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Sample records for cell plasma membrane

  1. Plasma membranes from insect midgut cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Terra

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membranes from insect midgut cells are separated into apical and basolateral domains. The apical domain is usually modified into microvilli with a molecular structure similar to other animals. Nevertheless, the microvillar structure should differ in some insects to permit the traffic inside them of secretory vesicles that may budd laterally or pinch-off from the tips of microvilli. Other microvillar modifications are associated with proton-pumping or with the interplay with an ensheathing lipid membrane (the perimicrovilllar membrane observed in the midgut cells of hemipterans (aphids and bugs. The perimicrovillar membranes are thought to be involved in amino acid absorption from diluted diets. The microvillar and perimicrovillar membranes have densities (and protein content that depend on the insect taxon. The role played by the microvillar and perimicrovillar proteins in insect midgut physiology is reviewed here trying to provide a coherent picture of data and highlighting further research areas.As membranas plasmáticas das células intestinais dos insetos apresentam um domínio apical e outro basal. O domínio apical é geralmente modificado em microvilosidades com organização molecular similar a de outros animais, embora possam diferir naqueles insetos que apresentam vesículas secretoras em trânsito que brotam lateralmente ou destacam-se das extremidades das microvilosidades. Outras modificações microvilares estão associadas a bombeamento de prótons ou a interrelações com uma membrana lipídica (a membrana perimicrovilar que reveste as microvilosidades de células intestinais de hemípteros (pulgões e percevejos. Admite-se que as membranas perimicrovilares estejam envolvidas na absorção de aminoácidos a partir de dietas diluídas. As membranas microvilares e perimicrovilares tem densidades distintas (e conteúdo protéico que dependem do táxon do inseto. O papel desempenhado pelas proteínas microvilares e

  2. Does ATP cross the cell plasma membrane.

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudry, I. H.

    1982-01-01

    Although there is an abundance of evidence which indicates that ATP is released as well as taken up by cells, the concept that ATP cannot cross the cell membrane has tended to prevail. This article reviews the evidence for the release as well as uptake of ATP by cells. The evidence presented by various investigators clearly indicates that ATP can cross the cell membrane and suggests that the release and uptake of ATP are physiological processes.

  3. Nanodomain stabilization dynamics in plasma membranes of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tamal; Maiti, Tapas K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2011-02-01

    We discover that a synergistically amplifying role of stabilizing membrane proteins and continuous lipid recycling can explain the physics governing the stability, polydispersity, and dynamics of lipid raft domains in plasma membranes of biological cells. We establish the conjecture using a generalized order parameter based on theoretical formalism, endorsed by detailed scaling arguments and domain mapping. Quantitative agreements with morphological distributions of raft complexes, as obtained from Förster resonance energy transfer based visualization, support the present theoretical conjecture.

  4. Lipid signalling dynamics at the β-cell plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are clustered in islets of Langerhans and secrete insulin in response to increased concentrations of circulating glucose. Insulin in turn acts on liver, muscle and fat tissue to store energy and normalize the blood glucose level. Inappropriate insulin release may lead to impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. In addition to glucose, other nutrients, neural stimuli and hormonal stimuli control insulin secretion. Many of these signals are perceived at the plasma membrane, which is also the site where insulin granules undergo exocytosis. Therefore, it is not surprising that membrane lipids play an important role in the regulation of insulin secretion. β-cells release insulin in a pulsatile fashion. Signalling lipids integrate the nutrient and neurohormonal inputs to fine-tune, shape and co-ordinate the pulsatility. An important group of signalling lipids are phosphoinositides and their downstream messengers. This MiniReview will discuss new insights into lipid signalling dynamics in β-cells obtained from live-cell imaging experiments with fluorescent translocation biosensors. The plasma membrane concentration of several phosphoinositides and of their downstream messengers changes rapidly upon nutrient or neurohormonal stimulation. Glucose induces the most complex spatio-temporal patterns, typically involving oscillations of messenger concentrations, which sometimes are locally restricted. The tightly controlled levels of lipid messengers can mediate specific binding of downstream effectors to the plasma membrane, contributing to the appropriate regulation of insulin secretion.

  5. Plasma membrane ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Bækgaard, Lone; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura;

    2011-01-01

    The plasma membrane separates the cellular contents from the surrounding environment. Nutrients must enter through the plasma membrane in order to reach the cell interior, and toxic metabolites and several ions leave the cell by traveling across the same barrier. Biological pumps in the plasma...... membrane include ABC transporters, vacuolar (V-type) H+ pumps, and P-type pumps. These pumps all utilize ATP as a fuel for energizing pumping. This review focuses on the physiological roles of plasma membrane P-type pumps, as they represent the major ATP hydrolytic activity in this membrane....

  6. Analysis of plasma membrane phosphoinositides from fusogenic carrot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) were found to be associated with the plasma membrane-rich fractions isolated by aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning from fusogenic cells. They represented at least 5% and 0.7% of the total inositol-labeled lipids in the plasma membrane-rich fractions, respectively, and were present in a ratio of about 7:1 (PIP:PIP2). In addition, two unidentified inositol-labeled compounds, which together were approximately 3% of the inositol-labeled lipids, were found predominantly in the plasma membrane-rich fractions and migrated between PIP2 and PIP. The R/sub f/s of these compounds were approximately 0.31 and 0.34 in the solvent system CHCl3:MeOH:15N NH4OH:H2O (90:90:7:22) using LK5 plates presoaked in 1% potassium oxalate. These compounds incorporated 32P/sub i/, (3H)inositol and were hydrolyzed in mild base. These data suggested that they were glycero-phospholipids. Although the compounds did not comigrate with lysoPIP obtained from bovine brain (R/sub f/ ∼ 0.35), when endogenous PIP was hydrolyzed to lysoPIP, the breakdown product migrated in the region of the unidentified inositol lipids

  7. (poly)Phosphoinositide phosphorylation is a marker for plasma membrane in Friend erythroleukaemic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rawyler, A.J.; Roelofsen, B.; Wirtz, K.W.A.; Kamp, J.A.F. op den

    1982-01-01

    Upon subcellular fractionation of (murine) Friend erythroleukaemic cells (FELCs), purified plasma membranes were identified by their high enrichment in specific marker enzymes and typical plasma membrane lipids. When FELCs were incubated for short periods with 32Pi before cell fractionation, the lip

  8. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and phospholipdase A activities in plasma membranes from fusing muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, C; Vagelos, P R

    1976-06-17

    Plasma membrane from fusing embryonic muscle cells were assayed for phospholipase A activity to determine if this enzyme plays a role in cell fusion. The membranes were assayed under a variety of conditions with phosphatidylcholine as the substrate and no phospholipase A activity was found. The plasma membranes did contain a phosphatidic acid phosphatase which was optimally active in the presence of Triton X-100 and glycerol. The enzyme activity was constant from pH 5.2 to 7.0, and did not require divalent cations. Over 97% of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity was in the particulate fraction. The subcellular distribution of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase was the same as the distributions of the plasma membrane markers, (Na+ + k+)-ATPase and the acetylcholine receptor, which indicates that this phosphatase is located exclusively in the plasma membranes. There was no detectable difference in the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activities of plasma membranes from fusing and non-fusing cells.

  9. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  10. Plasma Membrane Lesions In Anthracycline-Resistant Tumor Cells Probed Using A Fluorescent Dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Thomas G.; Doroshow, James H.

    1989-06-01

    Human cancer cells selected for resistance to several structurally unrelated cytotoxic drugs are known to display plasma membrane alterations such as amplified levels of a variety of glycoproteins, modifications in lipid composition, alterations in membrane fluidity and increased cellular fragility to osmotic shock. We have studied the plasma membrane fluidity of HL60 human leukemia cells and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells that have been selected for acquired resistance against the cytocidal effects of the anthracycline anticancer drug Adriamycin. Fluidity measurements were accomplished by evaluating the fluorescence anisotropy of the plasma membrane specific probe trimethylamino-1,6-dipihenylhexatriene (TMA.DPH) bound to whole, living cells. TMA.DPH anisotropy values for MCF-7 sensitive and 12-fold resistant cells were 0.306 and 0.285, respectively, while anisotropy values for HL-60 sensitive and 80-fold resistant cells lines were 0.310 and 0.295, respectively. In all cases, cell viability exceeded 97% and anisotropy values were subject to a day-to-day uncertainty of +/-2%. Our results demonstrate that increased plasma membrane fluidity apparently accompanies the development of resistance in both cell lines. Because it is known that increased membrane fluidity results in significantly decreased Adriamycin binding in artificial membrane systems, we propose here that decreased drug associations with fluidized, plasma membrane lipid bilayer regions may be a mechanism which contributes, in part, to the reduced rates of drug accumulation observed in HL60 and MCF-7 cells resistant to Adriamycin.

  11. A microfluidic platform for probing single cell plasma membranes using optically trapped Smart Droplet Microtools (SDMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, Peter M P; Ninkovic, Tanja; Chan, Karen; de Mello, Andrew J; Willison, Keith R; Klug, David R; Templer, Richard H; Neil, Mark A A; Ces, Oscar

    2009-04-21

    We recently introduced a novel platform based upon optically trapped lipid coated oil droplets (Smart Droplet Microtools-SDMs) that were able to form membrane tethers upon fusion with the plasma membrane of single cells. Material transfer from the plasma membrane to the droplet via the tether was seen to occur. Here we present a customised version of the SDM approach based upon detergent coated droplets deployed within a microfluidic format. These droplets are able to differentially solubilise the plasma membrane of single cells with spatial selectivity and without forming membrane tethers. The microfluidic format facilitates separation of the target cells from the bulk SDM population and from downstream analysis modules. Material transfer from the cell to the SDM was monitored by tracking membrane localized EGFP.

  12. Normal chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum cells with a depolarized plasma membrane potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, Bert van; Vogelzang, Sake A.; Ypey, Dirk L.; Molen, Loek G. van der; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1990-01-01

    We examined a possible role for the plasma membrane potential in signal transduction during cyclic AMP-induced chemotaxis in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Chemotaxis, cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP responses in cells with a depolarized membrane potential were measured. Cells can be co

  13. Plasma membrane microorganization of LR73 multidrug-resistant cells revealed by FCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckler, Pascale; Jaffiol, Rodolphe; Cailler, Aurélie; Morjani, Hamid; Jeannesson, Pierre; Deturche, Régis

    2011-03-01

    Tumoral cells could present a multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapeutic treatments. This drug resistance would be associated to biomechanisms occurring at the plasma membrane level, involving modification of membrane fluidity, drug permeability, presence of microdomains (rafts, caveolae...), and membrane proteins overexpression such as Pglycoprotein. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is the relevant method to investigate locally the fluidity of biological membranes through the lateral diffusion of a fluorescent membrane probe. Thus, we use FCS to monitor the plasma membrane local organization of LR73 carcinoma cells and three derived multidrug-resistant cancer cells lines. Measurements were conducted at the single cell level, which enabled us to get a detailed overview of the plasma membrane microviscosity distribution of each cell line studied. Moreover, we propose 2D diffusion simulation based on a Monte Carlo model to investigate the membrane organisation in terms of microdomains. This simulation allows us to relate the differences in the fluidity distributions with microorganization changes in plasma membrane of MDR cells.

  14. Adhesion and receptor clustering stabilizes lateral heterogeneity in cell plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    The thermodynamic properties of plasma membrane lipids play a vital role in many functions that initiate at the mammalian cell surface. Some functions are thought to occur, at least in part, because plasma membrane lipids have a tendency to separate into two distinct liquid phases, called liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered. We find that isolated cell plasma membranes are poised near a miscibility critical point separating these two liquid phases, and postulate that critical composition fluctuations provide the physical basis of functional membrane heterogeneity in intact cells. In this talk I will describe several possible mechanisms through which dynamic fluctuations can be stabilized in super-critical membranes, and will present some preliminary evidence suggesting that these structures can be visualized in intact cells using quantitative super-resolution fluorescence localization imaging.

  15. High heterogeneity of plasma membrane microfluidity in multidrug-resistant cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Céline; Roche, Yann; Millot, Christine; Deturche, Régis; Royer, Pascal; Manfait, Michel; Plain, Jérôme; Jeannesson, Pierre; Millot, Jean-Marc; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2009-05-01

    Diffusion-time distribution analysis (DDA) has been used to explore the plasma membrane fluidity of multidrug-resistant cancer cells (LR73 carcinoma cells) and also to characterize the influence of various membrane agents present in the extracellular medium. DDA is a recent single-molecule technique, based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), well suited to retrieve local organization of cell membrane. The method was conducted on a large number of living cells, which enabled us to get a detailed overview of plasma membrane microviscosity, and plasma membrane micro-organization, between the cells of the same line. Thus, we clearly reveal the higher heterogeneity of plasma membrane in multidrug-resistant cancer cells in comparison with the nonresistant ones (denoted sensitive cells). We also display distinct modifications related to a membrane fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol, and two revertants of multidrug resistance, verapamil and cyclosporin-A. A relation between the distribution of the diffusion-time values and the modification of membrane lateral heterogeneities is proposed.

  16. Detecting Subtle Plasma Membrane Perturbation in Living Cells Using Second Harmonic Generation Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Moen, Erick K.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.

    2014-01-01

    The requirement of center asymmetry for the creation of second harmonic generation (SHG) signals makes it an attractive technique for visualizing changes in interfacial layers such as the plasma membrane of biological cells. In this article, we explore the use of lipophilic SHG probes to detect minute perturbations in the plasma membrane. Three candidate probes, Di-4-ANEPPDHQ (Di-4), FM4-64, and all-trans-retinol, were evaluated for SHG effectiveness in Jurkat cells. Di-4 proved superior with...

  17. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Guijarro, José Manuel; García, Carolina; Macías, Álvaro; García-Fernández, Luis Francisco; Moreno, Cristina; Reyes, Fernando; Martínez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Fernández, Rogelio; Martínez, Valentín; Valenzuela, Carmen; Lillo, M. Pilar; Galmarini, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734) inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv) presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:26474061

  18. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Molina-Guijarro

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734 inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy.

  19. Plasma membranes modified by plasma treatment or deposition as solid electrolytes for potential application in solid alkaline fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-07-30

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane.

