the apical surface in Albatross knockdown cells, which retain intact microvilli. Analysis of keratin-deficient epithelial cells revealed that keratins are required to stabilize the Albatross protein, thus promoting the formation of AJC. We propose that keratins and the keratin-binding protein Albatross are important for epithelial cell polarization.

  4. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M., E-mail: carien.niessen@uni-koeln.de

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  5. Cell polarity and neurogenesis in embryonic stem cell-derived neural rosettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Erin; McKinsey, Anna; Germain, Noelle; Carter, James; Anderson, Nickesha Camille; Grabel, Laura

    2015-04-15

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) undergoing neural differentiation form radial arrays of neural stem cells, termed neural rosettes. These structures manifest many of the properties associated with embryonic and adult neurogenesis, including cell polarization, interkinetic nuclear migration (INM), and a gradient of neuronal differentiation. We now identify novel rosette structural features that serve to localize key regulators of neurogenesis. Cells within neural rosettes have specialized basal as well as apical surfaces, based on localization of the extracellular matrix receptor β1 integrin. Apical processes of cells in mature rosettes terminate at the lumen, where adherens junctions are apparent. Primary cilia are randomly distributed in immature rosettes and tightly associated with the neural stem cell's apical domain as rosettes mature. Components of two signaling pathways known to regulate neurogenesis in vivo and in rosettes, Hedgehog and Notch, are apically localized, with the Hedgehog effector Smoothened (Smo) associated with primary cilia and the Notch pathway γ-secretase subunit Presenilin 2 associated with the adherens junction. Increased neuron production upon treatment with the Notch inhibitor DAPT suggests a major role for Notch signaling in maintaining the neural stem cell state, as previously described. A less robust outcome was observed with manipulation of Hedgehog levels, though consistent with a role in neural stem cell survival or proliferation. Inhibition of both pathways resulted in an additive effect. These data support a model by which cells extending a process to the rosette lumen maintain neural stem cell identity whereas release from this association, either through asymmetric cell division or apical abscission, promotes neuronal differentiation.

  6. Expanding signaling-molecule wavefront model of cell polarization in the Drosophila wing primordium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortman, Juliana C; Nahmad, Marcos; Zhang, Peng Cheng; Lander, Arthur D; Yu, Clare C

    2017-07-01

    In developing tissues, cell polarization and proliferation are regulated by morphogens and signaling pathways. Cells throughout the Drosophila wing primordium typically show subcellular localization of the unconventional myosin Dachs on the distal side of cells (nearest the center of the disc). Dachs localization depends on the spatial distribution of bonds between the protocadherins Fat (Ft) and Dachsous (Ds), which form heterodimers between adjacent cells; and the Golgi kinase Four-jointed (Fj), which affects the binding affinities of Ft and Ds. The Fj concentration forms a linear gradient while the Ds concentration is roughly uniform throughout most of the wing pouch with a steep transition region that propagates from the center to the edge of the pouch during the third larval instar. Although the Fj gradient is an important cue for polarization, it is unclear how the polarization is affected by cell division and the expanding Ds transition region, both of which can alter the distribution of Ft-Ds heterodimers around the cell periphery. We have developed a computational model to address these questions. In our model, the binding affinity of Ft and Ds depends on phosphorylation by Fj. We assume that the asymmetry of the Ft-Ds bond distribution around the cell periphery defines the polarization, with greater asymmetry promoting cell proliferation. Our model predicts that this asymmetry is greatest in the radially-expanding transition region that leaves polarized cells in its wake. These cells naturally retain their bond distribution asymmetry after division by rapidly replenishing Ft-Ds bonds at new cell-cell interfaces. Thus we predict that the distal localization of Dachs in cells throughout the pouch requires the movement of the Ds transition region and the simple presence, rather than any specific spatial pattern, of Fj.

  7. Dystrophin expression in muscle stem cells regulates their polarity and asymmetric division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Nicolas A; Wang, Yu Xin; von Maltzahn, Julia; Pasut, Alessandra; Bentzinger, C Florian; Brun, Caroline E; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Dystrophin is expressed in differentiated myofibers, in which it is required for sarcolemmal integrity, and loss-of-function mutations in the gene that encodes it result in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a disease characterized by progressive and severe skeletal muscle degeneration. Here we found that dystrophin is also highly expressed in activated muscle stem cells (also known as satellite cells), in which it associates with the serine-threonine kinase Mark2 (also known as Par1b), an important regulator of cell polarity. In the absence of dystrophin, expression of Mark2 protein is downregulated, resulting in the inability to localize the cell polarity regulator Pard3 to the opposite side of the cell. Consequently, the number of asymmetric divisions is strikingly reduced in dystrophin-deficient satellite cells, which also display a loss of polarity, abnormal division patterns (including centrosome amplification), impaired mitotic spindle orientation and prolonged cell divisions. Altogether, these intrinsic defects strongly reduce the generation of myogenic progenitors that are needed for proper muscle regeneration. Therefore, we conclude that dystrophin has an essential role in the regulation of satellite cell polarity and asymmetric division. Our findings indicate that muscle wasting in DMD not only is caused by myofiber fragility, but also is exacerbated by impaired regeneration owing to intrinsic satellite cell dysfunction.

  8. Regulation of vascular endothelial cell polarization and migration by Hsp70/Hsp90-organizing protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyu; Sun, Xiaodong; Wang, Zaizhu; Chen, Li; Li, Dengwen; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Min

    2012-01-01

    Hsp70/Hsp90-organizing protein (HOP) is a member of the co-chaperone family, which directly binds to chaperones to regulate their activities. The participation of HOP in cell motility and endothelial cell functions remains largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that HOP is critically involved in endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. Tube formation and capillary sprouting experiments reveal that depletion of HOP expression significantly inhibits vessel formation from endothelial cells. Wound healing and transwell migration assays show that HOP is important for endothelial cell migration. By examination of centrosome reorientation and membrane ruffle dynamics, we find that HOP plays a crucial role in the establishment of cell polarity in response to migratory stimulus. Furthermore, our data show that HOP interacts with tubulin and colocalizes with microtubules in endothelial cells. These findings indicate HOP as a novel regulator of angiogenesis that functions through promoting vascular endothelial cell polarization and migration.

  9. Intracellular trafficking and PIN-mediated cell polarity during tropic responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakusová, Hana; Fendrych, Matyáš; Friml, Jiří

    2015-02-01

    Subcellular trafficking and cell polarity are basic cellular processes crucial for plant development including tropisms - directional growth responses to environmental stimuli such as light or gravity. Tropisms involve auxin gradient across the stimulated organ that underlies the differential cell elongation and bending. The perception of light or gravity is followed by changes in the polar, cellular distribution of the PIN auxin transporters. Such re-specification of polar trafficking pathways is a part of the mechanism, by which plants adjust their phenotype to environmental changes. Recent genetic and biochemical studies provided the important insights into mechanisms of PIN polarization during tropisms. In this review, we summarize the present state of knowledge on dynamic PIN repolarization and its specific regulations during hypocotyl tropisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of III-nitride polarization on V{sub OC} in p-i-n and MQW solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkoong, Gon; Boland, Patrick; Foe, Kurniawan; Latimer, Kevin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Applied Research Center, 12050 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Bae, Si-Young; Shim, Jae-Phil; Lee, Dong-Seon [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro (Oryong-dong), Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seong-Ran [Korea Photonics Technology Institute, 971-35, Wolchul-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500-779 (Korea, Republic of); Doolittle, W. Alan [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    We performed detailed studies of the effect of polarization on III-nitride solar cells. Spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations were assessed to determine their impacts upon the open circuit voltages (V{sub OC}) in p-i(InGaN)-n and multi-quantum well (MQW) solar cells. We found that the spontaneous polarization in Ga-polar p-i-n solar cells strongly modifies energy band structures and corresponding electric fields in a way that degrades V{sub OC} compared to non-polar p-i-n structures. In contrast, we found that piezoelectric polarization in Ga-polar MQW structures does not have a large influence on V{sub OC} compared to non-polar MQW structures. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. The polarity protein Par1b/EMK/MARK2 regulates T cell receptor-induced microtubule-organizing center polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Joseph; Hou, Kirk K; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Shaw, Andrey S

    2009-07-15

    Engagement of a T cell to an APC induces the formation of an immunological synapse as well as reorientation of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) toward the APC. How signals emanating from the TCR induce MTOC polarization is not known. One group of proteins known to play a critical role in asymmetric cell division and cell polarization is the partitioning defective (Par) family of proteins. In this study we found that Par1b, a member of the Par family of proteins, was inducibly phosphorylated following TCR stimulation. This phosphorylation resulted in 14-3-3 protein binding and caused the relocalization of Par1b from the membrane into the cytoplasm. Because a dominant-negative form of Par1b blocked TCR-induced MTOC polarization, our data suggest that Par1b functions in the establishment of T cell polarity following engagement to an APC.

  12. Evidence for Nuclear Tensor Polarization of Deuterium Molecules in Storage Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van den Brand, J.; Bulten, H.; Zhou, Z.; Unal, O.; van den Brand, J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Botto, T.; Bouwhuis, M.; Heimberg, P.; de Jager, C.; de Lange, D.; Nooren, G.; Papadakis, N.; Passchier, I.; Poolman, H.; Steijger, J.; Vodinas, N.; de Vries, H.; van den Brand, J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Lang, J.; Alarcon, R.; Dolfini, S.; Ent, R.; Higinbotham, D.

    1997-01-01

    Deuterium molecules were obtained by recombination, on a copper surface, of deuterium atoms prepared in specific hyperfine states. The molecules were stored for about 5ms in an open-ended cylindrical cell, placed in a 23mT magnetic field, and their tensor polarization was measured by elastic scattering of 704MeV electrons. The results of the measurements are consistent with the deuterium molecules retaining the tensor polarization of the initial atoms. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  13. Tropospheric entrainment as a source of ground level aerosols within the polar Antarctic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, R. S.; Schofield, R.; Keywood, M.; Wilson, S. R.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Paton-Walsh, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Antarctic region is a pristine environment without any significant anthropogenic influence. Measurements of aerosols in this environment therefore allow the study of natural aerosol properties and formation mechanisms in polar conditions, and also allow insight into polar atmospheric dynamics. Measurements in this region have been limited primarily to continental and coastal locations where permanent stations exist, with only one other measurement campaign passing through the sea ice region. The MAPS campaign (Measurements of Aerosols and Precursors during SIPEXII) occurred as part of SIPEX II (Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystems eXperiment II) voyage in Spring, 2012, and produced the first sea-ice focused aerosol dataset aimed at characterizing new particle formation processes in the pack ice off the coast of East Antarctica (~65°S, 120°E). Numerous atmospheric parameters and species were measured, including the number of aerosol particles in the 3-10 nm size range, the range associated with new particle formation. During the latitudinal transect through the sea ice, these measurements were used to identify the polar front - the boundary between the Polar cell and the Ferrel cell. Nuclei concentrations showed a clear and sudden change with latitude, averaging 51cm-3 north of the front in the Ferrel cell, and 766 cm-3 south of the front, in the Polar cell region. The latitudinal location of the polar front was also confirmed by wind directions which reflected global circulation patterns (Ferrel cell westerlies and Polar cell easterlies). Background aerosol populations in the Polar cell fluctuated significantly (3-10 nm particle concentrations ranged between 153 cm-3 to 2312 cm-3) but displayed no growth indicators, suggesting transport. Back-trajectories revealed that air parcels often descended from the free-troposphere within the previous 24-48 hrs. It is proposed that particle formation occurs in the free troposphere from precursors uplifted at the polar front

  14. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have constructed a dual trap optical tweezers set-up around an inverted microscope where both the traps can be independently controlled and manipulated in all the three dimensions. Here we report our observations on rotation of red blood cells (RBCs) in a linearly polarized optical trap. Red blood cells deform and ...

  15. Barley disease susceptibility factor RACB acts in epidermal cell polarity and positioning of the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Björn; Schnepf, Vera; Galgenmüller, Carolina; Ranf, Stefanie; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    RHO GTPases are regulators of cell polarity and immunity in eukaryotes. In plants, RHO-like RAC/ROP GTPases are regulators of cell shaping, hormone responses, and responses to microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) RAC/ROP protein RACB is required for full susceptibility to penetration by Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh), the barley powdery mildew fungus. Disease susceptibility factors often control host immune responses. Here we show that RACB does not interfere with early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses such as the oxidative burst or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. RACB also supports rather than restricts expression of defence-related genes in barley. Instead, silencing of RACB expression by RNAi leads to defects in cell polarity. In particular, initiation and maintenance of root hair growth and development of stomatal subsidiary cells by asymmetric cell division is affected by silencing expression of RACB. Nucleus migration is a common factor of developmental cell polarity and cell-autonomous interaction with Bgh RACB is required for positioning of the nucleus near the site of attack from Bgh We therefore suggest that Bgh profits from RACB's function in cell polarity rather than from immunity-regulating functions of RACB. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. Hugl1 and Hugl2 in mammary epithelial cells: polarity, proliferation, and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atlantis Russ

    Full Text Available Loss of epithelial polarity is described as a hallmark of epithelial cancer. To determine the role of Hugl1 and Hugl2 expression in the breast, we investigated their localization in human mammary duct tissue and the effects of expression modulation in normal and cancer cell lines on polarity, proliferation and differentiation. Expression of Hugl1 and Hugl2 was silenced in both MCF10A cells and Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and cell lines were grown in 2-D on plastic and in 3-D in Matrigel to form acini. Cells in monolayer were compared for proliferative and phenotypic changes while acini were examined for differences in size, ability to form a hollow lumen, nuclear size and shape, and localization of key domain-specific proteins as a measure of polarity. We detected overlapping but distinct localization of Hugl1 and Hugl2 in the human mammary gland, with Hugl1 expressed in both luminal and myoepithelium and Hugl2 largely restricted to myoepithelium. On a plastic surface, loss of Hugl1 or Hugl2 in normal epithelium induced a mesenchymal phenotype, and these cells formed large cellular masses when grown in Matrigel. In addition, loss of Hugl1 or Hugl2 expression in MCF10A cells resulted in increased proliferation on Matrigel, while gain of Hugl1 expression in tumor cells suppressed proliferation. Loss of polarity was also observed with knockdown of either Hugl1 or Hugl2, with cells growing in Matrigel appearing as a multilayered epithelium, with randomly oriented Golgi and multiple enlarged nuclei. Furthermore, Hugl1 knock down resulted in a loss of membrane identity and the development of cellular asymmetries in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells. Overall, these data demonstrate an essential role for both Hugl1 and Hugl2 in the maintenance of breast epithelial polarity and differentiated cell morphology, as well as growth control.

  17. Iron repletion relocalizes hephaestin to a proximal basolateral compartment in polarized MDCK and Caco2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Min [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Columbia, NY (United States); Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Attieh, Zouhair K. [Department of Laboratory Science and Technology, American University of Science and Technology, Ashrafieh (Lebanon); Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Son, Hee Sook [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Chonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Huijun [Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu Province (China); Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bacouri-Haidar, Mhenia [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences (I), Lebanese University, Hadath (Lebanon); Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Vulpe, Chris D., E-mail: vulpe@berkeley.edu [Department of Nutritional Science and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hephaestin localizes in the perinuclear space in non-polarized cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hephaestin localizes in the perinuclear space in iron deficient and polarized cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hephaestin with apical iron moves near to basolateral membrane of polarized cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peri-basolateral location of hephaestin is accessible to the extracellular space. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hephaestin is involved in iron mobilization from the intestine to circulation. -- Abstract: While intestinal cellular iron entry in vertebrates employs multiple routes including heme and non-heme routes, iron egress from these cells is exclusively channeled through the only known transporter, ferroportin. Reduced intestinal iron export in sex-linked anemia mice implicates hephaestin, a ferroxidase, in this process. Polarized cells are exposed to two distinct environments. Enterocytes contact the gut lumen via the apical surface of the cell, and through the basolateral surface, to the body. Previous studies indicate both local and systemic control of iron uptake. We hypothesized that differences in iron availability at the apical and/or basolateral surface may modulate iron uptake via cellular localization of hephaestin. We therefore characterized the localization of hephaestin in two models of polarized epithelial cell lines, MDCK and Caco2, with varying iron availability at the apical and basolateral surfaces. Our results indicate that hephaestin is expressed in a supra-nuclear compartment in non-polarized cells regardless of the iron status of the cells and in iron deficient and polarized cells. In polarized cells, we found that both apical (as FeSO{sub 4}) and basolateral iron (as the ratio of apo-transferrin to holo-transferrin) affect mobilization of hephaestin from the supra-nuclear compartment. We find that the presence of apical iron is essential for relocalization of hephaestin to a

  18. Monitoring the initiation and kinetics of human dendritic cell-induced polarization of autologous naive CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy Oth

    Full Text Available A crucial step in generating de novo immune responses is the polarization of naive cognate CD4+ T cells by pathogen-triggered dendritic cells (DC. In the human setting, standardized DC-dependent systems are lacking to study molecular events during the initiation of a naive CD4+ T cell response. We developed a TCR-restricted assay to compare different pathogen-triggered human DC for their capacities to instruct functional differentiation of autologous, naive CD4+ T cells. We demonstrated that this methodology can be applied to compare differently matured DC in terms of kinetics, direction, and magnitude of the naive CD4+ T cell response. Furthermore, we showed the applicability of this assay to study the T cell polarizing capacity of low-frequency blood-derived DC populations directly isolated ex vivo. This methodology for addressing APC-dependent instruction of naive CD4+ T cells in a human autologous setting will provide researchers with a valuable tool to gain more insight into molecular mechanisms occurring in the early phase of T cell polarization. In addition, it may also allow the study of pharmacological agents on DC-dependent T cell polarization in the human system.

  19. Label-free investigation of the effects of lithium niobate polarization on cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracchia, B.; Gennari, O.; Paturzo, M.; Grilli, S.; Ferraro, P.

    2017-06-01

    The determination of contact area is pivotal to understand how biomaterials properties influence cell adhesion. In particular, the influence of surface charges is well-known but still controversial, especially when new functional materials and methods are introduced. Here, we use for the first time Holographic Total Internal Reflection Microscopy (HoloTIRM) to study the influence of the spontaneous polarization of ferroelectric lithium niobate (LN) on the adhesion properties of fibroblast cells. The selective illumination of a very thin region directly above the substrate, achieved by Total Internal Reflection, provides high-contrast images of the contact regions. Holographic recording, on the other hand, allows for label-free quantitative phase imaging of the contact areas between cells and LN. Phase signal is more sensitive in the first 100nm and, thus more reliable in order to locate focal contacts. This work shows that cells adhering on negatively polarized LN present a significant increase of the contact area in comparison with cells adhering on the positively polarized LN substrate, as well as an intensification of contact vicinity. This confirms the potential of LN as a platform for investigating the role of charges on cellular processes. The similarity of cell adhesion behavior on negatively polarized LN and glass control also confirms the possibility to use LN as an active substrate without impairing cell behavior.

  20. Krüppel-like factor 4 regulates intestinal epithelial cell morphology and polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxin Yu

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4 is a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a vital role in regulating cell lineage differentiation during development and maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the intestine. In normal intestine, KLF4 is predominantly expressed in the differentiated epithelial cells. It has been identified as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. KLF4 knockout mice demonstrated a decrease in number of goblet cells in the colon, and conditional ablation of KLF4 from the intestinal epithelium led to altered epithelial homeostasis. However, the role of KLF4 in differentiated intestinal cells and colon cancer cells, as well as the mechanism by which it regulates homeostasis and represses tumorigenesis in the intestine is not well understood. In our study, KLF4 was partially depleted in the differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase. We found a significant increase in the number of goblet cells in the KLF4-deleted small intestine, suggesting that KLF4 is not only required for goblet cell differentiation, but also required for maintaining goblet cell numbers through its function in inhibiting cell proliferation. The number and position of Paneth cells also changed. This is consistent with the KLF4 knockout study using villin-Cre [1]. Through immunohistochemistry (IHC staining and statistical analysis, we found that a stem cell and/or tuft cell marker, DCAMKL1, and a proliferation marker, Ki67, are affected by KLF4 depletion, while an enteroendocrine cell marker, neurotensin (NT, was not affected. In addition, we found KLF4 depletion altered the morphology and polarity of the intestinal epithelial cells. Using a three-dimensional (3D intestinal epithelial cyst formation assay, we found that KLF4 is essential for cell polarity and crypt-cyst formation in human colon cancer cells. These findings suggest that, as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer, KLF4 affects intestinal epithelial cell

  1. Effect of atomic noise on optical squeezing via polarization self-rotation in a thermal vapor cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, M.T.L.; Hetet, G.; Peng, A.

    2006-01-01

    The traversal of an elliptically polarized optical field through a thermal vapor cell can give rise to a rotation of its polarization axis. This process, known as polarization self-rotation (PSR), has been suggested as a mechanism for producing squeezed light at atomic transition wavelengths. We...

  2. PrPC Undergoes Basal to Apical Transcytosis in Polarized Epithelial MDCK Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Arkhipenko

    Full Text Available The Prion Protein (PrP is an ubiquitously expressed glycosylated membrane protein attached to the external leaflet of the plasma membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor (GPI. While the misfolded PrPSc scrapie isoform is the infectious agent of prion disease, the cellular isoform (PrPC is an enigmatic protein with unclear function. Of interest, PrP localization in polarized MDCK cells is controversial and its mechanism of trafficking is not clear. Here we investigated PrP traffic in MDCK cells polarized on filters and in three-dimensional MDCK cysts, a more physiological model of polarized epithelia. We found that, unlike other GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs, PrP undergoes basolateral-to-apical transcytosis in fully polarized MDCK cells. Following this event full-length PrP and its cleavage fragments are segregated in different domains of the plasma membrane in polarized cells in both 2D and 3D cultures.

  3. Lactobacilli activate human dendritic cells that skew T cells toward T helper 1 polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Olson, Scott; Kalina, Warren V; Ruthel, Gordon; Demmin, Gretchen L; Warfield, Kelly L; Bavari, Sina; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2005-02-22

    Professional antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) are critical in regulating T cell immune responses at both systemic and mucosal sites. Many Lactobacillus species are normal members of the human gut microflora and most are regarded as safe when administered as probiotics. Because DCs can naturally or therapeutically encounter lactobacilli, we investigated the effects of several well defined strains, representing three species of Lactobacillus on human myeloid DCs (MDCs) and found that they modulated the phenotype and functions of human MDCs. Lactobacillus-exposed MDCs up-regulated HLA-DR, CD83, CD40, CD80, and CD86 and secreted high levels of IL-12 and IL-18, but not IL-10. IL-12 was sustained in MDCs exposed to all three Lactobacillus species in the presence of LPS from Escherichia coli, whereas LPS-induced IL-10 was greatly inhibited. MDCs activated with lactobacilli clearly skewed CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells to T helper 1 and Tc1 polarization, as evidenced by secretion of IFN-gamma, but not IL-4 or IL-13. These results emphasize a potentially important role for lactobacilli in modulating immunological functions of DCs and suggest that certain strains could be particularly advantageous as vaccine adjuvants, by promoting DCs to regulate T cell responses toward T helper 1 and Tc1 pathways.

  4. Vimentin intermediate filaments template microtubule networks to enhance persistence in cell polarity and directed migration

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Zhuo; Ding, Liya; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Lowery, Jason; Zaritsky, Assaf; Sitterley, Karlyndsay; Mota, Andressa; Costigliola, Nancy; Starker, Colby G.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Tytell, Jessica; Goldman, Robert D.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF) enhances directed cell migration, but the mechanism behind VIF’s effect on motility is not understood. VIF interact with microtubules, whose organization contributes to polarity maintenance in migrating cells. Here we characterize the dynamic coordination of VIF and microtubule networks in wounded monolayers of Retinal Pigment Epithelial cells. By genome editing we fluorescently labelled endogenous vimentin and α-...

  5. Polarization Curve of a Non-Uniformly Aged PEM Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Kulikovsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a semi-analytical model for polarization curve of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cell with distributed (aged along the oxygen channel MEA transport and kinetic parameters of the membrane–electrode assembly (MEA. We show that the curve corresponding to varying along the channel parameter, in general, does not reduce to the curve for a certain constant value of this parameter. A possibility to determine the shape of the deteriorated MEA parameter along the oxygen channel by fitting the model equation to the cell polarization data is demonstrated.

  6. Cdc42 is not essential for filopodium formation, directed migration, cell polarization, and mitosis in fibroblastoid cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czuchra, Aleksandra; Wu, Xunwei; Meyer, Hannelore

    2005-01-01

    Cdc42 is a small GTPase involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and cell polarity. To test whether Cdc42 has an essential role in the formation of filopodia or directed cell migration, we generated Cdc42-deficient fibroblastoid cells by conditional gene inactivation. We report here that loss...... of Cdc42 did not affect filopodium or lamellipodium formation and had no significant influence on the speed of directed migration nor on mitosis. Cdc42-deficient cells displayed a more elongated cell shape and had a reduced area. Furthermore, directionality during migration and reorientation of the Golgi...... apparatus into the direction of migration was decreased. However, expression of dominant negative Cdc42 in Cdc42-null cells resulted in strongly reduced directed migration, severely reduced single cell directionality, and complete loss of Golgi polarization and of directionality of protrusion formation...

  7. Rap1 integrates tissue polarity, lumen formation, and tumorigenicpotential in human breast epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Masahiko; Nelson, Celeste M.; Myers, Connie A.; Bissell,Mina J.

    2006-09-29

    Maintenance of apico-basal polarity in normal breast epithelial acini requires a balance between cell proliferation, cell death, and proper cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix signaling. Aberrations in any of these processes can disrupt tissue architecture and initiate tumor formation. Here we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is a crucial element in organizing acinar structure and inducing lumen formation. Rap1 activity in malignant HMT-3522 T4-2 cells is appreciably higher than in S1 cells, their non-malignant counterparts. Expression of dominant-negative Rap1 resulted in phenotypic reversion of T4-2 cells, led to formation of acinar structures with correct apico-basal polarity, and dramatically reduced tumor incidence despite the persistence of genomic abnormalities. The resulting acini contained prominent central lumina not observed when other reverting agents were used. Conversely, expression of dominant-active Rap1 in T4-2 cells inhibited phenotypic reversion and led to increased invasiveness and tumorigenicity. Thus, Rap1 acts as a central regulator of breast architecture, with normal levels of activation instructing apical polarity during acinar morphogenesis, and increased activation inducing tumor formation and progression to malignancy.

  8. Evolution and development of hair cell polarity and efferent function in the inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienknecht, Ulrike J; Köppl, Christine; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The function of the inner ear critically depends on mechanoelectrically transducing hair cells and their afferent and efferent innervation. The first part of this review presents data on the evolution and development of polarized vertebrate hair cells that generate a sensitive axis for mechanical stimulation, an essential part of the function of hair cells. Beyond the cellular level, a coordinated alignment of polarized hair cells across a sensory epithelium, a phenomenon called planar cell polarity (PCP), is essential for the organ's function. The coordinated alignment of hair cells leads to hair cell orientation patterns that are characteristic of the different sensory epithelia of the vertebrate inner ear. Here, we review the developmental mechanisms that potentially generate molecular and morphological asymmetries necessary for the control of PCP. In the second part, this review concentrates on the evolution, development and function of the enigmatic efferent neurons terminating on hair cells. We present evidence suggestive of efferents being derived from motoneurons and synapsing predominantly onto a unique but ancient cholinergic receptor. A review of functional data shows that the plesiomorphic role of the efferent system likely was to globally shut down and protect the peripheral sensors, be they vestibular, lateral line or auditory hair cells, from desensitization and damage during situations of self-induced sensory overload. The addition of a dedicated auditory papilla in land vertebrates appears to have favored the separation of vestibular and auditory efferents and specializations for more sophisticated and more diverse functions. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. n3 PUFAs Reduce Mouse CD4+ T-Cell Ex Vivo Polarization into Th17 Cells123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Jennifer M.; Hou, Tim Y.; Turk, Harmony F.; McMurray, David N.; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of n3 (ω3) PUFAs on polarization of CD4+ T cells into effector subsets other than Th1 and Th2. We assessed the effects of dietary fat [corn oil (CO) vs. fish oil (FO)] and fermentable fiber [cellulose (C) vs. pectin (P)] (2 × 2 design) in male C57BL/6 mice fed CO-C, CO-P, FO-C, or FO-P diets for 3 wk on the ex vivo polarization of purified splenic CD4+ T cells (using magnetic microbeads) into regulatory T cells [Tregs; forkhead box P3 (Foxp3+) cells] or Th17 cells [interleukin (IL)-17A+ and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR) γτ+ cells] by flow cytometry. Treg polarization was unaffected by diet; however, FO independently reduced the percentage of both CD4+ IL-17A+ (P diets enriched in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or DHA + EPA similarly reduced Th17-cell polarization in comparison to CO by reducing expression of the Th17-cell signature cytokine (IL-17A; P = 0.0015) and transcription factor (RORγτ P = 0.02), whereas Treg polarization was unaffected. Collectively, these data show that n3 PUFAs exert a direct effect on the development of Th17 cells in healthy mice, implicating a novel n3 PUFA–dependent, anti-inflammatory mechanism of action via the suppression of the initial development of this inflammatory T-cell subset. PMID:23864512

  10. Proliferative effects of apical, but not basal, matrix metalloproteinase-7 activity in polarized MDCK cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrell, Permila C.; McCawley, Lisa J.; Fingleton, Barbara; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Matrisian, Lynn M.

    2005-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is primarily expressed in glandular epithelium. Therefore, its mechanism of action may be influenced by its regulated vectorial release to either the apical and/or basolateral compartments, where it would act on its various substrates. To gain a better understanding of where MMP-7 is released in polarized epithelium, we have analyzed its pattern of secretion in polarized MDCK cells expressing stably transfected human MMP-7 (MDCK-MMP-7), and HCA-7 and Caco2 human colon cancer cell lines. In all cell lines, latent MMP-7 was secreted to both cellular compartments, but was 1.5- to 3-fold more abundant in the basolateral compartment as compared to the apical. However, studies in the MDCK system demonstrated that MMP-7 activity was 2-fold greater in the apical compartment of MDCK-MMP-7 HIGH -polarized monolayers, which suggests the apical co-release of an MMP-7 activator. In functional assays, MMP-7 over-expression increased cell saturation density as a result of increased cell proliferation with no effect on apoptosis. Apical MMP-7 activity was shown to be responsible for the proliferative effect, which occurred, as demonstrated by media transfer experiments, through cleavage of an apical substrate and not through the generation of a soluble factor. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the importance of MMP-7 secretion in relation to its mechanism of action when expressed in a polarized epithelium

  11. IKKα Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis by Limiting Recruitment of M1-like Polarized Myeloid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan I. Göktuna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment of immune cells into solid tumors is an essential prerequisite of tumor development. Depending on the prevailing polarization profile of these infiltrating leucocytes, tumorigenesis is either promoted or blocked. Here, we identify IκB kinase α (IKKα as a central regulator of a tumoricidal microenvironment during intestinal carcinogenesis. Mice deficient in IKKα kinase activity are largely protected from intestinal tumor development that is dependent on the enhanced recruitment of interferon γ (IFNγ-expressing M1-like myeloid cells. In IKKα mutant mice, M1-like polarization is not controlled in a cell-autonomous manner but, rather, depends on the interplay of both IKKα mutant tumor epithelia and immune cells. Because therapies aiming at the tumor microenvironment rather than directly at the mutated cancer cell may circumvent resistance development, we suggest IKKα as a promising target for colorectal cancer (CRC therapy.

  12. The role of secretory and endocytic pathways in the maintenance of cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Su Fen; Fölsch, Heike

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial cells line virtually every organ cavity in the body and are important for vectorial transport through epithelial monolayers such as nutrient uptake or waste product excretion. Central to these tasks is the establishment of epithelial cell polarity. During organ development, epithelial cells set up two biochemically distinct plasma membrane domains, the apical and the basolateral domain. Targeting of correct constituents to each of these regions is essential for maintaining epithelial cell polarity. Newly synthesized transmembrane proteins destined for the basolateral or apical membrane domain are sorted into separate transport carriers either at the TGN (trans-Golgi network) or in perinuclear REs (recycling endosomes). After initial delivery, transmembrane proteins, such as nutrient receptors, frequently undergo multiple rounds of endocytosis followed by re-sorting in REs. Recent work in epithelial cells highlights the REs as a potent sorting station with different subdomains representing individual targeting zones that facilitate the correct surface delivery of transmembrane proteins.

  13. Requirement for Dlgh-1 in planar cell polarity and skeletogenesis during vertebrate development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene Rivera

    Full Text Available The development of specialized organs is tightly linked to the regulation of cell growth, orientation, migration and adhesion during embryogenesis. In addition, the directed movements of cells and their orientation within the plane of a tissue, termed planar cell polarity (PCP, appear to be crucial for the proper formation of the body plan. In Drosophila embryogenesis, Discs large (dlg plays a critical role in apical-basal cell polarity, cell adhesion and cell proliferation. Craniofacial defects in mice carrying an insertional mutation in Dlgh-1 suggest that Dlgh-1 is required for vertebrate development. To determine what roles Dlgh-1 plays in vertebrate development, we generated mice carrying a null mutation in Dlgh-1. We found that deletion of Dlgh-1 caused open eyelids, open neural tube, and misorientation of cochlear hair cell stereociliary bundles, indicative of defects in planar cell polarity (PCP. Deletion of Dlgh-1 also caused skeletal defects throughout the embryo. These findings identify novel roles for Dlgh-1 in vertebrates that differ from its well-characterized roles in invertebrates and suggest that the Dlgh-1 null mouse may be a useful animal model to study certain human congenital birth defects.

  14. Effect of Polarization on Airway Epithelial Conditioning of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papazian, Dick; Chhoden, Tashi; Arge, Maria

    2015-01-01

    ' immunoregulatory properties; thus, previous observations obtained using traditional setups should be considered with caution. Using the optimized setup, AEC conditioning of MDDCs led to increased expression of programmed death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1), Immunoglobulin-Like Transcript 3, CD40, CD80 and CD23...... were allowed to polarize on filter inserts, and MDDCs were allowed to adhere to the epithelial basal side. In an optimized setup, the cell application was reversed, and the culture conditions were modified to preserve cellular polarization and integrity. These two parameters were crucial for the MDDCs...... to sample allergens administered to the apical side. Allergen uptake depended on both polarization and the nature of the allergen. AEC conditioning led to decreased birch allergen-specific proliferation of autologous T cells and a trend toward decreased secretion of the Th2-specific cytokines IL-5 and IL-13...

  15. Planar Cell Polarity Breaks the Symmetry of PAR Protein Distribution prior to Mitosis in Drosophila Sensory Organ Precursor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Charlotte; Bernard, Fred; Corson, Francis; Rouault, Hervé; Reynaud, Elodie; Keder, Alyona; Mazouni, Khalil; Schweisguth, François

    2015-04-20

    During development, cell-fate diversity can result from the unequal segregation of fate determinants at mitosis. Polarization of the mother cell is essential for asymmetric cell division (ACD). It often involves the formation of a cortical domain containing the PAR complex proteins Par3, Par6, and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC). In the fly notum, sensory organ precursor cells (SOPs) divide asymmetrically within the plane of the epithelium and along the body axis to generate two distinct cells. Fate asymmetry depends on the asymmetric localization of the PAR complex. In the absence of planar cell polarity (PCP), SOPs divide with a random planar orientation but still asymmetrically, showing that PCP is dispensable for PAR asymmetry at mitosis. To study when and how the PAR complex localizes asymmetrically, we have used a quantitative imaging approach to measure the planar polarization of the proteins Bazooka (Baz, fly Par3), Par6, and aPKC in living pupae. By using imaging of functional GFP-tagged proteins with image processing and computational modeling, we find that Baz, Par6, and aPKC become planar polarized prior to mitosis in a manner independent of the AuroraA kinase and that PCP is required for the planar polarization of Baz, Par6, and aPKC during interphase. This indicates that a "mitosis rescue" mechanism establishes asymmetry at mitosis in PCP mutants. This study therefore identifies PCP as the initial symmetry-breaking signal for the planar polarization of PAR proteins in asymmetrically dividing SOPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The subapical compartment and its role in intracellular trafficking and cell polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Maier, Olaf; Van Der Wouden, Johanna M.; Hoekstra, Dick

    In polarized epithelial cells and hepatocytes, apical and basolateral plasma membrane surfaces are maintained, each displaying a distinct molecular composition. In recent years, it has become apparent that a subapical compartment, referred to as SAC, plays a prominent if not crucial role in the

  17. LKB1 and AMPK Family Signaling: The Intimate Link Between Cell Polarity and Energy Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Marnix; ten Klooster, Jean Paul; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Clevers, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Jansen M, ten Klooster JP, Offerhaus GJ, Clevers H. LKB1 and AMPK Family Signaling: The Intimate Link Between Cell Polarity and Energy Metabolism. Physiol Rev 89: 777-798, 2009; doi:10.1152/physrev.00026.2008. Research on the LKB1 tumor suppressor protein mutated in cancer-prone Peutz-Jeghers

  18. TH1 and TH2 cell polarization increases with aging and is modulated by zinc supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    TH1 and TH2 cell polarization increases with aging and is modulated by zinc supplementation correspondence: Corresponding author. Tel.: +49 241 8080208; fax: +49 241 8082613. (Rink, Lothar) (Rink, Lothar) Institute of Immunology, University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University - Aachen--> - GERMANY (Uciechowski, Peter) Institute of Immunology, University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University - Aachen--> - GERMAN...

  19. Apical–basal polarity: why plant cells don't stand on their heads

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Friml, J.; Benfey, P.; Benková, E.; Bennett, M. D.; Berleth, T.; Geldner, N.; Grebe, M.; Heisler, M.; Hejátko, J.; Jürgens, G.; Laux, T.; Lindsey, K.; Lukowitz, W.; Luschnig, Ch.; Offringa, R.; Scheres, B.; Swarup, R.; Torres-Ruiz, R.; Weijers, D.; Zažímalová, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2006), s. 12-14 ISSN 1360-1385 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6038303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Apical * Basal * Polarity of plant cell Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 8.000, year: 2006

  20. Mutation of the planar cell polarity gene VANGL1 in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Malene Rask; Farooq, Muhammad; Rasmussen, Karen Koefoed

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Mutation analysis of a candidate disease gene in a cohort of patients with moderate to severe Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). OBJECTIVE: To investigate if damaging mutations in the planar cell polarity gene VANGL1 could be identified in AIS patients. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA...

  1. Measurement of cell wall depolarization of polarized hydrogen gas targets in a weak magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.S.; Haeberli, W.

    1994-01-01

    Polarized gas targets using windowless storage cells are being developed for use as internal targets in medium and high energy particle storage rings. Tests were conducted to evaluate wall depolarization for different cell wall materials. Measurements of the target polarization were made on polarized vector H 0 gas targets in a weak magnetic field. Fifteen materials were tested in geometries corresponding to different average number of wall collisions, N 0 , from 40 to 380 collisions, for wall temperatures, T, from 20 K to 300 K. A method was developed to measure the polarization of a vector H 0 target in a 0.5 mT field: a beam of 50 keV D + picks up electrons from the target gas and the vector D 0 acquires a tensor polarization, p zz , which is measured by means of the 3 H( vector d, n) 4 He reaction. A simple model for depolarization at surfaces is proposed. Comparison to the data shows fair agreement, but the model is unrealistic in that it does not include the effects of the recombination of atoms on the surface to form molecules. ((orig.))

  2. Mathematical modeling of planar cell polarity signaling in the Drosophila melanogaster wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling refers to the coordinated polarization of cells within the plane of various epithelial tissues to generate sub-cellular asymmetry along an axis orthogonal to their apical-basal axes. For example, in the Drosophila wing, PCP is seen in the parallel orientation of hairs that protrude from each of the approximately 30,000 epithelial cells to robustly point toward the wing tip. Through a poorly understood mechanism, cell clones mutant for some PCP signaling components, including some, but not all alleles of the receptor frizzled, cause polarity disruptions of neighboring, wild-type cells, a phenomenon referred to as domineering nonautonomy. Previous models have proposed diffusible factors to explain nonautonomy, but no such factors have yet been found. This dissertation describes the mathematical modeling of PCP in the Drosophila wing, based on a contact dependent signaling hypothesis derived from experimental results. Intuition alone is insufficient to deduce that this hypothesis, which relies on a local feedback loop acting at the cell membrane, underlies the complex patterns observed in large fields of cells containing mutant clones, and others have argued that it cannot account for observed phenotypes. Through reaction-diffusion, partial differential equation modeling and simulation, the feedback loop is shown to fully reproduce PCP phenotypes, including domineering nonautonomy. The sufficiency of this model and the experimental validation of model predictions argue that previously proposed diffusible factors need not be invoked to explain PCP signaling and reveal how specific protein-protein interactions lead to autonomy or domineering nonautonomy. Based on these results, an ordinary differential equation model is derived to study the relationship of the feedback loop with upstream signaling components. The cadherin Fat transduces a cue to the local feedback loop, biasing the polarity direction of each cell toward the wing tip

  3. Bipolar Plasma Membrane Distribution of Phosphoinositides and Their Requirement for Auxin-Mediated Cell Polarity and Patterning in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tejos, R.; Sauer, M.; Vanneste, S.; Palacios-Gomez, M.; Li, H.; Heilmann, M.; van Wijk, R.; Vermeer, J.E.M.; Heilmann, I.; Munnik, T.; Friml, J.

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarity manifested by asymmetric distribution of cargoes, such as receptors and transporters, within the plasma membrane (PM) is crucial for essential functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell polarity (re)establishment is intimately linked to patterning processes. Despite the

  4. Polarity establishment, morphogenesis, and cultured plant cells in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1989-01-01

    Plant development entails an orderly progression of cellular events both in terms of time and geometry. There is only circumstantial evidence that, in the controlled environment of the higher plant embryo sac, gravity may play a role in embryo development. It is still not known whether or not normal embryo development and differentiation in higher plants can be expected to take place reliably and efficiently in the micro g space environment. It seems essential that more attention be given to studying aspects of reproductive biology in order to be confident that plants will survive seed to seed to seed in a space environment. Until the time arrives when successive generations of plants can be grown, the best that can be done is utilize the most appropriate systems and begin, piece meal, to accumulate information on important aspects of plant reproduction. Cultured plant cells can play an important role in these activities since they can be grown so as to be morphogenetically competent, and thus can simulate those embryogenic events more usually identified with fertilized eggs in the embryo sac of the ovule in the ovary. Also, they can be manipulated with relative ease. The extreme plasticity of such demonstrably totipotent cell systems provides a means to test environmental effects such as micro g on a potentially free-running entity. The successful manipulation and management of plant cells and propagules in space also has significance for exploitation of biotechnologies in space since such systems, perforce, are an important vehicle whereby many genetic engineering manipulations are achieved.

  5. Basolateral invasion and trafficking of Campylobacter jejuni in polarized epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieneke I Bouwman

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial diarrheal disease. Most enteropathogenic bacteria including C. jejuni can invade cultured eukaryotic cells via an actin- and/or microtubule-dependent and an energy-consuming uptake process. Recently, we identified a novel highly efficient C. jejuni invasion pathway that involves bacterial migration into the subcellular space of non-polarized epithelial cells (termed subvasion followed by invasion from the cell basis. Here we report cellular requirements of this entry mechanism and the subsequent intracellular trafficking route of C. jejuni in polarized islands of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Advanced microscopy on infected cells revealed that C. jejuni invades the polarized intestinal cells via the subcellular invasion pathway. Remarkably, invasion was not blocked by the inhibitors of microtubule dynamics colchicine or paclitaxel, and was even enhanced after disruption of host cell actin filaments by cytochalasin D. Invasion also continued after dinitrophenol-induced cellular depletion of ATP, whereas this compound effectively inhibited the uptake of invasive Escherichia coli. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that intracellular C. jejuni resided in membrane-bound CD63-positive cellular compartments for up to 24 h. Establishment of a novel luciferase reporter-based bacterial viability assay, developed to overcome the limitations of the classical bacterial recovery assay, demonstrated that a subset of C. jejuni survived intracellularly for up to 48 h. Taken together, our results indicate that C. jejuni is able to actively invade polarized intestinal epithelial cells via a novel actin- and microtubule-independent mechanism and remains metabolically active in the intracellular niche for up to 48 hours.

  6. Influenza H5N1 virus infection of polarized human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kit M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is entrenched in poultry in Asia and Africa and continues to infect humans zoonotically causing acute respiratory disease syndrome and death. There is evidence that the virus may sometimes spread beyond respiratory tract to cause disseminated infection. The primary target cell for HPAI H5N1 virus in human lung is the alveolar epithelial cell. Alveolar epithelium and its adjacent lung microvascular endothelium form host barriers to the initiation of infection and dissemination of influenza H5N1 infection in humans. These are polarized cells and the polarity of influenza virus entry and egress as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from the virus infected cells are likely to be central to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Aim To study influenza A (H5N1 virus replication and host innate immune responses in polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells and its relevance to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Methods We use an in vitro model of polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells grown in transwell culture inserts to compare infection with influenza A subtype H1N1 and H5N1 viruses via the apical or basolateral surfaces. Results We demonstrate that both influenza H1N1 and H5N1 viruses efficiently infect alveolar epithelial cells from both apical and basolateral surface of the epithelium but release of newly formed virus is mainly from the apical side of the epithelium. In contrast, influenza H5N1 virus, but not H1N1 virus, efficiently infected polarized microvascular endothelial cells from both apical and basolateral aspects. This provides a mechanistic explanation for how H5N1 virus may infect the lung from systemic circulation. Epidemiological evidence has implicated ingestion of virus-contaminated foods as the source of infection in some instances and our

  7. Apolar and polar transitions drive the conversion between amoeboid and mesenchymal shapes in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sam; Sadok, Amine; Bousgouni, Vicky; Bakal, Chris

    2015-11-05

    Melanoma cells can adopt two functionally distinct forms, amoeboid and mesenchymal, which facilitates their ability to invade and colonize diverse environments during the metastatic process. Using quantitative imaging of single living tumor cells invading three-dimensional collagen matrices, in tandem with unsupervised computational analysis, we found that melanoma cells can switch between amoeboid and mesenchymal forms via two different routes in shape space--an apolar and polar route. We show that whereas particular Rho-family GTPases are required for the morphogenesis of amoeboid and mesenchymal forms, others are required for transitions via the apolar or polar route and not amoeboid or mesenchymal morphogenesis per se. Altering the transition rates between particular routes by depleting Rho-family GTPases can change the morphological heterogeneity of cell populations. The apolar and polar routes may have evolved in order to facilitate conversion between amoeboid and mesenchymal forms, as cells are either searching for, or attracted to, particular migratory cues, respectively. © 2015 Cooper et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. Keeping Your Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Exercise/Safe Movement › Keeping Your Balance Keeping Your Balance Balance is very important for people with osteoporosis. Your ... all play an important role in maintaining your balance and preventing broken bones. Medical conditions and medicines ...

  9. New, simple theory-based, accurate polarization microscope for birefringence imaging of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, In Hee; Shin, Sang-Mo; Kim, Dug Young

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new, simple theory-based, accurate polarization microscope for birefringence imaging of cytoskeletal structures of biological cells. The new theory lets us calculate very easily the phase retardation and the orientation of the principal axis of a particular area of a biological living cell in media by simply measuring the intensity variation of a pixel of a CCD camera while rotating a single polarizer. Just from the measured intensity maxima and minima, the amount of phase retardation δ between the fast and the slow axis of the sample area is obtained with an accuracy of 5.010+/-0.798×10-3 rad. The orientation of the principal axis is calculated from the angle of the polarizer for the intensity maximum. We have compared our microscopes with two previously reported polarization microscopes for birefringence imaging of cytoskeletal structures and demonstrated the utility of our microscope with the phase retardation and orientation images of weakly invasive MCF7 and highly invasive MDA MB 231 human breast cancer cells as an example.

  10. Concomitant use of polarization and positive phase contrast microscopy for the study of microbial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žižka, Zdeněk; Gabriel, Jiří

    2015-11-01

    Polarization and positive phase contrast microscope were concomitantly used in the study of the internal structure of microbial cells. Positive phase contrast allowed us to view even the fine cell structure with a refractive index approaching that of the surrounding environment, e.g., the cytoplasm, and transferred the invisible phase image to a visible amplitude image. With polarization microscopy, crossed polarizing filters together with compensators and a rotary stage showed the birefringence of different cell structures. Material containing algae was collected in ponds in Sýkořice and Zbečno villages (Křivoklát region). The objects were studied in laboratory microscopes LOMO MIN-8 Sankt Petersburg and Polmi A Carl Zeiss Jena fitted with special optics for positive phase contrast, polarizers, analyzers, compensators, rotary stages, and digital SLR camera Nikon D 70 for image capture. Anisotropic granules were found in the cells of flagellates of the order Euglenales, in green algae of the orders Chlorococcales and Chlorellales, and in desmid algae of the order Desmidiales. The cell walls of filamentous algae of the orders Zygnematales and Ulotrichales were found to exhibit significant birefringence; in addition, relatively small amounts of small granules were found in the cytoplasm. A typical shape-related birefringence of the cylindrical walls and the septa between the cells differed in intensity, which was especially apparent when using a Zeiss compensator RI-c during its successive double setting. In conclusion, the anisotropic granules found in the investigated algae mostly showed strong birefringence and varied in number, size, and location of the cells. Representatives of the order Chlorococcales contained the highest number of granules per cell, and the size of these granules was almost double than that of the other monitored microorganisms. Very strong birefringence was exhibited by cell walls of filamentous algae; it differed in the intensity

  11. Participation of the cell polarity protein PALS1 to T-cell receptor-mediated NF-κB activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Carvalho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Beside their established function in shaping cell architecture, some cell polarity proteins were proposed to participate to lymphocyte migration, homing, scanning, as well as activation following antigen receptor stimulation. Although PALS1 is a central component of the cell polarity network, its expression and function in lymphocytes remains unknown. Here we investigated whether PALS1 is present in T cells and whether it contributes to T Cell-Receptor (TCR-mediated activation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By combining RT-PCR and immunoblot assays, we found that PALS1 is constitutively expressed in human T lymphocytes as well as in Jurkat T cells. siRNA-based knockdown of PALS1 hampered TCR-induced activation and optimal proliferation of lymphocyte. We further provide evidence that PALS1 depletion selectively hindered TCR-driven activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. CONCLUSIONS: The cell polarity protein PALS1 is expressed in T lymphocytes and participates to the optimal activation of NF-κB following TCR stimulation.

  12. Polarization of migrating monocytic cells is independent of PI 3-kinase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Volpe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migration of mammalian cells is a complex cell type and environment specific process. Migrating hematopoietic cells assume a rapid amoeboid like movement when exposed to gradients of chemoattractants. The underlying signaling mechanisms remain controversial with respect to localization and distribution of chemotactic receptors within the plasma membrane and the role of PI 3-kinase activity in cell polarization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a novel model for the investigation of human leukocyte migration. Monocytic THP-1 cells transfected with the alpha(2A-adrenoceptor (alpha(2AAR display comparable signal transduction responses, such as calcium mobilization, MAP-kinase activation and chemotaxis, to the noradrenaline homologue UK 14'304 as when stimulated with CCL2, which binds to the endogenous chemokine receptor CCR2. Time-lapse video microscopy reveals that chemotactic receptors remain evenly distributed over the plasma membrane and that their internalization is not required for migration. Measurements of intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET of alpha(2AAR-YFP/CFP suggest a uniform activation of the receptors over the entire plasma membrane. Nevertheless, PI 3-kinase activation is confined to the leading edge. When reverting the gradient of chemoattractant by moving the dispensing micropipette, polarized monocytes--in contrast to neutrophils--rapidly flip their polarization axis by developing a new leading edge at the previous posterior side. Flipping of the polarization axis is accompanied by re-localization of PI-3-kinase activity to the new leading edge. However, reversal of the polarization axis occurs in the absence of PI 3-kinase activation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Accumulation and internalization of chemotactic receptors at the leading edge is dispensable for cell migration. Furthermore, uniformly distributed receptors allow the cells to rapidly reorient and adapt to changes in the

  13. Nuclear fallout provides a new link between aPKC and polarized cell trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero-Cuenca, Francisco J; Espinosa-Vázquez, José Manuel; Reina-Campos, Miguel; Díaz-Meco, María T; Moscat, Jorge; Sotillos, Sol

    2016-04-18

    Cell polarity, essential for cell physiology and tissue coherence, emerges as a consequence of asymmetric localization of protein complexes and directional trafficking of cellular components. Although molecules required in both processes are well known their relationship is still poorly understood. Here we show a molecular link between Nuclear Fallout (Nuf), an adaptor of Rab11-GTPase to the microtubule motor proteins during Recycling Endosome (RE) trafficking, and aPKC, a pivotal kinase in the regulation of cell polarity. We demonstrate that aPKC phosphorylates Nuf modifying its subcellular distribution. Accordingly, in aPKC mutants Nuf and Rab11 accumulate apically indicating altered RE delivery. We show that aPKC localization in the apico-lateral cortex is dynamic. When we block exocytosis, by means of exocyst-sec mutants, aPKC accumulates inside the cells. Moreover, apical aPKC concentration is reduced in nuf mutants, suggesting aPKC levels are maintained by recycling. We demonstrate that active aPKC interacts with Nuf, phosphorylating it and, as a result, modifying its subcellular distribution. We propose a regulatory loop by which Nuf promotes aPKC apical recycling until sufficient levels of active aPKC are reached. Thus, we provide a novel link between cell polarity regulation and traffic control in epithelia.

  14. Trafficking through COPII stabilises cell polarity and drives secretion during Drosophila epidermal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Norum

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of an extracellular matrix (ECM at the apical side of epithelial cells implies massive polarised secretion and membrane trafficking. An epithelial cell is hence engaged in coordinating secretion and cell polarity for a correct and efficient ECM formation.We are studying the molecular mechanisms that Drosophila tracheal and epidermal cells deploy to form their specific apical ECM during differentiation. In this work we demonstrate that the two genetically identified factors haunted and ghost are essential for polarity maintenance, membrane topology as well as for secretion of the tracheal luminal matrix and the cuticle. We show that they code for the Drosophila COPII vesicle-coating components Sec23 and Sec24, respectively, that organise vesicle transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus.Taken together, epithelial differentiation during Drosophila embryogenesis is a concerted action of ECM formation, plasma membrane remodelling and maintenance of cell polarity that all three rely mainly, if not absolutely, on the canonical secretory pathway from the ER over the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane. Our results indicate that COPII vesicles constitute a central hub for these processes.

  15. ErbB receptors and cell polarity: New pathways and paradigms for understanding cell migration and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigin, Michael E.; Muthuswamy, Senthil K.

    2009-01-01

    The ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases is involved in initiation and progression of a number of human cancers, and receptor activation or overexpression correlates with poor patient survival. Research over the past two decades has elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying ErbB-induced tumorigenesis, which has resulted in the development of effective targeted therapies. ErbB-induced signal transduction cascades regulate a wide variety of cell processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell polarity, migration and invasion. Within tumors, disruption of these core processes, through cooperative oncogenic lesions, results in aggressive, metastatic disease. This review will focus on the ErbB signaling networks that regulate migration and invasion and identify a potential role for cell polarity pathways during cancer progression

  16. Ultrastructural analyses of somatic embryo initiation, development and polarity establishment from mesophyll cells of Dactylis glomerata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilenko, A.; McDaniel, J. K.; Conger, B. V.

    2000-01-01

    Somatic embryos initiate and develop directly from single mesophyll cells in in vitro-cultured leaf segments of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.). Embryogenic cells establish themselves in the predivision stage by formation of thicker cell walls and dense cytoplasm. Electron microscopy observations for embryos ranging from the pre-cell-division stage to 20-cell proembryos confirm previous light microscopy studies showing a single cell origin. They also confirm that the first division is predominantly periclinal and that this division plane is important in establishing embryo polarity and in determining the embryo axis. If the first division is anticlinal or if divisions are in random planes after the first division, divisions may not continue to produce an embryo. This result may produce an embryogenic cell mass, callus formation, or no structure at all. Grant numbers: NAGW-3141, NAG10-0221.

  17. Diacylglycerol Kinases: Shaping Diacylglycerol and Phosphatidic Acid Gradients to Control Cell Polarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Baldanzi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs terminate diacylglycerol (DAG signaling and promote phosphatidic acid (PA production. Isoform specific regulation of DGKs activity and localization allows DGKs to shape the DAG and PA gradients. The capacity of DGKs to constrain the areas of DAG signaling is exemplified by their role in defining the contact interface between T cells and antigen presenting cells: the immune synapse. Upon T cell receptor engagement, both DGK α and ζ metabolize DAG at the immune synapse thus constraining DAG signaling. Interestingly, their activity and localization are not fully redundant because DGKζ activity metabolizes the bulk of DAG in the cell, whereas DGKα limits the DAG signaling area localizing specifically at the periphery of the immune synapse.When DGKs terminate DAG signaling, the local PA production defines a new signaling domain, where PA recruits and activates a second wave of effector proteins. The best-characterized example is the role of DGKs in protrusion elongation and cell migration. Indeed, upon growth factor stimulation, several DGK isoforms, such as α, ζ, and γ, are recruited and activated at the plasma membrane. Here, local PA production controls cell migration by finely modulating cytoskeletal remodeling and integrin recycling. Interestingly, DGK-produced PA also controls the localization and activity of key players in cell polarity such as aPKC, Par3, and integrin β1. Thus, T cell polarization and directional migration may be just two instances of the general contribution of DGKs to the definition of cell polarity by local specification of membrane identity signaling.

  18. A Kinome RNAi Screen in Drosophila Identifies Novel Genes Interacting with Lgl, aPKC, and Crb Cell Polarity Genes in Epithelial Tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsons, Linda M.; Grzeschik, Nicola A; Amaratunga, Kasun; Burke, Peter; Quinn, Leonie M; Richardson, Helena E

    2017-01-01

    In both Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian systems, epithelial structure and underlying cell polarity are essential for proper tissue morphogenesis and organ growth. Cell polarity interfaces with multiple cellular processes that are regulated by the phosphorylation status of large protein

  19. Comparison of clinical grade type 1 polarized and standard matured dendritic cells for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Donia, Marco

    2013-01-01

    induction of type 1 effector T cells. Standard matured clinical grade DCs “sDCs” were compared with DCs matured with either of two type 1 polarizing maturation cocktails; the alpha-type-1 DCs “αDC1s” (TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ, IFN-α, Poly(I:C)) and “mDCs” (monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), IFN-γ) or a mixed cocktail....... αDC1s and mDCs were functionally superior to sDCs as they polarized naïve CD4+ T cells most efficiently into T helper type 1 effector cells and primed more functional MART-1 specific CD8+ T cells although with variation between donors. αDC1s and mDCs were transiently less capable of CCL21-directed......DCs and strikingly had the highest expression of the inhibitory molecules PD-L1 and CD25. Thus, further studies with type 1 polarized DCs are warranted for use in immunotherapy, but when combined with PGE2 as in mpDCs, they seems to be less optimal for maturation of DCs....

  20. Neuropeptide Y induces potent migration of human immature dendritic cells and promotes a Th2 polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttari, Brigitta; Profumo, Elisabetta; Domenici, Giacomo; Tagliani, Angela; Ippoliti, Flora; Bonini, Sergio; Businaro, Rita; Elenkov, Ilia; Riganò, Rachele

    2014-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a major autonomic nervous system and stress mediator, is emerging as an important regulator of inflammation, implicated in autoimmunity, asthma, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Yet the role of NPY in regulating phenotype and functions of dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen-presenting cells, remains undefined. Here we investigated whether NPY could induce DCs to migrate, mature, and polarize naive T lymphocytes. We found that NPY induced a dose-dependent migration of human monocyte-derived immature DCs through the engagement of NPY Y1 receptor and the activation of ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases. NPY promoted DC adhesion to endothelial cells and transendothelial migration. It failed to induce phenotypic DC maturation, whereas it conferred a T helper 2 (Th2) polarizing profile to DCs through the up-regulation of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 production. Thus, during an immune/inflammatory response NPY may exert proinflammatory effects through the recruitment of immature DCs, but it may exert antiinflammatory effects by promoting a Th2 polarization. Locally, at inflammatory sites, cell recruitment could be amplified in conditions of intense acute, chronic, or cold stress. Thus, altered or amplified signaling through the NPY-NPY-Y1 receptor-DC axis may have implications for the development of inflammatory conditions.-Buttari, B., Profumo, E., Domenici, G., Tagliani, A., Ippoliti, F., Bonini, S., Businaro, R., Elenkov, I., Riganò, R. Neuropeptide Y induces potent migration of human immature dendritic cells and promotes a Th2 polarization. © FASEB.

  1. B Cells Producing Type I IFN Modulate Macrophage Polarization in Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénard, Alan; Sakwa, Imme; Schierloh, Pablo; Colom, André; Mercier, Ingrid; Tailleux, Ludovic; Jouneau, Luc; Boudinot, Pierre; Al-Saati, Talal; Lang, Roland; Rehwinkel, Jan; Loxton, Andre G; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Anton-Leberre, Véronique; O'Garra, Anne; Sasiain, Maria Del Carmen; Gicquel, Brigitte; Fillatreau, Simon; Neyrolles, Olivier; Hudrisier, Denis

    2018-03-15

    In addition to their well-known function as antibody-producing cells, B lymphocytes can markedly influence the course of infectious or noninfectious diseases via antibody-independent mechanisms. In tuberculosis (TB), B cells accumulate in lungs, yet their functional contribution to the host response remains poorly understood. To document the role of B cells in TB in an unbiased manner. We generated the transcriptome of B cells isolated from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected mice and validated the identified key pathways using in vitro and in vivo assays. The obtained data were substantiated using B cells from pleural effusion of patients with TB. B cells isolated from Mtb-infected mice displayed a STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 1)-centered signature, suggesting a role for IFNs in B-cell response to infection. B cells stimulated in vitro with Mtb produced type I IFN, via a mechanism involving the innate sensor STING (stimulator of interferon genes), and antagonized by MyD88 (myeloid differentiation primary response 88) signaling. In vivo, B cells expressed type I IFN in the lungs of Mtb-infected mice and, of clinical relevance, in pleural fluid from patients with TB. Type I IFN expression by B cells induced an altered polarization of macrophages toward a regulatory/antiinflammatory profile in vitro. In vivo, increased provision of type I IFN by B cells in a murine model of B cell-restricted Myd88 deficiency correlated with an enhanced accumulation of regulatory/antiinflammatory macrophages in Mtb-infected lungs. Type I IFN produced by Mtb-stimulated B cells favors macrophage polarization toward a regulatory/antiinflammatory phenotype during Mtb infection.

  2. Coupling Mechanical Deformations and Planar Cell Polarity to Create Regular Patterns in the Zebrafish Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbreux, Guillaume; Barthel, Linda K.; Raymond, Pamela A.; Lubensky, David K.

    2012-01-01

    The orderly packing and precise arrangement of epithelial cells is essential to the functioning of many tissues, and refinement of this packing during development is a central theme in animal morphogenesis. The mechanisms that determine epithelial cell shape and position, however, remain incompletely understood. Here, we investigate these mechanisms in a striking example of planar order in a vertebrate epithelium: The periodic, almost crystalline distribution of cone photoreceptors in the adult teleost fish retina. Based on observations of the emergence of photoreceptor packing near the retinal margin, we propose a mathematical model in which ordered columns of cells form as a result of coupling between planar cell polarity (PCP) and anisotropic tissue-scale mechanical stresses. This model recapitulates many observed features of cone photoreceptor organization during retinal growth and regeneration. Consistent with the model's predictions, we report a planar-polarized distribution of Crumbs2a protein in cone photoreceptors in both unperturbed and regenerated tissue. We further show that the pattern perturbations predicted by the model to occur if the imposed stresses become isotropic closely resemble defects in the cone pattern in zebrafish lrp2 mutants, in which intraocular pressure is increased, resulting in altered mechanical stress and ocular enlargement. Evidence of interactions linking PCP, cell shape, and mechanical stresses has recently emerged in a number of systems, several of which show signs of columnar cell packing akin to that described here. Our results may hence have broader relevance for the organization of cells in epithelia. Whereas earlier models have allowed only for unidirectional influences between PCP and cell mechanics, the simple, phenomenological framework that we introduce here can encompass a broad range of bidirectional feedback interactions among planar polarity, shape, and stresses; our model thus represents a conceptual framework

  3. RCAN1.4 regulates VEGFR-2 internalisation, cell polarity and migration in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghanem, Ahmad F; Wilkinson, Emma L; Emmett, Maxine S; Aljasir, Mohammad A; Holmes, Katherine; Rothermel, Beverley A; Simms, Victoria A; Heath, Victoria L; Cross, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) is an endogenous inhibitor of the calcineurin pathway in cells. It is expressed as two isoforms in vertebrates: RCAN1.1 is constitutively expressed in most tissues, whereas transcription of RCAN1.4 is induced by several stimuli that activate the calcineurin-NFAT pathway. RCAN1.4 is highly upregulated in response to VEGF in human endothelial cells in contrast to RCAN1.1 and is essential for efficient endothelial cell migration and tubular morphogenesis. Here, we show that RCAN1.4 has a role in the regulation of agonist-stimulated VEGFR-2 internalisation and establishment of endothelial cell polarity. siRNA-mediated gene silencing revealed that RCAN1 plays a vital role in regulating VEGF-mediated cytoskeletal reorganisation and directed cell migration and sprouting angiogenesis. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of RCAN1.4 resulted in increased endothelial cell migration. Antisense-mediated morpholino silencing of the zebrafish RCAN1.4 orthologue revealed a disrupted vascular development further confirming a role for the RCAN1.4 isoform in regulating vascular endothelial cell physiology. Our data suggest that RCAN1.4 plays a novel role in regulating endothelial cell migration by establishing endothelial cell polarity in response to VEGF.

  4. Kv7.1 surface expression is regulated by epithelial cell polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin N; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger

    2011-01-01

    The potassium channel K(V)7.1 is expressed in the heart where it contributes to the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. In addition, K(V)7.1 is expressed in epithelial tissues where it plays a role in salt and water transport. Mutations in the kcnq1 gene can lead to long QT syndrome...... and deafness, and several mutations have been described as trafficking mutations. To learn more about the basic mechanisms that regulate K(V)7.1 surface expression, we have investigated the trafficking of K(V)7.1 during the polarization process of the epithelial cell line Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) using...... is regulated by signaling mechanisms involved in epithelial cell polarization in particular signaling cascades involving protein kinase C and PI3K....

  5. Characterization of a pancreatic islet cell tumor in a polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Jessica S; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we report a 25-year-old male polar bear suffering from a pancreatic islet cell tumor. The aim of this report is to present a case of this rare tumor in a captive polar bear. The implication of potential risk factors such as high carbohydrate diet or the presence of amyloid fibril deposits was assessed. Necropsy examination revealed several other changes, including nodules observed in the liver, spleen, pancreas, intestine, and thyroid glands that were submitted for histopathologic analysis. Interestingly, the multiple neoplastic nodules were unrelated and included a pancreatic islet cell tumor. Immunohistochemistry of the pancreas confirmed the presence of insulin and islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) within the pancreatic islet cells. The IAPP gene was extracted from the paraffin-embedded liver tissue and sequenced. IAPP cDNA from the polar bear exhibits some differences as compared to the sequence published for several other species. Different factors responsible for neoplasms in bears such as diet, infectious agents, and industrial chemical exposure are reviewed. This case report raised several issues that further studies may address by evaluating the prevalence of cancers in captive or wild animals. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Self-organized spatiotemporal patterns of PIP3 and PTEN during spontaneous cell polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Fabian; Tarantola, Marco; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    During spontaneous cell polarization of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, PIP3 (phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphoshpate) and PTEN (phosphatase tensin homolog) have been identified as key signaling molecules, which govern the process of polarization in a self-organized manner. Gerisch et al. have shown that randomly triggered excitable PIP3 waves regulate the anti-correlated PTEN concentration. Here we show that this requires a switch-like dynamics of the overall membrane bound PTEN concentration in combination with two species of PTEN differing in their dephosphorylation rates. A quantitative modeling with a coupled reaction-diffusion system shows excellent agreement with experimental results and predicts a ratio σ of dephosphorylation rates acting on PIP3 of σ ~ 80 - 100. Our quantitative analysis suggests that surface-attached cell membrane spanning PIP3 waves are necessary for resetting the global actin network. This is evidenced by the experimentally observed delay between polarization-cycles also quantitatively captured by our analysis. Max Planck Society and Center for Theoretical Biological Physics.

  7. Knockin' on pollen's door: live cell imaging of early polarization events in germinating Arabidopsis pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Frank; Konrad, Sebastian S. A.; Sprunck, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Pollen tubes are an excellent system for studying the cellular dynamics and complex signaling pathways that coordinate polarized tip growth. Although several signaling mechanisms acting in the tip-growing pollen tube have been described, our knowledge on the subcellular and molecular events during pollen germination and growth site selection at the pollen plasma membrane is rather scarce. To simultaneously track germinating pollen from up to 12 genetically different plants we developed an inexpensive and easy mounting technique, suitable for every standard microscope setup. We performed high magnification live-cell imaging during Arabidopsis pollen activation, germination, and the establishment of pollen tube tip growth by using fluorescent marker lines labeling either the pollen cytoplasm, vesicles, the actin cytoskeleton or the sperm cell nuclei and membranes. Our studies revealed distinctive vesicle and F-actin polarization during pollen activation and characteristic growth kinetics during pollen germination and pollen tube formation. Initially, the germinating Arabidopsis pollen tube grows slowly and forms a uniform roundish bulge, followed by a transition phase with vesicles heavily accumulating at the growth site before switching to rapid tip growth. Furthermore, we found the two sperm cells to be transported into the pollen tube after the phase of rapid tip growth has been initiated. The method presented here is suitable to quantitatively study subcellular events during Arabidopsis pollen germination and growth, and for the detailed analysis of pollen mutants with respect to pollen polarization, bulging, or growth site selection at the pollen plasma membrane. PMID:25954283

  8. Effect of Toxic Components on Microbial Fuel Cell-Polarization Curves and Estimation of the Type of Toxic Inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, N.E.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Straten, van G.; Keesman, K.J.

    2012-01-01

    Polarization curves are of paramount importance for the detection of toxic components in microbial fuel cell (MFC) based biosensors. In this study, polarization curves were made under non-toxic conditions and under toxic conditions after the addition of various concentrations of nickel, bentazon,

  9. Effect of toxic components on microbial fuel cell-polarization curves and estimation of the type of toxic inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, N.E.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Straten, G. van; Keesman, K.J.

    2012-01-01

    Polarization curves are of paramount importance for the detection of toxic components in microbial fuel cell (MFC) based biosensors. In this study, polarization curves were made under non-toxic conditions and under toxic conditions after the addition of various concentrations of nickel, bentazon,

  10. Polarity of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in a human intestinal cell line (CACO-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trotter, P.J.; Storch, J. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

    1990-02-26

    Free fatty acids (ffa) can enter the intestinal cell via the apical (AP) or basolateral (BL) membrane. The authors are using the Caco-2 intestinal cell line to examine the polarity of ffa uptake and metabolism in the enterocyte. Cells are grown on permeable polycarbonate Transwell filters in order to obtain access to both AP and BL compartments. Differentiated Caco-2 cells form tight polarized monolayers which express small intestine-specific enzymes and are impermeable to the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow. Submicellar concentrations of {sup 3}H-palmitic acid (2uM) were added to AP or BL sides of Caco-2 monolayers at 37{degrees}C and cells were incubated for various times between 2 and 120 minutes. Total AP and BL uptake is similar; however, when relative membrane surface areas are accounted for, AP uptake is about 2-fold higher. The metabolism of AP and BL ffa is not significantly different: triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine account for most of the metabolites (32{plus minus}4 and 24{plus minus}2% respectively at 5 minutes). Little ffa oxidation is observed. Preincubation with albumin-bound 2-monoolein (100uM) and palmitate (50uM) increases the level of TG metabolites. The results suggest that in this cell line the uptake of AP ffa may be greater than BL ffa, but that AP (dietary) ffa and BL (plasma) ffa are metabolized similarly.

  11. Polarity of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in a human intestinal cell line (CACO-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotter, P.J.; Storch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Free fatty acids (ffa) can enter the intestinal cell via the apical (AP) or basolateral (BL) membrane. The authors are using the Caco-2 intestinal cell line to examine the polarity of ffa uptake and metabolism in the enterocyte. Cells are grown on permeable polycarbonate Transwell filters in order to obtain access to both AP and BL compartments. Differentiated Caco-2 cells form tight polarized monolayers which express small intestine-specific enzymes and are impermeable to the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow. Submicellar concentrations of 3 H-palmitic acid (2uM) were added to AP or BL sides of Caco-2 monolayers at 37 degrees C and cells were incubated for various times between 2 and 120 minutes. Total AP and BL uptake is similar; however, when relative membrane surface areas are accounted for, AP uptake is about 2-fold higher. The metabolism of AP and BL ffa is not significantly different: triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine account for most of the metabolites (32±4 and 24±2% respectively at 5 minutes). Little ffa oxidation is observed. Preincubation with albumin-bound 2-monoolein (100uM) and palmitate (50uM) increases the level of TG metabolites. The results suggest that in this cell line the uptake of AP ffa may be greater than BL ffa, but that AP (dietary) ffa and BL (plasma) ffa are metabolized similarly

  12. Polarity, cell division, and out-of-equilibrium dynamics control the growth of epithelial structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, Benedetta; Puliafito, Alberto; Shewan, Annette M.; Yu, Wei; Combes, Alexander N.; Little, Melissa H.; Chianale, Federica; Primo, Luca; Serini, Guido; Mostov, Keith E.; Celani, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The growth of a well-formed epithelial structure is governed by mechanical constraints, cellular apico-basal polarity, and spatially controlled cell division. Here we compared the predictions of a mathematical model of epithelial growth with the morphological analysis of 3D epithelial structures. In both in vitro cyst models and in developing epithelial structures in vivo, epithelial growth could take place close to or far from mechanical equilibrium, and was determined by the hierarchy of time-scales of cell division, cell–cell rearrangements, and lumen dynamics. Equilibrium properties could be inferred by the analysis of cell–cell contact topologies, and the nonequilibrium phenotype was altered by inhibiting ROCK activity. The occurrence of an aberrant multilumen phenotype was linked to fast nonequilibrium growth, even when geometric control of cell division was correctly enforced. We predicted and verified experimentally that slowing down cell division partially rescued a multilumen phenotype induced by altered polarity. These results improve our understanding of the development of epithelial organs and, ultimately, of carcinogenesis. PMID:24145168

  13. Co-regulation of cell polarization and migration by caveolar proteins PTRF/Cavin-1 and caveolin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Hill

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 and caveolae are differentially polarized in migrating cells in various models, and caveolin-1 expression has been shown to quantitatively modulate cell migration. PTRF/cavin-1 is a cytoplasmic protein now established to be also necessary for caveola formation. Here we tested the effect of PTRF expression on cell migration. Using fluorescence imaging, quantitative proteomics, and cell migration assays we show that PTRF/cavin-1 modulates cellular polarization, and the subcellular localization of Rac1 and caveolin-1 in migrating cells as well as PKCα caveola recruitment. PTRF/cavin-1 quantitatively reduced cell migration, and induced mesenchymal epithelial reversion. Similar to caveolin-1, the polarization of PTRF/cavin-1 was dependent on the migration mode. By selectively manipulating PTRF/cavin-1 and caveolin-1 expression (and therefore caveola formation in multiple cell systems, we unveil caveola-independent functions for both proteins in cell migration.

  14. Characteristics of anodic polarization of solid oxide fuel cells under pressurized conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Ryuji; Yano, Tatsuya; Eguchi, Koichi [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Takeguchi, Tatsuya [Catalysis Research Center, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan)

    2004-10-29

    AC impedance measurements were carried out under pressurized conditions by using a Ni-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/YSZ half cell in order to investigate anodic polarization at high-pressure conditions. AC impedance spectra were measured at 900 and 1000C in H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system with a constant H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ratio, or a constant partial pressure of H{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O for different total pressures of 1 to 10 atm. At high pressures, the resistance characterized by the semicircle at high frequency was lowered, whereas that at low frequency was raised. A model based on one-dimensional diffusion was developed to estimate concentration polarization based on the impedance measurements, and activation polarization was evaluated using a linear current-potential relation derived from the Butler-Volmer equation. The activation overvoltage was at most 40 mV at 10 mA/cm{sup 2}, irrespective of the total pressure. Concentration polarization was computed to increase as the total pressure was raised, whereas it was almost constant for temperature change. Large voltage drop at small current densities was calculated for the system with low partial pressure of oxygen.

  15. Human B cells induce dendritic cell maturation and favour Th2 polarization by inducing OX-40 ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddur, Mohan S.; Sharma, Meenu; Hegde, Pushpa; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Pulendran, Bali; Kaveri, Srini V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in immune homeostasis by regulating the functions of various immune cells, including T and B cells. Notably, DCs also undergo education on reciprocal signalling by these immune cells and environmental factors. Various reports demonstrated that B cells have profound regulatory functions, although only few reports have explored the regulation of human DCs by B cells. Here we demonstrate that activated but not resting B cells induce maturation of DCs with distinct features to polarize Th2 cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-5, IL-4 and IL-13. B-cell-induced maturation of DCs is contact dependent and implicates signalling of B-cell activation molecules CD69, B-cell-activating factor receptor, and transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand interactor. Mechanistically, differentiation of Th2 cells by B-cell-matured DCs is dependent on OX-40 ligand. Collectively, our results suggest that B cells have the ability to control their own effector functions by enhancing the ability of human DCs to mediate Th2 differentiation. PMID:24910129

  16. NKp46 clusters at the immune synapse and regulates NK cell polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzi eHadad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells play an important role in first-line defense against tumor and virus-infected cells. The activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by a repertoire of cell-surface expressed inhibitory and activating receptors. NKp46 is a major NK cell activating receptor that is involved in the elimination of target cells. NK cells form different types of synapses that result in distinct functional outcomes: cytotoxic, inhibitory, and regulatory. Recent studies revealed that complex integration of NK receptor signaling controls cytoskeletal rearrangement and other immune synapse-related events. However the distinct nature by which NKp46 participates in NK immunological synapse formation and function remains unknown. In this study we determined that NKp46 forms microclusters structures at the immune synapse between NK cells and target cells. Over-expression of human NKp46 is correlated with increased accumulation of F-actin mesh at the immune synapse. Concordantly, knock-down of NKp46 in primary human NK cells decreased recruitment of F-actin to the synapse. Live cell imaging experiments showed a linear correlation between NKp46 expression and lytic granules polarization to the immune synapse. Taken together, our data suggest that NKp46 signaling directly regulates the NK lytic immune synapse from early formation to late function.

  17. All-optical clocked flip-flops and random access memory cells using the nonlinear polarization rotation effect of low-polarization-dependent semiconductor optical amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xinyu; Tian, Qinghua; Wang, Lina; Xin, Xiangjun

    2018-03-01

    Basic configurations of various all-optical clocked flip-flops (FFs) and optical random access memory (RAM) based on the nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) effect of low-polarization-dependent semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) are proposed. As the constituent elements, all-optical logic gates and all-optical SR latches are constructed by taking advantage of the SOA's NPR switch. Different all-optical FFs (AOFFs), including SR-, D-, T-, and JK-types as well as an optical RAM cell were obtained by the combination of the proposed all-optical SR latches and logic gates. The effectiveness of the proposed schemes were verified by simulation results and demonstrated by a D-FF and 1-bit RAM cell experimental system. The proposed all-optical clocked FFs and RAM cell are significant to all-optical signal processing.

  18. Evolutionarily conserved sites in yeast tropomyosin function in cell polarity, transport and contractile ring formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Cranz-Mileva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tropomyosin is a coiled-coil protein that binds and regulates actin filaments. The tropomyosin gene in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cdc8, is required for formation of actin cables, contractile rings, and polar localization of actin patches. The roles of conserved residues were investigated in gene replacement mutants. The work validates an evolution-based approach to identify tropomyosin functions in living cells and sites of potential interactions with other proteins. A cdc8 mutant with near-normal actin affinity affects patch polarization and vacuole fusion, possibly by affecting Myo52p, a class V myosin, function. The presence of labile residual cell attachments suggests a delay in completion of cell division and redistribution of cell patches following cytokinesis. Another mutant with a mild phenotype is synthetic negative with GFP-fimbrin, inferring involvement of the mutated tropomyosin sites in interaction between the two proteins. Proteins that assemble in the contractile ring region before actin do so in a mutant cdc8 strain that cannot assemble condensed actin rings, yet some cells can divide. Of general significance, LifeAct-GFP negatively affects the actin cytoskeleton, indicating caution in its use as a biomarker for actin filaments.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosislpdC, Rv0462, induces dendritic cell maturation and Th1 polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Deok Rim [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Beom-eo Ri, Mulgum Eop, Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do 626-770 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Jae; Kim, Woo Sik [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Munwha-Dong, Jung-Ku, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Kyung Tae; Park, Jin Wook; Son, Kwang Hee [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Beom-eo Ri, Mulgum Eop, Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do 626-770 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won Sun [Department of Physiology, Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min-Goo [Department of Physiology, Korea University, College of Medicine, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Daejin [Department of Anatomy, Chung-Ang University, College of Medicine, 221 Heuksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yong Kyoo [Department of Pharmacology, Chung-Ang University, College of Medicine, 221 Heuksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, In Duk, E-mail: jungid@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Beom-eo Ri, Mulgum Eop, Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do 626-770 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Beom-eo Ri, Mulgum Eop, Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do 626-770 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yeong-Min, E-mail: immunpym@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Beom-eo Ri, Mulgum Eop, Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do 626-770 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Beom-eo Ri, Mulgum Eop, Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do 626-770 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Rv0462 induces the expression of surface molecules and the production of cytokines in DCs. {yields} Rv0462 induces the activation of MAPKs. {yields} Rv0462-treated DCs enhances the proliferation of CD4{sup +} T cells. -- Abstract: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological factor of pulmonary tuberculosis, causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Activation of host immune responses for containment of mycobacterial infections involves participation of innate immune cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we demonstrated that the gene encoding lipoamide dehydrogenase C (lpdC) from M. tuberculosis, Rv0462, induce maturation and activation of DCs involved in the MAPKs signaling pathway. Moreover, Rv0462-treated DCs activated naive T cells, polarized CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells to secrete IFN-{gamma} in syngeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions, which would be expected to contribute to Th1 polarization of the immune response. Our results suggest that Rv0462 can contribute to the innate and adaptive immune responses during tuberculosis infection, and thus modulate the clinical course of tuberculosis.

  20. Dystroglycan loss disrupts polarity and beta-casein induction inmammary epithelial cells by perturbing laminin anchoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, M. Lynn; Oppizzi, Maria Luisa; Henry, Michael D.; Onishi,Akiko; Campbell, Kevin P.; Bissell, Mina J.; Muschler, John L.

    2006-02-17

    Precise contact between epithelial cells and their underlying basement membrane is critical to the maintenance of tissue architecture and function. To understand the role that the laminin receptor dystroglycan (DG) plays in these processes, we assayed cell responses to laminin-111 following conditional ablation of DG expression in cultured mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Strikingly, DG loss disrupted laminin-111-induced polarity and {beta}-casein production, and abolished laminin assembly at the step of laminin binding to the cell surface. DG re-expression restored these deficiencies. Investigations of mechanism revealed that DG cytoplasmic sequences were not necessary for laminin assembly and signaling, and only when the entire mucin domain of extracellular DG was deleted did laminin assembly not occur. These results demonstrate that DG is essential as a laminin-111 co-receptor in MECs that functions by mediating laminin anchoring to the cell surface, a process that allows laminin polymerization, tissue polarity, and {beta}-casein induction. The observed loss of laminin-111 assembly and signaling in DG-/-MECs provides insights into the signaling changes occurring in breast carcinomas and other cancers, where DG's laminin-binding function is frequently defective.

  1. T cell receptor reversed polarity recognition of a self-antigen major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Dennis X; Kleijwegt, Fleur S; Wiede, Florian; van der Slik, Arno R; Loh, Khai Lee; Petersen, Jan; Dudek, Nadine L; Duinkerken, Gaby; Laban, Sandra; Joosten, Antoinette; Vivian, Julian P; Chen, Zhenjun; Uldrich, Adam P; Godfrey, Dale I; McCluskey, James; Price, David A; Radford, Kristen J; Purcell, Anthony W; Nikolic, Tatjana; Reid, Hugh H; Tiganis, Tony; Roep, Bart O; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2015-11-01

    Central to adaptive immunity is the interaction between the αβ T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule. Presumably reflecting TCR-MHC bias and T cell signaling constraints, the TCR universally adopts a canonical polarity atop the MHC. We report the structures of two TCRs, derived from human induced T regulatory (iT(reg)) cells, complexed to an MHC class II molecule presenting a proinsulin-derived peptide. The ternary complexes revealed a 180° polarity reversal compared to all other TCR-peptide-MHC complex structures. Namely, the iT(reg) TCR α-chain and β-chain are overlaid with the α-chain and β-chain of MHC class II, respectively. Nevertheless, this TCR interaction elicited a peptide-reactive, MHC-restricted T cell signal. Thus TCRs are not 'hardwired' to interact with MHC molecules in a stereotypic manner to elicit a T cell signal, a finding that fundamentally challenges our understanding of TCR recognition.

  2. CLAMP/Spef1 regulates planar cell polarity signaling and asymmetric microtubule accumulation in the Xenopus ciliated epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun K; Zhang, Siwei; Werner, Michael E; Brotslaw, Eva J; Mitchell, Jennifer W; Altabbaa, Mohamed M; Mitchell, Brian J

    2018-03-07

    Most epithelial cells polarize along the axis of the tissue, a feature known as planar cell polarity (PCP). The initiation of PCP requires cell-cell signaling via the noncanonical Wnt/PCP pathway. Additionally, changes in the cytoskeleton both facilitate and reflect this polarity. We have identified CLAMP/Spef1 as a novel regulator of PCP signaling. In addition to decorating microtubules (MTs) and the ciliary rootlet, a pool of CLAMP localizes at the apical cell cortex. Depletion of CLAMP leads to the loss of PCP protein asymmetry, defects in cilia polarity, and defects in the angle of cell division. Additionally, depletion of CLAMP leads to a loss of the atypical cadherin-like molecule Celrs2, suggesting that CLAMP facilitates the stabilization of junctional interactions responsible for proper PCP protein localization. Depletion of CLAMP also affects the polarized organization of MTs. We hypothesize that CLAMP facilitates the establishment of cell polarity and promotes the asymmetric accumulation of MTs downstream of the establishment of proper PCP. © 2018 Kim et al.

  3. Simultaneously improving optical absorption of both transverse-electric polarized and transverse-magnetic polarized light for organic solar cells with Ag grating used as transparent electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbing Long

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical simulations are performed to investigate optical performance of organic solar cells with Ag grating electrode. It is demonstrated that optical absorption for both transverse-electric (TE polarized and transverse-magnetic(TM polarized light is simultaneously improved when compared with that for the device without the Ag grating. The improvement is respectively attributed to the resonance and the surface plasmon polaritons within the device. After an additional WO3 layer is capped on the Ag grating, absorption of TE-polarized light is further improved due to resonance of double microcavities within the device, and absorption of TM-polarized light is improved by the combined effects of the microcavity resonance and the surface plasmon polaritons. Correspondingly, the short current density for randomly polarized light is improved by 18.1% from that of the device without the Ag grating. Finally, it is demonstrated that high transmission may not be an essential prerequisite for metallic gratings when they are used as transparent electrode since absorption loss caused by low transmission can be compensated by using a capping layer to optimize optical resonance of the WMC structure within the device.

  4. Kermit interacts with Gαo, Vang, and motor proteins in Drosophila planar cell polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Lin

    Full Text Available In addition to the ubiquitous apical-basal polarity, epithelial cells are often polarized within the plane of the tissue--the phenomenon known as planar cell polarity (PCP. In Drosophila, manifestations of PCP are visible in the eye, wing, and cuticle. Several components of the PCP signaling have been characterized in flies and vertebrates, including the heterotrimeric Go protein. However, Go signaling partners in PCP remain largely unknown. Using a genetic screen we uncover Kermit, previously implicated in G protein and PCP signaling, as a novel binding partner of Go. Through pull-down and genetic interaction studies, we find that Kermit interacts with Go and another PCP component Vang, known to undergo intracellular relocalization during PCP establishment. We further demonstrate that the activity of Kermit in PCP differentially relies on the motor proteins: the microtubule-based dynein and kinesin motors and the actin-based myosin VI. Our results place Kermit as a potential transducer of Go, linking Vang with motor proteins for its delivery to dedicated cellular compartments during PCP establishment.

  5. Spontaneous cell polarization: Feedback control of Cdc42 GTPase breaks cellular symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sophie G

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous polarization without spatial cues, or symmetry breaking, is a fundamental problem of spatial organization in biological systems. This question has been extensively studied using yeast models, which revealed the central role of the small GTPase switch Cdc42. Active Cdc42-GTP forms a coherent patch at the cell cortex, thought to result from amplification of a small initial stochastic inhomogeneity through positive feedback mechanisms, which induces cell polarization. Here, I review and discuss the mechanisms of Cdc42 activity self-amplification and dynamic turnover. A robust Cdc42 patch is formed through the combined effects of Cdc42 activity promoting its own activation and active Cdc42-GTP displaying reduced membrane detachment and lateral diffusion compared to inactive Cdc42-GDP. I argue the role of the actin cytoskeleton in symmetry breaking is not primarily to transport Cdc42 to the active site. Finally, negative feedback and competition mechanisms serve to control the number of polarization sites. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cancer-associated fibroblasts as another polarized cell type of the tumor microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eAugsten

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor- or cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs are one of the most abundant stromal cell types in different carcinomas and comprise a heterogeneous cell population. Classically, CAFs are assigned with pro-tumorigenic effects stimulating tumor growth and progression. More recent studies demonstrated also tumor-inhibitory effects of CAFs suggesting that tumor-residing fibroblasts exhibit a similar degree of plasticity as other stromal cell types. Reciprocal interactions with the tumor milieu and different sources of origin are emerging as two important factors underlying CAF heterogeneity. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of CAF biology and proposes to expand the term of cellular ´polarization´, previously introduced to describe different activation states of various immune cells, onto CAFs to reflect their phenotypic diversity.

  7. Hydrodynamic instabilities and concentration polarization coupled by osmotic pressure in a Taylor-Couette cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinand, Denis; Tilton, Nils

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses analytically and numerically the coupling between hydrodynamic instabilities and osmotic pressure driven by concentration polarization. The configuration consists of a Taylor-Couette cell filled with a Newtonian fluid carrying a passive scalar. Whereas the concentric inner and outer cylinders are membranes permeable to the solvent, they totally reject the scalar. As a radial in- or outflow of solvent is imposed through both cylinders, a concentration boundary layer develops on the cylinder where the solvent exits, until an equilibrium steady state is reached. In addition, the rotation of the inner cylinder is used to drive centrifugal instabilities in the form of toroidal vortices, which interact with the concentration boundary layer. By means of the osmotic pressure, concentration polarization is found to promote or hinder the hydrodynamic instabilities, depending on capacity of the vortices and diffusion to increase the concentration field at the membrane. The results obtained by analytical stability analysis agree with dedicated Direct Numerical Simulations.

  8. A Kinome RNAi Screen inDrosophilaIdentifies Novel Genes Interacting with Lgl, aPKC, and Crb Cell Polarity Genes in Epithelial Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Linda M; Grzeschik, Nicola A; Amaratunga, Kasun; Burke, Peter; Quinn, Leonie M; Richardson, Helena E

    2017-08-07

    In both Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian systems, epithelial structure and underlying cell polarity are essential for proper tissue morphogenesis and organ growth. Cell polarity interfaces with multiple cellular processes that are regulated by the phosphorylation status of large protein networks. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell polarity with tissue growth, we screened a boutique collection of RNAi stocks targeting the kinome for their capacity to modify Drosophila "cell polarity" eye and wing phenotypes. Initially, we identified kinase or phosphatase genes whose depletion modified adult eye phenotypes associated with the manipulation of cell polarity complexes (via overexpression of Crb or aPKC). We next conducted a secondary screen to test whether these cell polarity modifiers altered tissue overgrowth associated with depletion of Lgl in the wing. These screens identified Hippo, Jun kinase (JNK), and Notch signaling pathways, previously linked to cell polarity regulation of tissue growth. Furthermore, novel pathways not previously connected to cell polarity regulation of tissue growth were identified, including Wingless (Wg/Wnt), Ras, and lipid/Phospho-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathways. Additionally, we demonstrated that the "nutrient sensing" kinases Salt Inducible Kinase 2 and 3 ( SIK2 and 3 ) are potent modifiers of cell polarity phenotypes and regulators of tissue growth. Overall, our screen has revealed novel cell polarity-interacting kinases and phosphatases that affect tissue growth, providing a platform for investigating molecular mechanisms coordinating cell polarity and tissue growth during development. Copyright © 2017 Parsons et al.

  9. Structural polarity and dynamics of male germline stem cells in the milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Esther D; Dorn, August

    2004-11-01

    The male germline stem cells (GSCs) of the milkweed bug present an extraordinary structural polarity that is, to our knowledge, unequalled by any other type of stem cells. They consist of a perikaryon and numerous projections arising from the cell pole directed toward the apical cells, the proposed niche of the GSCs. The projections can traverse a considerable distance until their terminals touch the apical cells. From hatching until death, the GSC projections undergo conspicuous changes, the sequence of which has been deduced from observations of all developmental stages. Projection formation starts from lobular cell protrusions showing trabecular ingrowths of the cell membrane. Finger-like projections result from a process of growth and "carving out". The newly formed projections contain mostly only free ribosomes other than a few mitochondria. A stereotyped degradation process commences in the projection terminals: profiles of circular, often concentric, cisternae of rough endoplasmic reticulum appear and turn into myelin bodies, whereas mitochondria become more numerous. The cytoplasm vesiculates, lysosomal bodies appear, and mitochondria become swollen. At the same time, the projection terminals are segregated by transverse ingrowths of the cell membrane. Finally, autophagic vacuoles and myelin bodies fill the segregated terminals, which then rupture. Simultaneously, new projections seem to sprout from the perikaryon of the GSCs. These dynamics, which are not synchronized among the GSCs, indicate that a novel type of signal exchange and transduction between the stem cells and their niche is involved in the regulation of asymmetric versus symmetric division of GSCs.

  10. Domain-specific control of germ cell polarity and migration by multifunction Tre1 GPCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs) from their place of origin to the embryonic gonad is an essential reproductive feature in many animal species. In Drosophila melanogaster, a single G protein–coupled receptor, Trapped in endoderm 1 (Tre1), mediates germ cell polarization at the onset of active migration and directs subsequent migration of PGCs through the midgut primordium. How these different aspects of cell behavior are coordinated through a single receptor is not known. We demonstrate that two highly conserved domains, the E/N/DRY and NPxxY motifs, have overlapping and unique functions in Tre1. The Tre1-NRY domain via G protein signaling is required for reading and responding to guidance and survival cues controlled by the lipid phosphate phosphatases Wunen and Wunen2. In contrast, the Tre1-NPIIY domain has a separate role in Rho1- and E-cadherin–mediated polarization at the initiation stage independent of G protein signaling. We propose that this bifurcation of the Tre1 G protein–coupled receptor signaling response via G protein–dependent and independent branches enables distinct spatiotemporal regulation of germ cell migration. PMID:28687666

  11. A Molecular Probe for the Detection of Polar Lipids in Live Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie A Bader

    Full Text Available Lipids have an important role in many aspects of cell biology, including membrane architecture/compartment formation, intracellular traffic, signalling, hormone regulation, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism. Lipid biology is therefore integrally involved in major human diseases, including metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, heart disease, immune disorders and cancers, which commonly display altered lipid transport and metabolism. However, the investigation of these important cellular processes has been limited by the availability of specific tools to visualise lipids in live cells. Here we describe the potential for ReZolve-L1™ to localise to intracellular compartments containing polar lipids, such as for example sphingomyelin and phosphatidylethanolamine. In live Drosophila fat body tissue from third instar larvae, ReZolve-L1™ interacted mainly with lipid droplets, including the core region of these organelles. The presence of polar lipids in the core of these lipid droplets was confirmed by Raman mapping and while this was consistent with the distribution of ReZolve-L1™ it did not exclude that the molecular probe might be detecting other lipid species. In response to complete starvation conditions, ReZolve-L1™ was detected mainly in Atg8-GFP autophagic compartments, and showed reduced staining in the lipid droplets of fat body cells. The induction of autophagy by Tor inhibition also increased ReZolve-L1™ detection in autophagic compartments, whereas Atg9 knock down impaired autophagosome formation and altered the distribution of ReZolve-L1™. Finally, during Drosophila metamorphosis fat body tissues showed increased ReZolve-L1™ staining in autophagic compartments at two hours post puparium formation, when compared to earlier developmental time points. We concluded that ReZolve-L1™ is a new live cell imaging tool, which can be used as an imaging reagent for the detection of polar lipids in

  12. A Molecular Probe for the Detection of Polar Lipids in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Christie A; Shandala, Tetyana; Carter, Elizabeth A; Ivask, Angela; Guinan, Taryn; Hickey, Shane M; Werrett, Melissa V; Wright, Phillip J; Simpson, Peter V; Stagni, Stefano; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Lay, Peter A; Massi, Massimiliano; Plush, Sally E; Brooks, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Lipids have an important role in many aspects of cell biology, including membrane architecture/compartment formation, intracellular traffic, signalling, hormone regulation, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism. Lipid biology is therefore integrally involved in major human diseases, including metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, heart disease, immune disorders and cancers, which commonly display altered lipid transport and metabolism. However, the investigation of these important cellular processes has been limited by the availability of specific tools to visualise lipids in live cells. Here we describe the potential for ReZolve-L1™ to localise to intracellular compartments containing polar lipids, such as for example sphingomyelin and phosphatidylethanolamine. In live Drosophila fat body tissue from third instar larvae, ReZolve-L1™ interacted mainly with lipid droplets, including the core region of these organelles. The presence of polar lipids in the core of these lipid droplets was confirmed by Raman mapping and while this was consistent with the distribution of ReZolve-L1™ it did not exclude that the molecular probe might be detecting other lipid species. In response to complete starvation conditions, ReZolve-L1™ was detected mainly in Atg8-GFP autophagic compartments, and showed reduced staining in the lipid droplets of fat body cells. The induction of autophagy by Tor inhibition also increased ReZolve-L1™ detection in autophagic compartments, whereas Atg9 knock down impaired autophagosome formation and altered the distribution of ReZolve-L1™. Finally, during Drosophila metamorphosis fat body tissues showed increased ReZolve-L1™ staining in autophagic compartments at two hours post puparium formation, when compared to earlier developmental time points. We concluded that ReZolve-L1™ is a new live cell imaging tool, which can be used as an imaging reagent for the detection of polar lipids in different intracellular

  13. A Molecular Probe for the Detection of Polar Lipids in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Christie A.; Shandala, Tetyana; Carter, Elizabeth A.; Ivask, Angela; Guinan, Taryn; Hickey, Shane M.; Werrett, Melissa V.; Wright, Phillip J.; Simpson, Peter V.; Stagni, Stefano; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Lay, Peter A.; Massi, Massimiliano; Brooks, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    Lipids have an important role in many aspects of cell biology, including membrane architecture/compartment formation, intracellular traffic, signalling, hormone regulation, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism. Lipid biology is therefore integrally involved in major human diseases, including metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, heart disease, immune disorders and cancers, which commonly display altered lipid transport and metabolism. However, the investigation of these important cellular processes has been limited by the availability of specific tools to visualise lipids in live cells. Here we describe the potential for ReZolve-L1™ to localise to intracellular compartments containing polar lipids, such as for example sphingomyelin and phosphatidylethanolamine. In live Drosophila fat body tissue from third instar larvae, ReZolve-L1™ interacted mainly with lipid droplets, including the core region of these organelles. The presence of polar lipids in the core of these lipid droplets was confirmed by Raman mapping and while this was consistent with the distribution of ReZolve-L1™ it did not exclude that the molecular probe might be detecting other lipid species. In response to complete starvation conditions, ReZolve-L1™ was detected mainly in Atg8-GFP autophagic compartments, and showed reduced staining in the lipid droplets of fat body cells. The induction of autophagy by Tor inhibition also increased ReZolve-L1™ detection in autophagic compartments, whereas Atg9 knock down impaired autophagosome formation and altered the distribution of ReZolve-L1™. Finally, during Drosophila metamorphosis fat body tissues showed increased ReZolve-L1™ staining in autophagic compartments at two hours post puparium formation, when compared to earlier developmental time points. We concluded that ReZolve-L1™ is a new live cell imaging tool, which can be used as an imaging reagent for the detection of polar lipids in different intracellular

  14. Secretion of endogenous and exogenous proteins from polarized MDCK cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, T A; Beaudry, G; Rizzolo, L; Colman, A; Rindler, M; Adesnik, M; Sabatini, D D

    1986-04-01

    Confluent monolayers of MDCK (Madin-Darby canine kidney) cells provide a widely used system to study the biogenesis of epithelial cell polarity. We now report that these cells are also capable of the vectorial constitutive secretion of a major endogenous product, a glycoprotein of 81 kDa, which is released into the medium from the apical surface within 30 min of its synthesis. This release represents a bona fide exocytotic secretory process and is not the result of proteolytic cleavage of a plasma membrane-associated precursor since, in cells treated with chloroquine, a protein indistinguishable from the mature secretory product accumulated intracellularly. In contrast to the vectorial secretion of the endogenous product, a variety of exogenous exocrine and endocrine proteins synthesized in MDCK cells transfected with the corresponding genes were secreted from both the apical and basolateral surfaces. These included proteins such as rat growth hormone, chicken oviduct lysozyme, bovine gastric prochymosin, and rat salivary gland alpha 2u-globulin, which in their cells of origin are secreted via a regulated pathway, as well as the liver form of the alpha 2u-globulin and the immunoglobulin kappa chain, which are normally released constitutively. These results demonstrate the existence of secretory pathways that lead to both surfaces of MDCK cells and are accessible to the foreign secretory products. They are consistent with the operation of a sorting mechanism in which the polarized secretion of the endogenous product is effected through the recognition of signals that prevent its random distribution within the fluid phase in the cellular endomembrane system.