  20. Detecting subtle plasma membrane perturbation in living cells using second harmonic generation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Erick K; Ibey, Bennett L; Beier, Hope T

    2014-05-20

    The requirement of center asymmetry for the creation of second harmonic generation (SHG) signals makes it an attractive technique for visualizing changes in interfacial layers such as the plasma membrane of biological cells. In this article, we explore the use of lipophilic SHG probes to detect minute perturbations in the plasma membrane. Three candidate probes, Di-4-ANEPPDHQ (Di-4), FM4-64, and all-trans-retinol, were evaluated for SHG effectiveness in Jurkat cells. Di-4 proved superior with both strong SHG signal and limited bleaching artifacts. To test whether rapid changes in membrane symmetry could be detected using SHG, we exposed cells to nanosecond-pulsed electric fields, which are believed to cause formation of nanopores in the plasma membrane. Upon nanosecond-pulsed electric fields exposure, we observed an instantaneous drop of ~50% in SHG signal from the anodic pole of the cell. When compared to the simultaneously acquired fluorescence signals, it appears that the signal change was not due to the probe diffusing out of the membrane or changes in membrane potential or fluidity. We hypothesize that this loss in SHG signal is due to disruption in the interfacial nature of the membrane. The results show that SHG imaging has great potential as a tool for measuring rapid and subtle plasma membrane disturbance in living cells. PMID:24853757

  1. The connection of cytoskeletal network with plasma membrane and the cell wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengyu Liu; Staffan Persson; Yi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall provides external support of the plant cells, while the cytoskeletons including the microtubules and the actin filaments constitute an internal framework. The cytoskeletons contribute to the cell wall biosynthesis by spatially and temporarily regulating the transportation and deposition of cell wall components. This tight control is achieved by the dynamic behavior of the cytoskeletons, but also through the tethering of these structures to the plasma membrane. This tethering may also extend beyond the plasma membrane and impact on the cell wall, possibly in the form of a feedback loop. In this review, we discuss the linking components between the cytoskeletons and the plasma membrane, and/or the cell wall. We also discuss the prospective roles of these components in cell wall biosyn-thesis and modifications, and aim to provide a platform for further studies in this field.

  2. Yeast cell wall integrity sensors form specific plasma membrane microdomains important for signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Christian; Arlt, Henning; Ungermann, Christian; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae relies on the detection of cell surface stress by five sensors (Wsc1, Wsc2, Wsc3, Mid2, Mtl1). Each sensor contains a single transmembrane domain and a highly mannosylated extracellular region, and probably detects mechanical stress in the cell wall or the plasma membrane. We here studied the distribution of the five sensors at the cell surface by using fluorescently tagged variants in conjunction with marker proteins for established membrane compartments. We find that each of the sensors occupies a specific microdomain at the plasma membrane. The novel punctate 'membrane compartment occupied by Wsc1' (MCW) shows moderate overlap with other Wsc-type sensors, but not with those of the Mid-type sensors or other established plasma membrane domains. We further observed that sensor density and formation of the MCW compartment depends on the cysteine-rich head group near the N-terminus of Wsc1. Yet, signalling capacity depends more on the sensor density in the plasma membrane than on clustering within its microcompartment. We propose that the MCW microcompartment provides a quality control mechanism for retaining functional sensors at the plasma membrane to prevent them from endocytosis. PMID:27337501

  3. Yeast cell wall integrity sensors form specific plasma membrane microdomains important for signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Christian; Arlt, Henning; Ungermann, Christian; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae relies on the detection of cell surface stress by five sensors (Wsc1, Wsc2, Wsc3, Mid2, Mtl1). Each sensor contains a single transmembrane domain and a highly mannosylated extracellular region, and probably detects mechanical stress in the cell wall or the plasma membrane. We here studied the distribution of the five sensors at the cell surface by using fluorescently tagged variants in conjunction with marker proteins for established membrane compartments. We find that each of the sensors occupies a specific microdomain at the plasma membrane. The novel punctate 'membrane compartment occupied by Wsc1' (MCW) shows moderate overlap with other Wsc-type sensors, but not with those of the Mid-type sensors or other established plasma membrane domains. We further observed that sensor density and formation of the MCW compartment depends on the cysteine-rich head group near the N-terminus of Wsc1. Yet, signalling capacity depends more on the sensor density in the plasma membrane than on clustering within its microcompartment. We propose that the MCW microcompartment provides a quality control mechanism for retaining functional sensors at the plasma membrane to prevent them from endocytosis.

  4. Characterization of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization: focus on OH radical distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shota; Honda, Ryosuke; Hokari, Yutaro; Takashima, Keisuke; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-08-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) is used medically for plasma-induced cell permeabilization. However, how plasma irradiation specifically triggers permeabilization remains unclear. In an attempt to identify the dominant factor(s), the distribution of plasma-produced reactive species was investigated, primarily focusing on OH radicals. A stronger plasma discharge, which produced more OH radicals in the gas phase, also produced more OH radicals in the liquid phase (OHaq), enhancing the cell membrane permeability. In addition, plasma irradiation-induced enhancement of cell membrane permeability decreased markedly with increased solution thickness (plasma-produced OHaq decayed in solution (diffusion length on the order of several hundred micrometers). Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of OHaq corresponded with the distribution of the permeabilized cells by plasma irradiation, while the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species in solution (detected by iodine-starch reaction) exhibited a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that OHaq, among the plasma-produced oxidizing species, represents the dominant factor in plasma-induced cell permeabilization. These results enhance the current understanding of the mechanism of APP as a cell-permeabilization tool.

  5. Lipid-protein interactions in plasma membranes of fiber cells isolated from the human eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2014-03-01

    The protein content in human lens membranes is extremely high, increases with age, and is higher in the nucleus as compared with the cortex, which should strongly affect the organization and properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact membranes. To assess these effects, the intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from human lenses from 41- to 60-year-old donors were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling methods. Results were compared with those obtained for lens lipid membranes prepared from total lipid extracts from human eyes of the same age group [Mainali, L., Raguz, M., O'Brien, W. J., and Subczynski, W. K. (2013) Biochim. Biophys. Acta]. Differences were considered to be mainly due to the effect of membrane proteins. The lipid-bilayer portions of intact membranes were significantly less fluid than lipid bilayers of lens lipid membranes, prepared without proteins. The intact membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain. However, the cholesterol bilayer domain, which was detected in cortical and nuclear lens lipid membranes, was not detected in intact membranes. The relative amounts of bulk and trapped lipids were evaluated. The amount of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins was greater in nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. Thus, it is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes is greater than that of cortical membranes. Also the permeability coefficients for oxygen measured in domains of nuclear membranes were significantly lower than appropriate coefficients measured in cortical membranes. Relationships between the organization of lipids into lipid domains in fiber cells plasma membranes and the organization of membrane proteins are discussed.

  6. Plasma membrane rafts engaged in T cell signalling: new developments in an old concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangani Dhaval

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Considerable controversy arose over the concept that cholesterol/sphingolipid-rich rafts in the T cell plasma membrane serve as a platform for TCR signalling reactions. This controversy was founded on the initial definition of rafts as detergent resistant membranes which later turned out to misrepresent many features of cell membrane organisation under physiological conditions. Raft-organisation was subsequently studied using a number of detergent-free experimental approaches. The results led to a refined perception of membrane rafts which resolves the controversies. Here we review new biophysical and biochemical data which provide an updated picture of the highly dynamic nanometer-sized cholesterol/sphingolipid-rich raft domains stabilised by protein-networks to form TCR signalling platforms in the T cell plasma membrane.

  7. Accumulation of raft lipids in T-cell plasma membrane domains engaged in TCR signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zech, Tobias; Ejsing, Christer S.; Gaus, Katharina;

    2009-01-01

    Activating stimuli for T lymphocytes are transmitted through plasma membrane domains that form at T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalling foci. Here, we determined the molecular lipid composition of immunoisolated TCR activation domains. We observed that they accumulate cholesterol, sphingomyelin...... and saturated phosphatidylcholine species as compared with control plasma membrane fragments. This provides, for the first time, direct evidence that TCR activation domains comprise a distinct molecular lipid composition reminiscent of liquid-ordered raft phases in model membranes. Interestingly, TCR activation...... domains were also enriched in plasmenyl phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. Modulating the T-cell lipidome with polyunsaturated fatty acids impaired the plasma membrane condensation at TCR signalling foci and resulted in a perturbed molecular lipid composition. These results correlate...

  8. Effects of La3+ on inward K+ channels at plasma membrane in guard cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE; Shaowu; YANG; Pin

    2005-01-01

    The effects of La3+ on inward K+ channels at plasma membrane in vicia guard cells are investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp recording mode. It is shown that La3+ on both sides of plasma membrane blocks inward K+ currents in a concentration- dependent manner, indicating that La3+ binding sites may exist on both sides of plasma membrane in guard cells in vicia. The dose response is fitted by the Michaelis-Menten relation characterized by an inhibitor constant Ki of 2.56±0.25μmol·L-1 (outside membrane) and (1.18±0.11)×10-15 mol·L-1 (inside membrane). Intracellular La3+ has much stronger inhibitory effect on inward K+ currents than extracellular La3+ does, suggesting there may exist stronger binding sites inside membrane than outside membrane. Since ion channel activities of guard cells directly affect plant stomatal movement and water status, our results imply that rare earth elements might have potential practical values in regulating plant water status and strengthening plant drought endurance.

  9. Polyphosphoinositides are present in plasma membranes isolated from fusogenic carrot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusogenic carrot cells grown in suspension culture were labeled 12 hours with myo-[2-3H]inositol. Plasma membranes were isolated from the prelabeled fusogenic carrot cells by both aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning and Renografin density gradients. With both methods, the plasma membrane-enriched fractions, as identified by marker enzymes, were enriched in [3H]inositol-labeled phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2). An additional [3H]inositol-labeled lipid, lysophosphatidylinositol monophosphate, which migrated between PIP and PIP2 on thin layer plates, was found primarily in the plasma membrane-rich fraction of the fusogenic cells. This was in contrast to lysophosphatidylinositol which is found primarily in the lower phase, microsomal/mitchrondrial-rich fraction

  10. Plant cell plasma membrane structure and properties under clinostatting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polulakh, Yu. A.; Zhadko, S. I.; Klimchuk, D. A.; Baraboy, V. A.; Alpatov, A. N.; Sytnik, K. M.

    Structural-functional organization of plasma membrane of pea roots seedling was investigated by methods of chemiluminescence, fluorescence probes, chromatography and freeze-fracture studies under normal conditions and clinostatting. Phase character of lipid peroxidation intensity was fixed. The initial phase of this process is characterized by lipid peroxidation decreasing with its next induction. The primary changes depending on free-radical mechanisms of lipid peroxidation were excellently revealed by chemiluminescence. Plasmalemma microviscosity increased on the average of 15-20 % under microgravity at the initial stages of its phenomenon. There were major changes of phosphatidilcholine and phosphatidilethanolamine contents. The total quantity of phospholipids remained rather stable. Changes of phosphatide acid concentration point to degradation and phospholipids biosynthesis. There were increases of unsaturated fatty acids mainly at the expense of linoleic and linolenic acids and also a decrease of saturated fatty acid content at the expense of palmitic and stearic acids. Unsaturation index of fatty acids increased as well. On the whole fatty acid composition was variable in comparison with phospholipids. Probably it is one of mechanisms of maintaining of microviscosity within definite limits. Considerable structural changes in organization of plasmalemma protein-lipid complex were not revealed by the freeze-fracture studies.

  11. Small unilamellar liposomes as a membrane model for cell inactivation by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, S.; Frache, G.; Thomann, J. S.; Clément, F.; Penny, C.; Belmonte, T.; Duday, D.

    2016-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is thought to be a promising tool for numerous biomedical applications due to its ability to generate a large diversity of reactive species in a controlled way. In some cases, it can also generate pulsed electric fields at the zone of treatment, which can induce processes such as electroporation in cell membranes. However, the interaction of these reactive species and the pulse electric field with cells in a physiological medium is very complex, and we still need a better understanding in order to be useful for future applications. A way to reach this goal is to work with model cell membranes such as liposomes, with the simplest physiological liquid and in a controlled atmosphere in order to limit the number of parallel reactions and processes. In this paper, where this approach has been chosen, 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) have been synthesized in a phosphate buffered aqueous solution, and this solution has been treated by a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet under a pure nitrogen atmosphere. It is only the composition of the plasma gas that has been changed in order to generate different cocktails of reactive species. After the quantification of the main plasma reactive species in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, structural, surface charge state, and chemical modifications generated on the plasma treated liposomes, due to the interaction with the plasma reactive species, have been carefully characterized. These results allow us to further understand the effect of plasma reactive species on model cell membranes in physiological liquids. The permeation through the liposomal membrane and the reaction of plasma reactive species with molecules encapsulated inside the liposomes have also been evaluated. New processes of degradation are finally presented and discussed, which come from the specific conditions of plasma treatment under the pure nitrogen atmosphere.

  12. Influence of Low-Energy Ion Irradiation on Plasma MembranePermeability of Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dong-Mei; CUI Fu-Zhai; SUN Su-Qin; LIN You-Bo; TIAN Min-Bo; CHEN Guo-Qiang

    2000-01-01

    Effect of low-energy ion irradiation on plasma membrane permeability has been investigated by using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy of spin probe technique. The investigated system is plumule cells of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seeds implanted by 30keV N+ ions. ESR spectra indicated that plasmalemma permeability is sensitive to low-energyion irradiation. Ion irradiations with increasing fluences up to semi-lethal dose lead to gradual increase in plasmalemma permeability of the plumule cells. The possible factors relevant to the changes in membrane permeability are discussed in relation to the changes in the physical state and chemical nature of membranes.

  13. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  14. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-04-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been the subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored-mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic-ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane.

  15. Roles of the plasma membrane and the cell wall in the responses of plant cells to freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomoyoshi; Kuroda, Katsushi; Jitsuyama, Yutaka; Takezawa, Daisuke; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2002-09-01

    In an effort to clarify the responses of a wide range of plant cells to freezing, we examined the responses to freezing of the cells of chilling-sensitive and chilling-resistant tropical and subtropical plants. Among the cells of the plants that we examined, those of African violet ( Saintpaulia grotei Engl.) leaves were most chilling-sensitive, those of hypocotyls in mungbean [ Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilcz.] seedlings were moderately chilling-sensitive, and those of orchid [ Paphiopedilum insigne (Wallich ex Lindl.) Pfitz.] leaves were chilling-resistant, when all were chilled at -2 degrees C. By contrast, all these plant cells were freezing-sensitive and suffered extensive damage when they were frozen at -2 degrees C. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) confirmed that, upon chilling at -2 degrees C, both chilling-sensitive and chilling-resistant plant cells were supercooled. Upon freezing at -2 degrees C, by contrast, intracellular freezing occurred in Saintpaulia leaf cells, frost plasmolysis followed by intracellular freezing occurred in mungbean seedling cells, and extracellular freezing (cytorrhysis) occurred in orchid leaf cells. We postulate that chilling-related destabilization of membranes might result in the loss of the ability of the plasma membrane to act as a barrier against the propagation of extracellular ice in chilling-sensitive plant cells. We also examined the role of cell walls in the response to freezing using cells in which the plasma membrane had been disrupted by repeated freezing and thawing. In chilling-sensitive Saintpaulia and mungbean cells, the cells with a disrupted plasma membrane responded to freezing at -2 degrees C by intracellular freezing. By contrast, in chilling-resistant orchid cells, as well as in other cells of chilling-resistant and freezing-resistant plant tissues, including leaves of orchard grass ( Dactylis glomerata L.), leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and cortical tissues of mulberry ( Morus

  16. Systems analysis of endothelial cell plasma membrane proteome of rat lung microvasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witkiewicz Halina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial cells line all blood vessels to form the blood-tissue interface which is critical for maintaining organ homeostasis and facilitates molecular exchange. We recently used tissue subcellular fractionation combined with several multi-dimensional mass spectrometry-based techniques to enhance identification of lipid-embedded proteins for large-scale proteomic mapping of luminal endothelial cell plasma membranes isolated directly from rat lungs in vivo. The biological processes and functions of the proteins expressed at this important blood-tissue interface remain unexplored at a large scale. Results We performed an unbiased systems analysis of the endothelial cell surface proteome containing over 1800 proteins to unravel the major functions and pathways apparent at this interface. As expected, many key functions of plasma membranes in general (i.e., cell surface signaling pathways, cytoskeletal organization, adhesion, membrane trafficking, metabolism, mechanotransduction, membrane fusion, and vesicle-mediated transport and endothelial cells in particular (i.e., blood vessel development and maturation, angiogenesis, regulation of endothelial cell proliferation, protease activity, and endocytosis were significantly overrepresented in this proteome. We found that endothelial cells express multiple proteins that mediate processes previously reported to be restricted to neuronal cells, such as neuronal survival and plasticity, axon growth and regeneration, synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter metabolic process. Surprisingly, molecular machinery for protein synthesis was also detected as overrepresented, suggesting that endothelial cells, like neurons, can synthesize proteins locally at the cell surface. Conclusion Our unbiased systems analysis has led to the potential discovery of unexpected functions in normal endothelium. The discovery of the existence of protein synthesis at the plasma membrane in endothelial

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis of plasma membrane proteins between human osteosarcoma and normal osteoblastic cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone in children and adolescents. However, the knowledge in diagnostic modalities has progressed less. To identify new biomarkers for the early diagnosis of OS as well as for potential novel therapeutic candidates, we performed a sub-cellular comparative proteomic research. An osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63) and human osteoblastic cells (hFOB1.19) were used as our comparative model. Plasma membrane (PM) was obtained by aqueous two-phase partition. Proteins were analyzed through iTRAQ-based quantitative differential LC/MS/MS. The location and function of differential proteins were analyzed through GO database. Protein-protein interaction was examined through String software. One of differentially expressed proteins was verified by immunohistochemistry. 342 non-redundant proteins were identified, 68 of which were differentially expressed with 1.5-fold difference, with 25 up-regulated and 43 down-regulated. Among those differential proteins, 69% ware plasma membrane, which are related to the biological processes of binding, cell structure, signal transduction, cell adhesion, etc., and interaction with each other. One protein--CD151 located in net nodes was verified to be over-expressed in osteosarcoma tissue by immunohistochemistry. It is the first time to use plasma membrane proteomics for studying the OS membrane proteins according to our knowledge. We generated preliminary but comprehensive data about membrane protein of osteosarcoma. Among these, CD151 was further validated in patient samples, and this small molecule membrane might be a new target for OS research. The plasma membrane proteins identified in this study may provide new insight into osteosarcoma biology and potential diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers

  18. Phospholipid flippase associates with cisplatin resistance in plasma membrane of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The fusion of the liposomes containing N-(7-nitro-2, 1, 3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)-i ,2-hexadecanoylSn-glycero-3-1abeled phosphatidylethanolamine (NBD-PE) with A549 and A549/DDP cells was performed, and the activity of the phospholipid flippase in the plasma membrane of the cells was measured by fluorescence intensity change of NBDPE in the outer membrane. When A549 or A549/DDP cells containing N BD-PE were incubated at 37 C for 0, 30, 60 and 90 min, the fluorescence intensities in the outer membrane of the cells were 0%, 1.4%, 2.9% and 7.8% for A59cells, and 0%, 10.5 %, 15. 5 % and 18.3 % for A549/DDP cells respectively, demonstrating that the phospholipid flippase was distributed in the plasma membrane of As49 cells, but its activity in the drug-resistant A549/DDP cells was much higher than that in the A549 cells. When the A549/DDP cells were incubated with a multidrug resistance reverse agent, verapamil, for 60 min at 37C, the results showed that the NBD-PE in outer membrane decreased by 25.0% compared with the control's. Furthermore, when A549/DDP cells were incubated with 25 μmol/L cisplatin, which is a specific anticancer drug, the flippase activity decreased by 31.6%, and it further decreased with the increase of cisplatin concentration, suggesting that phospholipid flippase in the membrane might be related to the cisplatin-resistance of human lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells.

  19. Plasma lipid pattern and red cell membrane structure in β-thalassemia patients in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seruni K.U. Freisleben

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last 10 years, we have investigated thalassemia patients in Jakarta to obtain a comprehensive picture of iron overload, oxidative stress, and cell damage.Methods: In blood samples from 15 transfusion-dependent patients (group T, 5 non-transfused patients (group N and 10 controls (group C, plasma lipids and lipoproteins, lipid-soluble vitamin E, malondialdehyde (MDA and thiol status were measured. Isolated eryhtrocyte membranes were investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy using doxyl-stearic acid and maleimido-proxyl spin lables. Data were analyzed statistically with ANOVA.Results: Plasma triglycerides were higher and cholesterol levels were lower in thalassemic patients compared to controls. Vitamin E, group C: 21.8 vs T: 6.2 μmol/L and reactive thiols (C: 144 vs. T: 61 μmol/L were considerably lower in transfused patients, who exert clear signs of oxidative stress (MDA, C: 1.96 vs T: 9.2 μmol/L and of tissue cell damage, i.e., high transaminases plasma levels. Non-transfused thalassemia patients have slight signs of oxidative stress, but no significant indication of cell damage. Erythrocyte membrane parameters from EPR spectroscopy differ considerably between all groups. In transfusion-dependent patients the structure of the erythrocyte membrane and the gradients of polarity and fluidity are destroyed in lipid domains; binding capacity of protein thiols in the membrane is lower and immobilized.Conclusion: In tranfusion-dependent thalassemic patients, plasma lipid pattern and oxidative stress are associated with structural damage of isolated erythrocyte membranes as measured by EPR spectroscopy with lipid and proteinthiol spin labels. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:178-84Keywords: electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, erythrocyte membrane, lipoproteins, oxidative stress, thalassemia, plasma lipids.

  20. Luminol electrochemiluminescence for the analysis of active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guangzhong; Zhou, Junyu; Tian, Chunxiu; Jiang, Dechen; Fang, Danjun; Chen, Hongyuan

    2013-04-16

    A luminol electrochemiluminescence assay was reported to analyze active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single mammalian cells. The cellular membrane cholesterol was activated by the exposure of the cells to low ionic strength buffer or the inhibition of intracellular acyl-coA/cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT). The active membrane cholesterol was reacted with cholesterol oxidase in the solution to generate a peak concentration of hydrogen peroxide on the electrode surface, which induced a measurable luminol electrochemiluminescence. Further treatment of the active cells with mevastatin decreased the active membrane cholesterol resulting in a drop in luminance. No change in the intracellular calcium was observed in the presence of luminol and voltage, which indicated that our analysis process might not interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking. Single cell analysis was performed by placing a pinhole below the electrode so that only one cell was exposed to the photomultiplier tube (PMT). Twelve single cells were analyzed individually, and a large deviation on luminance ratio observed exhibited the cell heterogeneity on the active membrane cholesterol. The smaller deviation on ACAT/HMGCoA inhibited cells than ACAT inhibited cells suggested different inhibition efficiency for sandoz 58035 and mevastatin. The new information obtained from single cell analysis might provide a new insight on the study of intracellular cholesterol trafficking. PMID:23527944

  1. Chromium(VI)—induces Production of Reactive Oxygen Species,Change of Plasma Membrane Potential and Dissipation of Mitochondria Membrane otential in Chinese Hamster Lung Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEYI; ZHUANGZHI-XIONG

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To examine whether Reactive Oxygen Species(ROS) is generated,and whether plasma membrane potential and mitochnodrial membrane potential are depolarized in Chinese Hamster Lung(CHL)cell lines exposed to Cr(VI),Methods:CHL Cells were incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 umol/L,2.5umol/L,0.65umol/L for 3 and 6 hours,respectively.The rpoduction of ROS was performed by using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin discetate;The changes in plasma membrane potential were performed by using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin discetate;The changes in plasma membrane potential were performed by using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate;The changes in plasma membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent cationic dye DiBAC4;And the changes in mitochondria membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123,Results:The ROS levels in CHL cells increased in all treated groups compared with the control group(P<0.01);The plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cells dissipated after incubated with Cr(VI) at 10umol/L for 3 hours and 6 hours(P<0.01),at 2.5umol/L for 6 hours(P<0.01 or 0.05),Conclusion:Cr(VI) causes the dissipation of plasma membrane potential and mitochnodrial membrane otential in CHL cell cultrues,and Cr(VI)-induced ROS may play a role in the injuries.

  2. Proteomic analysis identifies interleukin 11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton Peter G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the peri-implantation period, the embryo adheres to an adequately prepared or receptive endometrial surface epithelium. Abnormal embryo adhesion to the endometrium results in embryo implantation failure and infertility. Endometrial epithelial cell plasma membrane proteins critical in regulating adhesion may potentially be infertility biomarkers or targets for treating infertility. Interleukin (IL 11 regulates human endometrial epithelial cells (hEEC adhesion. Its production is abnormal in women with infertility. The objective of the study was to identify IL11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in hEEC in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Using a 2D-differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE electrophoresis combined with LCMS/MS mass spectrometry approach, we identified 20 unique plasma membrane proteins differentially regulated by IL11 in ECC-1 cells, a hEEC derived cell line. Two IL11 regulated proteins with known roles in cell adhesion, annexin A2 (ANXA2 and flotillin-1 (FLOT1, were validated by Western blot and immunocytochemistry in hEEC lines (ECC-1 and an additional cell line, Ishikawa and primary hEEC. Flotilin-1 was further validated by immunohistochemistry in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle (n = 6-8/cycle. Results 2D-DIGE analysis identified 4 spots that were significantly different between control and IL11 treated group. Of these 4 spots, there were 20 proteins that were identified with LCMS/MS. Two proteins; ANXA2 and FLOT1 were chosen for further analyses and have found to be significantly up-regulated following IL11 treatment. Western blot analysis showed a 2-fold and a 2.5-fold increase of ANXA2 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. Similarly, a 1.8-fold and a 2.3/2.4-fold increase was also observed for FLOT1 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. In vitro, IL11 induced stronger ANXA2 expression on cell surface of primary h

  3. Damage of DNA and plasma membranes in murine lymphoma cells irradiated under aerobic or hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the knowledge of radiation effects on cell membranes and DNA and of repair mechanisms of radiation lesions is given. Investigations of properties of plasma membranes in L5178Y-S and L5178Y-R cells (surface charge, fluidity, transport of amino acids) indicate that there is no direct connection between membrane lesions and reproductive death. It was also found that in irradiated cells of both L5178Y-strains the rate of DNA chain elongation is the same, similarly as the amount of the initial DNA lesions and the rate of repair processes. Difference in the level of DNA synthesis inhibition is not proportional to the lethal effect. The results are also reported point to the difference between L5178Y-S and L5178Y-R cells in susceptibility of post-irradiation DNA synthesis to factors modifying chromatin conformation, such as inhibitors of (ADP-ribose)n polymerase. 221 refs. (author)

  4. Calcium pumps of plasma membrane and cell interior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strehler, Emanuel E; Treiman, Marek

    2004-01-01

    Calcium entering the cell from the outside or from intracellular organelles eventually must be returned to the extracellular milieu or to intracellular storage organelles. The two major systems capable of pumping Ca2+ against its large concentration gradient out of the cell or into the sarco......- and cell type-specific patterns of expression. Different PMCA and SERCA isoforms are characterized by different regulatory and kinetic properties that likely are optimized for the distinct functional tasks fulfilled by each pump in setting resting cytosolic or intra-organellar Ca2+ levels, and in shaping...

  5. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes.