  15. Absence of the Polar Organizing Protein PopZ Results in Reduced and Asymmetric Cell Division in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Matthew; Aliashkevich, Alena; Salisbury, Anne K; Cava, Felipe; Bowman, Grant R; Brown, Pamela J B

    2017-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a rod-shaped bacterium that grows by polar insertion of new peptidoglycan during cell elongation. As the cell cycle progresses, peptidoglycan synthesis at the pole ceases prior to insertion of new peptidoglycan at midcell to enable cell division. The A. tumefaciens homolog of the Caulobacter crescentus polar organelle development protein PopZ has been identified as a growth pole marker and a candidate polar growth-promoting factor. Here, we characterize the function of PopZ in cell growth and division of A. tumefaciens Consistent with previous observations, we observe that PopZ localizes specifically to the growth pole in wild-type cells. Despite the striking localization pattern of PopZ, we find the absence of the protein does not impair polar elongation or cause major changes in the peptidoglycan composition. Instead, we observe an atypical cell length distribution, including minicells, elongated cells, and cells with ectopic poles. Most minicells lack DNA, suggesting a defect in chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the canonical cell division proteins FtsZ and FtsA are misplaced, leading to asymmetric sites of cell constriction. Together, these data suggest that PopZ plays an important role in the regulation of chromosome segregation and cell division. IMPORTANCE A. tumefaciens is a bacterial plant pathogen and a natural genetic engineer. However, very little is known about the spatial and temporal regulation of cell wall biogenesis that leads to polar growth in this bacterium. Understanding the molecular basis of A. tumefaciens growth may allow for the development of innovations to prevent disease or to promote growth during biotechnology applications. Finally, since many closely related plant and animal pathogens exhibit polar growth, discoveries in A. tumefaciens may be broadly applicable for devising antimicrobial strategies. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle W Clark

    Full Text Available Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH, no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5 the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2-7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress.

  17. Loss of PodJ in Agrobacterium tumefaciens Leads to Ectopic Polar Growth, Branching, and Reduced Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Furgeson, James C; Zupan, John R; Grangeon, Romain; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2016-07-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium that elongates by unipolar addition of new cell envelope material. Approaching cell division, the growth pole transitions to a nongrowing old pole, and the division site creates new growth poles in sibling cells. The A. tumefaciens homolog of the Caulobacter crescentus polar organizing protein PopZ localizes specifically to growth poles. In contrast, the A. tumefaciens homolog of the C. crescentus polar organelle development protein PodJ localizes to the old pole early in the cell cycle and accumulates at the growth pole as the cell cycle proceeds. FtsA and FtsZ also localize to the growth pole for most of the cell cycle prior to Z-ring formation. To further characterize the function of polar localizing proteins, we created a deletion of A. tumefaciens podJ (podJAt). ΔpodJAt cells display ectopic growth poles (branching), growth poles that fail to transition to an old pole, and elongated cells that fail to divide. In ΔpodJAt cells, A. tumefaciens PopZ-green fluorescent protein (PopZAt-GFP) persists at nontransitioning growth poles postdivision and also localizes to ectopic growth poles, as expected for a growth-pole-specific factor. Even though GFP-PodJAt does not localize to the midcell in the wild type, deletion of podJAt impacts localization, stability, and function of Z-rings as assayed by localization of FtsA-GFP and FtsZ-GFP. Z-ring defects are further evidenced by minicell production. Together, these data indicate that PodJAt is a critical factor for polar growth and that ΔpodJAt cells display a cell division phenotype, likely because the growth pole cannot transition to an old pole. How rod-shaped prokaryotes develop and maintain shape is complicated by the fact that at least two distinct species-specific growth modes exist: uniform sidewall insertion of cell envelope material, characterized in model organisms such as Escherichia coli, and unipolar growth, which occurs in several

  18. Polarization Sensitive Measurements of Molecular Reorientation in a Glass Capacitor Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Nathan; Lawhead, Carlos; Anderson, Josiah; Shiver, Tegan; Prayaga, Chandra; Ujj, Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that molecules having a permanent dipole moment tend to orient in the direction of the electric field at room temperature. The reorientation can be probed with the help of linear spectroscopy methods such as fluorescence anisotropy measurements. We have used nonlinear polarization sensitive Raman scattering spectroscopy to quantify the orientation effect of the dipoles. Vibrational spectra of the molecules has been recorded as a function of the external electric field. The polarization changes observed during the measurement are directly linked to the molecular reorientation rearrangement. Spectra has been recorded with a laser spectrometer comprised of a Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator and an imaging spectrometer with a CCD detector. In order to make this measurement we have constructed a glass capacitor cell coated in TiO and applied a significant electric field (0-3 kV/mm) to the sample. Our measurements showed that the orientation effect is most significant for liquid crystals as observed previously with non-polarization sensitive CARS spectroscopy.

  19. Bipolar Plasma Membrane Distribution of Phosphoinositides and Their Requirement for Auxin-Mediated Cell Polarity and Patterning in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Ricardo; Sauer, Michael; Vanneste, Steffen; Palacios-Gomez, Miriam; Li, Hongjiang; Heilmann, Mareike; van Wijk, Ringo; Vermeer, Joop E M; Heilmann, Ingo; Munnik, Teun; Friml, Jiří

    2014-05-01

    Cell polarity manifested by asymmetric distribution of cargoes, such as receptors and transporters, within the plasma membrane (PM) is crucial for essential functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell polarity (re)establishment is intimately linked to patterning processes. Despite the importance of cell polarity, its underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown, including the definition and distinctiveness of the polar domains within the PM. Here, we show in Arabidopsis thaliana that the signaling membrane components, the phosphoinositides phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P 2 ] as well as PtdIns4P 5-kinases mediating their interconversion, are specifically enriched at apical and basal polar plasma membrane domains. The PtdIns4P 5-kinases PIP5K1 and PIP5K2 are redundantly required for polar localization of specifically apical and basal cargoes, such as PIN-FORMED transporters for the plant hormone auxin. As a consequence of the polarity defects, instructive auxin gradients as well as embryonic and postembryonic patterning are severely compromised. Furthermore, auxin itself regulates PIP5K transcription and PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P 2 levels, in particular their association with polar PM domains. Our results provide insight into the polar domain-delineating mechanisms in plant cells that depend on apical and basal distribution of membrane lipids and are essential for embryonic and postembryonic patterning. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  20. Dishevelled is essential for neural connectivity and planar cell polarity in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuedo-Castillo, Maria; Saló, Emili; Adell, Teresa

    2011-02-15

    The Wingless/Integrated (Wnt) signaling pathway controls multiple events during development and homeostasis. It comprises multiple branches, mainly classified according to their dependence on β-catenin activation. The Wnt/β-catenin branch is essential for the establishment of the embryonic anteroposterior (AP) body axis throughout the phylogenetic tree. It is also required for AP axis establishment during planarian regeneration. Wnt/β-catenin-independent signaling encompasses several different pathways, of which the most extensively studied is the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, which is responsible for planar polarization of cell structures within an epithelial sheet. Dishevelled (Dvl) is the hub of Wnt signaling because it regulates and channels the Wnt signal into every branch. Here, we analyze the role of Schmidtea mediterranea Dvl homologs (Smed-dvl-1 and Smed-dvl-2) using gene silencing. We demonstrate that in addition to a role in AP axis specification, planarian Dvls are involved in at least two different β-catenin-independent processes. First, they are essential for neural connectivity through Smed-wnt5 signaling. Second, Smed-dvl-2, together with the S. mediterranea homologs of Van-Gogh (Vang) and Diversin (Div), is required for apical positioning of the basal bodies of epithelial cells. These data represent evidence not only of the function of the PCP network in lophotrocozoans but of the involvement of the PCP core elements Vang and Div in apical positioning of the cilia.

  1. Protocadherin FAT1 binds Ena/VASP proteins and is necessary for actin dynamics and cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Marcus J; Soofi, Abdulsalam; Braun, Gerald S; Li, Xiaodong; Watzl, Carsten; Kriz, Wilhelm; Holzman, Lawrence B

    2004-10-01

    Cell migration requires integration of cellular processes resulting in cell polarization and actin dynamics. Previous work using tools of Drosophila genetics suggested that protocadherin fat serves in a pathway necessary for determining cell polarity in the plane of a tissue. Here we identify mammalian FAT1 as a proximal element of a signaling pathway that determines both cellular polarity in the plane of the monolayer and directed actin-dependent cell motility. FAT1 is localized to the leading edge of lamellipodia, filopodia, and microspike tips where FAT1 directly interacts with Ena/VASP proteins that regulate the actin polymerization complex. When targeted to mitochondrial outer leaflets, FAT1 cytoplasmic domain recruits components of the actin polymerization machinery sufficient to induce ectopic actin polymerization. In an epithelial cell wound model, FAT1 knockdown decreased recruitment of endogenous VASP to the leading edge and resulted in impairment of lamellipodial dynamics, failure of polarization, and an attenuation of cell migration. FAT1 may play an integrative role regulating cell migration by participating in Ena/VASP-dependent regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge and by transducing an Ena/VASP-independent polarity cue.

  2. ImaEdge - a platform for quantitative analysis of the spatiotemporal dynamics of cortical proteins during cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Lim, Yen Wei; Zhao, Peng; Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Motegi, Fumio

    2017-12-15

    Cell polarity involves the compartmentalization of the cell cortex. The establishment of cortical compartments arises from the spatial bias in the activity and concentration of cortical proteins. The mechanistic dissection of cell polarity requires the accurate detection of dynamic changes in cortical proteins, but the fluctuations of cell shape and the inhomogeneous distributions of cortical proteins greatly complicate the quantitative extraction of their global and local changes during cell polarization. To address these problems, we introduce an open-source software package, ImaEdge, which automates the segmentation of the cortex from time-lapse movies, and enables quantitative extraction of cortical protein intensities. We demonstrate that ImaEdge enables efficient and rigorous analysis of the dynamic evolution of cortical PAR proteins during Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. It is also capable of accurate tracking of varying levels of transgene expression and discontinuous signals of the actomyosin cytoskeleton during multiple rounds of cell division. ImaEdge provides a unique resource for quantitative studies of cortical polarization, with the potential for application to many types of polarized cells.This article has an associated First Person interview with the first authors of the paper. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. An Instructive Role for C. elegans HMR-1/E-cadherin in Translating Cell Contact Cues into Cortical Polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klompstra, Diana; Anderson, Dorian C.; Yeh, Justin Y.; Zilberman, Yuliya; Nance, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Cell contacts provide spatial cues that polarize early embryos and epithelial cells. The homophilic adhesion protein E-cadherin is required for contact-induced polarity in many cells. However, it is debated whether E-cadherin functions instructively as a spatial cue, or permissively by ensuring adequate adhesion so that cells can sense other contact signals. In C. elegans, contacts polarize early embryonic cells by recruiting the RhoGAP PAC-1 to the adjacent cortex, inducing PAR protein asymmetry. Here we show that HMR-1/E-cadherin, which is dispensable for adhesion, functions together with HMP-1/α-catenin, JAC-1/p120 catenin, and the previously uncharacterized linker PICC-1/CCDC85/DIPA to bind PAC-1 and recruit it to contacts. Mislocalizing the HMR-1 intracellular domain to contact-free surfaces draws PAC-1 to these sites and depolarizes cells, demonstrating an instructive role for HMR-1 in polarization. Our findings identify an E-cadherin-mediated pathway that translates cell contacts into cortical polarity by directly recruiting a symmetry-breaking factor to the adjacent cortex. PMID:25938815

  4. Functional assessment of sodium chloride cotransporter NCC mutants in polarized mammalian epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaek, Lena L; Rizzo, Federica; MacAulay, Nanna

    2017-01-01

    -free solutions. NCC was detected in the plasma membrane, and both membrane abundance and phosphorylation of NCC were increased by incubation in chloride-free solutions. Furthermore, in cells exposed for 15 min to low or high extracellular K(+), the levels of phosphorylated NCC increased and decreased...... constitutively active, even without chloride-free stimulation. In conclusion, this system allows the activity, cellular localization, and abundance of wild-type or mutant NCC to be examined in the same polarized mammalian expression system in a rapid, easy, and low-cost fashion....

  5. In vitro biocompatibility and proliferative effects of polar and non-polar extracts of cucurbita ficifolia on human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristatile, Balakrishnan; Alshammari, Ghedeir M

    2017-05-01

    Cucurbita ficifolia (C. ficifolia) has been traditionally known for its medicinal properties as an antioxidant, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory agent. However, there has been an enduring attention towards the identification of unique method, to isolate the natural components for therapeutic applications. Our study focuses on different polar and non-polar solvents (methanol, hexane and chloroform) to extract the bioactive components from C. ficifolia (pumpkin) and to study the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity effects on human bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). The extracts were screened for their effects on cytotoxicity, cell proliferation and cell cycle on the hBM-MSCs cell line. The assays demonstrated that the chloroform extract was highly biocompatible, with less cytotoxic effect, and enhanced the cell proliferation. The methanol extract did not exhibit significant cytotoxicity when compare to the control. Concordantly, the cell cycle analysis confirmed that chloroform extract enhances the proliferation at lower concentrations. On the other hand, hexane extract showed high level of cytotoxicity with apoptotic and necrotic changes in hBM-MSCs. Collectively, our data revealed that chloroform is a good candidate to extract the bioactive components from C. ficifolia. Furthermore, our results suggest that specific gravity and density of the solvent might play a crucial role in the extraction process, which warrants further investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Normal and tumor-derived myoepithelial cells differ in their ability to interact with luminal breast epithelial cells for polarity and basement membrane deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Villadsen, Rene; Rank, Fritz; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2001-10-04

    The signals that determine the correct polarity of breast epithelial structures in vivo are not understood. We have shown previously that luminal epithelial cells can be polarized when cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane gel. We reasoned that such cues in vivo may be given by myoepithelial cells. Accordingly, we used an assay where luminal epithelial cells are incorrectly polarized to test this hypothesis. We show that culturing human primary luminal epithelial cells within collagen-I gels leads to formation of structures with no lumina and with reverse polarity as judged by dual stainings for sialomucin, epithelial specific antigen or occludin. No basement membrane is deposited, and {beta}4-integrin staining is negative. Addition of purified human myoepithelial cells isolated from normal glands corrects the inverse polarity, and leads to formation of double-layered acini with central lumina. Among the laminins present in the human breast basement membrane (laminin-1, -5 and -10/11), laminin-1 was unique in its ability to substitute for myoepithelial cells in polarity reversal. Myoepithelial cells were purified also from four different breast cancer sources including a biphasic cell line. Three out of four samples either totally lacked the ability to interact with luminal epithelial cells, or conveyed only correction of polarity in a fraction of acini. This behavior was directly related to the ability of the tumor myoepithelial cells to produce {alpha}-1 chain of laminin. In vivo, breast carcinomas were either negative for laminin-1 (7/12 biopsies) or showed a focal, fragmented deposition of a less intensely stained basement membrane (5/12 biopsies). Dual staining with myoepithelial markers revealed that tumorassociated myoepithelial cells were either negative or weakly positive for expression of laminin-1, establishing a strong correlation between loss of laminin-1 and breast cancer. We conclude that the double-layered breast acinus may be

  7. Ror2 Enhances Polarity and Directional Migration of Primordial Germ Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissner, Michael D.; Zhou, Xin; Anderson, Kathryn V.

    2011-01-01

    The trafficking of primordial germ cells (PGCs) across multiple embryonic structures to the nascent gonads ensures the transmission of genetic information to the next generation through the gametes, yet our understanding of the mechanisms underlying PGC migration remains incomplete. Here we identify a role for the receptor tyrosine kinase-like protein Ror2 in PGC development. In a Ror2 mouse mutant we isolated in a genetic screen, PGC migration and survival are dysregulated, resulting in a diminished number of PGCs in the embryonic gonad. A similar phenotype in Wnt5a mutants suggests that Wnt5a acts as a ligand to Ror2 in PGCs, although we do not find evidence that WNT5A functions as a PGC chemoattractant. We show that cultured PGCs undergo polarization, elongation, and reorientation in response to the chemotactic factor SCF (secreted KitL), whereas Ror2 PGCs are deficient in these SCF-induced responses. In the embryo, migratory PGCs exhibit a similar elongated geometry, whereas their counterparts in Ror2 mutants are round. The protein distribution of ROR2 within PGCs is asymmetric, both in vitro and in vivo; however, this asymmetry is lost in Ror2 mutants. Together these results indicate that Ror2 acts autonomously to permit the polarized response of PGCs to KitL. We propose a model by which Wnt5a potentiates PGC chemotaxis toward secreted KitL by redistribution of Ror2 within the cell. PMID:22216013

  8. Ror2 enhances polarity and directional migration of primordial germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana J Laird

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The trafficking of primordial germ cells (PGCs across multiple embryonic structures to the nascent gonads ensures the transmission of genetic information to the next generation through the gametes, yet our understanding of the mechanisms underlying PGC migration remains incomplete. Here we identify a role for the receptor tyrosine kinase-like protein Ror2 in PGC development. In a Ror2 mouse mutant we isolated in a genetic screen, PGC migration and survival are dysregulated, resulting in a diminished number of PGCs in the embryonic gonad. A similar phenotype in Wnt5a mutants suggests that Wnt5a acts as a ligand to Ror2 in PGCs, although we do not find evidence that WNT5A functions as a PGC chemoattractant. We show that cultured PGCs undergo polarization, elongation, and reorientation in response to the chemotactic factor SCF (secreted KitL, whereas Ror2 PGCs are deficient in these SCF-induced responses. In the embryo, migratory PGCs exhibit a similar elongated geometry, whereas their counterparts in Ror2 mutants are round. The protein distribution of ROR2 within PGCs is asymmetric, both in vitro and in vivo; however, this asymmetry is lost in Ror2 mutants. Together these results indicate that Ror2 acts autonomously to permit the polarized response of PGCs to KitL. We propose a model by which Wnt5a potentiates PGC chemotaxis toward secreted KitL by redistribution of Ror2 within the cell.

  9. Modeling self-organized spatio-temporal patterns of PIP₃ and PTEN during spontaneous cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Fabian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2014-08-01

    During spontaneous cell polarization of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphoshpate (PIP3) and PTEN (phosphatase tensin homolog) have been identified as key signaling molecules which govern the process of polarization in a self-organized manner. Recent experiments have quantified the spatio-temporal dynamics of these signaling components. Surprisingly, it was found that membrane-bound PTEN can be either in a high or low state, that PIP3 waves were initiated in areas lacking PTEN through an excitable mechanism, and that PIP3 was degraded even though the PTEN concentration remained low. Here we develop a reaction-diffusion model that aims to explain these experimental findings. Our model contains bistable dynamics for PTEN, excitable dynamics for PIP3, and postulates the existence of two species of PTEN with different dephosphorylation rates. We show that our model is able to produce results that are in good qualitative agreement with the experiments, suggesting that our reaction-diffusion model underlies the self-organized spatio-temporal patterns observed in experiments.

  10. TNF-α decreases VEGF secretion in highly polarized RPE cells but increases it in non-polarized RPE cells related to crosstalk between JNK and NF-κB pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Terasaki

    Full Text Available Asymmetrical secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells in situ is critical for maintaining the homeostasis of the retina and choroid. VEGF is also involved in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. We studied the effect of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α on the secretion of VEGF in polarized and non-polarized RPE cells (P-RPE cells and N-RPE cells, respectively in culture and in situ in rats. A subretinal injection of TNF-α caused a decrease in VEGF expression and choroidal atrophy. Porcine RPE cells were seeded on Transwell™ filters, and their maturation and polarization were confirmed by the asymmetrical VEGF secretion and trans electrical resistance. Exposure to TNF-α decreased the VEGF secretion in P-RPE cells but increased it in N-RPE cells in culture. TNF-α inactivated JNK in P-RPE cells but activated it in N-RPE cells, and TNF-α activated NF-κB in P-RPE cells but not in N-RPE cells. Inhibition of NF-κB activated JNK in both types of RPE cells indicating crosstalk between JNK and NF-κB. TNF-α induced the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on JNK in P-RPE cells because NF-κB is continuously inactivated. In N-RPE cells, however, it was not evident because NF-κB was already activated. The basic activation pattern of JNK and NF-κB and their crosstalk led to opposing responses of RPE cells to TNF-α. These results suggest that VEGF secretion under inflammatory conditions depends on cellular polarization, and the TNF-α-induced VEGF down-regulation may result in choroidal atrophy in polarized physiological RPE cells. TNF-α-induced VEGF up-regulation may cause neovascularization by non-polarized or non-physiological RPE cells.

  11. Connexin 43-mediated modulation of polarized cell movement and the directional migration of cardiac neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Francis, Richard; Wei, Chih Jen; Linask, Kaari L; Lo, Cecilia W

    2006-09-01

    Connexin 43 knockout (Cx43alpha1KO) mice have conotruncal heart defects that are associated with a reduction in the abundance of cardiac neural crest cells (CNCs) targeted to the heart. In this study, we show CNCs can respond to changing fibronectin matrix density by adjusting their migratory behavior, with directionality increasing and speed decreasing with increasing fibronectin density. However, compared with wild-type CNCs, Cx43alpha1KO CNCs show reduced directionality and speed, while CNCs overexpressing Cx43alpha1 from the CMV43 transgenic mice show increased directionality and speed. Altered integrin signaling was indicated by changes in the distribution of vinculin containing focal contacts, and altered temporal response of Cx43alpha1KO and CMV43 CNCs to beta1 integrin function blocking antibody treatment. High resolution motion analysis showed Cx43alpha1KO CNCs have increased cell protrusive activity accompanied by the loss of polarized cell movement. They exhibited an unusual polygonal arrangement of actin stress fibers that indicated a profound change in cytoskeletal organization. Semaphorin 3A, a chemorepellent known to inhibit integrin activation, was found to inhibit CNC motility, but in the Cx43alpha1KO and CMV43 CNCs, cell processes failed to retract with semaphorin 3A treatment. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses suggested close interactions between Cx43alpha1, vinculin and other actin-binding proteins. However, dye coupling analysis showed no correlation between gap junction communication level and fibronectin plating density. Overall, these findings indicate Cx43alpha1 may have a novel function in mediating crosstalk with cell signaling pathways that regulate polarized cell movement essential for the directional migration of CNCs.

  12. Modulation of cell polarization by the Na+-K+-ATPase-associated protein FXYD5 (dysadherin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubarski, Irina; Asher, Carol; Garty, Haim

    2014-06-01

    FXYD5 (dysadherin or also called a related to ion channel, RIC) is a transmembrane auxiliary subunit of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase shown to increase its maximal velocity (Vmax). FXYD5 has also been identified as a cancer-associated protein whose expression in tumor-derived cell lines impairs cytoskeletal organization and increases cell motility. Previously, we have demonstrated that the expression of FXYD5 in M1 cells derived from mouse kidney collecting duct impairs the formation of tight and adherence junctions. The current study aimed to further explore effects of FXYD5 at a single cell level. It was found that in M1, as well as three other cell lines, FXYD5 inhibits transformation of adhered single cells from the initial radial shape to a flattened, elongated shape in the first stage of monolayer formation. This is also correlated to less ordered actin cables and fewer focal points. Structure-function analysis has demonstrated that the transmembrane domain of FXYD5, and not its unique extracellular segment, mediates the inhibition of change in cell shape. This domain has been shown before to be involved in the association of FXYD5 with the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, which leads to the increase in Vmax. Furthermore, specific transmembrane point mutations in FXYD5 that either increase or decrease its effect on cell elongation had a corresponding effect on the coimmunoprecipitation of FXYD5 with α Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. These findings lend support to the possibility that FXYD5 affects cell polarization through its transmembrane domain interaction with the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. Yet interaction of FXYD5 with other proteins cannot be excluded. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  13. MHV-A59 enters polarized murine epithelial cells through the apical surface but is released basolaterally

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Voorhout, W F; Horzinek, M C; van der Ende, A; Strous, G J; Rottier, P J

    1995-01-01

    Coronaviruses have a marked tropism for epithelial cells. Entry and release of the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is restricted to apical surfaces of polarized epithelial cells, as we have recently shown (J. W. A. Rossen, C. P. J. Bekker, W. F. Voorhout, G. J. A. M. Strous, A.

  14. Clonal expansion of genome-intact HIV-1 in functionally polarized Th1 CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guinevere Q; Orlova-Fink, Nina; Einkauf, Kevin; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Sun, Xiaoming; Harrington, Sean; Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Hua, Stephane; Chen, Hsiao-Rong; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Reddy, Kavidha; Dong, Krista; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D; Rosenberg, Eric S; Yu, Xu G; Lichterfeld, Mathias

    2017-06-30

    HIV-1 causes a chronic, incurable disease due to its persistence in CD4+ T cells that contain replication-competent provirus, but exhibit little or no active viral gene expression and effectively resist combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). These latently infected T cells represent an extremely small proportion of all circulating CD4+ T cells but possess a remarkable long-term stability and typically persist throughout life, for reasons that are not fully understood. Here we performed massive single-genome, near-full-length next-generation sequencing of HIV-1 DNA derived from unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ex vivo-isolated CD4+ T cells, and subsets of functionally polarized memory CD4+ T cells. This approach identified multiple sets of independent, near-full-length proviral sequences from cART-treated individuals that were completely identical, consistent with clonal expansion of CD4+ T cells harboring intact HIV-1. Intact, near-full-genome HIV-1 DNA sequences that were derived from such clonally expanded CD4+ T cells constituted 62% of all analyzed genome-intact sequences in memory CD4 T cells, were preferentially observed in Th1-polarized cells, were longitudinally detected over a duration of up to 5 years, and were fully replication- and infection-competent. Together, these data suggest that clonal proliferation of Th1-polarized CD4+ T cells encoding for intact HIV-1 represents a driving force for stabilizing the pool of latently infected CD4+ T cells.

  15. Determination of apical membrane polarity in mammary epithelial cell cultures: The role of cell-cell, cell-substratum, and membrane-cytoskeleton interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, G.; Beck, J.C.; Moss, L.; Bartley, J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Ojakian, G.K. (State Univ. of New York, Brooklyn (United States))

    1990-06-01

    The membrane glycoprotein, PAS-O, is a major differentiation antigen on mammary epithelial cells and is located exclusively in the apical domain of the plasma membrane. The authors have used 734B cultured human mammary carcinoma cells as a model system to study the role of tight junctions, cell-substratum contacts, and submembranous cytoskeletal elements in restricting PAS-O to the apical membrane. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectronmicroscopy experiments demonstrated that while tight junctions demarcate PAS-O distribution in confluent cultures, apical polarity could be established at low culture densities when cells could not form tight junctions with neighboring cells. They suggest, then, that interactions between vitronectin and its receptor, are responsible for establishment of membrane domains in the absence of tight junctions. The role of cytoskeletal elements in restricting PAS-O distribution was examined by treating cultures with cytochalasin D, colchicine, or acrylamide. Cytochalasin D led to a redistribution of PAS0O while colchicine and acrylamide did not. They hypothesize that PAS-O is restricted to the apical membrane by interactions with a microfilament network and that the cytoskeletal organization is dependent upon cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions.

  16. YAP and TAZ in epithelial stem cells: A sensor for cell polarity, mechanical forces and tissue damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbediwy, Ahmed; Vincent-Mistiaen, Zoé I; Thompson, Barry J

    2016-07-01

    The YAP/TAZ family of transcriptional co-activators drives cell proliferation in epithelial tissues and cancers. Yet, how YAP and TAZ are physiologically regulated remains unclear. Here we review recent reports that YAP and TAZ act primarily as sensors of epithelial cell polarity, being inhibited when cells differentiate an apical membrane domain, and being activated when cells contact the extracellular matrix via their basal membrane domain. Apical signalling occurs via the canonical Crumbs/CRB-Hippo/MST-Warts/LATS kinase cascade to phosphorylate and inhibit YAP/TAZ. Basal signalling occurs via Integrins and Src family kinases to phosphorylate and activate YAP/TAZ. Thus, YAP/TAZ is localised to the nucleus in basal stem/progenitor cells and cytoplasm in differentiated squamous cells or columnar cells. In addition, other signals such as mechanical forces, tissue damage and possibly receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can influence MST-LATS or Src family kinase activity to modulate YAP/TAZ activity. © 2016 The Authors BioEssays Published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Endocytic machinery protein SlaB is dispensable for polarity establishment but necessary for polarity maintenance in hyphal tip cells of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervás-Aguilar, América; Peñalva, Miguel A

    2010-10-01

    The Aspergillus nidulans endocytic internalization protein SlaB is essential, in agreement with the key role in apical extension attributed to endocytosis. We constructed, by gene replacement, a nitrate-inducible, ammonium-repressible slaB1 allele for conditional SlaB expression. Video microscopy showed that repressed slaB1 cells are able to establish but unable to maintain a stable polarity axis, arresting growth with budding-yeast-like morphology shortly after initially normal germ tube emergence. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged secretory v-SNARE SynA, which continuously recycles to the plasma membrane after being efficiently endocytosed, we establish that SlaB is crucial for endocytosis, although it is dispensable for the anterograde traffic of SynA and of the t-SNARE Pep12 to the plasma and vacuolar membrane, respectively. By confocal microscopy, repressed slaB1 germlings show deep plasma membrane invaginations. Ammonium-to-nitrate medium shift experiments demonstrated reversibility of the null polarity maintenance phenotype and correlation of normal apical extension with resumption of SynA endocytosis. In contrast, SlaB downregulation in hyphae that had progressed far beyond germ tube emergence led to marked polarity maintenance defects correlating with deficient SynA endocytosis. Thus, the strict correlation between abolishment of endocytosis and disability of polarity maintenance that we report here supports the view that hyphal growth requires coupling of secretion and endocytosis. However, downregulated slaB1 cells form F-actin clumps containing the actin-binding protein AbpA, and thus F-actin misregulation cannot be completely disregarded as a possible contributor to defective apical extension. Latrunculin B treatment of SlaB-downregulated tips reduced the formation of AbpA clumps without promoting growth and revealed the formation of cortical "comets" of AbpA.

  18. Polarization of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment is influenced by EGFR signaling within colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weina; Chen, Lechuang; Ma, Kai; Zhao, Yahui; Liu, Xianghe; Wang, Yu; Liu, Mei; Liang, Shufang; Zhu, Hongxia; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target of colon cancer therapy, but the effects of this therapy on the tumor microenvironment remain poorly understood. Our in vivo studies showed that cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, effectively inhibited AOM/DSS-induced, colitis-associated tumorigenesis, downregulated M2-related markers, and decreased F4/80+/CD206+ macrophage populations. Treatment with conditioned medium of colon cancer cells increased macrophage expression of the M2-related markers arginase-1 (Arg1), CCL17, CCL22, IL-10 and IL-4. By contrast, conditioned medium of EGFR knockout colon cancer cells inhibited expression of these M2-related markers and induced macrophage expression of the M1-related markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-12, TNF-α and CCR7. EGFR knockout in colon cancer cells inhibited macrophage-induced promotion of xenograft tumor growth. Moreover, colon cancer-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased Arg1 expression, and treatment with the IGF1R inhibitor AG1024 inhibited that increase. These results suggest that inhibition of EGFR signaling in colon cancer cells modulates cytokine secretion (e.g. IGF-1) and prevents M1-to-M2 macrophage polarization, thereby inhibiting cancer cell growth. PMID:27683110

  19. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Activation and Subsequent Th1 Cell Polarization by Lidocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yeonseok

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play an essential role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing cellular stress including pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns and by shaping the types of antigen-specific T cell immunity. Although lidocaine is widely used in clinical settings that trigger cellular stress, it remains unclear whether such treatment impacts the activation of innate immune cells and subsequent differentiation of T cells. Here we showed that lidocaine inhibited the production of IL–6, TNFα and IL–12 from dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor ligands including lipopolysaccharide, poly(I:C) and R837 in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the differentiation of Th1 cells was significantly suppressed by the addition of lidocaine while the same treatment had little effect on the differentiation of Th17, Th2 and regulatory T cells in vitro. Moreover, lidocaine suppressed the ovalbumin-specific Th1 cell responses in vivo induced by the adoptive transfer of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. These results demonstrate that lidocaine inhibits the activation of dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor signals and subsequently suppresses the differentiation of Th1 cell responses. PMID:26445366

  20. Daple coordinates organ-wide and cell-intrinsic polarity to pattern inner-ear hair bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siletti, Kimberly; Tarchini, Basile; Hudspeth, A J

    2017-12-26

    The establishment of planar polarization by mammalian cells necessitates the integration of diverse signaling pathways. In the inner ear, at least two systems regulate the planar polarity of sensory hair bundles. The core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins coordinate the orientations of hair cells across the epithelial plane. The cell-intrinsic patterning of hair bundles is implemented independently by the G protein complex classically known for orienting the mitotic spindle. Although the primary cilium also participates in each of these pathways, its role and the integration of the two systems are poorly understood. We show that Dishevelled-associating protein with a high frequency of leucine residues (Daple) interacts with PCP and cell-intrinsic signals. Regulated by the cell-intrinsic pathway, Daple is required to maintain the polarized distribution of the core PCP protein Dishevelled and to position the primary cilium at the abneural edge of the apical surface. Our results suggest that the primary cilium or an associated structure influences the domain of cell-intrinsic signals that shape the hair bundle. Daple is therefore essential to orient and pattern sensory hair bundles. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  1. Structural polarity and dynamics of male germline stem cells in an insect (milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, David C; Dorn, August

    2008-01-01

    Knowing the structure opens a door for a better understanding of function because there is no function without structure. Male germline stem cells (GSCs) of the milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus) exhibit a very extraordinary structure and a very special relationship with their niche, the apical cells. This structural relationship is strikingly different from that known in the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) -- the most successful model system, which allowed deep insights into the signaling interactions between GSCs and niche. The complex structural polarity of male GSCs in the milkweed bug combined with their astonishing dynamics suggest that cell morphology and dynamics are causally related with the most important regulatory processes that take place between GSCs and niche and ensure maintenance, proliferation, and differentiation of GSCs in accordance with the temporal need of mature sperm. The intricate structure of the GSCs of the milkweed bug (and probably of some other insects, i.e., moths) is only accessible by electron microscopy. But, studying singular sections through the apical complex (i.e., GSCs and apical cells) is not sufficient to obtain a full picture of the GSCs; especially, the segregation of projection terminals is not tangible. Only serial sections and their overlay can establish whether membrane ingrowths merely constrict projections or whether a projection terminal is completely cut off. To sequence the GSC dynamics, it is necessary to include juvenile stages, when the processes start and the GSCs occur in small numbers. The fine structural analysis of segregating projection terminals suggests that these terminals undergo autophagocytosis. Autophagosomes can be labeled by markers. We demonstrated acid phosphatase and thiamine pyrophosphatase (TPPase). Both together are thought to identify autophagosomes. Using the appropriate substrate of the enzymes and cerium chloride, the precipitation of electron-dense cerium phosphate granules

  2. High expression of Rac1 is correlated with partial reversed cell polarity and poor prognosis in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingbing; Xiong, Jianhua; Liu, Guiqiu; Wu, Jing; Wen, Likun; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Chuanshan

    2017-07-01

    The change of cell polarity is usually associated with invasion and metastasis. Partial reverse cell polarity in IDC-NOS may play a role in lymphatic tumor spread. Rac1 is a kind of polarity related protein. It plays an important role in invasion and metastasis in tumors. We here investigated the expression of Rac1 and partial reverse cell polarity status in breast cancer and evaluated their value for prognosis in breast cancer. The association of the expression of Rac1 and MUC-1 with clinicopathological parameters and prognostic significance was evaluated in 162 cases of IDC-NOS paraffin-embedded tissues by immunohistochemical method. The Rac1 messenger RNA expression was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 30 breast cancer patients, which was divided into two groups of partial reverse cell polarity and no partial reverse cell polarity. We found that lymph node metastasis of partial reverse cell polarity patients was higher than no partial reverse cell polarity patients (Z = -4.030, p = 0.000). Rac1 was upregulated in partial reverse cell polarity group than no partial reverse cell polarity group (Z = -3.164, p = 0.002), and there was correlationship between the expression of Rac1 and partial reverse cell polarity status (r s  = 0.249, p = 0.001). The level of Rac1 messenger RNA expression in partial reverse cell polarity group was significantly higher compared to no partial reverse cell polarity group (t = -2.527, p = 0.017). Overexpression of Rac1 and partial reverse cell polarity correlates with poor prognosis of IDC-NOS patients (p = 0.011). Partial reverse cell polarity and lymph node metastasis remained as independent predictors for poor disease-free survival of IDC-NOS (p = 0.023, p = 0.046). Our study suggests that partial reverse cell polarity may lead to poor prognosis of breast cancer. Overexpression of Rac1 may lead to polarity change in IDC-NOS of the breast. Therefore, Rac1 could be a

  3. THE CONTENTS OF NEUTRAL AND POLAR LIPIDS IN CLOSTRIDIA CELLS UNDER CULTIVATION IN THE PRESENCE OF BUTANOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Voychuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in the portion of polar and neutral lipids in the cells of Clostridium during their cultivation in the presence of butanol. Four natural isolates of Clostridium genus were studied with flow cytometry approaches. Under the optimal culture conditions, the polar lipids prevailed over neutral ones in bacterial cells; the content of neutral lipids doubled in spores of these microorganisms, while the content of polar ones was reduced. Strains No 1 and No 2 were able to grow at 1% butanol in the medium, and the strain No 4 was at 1.5%. When cultivated in the presence of different concentrations of butanol, the bacterial strains did not differ in such cytomorphological features as granularity and cell size. The quantitative content of polar and neutral lipids in the presence of butanol varied depending on the content of butanol in the medium, however this effect had a strain-specific character and did not show a correlation with the resistance of these bacteria to butanol. So, the content of polar and neutral lipids varied depending on butanol content in the medium. However this effect was strain-specific independently of resistance of these bacteria to butanol. The use of bacterial biomass as a source of lipids for the production of biofuels requires further optimization of the process to increase the content of the neutral lipid fraction in bacterial cells.

  4. Shifted T Helper Cell Polarization in a Murine Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanqing; Zhou, Ming; Gao, Yang; Liu, Heyuan; Yang, Wenyu; Yue, Jinhua; Chen, Dekun

    2015-01-01

    Mastitis, one of the most costly diseases in dairy ruminants, is an inflammation of the mammary gland caused by pathogenic infection. The mechanisms of adaptive immunity against pathogens in mastitis have not been fully elucidated. To investigate T helper cell-mediated adaptive immune responses, we established a mastitis model by challenge with an inoculum of 4 × 106 colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus in the mammary gland of lactating mice, followed by quantification of bacterial burden and histological analysis. The development of mastitis was accompanied by a significant increase in both Th17 and Th1 cells in the mammary gland. Moreover, the relative expression of genes encoding cytokines and transcription factors involved in the differentiation and function of these T helper cells, including Il17, Rorc, Tgfb, Il1b, Il23, Ifng, Tbx21, and Il12, was greatly elevated in the infected mammary gland. IL-17 is essential for neutrophil recruitment to infected mammary gland via CXC chemokines, whereas the excessive IL-17 production contributes to tissue damage in mastitis. In addition, a shift in T helper cell polarization toward Th2 and Treg cells was observed 5 days post-infection, and the mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine Il10 was markedly increased at day 7 post-infection. These results indicate that immune clearance of Staphylococcus aureus in mastitis is facilitated by the enrichment of Th17, Th1 and Th2 cells in the mammary gland mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokine production, which is tightly regulated by Treg cells and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10.

  5. Priming dendritic cells for Th2 polarization: lessons learned from helminths and implications for metabolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie eHussaarts

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one quarter of the world’s population is infected with helminth parasites. A common feature of helminth infections is the manifestation of a type 2 immune response, characterized by T helper 2 (Th2 cells that mediate anti-helminth immunity. In addition, recent literature described a close association between type 2 immune responses and wound repair, suggesting that a Th2 response may concurrently mediate repair of parasite-induced damage. The molecular mechanisms that govern Th2 responses are poorly understood, although it is clear that dendritic cells (DCs, which are the most efficient antigen-presenting cells in the immune system, play a central role. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms by which DCs polarize Th2 cells, examining both helminth antigens and helminth-mediated tissue damage as Th2-inducing triggers. Finally, we discuss the implication of these findings in the context of metabolic disorders, as recent literature indicates that various aspects of the Th2-associated inflammatory response contribute to metabolic homeostasis.

  6. Epidermal wound repair is regulated by the planar cell polarity signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddy, Jacinta; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Darido, Charbel; Dworkin, Sebastian; Ting, Stephen B.; Zhao, Quan; Rank, Gerhard; Auden, Alana; Srivastava, Seema; Papenfuss, Tony A.; Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Humbert, Patrick O.; Boulos, Nidal; Weber, Thomas; Zuo, Jian; Cunningham, John M.; Jane, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The mammalian PCP pathway regulates diverse developmental processes requiring coordinated cellular movement, including neural tube closure and cochlear stereociliary orientation. Here, we show that epidermal wound repair is regulated by PCP signaling. Mice carrying mutant alleles of PCP genes Vangl2, Celsr1, PTK7, and Scrb1, and the transcription factor Grhl3, interact genetically, exhibiting failed wound healing, neural tube defects and disordered cochlear polarity. Using phylogenetic analysis, ChIP, and gene expression in Grhl3−/− mice, we identified RhoGEF19, a homologue of a RhoA activator involved in PCP signaling in Xenopus, as a direct target of GRHL3. Knockdown of Grhl3 or RhoGEF19 in keratinocytes induced defects in actin polymerisation, cellular polarity and wound healing, and re-expression of RhoGEF19 rescued these defects in Grhl3-kd cells. These results define a role for Grhl3 in PCP signaling, and broadly implicate this pathway in epidermal repair. PMID:20643356

  7. Analysis of polarization methods for elimination of power overshoot in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.

    2011-01-01

    Polarization curves from microbial fuel cells (MFCs) often show an unexpectedly large drop in voltage with increased current densities, leading to a phenomenon in the power density curve referred to as "power overshoot". Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV, 1 mV s- 1) and variable external resistances (at fixed intervals of 20 min) over a single fed-batch cycle in an MFC both resulted in power overshoot in power density curves due to anode potentials. Increasing the anode enrichment time from 30 days to 100 days did not eliminate overshoot, suggesting that insufficient enrichment of the anode biofilm was not the primary cause. Running the reactor at a fixed resistance for a full fed-batch cycle (~ 1 to 2 days), however, completely eliminated the overshoot in the power density curve. These results show that long times at a fixed resistance are needed to stabilize current generation by bacteria in MFCs, and that even relatively slow LSV scan rates and long times between switching circuit loads during a fed-batch cycle may produce inaccurate polarization and power density results for these biological systems. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The dual effects of polar methanolic extract of Hypericum perforatum L. in bladder cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nseyo, U. O.; Nseyo, O. U.; Shiverick, K. T.; Medrano, T.; Mejia, M.; Stavropoulos, N.; Tsimaris, I.; Skalkos, D.

    2007-02-01

    Introduction and background: We have reported on the polar methanolic fraction (PMF) of Hypericum Perforatum L as a novel photosensitizing agent for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photodynamic diagnosis (PDD). PMF has been tested in human leukemic cells, HL-60 cells, cord blood hemopoietic progenitor cells, bladder cancers derived from metastatic lymph node (T-24) and primary papillary bladder lesion (RT-4). However, the mechanisms of the effects of PMF on these human cell lines have not been elucidated. We have investigated mechanisms of PMF + light versus PMF-alone (dark experiment) in T-24 human bladder cancer cells. Methods: PMF was prepared from an aerial herb of HPL which was brewed in methanol and extracted with ether and methanol. Stock solutions of PMF were made in DSMO and stored in dark conditions. PMF contains 0.57% hypericin and 2.52% hyperforin. The T24 cell line was obtained from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). In PDT treatment, PMF (60μg/ml) was incubated with cells, which were excited with laser light (630nm) 24 hours later. Apoptosis was determined by DNA fragmentation/laddering assay. DNA isolation was performed according to the manufacture's instructions with the Kit (Oncogene Kit#AM41). Isolated DNA samples were separated by electrophoresis in 1.5% in agarose gels and bands were visualized by ethidium bromide labeling. The initial cell cycle analysis and phase distribution was by flow cytometry. DNA synthesis was measured by [3H] thymidine incorporation, and cell cycle regulatory proteins were assayed by Western immunoblot. Results: The results of the flow cytometry showed PMF +light induced significant (40%) apoptosis in T24 cells, whereas Light or PMF alone produced little apoptosis. The percentage of cells in G 0/G I phase was decreased by 25% and in G2/M phase by 38%. The main impact was observed on the S phase which was blocked by 78% from the specific photocytotoxic process. DNA laddering analysis showed that PMF (60

  9. Endothelial Cell Migration and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Are the Result of Loss of Breast Tissue Polarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Amy; Cuevas, Ileana; Kenny, Paraic A; Miyake, Hiroshi; Mace, Kimberley; Ghajar, Cyrus; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina; Boudreau, Nancy

    2009-05-26

    Recruiting a new blood supply is a rate-limiting step in tumor progression. In a three-dimensional model of breast carcinogenesis, disorganized, proliferative transformed breast epithelial cells express significantly higher expression of angiogenic genes compared with their polarized, growth-arrested nonmalignant counterparts. Elevated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by malignant cells enhanced recruitment of endothelial cells (EC) in heterotypic cocultures. Significantly, phenotypic reversion of malignant cells via reexpression of HoxD10, which is lost in malignant progression, significantly attenuated VEGF expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha}-independent fashion and reduced EC migration. This was due primarily to restoring polarity: forced proliferation of polarized, nonmalignant cells did not induce VEGF expression and EC recruitment, whereas disrupting the architecture of growth-arrested, reverted cells did. These data show that disrupting cytostructure activates the angiogenic switch even in the absence of proliferation and/or hypoxia and restoring organization of malignant clusters reduces VEGF expression and EC activation to levels found in quiescent nonmalignant epithelium. These data confirm the importance of tissue architecture and polarity in malignant progression.

  10. Keeping Plateaued Performers Motivated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLon, Barbara A.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the problem of keeping library staff motivated when promotions are not available. Topics addressed include the importance of management training that emphasizes communication skills; alternative ways to help employees grow, including staff development programs, lateral transfers, job rotation, and short-term projects; and helpful…

  11. Keeping Track of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrli, Kurt O.

    2009-01-01

    A lack of consistent and accurate auditing and record keeping of district IT equipment can lead to confusion between administrative departments, including redundant purchases, transferred equipment being mislabeled as stolen, computers and other equipment simply being lost, or a variety of other scenarios. This had led to an increased demand for…

  12. Keeping Food Safe

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-27

    This CDC Kidtastics podcast discusses things kids and parents can do to help prevent illness by keeping food safe.  Created: 5/27/2009 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 5/27/2009.

  13. Planar cell polarity enables posterior localization of nodal cilia and left-right axis determination during mouse and Xenopus embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Antic

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Left-right asymmetry in vertebrates is initiated in an early embryonic structure called the ventral node in human and mouse, and the gastrocoel roof plate (GRP in the frog. Within these structures, each epithelial cell bears a single motile cilium, and the concerted beating of these cilia produces a leftward fluid flow that is required to initiate left-right asymmetric gene expression. The leftward fluid flow is thought to result from the posterior tilt of the cilia, which protrude from near the posterior portion of each cell's apical surface. The cells, therefore, display a morphological planar polarization. Planar cell polarity (PCP is manifested as the coordinated, polarized orientation of cells within epithelial sheets, or as directional cell migration and intercalation during convergent extension. A set of evolutionarily conserved proteins regulates PCP. Here, we provide evidence that vertebrate PCP proteins regulate planar polarity in the mouse ventral node and in the Xenopus gastrocoel roof plate. Asymmetric anterior localization of VANGL1 and PRICKLE2 (PK2 in mouse ventral node cells indicates that these cells are planar polarized by a conserved molecular mechanism. A weakly penetrant Vangl1 mutant phenotype suggests that compromised Vangl1 function may be associated with left-right laterality defects. Stronger functional evidence comes from the Xenopus GRP, where we show that perturbation of VANGL2 protein function disrupts the posterior localization of motile cilia that is required for leftward fluid flow, and causes aberrant expression of the left side-specific gene Nodal. The observation of anterior-posterior PCP in the mouse and in Xenopus embryonic organizers reflects a strong evolutionary conservation of this mechanism that is important for body plan determination.

  14. Absence of transepithelial anion exchange by rabbit OMCD: Evidence against reversal of cell polarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Matsuhiko; Schuster, V.L.; Stokes, J.B. (Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City (USA))

    1988-08-01

    In the rabbit cortical collecting duct (CCD), Cl tracer crosses the epithelium predominantly via an anion exchange system that operates in either a Cl-Cl or Cl-HCO{sub 3} exchange mode. In the present study, the authors used the {sup 36}Cl lumen-to-bath rate coefficient (K{sub Cl}, nm/s), a sensitive measurement of CCD transepithelial anion transport, to investigate the nature of Cl transport in the medullary collecting duct dissected from inner stripe, outer medulla (OMCD). The K{sub Cl} in OMCD perfused and bathed in HCO{sub 3}-Ringer solution was low and similar to that value observed in the CCD when anion exchange is inhibited and Cl permeates the epithelium by diffusion. To test the hypothesis that metabolic alkalosis could reverse the polarity of intercalated cells and thus induce an apical Cl-HCO{sub 3} exchanger in H{sup +}-secreting OMCD cells, they measured K{sub Cl} in OMCD from rabbits make alkalotic by deoxycorticosterone and furosemide. Although the base-line K{sub Cl} was slightly higher than in OMCD from control rabbits, the value was still far lower than the K{sub Cl} under comparable conditions in CCD. They conclude (1) Cl transport across the MCD by anion exchange is immeasurably low or nonexistent; (2) unlike the CCD, Cl transport in OMCD is not responsive to cAMP; and (3) metabolic alkalosis does not induce an apical anion exchanger in OMCD, i.e., does not cause epithelial polarity reversal.

  15. Polarizing T and B cell responses by APC-targeted subunit vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnveig eGrødeland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Current influenza vaccines mostly aim at the induction of specific neutralizing antibodies. While antibodies are important for protection against a particular virus strain, T cells can recognize epitopes that will offer broader protection against influenza. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine format by which protein antigens can be targeted specifically to receptors on antigen presenting cells (APCs. The DNA-encoded vaccine proteins are homodimers, each chain consisting of a targeting unit, a dimerization unit, and an antigen. The strategy of targeting antigen to APCs greatly enhances immune responses as compared to non-targeted controls. Furthermore, targeting of antigen to different receptors on APCs can polarize the immune response to different arms of immunity. Here, we discuss how targeting of hemagglutinin (HA to MHC class II molecules increases Th2 and IgG1 antibody responses, whereas targeting to chemokine receptors XCR1 or CCR1/3/5 increases Th1 and IgG2a responses, in addition to CD8+ T cell responses. We also discuss these results in relation to work published by others on APC-targeting. Differential targeting of APC surface molecules may allow the induction of tailor-made phenotypes of adaptive immune responses that are optimal for protection against various infectious agents, including influenza virus.

  16. Directional cell migration establishes the axes of planar polarity in the posterior lateral-line organ of the zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Schier, Hernán; Starr, Catherine J; Kappler, James A; Kollmar, Richard; Hudspeth, A J

    2004-09-01

    The proper orientation of mechanosensory hair cells along the lateral-line organ of a fish or amphibian is essential for the animal's ability to sense directional water movements. Within the sensory epithelium, hair cells are polarized in a stereotyped manner, but the mechanisms that control their alignment relative to the body axes are unknown. We have found, however, that neuromasts can be oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the anteroposterior body axis. By characterizing the strauss mutant zebrafish line and by tracking labeled cells, we have demonstrated that neuromasts of these two orientations originate from, respectively, the first and second primordia. Furthermore, altering the migratory pathway of a primordium reorients a neuromast's axis of planar polarity. We propose that the global orientation of hair cells relative to the body axes is established through an interaction between directional movement by primordial cells and the timing of neuromast maturation.

  17. Ca2+ influx and phosphoinositide signalling are essential for the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity in monospores from the red alga Porphyra yezoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Saga, Naotsune; Mikami, Koji

    2009-01-01

    The asymmetrical distribution of F-actin directed by cell polarity has been observed during the migration of monospores from the red alga Porphyra yezoensis. The significance of Ca2+ influx and phosphoinositide signalling during the formation of cell polarity in migrating monospores was analysed pharmacologically. The results indicate that the inhibition of the establishment of cell polarity, as judged by the ability of F-actin to localize asymmetrically, cell wall synthesis, and development into germlings, occurred when monospores were treated with inhibitors of the Ca2+ permeable channel, phospholipase C (PLC), diacylglycerol kinase, and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor. Moreover, it was also found that light triggered the establishment of cell polarity via photosynthetic activity but not its direction, indicating that the Ca2+ influx and PLC activation required for the establishment of cell polarity are light dependent. By contrast, inhibition of phospholipase D (PLD) prevented the migration of monospores but not the asymmetrical localization of F-actin. Taken together, these findings suggest that there is functional diversity between the PLC and PLD signalling systems in terms of the formation of cell polarity; the former being critical for the light-dependent establishment of cell polarity and the latter playing a role in the maintenance of established cell polarity.

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of a candidate human growth-related and time-keeping constitutive cell surface hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ziying; Gorenstein, Nina M; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2008-12-30

    ENOX (ECTO-NOX) proteins are growth-related cell surface proteins that catalyze both hydroquinone or NADH oxidation and protein disulfide-thiol interchange and exhibit both prion-like and time-keeping (clock) properties. The two enzymatic activities they catalyze alternate to generate a regular period of 24 min in length. Here we report the cloning, expression, and characterization of a human candidate constitutive ENOX (CNOX or ENOX1) protein. The gene encoding this 643 amino acid long protein is located on chromosome 13 (13q 14.11). Functional motifs previously identified by site-directed mutagenesis in a cancer-associated ENOX (tNOX or ENOX2) as adenine nucleotide or copper binding along with essential cysteines are present, but the drug-binding motif (EEMTE) sequence of ENOX2 is absent. The activities of the recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli were not affected by capsaicin, EGCg, and other ENOX2-inhibiting substances. The purified recombinant protein bound ca. 2 mol of copper/mol of protein. Bound copper was necessary for activity. H260 and H579 were required for copper binding as confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, loss of copper-binding capacity, and resultant loss of enzymatic activity. Addition of melatonin phased the 24 min period such that the next complete period began exactly 24 min after the melatonin addition as appears to be characteristic of ENOX1 activities in general. Oxidative activity was exhibited with both NAD(P)H and reduced coenzyme Q as substrate. Concentrated solutions of the purified candidate ENOX1 protein irreversibly formed insoluble aggregates, devoid of enzymatic activity, resembling amyloid.

  19. Alpha-type-1 polarized dendritic cells: A novel immunization tool with optimized CTL-inducing activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mailliard, Robbie B.; Wankowicz-Kalinska, Anna; Cai, Quan; Wesa, Amy; Hilkens, Catharien M.; Kapsenberg, Martien L.; Kirkwood, John M.; Storkus, Walter J.; Kalinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    Using the principle of functional polarization of dendritic cells (DCs), we have developed a novel protocol to generate human DCs combining the three features critical for the induction of type-1 immunity: (a) fully mature status; (b) responsiveness to secondary lymphoid organ chemokines; and (c)

  20. Regulatory Cells and Immunosuppressive Cytokines: Parasite-Derived Factors Induce Immune Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ouaissi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections are prevalent in both tropical and subtropical areas. Most of the affected and/or exposed populations are living in developing countries where control measures are lacking or inadequately applied. Although significant progress has been made in our understanding of the immune response to parasites, no definitive step has yet been successfully done in terms of operational vaccines against parasitic diseases. Evidence accumulated during the past few years suggests that the pathology observed during parasitic infections is in part due to deregulation of normal components of the immune system, mainly cytokines, antibodies, and immune effector cell populations. A large number of studies that illustrate how parasites can modify the host immune system for their own benefit have been reported in both metazoan and protozoan parasites. The first line of defense against foreign organisms is barrier tissue such as skin, humoral factors, for instance the complement system and pentraxin, which upon activation of the complement cascade facilitate pathogen recognition by cells of innate immunity such as macrophages and DC. However, all the major groups of parasites studied have been shown to contain and/or to release factors, which interfere with both arms of the host immune system. Even some astonishing observations relate to the production by some parasites of orthologues of mammalian cytokines. Furthermore, chronic parasitic infections have led to the immunosuppressive environment that correlates with increased levels of myeloid and T suppressor cells that may limit the success of immunotherapeutic strategies based on vaccination. This minireview briefly analyzes some of the current data related to the regulatory cells and molecules derived from parasites that affect cellular function and contribute to the polarization of the immune response of the host. Special attention is given to some of the data from our laboratory illustrating the

  1. Auxin efflux carrier activity and auxin accumulation regulate cell division and polarity in tobacco cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrášek, Jan; Elčkner, Miroslav; Morris, David; Zažímalová, Eva

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 216, - (2002), s. 302-308 ISSN 0032-0935 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/98/1510 Grant - others:INCO Copernicus(BE) IC15-CT98-0118 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Auxin carrier * 1,N,Naphthylphthalamic acid * Nicotiana ( cell culture) Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.960, year: 2002

  2. Lactobacilli Activate Human Dendritic Cells that Skew T Cells Toward T Helper 1 Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-06

    as Klebsiella pneumoniae (21–23). To determine whether this difference might vary among species, live L . gasseri, L . johnsonii, and L . reuteri cells...or L . reuteri plus E. coli LPS for 2 d. Under these conditions, LPS promoted the production of IL-10 only in 11% of MDCs, compared with the high (60...induction of IL-10 with E. coli LPS in the absence of L . reuteri (Fig. 2 B and C). Lethally-irradiated Lactobacillus species (10 gml) also

  3. The influence of non polar and polar molecules in mouse motile cells membranes and pure lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Sierra-Valdez

    Full Text Available We report an experimental study of mouse sperm motility that shows chief aspects characteristic of neurons: the anesthetic (produced by tetracaine and excitatory (produced by either caffeine or calcium effects and their antagonic action. While tetracaine inhibits sperm motility and caffeine has an excitatory action, the combination of these two substances balance the effects, producing a motility quite similar to that of control cells. We also study the effects of these agents (anesthetic and excitatory on the melting points of pure lipid liposomes constituted by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA. Tetracaine induces a large fluidization of the membrane, shifting the liposomes melting transition temperature to much lower values. The effect of caffeine is null, but its addition to tetracaine-doped liposomes greatly screen the fluidization effect. A high calcium concentration stiffens pure lipid membranes and strongly reduces the effect of tetracaine. Molecular Dynamics Simulations are performed to further understand our experimental findings at the molecular level. We find a strong correlation between the effect of antagonic molecules that could explain how the mechanical properties suitable for normal cell functioning are affected and recovered.

  4. Non-canonical Wnt signaling regulates cell polarity in female reproductive tract development via van gogh-like 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    vandenBerg, Alysia L.; Sassoon, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Wnt signaling effectors direct the development and adult remodeling of the female reproductive tract (FRT); however, the role of non-canonical Wnt signaling has not been explored in this tissue. The non-canonical Wnt signaling protein van gogh-like 2 is mutated in loop-tail (Lp) mutant mice (Vangl2Lp), which display defects in multiple tissues. We find that Vangl2Lp mutant uterine epithelium displays altered cell polarity, concommitant with changes in cytoskeletal actin and scribble (scribbled, Scrb1) localization. The postnatal mutant phenotype is an exacerbation of that seen at birth, exhibiting more smooth muscle and reduced stromal mesenchyme. These data suggest that early changes in cell polarity have lasting consequences for FRT development. Furthermore, Vangl2 is required to restrict Scrb1 protein to the basolateral epithelial membrane in the neonatal uterus, and an accumulation of fibrillar-like structures observed by electron microscopy in Vangl2Lp mutant epithelium suggests that mislocalization of Scrb1 in mutants alters the composition of the apical face of the epithelium. Heterozygous and homozygous Vangl2Lp mutant postnatal tissues exhibit similar phenotypes and polarity defects and display a 50% reduction in Wnt7a levels, suggesting that the Vangl2Lp mutation acts dominantly in the FRT. These studies demonstrate that the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity through non-canonical Wnt signaling are required for FRT development. PMID:19363157

  5. AHP 47: KEEPING WATCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pad ma skyid པདྨ་སྐྱིད།

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A rig rgad po circumambulated the Jo khang the whole night. As soon as the door opened in the early morning, he entered the Jo khang and sat on the floor across from the Jo bo. "I am so happy to see you," A rig rgad po said. The Jo bo image smiled in return. "My feet ache from walking, but you are still smiling!" A rig rgad po said. He continued, "If you've got nothing to say, keep an eye on my shoes. Please don’t lose them. They are my only shoes. I'll be right back." ...

  6. T cells' immunological synapses induce polarization of brain astrocytes in vivo and in vitro: a novel astrocyte response mechanism to cellular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcia, Carlos; Sanderson, Nicholas S R; Barrett, Robert J; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Kroeger, Kurt M; Puntel, Mariana; Liu, Chunyan; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2008-08-20

    Astrocytes usually respond to trauma, stroke, or neurodegeneration by undergoing cellular hypertrophy, yet, their response to a specific immune attack by T cells is poorly understood. Effector T cells establish specific contacts with target cells, known as immunological synapses, during clearance of virally infected cells from the brain. Immunological synapses mediate intercellular communication between T cells and target cells, both in vitro and in vivo. How target virally infected astrocytes respond to the formation of immunological synapses established by effector T cells is unknown. Herein we demonstrate that, as a consequence of T cell attack, infected astrocytes undergo dramatic morphological changes. From normally multipolar cells, they become unipolar, extending a major protrusion towards the immunological synapse formed by the effector T cells, and withdrawing most of their finer processes. Thus, target astrocytes become polarized towards the contacting T cells. The MTOC, the organizer of cell polarity, is localized to the base of the protrusion, and Golgi stacks are distributed throughout the protrusion, reaching distally towards the immunological synapse. Thus, rather than causing astrocyte hypertrophy, antiviral T cells cause a major structural reorganization of target virally infected astrocytes. Astrocyte polarization, as opposed to hypertrophy, in response to T cell attack may be due to T cells providing a very focused attack, and thus, astrocytes responding in a polarized manner. A similar polarization of Golgi stacks towards contacting T cells was also detected using an in vitro allogeneic model. Thus, different T cells are able to induce polarization of target astrocytes. Polarization of target astrocytes in response to immunological synapses may play an important role in regulating the outcome of the response of astrocytes to attacking effector T cells, whether during antiviral (e.g. infected during HIV, HTLV-1, HSV-1 or LCMV infection), anti

  7. T cells' immunological synapses induce polarization of brain astrocytes in vivo and in vitro: a novel astrocyte response mechanism to cellular injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Barcia

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes usually respond to trauma, stroke, or neurodegeneration by undergoing cellular hypertrophy, yet, their response to a specific immune attack by T cells is poorly understood. Effector T cells establish specific contacts with target cells, known as immunological synapses, during clearance of virally infected cells from the brain. Immunological synapses mediate intercellular communication between T cells and target cells, both in vitro and in vivo. How target virally infected astrocytes respond to the formation of immunological synapses established by effector T cells is unknown.Herein we demonstrate that, as a consequence of T cell attack, infected astrocytes undergo dramatic morphological changes. From normally multipolar cells, they become unipolar, extending a major protrusion towards the immunological synapse formed by the effector T cells, and withdrawing most of their finer processes. Thus, target astrocytes become polarized towards the contacting T cells. The MTOC, the organizer of cell polarity, is localized to the base of the protrusion, and Golgi stacks are distributed throughout the protrusion, reaching distally towards the immunological synapse. Thus, rather than causing astrocyte hypertrophy, antiviral T cells cause a major structural reorganization of target virally infected astrocytes.Astrocyte polarization, as opposed to hypertrophy, in response to T cell attack may be due to T cells providing a very focused attack, and thus, astrocytes responding in a polarized manner. A similar polarization of Golgi stacks towards contacting T cells was also detected using an in vitro allogeneic model. Thus, different T cells are able to induce polarization of target astrocytes. Polarization of target astrocytes in response to immunological synapses may play an important role in regulating the outcome of the response of astrocytes to attacking effector T cells, whether during antiviral (e.g. infected during HIV, HTLV-1, HSV-1 or LCMV

  8. Cigarette smoke extract-treated mast cells promote alveolar macrophage infiltration and polarization in experimental chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Yang, Tian; Ning, Qian; Li, Feiyan; Chen, Tianjun; Yao, Yan; Sun, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the main cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may modulate the immune response of exposed individuals. Mast cell function can be altered by cigarette smoking, but the role of smoking in COPD remains poorly understood. The current study aimed to explore the role of cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-treated mast cells in COPD pathogenesis. Cytokine and chemokine expression as well as degranulation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were detected in cells exposed to immunoglobulin E (IgE) and various doses of CSE. Adoptive transfer of CSE-treated BMMCs into C57BL/6J mice was performed, and macrophage infiltration and polarization were evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Furthermore, a coculture system of BMMCs and macrophages was established to examine macrophage phenotype transition. The role of protease serine member S31 (Prss31) was also investigated in the co-culture system and in COPD mice. CSE exposure suppressed cytokine expression and degranulation in BMMCs, but promoted the expressions of chemokines and Prss31. Adoptive transfer of CSE-treated BMMCs induced macrophage infiltration and M2 polarization in the mouse lung. Moreover, CSE-treated BMMCs triggered macrophage M2 polarization via Prss31 secretion. Recombinant Prss31 was shown to activate interleukin (IL)-13/IL-13Rα/Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) 6 signaling in macrophages. Additionally, a positive correlation was found between Prss31 expression and the number of M2 macrophages in COPD mice. In conclusion, CSE-treated mast cells may induce macrophage infiltration and M2 polarization via Prss31 expression, and potentially contribute to COPD progression.

  9. A link between planar polarity and staircase-like bundle architecture in hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarchini, Basile; Tadenev, Abigail L D; Devanney, Nicholas; Cayouette, Michel

    2016-11-01

    Sensory perception in the inner ear relies on the hair bundle, the highly polarized brush of movement detectors that crowns hair cells. We previously showed that, in the mouse cochlea, the edge of the forming bundle is defined by the 'bare zone', a microvilli-free sub-region of apical membrane specified by the Insc-LGN-Gαi protein complex. We now report that LGN and Gαi also occupy the very tip of stereocilia that directly abut the bare zone. We demonstrate that LGN and Gαi are both essential for promoting the elongation and differential identity of stereocilia across rows. Interestingly, we also reveal that total LGN-Gαi protein amounts are actively balanced between the bare zone and stereocilia tips, suggesting that early planar asymmetry of protein enrichment at the bare zone confers adjacent stereocilia their tallest identity. We propose that LGN and Gαi participate in a long-inferred signal that originates outside the bundle to model its staircase-like architecture, a property that is essential for direction sensitivity to mechanical deflection and hearing. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Bipolar Plasma Membrane Distribution of Phosphoinositides and Their Requirement for Auxin-Mediated Cell Polarity and Patterning in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Ricardo; Sauer, Michael; Vanneste, Steffen; Palacios-Gomez, Miriam; Li, Hongjiang; Heilmann, Mareike; van Wijk, Ringo; Vermeer, Joop E.M.; Heilmann, Ingo; Munnik, Teun; Friml, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarity manifested by asymmetric distribution of cargoes, such as receptors and transporters, within the plasma membrane (PM) is crucial for essential functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell polarity (re)establishment is intimately linked to patterning processes. Despite the importance of cell polarity, its underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown, including the definition and distinctiveness of the polar domains within the PM. Here, we show in Arabidopsis thaliana that the signaling membrane components, the phosphoinositides phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] as well as PtdIns4P 5-kinases mediating their interconversion, are specifically enriched at apical and basal polar plasma membrane domains. The PtdIns4P 5-kinases PIP5K1 and PIP5K2 are redundantly required for polar localization of specifically apical and basal cargoes, such as PIN-FORMED transporters for the plant hormone auxin. As a consequence of the polarity defects, instructive auxin gradients as well as embryonic and postembryonic patterning are severely compromised. Furthermore, auxin itself regulates PIP5K transcription and PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P2 levels, in particular their association with polar PM domains. Our results provide insight into the polar domain–delineating mechanisms in plant cells that depend on apical and basal distribution of membrane lipids and are essential for embryonic and postembryonic patterning. PMID:24876254

  11. Intracellular photoreceptive site for blue light-induced cell division in protonemata of the fern Adiantum [Pteridophyta]: Further analyses by polarized light irradiation and cell centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadota, A.; Fushimi, Y.; Wada, M.

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular localization of the photoreceptive site for blue light-induced cell division in single-celled protonemata of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. was investigated using polarized light irradiation and protonemal cell centrifugation. The response to irradiation with polarized blue light showed no dependence on the direction of light polarization. However, centrifugation of the protonemata followed by microbeam irradiation showed that the site of blue light perception could be displaced together with the nucleus. Centrifugal treatment changed the distribution of intracellular organelles at the time of light exposure and basipetally displaced the nucleus about 90μm. This treatment had no effect on the induction of cell division with blue light if the protonemata were centrifuged again acropetally after the light treatment. Microbeam (30×30 μm2) irradiation with blue light of the apical 45–75 βm region, the receptive site of blue light in non-centrifuged cell, did not induce cell division. However, cell division was induced by irradiation of the nucleus-containing region, indicating that the photoreceptive site was displaced together with the nucleus by the centrifugation. These results suggest that the blue light receptor regulating cell division in Adiantum protonemata is not likely to be located on the plasma membrane. (author)

  12. Par1b links lumen polarity with LGN-NuMA positioning for distinct epithelial cell division phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Cohen, David; Fernandez, Dawn; Hodgson, Louis; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C D; Müsch, Anne

    2013-10-28

    Columnar epithelia establish their luminal domains and their mitotic spindles parallel to the basal surface and undergo symmetric cell divisions in which the cleavage furrow bisects the apical domain. Hepatocyte lumina interrupt the lateral domain of neighboring cells perpendicular to two basal domains and their cleavage furrow rarely bifurcates the luminal domains. We determine that the serine/threonine kinase Par1b defines lumen position in concert with the position of the astral microtubule anchoring complex LGN-NuMA to yield the distinct epithelial division phenotypes. Par1b signaling via the extracellular matrix (ECM) in polarizing cells determined RhoA/Rho-kinase activity at cell-cell contact sites. Columnar MDCK and Par1b-depleted hepatocytic HepG2 cells featured high RhoA activity that correlated with robust LGN-NuMA recruitment to the metaphase cortex, spindle alignment with the substratum, and columnar organization. Reduced RhoA activity at the metaphase cortex in HepG2 cells and Par1b-overexpressing MDCK cells correlated with a single or no LGN-NuMA crescent, tilted spindles, and the development of lateral lumen polarity.

  13. Rab17 and rab18, small GTPases with specificity for polarized epithelial cells: genetic mapping in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, E B; Barbosa, M D; Zerial, M; Kingsmore, S F

    1997-11-01

    The Rab subfamily of small GTPases plays an important role in the regulation of membrane traffic in eukaryotic cells. While most Rab proteins are equally expressed in polarized and nonpolarized cells, Rab17 and Rab18 show epithelial cell specificity. Here we report the genetic mapping of Rab17 and Rab18 on mouse chromosomes 1 and 18, respectively. We also discuss some implications of Rab17 and Rab18 mapping, including their candidacy for the mouse mutations ln (leaden), Tw (twirler), and ax (ataxia). Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  14. ASPP2 links the apical lateral polarity complex to the regulation of YAP activity in epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Royer

    Full Text Available The Hippo pathway, by tightly controlling the phosphorylation state and activity of the transcription cofactors YAP and TAZ is essential during development and tissue homeostasis whereas its deregulation may lead to cancer. Recent studies have linked the apicobasal polarity machinery in epithelial cells to components of the Hippo pathway and YAP and TAZ themselves. However the molecular mechanism by which the junctional pool of YAP proteins is released and activated in epithelial cells remains unknown. Here we report that the tumour suppressor ASPP2 forms an apical-lateral polarity complex at the level of tight junctions in polarised epithelial cells, acting as a scaffold for protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 and junctional YAP via dedicated binding domains. ASPP2 thereby directly induces the dephosphorylation and activation of junctional YAP. Collectively, this study unearths a novel mechanistic paradigm revealing the critical role of the apical-lateral polarity complex in activating this localised pool of YAP in vitro, in epithelial cells, and in vivo, in the murine colonic epithelium. We propose that this mechanism may commonly control YAP functions in epithelial tissues.

  15. Dependence of InGaN solar cell performance on polarization-induced electric field and carrier lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jing; Zhao De-Gang; Jiang De-Sheng; Liu Zong-Shun; Chen Ping; Li Liang; Wu Liang-Liang; Le Ling-Cong; Li Xiao-Jing; He Xiao-Guang; Yang Hui; Wang Hui; Zhu Jian-Jun; Zhang Shu-Ming; Zhang Bao-Shun

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Mg-induced net acceptor doping concentration and carrier lifetime on the performance of a p—i—n InGaN solar cell are investigated. It is found that the electric field induced by spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization in the i-region could be totally shielded when the Mg-induced net acceptor doping concentration is sufficiently high. The polarization-induced potential barriers are reduced and the short circuit current density is remarkably increased from 0.21 mA/cm 2 to 0.95 mA/cm 2 by elevating the Mg doping concentration. The carrier lifetime determined by defect density of i-InGaN also plays an important role in determining the photovoltaic properties of solar cell. The short circuit current density severely degrades, and the performance of InGaN solar cell becomes more sensitive to the polarization when carrier lifetime is lower than the transit time. This study demonstrates that the crystal quality of InGaN absorption layer is one of the most important challenges in realizing high efficiency InGaN solar cells. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  16. Study of Collagen Birefringence in Different Grades of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using Picrosirius Red and Polarized Light Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillai Arun Gopinathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The present study was done to evaluate birefringence pattern of collagen fibres in different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma using Picrosirius red stain and polarization microscopy and to determine if there is a change in collagen fibres between different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods. Picrosirius red stained 5 μm thick sections of previously diagnosed different grades of squamous cell carcinoma and normal oral mucosa were studied under polarization microscopy for arrangement as well as birefringence of collagen fibres around tumour islands. Results. It was found that thin collagen fibres increased and thick collagen fibres decreased with dedifferentiation of OSCC (P<0.0001 . It was observed that there was change in polarization colours of thick fibres from yellowish orange to greenish yellow with dedifferentiation of OSCC indicating loosely packed fibres (P<0.0001. Conclusion. There was a gradual change of birefringence of collagen from yellowish orange to greenish yellow from well to poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, indicating that there is a change from mature form of collagen to immature form as tumour progresses. Studying collagen fibres with Picrosirius red for stromal changes around tumour islands along with routine staining may help in predicting the prognosis of tumour.

  17. A new source of Southern Ocean and Antarctic aerosol from tropospheric polar cell chemistry of sea ice emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, R. S.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Schofield, R.; Robinson, A. D.; Harris, N. R. P.; Keywood, M.; Ward, J.; Galbally, I.; Molloy, S.; Thomas, A.; Wilson, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Antarctic region is a pristine environment with minimal anthropogenic influence. Aerosol measurements in this environment allow the study of natural aerosols and polar atmospheric dynamics. Measurements in this region have been limited primarily to continental and coastal locations where permanent stations exist, with a handful of measurements in the sea ice region. The MAPS campaign (Measurements of Aerosols and Precursors during SIPEXII) occurred as part of SIPEX II (Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystems eXperiment II) voyage in Spring, 2012, and produced the first Antarctic pack-ice focused aerosol dataset aimed at characterizing new particle formation processes off the coast of East Antarctica (~65°S, 120°E). Numerous atmospheric parameters and species were measured, including the number of aerosol particles in the 3-10 nm size range, the range associated with nucleating particle formation. A latitudinal transect through the sea ice identified the Polar Front from sudden changes in nucleating particle concentrations, averaging 51cm-3 north of the front in the Ferrel cell, and 766 cm-3 south of the front, in the Polar cell region. The Polar Front location was also confirmed by meteorological and back-trajectory data. Background aerosol populations in the Polar cell fluctuated significantly but displayed no growth indicators, suggesting transport. Back-trajectories revealed that air parcels often descended from the free-troposphere within the previous 24-48 hrs. It is proposed that particle formation occurs in the free troposphere from precursors uplifted at the polar front region which, being a sea-ice/ocean region, is a significant precursor source. After tropospheric formation, populations descending at the poles are transported northward and reach the sea ice surface, missing continental stations. Current measurements of Antarctic aerosol suggest very low loading which may be explained by these circulation patterns and may underestimate total regional loading

  18. Photon harvesting, coloring and polarizing in photovoltaic cell integrated color filters: efficient energy routing strategies for power-saving displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Long; Chen, Qin; Song, Shichao; Yu, Yan; Jin, Lin; Hu, Xin

    2015-07-03

    We describe the integral electro-optical strategies that combine the functionalities of photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation and color filtering as well as polarizing to realize more efficient energy routing in display technology. Unlike the conventional pigment-based filters and polarizers, which absorb substantial amounts of unwanted spectral components and dissipate them in the form of heat, we propose converting the energy of those photons into electricity by constructing PV cell-integrated color filters based on a selectively transmitting aluminum (Al) rear electrode perforated with nanoholes (NHs). Combining with a dielectric-metal-dielectric (DMD) front electrode, the devices were optimized to enable efficient cavity-enhanced photon recycling in the PV functional layers. We perform a comprehensive theoretical and numerical analysis to explore the extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through the Al NHs and identify basic design rules for achieving structural coloring or polarizing in our PV color filters. We show that the addition of thin photoactive polymer layers on the symmetrically configured Al NH electrode narrows the bandwidth of the EOT-assisted high-pass light filtering due to the strongly damped anti-symmetric coupling of the surface modes excited on the front and rear surface of the Al NHs, which facilitates the whole visible coloring with relatively high purity for the devices. By engineering the cut-off characteristics of the plasmonic waveguide mode supported by the circular or ellipsoidal Al NHs, beyond the photon recycling capacity, PV color filters and PV polarizing color filters that allow polarization-insensitive and strong polarization-anisotropic color filtering were demonstrated. The findings presented here may shed some light on expanding the utilization of PV electricity generation across new-generation energy-saving electrical display devices.

  19. Photon harvesting, coloring and polarizing in photovoltaic cell integrated color filters: efficient energy routing strategies for power-saving displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Long; Chen, Qin; Song, Shichao; Yu, Yan; Jin, Lin; Hu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the integral electro-optical strategies that combine the functionalities of photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation and color filtering as well as polarizing to realize more efficient energy routing in display technology. Unlike the conventional pigment-based filters and polarizers, which absorb substantial amounts of unwanted spectral components and dissipate them in the form of heat, we propose converting the energy of those photons into electricity by constructing PV cell-integrated color filters based on a selectively transmitting aluminum (Al) rear electrode perforated with nanoholes (NHs). Combining with a dielectric-metal-dielectric (DMD) front electrode, the devices were optimized to enable efficient cavity-enhanced photon recycling in the PV functional layers. We perform a comprehensive theoretical and numerical analysis to explore the extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through the Al NHs and identify basic design rules for achieving structural coloring or polarizing in our PV color filters. We show that the addition of thin photoactive polymer layers on the symmetrically configured Al NH electrode narrows the bandwidth of the EOT-assisted high-pass light filtering due to the strongly damped anti-symmetric coupling of the surface modes excited on the front and rear surface of the Al NHs, which facilitates the whole visible coloring with relatively high purity for the devices. By engineering the cut-off characteristics of the plasmonic waveguide mode supported by the circular or ellipsoidal Al NHs, beyond the photon recycling capacity, PV color filters and PV polarizing color filters that allow polarization-insensitive and strong polarization-anisotropic color filtering were demonstrated. The findings presented here may shed some light on expanding the utilization of PV electricity generation across new-generation energy-saving electrical display devices. (paper)

  20. Identification of the arabidopsis RAM/MOR signalling network: adding new regulatory players in plant stem cell maintenance and cell polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zermiani, Monica; Begheldo, Maura; Nonis, Alessandro; Palme, Klaus; Mizzi, Luca; Morandini, Piero; Nonis, Alberto; Ruperti, Benedetto

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The RAM/MOR signalling network of eukaryotes is a conserved regulatory module involved in co-ordination of stem cell maintenance, cell differentiation and polarity establishment. To date, no such signalling network has been identified in plants. Methods Genes encoding the bona fide core components of the RAM/MOR pathway were identified in Arabidopsis thaliana (arabidopsis) by sequence similarity searches conducted with the known components from other species. The transcriptional network(s) of the arabidopsis RAM/MOR signalling pathway were identified by running in-depth in silico analyses for genes co-regulated with the core components. In situ hybridization was used to confirm tissue-specific expression of selected RAM/MOR genes. Key Results Co-expression data suggested that the arabidopsis RAM/MOR pathway may include genes involved in floral transition, by co-operating with chromatin remodelling and mRNA processing/post-transcriptional gene silencing factors, and genes involved in the regulation of pollen tube polar growth. The RAM/MOR pathway may act upstream of the ROP1 machinery, affecting pollen tube polar growth, based on the co-expression of its components with ROP-GEFs. In silico tissue-specific co-expression data and in situ hybridization experiments suggest that different components of the arabidopsis RAM/MOR are expressed in the shoot apical meristem and inflorescence meristem and may be involved in the fine-tuning of stem cell maintenance and cell differentiation. Conclusions The arabidopsis RAM/MOR pathway may be part of the signalling cascade that converges in pollen tube polarized growth and in fine-tuning stem cell maintenance, differentiation and organ polarity. PMID:26078466

  1. Polarization Imaging Apparatus for Cell and Tissue Imaging and Diagnostics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work proposes to capitalize on our Phase I success in a novel visible-near infrared Stokes polarization imaging technology based on high performance fast...

  2. Polarization Imaging Apparatus for Cell and Tissue Imaging and Diagnostics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the propagation of polarized light in randomly scattering media. The investigation of backscattered light is...

  3. Polarization Imaging Apparatus for Cell and Tissue Imaging and Diagnostics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work proposes to capitalize on our Phase I success in a novel visible-near infrared Stokes polarization imaging technology based on high performance fast...

  4. Mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 regulates GSK3β-dependent microtubule dynamics required for T cell migratory polarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoxia Dong

    Full Text Available The mammalian diaphanous-related formin (mDia1, a Rho-regulated cytoskeletal modulator, has been shown to promote T lymphocyte chemotaxis and interaction with antigen presenting cells, but the mechanisms underpinning mDia1 roles in these processes have not been defined. Here we show that mDia1(-/- T cells exhibit impaired lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1-mediated T cell adhesion, migration and in vivo trafficking. These defects are associated with impaired microtubule (MT polarization and stabilization, altered MT dynamics and reduced peripheral clustering of the MT plus-end-protein, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC in migrating T cells following LFA-1-engagement. Loss of mDia1 also leads to impaired inducible inactivation of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK 3β as well as hyperphosphorylation and reduced levels of APC in migrating T cells. These findings identify essential roles for the mDia1 formin in modulating GSK3β-dependent MT contributions to induction of T-cell polarity, adhesion and motility.

  5. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  6. Water-polysaccharide interactions in the primary cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana from polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water (1)H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide (13)C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water-pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water-cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water-polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water-pectin spin diffusion precedes water-cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.

  7. Differential expression of p-ERM, a marker of cell polarity, in benign and neoplastic oviductal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Gang; Bijron, Jonathan G; Yuan, Ju; Hirsch, Michelle S; McKeon, Frank D; Nucci, Marisa R; Crum, Christopher P; Xian, Wa

    2013-07-01

    Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) is a noninvasive phase of pelvic serous cancer at risk for metastasizing. Because of its biologic significance, its accurate distinction from nonmalignant mimics is important. Loss of cell orientation is an important feature of STIC. We sought to determine whether the immunohistochemical localization of cytoskeletal-organizing proteins phospho-ezrin-radaxin-moesin (p-ERM) would be useful in making this distinction. The benign oviductal entities (normal and p53 signatures), premalignant atypias (tubal intraepithelial lesions in transition), serous intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs), and carcinomas were analyzed for 5 staining patterns and compared. Linear or uniform luminal p-ERM staining was strongly associated with benign mucosa in contrast to STICs, in which it was lost and often replaced by nonlinear or nonuniform patterns highlighting individually cell groups or single cells. Premalignant atypias were similar to benign mucosa by p-ERM staining and retained the linear luminal pattern. This study shows, for the first time, that patterns of staining for an immunohistochemical correlate of cell polarity (p-ERM) differ between STICs, their benign counterparts and premalignant atypias that do not fulfill the criteria for STICs. If confirmed, these findings warrant further analysis of indices of cell polarity as objective markers for the diagnosis and mapping of the evolution of pelvic serous precursors.

  8. Effects of low molecular weight heparin on the polarization and cytokine profile of macrophages and T helper cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Valentina; Svensson-Arvelund, Judit; Rubér, Marie; Berg, Göran; Piccione, Emilio; Jenmalm, Maria C; Ernerudh, Jan

    2018-03-08

    Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is widely used in recurrent miscarriage treatment. The anti-coagulant effects are established, while immunological effects are not fully known. Our aim was to assess LMWH effects on activation and polarization of central regulatory immune cells from healthy women, and on placenta tissues from women undergoing elective abortions. Isolated blood monocytes and T helper (Th) cells under different activation and polarizing conditions were cultured with or without LMWH. Flow cytometry showed that LMWH exposure induced increased expression of HLA-DR and CD206 in macrophages. This phenotype was associated with increased secretion of Th17-associated CCL20, and decreased secretion of CCL2 (M2-associated) and CCL22 (Th2), as measured by multiplex bead array. In accordance, LMWH exposure to Th cells reduced the proportion of CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T-cells, intensified IFN-γ secretion and showed a tendency to increase the lymphoblast proportions. Collectively, a mainly pro-inflammatory effect was noted on two essential tolerance-promoting cells. Although the biological significancies of these in vitro findings are uncertain and need to be confirmed in vivo, they suggest the possibility that immunological effects of LMWH may be beneficial mainly at an earlier gestational age to provide an appropriate implantation process in women with recurrent miscarriage.

  9. Membrane potential of cells and its regulation during aging. 2. Report: the effect of hormones on the level of the cellular plasma membrane polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolkis, V V; Tanin, S A; Gorban, E N; Bogatskaya, L N; Sabko, V E

    1987-01-01

    Age-dependent changes in the polarization of plasma membranes (PM) of various cell types and the mechanisms responsible for its regulation were studied in the experiments on the adult (6-8 and old (28-32 months) Wistar male rats. It was found that the effect of the hormones on the PM polarization level is altered during aging. This being related to shifts in the number and affinity of the hormonal receptors, energetic processes and protein synthesis in the cell.

  10. Living Cells and Dynamic Molecules Observed with the Polarized Light Microscope: the Legacy of Shinya Inoué.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Tomomi; Shribak, Michael; Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2016-08-01

    In 1948, Shinya Inoué arrived in the United States for graduate studies at Princeton. A year later he came to Woods Hole, starting a long tradition of summer research at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), which quickly became Inoué's scientific home. Primed by his Japanese mentor, Katsuma Dan, Inoué followed Dan's mantra to work with healthy, living cells, on a fundamental problem (mitosis), with a unique tool set that he refined for precise and quantitative observations (polarized light microscopy), and a fresh and brilliant mind that was unafraid of challenging current dogma. Building on this potent combination, Inoué contributed landmark observations and concepts in cell biology, including the notion that there are dynamic, fine structures inside living cells, in which molecular assemblies such as mitotic spindle fibers exist in delicate equilibrium with their molecular building blocks suspended in the cytoplasm. In the late 1970s and 1980s, Inoué and others at the MBL were instrumental in conceiving video microscopy, a groundbreaking technique which married light microscopy and electronic imaging, ushering in a revolution in how we know and what we know about living cells and the molecular mechanisms of life. Here, we recount some of Inoué's accomplishments and describe how his legacy has shaped current activities in polarized light imaging at the MBL. © 2016 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  11. Type I collagen gel induces Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to become fusiform in shape and lose apical-basal polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, A; Matlin, K S; Hay, E D

    1989-03-01

    In the embryo, epithelia give rise to mesenchyme at specific times and places. Recently, it has been reported (Greenburg, G., and E. D. Hay. 1986. Dev. Biol. 115:363-379; Greenberg, G., and E. D. Hay. 1988. Development (Camb.). 102:605-622) that definitive epithelia can give rise to fibroblast-like cells when suspended within type I collagen gels. We wanted to know whether Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, an epithelial line, can form mesenchyme under similar conditions. Small explants of MDCK cells on basement membrane were suspended within or placed on top of extracellular matrix gels. MDCK cells on basement membrane gel are tall, columnar in shape, and ultrastructurally resemble epithelia transporting fluid and ions. MDCK explants cultured on type I collagen gel give rise to isolated fusiform-shaped cells that migrate over the gel surface. The fusiform cells extend pseudopodia and filopodia, lose cell membrane specializations, and develop an actin cortex around the entire cell. Unlike true mesenchymal cells, which express vimentin and type I collagen, fusiform cells produce both keratin and vimentin, continue to express laminin, and do not turn on type I collagen. Fusiform cells are not apically-basally polarized, but show mesenchymal cell polarity. Influenza hemagglutinin and virus budding localize to the front end or entire cell surface. Na,K-ATPase occurs intracellularly and also symmetrically distributes on the cell surface. Fodrin becomes diffusely distributed along the plasma membrane, ZO-1 cannot be detected, and desmoplakins distribute randomly in the cytoplasm. The loss of epithelial polarity and acquisition of mesenchymal cell polarity and shape by fusiform MDCK cells on type I collagen gel was previously unsuspected. The phenomenon may offer new opportunities for studying cytoplasmic and nuclear mechanisms regulating cell shape and polarity.

  12. Keeping Up: Personal Staff Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolls, Blanche

    2009-01-01

    Some essential components of "keeping current" with trends and new developments in the school library field for library media specialists includes attending conferences and reading professional literature. Beginning in May 2007, one article on "keeping up" each year has been devoted to summarizing the major themes in conferences and professional…

  13. Exocytosis and polarity in plant cells: insights by studying cellulose synthase complexes and the exocyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ying Zhang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis covers aspects of exocytosis, plant cell growth and cell wall formation. These processes are strongly linked as cell growth and cell wall formation occur simultaneously and exocytosis is the process that delivers cell wall components to the existing cell wall

  14. Proinflammatory-Activated Glioma Cells Induce a Switch in Microglial Polarization and Activation Status, From a Predominant M2b Phenotype to a Mixture of M1 and M2a/B Polarized Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Lisi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are primary brain tumors characterized by morphological and genetic complexities, as well as diffuse infiltration into normal brain parenchyma. Within gliomas, microglia/macrophages represent the largest tumor-infiltrating cell population, contributing by at least one-third to the total tumor mass. Bi-directional interactions between glioma cells and microglia may therefore play an important role on tumor growth and biology. In the present study, we have characterized the influence of glioma-soluble factors on microglial function, comparing the effects of media harvested under basal conditions with those of media obtained after inducing a pro-inflammatory activation state in glioma cells. We found that microglial cells undergo a different pattern of activation depending on the stimulus; in the presence of activated glioma-derived factors, i.e. a condition mimicking the late stage of pathology, microglia presents as a mixture of polarization phenotypes (M1 and M2a/b, with up-regulation of iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase, ARG (arginase and IL (interleukine-10. At variance, microglia exposed to basal glioma-derived factors, i.e. a condition resembling the early stage of pathology, shows a more specific pattern of activation, with increased M2b polarization status and up-regulation of IL-10 only. As far as viability and cell proliferation are concerned, both LI-CM [LPS (lipopolysaccharide—IFNγ (interferon γ conditioned media] and C-CM (control-conditioned media induce similar effects on microglial morphology. Finally, in human glioma tissue obtained from surgical resection of patients with IV grade glioblastoma, we detected a significant amount of CD68 positive cells, which is a marker of macrophage/microglial phagocytic activity, suggesting that in vitro findings presented here might have a relevance in the human pathology as well.

  15. Keeping out the oxygen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen, the lightest of the elements, is expected to play a major role in our future energy economy. Its staggering energy content of 142 MJ kg-1 exceeds that of petroleum by a factor of three. Moreover, the combustion of hydrogen, as well as its use in electricity-producing fuel cells, is not

  16. T helper type 1 polarizing γδ T cells and Scavenger receptors contribute to the pathogenesis of Pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dayasagar; Anand, Vivek; Khandpur, Sujay; Sharma, Vinod K; Sharma, Alpana

    2018-01-01

    γδ T cells and Scavenger receptors are key parts of the innate immune machinery, playing significant roles in regulating immune homeostasis at the epithelial surface. The roles of these immune components are not yet characterized for the autoimmune skin disorder Pemphigus vulgaris (PV). Phenotyping and frequency of γδ T cells estimated by flow cytometry have shown increased frequency of γδ T cells (6·7% versus 4·4%) producing interferon- γ (IFN-γ; 35·2% versus 26·68%) in the circulation of patients compared with controls. Dual cytokine-secreting (IFN-γ and interleukin-4) γδ T cells indicate the plasticity of these cells. The γδ T cells of patients with PV have shown higher cytotoxic potential and the higher frequency of γδ T cells producing IFN-γ shows T helper type 1 polarization. The increased expression of Scavenger receptors expression (CD36 and CD163) could be contributing to the elevated inflammatory environment and immune imbalance in this disease. Targeting the inflammatory γδ T cells and Scavenger receptors may pave the way for novel therapeutics. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Impedance of vapor feed direct methanol fuel cells--polarization dependence of elementary processes at the anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, Hiroshi; Ishida, Tomohiro; Teranishi, Nozomu; Arai, Chikao; Yamada, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    Membrane electrode assemblies of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) with different catalyst and ionomer loading were prepared. Anode performance and impedance spectra were measured to clarify the characteristics of vapor feed DMFCs (VF-DMFCs). The impedance spectra were deconvolved into three semi-circles with different time constants, each showing a different dependence on the anodic polarization. The middle-frequency range arc decreased as the anodic polarization increased, indicating that this process represents the oxidation reaction of methanol. The high-frequency range arc showed little dependence on the anodic polarization, but increased with the thickness of the electrode, indicating that this process might be related to proton conduction through the electrode. The low-frequency range arc was observed only when the methanol concentration was low, in contrast to liquid feed DMFCs (LF-DMFCs), for which the removal of the product gas presents a large resistance. A simpler design can therefore be used for a VF-DMFC, giving it an advantage over an LF-DMFC. A decreasing ionomer to catalyst ratio (I/C) caused the interfacial conductivity (σ E ) to increase, but it intensively decreased when I/C was below 0.25. Thus, the connection of the catalysts is important for the anode's performance

  18. All in one - integrating cell polarity, meiosis, mitosis and mechanical forces in early oocyte differentiation in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkouby, Yaniv M

    2017-01-01

    While the differentiation of oocytes is key for embryonic development, and its investigation is crucial for advancing our understanding of human reproduction and fertility, many fundamental questions in oogenesis have been long standing. However, recent technical advances have led to several breakthroughs mainly in mice and zebrafish. Here I review these recent findings, including regulation and organization of the germline cyst, the mechanistics of chromosomal pairing, establishment of cell polarity, and formation of a universal mRNA-protein (mRNP) granule called the Balbiani body. I discuss common themes in oogenesis from frogs, fish and mouse and compare them to findings from C. elegans and Drosophila. The zebrafish juvenile ovary is an attractive model where these individual processes can be investigated, but also revealing how they are inter-coordinated in oocyte differentiation. A conserved cellular organizer was discovered in the zebrafish oocyte that seems to function at a nexus of oocyte differentiation. This organizer, termed the Meiotic Vegetal Center (MVC), is composed of the oocyte centrosome, and couples meiotic chromosomal pairing with oocyte polarization and Balbiani body formation. The MVC breaks the oocyte symmetry, is regulated by upstream mitotic division in the cyst and nucleates Balbiani body mRNPs prion-like aggregation downstream. These processes can shed new light on broad questions in biology, such as how mitosis contributes to cell polarity, and how prion aggregation which lead to neurodegenerative disease when awry, is regulated in a physiological context. Furthermore, novel cytoskeletal structures can unravel cytoplasmic mechanical functions in chromosomal pairing. Finally, together with recently developed tools, genome editing technology now enables a robust genetic analysis of these fundamental processes in the zebrafish, paving the way for a comprehensive cell and developmental view of vertebrate oogenesis.

  19. M2-polarized tumor-associated macrophages facilitated migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of HCC cells via the TLR4/STAT3 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rong-Rong; Li, Jing-Huan; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Rong-Xin; Wang, Yan-Hong

    2018-01-16

    M2-polarized macrophages are tumor-associated-macrophages (TAMs), which are important contents of tumor-infiltrating immune cells. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a molecular biomarker of tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have important roles in the immune system and M2-polarized macrophages. However, the effects of TLR4 on M2-polarized macrophages in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are unknown. Here, TLR4 expressed on HCC cells mediates the pro-tumor effects and mechanisms of M2-polarized macrophages. THP-1 cells were induced to differentiate into M2-like macrophages through treatments with IL-4, IL-13, and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). We used the HCC cell lines SMMC-7721 and MHCC97-H cultured in conditioned medium from M2-like macrophages (M2-CM) to investigate the migration potential of HCC cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated molecular genetics. Signaling pathways that mediated M2-CM-promoted HCC migration were detected using western blotting. HCC cells cultured with M2-CM displayed a fibroblast-like morphology, an increased metastatic capability, and expression of EMT markers. TLR4 expression was markedly increased in M2-CM-treated HCC cells. TLR4 overexpression promoted HCC cell migration, and a TLR4-neutralizing antibody markedly inhibited HCC EMT in cells cultured with M2-CM. Furthermore, the TLR4/(signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway contributed to the effects of M2-CM on HCC cells. Taken together, M2-polarized macrophages facilitated the migration and EMT of HCC cells via the TLR4/STAT3 signaling pathway, suggesting that TLR4 may be a novel therapeutic target. These results improve our understanding of M2-polarized macrophages.

  20. [Fluorescence polarization used to investigate the cell membrane fluidity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated by pulsed electric field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zeng, Xin-An; Wen, Qi-Biao; Li, Lin

    2008-01-01

    To know the lethal mechanism of microorganisms under pulsed electric field treatment, the relationship between the inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CICC1308) cell and the permeability and fluidity changes of its cell membrane treated by pulsed electric field (0-25 kV x cm(-1), 0-266 ms) was investigated. With 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) used as a probe, the cell membrane fluidity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated by pulsed electric field was expressed by fluorescence polarization. Results showed that the cell membrane fluidity decreases when the electric flied strength is up to 5 kV x cm(-1), and decreases with the increase in electric field strength and treatment time. The plate counting method and ultraviolet spectrophotometer were used to determine the cell viability and to investigate the cell membrane permeability, respectively, treated by pulsed electric field. Results showed that the lethal ratio and the content of protein and nucleic acid leaked from intracellular plasma increased with the increase in the electric field strength and the extension of treatment time. Even in a quite lower electric field of 5 kV x cm(-1) with a tiny microorganism lethal level, the increase in UV absorption value and the decrease in fluidity were significant. It was demonstrated that the cell membrane fluidity decreases with the increase in lethal ratio and cell membrane permeability. The viscosity of cell membrane increases with the decrease in fluidity. These phenomena indicated that cell membrane is one of the most key sites during the pulsed electric field treatment, and the increased membrane permeability and the decreased cell membrane fluidity contribute to the cell death.

  1. PINCH1 regulates cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesions, cell polarity and cell survival during the peri-implantation stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shaohua; Bordoy, Randi; Stanchi, Fabio

    2005-01-01

    PINCH1 is composed of 5 LIM domains, binds integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and locates to integrin-mediated adhesion sites. In order to investigate PINCH1 function we generated mice and embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) lacking the PINCH1 gene. Similar to mice lacking beta1...... integrin or Ilk, loss of PINCH1 arrested development at the peri-implantation stage. In contrast to beta1 integrin or Ilk mutants, however, disruption of the PINCH1 gene produced implantation chambers with visible cell clumps even at embryonic day 9.5. In order to define the phenotype leading to the peri...... with specific antibodies revealed no apparent alteration of PKB/Akt phosphorylation in PINCH1-deficient EBs. Altogether these data demonstrate an important role of PINCH1 for integrin function, actin organization, cell-cell adhesion and endodermal cell survival during the implanting of mouse embryos....