  6. Plasma membrane and cytoskeleton dynamics during single-cell wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Eric; Mandato, Craig A

    2015-10-01

    Wounding leads not only to plasma membrane disruption, but also to compromised cytoskeleton structures. This results not only in unwarranted exchanges between the cytosol and extracellular milieu, but also in loss of tensegrity, which may further endanger the cell. Tensegrity can be described as the interplay between the tensile forces generated by the apparent membrane tension, actomyosin contraction, and the cytoskeletal structures resisting those changes (e.g., microtubules). It is responsible for the structural integrity of the cell and for its ability to sense mechanical signals. Recent reviews dealing with single-cell healing mostly focused on the molecular machineries controlling the traffic and fusion of specific vesicles, or their role in different pathologies. In this review, we aim to take a broader view of the different modes of single cell repair, while focussing on the different ways the changes in plasmalemma surface area and composition, plasmalemma tension, and cytoskeletal dynamics may influence and affect single-cell repair. PMID:26209916

  7. Flavivirus infection from mosquitoes in vitro reveals cell entry at the plasma membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vancini, Ricardo [Department of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Kramer, Laura D. [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, and School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, NY (United States); Ribeiro, Mariana; Hernandez, Raquel [Department of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Brown, Dennis, E-mail: dennis_brown@ncsu.edu [Department of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2013-01-20

    Dengue and West Nile viruses are enveloped RNA viruses that belong to genus Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae) and are considered important mosquito-borne viral pathogenic agents worldwide. A potential target for intervention strategies is the virus cell entry mechanism. Previous studies of flavivirus entry have focused on the effects of biochemical and molecular inhibitors on viral entry leading to controversial conclusions suggesting that the process is dependent upon endocytosis and low pH mediated membrane fusion. In this study we analyzed the early events in the infection process by means of electron microscopy and immuno-gold labeling of viral particles during cell entry, and used as a new approach for infecting cells with viruses obtained directly from mosquitoes. The results show that Dengue and West Nile viruses may infect cells by a mechanism that involves direct penetration of the host cell plasma membrane as proposed for alphaviruses.

  8. Characterization of Plasma Membrane Proteins from Ovarian Cancer Cells Using Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Springer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine how the repertoire of plasma membrane proteins change with disease state, specifically related to cancer, several methods for preparation of plasma membrane proteins were evaluated. Cultured cells derived from stage IV ovarian tumors were grown to 90% confluence and harvested in buffer containing CHAPS detergent. This preparation was centrifuged at low speed to remove insoluble cellular debris resulting in a crude homogenate. Glycosylated proteins in the crude homogenate were selectively enriched using lectin affinity chromatography. The crude homogenate and the lectin purified sample were prepared for mass spectrometric evaluation. The general procedure for protein identification began with trypsin digestion of protein fractions followed by separation by reversed phase liquid chromatography that was coupled directly to a conventional tandem mass spectrometer (i.e. LCQ ion trap. Mass and fragmentation data for the peptides were searched against a human proteome data base using the informatics program SEQUEST. Using this procedure 398 proteins were identified with high confidence, including receptors, membrane-associated ligands, proteases, phosphatases, as well as structural and adhesion proteins. Results indicate that lectin chromatography provides a select subset of proteins and that the number and quality of the identifications improve as does the confidence of the protein identifications for this subset. These results represent the first step in development of methods to separate and successfully identify plasma membrane proteins from advanced ovarian cancer cells. Further characterization of plasma membrane proteins will contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying progression of this deadly disease and may lead to new targeted interventions as well as new biomarkers for diagnosis.

  9. Spatially-Selective Membrane Permeabilization Induced by Cell-Solution Electrode Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shota; Hokari, Yutaro; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-09-01

    Gene transfection, which is the process of deliberately introducing nucleic acids into cells, is expected to play an important role in medical treatment because the process is necessary for gene therapy and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional transfection methods have some problems, so we focus attention on promising transfection methods by atmospheric pressure plasma (APP). We have previously reported that the cell membrane permeability, which is closely related with gene transfection, is improved using a cell-solution electrode for generating He-APP. He-APP is irradiated to the solution containing the adherent cells and delivery materials such as fluorescent dyes (YOYO-1) and plasmid DNA (GFP). In case of YOYO-1 delivery, more than 80% of cells can be transferred only in the plasma-irradiated area and the spatially-selective membrane permeabilization is realized by the plasma irradiation. In addition, it is confirmed that plasmid DNA is transfected and the GFP genes are expressed using same APP irradiation system with no obvious cellular damage.

  10. Deciphering the plasma membrane hallmarks of apoptotic cells: Phosphatidylserine transverse redistribution and calcium entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez M Carmen

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During apoptosis, Ca2+-dependent events participate in the regulation of intracellular and morphological changes including phosphatidylserine exposure in the exoplasmic leaflet of the cell plasma membrane. The occurrence of phosphatidylserine at the surface of specialized cells, such as platelets, is also essential for the assembly of the enzyme complexes of the blood coagulation cascade, as demonstrated by hemorrhages in Scott syndrome, an extremely rare genetic deficiency of phosphatidylserine externalization, without other apparent pathophysiologic consequences. We have recently reported a reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry in Scott cells which may be part of the Scott phenotype. Results Taking advantage of these mutant lymphoblastoid B cells, we have studied the relationship between this mode of Ca2+ entry and phosphatidylserine redistribution during apoptosis. Ca2+ ionophore induced apoptosis in Scott but not in control cells. However, inhibition of store-operated Ca2+ channels led to caspase-independent DNA fragmentation and decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential in both control and Scott cells. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 also reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry and induced apoptosis at comparable extents in control and Scott cells. During the apoptotic process, both control and more markedly Scott cells externalized phosphatidylserine, but in the latter, this membrane feature was however dissociated from several other intracellular changes. Conclusions The present results suggest that different mechanisms account for phosphatidylserine transmembrane migration in cells undergoing stimulation and programmed death. These observations testify to the plasticity of the plasma membrane remodeling process, allowing normal apoptosis even when less fundamental functions are defective.

  11. Identification and characterization of inward K ~+-channels in plasma membranes of Arabidopsis root cortex cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于川江; 武维华

    1999-01-01

    Patch clamping whole-cell reeording techniques were apphed to study the inward K+ channels in Arabidopsis root cortex cells. The inward K+-channels in the plasma membranes of the root cortex cell protoplasts were activated by hyperpolarized membrane potentials. The channels were highly selective tor K+ ions over Na+ ions. The channel activity was significantly inbibited by the external TEA(?) or Ba(?) The changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations did not affect the whole-cell inward K+-currents. The possible asso(?)ation betw(?)en the channel selectivity to K+ and Na(?) ions and plant salt-tolerance was also discussed.

  12. Up against the wall: is yeast cell wall integrity ensured by mechanosensing in plasma membrane microdomains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Christian; Dufrêne, Yves F; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling serves as a model of the regulation of fungal cell wall synthesis and provides the basis for the development of antifungal drugs. A set of five membrane-spanning sensors (Wsc1 to Wsc3, Mid2, and Mtl1) detect cell surface stress and commence the signaling pathway upon perturbations of either the cell wall structure or the plasma membrane. We here summarize the latest advances in the structure/function relationship primarily of the Wsc1 sensor and critically review the evidence that it acts as a mechanosensor. The relevance and physiological significance of the information obtained for the function of the other CWI sensors, as well as expected future developments, are discussed.

  13. Kinetic imaging of NPC1L1 and sterol trafficking between plasma membrane and recycling endosomes in hepatoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwig Petersen, Nicole; Færgeman, Nils J; Yu, Liqing;

    2008-01-01

    fluorescent protein (NPC1L1-EGFP) and cholesterol analogues in hepatoma cells. At steady state about 42% of NPC1L1 resided in the transferrin (Tf) positive, sterol enriched endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), while time-lapse microscopy demonstrated NPC1L1 traffic between plasma membrane and ERC...... the ERC to the plasma membrane. NPC1L1-EGFP facilitated transport of fluorescent sterols from the plasma membrane to the ERC. Insulin induced translocation of vesicles containing NPC1L1 and fluorescent sterol from the ERC to the cell membrane. Upon polarization of hepatoma cells NPC1L1 resided almost...... exclusively in the canalicular membrane, where the protein is highly mobile. Our study demonstrates dynamic trafficking of NPC1L1 between cell surface and intracellular compartments and suggests that this transport is involved in NPC1L1 mediated cellular sterol uptake....

  14. Effects of n-3 PUFAs on breast cancer cells through their incorporation in plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berra Bruno

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PUFAs are important molecules for membrane order and function; they can modify inflammation-inducible cytokines production, eicosanoid production, plasma triacylglycerol synthesis and gene expression. Recent studies suggest that n-3 PUFAs can be cancer chemopreventive, chemosuppressive and auxiliary agents for cancer therapy. N-3 PUFAs could alter cancer growth influencing cell replication, cell cycle, and cell death. The question that remains to be answered is how n-3 PUFAs can affect so many physiological processes. We hypothesize that n-3 PUFAs alter membrane stability, modifying cellular signalling in breast cancer cells. Methods Two lines of human breast cancer cells characterized by different expression of ER and EGFR receptors were treated with AA, EPA or DHA. We have used the MTT viability test and expression of apoptotic markers to evaluate the effect of PUFAs on cancer growth. Phospholipids were analysed by HPLC/GC, to assess n-3 incorporation into the cell membrane. Results We have observed that EPA and DHA induce cell apoptosis, a reduction of cell viability and the expression of Bcl2 and procaspase-8. Moreover, DHA slightly reduces the concentration of EGFR but EPA has no effect. Both EPA and DHA reduce the activation of EGFR. N-3 fatty acids are partially metabolized in both cell lines; AA is integrated without being further metabolized. We have analysed the fatty acid pattern in membrane phospholipids where they are incorporated with different degrees of specificity. N-3 PUFAs influence the n-6 content and vice versa. Conclusions Our results indicate that n-3 PUFA feeding might induce modifications of breast cancer membrane structure that increases the degree of fatty acid unsaturation. This paper underlines the importance of nutritional factors on health maintenance and on disease prevention.

  15. Chromium(VI)-induced Production of Reactive Oxygen Species, Change of Plasma Membrane Potential and Dissipation of Mitochondria Membrane Potential in Chinese Hamster Lung Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To examine whether Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) is generated, and whether plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential are depolarized in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cell lines exposed to Cr (VI). Methods CHL cells were incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 μmol/L, 2.5 μmol/L, 0.65 μmol/L for 3 and 6 hours, respectively. The production of ROS was performed by using 2,7_dichlorofluorescin diacetate; The changes in plasma membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent cationic dye DiBAC4; And the changes in mitochondria membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123. Results The ROS levels in CHL cells increased in all treated groups compared with the control group (P<0.01); The plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cells dissipated after incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 μmol/L for 3 hours and 6 hours (P<0.01), at 2.5 μmol/L for 6 hours (P<0.01 or 0.05). Conclusion Cr(VI) causes the dissipation of plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cell cultures, and Cr(VI)_induced ROS may play a role in the injuries.

  16. SH4-domain-induced plasma membrane dynamization promotes bleb-associated cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournaviti, Stella; Hannemann, Sebastian; Terjung, Stefan; Kitzing, Thomas M; Stegmayer, Carolin; Ritzerfeld, Julia; Walther, Paul; Grosse, Robert; Nickel, Walter; Fackler, Oliver T

    2007-11-01

    SH4 domains provide bipartite membrane-targeting signals for oncogenic Src family kinases. Here we report the induction of non-apoptotic plasma membrane (PM) blebbing as a novel and conserved activity of SH4 domains derived from the prototypic Src kinases Src, Fyn, Yes and Lck as well as the HASPB protein of Leishmania parasites. SH4-domain-induced blebbing is highly dynamic, with bleb formation and collapse displaying distinct kinetics. These reorganizations of the PM are controlled by Rho but not Rac or Cdc42 GTPase signalling pathways. SH4-induced membrane blebbing requires the membrane association of the SH4 domain, is regulated by the activities of Rock kinase and myosin II ATPase, and depends on the integrity of F-actin as well as microtubules. Endogenous Src kinase activity is crucial for PM blebbing in SH4-domain-expressing cells, active Src and Rock kinases are enriched in SH4-domain-induced PM blebs, and PM blebbing correlates with enhanced cell invasion in 3D matrices. These results establish a novel link between SH4 domains, Src activity and Rho signalling, and implicate SH4-domain-mediated PM dynamization as a mechanism that influences invasiveness of cells transformed by SH4-domain-containing oncoproteins. PMID:17959630

  17. Calcium fluxes across the plasma membrane of Commelina communis L. assayed in a cell-free system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inside-out fraction of plasma membrane-rich vesicles prepared from leaves of Commelina communis L. by aqueous two-phase partitioning was loaded with 45Ca2+ through the action of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase. Results suggest the presence of a Ca2+ channel in the plasma membrane of C. communis. The channel is obtained in a Ca2+-inactivated state after preparation and Ca2+-loading of the vesicles. The inactivation is removed by TFP [trifluoperazine] or W-7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide], presumably due to the Ca2+-mobilizing effect of these compounds. The activated Ca2+ channel is La3+ sensitive and, in the cell, would allow for passage of Ca2+ into the cell. The possibility that TFP or W-7 act independent of CM, or through CM tightly associated with the plasma membrane, is discussed

  18. Intact transmembrane isoforms of the neural cell adhesion molecule are released from the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M; Krog, L; Edvardsen, K;

    1993-01-01

    density-gradient centrifugation it was shown that shed transmembrane NCAM-B was present in fractions of high, as well as low, density, indicating that a fraction of the shed NCAM is associated with minor plasma membrane fragments. Finally, it was shown that isolated soluble NCAM inhibited cell binding to......-s1 and NCAM-s2 and the function of soluble NCAM forms were investigated. It was shown that all three soluble forms could be released from brain membranes with M(r) values identical to the three major membrane-associated forms: the large transmembrane 190,000-M(r) form (NCAM-A), the smaller...... intact soluble form from membranes of cells transfected with this isoform. Thus, NCAM-s1 and NCAM-s2 probably represent intact released transmembrane NCAM-A and NCAM-B. The soluble transmembrane forms are likely to exist in vivo, as NCAM-s1 and NCAM-s2 were readily demonstrated in cerebrospinal fluid. By...