  2. Adipose-derived stem cells were impaired in restricting CD4+T cell proliferation and polarization in type 2 diabetic ApoE-/- mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Hao; Li, Ya; Han, Lu; Zhang, Yao-Yuan; Wang, Di; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Zhou, Hui-Min; Song, Ming; Li, Yi-Hui; Tang, Meng-Xiong; Zhang, Wei; Zhong, Ming

    2017-07-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is the most common and serious complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is accelerated via chronic systemic inflammation rather than hyperglycemia. Adipose tissue is the major source of systemic inflammation in abnormal metabolic state. Pro-inflammatory CD4 + T cells play pivotal role in promoting adipose inflammation. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for fat regeneration have potent ability of immunosuppression and restricting CD4 + T cells as well. Whether T2DM ADSCs are impaired in antagonizing CD4 + T cell proliferation and polarization remains unclear. We constructed type 2 diabetic ApoE -/- mouse models and tested infiltration and subgroups of CD4 + T cell in stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) in vivo. Normal/T2DM ADSCs and normal splenocytes with or without CD4 sorting were separated and co-cultured at different scales ex vivo. Immune phenotypes of pro- and anti-inflammation of ADSCs were also investigated. Flow cytometry (FCM) and ELISA were applied in the experiments above. CD4 + T cells performed a more pro-inflammatory phenotype in adipose tissue in T2DM ApoE -/- mice in vivo. Restriction to CD4 + T cell proliferation and polarization was manifested obviously weakened after co-cultured with T2DM ADSCs ex vivo. No obvious distinctions were found in morphology and growth type of both ADSCs. However, T2DM ADSCs acquired a pro-inflammatory immune phenotype, with secreting less PGE2 and expressing higher MHC-II and co-stimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80). Normal ADSCs could also obtain the phenotypic change after cultured with T2DM SVF supernatant. CD4 + T cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory polarization exist in adipose tissue in type 2 diabetic ApoE -/- mice. T2DM ADSCs had impaired function in restricting CD4 + T lymphocyte proliferation and pro-inflammatory polarization due to immune phenotypic changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comprehensive analysis of tobacco pollen transcriptome unveils common pathways in polar cell expansion and underlying heterochronic shift during spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafidh Said

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many flowering plants produce bicellular pollen. The two cells of the pollen grain are destined for separate fates in the male gametophyte, which provides a unique opportunity to study genetic interactions that govern guided single-cell polar expansion of the growing pollen tube and the coordinated control of germ cell division and sperm cell fate specification. We applied the Agilent 44 K tobacco gene chip to conduct the first transcriptomic analysis of the tobacco male gametophyte. In addition, we performed a comparative study of the Arabidopsis root-hair trichoblast transcriptome to evaluate genetic factors and common pathways involved in polarized cell-tip expansion. Results Progression of pollen grains from freshly dehisced anthers to pollen tubes 4 h after germination is accompanied with > 5,161 (14.9% gametophyte-specific expressed probes active in at least one of the developmental stages. In contrast, > 18,821 (54.4% probes were preferentially expressed in the sporophyte. Our comparative approach identified a subset of 104 pollen tube-expressed genes that overlap with root-hair trichoblasts. Reverse genetic analysis of selected candidates demonstrated that Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (CSD1, a WD-40 containing protein (BP130384, and Replication factor C1 (NtRFC1 are among the central regulators of pollen-tube tip growth. Extension of our analysis beyond the second haploid mitosis enabled identification of an opposing-dynamic accumulation of core regulators of cell proliferation and cell fate determinants in accordance with the progression of the germ cell cycle. Conclusions The current study provides a foundation to isolate conserved regulators of cell tip expansion and those that are unique for pollen tube growth to the female gametophyte. A transcriptomic data set is presented as a benchmark for future functional studies using developing pollen as a model. Our results demonstrated previously unknown functions of

  4. Comprehensive analysis of tobacco pollen transcriptome unveils common pathways in polar cell expansion and underlying heterochronic shift during spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Many flowering plants produce bicellular pollen. The two cells of the pollen grain are destined for separate fates in the male gametophyte, which provides a unique opportunity to study genetic interactions that govern guided single-cell polar expansion of the growing pollen tube and the coordinated control of germ cell division and sperm cell fate specification. We applied the Agilent 44 K tobacco gene chip to conduct the first transcriptomic analysis of the tobacco male gametophyte. In addition, we performed a comparative study of the Arabidopsis root-hair trichoblast transcriptome to evaluate genetic factors and common pathways involved in polarized cell-tip expansion. Results Progression of pollen grains from freshly dehisced anthers to pollen tubes 4 h after germination is accompanied with > 5,161 (14.9%) gametophyte-specific expressed probes active in at least one of the developmental stages. In contrast, > 18,821 (54.4%) probes were preferentially expressed in the sporophyte. Our comparative approach identified a subset of 104 pollen tube-expressed genes that overlap with root-hair trichoblasts. Reverse genetic analysis of selected candidates demonstrated that Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (CSD1), a WD-40 containing protein (BP130384), and Replication factor C1 (NtRFC1) are among the central regulators of pollen-tube tip growth. Extension of our analysis beyond the second haploid mitosis enabled identification of an opposing-dynamic accumulation of core regulators of cell proliferation and cell fate determinants in accordance with the progression of the germ cell cycle. Conclusions The current study provides a foundation to isolate conserved regulators of cell tip expansion and those that are unique for pollen tube growth to the female gametophyte. A transcriptomic data set is presented as a benchmark for future functional studies using developing pollen as a model. Our results demonstrated previously unknown functions of certain genes in pollen

  5. Keeping Kids Still during Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    What you need to know about… Keeping Kids Still During Exams Photo courtesy of Modern Way Immobilizers Inc., Clifton, Tenn. Nothing is more frightening for a parent than to have a sick child, especially if ...

  6. Apico-basal polarity complex and cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Apico-basal polarity is a cardinal molecular feature of adult eukaryotic epithelial cells and appears to be involved in several key cellular processes including polarized cell migration and maintenance of tissue architecture. Epithelial cell polarity is maintained by three well-conserved polarity complexes, namely, PAR, Crumbs ...

  7. The Fz-Dsh planar cell polarity pathway induces oriented cell division via Mud/NuMA in Drosophila and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ségalen, Marion; Johnston, Christopher A; Martin, Charlotte A; Dumortier, Julien G; Prehoda, Kenneth E; David, Nicolas B; Doe, Chris Q; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2010-11-16

    The Frizzled receptor and Dishevelled effector regulate mitotic spindle orientation in both vertebrates and invertebrates, but how Dishevelled orients the mitotic spindle is unknown. Using the Drosophila S2 cell "induced polarity" system, we find that Dishevelled cortical polarity is sufficient to orient the spindle and that Dishevelled's DEP domain mediates this function. This domain binds a C-terminal domain of Mud (the Drosophila NuMA ortholog), and Mud is required for Dishevelled-mediated spindle orientation. In Drosophila, Frizzled-Dishevelled planar cell polarity (PCP) orients the sensory organ precursor (pI) spindle along the anterior-posterior axis. We show that Dishevelled and Mud colocalize at the posterior cortex of pI, Mud localization at the posterior cortex requires Dsh, and Mud loss-of-function randomizes spindle orientation. During zebrafish gastrulation, the Wnt11-Frizzled-Dishevelled PCP pathway orients spindles along the animal-vegetal axis, and reducing NuMA levels disrupts spindle orientation. Overall, we describe a Frizzled-Dishevelled-NuMA pathway that orients division from Drosophila to vertebrates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ROCK and RHO Playlist for Preimplantation Development: Streaming to HIPPO Pathway and Apicobasal Polarity in the First Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, Vernadeth B; Marikawa, Yusuke

    2018-01-01

    In placental mammalian development, the first cell differentiation produces two distinct lineages that emerge according to their position within the embryo: the trophectoderm (TE, placenta precursor) differentiates in the surface, while the inner cell mass (ICM, fetal body precursor) forms inside. Here, we discuss how such position-dependent lineage specifications are regulated by the RHOA subfamily of small GTPases and RHO-associated coiled-coil kinases (ROCK). Recent studies in mouse show that activities of RHO/ROCK are required to promote TE differentiation and to concomitantly suppress ICM formation. RHO/ROCK operate through the HIPPO signaling pathway, whose cell position-specific modulation is central to establishing unique gene expression profiles that confer cell fate. In particular, activities of RHO/ROCK are essential in outside cells to promote nuclear localization of transcriptional co-activators YAP/TAZ, the downstream effectors of HIPPO signaling. Nuclear localization of YAP/TAZ depends on the formation of apicobasal polarity in outside cells, which requires activities of RHO/ROCK. We propose models of how RHO/ROCK regulate lineage specification and lay out challenges for future investigations to deepen our understanding of the roles of RHO/ROCK in preimplantation development. Finally, as RHO/ROCK may be inhibited by certain pharmacological agents, we discuss their potential impact on human preimplantation development in relation to fertility preservation in women.

  9. Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Form Dysfunctional Immune Synapses with B Cells Characterized by Non-Polarized Lytic Granule Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kabanova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of the cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response has been proposed as one mechanism for immune evasion in cancer. In this study, we have explored the underlying basis for CTL suppression in the context of B cell malignancies. We document that human B cells have an intrinsic ability to resist killing by freshly isolated cytotoxic T cells (CTLs, but are susceptible to lysis by IL-2 activated CTL blasts and CTLs isolated from immunotherapy-treated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Impaired killing was associated with the formation of dysfunctional non-lytic immune synapses characterized by the presence of defective linker for activation of T cells (LAT signaling and non-polarized release of the lytic granules transported by ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 8 (Arl8. We propose that non-lytic degranulation of CTLs are a key regulatory mechanism of evasion through which B cells may interfere with the formation of functional immune synapses by CTLs.

  10. Myofibroblast keratinocyte growth factor reduces tight junctional integrity and increases claudin-2 levels in polarized Caco-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Il; Poulin, Emily J.; Blask, Elliot; Bukhalid, Raghida; Whitehead, Robert H.; Franklin, Jeffrey L.; Coffey, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The colonic epithelium is composed of a polarized monolayer sheathed by a layer of pericryptal myofibroblasts (PCMFs). We mimicked these cellular compartments in vitro to assess the effects of paracrine-acting PCMF-derived factors on tight junction (TJ) integrity, as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). Co-culture with 18Co PCMFs, or basolateral administration of 18Co conditioned medium (CM), significantly reduced TER of polarized Caco-2 cells. Amongst candidate paracrine factors, only keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) reduced Caco-2 TER; basolateral KGF treatment led to time- and concentration-dependent increases in claudin-2 levels. We also demonstrate amphiregulin (AREG), produced largely by Caco-2 cells, increased claudin-2 levels, leading to epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated TER reduction. We propose that colonic epithelial TJ integrity can be modulated by paracrine KGF and autocrine AREG through increased claudin-2 levels. KGF-regulated claudin-2 induction may have implications for inflammatory bowel disease, where both KGF and claudin-2 are upregulated. PMID:22946653

  11. Modeling self-organized spatio-temporal patterns of PIP3 and PTEN during spontaneous cell polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoch, Fabian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2014-01-01

    During spontaneous cell polarization of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphoshpate (PIP 3 ) and PTEN (phosphatase tensin homolog) have been identified as key signaling molecules which govern the process of polarization in a self-organized manner. Recent experiments have quantified the spatio-temporal dynamics of these signaling components. Surprisingly, it was found that membrane-bound PTEN can be either in a high or low state, that PIP 3 waves were initiated in areas lacking PTEN through an excitable mechanism, and that PIP 3 was degraded even though the PTEN concentration remained low. Here we develop a reaction-diffusion model that aims to explain these experimental findings. Our model contains bistable dynamics for PTEN, excitable dynamics for PIP 3 , and postulates the existence of two species of PTEN with different dephosphorylation rates. We show that our model is able to produce results that are in good qualitative agreement with the experiments, suggesting that our reaction-diffusion model underlies the self-organized spatio-temporal patterns observed in experiments. (paper)

  12. Modeling self-organized spatio-temporal patterns of PIP3 and PTEN during spontaneous cell polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Fabian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2014-08-01

    During spontaneous cell polarization of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphoshpate (PIP3) and PTEN (phosphatase tensin homolog) have been identified as key signaling molecules which govern the process of polarization in a self-organized manner. Recent experiments have quantified the spatio-temporal dynamics of these signaling components. Surprisingly, it was found that membrane-bound PTEN can be either in a high or low state, that PIP3 waves were initiated in areas lacking PTEN through an excitable mechanism, and that PIP3 was degraded even though the PTEN concentration remained low. Here we develop a reaction-diffusion model that aims to explain these experimental findings. Our model contains bistable dynamics for PTEN, excitable dynamics for PIP3, and postulates the existence of two species of PTEN with different dephosphorylation rates. We show that our model is able to produce results that are in good qualitative agreement with the experiments, suggesting that our reaction-diffusion model underlies the self-organized spatio-temporal patterns observed in experiments.

  13. Holographic binary grating liquid crystal cells fabricated by one-step exposure of photocrosslinkable polymer liquid crystalline alignment substrates to a polarization interference ultraviolet beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kotaro; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Noda, Kohei; Sakamoto, Moritsugu; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Holographic binary grating liquid crystal (LC) cells, in which the optical anisotropy was rectangularly modulated even as the grating was fabricated using holographic exposure, were fabricated by one-step polarization holographic exposure of an empty glass cell, the interior of which was coated with a photocrosslinkable polymer LC (PCLC). The present study is of great significance in that three types of holographic binary grating LC cells containing twisted alignments can be fabricated by simultaneous exposure of two PCLC substrates to the UV interference beams, which are sinusoidally modulated. The polarization conversion properties of the diffracted beams are explained well by theoretical analysis based on Jones calculus.

  14. Vertebrate kidney tubules elongate using a planar cell polarity-dependent, rosette-based mechanism of convergent extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienkamp, Soeren S; Liu, Kun; Karner, Courtney M; Carroll, Thomas J; Ronneberger, Olaf; Wallingford, John B; Walz, Gerd

    2012-12-01

    Cystic kidney diseases are a global public health burden, affecting over 12 million people. Although much is known about the genetics of kidney development and disease, the cellular mechanisms driving normal kidney tubule elongation remain unclear. Here, we used in vivo imaging to show for the first time that mediolaterally oriented cell intercalation is fundamental to vertebrate kidney morphogenesis. Unexpectedly, we found that kidney tubule elongation is driven in large part by a myosin-dependent, multicellular rosette-based mechanism, previously only described in Drosophila melanogaster. In contrast to findings in Drosophila, however, non-canonical Wnt and planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling is required to control rosette topology and orientation during vertebrate kidney tubule elongation. These data resolve long-standing questions concerning the role of PCP signaling in the developing kidney and, moreover, establish rosette-based intercalation as a deeply conserved cellular engine for epithelial morphogenesis.

  15. Entry and release of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus are restricted to apical surfaces of polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J. W.; Bekker, C. P.; Voorhout, W. F.; Strous, G. J.; van der Ende, A.; Rottier, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) infects the epithelial cells of the intestinal tract of pigs, resulting in a high mortality rate in piglets. This study shows the interaction of TGEV with a porcine epithelial cell line. To determine the site of viral entry, LLC-PK1 cells were

  16. How to deal with polarized Th2 cells: exploring the Achilles' heel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, H. H.; Hilkens, C. M.; Kalinski, P.; Kapsenberg, M. L.; Wierenga, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    The central effector cells in the pathogenesis of atopic allergic diseases are type 2 T helper (Th2) cells, which display an aberrant cytokine profile dominated by type 2 cytokines. Initial reports from mouse studies indicated that established and committed Th2 cells are stable and unsusceptible to

  17. A mucin-like peptide from Fasciola hepatica instructs dendritic cells with parasite specific Th1-polarizing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noya, Verónica; Brossard, Natalie; Rodríguez, Ernesto; Dergan-Dylon, L Sebastián; Carmona, Carlos; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Freire, Teresa

    2017-01-12

    Fasciolosis is a trematode zoonosis of interest in public health and cattle production. We report here the immunostimulatory effect of a 66 mer mucin-like peptide from Fasciola hepatica (Fhmuc), which synergizes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to promote dendritic cell (DC) maturation, endowing these cells with Th1-polarizing capacity. Exposure of DCs to Fhmuc in presence of LPS induced enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and expression of co-stimulatory molecules by DCs, promoting their T cell stimulatory capacity and selectively augmenting IFN-γ secretion by allogeneic T cells. Furthermore, exposure of DCs to Fhmuc augmented LPS-induced Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 expression on the cell surface. Finally, Fhmuc-conditioned DCs induced parasite specific-adaptive immunity with increased levels of IFN-γ secreted by splenocytes from vaccinated animals, and higher parasite-specific IgG antibodies. However, Fhmuc-treated DC conferred modest protection against F. hepatica infection highlighting the potent immuno-regulatory capacity of the parasite. In summary, this work highlights the capacity of a mucin-derived peptide from F. hepatica to enhance LPS-maturation of DCs and induce parasite-specific immune responses with potential implications in vaccination and therapeutic strategies.

  18. Charge-Transfer States in Organic Solar Cells: Understanding the Impact of Polarization, Delocalization, and Disorder

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Zilong

    2017-05-08

    We investigate the impact of electronic polarization, charge delocalization, and energetic disorder on the charge-transfer (CT) states formed at a planar C60/pentacene interface. The ability to examine large complexes containing up to seven pentacene molecules and three C60 molecules allows us to take explicitly into account the electronic polarization effects. These complexes are extracted from a bilayer architecture modeled by molecular dynamics simulations and evaluated by means of electronic-structure calculations based on long-range-separated functionals (ωB97XD and BNL) with optimized range-separation parameters. The energies of the lowest charge-transfer states derived for the large complexes are in very good agreement with the experimentally reported values. The average singlet-triplet energy splittings of the lowest CT states are calculated not to exceed 10 meV. The rates of geminate recombination as well as of dissociation of the triplet excitons are also evaluated. In line with experiment, our results indicate that the pentacene triplet excitons generated through singlet fission can dissociate into separated charges on a picosecond time scale, despite the fact that their energy in C60/pentacene heterojunctions is slightly lower than the energies of the lowest CT triplet states.

  19. Essential role of copper in the activity and regular periodicity of a recombinant, tumor-associated, cell surface, growth-related and time-keeping hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity (ENOX2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Chueh, P-J; Jiang, Ziying; Layman, Sara; Martin, Berdine; Kim, Chinpal; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2010-10-01

    ECTO-NOX proteins are growth-related cell surface proteins that catalyze both hydroquinone or NADH oxidation and protein disulfide interchange and exhibit time-keeping and prion-like properties. A bacterially expressed truncated recombinant 46 kDa ENOX2 with full ENOX2 activity bound ca 2 moles copper and 2 moles of zinc per mole of protein. Unfolding of the protein in trifluoroacetic acid in the presence of the copper chelator bathocuproine resulted in reversible loss of both enzymatic activities and of a characteristic pattern in the Amide I to Amide II ratios determined by FTIR with restoration by added copper. The H546-V-H together with His 562 form one copper binding site and H582 represents a second copper site as determined from site-directed mutagenesis. Bound copper emerges as having an essential role in ENOX2 both for enzymatic activity and for the structural changes that underly the periodic alternations in activity that define the time-keeping cycle of the protein.

  20. Record keeping, genetic selection, educational experience and farm management effects on average milk yield per cow, milk fat percentage, bacterial score and bulk tank somatic cell count of dairy farms in the Central region of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhone, J A; Koonawootrittriron, S; Elzo, M A

    2008-12-01

    A study was conducted to estimate the record keeping, genetic selection, educational, and farm management effects on average milk yield per cow (AYC), milk fat percentage, bacterial score, and bulk tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) of dairy farms in the central region of Thailand. Farms were located in the provinces of Saraburi and Nakhon Ratchisima and were members of the Muaklek dairy cooperative. Records from individual animals were unavailable. Thus, farm records of milk yield, milk fat percentage, bacterial score, and BTCCC were collected from July 1, 2003 through June 30, 2006. Additional record keeping, genetic selection, education, and farm management information was collected through a questionnaire in May of 2006. Data from the Muaklek dairy cooperative and the questionnaire were then merged by a farm identification number. A single trait mixed model was used to analyze AYC, milk fat percentage, and BTSCC, while a log linear model was used to analyze bacterial score. Results showed that farms that kept records on individual animals had higher (P farms that did not. Farms that used genetic information (EBV) and phenotypes when selecting sires were higher (P farms that used only phenotypes and personal opinion. Farms milking cows with a single unit milking machine and by hand, had higher (P farms using only a single or multi unit machine. Overall farms that kept individual animal records, used EBV when selecting sires, used a single method for collecting milk, and used family labor achieved higher performance from their herds than farms that did not.

  1. Macrophage polarization in nerve injury: do Schwann cells play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Anne Stratton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to peripheral nerve injury, the inflammatory response is almost entirely comprised of infiltrating macrophages. Macrophages are a highly plastic, heterogenic immune cell, playing an indispensable role in peripheral nerve injury, clearing debris and regulating the microenvironment to allow for efficient regeneration. There are several cells within the microenvironment that likely interact with macrophages to support their function - most notably the Schwann cell, the glial cell of the peripheral nervous system. Schwann cells express several ligands that are known to interact with receptors expressed by macrophages, yet the effects of Schwann cells in regulating macrophage phenotype remains largely unexplored. This review discusses macrophages in peripheral nerve injury and how Schwann cells may regulate their behavior.

  2. Cholera Toxin Promotes Th17 Cell Differentiation by Modulating Expression of Polarizing Cytokines and the Antigen-Presenting Potential of Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ok Kang

    Full Text Available Cholera toxin (CT, an exotoxin produced by Vibrio cholera, acts as a mucosal adjuvant. In a previous study, we showed that CT skews differentiation of CD4 T cells to IL-17-producing Th17 cells. Here, we found that intranasal administration of CT induced migration of migratory dendritic cell (DC populations, CD103+ DCs and CD11bhi DCs, to the lung draining mediastinal lymph nodes (medLN. Among those DC subsets, CD11bhi DCs that were relatively immature had a major role in Th17 cell differentiation after administration of CT. CT-treated BMDCs showed reduced expression of MHC class II and CD86, similar to CD11bhi DCs in medLN, and these BMDCs promoted Th17 cell differentiation more potently than other BMDCs expressing higher levels of MHC class II and CD86. By analyzing the expression of activation markers such as CD25 and CD69, proliferation and IL-2 production, we determined that CT-treated BMDCs showed diminished antigen-presenting potential to CD4+ T cells compared with normal BMDCs. We also found that CT-stimulated BMDCs promote activin A expression as well as IL-6 and IL-1β, and activin A had a synergic role with TGF-β1 in CT-mediated Th17 cell differentiation. Taken together, our results suggest that CT-stimulated DCs promote Th17 cell differentiation by not only modulating antigen-presenting potential but also inducing Th polarizing cytokines.

  3. Keeping Track of Your Blood Sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search English Español Keeping Track of Your Blood Sugar KidsHealth / For Teens / Keeping Track of Your Blood ... levels regularly. Why Should I Check My Blood Sugar Levels? Keeping an eye on blood sugar levels ...

  4. Keeping Noise Down on the Farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Do > Keeping Noise Down on the Farm Keeping Noise Down on the Farm SHARE Some people may ... risks permanent hearing damage. Take steps to reduce noise from machinery. Keep machinery running smoothly by replacing ...

  5. Essential Function for PDLIM2 in Cell Polarization in Three-Dimensional Cultures by Feedback Regulation of the β1-Integrin–RhoA Signaling Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kiran Deevi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available PDLIM2 is a cytoskeletal and nuclear PDZ-LIM domain protein that regulates the stability of Nuclear Factor kappa-B (NFκB and other transcription factors, and is required for polarized cell migration. PDLIM2 expression is suppressed by methylation in different cancers, but is strongly expressed in invasive breast cancer cells that have undergone an Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT. PDLIM2 is also expressed in non-transformed breast myoepithelial MCF10A cells and here we asked whether it is important for maintaining the polarized, epithelial phenotype of these cells. Suppression of PDLIM2 in MCF10A cells was sufficient to disrupt cell polarization and acini formation with increased proliferation and reduced apoptosis in the luminal space compared to control acini with hollow lumina. Spheroids with suppressed PDLIM2 exhibited increased expression of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion proteins including beta 1 (β1 integrin. Interestingly, levels of the Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1 R and Receptor of activated protein kinase C 1 (RACK1, which scaffolds IGF-1R to β1 integrin, were also increased, indicating a transformed phenotype. Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK and cofilin phosphorylation, and RhoA Guanosine Triphosphatase (GTPase activity were all enhanced in these spheroids compared to control acini. Importantly, inhibition of either FAK or Rho Kinase (ROCK was sufficient to rescue the polarity defect. We conclude that PDLIM2 expression is essential for feedback regulation of the β1-integrin-RhoA signalling axis and integration of cellular microenvironment signals with gene expression to control the polarity of breast epithelial acini structures. This is a mechanism by which PDLIM2 could mediate tumour suppression in breast epithelium.

  6. Cardiosphere-Derived Cells Facilitate Heart Repair by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization and Neutrophil Recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Shaimaa Hasan

    Full Text Available Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs, one of the promising stem cell sources for myocardial repair, have been tested in clinical trials and resulted in beneficial effects; however, the relevant mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that CDCs favor heart repair by switching the macrophages from a pro-inflammatory phenotype (M1 into a regulatory anti-inflammatory phenotype (M2. Macrophages from mice were cultured with CDCs-conditioned medium or with fibroblasts-conditioned medium as a control. Immunostaining showed that CDCs-conditioned medium significantly enhanced the expression of CD206 (a marker for M2 macrophages, but decreased the expression of CD86 (a marker for M1 macrophages 3 days after culture. For animal studies, we used an acute myocardial infarction model of mice. We injected CDCs, fibroblasts, or saline only into the border zone of infarction. Then we collected the heart tissues for histological analysis 5 and 14 days after treatment. Compared with control animals, CDCs treatment significantly decreased M1 macrophages and neutrophils but increased M2 macrophages in the infarcted heart. Furthermore, CDCs-treated mice had reduced infarct size and fewer apoptotic cells compared to the controls. Our data suggest that CDCs facilitate heart repair by modulating M1/M2 macrophage polarization and neutrophil recruitment, which may provide a new insight into the mechanisms of stem cell-based myocardial repair.

  7. Zonula occludens-1 and -2 regulate apical cell structure and the zonula adherens cytoskeleton in polarized epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Alan S.; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Anderson, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The structure and function of both adherens (AJ) and tight (TJ) junctions are dependent on the cortical actin cytoskeleton. The zonula occludens (ZO)-1 and -2 proteins have context-dependent interactions with both junction types and bind directly to F-actin and other cytoskeletal proteins, suggesting ZO-1 and -2 might regulate cytoskeletal activity at cell junctions. To address this hypothesis, we generated stable Madin-Darby canine kidney cell lines depleted of both ZO-1 and -2. Both paracellular permeability and the localization of TJ proteins are disrupted in ZO-1/-2–depleted cells. In addition, immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy revealed a significant expansion of the perijunctional actomyosin ring associated with the AJ. These structural changes are accompanied by a recruitment of 1-phosphomyosin light chain and Rho kinase 1, contraction of the actomyosin ring, and expansion of the apical domain. Despite these changes in the apical cytoskeleton, there are no detectable changes in cell polarity, localization of AJ proteins, or the organization of the basal and lateral actin cytoskeleton. We conclude that ZO proteins are required not only for TJ assembly but also for regulating the organization and functional activity of the apical cytoskeleton, particularly the perijunctional actomyosin ring, and we speculate that these activities are relevant both to cellular organization and epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:22190737

  8. {sup 13}C dynamic nuclear polarization for measuring metabolic flux in endothelial progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Nathalie; Laustsen, Christoffer; Bertelsen, Lotte Bonde, E-mail: Lotte@clin.au.dk

    2016-11-15

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) represent a heterogeneous cell population that is believed to be involved in vasculogenesis. With the purpose of enhancing endothelial repair, EPCs could have a potential for future cell therapies. Due to the low amount of EPCs in the peripheral circulating blood, in vitro expansion is needed before administration to recipients and the effects of in vitro culturing is still an under-evaluated field with little knowledge of how the cells change over time in culture. The aim of this study was to use hyperpolarised carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy to profile important metabolic pathways in a population of progenitor cells and to show that cell culturing in 3D scaffolds seem to block the metabolic processes that leads to cell senescence. The metabolic breakdown of hyperpolarized [1-{sup 13}C]pyruvate was followed after injection of the substrate to a bioreactor system with EPCs either adhered to 3D printed scaffolds or kept in cell suspension. The pyruvate-to-lactate conversion was elevated in suspension of EPCs compared to the EPCs adhered to scaffolds. Furthermore in the setup with EPCs in suspension, an increase in lactate production was seen over time indicating that the older the cultures of EPCs was before using the cells for cell suspension experiments, the more lactate they produce, compared to a constant lactate level in the cells adhered to scaffolds. It could therefore be stated that cells grown first in 2D culture and subsequent prepared for cell suspension show a metabolism with higher lactate production consistent with cells senescence processes compared to cells grown first at 2D culture and subsequent in the 3D printed scaffolds, where metabolism shows no sign of metabolic shifting during the monitored period. - Highlights: • Hyperpolarized 13C MRS detects EPCs metabolic changes associated with ageing and cultivating conditions. • Increased lactate production in EPC’s correlates positively with aging.

  9. Microtubules in legume root hairs: cell polarity and response to rhizobial signal molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieberer, B.

    2005-01-01

    Microtubules, which occur as hollow protein tubes with a diameter of 25 nanometers, are an important compound of the cytoskeleton and occur in plant cells as a highly organized and dynamic array, which actual arrangement will depend on its tasks during the cell cycle. Microtubules play a key-role in

  10. Photoelectric properties of ITO/p(+)-p(-)-InP solar cells in linearly polarized light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botnaryuk, VM; Gorchak, LV; Raevskii, SD; Sherban, DA; Rud, VY; Rud, YV

    Indium phosphide heterostructures and transparent conducting films of wide-gap oxides have previously been used in the development of highly efficient solar cells, making it possible to bring their efficiencies up to 18% [M, M. Koltun, Optics and Metrology of Solar Cells [in Russian], Nauka, Moscow

  11. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    produces less torque under the radiation pressure resulting in slower rotation at the same laser power. Keywords. Rotation of red blood cell; optical tweezers, dual optical trap. PACS Nos 87.80.Cc; 87.83.+a; 87.80.Fe; 89.20.-a. 1. Introduction. The application of optical tweezers in trapping and manipulating single cells [1].

  12. Past lessons and future importance of polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    Polarization and spin effects have traditionally brought surprises to physicists particularly to those who thought that such effects were unimportant. In hadron physics, large unexplained effects keep turning up and are still unresolved puzzles. A good measurement of the uninteresting beta ray polarization could have discovered parity nonconservation many years before its prediction by Lee and Yang. Nobody knows whether there are further exciting discoveries of this kind waiting for polarization experiments

  13. Perturbed microRNA Expression by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Promotes Macrophage Polarization Leading to Pro-survival Foam Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Pankaj Kumar; Pandey, Rajan Kumar; Sehajpal, Prabodh Kumar; Prajapati, Vijay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the prevalent causes of death worldwide, with 95% of these deaths occurring in developing countries, like India. The causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) has the tenacious ability to circumvent the host's immune system for its own advantage. Macrophages are one of the phagocytic cells that are central to immunity against MTb. These are highly plastic cells dependent on the milieu and can showcase M1/M2 polarization. M1 macrophages are bactericidal in action, but M2 macrophages are anti-inflammatory in their immune response. This computational study is an effort to elucidate the role of miRNAs that influences the survival of MTb in the macrophage. To identify the miRNAs against critical transcription factors, we selected only conserved hits from TargetScan database. Further, validation of these miRNAs was achieved using four databases viz . DIANA-microT, miRDB, miRanda-mirSVR, and miRNAMap. All miRNAs were identified through a conserved seed sequence against the 3'-UTR of transcription factors. This bioinformatics study found that miR-27a and miR-27b has a putative binding site at 3'-UTR of IRF4, and miR-302c against IRF5. miR-155, miR-132, and miR-455-5p are predicted microRNAs against suppressor of cytokine signaling transcription factors. Several other microRNAs, which have an affinity for critical transcription factors, are also predicted in this study. This MTb-associated modulation of microRNAs to modify the expression of the target gene(s) plays a critical role in TB pathogenesis. Other than M1/M2 plasticity, MTb has the ability to convert macrophage into foam cells that are rich in lipids and cholesterol. We have highlighted few microRNAs which overlap between M2/foam cell continuums. miR-155, miR-33, miR-27a, and miR-27b plays a dual role in deciding macrophage polarity and its conversion to foam cells. This study shows a glimpse of microRNAs which can be modulated by MTb not only to prevent its elimination but also

  14. Polarized Th2 like cells, in the absence of Th0 cells, are responsible for lymphocyte produced IL-4 in high IgE-producer schistosomiasis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares-Silveira Alda

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human resistance to re-infection with S. mansoni is correlated with high levels of anti-soluble adult worm antigens (SWAP IgE. Although it has been shown that IL-4 and IL-5 are crucial in establishing IgE responses in vitro, the active in vivo production of these cytokines by T cells, and the degree of polarization of Th2 vs. Th0 in human schistosomiasis is not known. To address this question, we determined the frequency of IL-4 and IFN-γ or IL-5 and IL-2 producing lymphocytes from schistosomiasis patients with high or low levels of IgE anti-SWAP. Results Our analysis showed that high and low IgE-producers responded equally to schistosomiasis antigens as determined by proliferation. Moreover, patients from both groups displayed similar percentages of circulating lymphocytes. However, high IgE-producers had an increased percentage of activated CD4+ T cells as compared to the low IgE-producers. Moreover, intracellular cytokine analysis, after short-term stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 mAbs, showed that IgE high-producers display an increase in the percentage of T lymphocytes expressing IL-4 and IL-5 as compared to IgE low-responders. A coordinate control of the frequency of IL-4 and IL-5 producing lymphocytes in IgE high, but not IgE low-responders, was observed. Conclusions High IgE phenotype human schistosomiasis patients exhibit a coordinate regulation of IL-4 and IL-5 producing cells and the lymphocyte derived IL-4 comes from true polarized Th2 like cells, in the absence of measurable Th0 cells as measured by co-production of IL-4 and IFN-γ.

  15. Iron, copper, and manganese complexes with in vitro superoxide dismutase and/or catalase activities that keep Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells alive under severe oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Thales P; Fernandes, Christiane; Melo, Karen V; Ferreira, Sarah S; Lessa, Josane A; Franco, Roberto W A; Schenk, Gerhard; Pereira, Marcos D; Horn, Adolfo

    2015-03-01

    Due to their aerobic lifestyle, eukaryotic organisms have evolved different strategies to overcome oxidative stress. The recruitment of some specific metalloenzymes such as superoxide dismutases (SODs) and catalases (CATs) is of great importance for eliminating harmful reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion). Using the ligand HPClNOL {1-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]-3-chloropropan-2-ol}, we have synthesized three coordination compounds containing iron(III), copper(II), and manganese(II) ions, which are also present in the active site of the above-noted metalloenzymes. These compounds were evaluated as SOD and CAT mimetics. The manganese and iron compounds showed both SOD and CAT activities, while copper showed only SOD activity. The copper and manganese in vitro SOD activities are very similar (IC50~0.4 μmol dm(-3)) and about 70-fold higher than those of iron. The manganese compound showed CAT activity higher than that of the iron species. Analyzing their capacity to protect Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress (H2O2 and the O2(•-) radical), we observed that all compounds act as antioxidants, increasing the resistance of yeast cells mainly due to a reduction of lipid oxidation. Especially for the iron compound, the data indicate complete protection when wild-type cells were exposed to H2O2 or O2(•-) species. Interestingly, these compounds also compensate for both superoxide dismutase and catalase deficiencies; their antioxidant activity is metal ion dependent, in the order iron(III)>copper(II)>manganese(II). The protection mechanism employed by the complexes proved to be independent of the activation of transcription factors (such as Yap1, Hsf1, Msn2/Msn4) and protein synthesis. There is no direct relation between the in vitro and the in vivo antioxidant activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Immunomodulatory Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Polarization within the Tumor Microenvironment Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosette M. Rivera-Cruz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs represent a promising tool for cell therapy, particularly for their antitumor effects. This cell population can be isolated from multiple tissue sources and also display an innate ability to home to areas of inflammation, such as tumors. Upon entry into the tumor microenvironment niche, MSCs promote or inhibit tumor progression by various mechanisms, largely through the release of soluble factors. These factors can be immunomodulatory by activating or inhibiting both the adaptive and innate immune responses. The mechanisms by which MSCs modulate the immune response are not well understood. Because of this, the relationship between MSCs and immune cells within the tumor microenvironment niche continues to be an active area of research in order to help explain the apparent contradictory findings currently available in the literature. The ongoing research aims to enhance the potential of MSCs in future therapeutic applications.

  17. Concomitant use of polarization and positive phase contrast microscopy for the study of microbial cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk; Gabriel, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 6 (2014), s. 545-550 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : microbial cells * microscopy * microorganism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  18. A small mono-polar direct methanol fuel cell stack with passive operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y. H.; Zhao, T. S.; Chen, R.; Xu, C.

    A passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) stack that consists of six unit cells was designed, fabricated, and tested. The stack was tested with different methanol concentrations under ambient conditions. It was found that the stack performance increased when the methanol concentration inside the fuel tank was increased from 2.0 to 6.0 M. The improved performance is primarily due to the increased cell temperature as a result of the exothermic reaction between the permeated methanol and oxygen on the cathode. Moreover, the increased cell temperature enhanced the water evaporation rate on the air-breathing cathode, which significantly reduced water flooding on the cathode and further improved the stack performance. This passive DMFC stack, providing 350 mW at 1.8 V, was successfully applied to power a seagull display kit. The seagull display kit can continuously run for about 4 h on a single charge of 25 cm 3 4.0-M methanol solution.

  19. Keeping my professional development continuous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanjiku Mathenge

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Keeping up professionally means knowing what is current and then selecting what is applicable to your work. This requires a personal commitment to recognise the need, find the time and seek resources. The process is lifelong and can become part of your routine.

  20. Polarity in Mammalian Epithelial Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roignot, Julie; Peng, Xiao; Mostov, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarity is fundamental for the architecture and function of epithelial tissues. Epithelial polarization requires the intervention of several fundamental cell processes, whose integration in space and time is only starting to be elucidated. To understand what governs the building of epithelial tissues during development, it is essential to consider the polarization process in the context of the whole tissue. To this end, the development of three-dimensional organotypic cell culture model...

  1. Long polar fimbriae participates in the induction of neutrophils transepithelial migration across intestinal cells infected with enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Alejandra F; Vidal, Roberto M; Torres, Alfredo G; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains are causative agents of diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis, both diseases associated with intestinal inflammation and cell damage. Several studies have correlated EHEC virulence factors to high levels of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and we have previously described that the Long polar fimbriae (Lpf) is involved in the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and up-regulation of genes belonging to the NF-κB pathway using non-polarized epithelial intestinal T84 cells. In the current study, we evaluated the two EHEC O157 Lpf fimbriae (Lpf1 and Lpf2) for their ability to induce intestinal secretion of IL-8 and the activation of IL8, CCL20, and ICAM1 genes on polarized T84 cells. We also determined the participation of Lpf1 and Lpf2 in transepithelial migration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Polarized T84 cells infected with EHEC revealed that both, Lpf1 and Lpf2, were required for the secretion of IL-8 and the induction of IL8, CCL20, and ICAM1 genes. Both fimbriae also played a role in the migration of PMNs trough the intestinal cells monolayer. Overall, the present work further demonstrated that the fimbriae Lpf1 and Lpf2 are important bacterial virulence factors that might be involved in the inflammatory responses associated with EHEC infections.

  2. Polarization of the epithelial layer and apical localization of integrins are required for engulfment of apoptotic cells in the Drosophila ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Tracy L; Kleinsorge, Sarah E; Timmons, Allison K; Taylor, Jeffrey D; McCall, Kimberly

    2015-12-01

    Inefficient clearance of dead cells or debris by epithelial cells can lead to or exacerbate debilitating conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Despite the importance of engulfment by epithelial cells, little is known about the molecular changes that are required within these cells. The misregulation of integrins has previously been associated with disease states, suggesting that a better understanding of the regulation of receptor trafficking could be key to treating diseases caused by defects in phagocytosis. Here, we demonstrate that the integrin heterodimer αPS3/βPS becomes apically enriched and is required for engulfment by the epithelial follicle cells of the Drosophila ovary. We found that integrin heterodimer localization and function is largely directed by the α-subunit. Moreover, proper cell polarity promotes asymmetric integrin enrichment, suggesting that αPS3/βPS trafficking occurs in a polarized fashion. We show that several genes previously known for their roles in trafficking and cell migration are also required for engulfment. Moreover, as in mammals, the same α-integrin subunit is required by professional and non-professional phagocytes and migrating cells in Drosophila. Our findings suggest that migrating and engulfing cells use common machinery, and demonstrate a crucial role for integrin function and polarized trafficking of integrin subunits during engulfment. This study also establishes the epithelial follicle cells of the Drosophila ovary as a powerful model for understanding the molecular changes required for engulfment by a polarized epithelium. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. The uptake of apoptotic cells drives Coxiella burnetii replication and macrophage polarization: a model for Q fever endocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Benoit

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with valvulopathy have the highest risk to develop infective endocarditis (IE, although the relationship between valvulopathy and IE is not clearly understood. Q fever endocarditis, an IE due to Coxiella burnetii, is accompanied by immune impairment. Patients with valvulopathy exhibited increased levels of circulating apoptotic leukocytes, as determined by the measurement of active caspases and nucleosome determination. The binding of apoptotic cells to monocytes and macrophages, the hosts of C. burnetii, may be responsible for the immune impairment observed in Q fever endocarditis. Apoptotic lymphocytes (AL increased C. burnetii replication in monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in a cell-contact dependent manner, as determined by quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence. AL binding induced a M2 program in monocytes and macrophages stimulated with C. burnetii as determined by a cDNA chip containing 440 arrayed sequences and functional tests, but this program was in part different in monocytes and macrophages. While monocytes that had bound AL released high levels of IL-10 and IL-6, low levels of TNF and increased CD14 expression, macrophages that had bound AL released high levels of TGF-beta1 and expressed mannose receptor. The neutralization of IL-10 and TGF-beta1 prevented the replication of C. burnetii due to the binding of AL, suggesting that they were critically involved in bacterial replication. In contrast, the binding of necrotic cells to monocytes and macrophages led to C. burnetii killing and typical M1 polarization. Finally, interferon-gamma corrected the immune deactivation induced by apoptotic cells: it prevented the replication of C. burnetii and re-directed monocytes and macrophages toward a M1 program, which was deleterious for C. burnetii. We suggest that leukocyte apoptosis associated with valvulopathy may be critical for the pathogenesis of Q fever endocarditis by deactivating immune cells and creating a

  4. Generation of IL-8 and IL-9 Producing CD4+ T Cells Is Affected by Th17 Polarizing Conditions and AHR Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Gasch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The T helper cell subsets Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg play an important role in immune cell homeostasis, in host defense, and in immunological disorders. Recently, much attention has been paid to Th17 cells which seem to play an important role in the early phase of the adoptive immune response and autoimmune disease. When generating Th17 cells under in vitro conditions the amount of IL-17A producing cells hardly exceeds 20% while the nature of the remaining T cells is poorly characterized. As engagement of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR has also been postulated to modulate the differentiation of T helper cells into Th17 cells with regard to the IL-17A expression we ask how far do Th17 polarizing conditions in combination with ligand induced AHR activation have an effect on the production of other T helper cell cytokines. We found that a high proportion of T helper cells cultured under Th17 polarizing conditions are IL-8 and IL-9 single producing cells and that AHR activation results in an upregulation of IL-8 and a downregulation of IL-9 production. Thus, we have identified IL-8 and IL-9 producing T helper cells which are subject to regulation by the engagement of the AHR.

  5. High mobility group box 1 skews macrophage polarization and negatively influences phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, Fleur; de Leeuw, Karina; Horst, Geesje; Bootsma, Hendrika; Limburg, Pieter C.; Heeringa, Peter; Bijl, Marc; Westra, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic cells plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE. This can lead to secondary necrosis and release of nuclear proteins, such as high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). We hypothesized that increased HMGB1 levels, as present in SLE, skew macrophage

  6. Efficiency enhancement using voltage biasing for ferroelectric polarization in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangmo; Song, Myoung Geun; Bark, Chung Wung

    2018-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are one of the most promising third generation solar cells that have been extensively researched over the past decade as alternative to silicon-based solar cells, due to their low production cost and high energy-conversion efficiency. In general, a DSSC consists of a transparent electrode, a counter electrode, and an electrolyte such as dye. To achieve high power-conversion efficiency in cells, many research groups have focused their efforts on developing efficient dyes for liquid electrolytes. In this work, we report on the photovoltaic properties of DSSCs fabricated using a mixture of TiO2 with nanosized Fe-doped bismuth lanthanum titanate (nFe-BLT) powder). Firstly, nFe-BLT powders were prepared using a high-energy ball milling process and then, TiO2 and nFe-BLT powders were stoichiometrically blended. Direct current (DC) bias of 20 MV/m was applied to lab-made DSSCs. With the optimal concentration of nFe-BLT doped in the electrode, their light-to-electricity conversion efficiency could be improved by ∼64% compared with DSSCs where no DC bias was applied.

  7. Can Ferroelectric Polarization Explain the High Performance of Hybrid Halide Perovskite Solar Cells?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherkar, Tejas; Koster, L. Jan Anton

    The power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells based on the use of hybrid halide perovskites, CH3NH3PbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I), now exceeds 20%. Recently, it was suggested that this high performance originates from the presence of ferroelectricity in the perovskite, which is hypothesized to lower

  8. The song of lipids and proteins: dynamic lipid-protein interfaces in the regulation of plant cell polarity at different scales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sekereš, Juraj; Pleskot, Roman; Pejchar, Přemysl; Žárský, Viktor; Potocký, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 6 (2015), s. 1587-1598 ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-19073S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1417 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Cell polarity * endocytosis * exocytosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.677, year: 2015

  9. The song of lipids and proteins: dynamic lipid-protein interfaces in the regulation of plant cell polarity at different scales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sekereš, J.; Pleskot, Roman; Pejchar, P.; Žárský, V.; Potocký, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 6 (2015), s. 1587-1598 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cell polarity * endocytosis * exocytosis * membrane trafficking * membrane domain Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.677, year: 2015

  10. Feline and canine coronaviruses are released from the basolateral side of polarized epithelial LLC-PK1 cells expressing the recombinant feline aminopeptidase-N cDNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Kouame, J; Goedheer, A J; Vennema, H; Rottier, P J

    2001-01-01

    In this study feline (FECV and FIPV) and canine (CCoV) coronavirus entry into and release from polarized porcine epithelial LLC-PK1 cells, stably expressing the recombinant feline aminopeptidase-N cDNA, were investigated. Virus entry appeared to occur preferentially through the apical membrane,

  11. Proximal tubule-derived colony stimulating factor-1 mediates polarization of renal macrophages and dendritic cells, and recovery in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinqiu; Chang, Jian; Yao, Bing; Niu, Aolei; Kelly, Emily; Breeggemann, Matthew C; Abboud Werner, Sherry L; Harris, Raymond C; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Infiltrating cells play an important role in both the development of and recovery from acute kidney injury (AKI). Macrophages and renal dendritic cells are of particular interest because they can exhibit distinctly different functional phenotypes, broadly characterized as proinflammatory (M1) or tissue reparative (M2). Resident renal macrophages and dendritic cells participate in recovery from AKI in response to either ischemia/reperfusion or a model of selective proximal tubule injury induced by diphtheria-toxin-induced apoptosis in transgenic mice expressing the human diphtheria toxin receptor on proximal tubule cells. Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) is an important factor mediating the recovery from AKI, and CSF-1 can stimulate macrophage and dendritic cell proliferation and polarization during the recovery phase of AKI. The kidney, and specifically the proximal tubule, is a major source of intrarenal CSF-1 production in response to AKI. We induced selective deletion of proximal tubule CSF-1 to determine its role in expansion and proliferation of renal macrophages and dendritic cells and in recovery from AKI. In both models of AKI, there was decreased M2 polarization, delayed functional and structural recovery, and increased tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Thus, intrarenal CSF-1 is an important mediator of macrophage/dendritic cell polarization and recovery from AKI.

  12. Measurement of Collagen and Smooth Muscle Cell Content in Atherosclerotic Plaques Using Polarization-Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Seemantini K.; Pierce, Mark C.; Park, B. Hyle; de Boer, Johannes F.; Whittaker, Peter; Bouma, Brett E.; Bressner, Jason E.; Halpern, Elkan; Houser, Stuart L.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the measurement of collagen and smooth muscle cell (SMC) content in atherosclerotic plaques using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT). Background A method capable of evaluating plaque collagen content and SMC density can provide a measure of the mechanical fidelity of the fibrous cap and can enable the identification of high-risk lesions. Optical coherence tomography has been demonstrated to provide cross-sectional images of tissue microstructure with a resolution of 10 µm. A recently developed technique, PSOCT measures birefringence, a material property that is elevated in tissues such as collagen and SMCs. Methods We acquired PSOCT images of 87 aortic plaques obtained from 20 human cadavers. Spatially averaged PSOCT birefringence, Φ, was measured and compared with plaque collagen and SMC content, quantified morphometrically by picrosirius red and smooth muscle actin staining at the corresponding locations. Results There was a high positive correlation between PSOCT measurements of Φ and total collagen content in all plaques (r = 0.67, p < 0.001) and in fibrous caps of necrotic core fibroatheromas (r = 0.68, p < 0.001). Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography measurements of Φ demonstrated a strong positive correlation with thick collagen fiber content (r = 0.76, p < 0.001) and SMC density (r = 0.74, p < 0.01). Conclusions Our results demonstrate that PSOCT enables the measurement of birefringence in plaques and in fibrous caps of necrotic core fibroatheromas. Given its potential to evaluate collagen content, collagen fiber thickness, and SMC density, we anticipate that PSOCT will significantly improve our ability to evaluate plaque stability in patients. PMID:17397678

  13. The apical actin fringe contributes to localized cell wall deposition and polarized growth in the lily pollen tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Caleb M; Hepler, Peter K; Winship, Lawrence J

    2014-09-01

    In lily (Lilium formosanum) pollen tubes, pectin, a major component of the cell wall, is delivered through regulated exocytosis. The targeted transport and secretion of the pectin-containing vesicles may be controlled by the cortical actin fringe at the pollen tube apex. Here, we address the role of the actin fringe using three different inhibitors of growth: brefeldin A, latrunculin B, and potassium cyanide. Brefeldin A blocks membrane trafficking and inhibits exocytosis in pollen tubes; it also leads to the degradation of the actin fringe and the formation of an aggregate of filamentous actin at the base of the clear zone. Latrunculin B, which depolymerizes filamentous actin, markedly slows growth but allows focused pectin deposition to continue. Of note, the locus of deposition shifts frequently and correlates with changes in the direction of growth. Finally, potassium cyanide, an electron transport chain inhibitor, briefly stops growth while causing the actin fringe to completely disappear. Pectin deposition continues but lacks focus, instead being delivered in a wide arc across the pollen tube tip. These data support a model in which the actin fringe contributes to the focused secretion of pectin to the apical cell wall and, thus, to the polarized growth of the pollen tube. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Keeping disease at arm's length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    2015-01-01

    and physical activities at the activity centre. In this way, keeping disease at arm’s length is analysed as an ambiguous health strategy. The article shows the importance of looking into how active ageing is practised, as active ageing seems to work well in the everyday life of the older people by not giving......Many older people live with a range of chronic diseases. However, these diseases do not necessarily impede an active lifestyle. In this article the author analyses the relation between the active ageing discourse and the way older people at two Danish activity centres handle disease. How does...... active ageing change everyday life with chronic disease, and how do older people combine an active life with a range of chronic diseases? The participants in the study use activities to keep their diseases at arm’s length, and this distancing of disease at the same time enables them to engage in social...

  15. Liver progenitor cells develop cholangiocyte-type epithelial polarity in three-dimensional culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Tanimizu, Naoki; Miyajima, Atsushi; Mostov, Keith E

    2007-01-01

    Cholangiocytes are cellular components of the bile duct system of the liver, which originate from hepatoblasts during embryonic liver development. Although several transcription factors and signaling molecules have been implicated in bile duct development, its molecular mechanism has not been studied in detail. Here, we applied a three-dimensional (3D) culture technique to a liver progenitor cell line, HPPL, to establish an in vitro culture system in which HPPL acquire differentiated cholangi...

  16. Combined TLR2 and TLR4 ligation in the context of bacterial or helminth extracts in human monocyte derived dendritic cells: Molecular correlates for Th1/Th2 polarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, E. van; Everts, B.; Retra, K.; Phylipsen, M.; Hellemond, J.J. van; Tielens, A.G.M.; Kleij, D. van der; Hartgers, F.C.; Yazdanbakhsh, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recognition of pathogens by dendritic cells (DCs) through interaction with pattern recognition receptors, including Toll like receptors (TLR), is crucial for the initiation of appropriate polarized T helper (Th) cell responses. Yet, the characteristics and differences in molecular

  17. Combined TLR2 and TLR4 ligation in the context of bacterial or helminth extracts in human monocyte derived dendritic cells: Molecular correlates for Th1/Th2 polarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Riet (Elly); B. Everts (Bart); K. Retra (Kim); M. Phylipsen (Marion); J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); A.G.M. Tielens (Aloysius); D. van der Kleij (Desiree); F.C. Hartgers (Franca); M. Yazdanbakhsh (Maria)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Recognition of pathogens by dendritic cells (DCs) through interaction with pattern recognition receptors, including Toll like receptors (TLR), is crucial for the initiation of appropriate polarized T helper (Th) cell responses. Yet, the characteristics and differences in

  18. Prolactin/Jak2 directs apical/basal polarization and luminal linage maturation of mammary epithelial cells through regulation of the Erk1/2 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengming Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tissue development/remodeling requires modulations in both cellular architecture and phenotype. Aberration in these processes leads to tumorigenesis. During the pregnancy/lactation cycle the mammary epithelial cells undergo complex morphological and phenotypic programs resulting in the acquisition of apical/basal (A/B polarization and cellular maturation necessary for proper lactation. Still the hormonal regulations and cellular mechanisms controlling these events are not entirely elucidated. Here we show that prolactin (PRL/Jak2 pathway in mammary epithelial cells uniquely signals to establish A/B polarity as determined by the apical localization of the tight junction protein zona occludens 1 (ZO-1 and the basal/lateral localization of E-cadherin, and the apical trafficking of lipid droplets. As well, our results indicate that this pathway regulates mammary stem cell hierarchy by inducing the differentiation of luminal progenitor (EpCAMhi/CD49fhi cells to mature luminal (EpCAMhi/CD49flow cells. Moreover, our data indicate that PRL/Jak2 coordinates both of these cellular events through limiting the mitogen activated protein kinase (Erk1/2 pathway. Together our findings define a novel unifying mechanism coupling mammary epithelial cell A/B polarization and terminal differentiation.

  19. Snapshot Mueller matrix polarimetry by wavelength polarization coding and application to the study of switching dynamics in a ferroelectric liquid crystal cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Jeune B.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a snapshot Mueller matrix polarimeter by wavelength polarization coding. This device is aimed at encoding polarization states in the spectral domain through use of a broadband source and high-order retarders. This allows one to measure a full Mueller matrix from a single spectrum whose acquisition time only depends on the detection system aperture. The theoretical fundamentals of this technique are developed prior to validation by experiments. The setup calibration is described as well as optimization and stabilization procedures. Then, it is used to study, by time-resolved Mueller matrix polarimetry, the switching dynamics in a ferroelectric liquid crystal cell.

  20. Planar polarity pathway and Nance-Horan syndrome-like 1b have essential cell-autonomous functions in neuronal migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Gregory S; Grant, Paul K; Morgan, John A; Moens, Cecilia B

    2011-07-01

    Components of the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway are required for the caudal tangential migration of facial branchiomotor (FBM) neurons, but how PCP signaling regulates this migration is not understood. In a forward genetic screen, we identified a new gene, nhsl1b, required for FBM neuron migration. nhsl1b encodes a WAVE-homology domain-containing protein related to human Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) protein and Drosophila GUK-holder (Gukh), which have been shown to interact with components of the WAVE regulatory complex that controls cytoskeletal dynamics and with the polarity protein Scribble, respectively. Nhsl1b localizes to FBM neuron membrane protrusions and interacts physically and genetically with Scrib to control FBM neuron migration. Using chimeric analysis, we show that FBM neurons have two modes of migration: one involving interactions between the neurons and their planar-polarized environment, and an alternative, collective mode involving interactions between the neurons themselves. We demonstrate that the first mode of migration requires the cell-autonomous functions of Nhsl1b and the PCP components Scrib and Vangl2 in addition to the non-autonomous functions of Scrib and Vangl2, which serve to polarize the epithelial cells in the environment of the migrating neurons. These results define a role for Nhsl1b as a neuronal effector of PCP signaling and indicate that proper FBM neuron migration is directly controlled by PCP signaling between the epithelium and the migrating neurons.

  1. Effect of anode polarization on biofilm formation and electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensis/graphite felt microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, David; Coradin, Thibaud; Laberty-Robert, Christel

    2018-04-01

    In microbial fuel cells, electricity generation is assumed by bacterial degradation of low-grade organics generating electrons that are transferred to an electrode. The nature and efficiency of the electron transfer from the bacteria to the electrodes are determined by several chemical, physical and biological parameters. Specifically, the application of a specific potential at the bioanode has been shown to stimulate the formation of an electro-active biofilm, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the effect of an applied potential on the formation and electroactivity of biofilms established by Shewanella oneidensis bacteria on graphite felt electrodes in single- and double-chamber reactor configurations in oxic conditions. Using amperometry, cyclic voltammetry, and OCP/Power/Polarization curves techniques, we showed that a potential ranging between -0.3V and +0.5V (vs. Ag/AgCl/KCl sat.) and its converse application to a couple of electrodes leads to different electrochemical behaviors, anodic currents and biofilm architectures. For example, when the bacteria were confined in the anodic compartment of a double-chamber cell, a negative applied potential (-0.3V) at the bioanode favors a mediated electron transfer correlated with the progressive formation of a biofilm that fills the felt porosity and bridges the graphite fibers. In contrast, a positive applied potential (+0.3V) at the bioanode stimulates a direct electron transfer resulting in the fast-bacterial colonization of the fibers only. These results provide significant insight for the understanding of the complex bacteria-electrode interactions in microbial fuel cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental and analytical analysis of polarization and water transport behaviors of hydrogen alkaline membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Sen; Zhou, Jiaxun; Wang, Tianyou; Chen, Rui; Jiao, Kui

    2018-04-01

    Experimental test and analytical modeling are conducted to investigate the operating behavior of an alkaline electrolyte membrane (AEM) fuel cell fed by H2/air (or O2) and explore the effect of various operating pressures on the water transfer mechanism. According to the experimental test, the cell performance is greatly improved through increasing the operating pressure gradient from anode to cathode which leads to significant liquid water permeation through the membrane. The high frequency resistance of the A901 alkaline membrane is observed to be relatively stable as the operating pressure varies based on the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method. Correspondingly, based on the modeling prediction, the averaged water content in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) does not change too much which leads to the weak variation of membrane ohmic resistance. This reveals that the performance enhancement should give the credit to better electro-chemical reaction kinetics for both the anode and cathode, also prone by the EIS results. The reversion of water back diffusion direction across the membrane is also observed through analytical solution.

  3. Visual stimulation switches the polarity of excitatory input to starburst amacrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasits, Anna L; Bos, Rémi; Morrie, Ryan D; Fortuny, Cécile; Flannery, John G; Feller, Marla B; Rivlin-Etzion, Michal

    2014-09-03

    Direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) are tuned to motion in one direction. Starburst amacrine cells (SACs) are thought to mediate this direction selectivity through precise anatomical wiring to DSGCs. Nevertheless, we previously found that visual adaptation can reverse DSGCs's directional tuning, overcoming the circuit anatomy. Here we explore the role of SACs in the generation and adaptation of direction selectivity. First, using pharmacogenetics and two-photon calcium imaging, we validate that SACs are necessary for direction selectivity. Next, we demonstrate that exposure to an adaptive stimulus dramatically alters SACs' synaptic inputs. Specifically, after visual adaptation, On-SACs lose their excitatory input during light onset but gain an excitatory input during light offset. Our data suggest that visual stimulation alters the interactions between rod- and cone-mediated inputs that converge on the terminals of On-cone BCs. These results demonstrate how the sensory environment can modify computations performed by anatomically defined neuronal circuits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  5. Setup for polarized neutron imaging using in situ3He cells at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CG-1D beamline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, I; Ziesche, Ralf; Wang, Tianhao; Bilheux, Hassina; Santodonato, Lou; Tong, X; Jiang, C Y; Manke, Ingo; Treimer, Wolfgang; Chatterji, Tapan; Kardjilov, Nikolay

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we report a new setup for polarized neutron imaging at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor CG-1D beamline using an in situ 3 He polarizer and analyzer. This development is very important for extending the capabilities of the imaging instrument at ORNL providing a polarized beam with a large field-of-view, which can be further used in combination with optical devices like Wolter optics, focusing guides, or other lenses for the development of microscope arrangement. Such a setup can be of advantage for the existing and future imaging beamlines at the pulsed neutron sources. The first proof-of-concept experiment is performed to study the ferromagnetic phase transition in the Fe 3 Pt sample. We also demonstrate that the polychromatic neutron beam in combination with in situ 3 He cells can be used as the initial step for the rapid measurement and qualitative analysis of radiographs.

  6. Setup for polarized neutron imaging using in situ 3He cells at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CG-1D beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, I.; Ziesche, Ralf; Wang, Tianhao; Bilheux, Hassina; Santodonato, Lou; Tong, X.; Jiang, C. Y.; Manke, Ingo; Treimer, Wolfgang; Chatterji, Tapan; Kardjilov, Nikolay

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we report a new setup for polarized neutron imaging at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor CG-1D beamline using an in situ 3He polarizer and analyzer. This development is very important for extending the capabilities of the imaging instrument at ORNL providing a polarized beam with a large field-of-view, which can be further used in combination with optical devices like Wolter optics, focusing guides, or other lenses for the development of microscope arrangement. Such a setup can be of advantage for the existing and future imaging beamlines at the pulsed neutron sources. The first proof-of-concept experiment is performed to study the ferromagnetic phase transition in the Fe3Pt sample. We also demonstrate that the polychromatic neutron beam in combination with in situ 3He cells can be used as the initial step for the rapid measurement and qualitative analysis of radiographs.

  7. A Gly65Val substitution in an actin, GhACT_LI1, disrupts cell polarity and F-actin organization resulting in dwarf, lintless cotton plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Gregory N; Fang, David D; Turley, Rickie B; Florane, Christopher B; Li, Ping; Mattison, Christopher P; Naoumkina, Marina

    2017-04-01

    Actin polymerizes to form part of the cytoskeleton and organize polar growth in all eukaryotic cells. Species with numerous actin genes are especially useful for the dissection of actin molecular function due to redundancy and neofunctionalization. Here, we investigated the role of a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) actin gene in the organization of actin filaments in lobed cotyledon pavement cells and the highly elongated single-celled trichomes that comprise cotton lint fibers. Using mapping-by-sequencing, virus-induced gene silencing, and molecular modeling, we identified the causative mutation of the dominant dwarf Ligon lintless Li 1 short fiber mutant as a single Gly65Val amino acid substitution in a polymerization domain of an actin gene, GhACT_LI1 (Gh_D04G0865). We observed altered cell morphology and disrupted organization of F-actin in Li 1 plant cells by confocal microscopy. Mutant leaf cells lacked interdigitation of lobes and F-actin did not uniformly decorate the nuclear envelope. While wild-type lint fiber trichome cells contained long longitudinal actin cables, the short Li 1 fiber cells accumulated disoriented transverse cables. The polymerization-defective Gly65Val allele in Li 1 plants likely disrupts processive elongation of F-actin, resulting in a disorganized cytoskeleton and reduced cell polarity, which likely accounts for the dominant gene action and diverse pleiotropic effects associated with the Li 1 mutation. Lastly, we propose a model to account for these effects, and underscore the roles of actin organization in determining plant cell polarity, shape and plant growth. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Characterizing the circulating, gliadin-specific CD4+ memory T cells in patients with celiac disease: linkage between memory function, gut homing and Th1 polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Horin, Shomron; Green, Peter H R; Bank, Ilan; Chess, Leonard; Goldstein, Itamar

    2006-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder of the gut, driven by T cells reacting locally to a distinct antigen, gliadin. Thus, CD offers the opportunity to study the T cell memory response to gliadin and whether gut tropism and T helper cell type 1 (Th1) polarization, which characterize the effector phase, are preserved in the memory progeny. It is notable that previous studies yielded conflicting results as to the presence of gliadin-specific memory CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood of CD patients. However, we used a different and highly sensitive approach based on fluorescein-derived label dilution, whereby the memory cells are identified operationally by their greater capacity to proliferate upon re-encounter with antigen. Thus, using flow cytometry, we could resolve multiple successive generations as well as immunophenotype the dividing cells. Here, we show that the peripheral blood lymphocyte of some CD patients on a gliadin-free diet, but not healthy donors, contains a detectable population of CD4+ memory T cells specific for deamidated gliadin. Moreover, these gliadin-specific memory T cells are marked by a distinctive phenotype: They express high levels of the gut-homing beta7 integrins and primarily produce interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha. We conclude that memory for gliadin-derived antigens within the circulating CD4+ T cells is linked with gut tropism as well as Th1 polarization.

  9. Regulation of Human Macrophage M1–M2 Polarization Balance by Hypoxia and the Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Raggi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages (Mf are a heterogeneous population of tissue-resident professional phagocytes and a major component of the leukocyte infiltrate at sites of inflammation, infection, and tumor growth. They can undergo diverse forms of activation in response to environmental factors, polarizing into specialized functional subsets. A common hallmark of the pathologic environment is represented by hypoxia. The impact of hypoxia on human Mf polarization has not been fully established. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of a hypoxic environment reflecting that occurring in vivo in diseased tissues on the ability of human Mf to polarize into classically activated (proinflammatory M1 and alternatively activated (anti-inflammatory M2 subsets. We present data showing that hypoxia hinders Mf polarization toward the M1 phenotype by decreasing the expression of T cell costimulatory molecules and chemokine homing receptors and the production of proinflammatory, Th1-priming cytokines typical of classical activation, while promoting their acquisition of phenotypic and secretory features of alternative activation. Furthermore, we identify the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM-1, a member of the Ig-like immunoregulatory receptor family, as a hypoxia-inducible gene in Mf and demonstrate that its engagement by an agonist Ab reverses the M2-polarizing effect of hypoxia imparting a M1-skewed phenotype to Mf. Finally, we provide evidence that Mf infiltrating the inflamed hypoxic joints of children affected by oligoarticular juvenile idiopatic arthritis express high surface levels of TREM-1 associated with predominant M1 polarization and suggest the potential of this molecule in driving M1 proinflammatory reprogramming in the hypoxic synovial environment.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a tumor-associated, growth-related, and time-keeping hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase (tNOX) of the HeLa cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueh, Pin-Ju; Kim, Chinpal; Cho, NaMi; Morre, Dorothy M.; Morre, D. James

    2002-01-01

    NOX proteins are growth-related cell surface proteins that catalyze both hydroquinone or NADH oxidation and protein disulfide interchange and exhibit prion-like properties. The two enzymatic activities alternate to generate a regular period length of about 24 min. Here we report the expression, cloning, and characterization of a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX). The cDNA sequence of 1830 bp is located on gene Xq25-26 with an open reading frame encoding 610 amino acids. The activities of the bacterially expressed tNOX oscillate with a period length of 22 min as is characteristic of tNOX activities in situ. The activities are inhibited completely by capsaicin, which represents a defining characteristic of tNOX activity. Functional motifs identified by site-directed mutagenesis within the C-terminal portion of the tNOX protein corresponding to the processed plasma membrane-associated form include quinone (capsaicin), copper and adenine nucleotide binding domains, and two cysteines essential for catalytic activity. Four of the six cysteine to alanine replacements retained enzymatic activity, but the period lengths of the oscillations were increased. A single protein with two alternating enzymatic activities indicative of a time-keeping function is unprecedented in the biochemical literature.

  11. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells exposed to microorganisms involved in hypersensitivity pneumonitis induce a Th1-polarized immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Pallandre, Jean-René; Borg, Christophe; Loeffert, Sophie; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Millon, Laurence

    2013-08-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an immunoallergic disease characterized by a prominent interstitial infiltrate composed predominantly of lymphocytes secreting inflammatory cytokines. Dendritic cells (DCs) are known to play a pivotal role in the lymphocytic response. However, their cross talk with microorganisms that cause HP has yet to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the initial interactions between human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and four microorganisms that are different in nature (Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula [actinomycetes], Mycobacterium immunogenum [mycobacteria], and Wallemia sebi and Eurotium amstelodami [filamentous fungi]) and are involved in HP. Our objectives were to determine the cross talk between MoDCs and HP-causative agents and to determine whether the resulting immune response varied according to the microbial extract tested. The phenotypic activation of MoDCs was measured by the increased expression of costimulatory molecules and levels of cytokines in supernatants. The functional activation of MoDCs was measured by the ability of MoDCs to induce lymphocytic proliferation and differentiation in a mixed lymphocytic reaction (MLR). E. amstelodami-exposed (EA) MoDCs expressed higher percentages of costimulatory molecules than did W. sebi-exposed (WS), S. rectivirgula-exposed (SR), or M. immunogenum-exposed (MI) MoDCs (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). EA-MoDCs, WS-MoDCs, SR-MoDCs, and MI-MoDCs induced CD4(+) T cell proliferation and a Th1-polarized immune response. The present study provides evidence that, although differences were initially observed between MoDCs exposed to filamentous fungi and MoDCs exposed to bacteria, a Th1 response was ultimately promoted by DCs regardless of the microbial extract tested.

  12. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojcieszak, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Barnhurst, K.G.; Ikeda, K.; Maia, R.C.M.; Wessler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass

  13. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  14. Polarization and Myelination in Myelinating Glia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Myelinating glia, oligodendrocytes in central nervous system and Schwann cells in peripheral nervous system, form myelin sheath, a multilayered membrane system around axons enabling salutatory nerve impulse conduction and maintaining axonal integrity. Myelin sheath is a polarized structure localized in the axonal side and therefore is supposed to be formed based on the preceding polarization of myelinating glia. Thus, myelination process is closely associated with polarization of myelinating glia. However, cell polarization has been less extensively studied in myelinating glia than other cell types such as epithelial cells. The ultimate goal of this paper is to provide insights for the field of myelination research by applying the information obtained in polarity study in other cell types, especially epithelial cells, to cell polarization of myelinating glia. Thus, in this paper, the main aspects of cell polarization study in general are summarized. Then, they will be compared with polarization in oligodendrocytes. Finally, the achievements obtained in polarization study for epithelial cells, oligodendrocytes, and other types of cells will be translated into polarization/myelination process by Schwann cells. Then, based on this model, the perspectives in the study of Schwann cell polarization/myelination will be discussed. PMID:23326681

  15. Community perspective of alternative methods of keeping ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Evaluation of the objectives of immunization programme will be impossible in settings where immunization record keeping and verbal reports may be unreliable like Nigeria. This necessitates a need for improved record keeping. Using end users' approach to seeking alternative record keeping system might ...

  16. Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  17. Internal polarized targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, E.R.; Coulter, K.; Gilman, R.; Holt, R.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Napolitano, J.; Potterveld, D.H.; Young, L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Mishnev, S.I.; Nikolenko, D.M.; Popov, S.G.; Rachek, I.A.; Temnykh, A.B.; Toporkov, D.K.; Tsentalovich, E.P.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B. (AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (USSR). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1989-01-01

    Internal polarized targets offer a number of advantages over external targets. After a brief review of the basic motivation and principles behind internal polarized targets, the technical aspects of the atomic storage cell will be discussed in particular. Sources of depolarization and the means by which their effects can be ameliorated will be described, especially depolarization by the intense magnetic fields arising from the circulating particle beam. The experience of the Argonne Novosibirsk collaboration with the use of a storage cell in a 2 GeV electron storage ring will be the focus of this technical discussion. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Drosophila tensin plays an essential role in cell migration and planar polarity formation during oogenesis by mediating integrin-dependent extracellular signals to actin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, In Jun; Lee, Jang Ho; Cho, Kyoung Sang; Lee, Sung Bae

    2017-03-11

    Oogenesis in Drosophila involves very dynamic cellular changes such as cell migration and polarity formation inside an ovary during short period. Previous studies identified a number of membrane-bound receptors directly receiving certain types of extracellular inputs as well as intracellular signalings to be involved in the regulation of these dynamic cellular changes. However, yet our understanding on exactly how these receptor-mediated extracellular inputs lead to dynamic cellular changes remains largely unclear. Here, we identified Drosophila tensin encoded by blistery (by) as a novel regulator of cell migration and planar polarity formation and characterized the genetic interaction between tensin and integrin during oogenesis. Eggs from by mutant showed decreased hatching rate and morphological abnormality, a round-shape, compared to the wild-type eggs. Further analyses revealed that obvious cellular defects such as defective border cell migration and planar polarity formation might be primarily associated with the decreased hatching rate and the round-shape phenotype of by mutant eggs, respectively. Moreover, by mutation also induced marked defects in F-actin organization closely associated with both cell migration and planar polarity formation during oogenesis of Drosophila. Notably, all these defective phenotypes observed in by mutant eggs became much severer by reduced level of integrin, indicative of a close functional association between integrin and tensin during oogenesis. Collectively, our findings suggest that tensin acts as a crucial regulator of dynamic cellular changes during oogenesis by bridging integrin-dependent extracellular signals to intracellular cytoskeletal organization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Phenomenological theory of current-producing processes at the solid oxide electrolyte/gas electrode interface: steady-state polarization of fuel-cell electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murygin, I.V.; Chebotin, V.N.

    1979-01-01

    The polarization of fuel-cell electrodes (mixtures CO + CO 2 and H 2 + H 2 O) in systems with solid oxide electrolytes is discussed. The theory is based upon a process model where the electrode reaction zone can spread along the line of three-phase contact by diffusion of reaction partners and products across the electrolyte/electrode and electrolyte/gas interface

  20. Keeping Up-to-Date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman L Jones

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available As a senior (read older practising respirologist, I have come to appreciate my position as editor, which keeps me current with present practice standards. Everyone talks about the volume and flow of new knowledge, and not a week goes by in which I feel that I know enough to treat my patients optimally. This is particularly the case when it comes to antibiotic usage: the number of antibiotics and the confident way that junior colleagues bandy them about leaves me distinctly depressed because most of the names mean little to me; even the families and generations of antibiotics seem beyond my grasp. That is why I welcomed the request from Dr Lionel Mandell to publish a summary statement on the use of antibiotics in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, which appears on pages 371-382 of the current issue of the Canadian Respiratory Journal.

  1. DAPNe with micro-capillary separatory chemistry-coupled to MALDI-MS for the analysis of polar and non-polar lipid metabolism in one cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jason S.; Aguilar, Roberto; Petros, Robby A.; Verbeck, Guido F.

    2017-05-01

    The cellular metabolome is considered to be a representation of cellular phenotype and cellular response to changes to internal or external events. Methods to expand the coverage of the expansive physiochemical properties that makeup the metabolome currently utilize multi-step extractions and chromatographic separations prior to chemical detection, leading to lengthy analysis times. In this study, a single-step procedure for the extraction and separation of a sample using a micro-capillary as a separatory funnel to achieve analyte partitioning within an organic/aqueous immiscible solvent system is described. The separated analytes are then spotted for MALDI-MS imaging and distribution ratios are calculated. Initially, the method is applied to standard mixtures for proof of partitioning. The extraction of an individual cell is non-reproducible; therefore, a broad chemical analysis of metabolites is necessary and will be illustrated with the one-cell analysis of a single Snu-5 gastric cancer cell taken from a cellular suspension. The method presented here shows a broad partitioning dynamic range as a single-step method for lipid analysis demonstrating a decrease in ion suppression often present in MALDI analysis of lipids.

  2. Copy number variation analysis implicates the cell polarity gene glypican 5 as a human spina bifida candidate gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassuk, Alexander G.; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Boland, Riley; Smith, Tiffany L.; Hulstrand, Alissa M.; Northrup, Hope; Hakeman, Matthew; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Yung, Christina K.; Long, Abby; Brouillette, Rachel B.; Au, Kit Sing; Gurnett, Christina; Houston, Douglas W.; Cornell, Robert A.; Manak, J. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Family and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component to NTDs. However, despite more than three decades of research, the genes involved in human NTDs remain largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that rare copy number variants (CNVs), especially de novo germline CNVs, are a significant risk factor for NTDs. We used array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify rare CNVs in 128 Caucasian and 61 Hispanic patients with non-syndromic lumbar-sacral myelomeningocele. We also performed aCGH analysis on the parents of affected individuals with rare CNVs where parental DNA was available (42 sets). Among the eight de novo CNVs that we identified, three generated copy number changes of entire genes. One large heterozygous deletion removed 27 genes, including PAX3, a known spina bifida-associated gene. A second CNV altered genes (PGPD8, ZC3H6) for which little is known regarding function or expression. A third heterozygous deletion removed GPC5 and part of GPC6, genes encoding glypicans. Glypicans are proteoglycans that modulate the activity of morphogens such as Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), both of which have been implicated in NTDs. Additionally, glypicans function in the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, and several PCP genes have been associated with NTDs. Here, we show that GPC5 orthologs are expressed in the neural tube, and that inhibiting their expression in frog and fish embryos results in NTDs. These results implicate GPC5 as a gene required for normal neural tube development. PMID:23223018

  3. Spin exchange in polarized deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przewoski, B. von; Meyer, H.O.; Balewski, J.; Doskow, J.; Ibald, R.; Pollock, R.E.; Rinckel, T.; Wellinghausen, A.; Whitaker, T.J.; Daehnick, W.W.; Haeberli, W.; Schwartz, B.; Wise, T.; Lorentz, B.; Rathmann, F.; Pancella, P.V.; Saha, Swapan K.; Thoerngren-Engblom, P.

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the vector and tensor polarization of an atomic deuterium target as a function of the target density. The polarized deuterium was produced in an atomic beam source and injected into a storage cell. For this experiment, the atomic beam source was operated without rf transitions, in order to avoid complications from the unknown efficiency of these transitions. In this mode, the atomic beam is vector and tensor polarized and both polarizations can be measured simultaneously. We used a 1.2-cm-diam and 27-cm-long storage cell, which yielded an average target density between 3 and 9x10 11 at/cm 3 . We find that the tensor polarization decreases with increasing target density while the vector polarization remains constant. The data are in quantitative agreement with the calculated effect of spin exchange between deuterium atoms at low field

  4. Quantitative cell polarity imaging defines leader-to-follower transitions during collective migration and the key role of microtubule-dependent adherens junction formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revenu, Céline; Streichan, Sebastian; Donà, Erika; Lecaudey, Virginie; Hufnagel, Lars; Gilmour, Darren

    2014-03-01

    The directed migration of cell collectives drives the formation of complex organ systems. A characteristic feature of many migrating collectives is a 'tissue-scale' polarity, whereby 'leader' cells at the edge of the tissue guide trailing 'followers' that become assembled into polarised epithelial tissues en route. Here, we combine quantitative imaging and perturbation approaches to investigate epithelial cell state transitions during collective migration and organogenesis, using the zebrafish lateral line primordium as an in vivo model. A readout of three-dimensional cell polarity, based on centrosomal-nucleus axes, allows the transition from migrating leaders to assembled followers to be quantitatively resolved for the first time in vivo. Using live reporters and a novel fluorescent protein timer approach, we investigate changes in cell-cell adhesion underlying this transition by monitoring cadherin receptor localisation and stability. This reveals that while cadherin 2 is expressed across the entire tissue, functional apical junctions are first assembled in the transition zone and become progressively more stable across the leader-follower axis of the tissue. Perturbation experiments demonstrate that the formation of these apical adherens junctions requires dynamic microtubules. However, once stabilised, adherens junction maintenance is microtubule independent. Combined, these data identify a mechanism for regulating leader-to-follower transitions within migrating collectives, based on the relocation and stabilisation of cadherins, and reveal a key role for dynamic microtubules in this process.

  5. γδ T Cells Are Required for M2 Macrophage Polarization and Resolution of Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Joel A; Kasahara, David I; Ribeiro, Luiza; Wurmbrand, Allison P; Ninin, Fernanda M C; Shore, Stephanie A

    2015-01-01

    We examined the role of γδ T cells in the induction of alternatively activated M2 macrophages and the resolution of inflammation after ozone exposure. Wildtype (WT) mice and mice deficient in γδ T cells (TCRδ-/- mice) were exposed to air or to ozone (0.3 ppm for up to 72h) and euthanized immediately or 1, 3, or 5 days after cessation of exposure. In WT mice, M2 macrophages accumulated in the lungs over the course of ozone exposure. Pulmonary mRNA abundance of the M2 genes, Arg1, Retnla, and Clec10a, also increased after ozone. In contrast, no evidence of M2 polarization was observed in TCRδ-/- mice. WT but not TCRδ-/- mice expressed the M2c polarizing cytokine, IL-17A, after ozone exposure and WT mice treated with an IL-17A neutralizing antibody exhibited attenuated ozone-induced M2 gene expression. In WT mice, ozone-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils and macrophages resolved quickly after cessation of ozone exposure returning to air exposed levels within 3 days. However, lack of M2 macrophages in TCRδ-/- mice was associated with delayed clearance of inflammatory cells after cessation of ozone and increased accumulation of apoptotic macrophages in the lungs. Delayed restoration of normal lung architecture was also observed in TCRδ-/- mice. In summary, our data indicate that γδ T cells are required for the resolution of ozone-induced inflammation, likely because γδ T cells, through their secretion of IL-17A, contribute to changes in macrophage polarization that promote clearance of apoptotic cells.

  6. Lewis Lung Cancer Cells Promote SIGNR1(CD209b)-Mediated Macrophages Polarization Induced by IL-4 to Facilitate Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaolong; Li, Wenhai; Pan, Lei; Fu, Enqing; Xie, Yonghong; Chen, Min; Mu, Deguang

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages are a prominent component of lung cancer and contribute to tumor progression by facilitating the immune evasion of cancer cells. DC-SIGN (CD209) assists in the immune evasion of a broad spectrum of pathogens and neoplasms by inhibiting the maturation of DCs and subsequent cytokines production. However, the expression of DC-SIGN in macrophages and its role in mediating immune evasion in lung cancer and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. Our study aimed to identify the immunosuppressive role of SIGNR1 in murine macrophage differentiation and lung cancer progression. We found that SIGNR1-positive RAW264.7 macrophages were enriched in mixed cultures with Lewis lung cancer cells (LLC) (ratio of RAW 264.7 to LLC being 1:1) after stimulation with IL-4. Moreover, LLC-educated macrophages exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-10 but lower IL-12 in response to IL-4 treatment as determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. However, inhibition of SIGNR1 markedly hampered the production of IL-10, indicating that SIGNR1 was indispensable for IL-4+LLC induced macrophage polarization towards the M2 subtype. Furthermore, polarized M2 cells immersed in a tumor microenvironment promoted the migration of LLCs, as measured by transwell assays, but migration was suppressed after blockade of SIGNR1 using CD209b antibody. In addition, IL-4+LLC-educated macrophages reduced the proliferation of the activated T cells and reduced IFN-γ-mediated Th1 response in T cells, while SIGNR1 inhibition rescued Th1 cell functions. In conclusion, murine SIGNR1 expressed in LLC-educated macrophages appears to mediate IL-4-induced RAW264.7 macrophage polarization and thus facilitate lung cancer evasion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Rapid paracellular transmigration of Campylobacter jejuni across polarized epithelial cells without affecting TER: role of proteolytic-active HtrA cleaving E-cadherin but not fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Manja; Hoy, Benjamin; Rohde, Manfred; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Bæk, Kristoffer T; Oyarzabal, Omar A; Brøndsted, Lone; Wessler, Silja; Backert, Steffen

    2012-04-25

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most important bacterial pathogens causing food-borne illness worldwide. Crossing the intestinal epithelial barrier and host cell entry by C. jejuni is considered the primary reason of damage to the intestinal tissue, but the molecular mechanisms as well as major bacterial and host cell factors involved in this process are still widely unclear. In the present study, we characterized the serine protease HtrA (high-temperature requirement A) of C. jejuni as a secreted virulence factor with important proteolytic functions. Infection studies and in vitro cleavage assays showed that C. jejuni's HtrA triggers shedding of the extracellular E-cadherin NTF domain (90 kDa) of non-polarised INT-407 and polarized MKN-28 epithelial cells, but fibronectin was not cleaved as seen for H. pylori's HtrA. Deletion of the htrA gene in C. jejuni or expression of a protease-deficient S197A point mutant did not lead to loss of flagella or reduced bacterial motility, but led to severe defects in E-cadherin cleavage and transmigration of the bacteria across polarized MKN-28 cell layers. Unlike other highly invasive pathogens, transmigration across polarized cells by wild-type C. jejuni is highly efficient and is achieved within a few minutes of infection. Interestingly, E-cadherin cleavage by C. jejuni occurs in a limited fashion and transmigration required the intact flagella as well as HtrA protease activity, but does not reduce transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) as seen with Salmonella, Shigella, Listeria or Neisseria. These results suggest that HtrA-mediated E-cadherin cleavage is involved in rapid crossing of the epithelial barrier by C. jejuni via a very specific mechanism using the paracellular route to reach basolateral surfaces, but does not cleave the fibronectin receptor which is necessary for cell entry.

  8. Rapid paracellular transmigration of Campylobacter jejuni across polarized epithelial cells without affecting TER: role of proteolytic-active HtrA cleaving E-cadherin but not fibronectin

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boehm, Manja

    2012-04-25

    AbstractBackgroundCampylobacter jejuni is one of the most important bacterial pathogens causing food-borne illness worldwide. Crossing the intestinal epithelial barrier and host cell entry by C. jejuni is considered the primary reason of damage to the intestinal tissue, but the molecular mechanisms as well as major bacterial and host cell factors involved in this process are still widely unclear.ResultsIn the present study, we characterized the serine protease HtrA (high-temperature requirement A) of C. jejuni as a secreted virulence factor with important proteolytic functions. Infection studies and in vitro cleavage assays showed that C. jejuni’s HtrA triggers shedding of the extracellular E-cadherin NTF domain (90 kDa) of non-polarised INT-407 and polarized MKN-28 epithelial cells, but fibronectin was not cleaved as seen for H. pylori’s HtrA. Deletion of the htrA gene in C. jejuni or expression of a protease-deficient S197A point mutant did not lead to loss of flagella or reduced bacterial motility, but led to severe defects in E-cadherin cleavage and transmigration of the bacteria across polarized MKN-28 cell layers. Unlike other highly invasive pathogens, transmigration across polarized cells by wild-type C. jejuni is highly efficient and is achieved within a few minutes of infection. Interestingly, E-cadherin cleavage by C. jejuni occurs in a limited fashion and transmigration required the intact flagella as well as HtrA protease activity, but does not reduce transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) as seen with Salmonella, Shigella, Listeria or Neisseria.ConclusionThese results suggest that HtrA-mediated E-cadherin cleavage is involved in rapid crossing of the epithelial barrier by C. jejuni via a very specific mechanism using the paracellular route to reach basolateral surfaces, but does not cleave the fibronectin receptor which is necessary for cell entry.

  9. Polarization measurement in the COMPASS polarized target

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, K; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Doshita, N; Gautheron, F; Görtz, S; Hasegawa, T; Horikawa, N; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kisselev, Yu V; Koivuniemi, J H; Le Goff, J M; Magnon, A; Meyer, W; Reicherz, G; Matsuda, T

    2004-01-01

    Continuous wave nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to determine the target polarization in the COMPASS experiment. The system is made of the so-called Liverpool Q-meters, Yale-cards, and VME modules for data taking and system controlling. In 2001 the NMR coils were embedded in the target material, while in 2002 and 2003 the coils were mounted on the outer surface of the target cells to increase the packing factor of the material. Though the error of the measurement became larger with the outer coils than with the inner coils, we have performed stable measurements throughout the COMPASS run time for 3 years. The maximum polarization was +57% and -53% as the average in the target cells.

  10. Continuous requirement of ErbB2 kinase activity for loss of cell polarity and lumen formation in a novel ErbB2/Neu-driven murine cell line model of metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar F Ortega-Cava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Well over a quarter of human breast cancers are ErbB2-driven and constitute a distinct subtype with substantially poorer prognosis. Yet, there are substantial gaps in our understanding of how ErbB2 tyrosine kinase activity unleashes a coordinated program of cellular and extracellular alterations that culminate in aggressive breast cancers. Cellular models that exhibit ErbB2 kinase dependency and can induce metastatic breast cancer in immune competent hosts are likely to help bridge this gap. Materials and Methods: Here, we derived and characterized a cell line model obtained from a transgenic ErbB2/Neu-driven mouse mammary adenocarcinoma. Results: The MPPS1 cell line produces metastatic breast cancers when implanted in the mammary fat pads of immune-compromised as well as syngeneic immune-competent hosts. MPPS1 cells maintain high ErbB2 overexpression when propagated in DFCI-1 or related media, and their growth is ErbB2-dependent, as demonstrated by concentration-dependent inhibition of proliferation with the ErbB kinase inhibitor Lapatinib. When grown in 3-dimensional (3-D culture on Matrigel, MPPS1 cells predominantly form large irregular cystic and solid structures. Remarkably, low concentrations of Lapatinib led to a switch to regular acinar growth on Matrigel. Immunofluorescence staining of control vs. Lapatinib-treated acini for markers of epithelial polarity revealed that inhibition of ErbB2 signaling led to rapid resumption of normal mammary epithelium-like cell polarity. Conclusions: The strict dependence of the MPPS1 cell system on ErbB2 signals for proliferation and alterations in cell polarity should allow its use to dissect ErbB2 kinase-dependent signaling pathways that promote loss of cell polarity, a key component of the epithelial mesenchymal transition and aggressiveness of ErbB2-driven breast cancers.

  11. EAT-2, a SAP-like adaptor, controls NK cell activation through phospholipase Cγ, Ca++, and Erk, leading to granule polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Quintero, Luis-Alberto; Roncagalli, Romain; Guo, Huaijian; Latour, Sylvain; Davidson, Dominique; Veillette, André

    2014-04-07

    Ewing's sarcoma-associated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is an Src homology 2 domain-containing intracellular adaptor related to signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP), the X-linked lymphoproliferative gene product. Both EAT-2 and SAP are expressed in natural killer (NK) cells, and their combined expression is essential for NK cells to kill abnormal hematopoietic cells. SAP mediates this function by coupling SLAM family receptors to the protein tyrosine kinase Fyn and the exchange factor Vav, thereby promoting conjugate formation between NK cells and target cells. We used a variety of genetic, biochemical, and imaging approaches to define the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which EAT-2 controls NK cell activation. We found that EAT-2 mediates its effects in NK cells by linking SLAM family receptors to phospholipase Cγ, calcium fluxes, and Erk kinase. These signals are triggered by one or two tyrosines located in the carboxyl-terminal tail of EAT-2 but not found in SAP. Unlike SAP, EAT-2 does not enhance conjugate formation. Rather, it accelerates polarization and exocytosis of cytotoxic granules toward hematopoietic target cells. Hence, EAT-2 promotes NK cell activation by molecular and cellular mechanisms distinct from those of SAP. These findings explain the cooperative and essential function of these two adaptors in NK cell activation.

  12. A chemo-mechanical free-energy-based approach to model durotaxis and extracellular stiffness-dependent contraction and polarization of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Vivek B; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Xiao

    2016-02-06

    We propose a chemo-mechanical model based on stress-dependent recruitment of myosin motors to describe how the contractility, polarization and strain in cells vary with the stiffness of their surroundings and their shape. A contractility tensor, which depends on the distribution of myosin motors, is introduced to describe the chemical free energy of the cell due to myosin recruitment. We explicitly include the contributions to the free energy that arise from mechanosensitive signalling pathways (such as the SFX, Rho-Rock and MLCK pathways) through chemo-mechanical coupling parameters. Taking the variations of the total free energy, which consists of the chemical and mechanical components, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics provides equations for the temporal evolution of the active stress and the contractility tensor. Following this approach, we are able to recover the well-known Hill relation for active stresses, based on the fundamental principles of irreversible thermodynamics rather than phenomenology. We have numerically implemented our free energy-based approach to model spatial distribution of strain and contractility in (i) cells supported by flexible microposts, (ii) cells on two-dimensional substrates, and (iii) cells in three-dimensional matrices. We demonstrate how the polarization of the cells and the orientation of stress fibres can be deduced from the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the contractility tensor. Our calculations suggest that the chemical free energy of the cell decreases with the stiffness of the extracellular environment as the cytoskeleton polarizes in response to stress-dependent recruitment of molecular motors. The mechanical energy, which includes the strain energy and motor potential energy, however, increases with stiffness, but the overall energy is lower for cells in stiffer environments. This provides a thermodynamic basis for durotaxis, whereby cells preferentially migrate towards stiffer regions of the

  13. HMBPP-deficient Listeria mutant immunization alters pulmonary/systemic responses, effector functions, and memory polarization of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frencher, James T; Shen, Hongbo; Yan, Lin; Wilson, Jessica O; Freitag, Nancy E; Rizzo, Alicia N; Chen, Crystal Y; Chen, Zheng W

    2014-12-01

    Whereas infection or immunization of humans/primates with microbes coproducing HMBPP/IPP can remarkably activate Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, in vivo studies have not been done to dissect HMBPP- and IPP-driven expansion, pulmonary trafficking, effector functions, and memory polarization of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. We define these phosphoantigen-host interplays by comparative immunizations of macaques with the HMBPP/IPP-coproducing Listeria ΔactA prfA* and HMBPP-deficient Listeria ΔactA ΔGCPE: prfA* mutant. The HMBPP-deficient ΔGCPE: mutant shows lower ability to expand Vγ2Vδ2 T cells in vitro than the parental HMBPP-producing strain but displays comparably attenuated infectivity or immunogenicity. Respiratory immunization of macaques with the HMBPP-deficient mutant elicits lower pulmonary and systemic responses of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells compared with the HMBPP-producing vaccine strain. Interestingly, HMBPP-deficient mutant reimmunization or boosting elicits enhanced responses of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, but the magnitude is lower than that by HMBPP-producing listeria. HMBPP-deficient listeria differentiated fewer Vγ2Vδ2 T effector cells capable of coproducing IFN-γ and TNF-α and inhibiting intracellular listeria than HMBPP-producing listeria. Furthermore, HMBPP deficiency in listerial immunization influences memory polarization of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. Thus, both HMBPP and IPP production in listerial immunization or infection elicit systemic/pulmonary responses and differentiation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, but a role for HMBPP is more dominant. Findings may help devise immune intervention. © 2014 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  14. HMBPP-deficient Listeria mutant immunization alters pulmonary/systemic responses, effector functions, and memory polarization of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frencher, James T.; Shen, Hongbo; Yan, Lin; Wilson, Jessica O.; Freitag, Nancy E.; Rizzo, Alicia N.; Chen, Crystal Y.; Chen, Zheng W.

    2014-01-01

    Whereas infection or immunization of humans/primates with microbes coproducing HMBPP/IPP can remarkably activate Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, in vivo studies have not been done to dissect HMBPP- and IPP-driven expansion, pulmonary trafficking, effector functions, and memory polarization of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. We define these phosphoantigen-host interplays by comparative immunizations of macaques with the HMBPP/IPP-coproducing Listeria ΔactA prfA* and HMBPP-deficient Listeria ΔactAΔgcpE prfA* mutant. The HMBPP-deficient ΔgcpE mutant shows lower ability to expand Vγ2Vδ2 T cells in vitro than the parental HMBPP-producing strain but displays comparably attenuated infectivity or immunogenicity. Respiratory immunization of macaques with the HMBPP-deficient mutant elicits lower pulmonary and systemic responses of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells compared with the HMBPP-producing vaccine strain. Interestingly, HMBPP-deficient mutant reimmunization or boosting elicits enhanced responses of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, but the magnitude is lower than that by HMBPP-producing listeria. HMBPP-deficient listeria differentiated fewer Vγ2Vδ2 T effector cells capable of coproducing IFN-γ and TNF-α and inhibiting intracellular listeria than HMBPP-producing listeria. Furthermore, HMBPP deficiency in listerial immunization influences memory polarization of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. Thus, both HMBPP and IPP production in listerial immunization or infection elicit systemic/pulmonary responses and differentiation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, but a role for HMBPP is more dominant. Findings may help devise immune intervention. PMID:25114162

  15. Human RPE Stem Cells Grown into Polarized RPE Monolayers on a Polyester Matrix Are Maintained after Grafting into Rabbit Subretinal Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris V. Stanzel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is being developed as a cell-replacement therapy for age-related macular degeneration. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived RPE are currently translating toward clinic. We introduce the adult human RPE stem cell (hRPESC as an alternative RPE source. Polarized monolayers of adult hRPESC-derived RPE grown on polyester (PET membranes had near-native characteristics. Trephined pieces of RPE monolayers on PET were transplanted subretinally in the rabbit, a large-eyed animal model. After 4 days, retinal edema was observed above the implant, detected by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and fundoscopy. At 1 week, retinal atrophy overlying the fetal or adult transplant was observed, remaining stable thereafter. Histology obtained 4 weeks after implantation confirmed a continuous polarized human RPE monolayer on PET. Taken together, the xeno-RPE survived with retained characteristics in the subretinal space. These experiments support that adult hRPESC-derived RPE are a potential source for transplantation therapies.

  16. The Wilms tumor gene, Wt1, is critical for mouse spermatogenesis via regulation of sertoli cell polarity and is associated with non-obstructive azoospermia in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Na Wang

    Full Text Available Azoospermia is one of the major reproductive disorders which cause male infertility in humans; however, the etiology of this disease is largely unknown. In the present study, six missense mutations of WT1 gene were detected in 529 human patients with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA, indicating a strong association between WT1 mutation and NOA. The Wilms tumor gene, Wt1, is specifically expressed in Sertoli cells (SCs which support spermatogenesis. To examine the functions of this gene in spermatogenesis, Wt1 was deleted in adult testis using Wt1(flox and Cre-ER(TM mice strains. We found that inactivation of Wt1 resulted in massive germ cell death and only SCs were present in most of the seminiferous tubules which was very similar to NOA in humans. In investigating the potential mechanism for this, histological studies revealed that the blood-testis barrier (BTB was disrupted in Wt1 deficient testes. In vitro studies demonstrated that Wt1 was essential for cell polarity maintenance in SCs. Further studies found that the expression of cell polarity associated genes (Par6b and E-cadherin and Wnt signaling genes (Wnt4, Wnt11 were downregulated in Wt1 deficient SCs, and that the expression of Par6b and E-cadherin was regulated by Wnt4. Our findings suggest that Wt1 is important in spermatogenesis by regulating the polarity of SCs via Wnt signaling pathway and that WT1 mutation is one of the genetic causes of NOA in humans.