  19. Cell Surface Interference with Plasma Membrane and Transport Processes in Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Jean Marie

    2016-01-01

    The wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a shell of about 120 nm thick, made of two distinct layers, which surrounds the cell. The outer layer is constituted of highly glycosylated proteins and the inner layer is composed of β-glucan and chitin. These two layers are interconnected through covalent linkages leading to a supramolecular architecture that is characterized by physical and chemical properties including rigidity, porosity and biosorption. The later property results from the presence of highly negative charged phosphate and carboxylic groups of the cell wall proteins, allowing the cell wall to act as an efficient barrier to metals ions, toxins and organic compounds. An intimate connection between cell wall and plasma membrane is indicated by the fact that changes in membrane fluidity results in change in cell wall nanomechanical properties. Finally, cell wall contributes to transport processes through the use of dedicated cell wall mannoproteins, as it is the case for Fit proteins implicated in the siderophore-iron bound transport and the Tir/Dan proteins family in the uptake of sterols. PMID:26721269

  20. Plasma membrane protein trafficking in plant-microbe interactions: a plant cell point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eLeborgne-Castel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure their physiological and cellular functions, plasma membrane (PM proteins must be properly conveyed from their site of synthesis, i.e. the endoplasmic reticulum, to their final destination, the PM, through the secretory pathway. PM protein homeostasis also relies on recycling and/or degradation, two processes that are initiated by endocytosis. Vesicular membrane trafficking events to and from the PM have been shown to be altered when plant cells are exposed to mutualistic or pathogenic microbes. In this review, we will describe the fine-tune regulation of such alterations, and their consequence in PM protein activity. We will consider the formation of intracellular perimicrobial compartments, the PM protein trafficking machinery of the host, and the delivery or retrieval of signaling and transport proteins such as pattern-recognition receptors, producers of reactive oxygen species, and sugar transporters.

  1. In silicio identification of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma-membrane and cell wall proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, L H; Tettelin, H; Vossen, J H; Ram, A F; van den Ende, H; Klis, F M

    1997-12-01

    Use of the Von Heijne algorithm allowed the identification of 686 open reading frames (ORFs) in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that encode proteins with a potential N-terminal signal sequence for entering the secretory pathway. On further analysis, 51 of these proteins contain a potential glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-attachment signal. Seven additional ORFs were found to belong to this group. Upon examination of the possible GPI-attachment sites, it was found that in yeast the most probable amino acids for GPI-attachment as asparagine and glycine. In yeast, GPI-proteins are found at the cell surface, either attached to the plasma-membrane or as an intrinsic part of the cell wall. It was noted that plasma-membrane GPI-proteins possess a dibasic residue motif just before their predicted GPI-attachment site. Based on this, and on homologies between proteins, families of plasma-membrane and cell wall proteins were assigned, revealing 20 potential plasma-membrane and 38 potential cell wall proteins. For members of three plasma-membrane protein families, a function has been described. On the other hand, most of the cell wall proteins seem to be structural components of the wall, responsive to different growth conditions. The GPI-attachment site of yeast slightly differs from mammalian cells. This might be of use in the development of anti-fungal drugs.

  2. Preferential transfer of certain plasma membrane proteins onto T and B cells by trogocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Daubeuf

    Full Text Available T and B cells capture antigens via membrane fragments of antigen presenting cells (APC in a process termed trogocytosis. Whether (and how a preferential transfer of some APC components occurs during trogocytosis is still largely unknown. We analyzed the transfer onto murine T and B cells of a large panel of fluorescent proteins with different intra-cellular localizations in the APC or various types of anchors in the plasma membrane (PM. Only the latter were transferred by trogocytosis, albeit with different efficiencies. Unexpectedly, proteins anchored to the PM's cytoplasmic face, or recruited to it via interaction with phosphinositides, were more efficiently transferred than those facing the outside of the cell. For proteins spanning the PM's whole width, transfer efficiency was found to vary quite substantially, with tetraspanins, CD4 and FcRgamma found among the most efficiently transferred proteins. We exploited our findings to set immunodiagnostic assays based on the capture of preferentially transferred components onto T or B cells. The preferential transfer documented here should prove useful in deciphering the cellular structures involved in trogocytosis.

  3. Criticality in Plasma Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machta, Benjamin; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Sethna, James; Veatch, Sarah

    2011-03-01

    We are motivated by recent observations of micron-sized critical fluctuations in the 2d Ising Universality class in plasma membrane vesicles that are isolated from cortical cytoskeleton. We construct a minimal model of the plasma membrane's interaction with intact cytoskeleton which explains why large scale phase separation has not been observed in Vivo. In addition, we use analytical techniques from conformal field theory and numerical simulations to investigate the form of effective forces mediated by the membrane's proximity to criticality. We show that the range of this force is maximized near a critical point and we quantify its usefulness in mediating communication using techniques from information theory. Finally we use theoretical techniques from statistical physics in conjunction with Monte-Carlo simulations to understand how criticality can be used to increase the efficiency of membrane bound receptor mediated signaling. We expect that this sort of analysis will be broadly useful in understanding and quantifying the role of lipid ``rafts'' in a wide variety of membrane bound processes. Generally, we demonstrate that critical fluctuations provide a physical mechanism to organize and spatially segregate membrane components by providing channels for interaction over relatively large distances.

  4. Actin Dynamics Regulates Voltage-Dependent Calcium-Permeable Channels of the Vicia faba Guard Cell Plasma Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Liu-Min Fan

    2009-01-01

    Free cytosolic Ca~(2+) ([Ca~(2+)]_(cyt)) is an ubiquitous second messenger in plant cell signaling, and [Ca~(2+)]_(cyt) elevation is associated with Ca~(2+)-permeable channels in the plasma membrane and endomembranes regulated by a wide range of stimuli. However, knowledge regarding Ca~(2+) channels and their regulation remains limited in planta. A type of voltage-dependent Ca~(2+)-permeable channel was identified and characterized for the Vicia faba L. guard cell plasma membrane by using patch-clamp techniques. These channels are permeable to both Ba~(2+) and Ca~(2+), and their activities can be inhibited by micromolar Gd~(3+). The unitary conductance and the reversal potential of the channels depend on the Ca~(2+) or Ba~(2+) gradients across the plasma membrane. The inward whole-cell Ca~(2+) (Ba~(2+)) current, as well as the unitary current amplitude and NP. of the single Ca~(2+) channel, increase along with the membrane hyperpolarization. Pharmacological experiments suggest that actin dynamics may serve as an upstream regulator of this type of calcium channel of the guard cell plasma membrane. Cytochalasin D, an actin polymerization blocker, activated the NP_o of these channels at the single channel level and increased the current amplitude at the whole-cell level. But these channel activations and current increments could be restrained by pretreatment with an F-actin stabilizer, phalloidin. The potential physiological significance of this regulatory mechanism is also discussed.

  5. Shotgun proteomics and network analysis between plasma membrane and extracellular matrix proteins from rat olfactory ensheathing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yisong; Teng, Xiaohua; Yang, Xiaoxu; Song, Qing; Lu, Rong; Xiong, Jixian; Liu, Bo; Zeng, Nianju; Zeng, Yu; Long, Jia; Cao, Rui; Lin, Yong; He, Quanze; Chen, Ping; Lu, Ming; Liang, Songping

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a special type of glial cells that have characteristics of both astrocytes and Schwann cells. Evidence suggests that the regenerative capacity of OECs is induced by soluble, secreted factors that influence their microenvironment. These factors may regulate OECs self-renewal and/or induce their capacity to augment spinal cord regeneration. Profiling of plasma membrane and extracellular matrix through a high-throughput expression proteomics approach was undertaken to identify plasma membrane and extracellular matrix proteins of OECs under serum-free conditions. 1D-shotgun proteomics followed with gene ontology (GO) analysis was used to screen proteins from primary culture rat OECs. Four hundred and seventy nonredundant plasma membrane proteins and 168 extracellular matrix proteins were identified, the majority of which were never before reported to be produced by OECs. Furthermore, plasma membrane and extracellular proteins were classified based on their protein-protein interaction predicted by STRING quantitatively integrates interaction data. The proteomic profiling of the OECs plasma membrane proteins and their connection with the secretome in serum-free culture conditions provides new insights into the nature of their in vivo microenvironmental niche. Proteomic analysis for the discovery of clinical biomarkers of OECs mechanism warrants further study.

  6. Cell Membrane Softening in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Händel, Chris; Käs, Josef

    Biomechanical properties are useful characteristics and regulators of the cell's state. Current research connects mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton to many cellular processes but does not investigate the biomechanics of the plasma membrane. We evaluated thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles, directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells and observed a lowered rigidity in the plasma membrane of malignant cells compared to non-malignant cells. To investigate the specific role of membrane rigidity changes, we treated two cell lines with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A. It changed the lipidome of cells and drastically increased membrane stiffness by up regulating short chained membrane lipids. These altered cells had a decreased motility in Boyden chamber assays. Our results indicate that the thermal fluctuations of the membrane, which are much smaller than the fluctuations driven by the cytoskeleton, can be modulated by the cell and have an impact on adhesion and motility.

  7. Increased plasma membrane cholesterol in cystic fibrosis cells correlates with CFTR genotype and depends on de novo cholesterol synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonawane Nitin D

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous observations demonstrate that Cftr-null cells and tissues exhibit alterations in cholesterol processing including perinuclear cholesterol accumulation, increased de novo synthesis, and an increase in plasma membrane cholesterol accessibility compared to wild type controls. The hypothesis of this study is that membrane cholesterol accessibility correlates with CFTR genotype and is in part influenced by de novo cholesterol synthesis. Methods Electrochemical detection of cholesterol at the plasma membrane is achieved with capillary microelectrodes with a modified platinum coil that accepts covalent attachment of cholesterol oxidase. Modified electrodes absent cholesterol oxidase serves as a baseline control. Cholesterol synthesis is determined by deuterium incorporation into lipids over time. Incorporation into cholesterol specifically is determined by mass spectrometry analysis. All mice used in the study are on a C57Bl/6 background and are between 6 and 8 weeks of age. Results Membrane cholesterol measurements are elevated in both R117H and ΔF508 mouse nasal epithelium compared to age-matched sibling wt controls demonstrating a genotype correlation to membrane cholesterol detection. Expression of wt CFTR in CF epithelial cells reverts membrane cholesterol to WT levels further demonstrating the impact of CFTR on these processes. In wt epithelial cell, the addition of the CFTR inhibitors, Gly H101 or CFTRinh-172, for 24 h surprisingly results in an initial drop in membrane cholesterol measurement followed by a rebound at 72 h suggesting a feedback mechanism may be driving the increase in membrane cholesterol. De novo cholesterol synthesis contributes to membrane cholesterol accessibility. Conclusions The data in this study suggest that CFTR influences cholesterol trafficking to the plasma membrane, which when depleted, leads to an increase in de novo cholesterol synthesis to restore membrane content.

  8. Rotavirus NSP4: Cell type-dependent transport kinetics to the exofacial plasma membrane and release from intact infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parr Rebecca D

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus NSP4 localizes to multiple intracellular sites and is multifunctional, contributing to RV morphogenesis, replication and pathogenesis. One function of NSP4 is the induction of early secretory diarrhea by binding surface receptors to initiate signaling events. The aims of this study were to determine the transport kinetics of NSP4 to the exofacial plasma membrane (PM, the subsequent release from intact infected cells, and rebinding to naïve and/or neighboring cells in two cell types. Methods Transport kinetics was evaluated using surface-specific biotinylation/streptavidin pull-downs and exofacial exposure of NSP4 was confirmed by antibody binding to intact cells, and fluorescent resonant energy transfer. Transfected cells similarly were monitored to discern NSP4 movement in the absence of infection or other viral proteins. Endoglycosidase H digestions, preparation of CY3- or CY5- labeled F(ab2 fragments, confocal imaging, and determination of preferential polarized transport employed standard laboratory techniques. Mock-infected, mock-biotinylated and non-specific antibodies served as controls. Results Only full-length (FL, endoglycosidase-sensitive NSP4 was detected on the exofacial surface of two cell types, whereas the corresponding cell lysates showed multiple glycosylated forms. The C-terminus of FL NSP4 was detected on exofacial-membrane surfaces at different times in different cell types prior to its release into culture media. Transport to the PM was rapid and distinct yet FL NSP4 was secreted from both cell types at a time similar to the release of virus. NSP4-containing, clarified media from both cells bound surface molecules of naïve cells, and imaging showed secreted NSP4 from one or more infected cells bound neighboring cell membranes in culture. Preferential sorting to apical or basolateral membranes also was distinct in different polarized cells. Conclusions The intracellular transport of NSP4 to

  9. Increased plasma membrane cholesterol in cystic fibrosis cells correlates with CFTR genotype and depends on de novo cholesterol synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sonawane Nitin D; Previs Stephen F; Jiang Dechen; Ruddy Jennifer; Manson Mary E; West Richard H; Fang Danjun; Burgess James D; Kelley Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous observations demonstrate that Cftr-null cells and tissues exhibit alterations in cholesterol processing including perinuclear cholesterol accumulation, increased de novo synthesis, and an increase in plasma membrane cholesterol accessibility compared to wild type controls. The hypothesis of this study is that membrane cholesterol accessibility correlates with CFTR genotype and is in part influenced by de novo cholesterol synthesis. Methods Electrochemical detectio...

  10. Virus movements on the plasma membrane support infection and transmission between cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph J Burckhardt

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available How viruses are transmitted across the mucosal epithelia of the respiratory, digestive, or excretory tracts, and how they spread from cell to cell and cause systemic infections, is incompletely understood. Recent advances from single virus tracking experiments have revealed conserved patterns of virus movements on the plasma membrane, including diffusive motions, drifting motions depending on retrograde flow of actin filaments or actin tail formation by polymerization, and confinement to submicrometer areas. Here, we discuss how viruses take advantage of cellular mechanisms that normally drive the movements of proteins and lipids on the cell surface. A concept emerges where short periods of fast diffusive motions allow viruses to rapidly move over several micrometers. Coupling to actin flow supports directional transport of virus particles during entry and cell-cell transmission, and local confinement coincides with either nonproductive stalling or infectious endocytic uptake. These conserved features of virus-host interactions upstream of infectious entry offer new perspectives for anti-viral interference.