  17. The Glycosylated Rv1860 Protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Inhibits Dendritic Cell Mediated TH1 and TH17 Polarization of T Cells and Abrogates Protective Immunity Conferred by BCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Kumar, Naveen; Jumani, Rajiv S.; Challu, Vijay; Elangovan, Shobha; Khan, Naseem A.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported interferon gamma secretion by human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in response to recombinant E. coli-expressed Rv1860 protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) as well as protection of guinea pigs against a challenge with virulent MTB following prime-boost immunization with DNA vaccine and poxvirus expressing Rv1860. In contrast, a Statens Serum Institute Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG-SSI) recombinant expressing MTB Rv1860 (BCG-TB1860) showed loss of protective ability compared to the parent BCG strain expressing the control GFP protein (BCG-GFP). Since Rv1860 is a secreted mannosylated protein of MTB and BCG, we investigated the effect of BCG-TB1860 on innate immunity. Relative to BCG-GFP, BCG-TB1860 effected a significant near total reduction both in secretion of cytokines IL-2, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, and up regulation of co-stimulatory molecules MHC-II, CD40, CD54, CD80 and CD86 by infected bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC), while leaving secreted levels of TGF-β unchanged. These effects were mimicked by BCG-TB1860His which carried a 6-Histidine tag at the C-terminus of Rv1860, killed sonicated preparations of BCG-TB1860 and purified H37Rv-derived Rv1860 glycoprotein added to BCG-GFP, but not by E. coli-expressed recombinant Rv1860. Most importantly, BMDC exposed to BCG-TB1860 failed to polarize allogeneic as well as syngeneic T cells to secrete IFN-γ and IL-17 relative to BCG-GFP. Splenocytes from mice infected with BCG-SSI showed significantly less proliferation and secretion of IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-17, but secreted higher levels of IL-10 in response to in vitro restimulation with BCG-TB1860 compared to BCG-GFP. Spleens from mice infected with BCG-TB1860 also harboured significantly fewer DC expressing MHC-II, IL-12, IL-2 and TNF-α compared to mice infected with BCG-GFP. Glycoproteins of MTB, through their deleterious effects on DC may thus contribute to suppress the generation of a TH1- and TH17-dominated

  18. Loss of the Drosophila cell polarity regulator Scribbled promotes epithelial tissue overgrowth and cooperation with oncogenic Ras-Raf through impaired Hippo pathway signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grusche Felix A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial neoplasias are associated with alterations in cell polarity and excessive cell proliferation, yet how these neoplastic properties are related to one another is still poorly understood. The study of Drosophila genes that function as neoplastic tumor suppressors by regulating both of these properties has significant potential to clarify this relationship. Results Here we show in Drosophila that loss of Scribbled (Scrib, a cell polarity regulator and neoplastic tumor suppressor, results in impaired Hippo pathway signaling in the epithelial tissues of both the eye and wing imaginal disc. scrib mutant tissue overgrowth, but not the loss of cell polarity, is dependent upon defective Hippo signaling and can be rescued by knockdown of either the TEAD/TEF family transcription factor Scalloped or the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie in the eye disc, or reducing levels of Yorkie in the wing disc. Furthermore, loss of Scrib sensitizes tissue to transformation by oncogenic Ras-Raf signaling, and Yorkie-Scalloped activity is required to promote this cooperative tumor overgrowth. The inhibition of Hippo signaling in scrib mutant eye disc clones is not dependent upon JNK activity, but can be significantly rescued by reducing aPKC kinase activity, and ectopic aPKC activity is sufficient to impair Hippo signaling in the eye disc, even when JNK signaling is blocked. In contrast, warts mutant overgrowth does not require aPKC activity. Moreover, reducing endogenous levels of aPKC or increasing Scrib or Lethal giant larvae levels does not promote increased Hippo signaling, suggesting that aPKC activity is not normally rate limiting for Hippo pathway activity. Epistasis experiments suggest that Hippo pathway inhibition in scrib mutants occurs, at least in part, downstream or in parallel to both the Expanded and Fat arms of Hippo pathway regulation. Conclusions Loss of Scrib promotes Yorkie/Scalloped-dependent epithelial tissue

  19. Metformin affects the features of a human hepatocellular cell line (HepG2) by regulating macrophage polarization in a co-culture microenviroment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miaojiao; Zhang, Jingjing; Hu, Fang; Liu, Shiping; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2015-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests an association between diabetes and cancer. Inflammation is a key event that underlies the pathological processes of the two diseases. Metformin displays anti-cancer effects, but the mechanism is not completely clear. This study investigated whether metformin regulated the microenvironment of macrophage polarization to affect the characteristics of HepG2 cells and the possible role of the Notch-signalling pathway. RAW264.7 macrophages were cultured alone or co-cultured with HepG2 cells and treated with metformin. We analysed classical (M1) and alternative (M2) gene expression in RAW264.7 cells using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Changes in mRNA and protein expressions of Notch signalling in both cell types were also detected using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western-blotting analyses. The proliferation, apoptosis and migration of HepG2 cells were detected using Cell Titer 96 AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay (MTS) (Promega Corporation, Fitchburg, WI, USA), Annexin V-FITC/PI (7SeaPharmTech, Shanghai, China) and the cell scratch assay, respectively. Metformin induced single-cultured RAW264.7 macrophages with an M2 phenotype but attenuated the M2 macrophage differentiation and inhibited monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) secretion in a co-culture system. The co-cultured group of metformin pretreatment activated Notch signalling in macrophages but repressed it inHepG2 cells. Co-culture also promoted the proliferation and migration of HepG2 cells. However, along with the enhanced apoptosis, the proliferation and the migration of HepG2 cells were remarkably inhibited in another co-culture system with metformin pretreatment. Metformin can skew RAW264.7 macrophages toward different phenotypes according to changes in the microenvironment, which may affect the inflammatory conditions mediated by macrophages, induce apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation and migration of HepG2

  20. Political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Avinash K.; Weibull, Jörgen W.

    2007-01-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  1. Political polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avinash K; Weibull, Jörgen W

    2007-05-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  2. HuR Is Necessary for Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Polarity at Least in Part via ΔNp63

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Cho, Seong-Jun; Chen, Xinbin

    2012-01-01

    HuR, a RNA binding protein, is known to function as a tumor maintenance gene in breast cancer and associated with tumor growth and poor prognosis. However, the cellular function of this protein remains largely unknown in normal mammary epithelial cells. Here, we showed that in immortalized MCF10A mammary epithelial cells, HuR knockdown inhibits cell proliferation and enhances premature senescence. We also showed that in three-dimensional culture, MCF10A cells with HuR knockdown form abnormal acini with filled lumen and an aberrant expression pattern of the extracellular matrix protein laminin V. In addition, we showed that HuR knockdown increases ΔNp63, but decreases wild-type p53, expression in MCF10A cells. Moreover, we showed that ΔNp63 knockdown partially rescues the proliferative defect induced by HuR knockdown in MCF10A cells. Consistent with this, we identified two U-rich elements in the 3′-untranslated region of p63 mRNA, to which HuR specifically binds. Finally, we showed that HuR knockdown enhances ΔNp63 mRNA translation but has no effect on p63 mRNA turnover. Together, our data suggest that HuR maintains cell proliferation and polarity of mammary epithelial cells at least in part via ΔNp63. PMID:23028944

  3. Instructional Note: On Keeping an Academic Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how keeping an academic journal has helped him to become a more insightful and relentless evaluator of his teaching expertise, and to acquire an academic conscience. The keeping of such an journal can inspire teachers to continually evaluate unrehearsed events and can help them get down to the true heart of…

  4. An audit of anaesthetic record keeping

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    One of the duties of any medical practitioner is to keep records ... It is concluded that the standard of record-keeping in this random sample falls far .... trend. It is, of course, possible that some of these practitio- ners regard the anaesthetic record as their personal document, and made their own anaesthetic records which they ...

  5. Flow-induced endothelial cell alignment requires the RhoGEF Trio as a scaffold protein to polarize active Rac1 distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Jeffrey; Heemskerk, Niels; Kalsbeek, Martin J T; de Waard, Vivian; van Rijssel, Jos; van Buul, Jaap D

    2017-07-01

    Endothelial cells line the lumen of the vessel wall and are exposed to flow. In linear parts of the vessel, the endothelial cells experience laminar flow, resulting in endothelial cell alignment in the direction of flow, thereby protecting the vessel wall from inflammation and permeability. In order for endothelial cells to align, they undergo rapid remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton by local activation of the small GTPase Rac1. However, it is not clear whether sustained and local activation of Rac1 is required for long-term flow-induced cell alignment. Using a FRET-based DORA Rac1 biosensor, we show that local Rac1 activity remains for 12 h upon long-term flow. Silencing studies show that the RhoGEF Trio is crucial for keeping active Rac1 at the downstream side of the cell and, as a result, for long-term flow-induced cell alignment. Surprisingly, Trio appears to be not involved in flow-induced activation of Rac1. Our data show that flow induces Rac1 activity at the downstream side of the cell in a Trio-dependent manner and that Trio functions as a scaffold protein rather than a functional GEF under long-term flow conditions. © 2017 Kroon et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  6. Polarization Energies at Organic–Organic Interfaces: Impact on the Charge Separation Barrier at Donor–Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-05-31

    We probe the energetic landscape at a model pentacene/fullerene-C60 interface to investigate the interactions between positive and negative charges, which are critical to the processes of charge separation and recombination in organic solar cells. Using a polarizable force field, we find that polarization energy, i.e. the stabilization a charge feels due to its environment, is larger at the interface than in the bulk for both a positive and a negative charge. The combination of the charge being more stabilized at the interface and the Coulomb attraction between the charges, results in a barrier to charge separation at the pentacene-C60 interface that can be in excess of 0.7 eV for static configurations of the donor and acceptor locations. However, the impact of molecular motions, i.e., the dynamics, at the interface at room temperature results in a distribution of polarization energies and in charge separation barriers that can be significantly reduced. The dynamic nature of the interface is thus critical, with the polarization energy distributions indicating that sites along the interface shift in time between favorable and unfavorable configurations for charge separation.

  7. Activation and polar sequestration of PopA, a c-di-GMP effector protein involved in Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozaki, Shogo; Schalch-Moser, Annina; Zumthor, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    When Caulobacter crescentus enters S-phase the replication initiation inhibitor CtrA dynamically positions to the old cell pole to be degraded by the polar ClpXP protease. Polar delivery of CtrA requires PopA and the diguanylate cyclase PleD that positions to the same pole. Here we present evidence...... that PopA originated through gene duplication from its paralogue response regulator PleD and subsequent co-option as c-di-GMP effector protein. While the C-terminal catalytic domain (GGDEF) of PleD is activated by phosphorylation of the N-terminal receiver domain, functional adaptation has reversed signal......A to the cell pole in response to c-di-GMP binding. In agreement with the divergent activation and targeting mechanisms, distinct markers sequester PleD and PopA to the old cell pole upon S-phase entry. Together these data indicate that PopA adopted a novel role as topology specificity factor to help recruit...

  8. Mapping microscopic order in plant and mammalian cells and tissues: novel differential polarization attachment for new generation confocal microscopes (DP-LSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, G.; Pawlak, K.; Pomozi, I.; Tóth, E. A.; Molnár, A.; Matkó, J.; Garab, G.

    2014-03-01

    Elucidation of the molecular architecture of complex, highly organized molecular macro-assemblies is an important, basic task for biology. Differential polarization (DP) measurements, such as linear (LD) and circular dichroism (CD) or the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), which can be carried out in a dichrograph or spectrofluorimeter, respectively, carry unique, spatially averaged information about the molecular organization of the sample. For inhomogeneous samples—e.g. cells and tissues—measurements on macroscopic scale are not satisfactory, and in some cases not feasible, thus microscopic techniques must be applied. The microscopic DP-imaging technique, when based on confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM), allows the pixel by pixel mapping of anisotropy of a sample in 2D and 3D. The first DP-LSM configuration, which, in fluorescence mode, allowed confocal imaging of different DP quantities in real-time, without interfering with the ‘conventional’ imaging, was built on a Zeiss LSM410. It was demonstrated to be capable of determining non-confocally the linear birefringence (LB) or LD of a sample and, confocally, its FDLD (fluorescence detected LD), the degree of polarization (P) and the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), following polarized and non-polarized excitation, respectively (Steinbach et al 2009 Acta Histochem.111 316-25). This DP-LSM configuration, however, cannot simply be adopted to new generation microscopes with considerably more compact structures. As shown here, for an Olympus FV500, we designed an easy-to-install DP attachment to determine LB, LD, FDLD and r, in new-generation confocal microscopes, which, in principle, can be complemented with a P-imaging unit, but specifically to the brand and type of LSM.

  9. Mapping microscopic order in plant and mammalian cells and tissues: novel differential polarization attachment for new generation confocal microscopes (DP-LSM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, G; Pawlak, K; Garab, G; Pomozi, I; Tóth, E A; Molnár, A; Matkó, J

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the molecular architecture of complex, highly organized molecular macro-assemblies is an important, basic task for biology. Differential polarization (DP) measurements, such as linear (LD) and circular dichroism (CD) or the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), which can be carried out in a dichrograph or spectrofluorimeter, respectively, carry unique, spatially averaged information about the molecular organization of the sample. For inhomogeneous samples—e.g. cells and tissues—measurements on macroscopic scale are not satisfactory, and in some cases not feasible, thus microscopic techniques must be applied. The microscopic DP-imaging technique, when based on confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM), allows the pixel by pixel mapping of anisotropy of a sample in 2D and 3D. The first DP-LSM configuration, which, in fluorescence mode, allowed confocal imaging of different DP quantities in real-time, without interfering with the ‘conventional’ imaging, was built on a Zeiss LSM410. It was demonstrated to be capable of determining non-confocally the linear birefringence (LB) or LD of a sample and, confocally, its FDLD (fluorescence detected LD), the degree of polarization (P) and the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), following polarized and non-polarized excitation, respectively (Steinbach et al 2009 Acta Histochem.111 316–25). This DP-LSM configuration, however, cannot simply be adopted to new generation microscopes with considerably more compact structures. As shown here, for an Olympus FV500, we designed an easy-to-install DP attachment to determine LB, LD, FDLD and r, in new-generation confocal microscopes, which, in principle, can be complemented with a P-imaging unit, but specifically to the brand and type of LSM. (paper)

  10. Mapping microscopic order in plant and mammalian cells and tissues: novel differential polarization attachment for new generation confocal microscopes (DP-LSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, G; Pawlak, K; Pomozi, I; Tóth, E A; Molnár, A; Matkó, J; Garab, G

    2014-02-24

    Elucidation of the molecular architecture of complex, highly organized molecular macro-assemblies is an important, basic task for biology. Differential polarization (DP) measurements, such as linear (LD) and circular dichroism (CD) or the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), which can be carried out in a dichrograph or spectrofluorimeter, respectively, carry unique, spatially averaged information about the molecular organization of the sample. For inhomogeneous samples-e.g. cells and tissues-measurements on macroscopic scale are not satisfactory, and in some cases not feasible, thus microscopic techniques must be applied. The microscopic DP-imaging technique, when based on confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM), allows the pixel by pixel mapping of anisotropy of a sample in 2D and 3D. The first DP-LSM configuration, which, in fluorescence mode, allowed confocal imaging of different DP quantities in real-time, without interfering with the 'conventional' imaging, was built on a Zeiss LSM410. It was demonstrated to be capable of determining non-confocally the linear birefringence (LB) or LD of a sample and, confocally, its FDLD (fluorescence detected LD), the degree of polarization (P) and the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), following polarized and non-polarized excitation, respectively (Steinbach et al 2009 Acta Histochem.111 316-25). This DP-LSM configuration, however, cannot simply be adopted to new generation microscopes with considerably more compact structures. As shown here, for an Olympus FV500, we designed an easy-to-install DP attachment to determine LB, LD, FDLD and r, in new-generation confocal microscopes, which, in principle, can be complemented with a P-imaging unit, but specifically to the brand and type of LSM.

  11. Apico-basal polarity complex and cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-27

    Jan 27, 2014 ... and regulated by several polarity proteins. These polarity pro- teins are often targeted by EMT inducers, leading to their altered function, ultimately facilitating cell migration (Martin-Belmonte and Perez-Moreno 2012). EMT-related alterations include over- expression or deregulation of components of polarity ...

  12. Successful cross-presentation of allogeneic myeloma cells by autologous alpha-type 1-polarized dendritic cells as an effective tumor antigen in myeloma patients with matched monoclonal immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deok-Hwan; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Youn-Kyung; Hong, Cheol Yi; Lee, Hyun Ju; Nguyen-Pham, Thanh-Nhan; Bae, Soo Young; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Chung, Ik-Joo; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Kalinski, Pawel; Lee, Je-Jung

    2011-12-01

    For wide application of a dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in myeloma patients, easily available tumor antigens should be developed. We investigated the feasibility of cellular immunotherapy using autologous alpha-type 1-polarized dendritic cells (αDC1s) loaded with apoptotic allogeneic myeloma cells, which could generate myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) against autologous myeloma cells in myeloma patients. Monocyte-derived DCs were matured by adding the αDC1-polarizing cocktail (TNFα/IL-1β/IFN-α/IFN-γ/poly-I:C) and loaded with apoptotic allogeneic CD138(+) myeloma cells from other patients with matched monoclonal immunoglobulins as a tumor antigen. There were no differences in the phenotypic expression between αDC1s loaded with apoptotic autologous and allogeneic myeloma cells. Autologous αDC1s effectively took up apoptotic allogeneic myeloma cells from other patients with matched subtype. Myeloma-specific CTLs against autologous target cells were successfully induced by αDC1s loaded with allogeneic tumor antigen. The cross-presentation of apoptotic allogeneic myeloma cells to αDC1s could generate CTL responses between myeloma patients with individual matched monoclonal immunoglobulins. There was no difference in CTL responses between αDC1s loaded with autologous tumor antigen and allogeneic tumor antigen against targeting patient's myeloma cells. Our data indicate that autologous DCs loaded with allogeneic myeloma cells with matched immunoglobulin can generate potent myeloma-specific CTL responses against autologous myeloma cells and can be a highly feasible and effective method for cellular immunotherapy in myeloma patients.

  13. Interference of HTLV-1 Tax Protein with Cell Polarity Regulators: Defining the Subcellular Localization of the Tax-DLG1 Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziali, Federico; Bugnon Valdano, Marina; Brunet Avalos, Clarisse; Moriena, Lucía; Cavatorta, Ana Laura; Gardiol, Daniela

    2017-11-23

    Human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV)-1 Tax (Tax) protein is very important in viral replication and cell transformation. Tax localizes in the nucleus and cytoplasm in association with organelles. Some activities of Tax depend on interactions with PDZ (PSD-95/Discs Large/Z0-1) domain-containing proteins such as Discs large protein 1 (DLG1) which is involved in cell polarity and proliferation. The DLG1 interaction results in a cytoplasmic co-localization pattern resembling vesicular aggregates, the nature of which is still unknown. To further explore the role of PDZ proteins in HTLV-1 cell transformation, we deeply investigated the Tax-DLG1 association. By fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we detected, for the first time, the direct binding of Tax to DLG1 within the cell. We showed that the interaction specifically affects the cellular distribution of not only DLG1, but also Tax. After studying different cell structures, we demonstrated that the aggregates distribute into the Golgi apparatus in spatial association with the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC). This study contributes to understand the biological significance of Tax-PDZ interactions.

  14. The normal chain length distribution of the O antigen is required for the interaction of Shigella flexneri 2a with polarized Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anilei Hoare

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri causes bacillary dysentery in humans. Essential to the establishment of the disease is the invasion of the colonic epithelial cells. Here we investigated the role of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS O antigen in the ability of S. flexneri to adhere to and invade polarized Caco-2 cells. The S. flexneri 2a O antigen has two preferred chain lengths: a short O antigen (S-OAg regulated by the WzzB protein and a very long O antigen (VL-OAg regulated by Wzz pHS2. Mutants with defined deletions of the genes required for O-antigen assembly and polymerization were constructed and assayed for their abilities to adhere to and enter cultured epithelial cells. The results show that both VL- and S-OAg are required for invasion through the basolateral cell membrane. In contrast, the absence of O antigen does not impair adhesion. Purified LPS does not act as a competitor for the invasion of Caco-2 cells by the wild-type strain, suggesting that LPS is not directly involved in the internalization process by epithelial cells.

  15. Occupational Health Record-keeping System (OHRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Occupational Health Record-keeping System (OHRS) is part of the Clinical Information Support System (CISS) portal framework and the initial CISS partner system. OHRS...

  16. Dementia - keeping safe in the home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the outside. Keep car keys out of sight. To prevent harm when someone with dementia does ... 2016. Budson AE, Solomon PR. Life adjustments for memory loss, Alzheimer's disease, and dementia. In: Budson AE, ...

  17. Course-keeping control of underactuated hovercraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Zhao, Guo-Liang

    2004-06-01

    The course-keeping control of underactuated hovercraft with two aft propellers was considered. The control of the heading error and cross-track error was accomplished by the yaw torque merely in this case. The hovercraft dynamic model is nonlinear and underactuated. At first the Controllability of course-keeping control for hovercraft was proved, then a course-keeping control law was derived that keeps hovercraft heading constant as well as minimizes the lateral movement of hovercraft. The proposed law guarantees heading error and sway error all converge to zero exponentially. Simulation tests were carried out to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control law. For further research, the disturbance influence would be considered in the dynamic equations.

  18. Can France keep its patients happy?

    OpenAIRE

    Degos, Laurent; Romaneix, François; Michel, Philippe; Bacou, Jean

    2008-01-01

    The French healthcare system gets high satisfaction ratings but is becoming more difficult to fund. Laurent Degos and colleagues examinethe challenges of keeping citizens content and improving cost effectiveness

  19. How to Keep Your Sight for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feature: Vision How to Keep Your Sight for Life Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents For ... would have the greatest impact on their daily life, according to a recent survey by the NIH's ...

  20. In vitro Th1 and Th2 cell polarization is severely influenced by the initial ratio of naïve and memory CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Lars; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2013-01-01

    Robust in vitro systems are important in elucidating mechanisms regarding the heterogenetic nature of in vivo immune responses and contribute with knowledge to design good in vivo experiments. In this study, we show that initial Th1 and in particular Th2 polarization was negatively influenced by ...

  1. Effector/memory T cells of the weanling mouse exhibit Type 2 cytokine polarization in vitro and in vivo in the advanced stages of acute energy deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steevels, Tessa A M; Hillyer, Lyn M; Monk, Jennifer M; Fisher, Megan E; Woodward, Bill D

    2010-06-01

    Our objective was to determine whether the polarizing cytokine profile of the effector/memory T-cell compartment reflects the profound decline of cell-mediated inflammatory competence that characterizes acute prepubescent malnutrition. Weanling C57BL/6J mice were permitted free access to a complete purified diet, free access to an isocaloric low-protein diet or restricted intake of the complete diet for 14 days. First, interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-gamma concentrations generated in vitro by splenic and nodal effector/memory T cells were assessed following exposure to plate-bound anti-CD3. Second, net systemic production of IFN-gamma and IL-4 by the effector/memory T-cell compartment was assessed by the in vivo cytokine capture assay following anti-CD3 stimulation. In vitro stimulation generated less IFN-gamma (P=.002) but more IL-4 (P=.05) by T cells from the restricted-intake group relative to the age-matched control group. Similarly, in vivo stimulation generated low serum levels of antibody-captured IFN-gamma in the restricted-intake group vis-à-vis the age-matched control group (P=.01), while the IL-4 response was sustained (P=.39). By contrast, the 14-day low-protein model exhibited no change in T-cell cytokine signature either in vitro or in vivo. However, following extended consumption of the low-protein diet (26 days), carcass energy losses exceeded those of the 14-day protocol and serum levels of in vivo antibody-captured IFN-gamma were low after anti-CD3 challenge relative to the age-matched control group (P=.02), while levels of captured IL-4 remained unaffected (P=.07). Acute weanling malnutrition elicits a Type 2 polarizing cytokine character on the part of the effector/memory T-cell compartment, but only in the most advanced stages of energy decrement. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. Exendin-4 Induces Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Migration Through Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages Polarization via PKA-STAT3 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The synthesis and degradation processes involved in bone remodeling are critically regulated by osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The GLP-1 receptor agonist Exendin-4 is beneficial for osteoblast differentiation and increases the number of osteoblasts. Methods: We constructed an ovariectomized model to evaluate the impact of Exendin-4 on bone formation in osteoporosis. A macrophage-depleted model was also created to investigate the effect of macrophages on bone formation. Thirty-two female WT C57BL/6 mice (aged 3 months were randomly assigned to a normal control group and four ovariectomized (OVX subgroups: OVX + vehicle group, OVX + Exendin-4 (4.2 µg/kg/day group, OVX + chloride phosphate liposome group and OVX + chloride phosphate liposome + Exendin-4 group. Results: In this study, we found that Exendin-4 not only increased the number of osteoblasts and decreased the number of osteoclasts, but also increased the number of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs at the bone surface. Moreover, we found that OVX mice treated with Exendin-4 increased TGF-β1 levels at the bone surface compared with that in OVX mice. Besides, Exendin-4 promoted the polarization of bone marrow-derived macrophages into M2 subtype and increased TGF-β1 secretion by the M2 subtype. Finally, we found that Exendin-4 induced macrophage polarization via the cAMP-PKA-STAT3 signaling pathway. Conclusion: Exendin-4 promotes bone marrow-derived macrophage polarization to the M2 subtype and induces BMSC migration to the bone surface via PKA-STAT3 signaling.

  4. Do allergic families avoid keeping furry pets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, R J; Carlsen, K C L; Granum, B; Carlsen, K-H; Håland, G; Devulapalli, C S; Munthe-Kaas, M C; Mowinckel, P; Løvik, M

    2010-06-01

    Studies addressing the relationship between pet keeping and development of asthma and allergies may be influenced by pet avoidance in families with a history of allergic disease. Following a cohort of 1019 children in Oslo till 10 years of age, we studied the association of pet keeping with socio-economic factors and allergic disease in the family. A family history of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis was not significantly associated with pet ownership at birth or with pet removal by 10 years. Acquiring cats and dogs was less likely if the child had allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, whereas no association was seen with asthma (in any family member). Single parenthood increased the likelihood of acquiring a cat, smoking parents more often had cats or dogs, and having older siblings was associated with keeping dogs and other furry pets. Among 319 families reporting pet avoidance, 70% never had pets, 8% had given up pets, and 22% avoided a particular type of pet only. Twenty-four per cent of the parents failed to retrospectively report pet keeping during the child's first year of life. Overall, allergic rhinitis, but not asthma was associated with actual pet avoidance, whereas the strongest predictors for keeping pets were found to be socio-economic factors. Allergic disease in a child most often does not lead to the removal of the family's furry pet. Pet avoidance is associated with allergic symptoms, but not asthma. Socio-economic factors like parental education, single parenthood and smoking affects the families' decisions on pet keeping, including the type of pets the families will avoid or acquire. The large recall error demonstrated points to the need for prospective data regarding pet keeping.

  5. On the large COMPASS polarized deuteron target

    CERN Document Server

    Finger, M; Baum, G; Doshita, N; Finger, M Jr; Gautheron, F; Goertz, St; Hasegawa, T; Heckmann, J; Hess, Ch; Horikawa, N; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kisselev, Y; Koivuniemi, J; Kondo, K; Le Goff, J-M; Magnon, A; Marchand, C; Matsuda, T; Meyer, W; Reicherz, G; Srnka, A

    2006-01-01

    The spin structure of the nucleons is investigated in deep inelastic scattering of a polarized muon beam and a polarized nucleon target in the COMPASS experiment at CERN since 2001. To achieve high luminosities a large solid polarized target is used. The COMPASS polarized target consists of a high cooling power $^{3}$He/$^{4}$He dilution refrigerator capable to maintain working temperature of the target material at about 50mK, a superconducting solenoid and dipole magnet system for longitudinal and transversal magnetic field on the target material, respectively, target cells containing polarizable material, microwave cavities and high power microwave radiation systems for dynamic nuclear polarization and the nuclear magnetic resonance system for nuclear spin polarization measurements. During 2001–2004 experiments superconducting magnet system with opening angle $\\pm$69 mrad, polarized target holder with two target cells and corresponding microwave and NMR systems have been used. For the data taking from 200...

  6. Density and length of stomatal and epidermal cells in "living fossil" trees grown under elevated CO 2 and a polar light regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaya, R.; Llorens, L.; Peñuelas, J.

    2011-07-01

    During the Cretaceous and early Tertiary, when the climate was warm and the atmospheric CO 2 concentration ([CO 2]) was at least double that of the present-day, polar forests populated high latitude landmasses. We investigated the density and length of stomata and other epidermal cells of two deciduous and three evergreen "living fossil" tree species representative of these ancient forests. These tree species were grown in a simulated Cretaceous high latitude environment at either ambient (400 ppmv) or elevated (800 ppmv) [CO 2] during four years. After 4 years growing at elevated [CO 2], the leaf stomatal density and index (percentage of leaf epidermal cells that are stomata) of these plants were similar to those of their counterparts growing at ambient [CO 2]. While the CO 2 enrichment only modified the stomatal pore length in two of the five studied species, it increased significantly the overall length of the epidermal cells of all the species, reducing their density. These results revealed that leaf epidermal cells of these "living fossil" species were more sensitive than stomata to an experimental doubling of atmospheric CO 2 concentration.

  7. Polar lipids from the marine macroalga Palmaria palmata inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production in RAW264.7 macrophage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banskota, Arjun H; Stefanova, Roumiana; Sperker, Sandra; Lall, Santosh P; Craigie, James S; Hafting, Jeff T; Critchley, Alan T

    2014-05-01

    The EtOAc soluble fraction of a MeOH/CHCl3 extract of Palmaria palmata showed strong nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NO production in murine RAW264.7 cells. NO inhibition-guided isolation led to identification of three new polar lipids including a sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol (SQDG) (2S)-1-O-eicosapentaenoyl-2-O-myristoyl-3-O-(6-sulfo-α-D-quinovopyranosyl)-glycerol (1) and two phosphatidylglycerols, 1-O-eicosapentaenoyl-2-O-trans-3-hexadecenoyl-3-phospho-(1'-glycerol)-glycerol (3) and 1-O-eicosapentaenoyl-2-O-palmitoyl-3-phospho-(1'-glycerol)-glycerol (4) from the EtOAc fraction. Seven known lipids were also isolated including a SQDG (2), a phospholipid (5) and five galactolipids (6-10). Structures of the isolated lipids were elucidated by spectral analyses. The isolated SQDGs, phosphatidylglycerols and phospholipid possessed strong and dose-dependent NO inhibitory activity compared to N(G)-methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA), a well-known NO inhibitor used as a positive control. Further study suggested that these polar lipids suppressed NO production through down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Apico-basal polarity complex and cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Loss of cell polarity is a hallmark for carcinoma, and its underlying molecular mechanism is beginning to emerge from studies on model organisms and cancer cell lines. Moreover, deregulated expression of apico-basal polarity complex components has been reported in human tumours. In this review, we provide an ...

  9. Apico-basal polarity complex and cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-27

    Jan 27, 2014 ... Cell polarity determines spatial differences in structure, shape and function of the cell. Specific structural ... polarized structure in terms of cellular components from the leading to lagging edge. For instance ..... tissue organization is a hallmark of carcinoma (Royer and. Lu 2011). Invasion and metastasis are ...

  10. Station keeping strategies for constellations of satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Alain; Pascal, Stephane

    Communication systems based on constellations of satellite deployed in Low Earth Orbits (LEO) constitute a great number of new space projects. The objectives of these missions are generally expressed in term of global properties: coverage (global or related to specific areas), simultaneous satellite visibilities with ground stations, maximum waiting time. The quality of the service provided by the mission is defined by statistical measurements of these properties (probability of having one satellite in visibility from any point more than 0.8 for example) that must be guaranteed during the mission life-time by adequate station keeping strategies. Immediate solutions for station keeping of constellation are either non-controlled orbits (simple but with uncertain results) or independent orbit control for each satellite (with respect to a nominal orbit). This latter solution is reliable and well known but may overload control stations; so it is necessary to find better strategies, in term of cost (reduction of Delta V or ground segment load), adapted to constellations. Thus, the aim of this paper is to study the feasibility of a global station keeping strategy. Provided that the perturbations affecting each satellite are of the same magnitude (as it is the case for Walker constellations for example), the constellation geometry degrade gracefully as well as its statistical properties. Consequently, the strategy consistes in controlling relative positions of the satellites instead of keeping each satellite in its absolute window. If one takes into account operational station keeping scenarios.

  11. Par1b links lumen polarity with LGN-NuMA positioning for distinct epithelial cell division phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazaro-Dieguez, Francisco; Cohen, David; Fernandez, Dawn; Hodgson, Louis; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Muesch, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Columnar epithelia establish their luminal domains and their mitotic spindles parallel to the basal surface and undergo symmetric cell divisions in which the cleavage furrow bisects the apical domain. Hepatocyte lumina interrupt the lateral domain of neighboring cells perpendicular to two basal

  12. Monomethylfumarate affects polarization of monocyte-derived dendritic cells resulting in down-regulated Th1 lymphocyte responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litjens, Nicolle H R; Rademaker, Mirjam; Ravensbergen, Bep

    2004-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris, a type-1 cytokine-mediated chronic skin disease, can be treated successfully with fumaric acid esters (FAE). Beneficial effects of this medication coincided with decreased production of IFN-gamma. Since dendritic cells (DC) regulate the differentiation of T helper (Th) cells, ...

  13. Polarized secretion of interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8 by human airway epithelia 16HBE14o- cells in response to cationic polypeptide challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Wai-ming Chow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The airway epithelium participates in asthmatic inflammation in many ways. Target cells of the epithelium can respond to a variety of inflammatory mediators and cytokines. Damage to the surface epithelium occurs following the secretion of eosinophil-derived, highly toxic cationic proteins. Moreover, the surface epithelium itself is responsible for the synthesis and release of cytokines that cause the selective recruitment, retention, and accumulation of various inflammatory cells. To mimic the damage seen during asthmatic inflammation, the bronchial epithelium can be challenged with highly charged cationic polypeptides such as poly-L-arginine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, human bronchial epithelial cells, 16HBE14o- cells, were "chemically injured" by exposing them to poly-l-arginine as a surrogate of the eosinophil cationic protein. Cytokine antibody array data showed that seven inflammatory mediators were elevated out of the 40 tested, including marked elevation in interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression levels were elevated as measured with real-time PCR. Cell culture supernatants from apical and basolateral compartments were collected, and the IL-6 and IL-8 production was quantified with ELISA. IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by 16HBE14o- epithelia into the apical compartment was significantly higher than that from the basolateral compartment. Using specific inhibitors, the production of IL-6 and IL-8 was found to be dependent on p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 MAPK, and NF-kappaB pathways. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results clearly demonstrate that damage to the bronchial epithelia by poly-L-arginine stimulates polarized IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. This apically directed secretion of cytokines may play an important role in orchestrating epithelial cell responses to inflammation.

  14. Microcomputer for controlled substance record keeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, R L; Motta, L J; Yee, A D

    1984-01-01

    The use of a microcomputer to maintain controlled substance inventory and record keeping is described. The system maintains perpetual inventories of the central narcotic vault and proof-of-use controlled drug records outstanding at nursing stations. The computerized system has eliminated (1) the delay previously encountered in the posting of transactions from the numeric log to perpetual inventory logs and (2) the potential addition and subtraction errors inherent in a manual system. Computerizing the controlled drug record-keeping system has saved approximately 166 minutes of labor per day, a cost savings of approximately $26. The new system also helps prevent diversion of controlled substances. The computer may also be used for other tasks while not running the controlled substance program. A microcomputer is well suited to the task of controlled-substance record-keeping functions, and the cost of the system (less than $4000) can be quickly recouped in labor savings.

  15. Electrokinetics of Polar Liquids in Contact with Non-Polar Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chih-Hsiu; Ferguson, Gregory S.; Chaudhury, Manoj K.

    2014-01-01

    Zeta potentials of several polar protic (water, ethylene glycol, formamide) as well as polar aprotic (dimethyl sulfoxide) liquids were measured in contact with three non-polar surfaces using closed-cell electro-osmosis. The test surfaces were chemisorbed monolayers of alkyl siloxanes, fluoroalkyl siloxanes and polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS) grafted on glass slides. All these liquids exhibited substantial electrokinetics in contact with the non-polar surfaces with these observations: the electro...

  16. Towards station-keeping using GPI controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Jerome

    the low-frequency linear model of a ship, and for which a very simple simulation is presented to illustrate the behavior of the GPI controller, we present the extension of the method to include a wave-frequency model that we then use for station-keeping in extreme seas. Simulations are presented......In this paper, we propose to use a Generalized Proportional-Integral controller for station-keeping of a ship. For output feedback, this has the advantage of not requiring the use of an asymptotic Luenberger or Kalman observer. After describing the methodology for the simple case of controlling...

  17. Precessing deuteron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnik, I.M.; Volkov, V.I.; Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M.; Plis, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the acceleration in the Nuclotron of deuterons polarized in the horizontal plane is considered. This horizontal polarization is named precessing polarization. The effects of the main magnetic field and synchrotron oscillations are included. The precessing polarization is supposed to be used in studying the polarization parameters of the elastic dp back-scattering and other experiments

  18. Keeping a Journal: A Path to Uncovering Identity (and Keeping Your Sanity)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Joanne E.

    2013-01-01

    A journal can help keep a person more organized, clarify their identity, and help them grapple with them own sense of belonging in the often bewildering world of academe. In this article, the author discusses: (1) the benefits and uses of keeping a journal; (2) Techniques for writing in a journal; and (3) Drawbacks of journal writing.

  19. Combined 17β-Estradiol with TCDD Promotes M2 Polarization of Macrophages in the Endometriotic Milieu with Aid of the Interaction between Endometrial Stromal Cells and Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to elucidate the effects of 17β-estradiol and TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on macrophage phenotypes in the endometriotic milieu. Co-culture of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs and U937 cells (macrophage cell line was performed to simulate the endometriotic milieu and to determine the effects of 17β-estradiol and/or TCDD on IL10, IL12 production and HLA-DR, CD86 expression by U937 macrophages. We found that combining 17β-estradiol with TCDD has a synergistic effect on inducing M2 activation when macrophages are co-cultured with ESCs. Moreover, the combination of 17β-estradiol and TCDD significantly enhanced STAT3 and P38 phosphorylation in macrophages. Differentiation of M2 macrophages induced by 17β-estradiol and TCDD were effectively abrogated by STAT3 and P38MAPK inhibitors, but not by ERK1/2 and JNK inhibitors. In conclusion, 17β-estradiol and TCDD in the ectopic milieu may lead to the development of endometriosis by inducing M2 polarization of macrophages through activation of the STAT3 and P38MAPK pathways.

  20. Evidence for involvement of Wnt signalling in body polarities, cell proliferation, and the neuro-sensory system in an adult ctenophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, Muriel; Dayraud, Cyrielle; Mialot, Antoine; Quéinnec, Eric; le Guyader, Hervé; Manuel, Michaël

    2013-01-01

    Signalling through the Wnt family of secreted proteins originated in a common metazoan ancestor and greatly influenced the evolution of animal body plans. In bilaterians, Wnt signalling plays multiple fundamental roles during embryonic development and in adult tissues, notably in axial patterning, neural development and stem cell regulation. Studies in various cnidarian species have particularly highlighted the evolutionarily conserved role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in specification and patterning of the primary embryonic axis. However in another key non-bilaterian phylum, Ctenophora, Wnts are not involved in early establishment of the body axis during embryogenesis. We analysed the expression in the adult of the ctenophore Pleurobrachia pileus of 11 orthologues of Wnt signalling genes including all ctenophore Wnt ligands and Fz receptors and several members of the intracellular β-catenin pathway machinery. All genes are strongly expressed around the mouth margin at the oral pole, evoking the Wnt oral centre of cnidarians. This observation is consistent with primary axis polarisation by the Wnts being a universal metazoan feature, secondarily lost in ctenophores during early development but retained in the adult. In addition, local expression of Wnt signalling genes was seen in various anatomical structures of the body including in the locomotory comb rows, where their complex deployment suggests control by the Wnts of local comb polarity. Other important contexts of Wnt involvement which probably evolved before the ctenophore/cnidarian/bilaterian split include proliferating stem cells and progenitors irrespective of cell types, and developing as well as differentiated neuro-sensory structures.

  1. Uteroglobin, an apically secreted protein of the uterine epithelium, is secreted non-polarized form MDCK cells and mainly basolaterally from Caco-2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, L K; Suske, G; Beato, M

    1993-01-01

    A complete cDNA encoding rabbit uteroglobin was constructed and expressed in MDCK and Caco-2 cells. The MDCK cells secrete uteroglobin in approximately equal amounts to the apical and the basolateral side, whereas the Caco-2 cells secrete uteroglobin mainly to the basolateral side. Both MDCK...... and Caco-2 cells thus secrete uteroglobin in a non-sorted manner. It has, however, previously been shown that uteroglobin is secreted exclusively at the apical membrane in primary cell culture of endometrial epithelial cells [S.K. Mani et al. (1991) Endocrinology 128, 1563-1573]. This suggests that either...... the endometrial epithelium has an apical default pathway or recognises a sorting signal not recognised by MDCK cells and Caco-2 cells. Our data thus show that a soluble molecule can be secreted at the apical, the basolateral or both membranes depending on the cell type....

  2. Polare maskuliniteter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Anne Hauan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper my aim is to read and understand the journal of Gerrit de Veer from the last journey of William Barents to the Arctic Regions in 1596 and the journal of captain Junge on his hunting trip from Tromsø to Svalbard in 1834.It is nearly 240 years between this to voyages. The first journal is known as the earliest report from the arctic era. Gerrit de Veer adds instructive copper engravings to his text and give us insight in the crews meeting with this new land. Captain Junges journal is found together with his dead crew in a house in a fjord nearby Ny-Ålesund and has no drawings, but word. Both of these journals may be read as sources of the knowledge and understanding of the polar region. They might also unveil the ideas of how to deal with and survive under the challenges that is given. In addition one can ask if the sources can tell us more about how men describe their challenges. Can the way they expressed themselves in the journals give us an understanding of masculinity? And not least help us to create good questions of the change in the ideas of masculinities which is said to follow the change in understanding of the wilderness.

  3. Anodic Concentration Polarization in SOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williford, Rick E.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Maupin, Gary D.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Wachsman, ED, et al

    2003-08-01

    Concentration polarization is important because it determines the maximum power output of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) at high fuel utilization. Anodic concentration polarization occurs when the demand for reactants exceeds the capacity of the porous ceramic anode to supply them by gas diffusion mechanisms. High tortuosities (bulk diffusion resistances) are often assumed to explain this behavior. However, recent experiments show that anodic concentration polarization originates in the immediate vicinity of the reactive triple phase boundary (TPB) sites near the anode/electrolyte interface. A model is proposed to describe how concentration polarization is controlled by two localized phenomena: competitive adsorption of reactants in areas adjacent to the reactive TPB sites, followed by relatively slow surface diffusion to the reactive sites. Results suggest that future SOFC design improvements should focus on optimization of the reactive area, adsorption, and surface diffusion at the anode/electrolyte interface.

  4. Being@: keep company with electronic evidence!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, J.; Hopstaken, Kees

    2000-01-01

    The title heading this paper Being@ keep company with electronic evedence is referring to an university training on the Internet which is processing insight into how science 'works' (in the active sense of the word) under the articulation of information- and communication technology (ICT) and

  5. Stock keeping unit fill rate specification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunter, R. H.; Syntetos, A. A.; Babai, M. Z.

    2017-01-01

    The fill rate is the most widely applied service level measure in industry and yet there is minimal advice available on how it should be differentiated on an individual Stock Keeping Unit (SKU) basis given that there is an overall system target service level. The typical approach utilized in

  6. Keeping control of reprocessing plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, K.G.

    1991-01-01

    Keeping control of reprocessing plant construction is a function of the traditional skills in project management, about which much has been written, but is critically dependent upon the selection of strategies and systems which will provide an appropriate infrastructure of policies, procedures, specifications, information, skills and community relations. (author)

  7. Web Tools: Keeping Learners on Pace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosloski, Mickey

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in teaching technology and engineering is pacing. Some students grasp new technological concepts quickly, while others need repetition and may struggle to keep pace. This poses an obstacle for the technology and engineering teacher, and is particularly true when teaching students to build a website. However, there…

  8. In Vitro Polarized Resonance Raman Study of N719 and N719-TBP in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassing, Søren; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Nguyen, Phuong Tuyet

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The working efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) depends on the long-term stability of the dye itself and on the microscopic structure of the dye-semiconductor interface. Previous experimental studies of DSCs based on ruthenium dye with bipyridine ligands (N719) adsorbed...

  9. IL-33 promotes GATA-3 polarization of gut-derived T cells in experimental and ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Coskun, Mehmet; Kvist, Peter Helding

    2015-01-01

    of the immune response in experimental colitis (piroxicam-accelerated colitis (PAC) in IL-10 -/- mice, dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) model) and UC.METHODS: Colonic IL-33 expression was determined in UC (8 active UC, 8 quiescent UC, and 7 controls) and experimental colitis. Mesenteric lymph node (MesLN) T cells...

  10. Visualization of polarized membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase activity in live cells by fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, Mingxing; Lu, Shaoying; Li, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Jing; Seong, Jihye; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; Shyy, John Y. -J.; Weiss, Stephen J.; Wang, Yingxiao

    2008-01-01

    Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) plays a critical role in cancer cell biology by proteolytically remodeling the extracellular matrix. Utilizing fluorescence resonance energy transfer ( FRET) imaging, we have developed a novel biosensor, with its sensing element anchoring at the

  11. A Gly65Val substitution in an actin, GhACT_LI1, disrupts cell polarity and membrane anchoring of F-actin resulting in dwarf, lintless Li1 cotton plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    • Actin polymerizes to form the cytoskeleton and organize polar growth in all eukaryotic cells. Species with numerous actin genes are especially useful for the dissection of actin molecular function due to redundancy and neofunctionalization. Here, we investigated the role of a cotton (Gossypium hi...

  12. Identification of Cells at Early and Late Stages of Polarization During Odontoblast Differentiation Using pOBCol3.6GFP and pOBCol2.3GFP Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balic, Anamaria; Aguila, H. Leonardo; Mina, Mina

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic mouse lines in which GFP expression is under the control of tissue-and stage specific promoters have provided powerful experimental tools for identification and isolation of cells at specific stage of differentiation along a lineage. In the present study we used primary cell cultures derived from the dental pulp from pOBCol3.6GFP and pOBCol2.3GFP transgenic mice as a model to develop markers for early stages of odontoblast differentiation from progenitor cells. We analyzed the temporal and spatial expression of 2.3-GFP and 3.6-GFP during in vitro mineralization. Using FACS to separate cells based on GFP expression, we obtained relatively homogenous sub-populations of cells and analyzed their dentinogenic potentials and their progression into odontoblasts. Our observations showed that these transgenes were activated before the onset of matrix deposition and in cells at different stages of polarization. The 3.6-GFP transgene was activated in cells in early stages of polarization whereas the 2.3-GFP transgene was activated at a later stage of polarization just before or at the time of formation of secretory odontoblast. PMID:20728593

  13. Ricin crosses polarized human intestinal cells and intestines of ricin-gavaged mice without evident damage and then disseminates to mouse kidneys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa D Flora

    Full Text Available Ricin is a potent toxin found in the beans of Ricinus communis and is often lethal for animals and humans when aerosolized or injected and causes significant morbidity and occasional death when ingested. Ricin has been proposed as a bioweapon because of its lethal properties, environmental stability, and accessibility. In oral intoxication, the process by which the toxin transits across intestinal mucosa is not completely understood. To address this question, we assessed the impact of ricin on the gastrointestinal tract and organs of mice after dissemination of toxin from the gut. We first showed that ricin adhered in a specific pattern to human small bowel intestinal sections, the site within the mouse gut in which a variable degree of damage has been reported by others. We then monitored the movement of ricin across polarized human HCT-8 intestinal monolayers grown in transwell inserts and in HCT-8 cell organoids. We observed that, in both systems, ricin trafficked through the cells without apparent damage until 24 hours post intoxication. We delivered a lethal dose of purified fluorescently-labeled ricin to mice by oral gavage and followed transit of the toxin from the gastrointestinal tracts to the internal organs by in vivo imaging of whole animals over time and ex vivo imaging of organs at various time points. In addition, we harvested organs from unlabeled ricin-gavaged mice and assessed them for the presence of ricin and for histological damage. Finally, we compared serum chemistry values from buffer-treated versus ricin-intoxicated animals. We conclude that ricin transverses human intestinal cells and mouse intestinal cells in situ prior to any indication of enterocyte damage and that ricin rapidly reaches the kidneys of intoxicated mice. We also propose that mice intoxicated orally with ricin likely die from distributive shock.

  14. Exposure to Candida albicans polarizes a T-cell driven arthritis model towards Th17 responses, resulting in a more destructive arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijnissen, Renoud J; Koenders, Marije I; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Dulos, John; Netea, Mihai G; Boots, Annemieke M H; Joosten, Leo A B; van den Berg, Wim B

    2012-01-01

    Fungal components have been shown very effective in generating Th17 responses. We investigated whether exposure to a minute amount of C. albicans in the arthritic joint altered the local cytokine environment, leading to enhanced Th17 expansion and resulting in a more destructive arthritis. Chronic SCW arthritis was induced by repeated injection with Streptococcus pyogenes (SCW) cell wall fragments into the knee joint of C57Bl/6 mice, alone or in combination with the yeast of C. albicans or Zymosan A. During the chronic phase of the arthritis, the cytokine levels, mRNA expression and histopathological analysis of the joints were performed. To investigate the phenotype of the IL-17 producing T-cells, synovial cells were isolated and analyzed by flowcytometry. Intra-articular injection of either Zymosan A or C. albicans on top of the SCW injection both resulted in enhanced joint swelling and inflammation compared to the normal SCW group. However, only the addition of C. albicans during SCW arthritis resulted in severe chondrocyte death and enhanced destruction of cartilage and bone. Additionally, exposure to C. albicans led to increased IL-17 in the arthritic joint, which was accompanied by an increased synovial mRNA expression of T-bet and RORγT. Moreover, the C. albicans-injected mice had significantly more Th17 cells in the synovium, of which a large population also produced IFN-γ. This study clearly shows that minute amounts of fungal components, like C. albicans, are very potent in interfering with the local cytokine environment in an arthritic joint, thereby polarizing arthritis towards a more destructive phenotype.

  15. Characterization of polarized expression of point- or deletion-mutated human BCRP/ABCG2 in LLC-PK1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Tappei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2005-03-01

    In polarized cells, such as hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells, transporters are localized on the apical or basolateral membranes and play important roles in the vectorial transport of their substrates. In the current study, we have aimed to clarify the mechanism for the cellular sorting of human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), which is expressed on the apical membrane of many tissues and functions as an efflux transporter. After the expression vector, including wild type or mutants of human BCRP cDNA, was transfected into LLC-PK1 cells, immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analyses were performed to characterize the cellular localization and the status of BCRP, respectively. The transfected cDNA product of wild-type BCRP was expressed on the apical membrane in LLC-PK1 cells. Glycosylation consensus sequences-disrupted mutants showed the apical localization as the wild type, whereas the apical-selective expression disappeared when disulfide bonds could not be formed. Furthermore, examination of the localization of deletion mutants of human BCRP emphasized the importance of some peptide sequences. The region between the N-terminal and ATP-binding cassette and proximal C-terminal region, both of which are well conserved in various animal species, were found to be significant for proper localization. These results suggest that, although the presence of N-glycan does not affect the localization of BCRP, disulfide bonds and some peptide sequences in both the N- and C-terminals are necessary for the apical expression of BCRP.