  11. Grb10 deletion enhances muscle cell proliferation, differentiation and GLUT4 plasma membrane translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokbel, Nancy; Hoffman, Nolan J; Girgis, Christian M; Small, Lewin; Turner, Nigel; Daly, Roger J; Cooney, Gregory J; Holt, Lowenna J

    2014-11-01

    Grb10 is an intracellular adaptor protein which binds directly to several growth factor receptors, including those for insulin and insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1), and negatively regulates their actions. Grb10-ablated (Grb10(-/-) ) mice exhibit improved whole body glucose homeostasis and an increase in muscle mass associated specifically with an increase in myofiber number. This suggests that Grb10 may act as a negative regulator of myogenesis. In this study, we investigated in vitro, the molecular mechanisms underlying the increase in muscle mass and the improved glucose metabolism. Primary muscle cells isolated from Grb10(-/-) mice exhibited increased rates of proliferation and differentiation compared to primary cells isolated from wild-type mice. The improved proliferation capacity was associated with an enhanced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK in the basal state and changes in the expression of key cell cycle progression markers involved in regulating transition of cells from the G1 to S phase (e.g., retinoblastoma (Rb) and p21). The absence of Grb10 also promoted a faster transition to a myogenin positive, differentiated state. Glucose uptake was higher in Grb10(-/-) primary myotubes in the basal state and was associated with enhanced insulin signaling and an increase in GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. These data demonstrate an important role for Grb10 as a link between muscle growth and metabolism with therapeutic implications for diseases, such as muscle wasting and type 2 diabetes.

  12. Peptide translocation through the plasma membrane of human cells: Can oxidative stress be exploited to gain better intracellular access?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Yi; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) enter cells primarily by escaping from endosomal compartments or by directly translocating across the plasma membrane. Due to their capability of permeating into the cytosolic space of the cell, CPPs are utilized for the delivery of cell-impermeable molecules. However, the fundamental mechanisms and parameters associated with the penetration of CPPs and their cargos through the lipid bilayer have not been fully determined. This in turn has hampered their usage in biotechnological or therapeutic applications. We have recently reported that the cell penetration activity of poly-arginine CPPs (PACPPs) is dependent on the oxidation status of the plasma membrane of cells. Our data support a model where the positively-charged PACPP binds negatively-charged lipids exposed on the cell surface as a result of oxidative damage. The PACPP then crosses the membrane via formation of inverted micelles with these anionic lipids. This model provides a plausible explanation for the high variability in the cell delivery efficiency of a PACPP often observed in different settings. Notably, taking into account the current literature describing the effects of lipid oxidation, our data point to a highly complex and underappreciated interplay between PACPPs and oxidized membrane species. Overall, a better understanding of oxidation-dependent cell penetration might provide a fundamental basis for development of optimal cell permeable peptides (including cyclic peptides, stapled peptides, peptoids, etc…) and of robust delivery protocols.

  13. Live cell plasma membranes do not exhibit a miscibility phase transition over a wide range of temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Il-Hyung; Saha, Suvrajit; Polley, Anirban; Huang, Hector; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan; Groves, Jay T

    2015-03-26

    Lipid/cholesterol mixtures derived from cell membranes as well as their synthetic reconstitutions exhibit well-defined miscibility phase transitions and critical phenomena near physiological temperatures. This suggests that lipid/cholesterol-mediated phase separation plays a role in the organization of live cell membranes. However, macroscopic lipid-phase separation is not generally observed in cell membranes, and the degree to which properties of isolated lipid mixtures are preserved in the cell membrane remain unknown. A fundamental property of phase transitions is that the variation of tagged particle diffusion with temperature exhibits an abrupt change as the system passes through the transition, even when the two phases are distributed in a nanometer-scale emulsion. We support this using a variety of Monte Carlo and atomistic simulations on model lipid membrane systems. However, temperature-dependent fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of labeled lipids and membrane-anchored proteins in live cell membranes shows a consistently smooth increase in the diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature. We find no evidence of a discrete miscibility phase transition throughout a wide range of temperatures: 14-37 °C. This contrasts the behavior of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) blebbed from the same cells, which do exhibit phase transitions and macroscopic phase separation. Fluorescence lifetime analysis of a DiI probe in both cases reveals a significant environmental difference between the live cell and the GPMV. Taken together, these data suggest the live cell membrane may avoid the miscibility phase transition inherent to its lipid constituents by actively regulating physical parameters, such as tension, in the membrane.

  14. FRET imaging in living maize cells reveals that plasma membrane aquaporins interact to regulate their subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelazny, Enric; Borst, Jan Willem; Muylaert, Mélanie; Batoko, Henri; Hemminga, Marcus A; Chaumont, François

    2007-07-24

    Zea mays plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (ZmPIPs) fall into two groups, ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s, that exhibit different water channel activities when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. ZmPIP1s are inactive, whereas ZmPIP2s induce a marked increase in the membrane osmotic water permeability coefficient, P(f). We previously showed that, in Xenopus oocytes, ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;1 interact to increase the cell P(f). Here, we report the localization and interaction of ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s in living maize cells. ZmPIPs were fused to monomeric yellow fluorescent protein and/or monomeric cyan fluorescent protein and expressed transiently in maize mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed alone, ZmPIP1 fusion proteins were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas ZmPIP2s were found in the plasma membrane. Interestingly, when coexpressed with ZmPIP2s, ZmPIP1s were relocalized to the plasma membrane. Using FRET/fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we demonstrated that this relocalization results from interaction between ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s. Immunoprecipitation experiments provided additional evidence for the association of ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;1 in maize roots and suspension cells. These data suggest that PIP1-PIP2 interaction is required for in planta PIP1 trafficking to the plasma membrane to modulate plasma membrane permeability. PMID:17636130

  15. STARD4 knockdown in HepG2 cells disrupts cholesterol trafficking associated with the plasma membrane, ER, and ERC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbarino, J.; Pan, M. H.; Chin, H. F.;

    2012-01-01

    small hairpin RNA knockdown technology to reduce STARD4 expression in HepG2 cells. In a cholesterol-poor environment, we found that a reduction in STARD4 expression leads to retention of cholesterol at the plasma membrane, reduction of endoplasmic reticulum-associated cholesterol, and decreased ACAT...... membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment to the endoplasmic reticulum and perhaps other intracellular compartments as well. -Garbarino, J., M. Pan, H.F. Chin, F.W. Lund, F.R. Maxfield, and J.L. Breslow. STARD4 knockdown in HepG2 cells disrupts cholesterol trafficking associated with the plasma...... membrane, ER, and ERC. J. Lipid Res. 2012. 53: 2716-2725....

  16. Detailed search for protein kinase(s) involved in plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity regulation of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Renata R; Castanheira, Diogo; Teixeira, Janaina A; Bouillet, Leoneide E M; Ribeiro, Erica M C; Trópia, Maria M J; Alvarez, Florencia; Correa, Lygia F M; Mota, Bruno E F; Conceição, Luis Eduardo F R; Castro, Ieso M; Brandão, Rogelio L

    2015-03-01

    This study displays a screening using yeast strains deficient in protein kinases known to exist in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. From 95 viable single mutants, 20 mutants appear to be affected in the glucose-induced extracellular acidification. The mutants that are unaffected in calcium signaling were tested for their sensitivity to hygromycin B. Furthermore, we verified whether the remaining mutants produced enzymes that are appropriately incorporated at plasma membrane. Finally, we measure the kinetic properties of the enzyme in purified plasma membranes from glucose-starved as well as glucose-fermenting cells. We confirmed the kinase Ptk2 involvement in H(+)-ATPase regulation (increase of affinity for ATP). However, the identification of the kinase(s) responsible for phosphorylation that leads to an increase in Vmax appears to be more complex. Complementary experiments were performed to check how those protein kinases could be related to the control of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and/or the potential membrane. In summary, our results did not permit us to identify the protein kinase(s) involved in regulating the catalytic efficiency of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. Therefore, our results indicate that the current regulatory model based on the phosphorylation of two different sites located in the C-terminus tail of the enzyme could be inappropriate.

  17. Membrane cholesterol regulates lysosome-plasma membrane fusion events and modulates Trypanosoma cruzi invasion of host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Hissa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi are able to invade several types of non-phagocytic cells through a lysosomal dependent mechanism. It has been shown that, during invasion, parasites trigger host cell lysosome exocytosis, which initially occurs at the parasite-host contact site. Acid sphingomyelinase released from lysosomes then induces endocytosis and parasite internalization. Lysosomes continue to fuse with the newly formed parasitophorous vacuole until the parasite is completely enclosed by lysosomal membrane, a process indispensable for a stable infection. Previous work has shown that host membrane cholesterol is also important for the T. cruzi invasion process in both professional (macrophages and non-professional (epithelial phagocytic cells. However, the mechanism by which cholesterol-enriched microdomains participate in this process has remained unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present work we show that cardiomyocytes treated with MβCD, a drug able to sequester cholesterol from cell membranes, leads to a 50% reduction in invasion by T. cruzi trypomastigotes, as well as a decrease in the number of recently internalized parasites co-localizing with lysosomal markers. Cholesterol depletion from host membranes was accompanied by a decrease in the labeling of host membrane lipid rafts, as well as excessive lysosome exocytic events during the earlier stages of treatment. Precocious lysosomal exocytosis in MβCD treated cells led to a change in lysosomal distribution, with a reduction in the number of these organelles at the cell periphery, and probably compromises the intracellular pool of lysosomes necessary for T. cruzi invasion. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these results, we propose that cholesterol depletion leads to unregulated exocytic events, reducing lysosome availability at the cell cortex and consequently compromise T. cruzi entry into host cells. The results also suggest that two different pools of

  18. Pericellular Hyaluronan Coat Visualized in Live Cells With a Fluorescent Probe Is Scaffolded by Plasma Membrane Protrusions

    OpenAIRE

    Rilla, Kirsi; Tiihonen, Riikka; Kultti, Anne; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija

    2008-01-01

    Many cell types wear up to 20-μm-wide hyaluronidase-sensitive surface coats, detected by exclusion of sedimenting particles like fixed erythrocytes. The structure of the coat is enigmatic, being apparently too thick to be accounted by random coils or even extended chains of just hyaluronan attached to cell surface. We have shown that hyaluronan synthesis enforced by green fluorescent protein–hyaluronan synthase transfection creates microvillous protrusions. The idea that the plasma membrane p...

  19. Recycling endosomes in apical plasma membrane domain formation and epithelial cell polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golachowska, Magdalena R.; Hoekstra, Dick; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2010-01-01

    Recycling endosomes have taken central stage in the intracellular sorting and polarized trafficking of apical and basolateral plasma membrane components. Molecular players in the underlying mechanisms are now emerging, including small GTPases, class V myosins and adaptor proteins. In particular, def

  20. Studies on Freezing Injury in Plant Cells : II. Protein and Lipid Changes in the Plasma Membranes of Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers during a Lethal Freezing in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, M; Yoshida, S

    1986-01-01

    Plasma membranes were isolated from both unfrozen and frozen tissues of Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L.) in high purity utilizing an aqueous two-polymer phase partition system. Although the recovery of the plasma membranes was decreased significantly by freezing of tissues even at the nonlethal temperature (-5 degrees C), the isolated plasma membrane samples were considered to be representative of the plasma membranes in situ. Freezing of the tissues at sublethal temperatures resulted in marked changes in the chemical composition of the plasma membrane. Those are losses of sterols and phosphatidylethanolamine from the plasma membranes, and a change of specific proteins with relatively high molecular weights into low molecular weight peptides. These specific proteins were designated as frost susceptible proteins. The properties of the plasma membrane ATPase seem to be not affected so much by the in vivo freezing of cells. However, inhibition of the plasma membrane ATPase by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) was relatively low before and after freezing in vivo at the nonlethal temperature at -5 degrees C, but was markedly enhanced by freezing in vivo at sublethal temperatures below -10 degrees C. From the results, it is assumed either that the enzyme molecule was partially modified, especially at the presumed DCCD binding sites or that the DCCD had become more accessible to the enzyme as a result of increased permeability of the plasma membranes. These observed changes are discussed in connection with the mechanism of cell injury. PMID:16664579

  1. Effects of cholesterol on plasma membrane lipid order in MCF-7 cells by two-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yixiu; Chen, Jianling; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and glycosphingolipids- enriched microdomains on plasma membrane surface of mammal cells, involved in a variety of cellular processes. Depleting cholesterol from the plasma membrane by drugs influences the trafficking of lipid raft markers. Optical imaging techniques are powerful tools to study lipid rafts in live cells due to its noninvasive feature. In this study, breast cancer cells MCF-7 were treated with different concentrations of MβCD to deplete cholesterol and an environmentally sensitive fluorescence probe, Laurdan was loaded to image lipid order by two-photon microscopy. The generalized polarization (GP) values were calculated to distinguish the lipid order and disorder phase. GP images and GP distributions of native and cholesterol-depleted MCF-7 cells were obtained. Our results suggest that even at low concentration (0.5 mM) of MβCD, the morphology of the MCF-7 cells changes. Small high GP areas (lipid order phase) decrease more rapidly than low GP areas (lipid disorder phase), indicating that lipid raft structure was altered more severely than nonraft domains. The data demonstrates that cholesterol dramatically affect raft coverage and plasma membrane fluidity in living cells.

  2. The Delta F508 mutation shortens the biochemical half-life of plasma membrane CFTR in polarized epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heda, G D; Tanwani, M; Marino, C R

    2001-01-01

    Although the biosynthetic arrest of the DeltaF508 mutant of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) can be partially reversed by physical and chemical means, recent evidence suggests that the functional stability of the mutant protein after reaching the cell surface is compromised. To understand the molecular basis for this observation, the current study directly measured the half-life of Delta F508 and wild-type CFTR at the cell surface of transfected LLC-PK(1) cells. Plasma membrane CFTR expression over time was characterized biochemically and functionally in these polarized epithelial cells. Surface biotinylation, streptavidin extraction, and quantitative immunoblot analysis determined the biochemical half-life of plasma membrane DeltaF508 CFTR to be approximately 4 h, whereas the plasma membrane half-life of wild-type CFTR exceeded 48 h. This difference in biochemical stability correlated with CFTR-mediated transport function. These findings indicate that the Delta F508 mutation decreases the biochemical stability of CFTR at the cell surface. We conclude that the Delta F508 mutation triggers more rapid internalization of CFTR and/or its preferential sorting to a pathway of rapid degradation. PMID:11121388

  3. Autocrine Signaling Underlies Fast Repetitive Plasma Membrane Translocation of Conventional and Novel Protein Kinase C Isoforms in β Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Anne; Yu, Qian; Tengholm, Anders

    2016-07-15

    PKC signaling has been implicated in the regulation of many cell functions, including metabolism, cell death, proliferation, and secretion. Activation of conventional and novel PKC isoforms is associated with their Ca(2+)- and/or diacylglycerol (DAG)-dependent translocation to the plasma membrane. In β cells, exocytosis of insulin granules evokes brief (<10 s) local DAG elevations ("spiking") at the plasma membrane because of autocrine activation of P2Y1 purinoceptors by ATP co-released with insulin. Using total internal reflection microscopy, fluorescent protein-tagged PKCs, and signaling biosensors, we investigated whether DAG spiking causes membrane recruitment of PKCs and whether different classes of PKCs show characteristic responses. Glucose stimulation of MIN6 cells triggered DAG spiking with concomitant repetitive translocation of the novel isoforms PKCδ, PKCϵ, and PKCη. The conventional PKCα, PKCβI, and PKCβII isoforms showed a more complex pattern with both rapid and slow translocation. K(+) depolarization-induced PKCϵ translocation entirely mirrored DAG spiking, whereas PKCβI translocation showed a sustained component, reflecting the subplasma membrane Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]pm), with additional effect during DAG spikes. Interference with DAG spiking by purinoceptor inhibition prevented intermittent translocation of PKCs and reduced insulin secretion but did not affect [Ca(2+)]pm elevation or sustained PKCβI translocation. The muscarinic agonist carbachol induced pronounced transient PKCβI translocation and sustained recruitment of PKCϵ. When rise of [Ca(2+)]pm was prevented, the carbachol-induced DAG and PKCϵ responses were somewhat reduced, but PKCβI translocation was completely abolished. We conclude that exocytosis-induced DAG spikes efficiently recruit both conventional and novel PKCs to the β cell plasma membrane. PKC signaling is thus implicated in autocrine regulation of β cell function.

  4. Autocrine Signaling Underlies Fast Repetitive Plasma Membrane Translocation of Conventional and Novel Protein Kinase C Isoforms in β Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Anne; Yu, Qian; Tengholm, Anders

    2016-01-01

    PKC signaling has been implicated in the regulation of many cell functions, including metabolism, cell death, proliferation, and secretion. Activation of conventional and novel PKC isoforms is associated with their Ca2+- and/or diacylglycerol (DAG)-dependent translocation to the plasma membrane. In β cells, exocytosis of insulin granules evokes brief (<10 s) local DAG elevations (“spiking”) at the plasma membrane because of autocrine activation of P2Y1 purinoceptors by ATP co-released with insulin. Using total internal reflection microscopy, fluorescent protein-tagged PKCs, and signaling biosensors, we investigated whether DAG spiking causes membrane recruitment of PKCs and whether different classes of PKCs show characteristic responses. Glucose stimulation of MIN6 cells triggered DAG spiking with concomitant repetitive translocation of the novel isoforms PKCδ, PKCϵ, and PKCη. The conventional PKCα, PKCβI, and PKCβII isoforms showed a more complex pattern with both rapid and slow translocation. K+ depolarization-induced PKCϵ translocation entirely mirrored DAG spiking, whereas PKCβI translocation showed a sustained component, reflecting the subplasma membrane Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]pm), with additional effect during DAG spikes. Interference with DAG spiking by purinoceptor inhibition prevented intermittent translocation of PKCs and reduced insulin secretion but did not affect [Ca2+]pm elevation or sustained PKCβI translocation. The muscarinic agonist carbachol induced pronounced transient PKCβI translocation and sustained recruitment of PKCϵ. When rise of [Ca2+]pm was prevented, the carbachol-induced DAG and PKCϵ responses were somewhat reduced, but PKCβI translocation was completely abolished. We conclude that exocytosis-induced DAG spikes efficiently recruit both conventional and novel PKCs to the β cell plasma membrane. PKC signaling is thus implicated in autocrine regulation of β cell function. PMID:27226533

  5. The plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekberg, Kira

      The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded H+-ATPases extrude protons from cells...... of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. A recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Together with biochemical and structural data presented in this thesis we are now able...... to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H+-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. Moreover, a completely new paradigm for post-translational activation of these proteins is presented. The talk will focus on the following themes...

  6. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images.

  7. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images. PMID:23085529

  8. Optical emission spectroscopy characterizations of micro-air plasma used for simulation of cell membrane poration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerrouki, A.; Motomura, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Jinno, M.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-07-01

    K. Then, \\text{N}2+ (FNS) for (0,0) and (1,1) head bands spectra at 391.4 nm and 388.4 nm allowed estimation of the vibrational temperature T vib from around 3000 K near the tip electrode up to about 6500 K near the plate. Last, the spatial variation along the z axis of the nitrogen ion density has been determined, with an error bar of about 50%, from the relative intensities of the same close wavelength spectra (N2(SPS) at 394.3 nm and \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm) when assuming a prior calibration of 1015 cm-3 at z  =  0 mm taken from literature streamer dynamics simulations. The present experimental plasma characteristics are used to better understand the mechanisms and the processes involved during plasma gene transfections in a Monte Carlo poration model previously developed to simulate the membrane permeabilization and pore formation when the cells are impacted by the present micro-air plasma fluxes.

  9. Identification and characterization of plasma membrane aquaporins isolated from fiber cells of Calotropis procera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Usman; Khatoon, Asia; Cheema, Hafiza Masooma Naseer; Bashir, Aftab

    2013-07-01

    Calotropis procera, commonly known as "milkweed", possesses long seed trichomes for seed dispersal and has the ability to survive under harsh conditions such as drought and salinity. Aquaporins are water channel proteins expressed in all land plants, divided into five subfamilies plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), NOD26-like proteins (NIPs), small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs), and the unfamiliar X intrinsic proteins (XIPs). PIPs constitute the largest group of water channel proteins that are involved in different developmental and regulatory mechanisms including water permeability, cell elongation, and stomata opening. Aquaporins are also involved in abiotic stress tolerance and cell expansion mechanisms, but their role in seed trichomes (fiber cells) has never been investigated. A large number of clones isolated from C. procera fiber cDNA library showed sequence homology to PIPs. Both expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies revealed that the transcript abundance of this gene family in fiber cells of C. procera is greater than that of cotton. Full-length cDNAs of CpPIP1 and CpPIP2 were isolated from C. procera fiber cDNA library and used for constructing plant expression vectors under constitutive (2×35S) and trichome-specific (GhLTP3) promoters. Transgenic tobacco plants were developed via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The phenotypic characteristics of the plants were observed after confirming the integration of transgene in plants. It was observed that CpPIP2 expression cassette under 2×35S and GhLTP3 promoter enhanced the numbers of stem and leave trichomes. However, 2×35S::CpPIP2 has a more amplified effect on trichome density and length than GhLTP3::CpPIP2 and other PIP constructs. These findings imply the role of C. procera PIP aquaporins in fiber cell elongation. The PIPs-derived cell expansion mechanism may be exploited through transgenic approaches for

  10. Identification and characterization of plasma membrane aquaporins isolated from fiber cells of Calotropis procera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Usman ASLAM; Asia KHATOON; Hafiza Masooma Naseer CHEEMA; Aftab BASHIR

    2013-01-01

    Calotropis procera,commonly known as "milkweed",possesses long seed trichomes for seed dispersal and has the ability to survive under harsh conditions such as drought and salinity.Aquaporins are water channel proteins expressed in all land plants,divided into five subfamilies plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs),tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs),NOD26-1ike proteins (NIPs),small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs),and the unfamiliar X intrinsic proteins (XlPs).PIPs constitute the largest group of water channel proteins that are involved in different developmental and regulatory mechanisms including water permeability,cell elongation,and stomata opening.Aquaporins are also involved in abiotic stress tolerance and cell expansion mechanisms,but their role in seed trichomes (fiber cells) has never been investigated.A large number of clones isolated from C.procera fiber cDNA library showed sequence homology to PIPs.Both expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies revealed that the transcript abundance of this gene family in fiber cells of C.procera is greater than that of cotton.Full-length cDNAs of CpPIP1 and CpPIP2 were isolated from C.procera fiber cDNA library and used for constructing plant expression vectors under constitutive (2x35S) and trichome-specific (GhLTP3) promoters.Transgenic tobacco plants were developed via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.The phenotypic characteristics of the plants were observed after confirming the integration of transgene in plants.It was observed that CpPIP2 expression cassette under 2x35S and GhLTP3 promoter enhanced the numbers of stem and leave trichomes.However,2x35S::CpPIP2 has a more amplified effect on trichome density and length than GhLTP3::CpPIP2 and other PIP constructs.These findings imply the role of C.procera PIP aquaporins in fiber cell elongation.The PIPs-derived cell expansion mechanism may be exploited through transgenic approaches for improvement of fiber staple

  11. A model for the biosynthesis and transport of plasma membrane-associated signaling receptors to the cell surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorina Claudia Popescu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular protein transport is emerging as critical in determining the outcome of receptor-activated signal transduction pathways. In plants, relatively little is known about the nature of the molecular components and mechanisms involved in coordinating receptor synthesis and transport to the cell surface. Recent advances in this field indicate that signaling pathways and intracellular transport machinery converge and coordinate to render receptors competent for signaling at their plasma membrane activity sites. The biogenesis and transport to the cell surface of signaling receptors appears to require both general trafficking and receptor-specific factors. Several molecular determinants, residing or associated with compartments of the secretory pathway and known to influence aspects in receptor biogenesis, are discussed and integrated into a predictive cooperative model for the functional expression of signaling receptors at the plasma membrane.

  12. Internalization of components of the host cell plasma membrane during infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho TMU

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi attach to the macrophage surface and are internalized with the formation of a membrane bounded vacuole, known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV. In order to determine if components of the host cell membrane are internalized during formation of the PV we labeled the macrophage surface with fluorescent probes for proteins, lipids and sialic acid residues and then allowed the labeled cells to interact with the parasites. The interaction process was interrupted after 1 hr at 37ºC and the distribution of the probes analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. During attachment of the parasites to the macrophage surface an intense labeling of the attachment regions was observed. Subsequently labeling of the membrane lining the parasitophorous vacuole containing epimastigote and trypomastigote forms was seen. Labeling was not uniform, with regions of intense and light or no labeling. The results obtained show that host cell membrane lipids, proteins and sialoglycoconjugates contribute to the formation of the membrane lining the PV containing epimastigote and trypomastigote T. cruzi forms. Lysosomes of the host cell may participate in the process of PV membrane formation.

  13. Identification and characterization of plasma membrane aquaporins isolated from fiber cells of Calotropis procera

    OpenAIRE

    Aslam, Usman; Khatoon, Asia; Cheema, Hafiza Masooma Naseer; Bashir, Aftab

    2013-01-01

    Calotropis procera, commonly known as “milkweed”, possesses long seed trichomes for seed dispersal and has the ability to survive under harsh conditions such as drought and salinity. Aquaporins are water channel proteins expressed in all land plants, divided into five subfamilies plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), NOD26-like proteins (NIPs), small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs), and the unfamiliar X intrinsic proteins (XIPs). PIPs constitute the l...

  14. Growth Conditions and Cell Cycle Phase Modulate Phase Transition Temperatures in RBL-2H3 Derived Plasma Membrane Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Gray

    Full Text Available Giant plasma membrane vesicle (GPMV isolated from a flask of RBL-2H3 cells appear uniform at physiological temperatures and contain coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases at low temperatures. While a single GPMV transitions between these two states at a well-defined temperature, there is significant vesicle-to-vesicle heterogeneity in a single preparation of cells, and average transition temperatures can vary significantly between preparations. In this study, we explore how GPMV transition temperatures depend on growth conditions, and find that average transition temperatures are negatively correlated with average cell density over 15°C in transition temperature and nearly three orders of magnitude in average surface density. In addition, average transition temperatures are reduced by close to 10°C when GPMVs are isolated from cells starved of serum overnight, and elevated transition temperatures are restored when serum-starved cells are incubated in serum-containing media for 12 h. We also investigated variation in transition temperature of GPMVs isolated from cells synchronized at the G1/S border through a double Thymidine block and find that average transition temperatures are systematically higher in GPMVs produced from G1 or M phase cells than in GPMVs prepared from S or G1 phase cells. Reduced miscibility transition temperatures are also observed in GPMVs prepared from cells treated with TRAIL to induce apoptosis or sphingomyelinase, and in some cases a gel phase is observed at temperatures above the miscibility transition in these vesicles. We conclude that at least some variability in GPMV transition temperature arises from variation in the local density of cells and asynchrony of the cell cycle. It is hypothesized that GPMV transition temperatures are a proxy for the magnitude of lipid-mediated membrane heterogeneity in intact cell plasma membranes at growth temperatures. If so, these results suggest that cells tune

  15. Generation, modulation and maintenance of the plasma membrane asymmetric phospholipid composition in yeast cells during growth: their relation to surface potential and membrane protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbón, J; Calderón, V

    1995-04-12

    During growth a cyclic exposure of anionic phospholipids to the external surface of the plasma membrane was found. The surface charge density (sigma) increased gradually reaching a maximum in the first 5 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial value at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth (10-12 h). Phosphatidylinositol, that determines to a large extent the magnitude of the sigma, increased 83% in the yeast cells during the first 4 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial level at 10-12 h. During the stationary phase (12-24 h), both sigma and the anionic/zwitterionic phospholipid ratio, remained without any significant variation. The high-affinity H-linked glutamate transport system that behaves as a sensor of the changes in the membrane surface potential (phi) increased its activity in the first 5 h and then decreased it, following with great accuracy the sigma variations and remained without changes during the stationary phase of growth. The phosphatidylserine (PS) relative concentration in the cells (9.0%) did not significantly change during the whole growth curve, but their asymmetric distribution varied, contributing to the changes in sigma. PS facing the outer membrane surface increased 2.45-times during the first 5 h of growth and then returned to their original value at the end of the log phase (12 h). Phosphatidylcholine (PC) remained constant during the whole growth curve (50%), while phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) decreased 3-fold in the first 4 h and then increased to its original value at 10 h. Interestingly, PE at the outer membrane surface remained constant (3% of the total phospholipids) during the whole growth curve. During growth yeast cells change their phospholipid composition originating altered patterns of the plasma membrane phospholipid composition and IN-OUT distribution. This dynamic asymmetry is involved in the regulation of the surface potential and membrane protein activity. PMID:7718598

  16. Metastasis-related plasma membrane proteins of human breast cancer cells identified by comparative quantitative mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lund, Rikke; Hansen, Helle V;

    2009-01-01

    '-nucleotidase (ecto-5'-NT, CD73), Ndrg1, integrin beta1, CD44, CD74 and MHC class II proteins. The altered expression levels of proteins identified by LC-MS/MS were validated using flow cytometry, Western blotting, immunocyto- and immunohisto-chemistry. Analysis of clinical breast cancer biopsies demonstrated......The spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to form metastasis at distant sites is a complex multi-step process. The cancer cell proteins, and plasma membrane proteins in particular, involved in this process are poorly defined and a study of the very early events of the metastatic process using...... clinical samples or in vitro assays is not feasible. We have used a unique model system consisting of two isogenic human breast cancer cell lines that are equally tumorigenic in mice, but while one gives rise to metastasis, the other disseminates single cells that remain dormant at distant organs. Membrane...