  16. The Apical Actin Fringe Contributes to Localized Cell Wall Deposition and Polarized Growth in the Lily Pollen Tube1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Caleb M.; Hepler, Peter K.; Winship, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    In lily (Lilium formosanum) pollen tubes, pectin, a major component of the cell wall, is delivered through regulated exocytosis. The targeted transport and secretion of the pectin-containing vesicles may be controlled by the cortical actin fringe at the pollen tube apex. Here, we address the role of the actin fringe using three different inhibitors of growth: brefeldin A, latrunculin B, and potassium cyanide. Brefeldin A blocks membrane trafficking and inhibits exocytosis in pollen tubes; it also leads to the degradation of the actin fringe and the formation of an aggregate of filamentous actin at the base of the clear zone. Latrunculin B, which depolymerizes filamentous actin, markedly slows growth but allows focused pectin deposition to continue. Of note, the locus of deposition shifts frequently and correlates with changes in the direction of growth. Finally, potassium cyanide, an electron transport chain inhibitor, briefly stops growth while causing the actin fringe to completely disappear. Pectin deposition continues but lacks focus, instead being delivered in a wide arc across the pollen tube tip. These data support a model in which the actin fringe contributes to the focused secretion of pectin to the apical cell wall and, thus, to the polarized growth of the pollen tube. PMID:25037212

  17. Current density and polarization curves for radial flow field patterns applied to PEMFCs (Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano-Andrade, S.; Hernandez-Guerrero, A.; Spakovsky, M.R. von; Damian-Ascencio, C.E.; Rubio-Arana, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical solution of the current density and velocity fields of a 3-D PEM radial configuration fuel cell is presented. The energy, momentum and electrochemical equations are solved using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code based on a finite volume scheme. There are three cases of principal interest for this radial model: four channels, eight channels and twelve channels placed in a symmetrical path over the flow field plate. The figures for the current-voltage curves for the three models proposed are presented, and the main factors that affect the behavior of each of the curves are discussed. Velocity contours are presented for the three different models, showing how the fuel cell behavior is affected by the velocity variations in the radial configuration. All these results are presented for the case of high relative humidity. The favorable results obtained for this unconventional geometry seems to indicate that this geometry could replace the conventional commercial geometries currently in use.

  18. Prevention of experimental diabetes by Uncaria tomentosa extract: Th2 polarization, regulatory T cell preservation or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Alexandre; Sartori, Alexandrina; Golim, Marjorie Assis; Valente, Ligia Maria Marino; da Rosa, Larissa Camargo; Ishikawa, Larissa Lumi Watanabe; Siani, Antonio Carlos; Viero, Rosa Marlene

    2011-09-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC (Rubiaceae) is a species native to the Amazon rainforest and surrounding tropical areas that is endowed with immunomodulatory properties and widely used around the world. In this study we investigated the immunomodulatory potential of Uncaria tomentosa (UT) aqueous-ethanol extract on the progression of immune-mediated diabetes. C57BL/6 male mice were injected with MLDS (40 mg/kg) and orally treated with UT at 10-400mg/kg during 21 days. Control groups received MLDS alone or the respective dilution vehicle. Pancreatic mononuclear infiltrate and β-cell insulin content were analyzed by HE and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, and measured by digital morphometry. Lymphocyte immunophenotyping and cytokine production were determined by flow cytometry analysis. Treating the animals with 50-400mg/kg of UT caused a significant reduction in the glycemic levels, as well as in the incidence of diabetes. The morphometric analysis of insulitis revealed a clear protective effect. Animals treated with UT at 400mg/kg presented a higher number of intact islets and a significant inhibition of destructive insulitis. Furthermore, a significant protection against the loss of insulin-secreting presented β-cells was achieved, as observed by a careful immunohistochemical evaluation. The phenotypic analysis indicated that the groups treated with higher doses (100-400mg/kg) presented CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell values similar to those observed in healthy animals. These same higher doses also increased the number of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells. Moreover, the extract modulated the production of Th1 and Th2, with increased levels of IL-4 and IL-5. The extract was effective to prevent the progression of immune-mediated diabetes by distinct pathways. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Polar solvent modification of x ray induced potentially lethal damage in heterogeneous human colon tumor cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arundel, C.M.; Leith, J.T.; Dexter, D.L.; Glicksman, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    Two subpopulations of tumor cells (clones A and D) obtained from a human colon adenocarcinoma were examined for their sensitivities to x-irradiation as unfed, early plateau phase cultures. Both the single dose survival curves and the kinetics of potentially lethal damage recovery (PLDR) were determined for the two tumor lines. Also, possible modification of PLDR by N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), which has previously been shown to enhance the radiosensitivity of exponentially growing tumor cells, was investigated by adding DMF (0.8% v/v) to plateau phase cultures immediately after irradiation, and determining effects on the extent of PLDR. For non-DMF treated cells, the survival curve parameters of the diploid (clone D) and aneuploid (clone A) lines were very similar. Using initial survival levels of 3.5% (clone D) or 5.5% (clone A) to investigate PLDR, it was found that the increase in survival for clone D was 2.2, while the SFR for clone A was 1.6. DMF did not change either the kinetics or extent of PLDR in these two tumor lines when added to cultures immediately after irradiation. These results indicate that significant heterogeneity in PLDR exists between these closely related tumor subpopulations

  20. Development of polarized {sup 3}He filter for polarized neutron experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, K.; Sato, H.; Yoshimi, A.; Asahi, K. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Faculty of Science; Masuda, Y.; Muto, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Morimoto, K.

    1996-08-01

    A high-pressure polarized {sup 3}He gas cell, pumped with two diode lasers, has been developed at KEK for use as a polarizer and a spin analyzer for low energy neutrons. The polarization attained of {sup 3}He was determined through the measurement of the transmission of the unpolarized neutrons through the {sup 3}He cell. So far we obtained P{sub He}=18% at 10 atm and P{sub He}=12% at 20 atm. (author)

  1. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity and asymmetrical accumulation of F-actin are necessary for establishment of cell polarity in the early development of monospores from the marine red alga Porphyra yezoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Saga, Naotsune; Mikami, Koji

    2008-01-01

    The polarized distribution of F-actin is important in providing the driving force for directional migration in mammalian leukocytes and Dictyostelium cells, in which compartmentation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and phosphatidylinositol phosphatase is critical for the establishment of cell polarity. Since monospores from the red alga Porphyra yezoensis are a real example of migrating plant cells, the involvement of the cytoskeleton and PI3K was investigated during their early development. Our results indicate that the asymmetrical localization of F-actin at the leading edge is fixed by the establishment of the anterior-posterior axis in migrating monospores, which is PI3K-dependent and protein synthesis-independent. After migration, monospores adhere to the substratum and then become upright, developing into multicellular thalli via the establishment of the apical-basal axis. In this process, F-actin usually accumulates at the bottom of the basal cell and development after migration requires new protein synthesis. These findings suggest that the establishment of anterior-posterior and apical-basal axes are differentially regulated during the early development of monospores. Our results also indicate that PI3K-dependent F-actin asymmetry is evolutionally conserved in relation to the establishment of cell polarity in migrating eukaryotic cells.

  2. Characterization of polarized THP-1 macrophages and polarizing ability of LPS and food compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chanput, W.; Mes, J.J.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wichers, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the polarizing potential of currently used human macrophage cell lines, while a better understanding phenomena can support the prediction of effects in vivo based on in vitro analysis. To test the polarization capability of PMA differentiated-THP-1 macrophages (M0), cells were

  3. Polarization in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadichev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  4. Sub-minute kinetics of human red cell fumarase: 1 H spin-echo NMR spectroscopy and 13 C rapid-dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishmarev, Dmitry; Wright, Alan J; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Pileio, Giuseppe; Stevanato, Gabriele; Brindle, Kevin M; Kuchel, Philip W

    2018-03-01

    Fumarate is an important probe of metabolism in hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. It is used to detect the release of fumarase in cancer tissues, which is associated with necrosis and drug treatment. Nevertheless, there are limited reports describing the detailed kinetic studies of this enzyme in various cells and tissues. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the sub-minute kinetics of human red blood cell fumarase using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and to provide a quantitative description of the enzyme that is relevant to the use of fumarate as a probe of cell rupture. The fumarase reaction was studied using time courses of 1 H spin-echo and 13 C-NMR spectra. 1 H-NMR experiments showed that the fumarase reaction in hemolysates is sufficiently rapid to make its kinetics amenable to study in a period of approximately 3 min, a timescale characteristic of hyperpolarized 13 C-NMR spectroscopy. The rapid-dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (RD-DNP) technique was used to hyperpolarize [1,4- 13 C]fumarate, which was injected into concentrated hemolysates. The kinetic data were analyzed using recently developed FmR α analysis and modeling of the enzymatic reaction using Michaelis-Menten equations. In RD-DNP experiments, the decline in the 13 C-NMR signal from fumarate, and the concurrent rise and fall of that from malate, were captured with high spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, which allowed the robust quantification of fumarase kinetics. The kinetic parameters obtained indicate the potential contribution of hemolysis to the overall rate of the fumarase reaction when 13 C-NMR RD-DNP is used to detect necrosis in animal models of implanted tumors. The analytical procedures developed will be applicable to studies of other rapid enzymatic reactions using conventional and hyperpolarized substrate NMR spectroscopy. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Use of monocyte/endothelial cell co-cultures (in vitro) and a subcutaneous implant mouse model (in vivo) to evaluate a degradable polar hydrophobic ionic polyurethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sarah M; Matheson, Loren A; McBane, Joanne E; Kuraitis, Drew; Suuronen, Erik; Santerre, Joseph Paul; Labow, Rosalind S

    2011-12-01

    Potential benefits of co-culturing monocytes (MC) with vascular smooth muscle cells have been reported on for tissue engineering applications with a degradable, polar, hydrophobic, and ionic polyurethane (D-PHI). Since the interaction of MC and endothelial cells (EC) within the blood vessel endothelium is also a process of wound repair it was of interest to investigate their function when cultured on the synthetic D-PHI materials, prior to considering the materials' use in vascular engineering. The co-culture (MC/EC) in vitro studies were carried out on films in 96 well plates and porous scaffold disks were prepared for implant studies in an in vivo subcutaneous mouse model. After 7 days in culture, the MC/EC condition was equal to EC growth but had lower esterase activity (a measure of degradative potential), no pro-inflammatory TNF-α and a relatively high anti-inflammatory IL-10 release while the ECs maintained their functional marker CD31. After explantation of the porous scaffolds, a live/dead stain showed that the cells infiltrating the scaffolds were viable and histological stains (May-Grunwald, Trichrome) demonstrated tissue in growth and extracellular matrix synthesis. Lysates from the implant scaffolds analyzed with a cytokine antibody array showed decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, GM-CSF), increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-13, TNF-RI), and increased chemotactic cytokines (MCP-1, MCP-5, RANTES). The low foreign body response elicited by D-PHI when implanted in vivo supported the in vitro studies (EC and MC co-culture), demonstrating that D-PHI promoted EC growth along with an anti-inflammatory MC, further demonstrating its potential as a tissue engineering scaffold for vascular applications. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Evidence for involvement of Wnt signalling in body polarities, cell proliferation, and the neuro-sensory system in an adult ctenophore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Jager

    Full Text Available Signalling through the Wnt family of secreted proteins originated in a common metazoan ancestor and greatly influenced the evolution of animal body plans. In bilaterians, Wnt signalling plays multiple fundamental roles during embryonic development and in adult tissues, notably in axial patterning, neural development and stem cell regulation. Studies in various cnidarian species have particularly highlighted the evolutionarily conserved role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in specification and patterning of the primary embryonic axis. However in another key non-bilaterian phylum, Ctenophora, Wnts are not involved in early establishment of the body axis during embryogenesis. We analysed the expression in the adult of the ctenophore Pleurobrachia pileus of 11 orthologues of Wnt signalling genes including all ctenophore Wnt ligands and Fz receptors and several members of the intracellular β-catenin pathway machinery. All genes are strongly expressed around the mouth margin at the oral pole, evoking the Wnt oral centre of cnidarians. This observation is consistent with primary axis polarisation by the Wnts being a universal metazoan feature, secondarily lost in ctenophores during early development but retained in the adult. In addition, local expression of Wnt signalling genes was seen in various anatomical structures of the body including in the locomotory comb rows, where their complex deployment suggests control by the Wnts of local comb polarity. Other important contexts of Wnt involvement which probably evolved before the ctenophore/cnidarian/bilaterian split include proliferating stem cells and progenitors irrespective of cell types, and developing as well as differentiated neuro-sensory structures.

  7. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  8. Electrochemical regulation of budding yeast polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Haupt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cells are naturally surrounded by organized electrical signals in the form of local ion fluxes, membrane potential, and electric fields (EFs at their surface. Although the contribution of electrochemical elements to cell polarity and migration is beginning to be appreciated, underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we show that an exogenous EF can orient cell polarization in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, directing the growth of mating projections towards sites of hyperpolarized membrane potential, while directing bud emergence in the opposite direction, towards sites of depolarized potential. Using an optogenetic approach, we demonstrate that a local change in membrane potential triggered by light is sufficient to direct cell polarization. Screens for mutants with altered EF responses identify genes involved in transducing electrochemical signals to the polarity machinery. Membrane potential, which is regulated by the potassium transporter Trk1p, is required for polarity orientation during mating and EF response. Membrane potential may regulate membrane charges through negatively charged phosphatidylserines (PSs, which act to position the Cdc42p-based polarity machinery. These studies thus define an electrochemical pathway that directs the orientation of cell polarization.

  9. Polarization Vision and the Development of Retinal Network Models. Neuronal Information Transfer Functions From Cones and Horizontal Cells to Bipolar Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamermans, Maarten; Hawryshyn, Craig

    2008-01-01

    ... with. Furthermore, the study demonstrated how horizontal cells, that store global stimulus parameters such as spectral composition and e-vector orientation of the global stimulus, adjust the gains...

  10. Control of Domain Wall Polarity by Current Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhaverbeke, A.; Bischof, A.; Allenspach, R.

    2008-09-01

    Direct observation of current-induced propagation of purely transverse magnetic domain walls with spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy is reported in Fe30Ni70 nanowires. After propagation, the domain walls keep their transverse nature but switch polarity in some cases. For uniform Ni70Fe30 wires, the effect is random and illustrates domain-wall propagation above the Walker threshold. In the case of Ni70Fe30/Fe wires, the transverse magnetization component in the wall is entirely determined by the polarity of the current pulse, an effect that is not reconciled by present theories even when taking into account the nonuniform Oersted field generated by the current.

  11. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live......In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...

  12. Power of Your Pancreas: Keep Your Digestive Juices Flowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe February 2017 Print this issue The Power of Your Pancreas Keep Your Digestive Juices Flowing ... your entire digestive system working properly. Related Stories Power to the Pelvis Battling a Bulging Hernia Keeping ...

  13. Polar transport in plants mediated by membrane transporters: focus on mechanisms of polar auxin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naramoto, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    Directional cell-to-cell transport of functional molecules, called polar transport, enables plants to sense and respond to developmental and environmental signals. Transporters that localize to plasma membranes (PMs) in a polar manner are key components of these systems. PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux carriers, which are the most studied polar-localized PM proteins, are implicated in the polar transport of auxin that in turn regulates plant development and tropic growth. In this review, the regulatory mechanisms underlying polar localization of PINs, control of auxin efflux activity, and PIN abundance at PMs are considered. Up to date information on polar-localized nutrient transporters that regulate directional nutrient movement from soil into the root vasculature is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 7 CFR 3200.9 - Accountability and record keeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accountability and record keeping. 3200.9 Section... TRANSFER OF EXCESS PERSONAL PROPERTY § 3200.9 Accountability and record keeping. USDA requires that Federal... accountability and record keeping systems. ...

  15. Gate-Keeping and Feedback as Determinants of the Translation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrs Afam

    Abstract. Based on a theoretical perspective and a critical documentary analysis, this paper seeks to locate the two ... Gate-Keeping and Feedback in the Process of (Mass) Communication. Gate-keeping and feedback ... fact, gatekeepers exist in large numbers in all mass communication organisations. Gate-keeping in this ...

  16. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  17. Rapid screening and identification of dominant B cell epitopes of HBV surface antigen by quantum dot-based fluorescence polarization assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhongji; Song, Ruihua; Chen, Yue; Zhu, Yang; Tian, Yanhui; Li, Ding; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-03-01

    A method for quickly screening and identifying dominant B cell epitopes was developed using hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen as a target. Eleven amino acid fragments from HBV surface antigen were synthesized by 9-fluorenylmethoxy carbonyl solid-phase peptide synthesis strategy, and then CdTe quantum dots were used to label the N-terminals of all peptides. After optimizing the factors for fluorescence polarization (FP) immunoassay, the antigenicities of synthetic peptides were determined by analyzing the recognition and combination of peptides and standard antibody samples. The results of FP assays confirmed that 10 of 11 synthetic peptides have distinct antigenicities. In order to screen dominant antigenic peptides, the FP assays were carried out to investigate the antibodies against the 10 synthetic peptides of HBV surface antigen respectively in 159 samples of anti-HBV surface antigen-positive antiserum. The results showed that 3 of the 10 antigenic peptides may be immunodominant because the antibodies against them existed more widely among the samples and their antibody titers were higher than those of other peptides. Using three dominant antigenic peptides, 293 serum samples were detected for HBV infection by FP assays; the results showed that the antibody-positive ratio was 51.9% and the sensitivity and specificity were 84.3% and 98.2%, respectively. In conclusion, a quantum dot-based FP assay is a very simple, rapid, and convenient method for determining immunodominant antigenic peptides and has great potential in applications such as epitope mapping, vaccine designing, or clinical disease diagnosis in the future.

  18. [Changes in polarization of myometrial cells plasma and internal mitochondrial membranes under calixarenes action as inhibitors of plasma membrane Na+, K+-ATPase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylovych, H V; Danylovych, Iu V; Kolomiiets', O V; Kosterin, S O; Rodik, R V; Cherenok, S O; Kal'chenko, V I; Chunikhin, O Iu; Horchev, V F; Karakhim, S O

    2012-01-01

    The influence of supramolecular macrocyclic compounds--calix[4]arenes C-97, C-99, C-107, which are ouabainomymetic high affinity inhibitors of Na+, K(+)-ATPase, on the polarization level of plasmic and mitochondrial membranes of rat uterine smooth muscle cells was investigated. The influence of these compounds on the myocytes characteristic size was studied. By using a confocal microscopy and specific for mitochondrial MitoTracker Orange CM-H2TMRos dye it was proved that the potential-sensitive fluorescent probe DiOC6(3) interacts with mitochondria. Artificial potential collapse of plasmic membrane in this case was modeled by myocytes preincubation with ouabain (1 mM). Further experiments performed using the method of flow cytometry with DiOC6(3) have shown that the compounds C-97, C-99 and C-107 at concentration 50-100 nM caused depolarization of the plasma membrane (at the level of 30% relative to control values) in conditions of artificial collapse of mitochondrial potential by myocytes preincubation in the presence of 5 mM of sodium azide. Under artificial sarcolemma depolarization by ouabain, calixarenes C-97, C-99 and C-107 at 100 nM concentrations caused a transient increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, that is 40% of the control level and lasted about 5 minutes. Calixarenes C-99 and C-107 caused a significant increase in fluorescence of myocytes in these conditions, which was confirmed by confocal microscopy too. It was proved by photon correlation spectroscopy method that the C-99 and C-107 caused an increase of characteristic size of myocytes.

  19. Immunohistochemistry for cell polarity protein lethal giant larvae 2 differentiates pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-3 and ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas from lower-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisovsky, Mikhail; Dresser, Karen; Woda, Bruce; Mino-Kenudson, Mari

    2010-06-01

    Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia is a precursor to ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas that shows gastric differentiation. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-3 has the highest potential to progress to adenocarcinoma, and its distinction from lower-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias is important for clinical management. However, morphologic grading of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia suffers from significant interobserver variability. A product of cell polarity gene lethal giant larvae 2 is a marker of gastric foveolar epithelium expressed in a basolateral fashion, which is lost or mislocalized in gastric epithelial dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. In this study, we investigated a role of lethal giant larvae 2 expression in differentiating low-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, that is, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-1 and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-2, from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-3 and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The immunohistochemical patterns of lethal giant larvae 2 expression were examined in normal pancreatic ducts, 48 pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions of all histologic grades, and 91 adenocarcinomas on a tissue microarray or conventional sections. The expression pattern was recorded as basolateral, cytoplasmic, negative, or combinations of any of them. Whereas normal duct epithelia did not exhibit lethal giant larvae immunoreactivity, all but one lesion of low-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia showed basolateral lethal giant larvae staining. Conversely, all lesions of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-3 and adenocarcinoma showed loss of lethal giant larvae 2 staining and/or its cytoplasmic localization. Interestingly, a basolateral expression was focally seen in 4 adenocarcinomas with a foamy gland pattern and was always admixed with negatively stained areas. In conclusion, our results show that low-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias express lethal giant larvae 2

  20. Investigation of the interplay between plasma lipids and macrophage polarization in small oral squamous cell carcinomas with different outcome: A pilot study of 17 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Christos; Weber, Manuel; Mitsimponas, Konstantinos T; Neukam, Friedrich W; Wehrhan, Falk

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests a correlation of alternative polarization of macrophages (M2) with a bad outcome of oral cancer. Macrophage polarization plays a significant role in the progression of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis, being influenced from plasma cholesterol. On the other hand plasma lipids have been studied epidemiologically as risk factors in carcinogenesis. Goal of our pilot study was the investigation of a possible association of plasma lipids with tumor outcome through their potential influence on macrophage polarization. 17 patients with small pN0 OSCC with different clinical outcome, treated operatively without postoperative R(C)T constituted our patient collective. Plasma lipids (total cholesterol and triglycerides) were studied in relation to macrophage polarization (determined through the expression of CD68, CD11c, CD163 and MRC1 antibodies) and tumor outcome. Patients with pathological chronic course of either plasma cholesterol or triglycerides demonstrated an increased infiltration with alternatively polarized macrophages in their specimens. Patients with pathological chronic course of plasma cholesterol showed moreover a bad tumor outcome. A role of plasma lipids in the tumor outcome via alternative macrophage polarization could be assumed. A larger prospective study is needed to confirm our preliminary results. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Principles of record keeping for decommissioning purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laraia, M.

    2003-01-01

    At the siting and conceptual design stage of a nuclear facility the first records pertaining to that facility are produced and stored. Subsequent phases in the facility's life cycle (detailed design, construction, commissioning, operation and shutdown) will include the production and retention of a large variety of records. Design, as-built drawings and operational records are essential for safe and efficient operation of any nuclear facility. This set of records is constantly updated and augmented during operation. Records from all phases of a nuclear facility are important for planning its decommissioning. Although not all of these records need to be included explicitly in the decommissioning plan itself, the process of initial, ongoing and final planning utilizes pertinent records for, and ultimately achieves, safe and cost effective decommissioning. When a nuclear facility is shutdown for decommissioning, current operating experience may be lost. Therefore, one important element of planning is to identify, secure and store appropriate operational records to support decommissioning. This process is preferably initiated during the design and construction phase and continues throughout operation including shutdown. Part of the records inventory from operation will become records for decommissioning and it is cost effective to identify these records before final facility shutdown. Experience shows that lack of attention to record keeping may result in an undue waste of time, other resources and additional costs. The newly established Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management recognizes the importance of keeping decommissioning-related records. In addition, the systematic management of records is an essential part of quality assurance and is often a licence condition. A good comprehensive decommissioning records management system (RMS) is one specific application of the broader concepts of 'Protection

  2. Polarized Moessbauer transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of the emission, absorption and scattering of polarized gamma rays are reviewed for a general case of combined magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions; various possibilities of obtaining polarized gamma sources are described and examples are given of the applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy with polarized gamma rays in solving problems of solid state physics. (A.K.)

  3. In vitro evidence for the brain glutamate efflux hypothesis: brain endothelial cells cocultured with astrocytes display a polarized brain-to-blood transport of glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Hans Christian; Madelung, Rasmus; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2012-05-01

    The concentration of the excitotoxic amino acid, L-glutamate, in brain interstitial fluid is tightly regulated by uptake transporters and metabolism in astrocytes and neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of the blood-brain barrier endothelium in brain L-glutamate homeostasis. Transendothelial transport- and accumulation studies of (3) H-L-glutamate, (3) H-L-aspartate, and (3) H-D-aspartate in an electrically tight bovine endothelial/rat astrocyte blood-brain barrier coculture model were performed. After 6 days in culture, the endothelium displayed transendothelial resistance values of 1014 ± 70 Ω cm(2) , and (14) C-D-mannitol permeability values of 0.88 ± 0.13 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) . Unidirectional flux studies showed that L-aspartate and L-glutamate, but not D-aspartate, displayed polarized transport in the brain-to-blood direction, however, all three amino acids accumulated in the cocultures when applied from the abluminal side. The transcellular transport kinetics were characterized with a K(m) of 69 ± 15 μM and a J(max) of 44 ± 3.1 pmol min(-1) cm(-2) for L-aspartate and a K(m) of 138 ± 49 μM and J(max) of 28 ± 3.1 pmol min(-1) cm(-2) for L-glutamate. The EAAT inhibitor, DL-threo-ß-Benzyloxyaspartate, inhibited transendothelial brain-to-blood fluxes of L-glutamate and L-aspartate. Expression of EAAT-1 (Slc1a3), -2 (Slc1a2), and -3 (Slc1a1) mRNA in the endothelial cells was confirmed by conventional PCR and localization of EAAT-1 and -3 in endothelial cells was shown with immunofluorescence. Overall, the findings suggest that the blood-brain barrier itself may participate in regulating brain L-glutamate concentrations. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Emergence and Dynamics of Polar Order in Developing Epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadifar, Reza

    2011-03-01

    Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) is a conserved process in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues, and is fundamental for the coordination of cell behavior and patterning. A well-studied example is the orientational pattern of hairs in the wing of the adult fruit fly Drosophila, which is an important model organism in biology. The Drosophila wing is an epithelium, i.e., a two-dimensional sheet of cells, which grows from a few cells to thousands of cells during the course of development. In the wing epithelium, planar polarity is established by an anisotropic distribution of PCP proteins within cells. The distribution of these proteins in a given cell affects the polarity of neighboring cells, such that at the end of wing development a large-scale PCP orientational order emerges. Here we present a theoretical study of planar polarity in developing epithelia based on a vertex model, which takes into account cell mechanics, cell adhesion, and cell division, combined with experimental results obtained from time-lapse imaging of the wing development. We show that in experiment, polarity order does not develop de novo at the end of wing development, but rather cells are initially polarized at an angle with respect to their final polarity axis. During wing development, the polarity axes of cells reorient towards their final direction. We identify a basic mechanism to generate such a large-scale initial polarization, based on the growth of a small number of cells with an initially random PCP distribution. Finally, we study the effect of shear and oriented cell division on dynamics of PCP order, showing that these two processes can robustly reorient the polarity axes of cells.

  5. Transplantation of an LGR6+ Epithelial Stem Cell-Enriched Scaffold for Repair of Full-Thickness Soft-Tissue Defects: The In Vitro Development of Polarized Hair-Bearing Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Denver M; Wetter, Nathan; Madsen, Christopher; Reichensperger, Joel; Cosenza, Nicole; Cox, Lisa; Harrison, Carrie; Neumeister, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    Recent literature has shown that full-thickness wounds, devoid of the stem cell niche, can subsequently be reconstructed with functional skin elements following migration of the LGR6 epithelial stem cell into the wound bed. In this study, the authors use a variety of LGR6 epithelial stem cell-seeded scaffolds to determine therapeutic utility and regenerative potential in the immediate reconstruction of full-thickness wounds. Isolated LGR6 epithelial stem cells were seeded onto a spectrum of acellular matrices and monitored in both in vitro and in vivo settings to determine their relative capacity to regenerate tissues and heal wounds. Wound beds containing LGR6 stem cell-seeded scaffolds showed significantly augmented rates of healing, epithelialization, and hair growth compared with controls. Gene and proteomic expression studies indicate that LGR6 stem cell-seeded constructs up-regulate WNT, epidermal growth factor, and angiogenesis pathways. Finally, the addition of stromal vascular fraction to LGR6 stem cell-seeded constructs induces polarized tissue formation, nascent hair growth, and angiogenesis within wounds. LGR6 stem cells are able to undergo proliferation, differentiation, and migration following seeding onto a variety of collagen-based scaffolding. In addition, deployment of these constructs induces epithelialization, hair growth, and angiogenesis within wound beds. The addition of stromal vascular fraction to LGR6 stem cell-containing scaffolds initiated an early form of tissue polarization, providing for the first time a clinically applicable stem cell-based construct that is capable of the repair of full-thickness wounds and hair regeneration. Therapeutic, V.

  6. Comparison of alpha-Type-1 polarizing and standard dendritic cell cytokine cocktail for maturation of therapeutic monocyte-derived dendritic cell preparations from cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trepiakas, Redas; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Met, Ozcan

    2008-01-01

    The current "gold standard" for generation of dendritic cell (DC) used in DC-based cancer vaccine studies is maturation of monocyte-derived DCs with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)/IL-1beta/IL-6 and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Recently, a protocol for producing so-called alpha-Type-1...... generation and to be superior to the standard DC (sDC) cocktail as it induced fully mature DCs with potent IL-12p70 secretion together with CCR7 expression which is necessary for priming of a TH1 response and for migration to the draining lymph node, respectively. In this study, we tested the adaptation...

  7. The Physics of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  8. Reduction of polarization-fluctuation induced drift in resonator fiber optic gyro by a resonator integrating in-line polarizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huilian; Yu, Xuhui; Jin, Zhonghe

    2012-08-15

    A method to decrease the polarization-fluctuation induced drift in a resonator fiber optic gyro (R-FOG) is demonstrated by inserting two in-line polarizers in a polarization-maintaining fiber resonator with twin 90° polarization-axis rotated splices. The in-line polarizers attenuate the unwanted resonance by introducing high loss for the unwanted eigenstates of polarization in the resonator. Compared to the resonator without in-line polarizers, the polarization-fluctuation induced drift is reduced by 6×10(3) times. The desired resonance in the resonator can keep excellent stability in a wide temperature range; thus the temperature-dependent polarization-fluctuation drift in the R-FOG is sufficiently suppressed. A typical bias stability of 4.7°/h over 6500 s with an integration time of 10 s has been carried out. To the best of our knowledge, the long-term bias stability and high temperature stability are the best ever demonstrated in an R-FOG.

  9. Optical pumping production of spin polarized hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knize, R.J.; Happer, W.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    There has been much interest recently in the production of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen in various fields including controlled fusion, quantum fluids, high energy, and nuclear physics. One promising method for the development of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen is the utilization of optical pumping with a laser. Optical pumping is a process where photon angular momentum is converted into electron and nuclear spin. The advent of tunable CW dye lasers (approx. 1 watt) allow the production of greater than 10 18 polarized atoms/sec. We have begun a program at Princeton to investigate the physics and technology of using optical pumping to produce large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen. Initial experiments have been done in small closed glass cells. Eventually, a flowing system, open target, or polarized ion source could be constructed

  10. Synthesis of a polar ordered oxynitride perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadapoo, Rajasekarakumar; Ahart, Muhtar; Somayazulu, Maddury; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Meng, Yue; Konopkova, Zuzana; Hemley, Russell J.; Cohen, R. E.

    2017-06-01

    For decades, numerous attempts have been made to produce polar oxynitride perovskites, where some of the oxygen is replaced by nitrogen, but a polar ordered oxynitride has never been demonstrated. Caracas and Cohen [Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 092902 (2007), 10.1063/1.2776370] studied possible ordered polar oxynitrides within density-functional theory (DFT) and found a few candidates that were predicted to be insulating and at least metastable. YSi O2N stood out with huge predicted polarization and nonlinear optic coefficients. In this study, we demonstrate the synthesis of perovskite-structured YSi O2N by using a combination of a diamond-anvil cell and in situ laser-heating techniques. Subsequent in situ x-ray diffraction, second-harmonic generation, and Raman-scattering measurements confirm that it is polar and a strong nonlinear optical material, with structure and properties similar to those predicted by DFT.

  11. Synthesis of a polar ordered oxynitride perovskite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadapoo, Rajasekarakumar; Ahart, Muhtar; Somayazulu, Maddury; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Meng, Yue; Konopkova, Zuzana; Hemley, Russell J.; Cohen, R. E.

    2017-06-01

    For decades, numerous attempts have been made to produce polar oxynitride perovskites, where some of the oxygen is replaced by nitrogen, but a polar ordered oxynitride has never been demonstrated. Caracas and Cohen [Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 092902 (2007)] studied possible ordered polar oxynitrides within density-functional theory (DFT) and found a few candidates that were predicted to be insulating and at least metastable. YSi O 2 N stood out with huge predicted polarization and nonlinear optic coefficients. In this study, we demonstrate the synthesis of perovskite-structured YSi O 2 N by using a combination of a diamond-anvil cell and in situ laser-heating techniques. Subsequent in situ x-ray diffraction, second-harmonic generation, and Raman-scattering measurements confirm that it is polar and a strong nonlinear optical material, with structure and properties similar to those predicted by DFT.

  12. miR-181a Induces Macrophage Polarized to M2 Phenotype and Promotes M2 Macrophage-mediated Tumor Cell Metastasis by Targeting KLF6 and C/EBPα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Bi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages can acquire a variety of polarization status and functions: classically activated macrophages (M1 macrophages; alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages. However, the molecular basis of the process is still unclear. Here, this study addresses that microRNA-181a (miR-181a is a key molecule controlling macrophage polarization. We found that miR-181a is overexpressed in M2 macrophages than in M1 macrophages. miR-181a expression was decreased when M2 phenotype converted to M1, whereas it increased when M1 phenotype converted to M2. Overexpression of miR-181a in M1 macrophages diminished M1 phenotype expression while promoting polarization to the M2 phenotype. In contrast, knockdown of miR-181a in M2 macrophages promoted M1 polarization and diminished M2 phenotype expression. Mechanistically, Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6 and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα is a potential target of miR-181a and luciferase assay confirmed that KLF6 and C/EBPα translation is suppressed by miR-181a through interaction with the 3′UTR of KLF6 and C/EBPα mRNA. Further analysis showed that induction of miR-181a suppressed KLF6 and C/EBPα protein expression. Importantly, miR-181a also diminishes M2 macrophages-mediated migration and invasion capacity of tumor cells. Collectively, our results suggest that miR-181a plays a significant role in regulating macrophage polarization through directly target KLF6 and C/EBPα.

  13. The endocrine disruption properties of an adipose contaminant mixture extracted from East Greenland polar bears studied in the H295R cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, R.; Letcher, R. J.; Blair, D.

    been well described and especially the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is recognized as being one of the most contaminated species in the Arctic. The present study investigated the in vitro endocrine disruptive effects of the POP mixture found in adipose tissue from 10 East Greenland polar bears collected...... compounds, where some can be in the parts-perbillion (ppb) concentration range. However, most reported studies on endocrine disruption effects have been on single compounds at concentrations higher than environmentally relevant. The presence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in arctic wildlife has...... (dehydroepiandrosterone and androstenedione). These results demonstrated comprehensive in vitro effects of POPs extracted from polar bear adipose tissue on key elements in the steroidogenesis, and identifies disruption of CYP17 activity as a mode of action. A POP-induced interference with CYP17 can potentially explain...

  14. Charge and Polarity Preferences for N-Glycosylation: A Genome-Wide In Silico Study and Its Implications Regarding Constitutive Proliferation and Adhesion of Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwar Hussain, Muhammad Ramzan; Iqbal, Zeeshan; Qazi, Wajahat M; Hoessli, Daniel C

    2018-01-01

    The structural and functional diversity of the human proteome is mediated by N - and O- linked glycosylations that define the individual properties of extracellular and membrane-associated proteins. In this study, we utilized different computational tools to perform in silico based genome-wide mapping of 1,117 human proteins and unravel the contribution of both penultimate and vicinal amino acids for the asparagine-based, site-specific N -glycosylation. Our results correlate the non-canonical involvement of charge and polarity environment of classified amino acids (designated as L, O, A, P, and N groups) in the N -glycosylation process, as validated by NetNGlyc predictions, and 130 literature-reported human proteins. From our results, particular charge and polarity combinations of non-polar aliphatic, acidic, basic, and aromatic polar side chain environment of both penultimate and vicinal amino acids were found to promote the N -glycosylation process. However, the alteration in side-chain charge and polarity environment of genetic variants, particularly in the vicinity of Asn-containing epitope, may induce constitutive glycosylation (e.g., aberrant glycosylation at preferred and non-preferred sites) of membrane proteins causing constitutive proliferation and triggering epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The current genome-wide mapping of 1,117 proteins (2,909 asparagine residues) was used to explore charge- and polarity-based mechanistic constraints in N -glycosylation, and discuss alterations of the neoplastic phenotype that can be ascribed to N -glycosylation at preferred and non-preferred sites.

  15. Charge and Polarity Preferences for N-Glycosylation: A Genome-Wide In Silico Study and Its Implications Regarding Constitutive Proliferation and Adhesion of Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ramzan Manwar Hussain

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The structural and functional diversity of the human proteome is mediated by N- and O-linked glycosylations that define the individual properties of extracellular and membrane-associated proteins. In this study, we utilized different computational tools to perform in silico based genome-wide mapping of 1,117 human proteins and unravel the contribution of both penultimate and vicinal amino acids for the asparagine-based, site-specific N-glycosylation. Our results correlate the non-canonical involvement of charge and polarity environment of classified amino acids (designated as L, O, A, P, and N groups in the N-glycosylation process, as validated by NetNGlyc predictions, and 130 literature-reported human proteins. From our results, particular charge and polarity combinations of non-polar aliphatic, acidic, basic, and aromatic polar side chain environment of both penultimate and vicinal amino acids were found to promote the N-glycosylation process. However, the alteration in side-chain charge and polarity environment of genetic variants, particularly in the vicinity of Asn-containing epitope, may induce constitutive glycosylation (e.g., aberrant glycosylation at preferred and non-preferred sites of membrane proteins causing constitutive proliferation and triggering epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The current genome-wide mapping of 1,117 proteins (2,909 asparagine residues was used to explore charge- and polarity-based mechanistic constraints in N-glycosylation, and discuss alterations of the neoplastic phenotype that can be ascribed to N-glycosylation at preferred and non-preferred sites.

  16. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  17. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  18. Polarization in Sagittarius A*

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the current state of polarization observations of Sagittarius A*, the compact radio source and supermassive black hole candidate in the Galactic Center. These observations are providing new tools for understanding accretion disks, jets and their environments. Linear polarization observations have shown that Sgr A* is unpolarized at frequencies as high as 86 GHz. However, recent single-dish observations indicate that Sgr A* may have strong linear polarization at frequencies higher...

  19. High-Tc superconducting thin films with composition control on a sub-unit cell level; the effect of the polar nature of the cuprates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Gertjan; Brinkman, Alexander; Hilgenkamp, Johannes W.M.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.

    2008-01-01

    Inspired by the work of Ohtomo and Hwang in 2004, we shed new light on thin films of layered cuprate high-Tc superconductors (HTS). In principle all HTS materials consist of charged perovskite-like layers which in thin films can lead to polar discontinuities at the interfaces of different materials.

  20. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshoven, James, Jr.; Dabney, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Instrument measures polarization characteristics of Earth at three wavelengths. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor (ALPS) measures optical polarization characteristics of land surface. Designed to be flown at altitudes of approximately 300 m to minimize any polarizing or depolarizing effects of intervening atmosphere and to look along nadir to minimize any effects depending on look angle. Data from measurements used in conjunction with data from ground surveys and aircraft-mounted video recorders to refine mathematical models used in interpretation of higher-altitude polarimetric measurements of reflected sunlight.

  1. Polarization at SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs

  2. Gene bookmarking: keeping the pages open.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarge, Kevin D; Park-Sarge, Ok-Kyong

    2005-11-01

    'Gene bookmarking' is a mechanism of epigenetic memory that functions to transmit through mitosis the pattern of active genes and/or genes that can be activated to daughter cells. It is thought that, at a point before mitosis, genes that exist in an open, transcriptionally competent state are bound by proteins or marked by some kind of modification event. This is thought to facilitate the assembly of transcription complexes on the promoters in early G1, thereby ensuring that daughter cells have the same pattern of gene expression as the cell from which they derived. Little is known, however, about these 'bookmarking factors' and modifications or the mechanisms by which they mediate the transmission of transcriptional competence after mitosis is complete. Recent findings have provided new insights into the mechanisms, regulation and biological importance of gene bookmarking in eukaryotic cell function.

  3. Kin2, the Budding Yeast Ortholog of Animal MARK/PAR-1 Kinases, Localizes to the Sites of Polarized Growth and May Regulate Septin Organization and the Cell Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Si-Min; Nie, Wen-Chao; He, Fei; Jia, Zhi-Wen; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    MARK/PAR-1 protein kinases play important roles in cell polarization in animals. Kin1 and Kin2 are a pair of MARK/PAR-1 orthologs in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. They participate in the regulation of secretion and ER stress response. However, neither the subcellular localization of these two kinases nor whether they may have other cellular functions is clear. Here, we show that Kin2 localizes to the sites of polarized growth in addition to localization on the plasma membrane. The localization to polarity sites is mediated by two targeting domains-TD1 and TD2. TD1 locates in the N-terminal region that spans the protein kinase domain whereas TD2 locates in the C-terminal end that covers the KA1 domain. We also show that an excess of Kin2 activity impaired growth, septin organization, and chitin deposition in the cell wall. Both TD1 and TD2 contribute to this function. Moreover, we find that the C-terminal region of Kin2 interacts with Cdc11, a septin subunit, and Pea2, a component of the polarisome that is known to play a role in septin organization. These findings suggest that Kin2 may play a role in the regulation of the septin cytoskeleton and the cell wall. Finally, we show that the C-terminal region of Kin2 interacts with Rho3, a Rho GTPase, whereas the N-terminal region of Kin2 interacts with Bmh1, a 14-3-3 protein. We speculate that Kin2 may be regulated by Bmh1, Rho3, or Pea2 in vivo. Our study provides new insight in the localization, function, and regulation of Kin2.

  4. Photonic crystal based polarization insensitive flat lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turduev, M.; Bor, E.; Kurt, H.

    2017-07-01

    The paper proposes a new design of an inhomogeneous artificially created photonic crystal lens structure consisting of annular dielectric rods to efficiently focus both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations of light into the same focal point. The locations of each individual cell that contains the annular dielectric rods are determined according to a nonlinear distribution function. The inner and outer radii of the annular photonic dielectric rods are optimized with respect to the polarization insensitive frequency response of the transmission spectrum of the lens structure. The physical background of the polarization insensitive focusing mechanism is investigated in both spatial and frequency domains. Moreover, polarization independent wavefront transformation/focusing has been explored in detail by investigating the dispersion relation of the structure. Corresponding phase index distribution of the lens is attained for polarization insensitive normalized frequency range of a/λ  =  0.280 and a/λ  =  0.300, where a denotes the lattice constant of the designed structure and λ denotes the wavelength of the incident light. We show the wave transformation performance and focal point movement dynamics for both polarizations of the lens structure by specially adjusting the length of the structure. The 3D finite-difference time domain numerical analysis is also performed to verifiy that the proposed design is able to focus the wave regardless of polarization into approximately the same focal point (difference between focal distances of both polarizations stays below 0.25λ) with an operating bandwidth of 4.30% between 1476 nm and 1541 nm at telecom wavelengths. The main superiorities of the proposed lens structure are being all dielectric and compact, and having flat front and back surfaces, rendering the proposed lens design more practical in the photonic integration process in various applications such as optical switch

  5. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP 4 . A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  6. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  7. Our Polar Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  8. Terahertz polarization imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Valk, N.C.J.; Van der Marel, W.A.M.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new method to measure the polarization state of a terahertz pulse by using a modified electrooptic sampling setup. To illustrate the power of this method, we show two examples in which the knowledge of the polarization of the terahertz pulse is essential for interpreting the results:

  9. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  10. Polar Science Is Cool!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  11. Precision Polarization of Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elise; Barron-Palos, Libertad; Couture, Aaron; Crawford, Christopher; Chupp, Tim; Danagoulian, Areg; Estes, Mary; Hona, Binita; Jones, Gordon; Klein, Andi; Penttila, Seppo; Sharma, Monisha; Wilburn, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Determining polarization of a cold neutron beam to high precision is required for the next generation neutron decay correlation experiments at the SNS, such as the proposed abBA and PANDA experiments. Precision polarimetry measurements were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the goal of determining the beam polarization to the level of 10-3 or better. The cold neutrons from FP12 were polarized using optically polarized ^3He gas as a spin filter, which has a highly spin-dependent absorption cross section. A second ^ 3He spin filter was used to analyze the neutron polarization after passing through a resonant RF spin rotator. A discussion of the experiment and results will be given.

  12. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2018-01-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements. PMID:29503479

  13. Optically polarized 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T. R.; Nacher, P. J.; Saam, B.; Walker, T. G.

    2017-10-01

    This article reviews the physics and technology of producing large quantities of highly spin-polarized 3He nuclei using spin-exchange (SEOP) and metastability-exchange (MEOP) optical pumping. Both technical developments and deeper understanding of the physical processes involved have led to substantial improvements in the capabilities of both methods. For SEOP, the use of spectrally narrowed lasers and K-Rb mixtures has substantially increased the achievable polarization and polarizing rate. For MEOP nearly lossless compression allows for rapid production of polarized 3He and operation in high magnetic fields has likewise significantly increased the pressure at which this method can be performed, and revealed new phenomena. Both methods have benefitted from development of storage methods that allow for spin-relaxation times of hundreds of hours, and specialized precision methods for polarimetry. SEOP and MEOP are now widely applied for spin-polarized targets, neutron spin filters, magnetic resonance imaging, and precision measurements.

  14. Parallel Polarization State Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-17

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  15. The endocrine disruption properties of an adipose contaminant mixture extracted from East Greenland polar bears studied in the H295R cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, R.; Letcher, R. J.; Blair, D.

    In recent years there has been much debate on the potential risk of chemicals that have been classified as endocrine disruption compounds (EDCs). Human and environmental risk assessment of EDCs is a challenge since the exposure to humans and wildlife is a complex mixture of many known and unknown...... compounds, where some can be in the parts-perbillion (ppb) concentration range. However, most reported studies on endocrine disruption effects have been on single compounds at concentrations higher than environmentally relevant. The presence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in arctic wildlife has...... been well described and especially the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is recognized as being one of the most contaminated species in the Arctic. The present study investigated the in vitro endocrine disruptive effects of the POP mixture found in adipose tissue from 10 East Greenland polar bears collected...

  16. Trajectory of Externalizing Child Behaviors in a KEEP Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uretsky, Mathew C.; Lee, Bethany R.; Greeno, Elizabeth J.; Barth, Richard P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to examine the correlates of child behavior change over time in a replication of the KEEP intervention. Method: The study sample was drawn from the treatment group of the Maryland replication of KEEP (n=65). Change over time was analyzed using multilevel linear mixed modeling. Results: Parents' use of…

  17. Why Should Scholars Keep Coming Back to John Dewey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    This essay attempts to explain why philosophers, philosophers of education, and scholars of democracy should keep coming back to John Dewey for insights and inspiration on issues related to democracy and education. Mordechai Gordon argues that there are four major reasons that contribute to scholars' need to keep returning to Dewey for inspiration…

  18. 40 CFR 1048.425 - What records must I keep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What records must I keep? 1048.425 Section 1048.425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION... may review your records at any time. (b) Keep paper records of your in-use testing for one full year...

  19. 40 CFR 1045.425 - What records must I keep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What records must I keep? 1045.425 Section 1045.425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION... available. (b) Keep paper records of your in-use testing for one full year after you complete all the...

  20. 40 CFR 1068.530 - What records must I keep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What records must I keep? 1068.530 Section 1068.530 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION... your records as described in this section. (a) Keep a paper copy of the written reports described in...

  1. Guidelines for Keeping the Cornell Farm Account Book. Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Dale J.

    This student manual contains guidelines for keeping the Cornell Farm Account Book. The manual is divided into the following fifteen units of instruction: (1) Why Keep Records?, (2) Operating Expenses, (3) Labor Records, (4) Interest and Debt Payments, (5) Capital Purchases and Improvements, (6) Milk Sales, (7) Crop Sales, (8) Livestock Sold, (9)…

  2. The use of abbreviations in surgical note keeping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Collard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abbreviations are used to improve the speed of note keeping and to simplify patient notes. However studies have shown that they can reduce clarity, increase mistakes and cause confusion in management plans. Our review highlights the misuse of abbreviations in surgical note keeping.

  3. The use of abbreviations in surgical note keeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, B; Royal, A

    2015-06-01

    Abbreviations are used to improve the speed of note keeping and to simplify patient notes. However studies have shown that they can reduce clarity, increase mistakes and cause confusion in management plans. Our review highlights the misuse of abbreviations in surgical note keeping.

  4. Good government and good governance: record keeping in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article addresses the challenges that arise when record keeping systems are advocated as a necessary under-pinning for good government and good governance. The relationship between record keeping and accountability is analysed and contextualised in relation to transparency and Freedom of Information ...

  5. 40 CFR 1068.455 - What records must I keep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROLS GENERAL COMPLIANCE PROVISIONS FOR ENGINE PROGRAMS Selective Enforcement Auditing § 1068.455 What records must I keep? (a) We may review your records at any time so it is important to keep required...) If you shipped the engine/equipment for testing, the date you shipped it, the associated storage or...

  6. International Peace-Keeping Operation: A Breach of International ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the legal implications of the international peace keeping operation on the sovereignty of states under International Law with insight into the meaning, origin, nature and structure of peace keeping operations. This work chronicled many peacekeeping operations already undertaken by the United ...

  7. Exercises for Keeping Pianists' Hands in Top Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Some pianists have idiosyncratic ways of keeping their hands and fingers relaxed. Glenn Gould, for example, religiously soaked his digits in hot water before performing or recording. While the jury is still out on the effectiveness of Gould's routine, there are plenty of other exercises and practices that will keep a pianist's fingers limber.…

  8. Self-polarizing terahertz liquid crystal phase shifter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-wen Lin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Using sub-wavelength metallic gratings as both transparent electrodes and broadband high-efficiency polarizers, a highly-compact self-polarizing phase shifter is demonstrated by electrically tuning the effective birefringence of a nematic liquid crystal cell. The metal grating polarizers ensure a good polarizing efficiency in the range of 0.2 to 2 THz. Phase shift of more than π/3 is achieved in a 256 μm-thick cell with a saturation root mean square voltage of around 130 V in this integrated device.

  9. Polarized gas targets for storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is widely recognized that polarized gas targets in electron storage rings represent a new opportunity for precision nuclear physics studies. New developments in polarized target technology specific to internal applications will be discussed. In particular, polarized gas targets have been used in the VEPP-3 electron ring in Novosibirsk. A simple storage cell was used to increase the total target thickness by a factor of 15 over the simple gas jet target from an atomic beam source. Results from the initial phase of this project will be reported. In addition, the plans for increasing the luminosity by an additional order or magnitude will be presented. The application of this work to polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets for the HERA ring will be noted. The influence of beam-induced depolarization, a phenomena encountered in short-pulse electron storage rings, will be discussed. Finally, the performance tests of laser-driven sources will be presented. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  10. Polarization at the SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    The Stanford Linear collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z/sup 0/ mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberli, W.

    1992-02-01

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings.

  12. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberli, W.

    1992-02-01

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings.

  13. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density