  17. Membrane Properties Involved in Calcium-Stimulated Microparticle Release from the Plasma Membranes of S49 Lymphoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauryl E. Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study answered the question of whether biophysical mechanisms for microparticle shedding discovered in platelets and erythrocytes also apply to nucleated cells: cytoskeletal disruption, potassium efflux, transbilayer phospholipid migration, and membrane disordering. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, disrupted the actin cytoskeleton of S49 lymphoma cells and produced rapid release of microparticles. This release was significantly inhibited by interventions that impaired calcium-activated potassium current. Microparticle release was also greatly reduced in a lymphocyte cell line deficient in the expression of scramblase, the enzyme responsible for calcium-stimulated dismantling of the normal phospholipid transbilayer asymmetry. Rescue of the scrambling function at high ionophore concentration also resulted in enhanced particle shedding. The effect of membrane physical properties was addressed by varying the experimental temperature (32–42°C. A significant positive trend in the rate of microparticle release as a function of temperature was observed. Fluorescence experiments with trimethylammonium diphenylhexatriene and Patman revealed significant decrease in the level of apparent membrane order along that temperature range. These results demonstrated that biophysical mechanisms involved in microparticle release from platelets and erythrocytes apply also to lymphocytes.

  18. Surface Electrical Potentials of Root Cell Plasma Membranes: Implications for Ion Interactions, Rhizotoxicity, and Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Min Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many crop plants are exposed to heavy metals and other metals that may intoxicate the crop plants themselves or consumers of the plants. The rhizotoxicity of heavy metals is influenced strongly by the root cell plasma membrane (PM surface’s electrical potential (ψ0. The usually negative ψ0 is created by negatively charged constituents of the PM. Cations in the rooting medium are attracted to the PM surface and anions are repelled. Addition of ameliorating cations (e.g., Ca2+ and Mg2+ to the rooting medium reduces the effectiveness of cationic toxicants (e.g., Cu2+ and Pb2+ and increases the effectiveness of anionic toxicants (e.g., SeO42− and H2AsO4−. Root growth responses to ions are better correlated with ion activities at PM surfaces ({IZ}0 than with activities in the bulk-phase medium ({IZ}b (IZ denotes an ion with charge Z. Therefore, electrostatic effects play a role in heavy metal toxicity that may exceed the role of site-specific competition between toxicants and ameliorants. Furthermore, ψ0 controls the transport of ions across the PM by influencing both {IZ}0 and the electrical potential difference across the PM from the outer surface to the inner surface (Em,surf. Em,surf is a component of the driving force for ion fluxes across the PM and controls ion-channel voltage gating. Incorporation of {IZ}0 and Em,surf into quantitative models for root metal toxicity and uptake improves risk assessments of toxic metals in the environment. These risk assessments will improve further with future research on the application of electrostatic theory to heavy metal phytotoxicity in natural soils and aquatic environments.

  19. Proteomics of MUC1-containing lipid rafts from plasma membranes and exosomes of human breast carcinoma cells MCF-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staubach, Simon; Razawi, Hanieh; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2009-05-01

    Apically expressed human MUC1 is known to become endocytosed and either to re-enter the secretory pathway for recycling to the plasma membrane or to be exported by the cells via the formation of multi-vesicular bodies and the release of exosomes. By using recombinant fusion-tagged MUC1 as a bait protein we followed an anti-myc affinity-based approach for isolating subpopulations of lipid rafts from the plasma membranes and exosomes of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. MUC1(+) lipid rafts were not only found to contain genuine raft proteins (flotillin-1, prohibitin, G protein, annexin A2), but also raft-associated proteins linking these to the cytoskeleton (ezrin/villin-2, profilin II, HSP27, gamma-actin, beta-actin) or proteins in complexes with raft proteins, including the bait protein (HSP60, HSP70). Major overlaps were revealed for the subproteomes of plasma membranous and exosomal lipid raft preparations, indicating that MUC1 is sorted into subpopulations of rafts for its trafficking via flotillin-dependent pathways and export via exosomes.

  20. Fusion of liposomes with the plasma membrane of epithelial cells: Fate of incorporated lipids as followed by freeze fracture and autoradiography of plastic sections

    OpenAIRE

    Knoll, G.; Burger, K.N.J.; Bron, R.; van Meer, G.; Verkleij, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    The fusion of liposomes with the plasma membrane of influenza virus- infected monolayers of an epithelial cell line, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (van Meer et al., 1985. Biochemistry. 24:3593-3602), has been analyzed by morphological techniques. The distribution of liposomal lipids over the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains after fusion was assessed by autoradiography of liposomal [3H]dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine after rapid freezing or chemical fixation and further processi...

  1. Tetraspanin CD82 inhibits protrusion and retraction in cell movement by attenuating the plasma membrane-dependent actin organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei M Liu

    Full Text Available To determine how tetraspanin KAI1/CD82, a tumor metastasis suppressor, inhibits cell migration, we assessed which cellular events critical for motility are altered by KAI1/CD82 and how KAI1/CD82 regulates these events. We found that KAI1/CD82-expressing cells typically exhibited elongated cellular tails and diminished lamellipodia. Live imaging demonstrated that the polarized protrusion and retraction of the plasma membrane became deficient upon KAI1/CD82 expression. The deficiency in developing these motility-related cellular events was caused by poor formations of actin cortical network and stress fiber and by aberrant dynamics in actin organization. Rac1 activity was reduced by KAI1/CD82, consistent with the diminution of lamellipodia and actin cortical network; while the growth factor-stimulated RhoA activity was blocked by KAI1/CD82, consistent with the loss of stress fiber and attenuation in cellular retraction. Upon KAI1/CD82 expression, Rac effector cofilin was not enriched at the cell periphery to facilitate lamellipodia formation while Rho kinase exhibited a significantly lower activity leading to less retraction. Phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-biphosphate, which initiates actin polymerization from the plasma membrane, became less detectable at the cell periphery in KAI1/CD82-expressing cells. Moreover, KAI1/CD82-induced phenotypes likely resulted from the suppression of multiple signaling pathways such as integrin and growth factor signaling. In summary, at the cellular level KAI1/CD82 inhibited polarized protrusion and retraction events by disrupting actin reorganization; at the molecular level, KAI1/CD82 deregulated Rac1, RhoA, and their effectors cofilin and Rho kinase by perturbing the plasma membrane lipids.

  2. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangil; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho; Sik Yang, Sang; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  3. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kangil; Sik Yang, Sang, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-06

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  4. Microcompartments within the yeast plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzendorfer, Hans; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2013-02-01

    Recent research in cell biology makes it increasingly clear that the classical concept of compartmentation of eukaryotic cells into different organelles performing distinct functions has to be extended by microcompartmentation, i.e., the dynamic interaction of proteins, sugars, and lipids at a suborganellar level, which contributes significantly to a proper physiology. As different membrane compartments (MCs) have been described in the yeast plasma membrane, such as those defined by Can1 and Pma1 (MCCs and MCPs), Saccharomyces cerevisiae can serve as a model organism, which is amenable to genetic, biochemical, and microscopic studies. In this review, we compare the specialized microcompartment of the yeast bud neck with other plasma membrane substructures, focusing on eisosomes, cell wall integrity-sensing units, and chitin-synthesizing complexes. Together, they ensure a proper cell division at the end of mitosis, an intricately regulated process, which is essential for the survival and proliferation not only of fungal, but of all eukaryotic cells.

  5. Rice Hypersensitive Induced Reaction Protein 1 (OsHIR1 associates with plasma membrane and triggers hypersensitive cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Sai-Ming

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In plants, HIR (Hypersensitive Induced Reaction proteins, members of the PID (Proliferation, Ion and Death superfamily, have been shown to play a part in the development of spontaneous hypersensitive response lesions in leaves, in reaction to pathogen attacks. The levels of HIR proteins were shown to correlate with localized host cell deaths and defense responses in maize and barley. However, not much was known about the HIR proteins in rice. Since rice is an important cereal crop consumed by more than 50% of the populations in Asia and Africa, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms of disease responses in this plant. We previously identified the rice HIR1 (OsHIR1 as an interacting partner of the OsLRR1 (rice Leucine-Rich Repeat protein 1. Here we show that OsHIR1 triggers hypersensitive cell death and its localization to the plasma membrane is enhanced by OsLRR1. Result Through electron microscopy studies using wild type rice plants, OsHIR1 was found to mainly localize to the plasma membrane, with a minor portion localized to the tonoplast. Moreover, the plasma membrane localization of OsHIR1 was enhanced in transgenic rice plants overexpressing its interacting protein partner, OsLRR1. Co-localization of OsHIR1 and OsLRR1 to the plasma membrane was confirmed by double-labeling electron microscopy. Pathogen inoculation studies using transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana expressing either OsHIR1 or OsLRR1 showed that both transgenic lines exhibited increased resistance toward the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. However, OsHIR1 transgenic plants produced more extensive spontaneous hypersensitive response lesions and contained lower titers of the invading pathogen, when compared to OsLRR1 transgenic plants. Conclusion The OsHIR1 protein is mainly localized to the plasma membrane, and its subcellular localization in that compartment is enhanced by OsLRR1. The expression of OsHIR1 may sensitize the plant

  6. A laser microsurgical method of cell wall removal allows detection of large-conductance ion channels in the guard cell plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedema, H.; Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Application of patch clamp techniques to higher-plant cells has been subject to the limitation that the requisite contact of the patch electrode with the cell membrane necessitates prior enzymatic removal of the plant cell wall. Because the wall is an integral component of plant cells, and because cell-wall-degrading enzymes can disrupt membrane properties, such enzymatic treatments may alter ion channel behavior. We compared ion channel activity in enzymatically isolated protoplasts of Vicia faba guard cells with that found in membranes exposed by a laser microsurgical technique in which only a tiny portion of the cell wall is removed while the rest of the cell remains intact within its tissue environment. "Laser-assisted" patch clamping reveals a new category of high-conductance (130 to 361 pS) ion channels not previously reported in patch clamp studies on plant plasma membranes. These data indicate that ion channels are present in plant membranes that are not detected by conventional patch clamp techniques involving the production of individual plant protoplasts isolated from their tissue environment by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. Given the large conductances of the channels revealed by laser-assisted patch clamping, we hypothesize that these channels play a significant role in the regulation of ion content and electrical signalling in guard cells.

  7. [The Role of Membrane-Bound Heat Shock Proteins Hsp90 in Migration of Tumor Cells in vitro and Involvement of Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Protein Binding to Plasma Membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigireva, A V; Vrublevskaya, V V; Skarga, Y Y; Morenkov, O S

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein Hsp90, detected in the extracellular space and on the membrane of cells, plays an important role in cell motility, migration, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. At present, the functional role and molecular mechanisms of Hsp90 binding to plasma membrane are not elucidated. Using isoform-specific antibodies against Hsp90, Hsp9α and Hsp90β, we showed that membrane-bound Hsp90α and Hsp90β play a significant role in migration of human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) and glioblastoma (A-172) cells in vitro. Disorders of sulfonation of cell heparan sulfates, cleavage of cell heparan. sulfates by heparinase I/III as well as treatment of cells with heparin lead to an abrupt reduction in the expression level of Hsp90 isoforms. Furthermore, heparin significantly inhibits tumor cell migration. The results obtained demonstrate that two isoforms of membrane-bound Hsp90 are involved in migration of tumor cells in vitro and that cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans play a pivotal role in the "anchoring" of Hsp90α and Hsp90β to the plasma membrane.

  8. Effect of colchicine on rat small intestinal absorptive cells. II. Distribution of label after incorporation of [3H]fucose into plasma membrane glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of radioautography the influence was tested of various periods (5, 15, 30, 40 min, 2 hr) of pretreatment with colchicine, administered intraperitoneally to rats at a dosage of 0.5 mg/100 g of body weight, on the intracellular pathway of [3H]fucose in absorptive cells of the small intestine. Administration of colchicine for 30 min and longer time intervals causes delay in the insertion of [3H]fucose into the oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates in the Golgi apparatus, and results in redistribution of the label apparent over the different portions of the plasma membrane. In controls, at 2 and 4 hr after administration of [3H]fucose the apical plasma membrane is strongly labeled. Colchicine causes equalization of the reaction of apical and basolateral regions of the plasma membrane: the number of silver grains attributable to the apical plasma membrane is reduced; following treatment with colchicine, apical portions of the plasma membrane comprise 31.6 +/- 1.8% of the silver grains, 38.6 +/- 3.8% are attributable to basolateral membrane regions. The colchicine-induced equalization of the density of label of apical and basolateral regions of the plasma membrane, in addition to the occurrence of basolateral microvillus borders, suggests microtubules to be important in the maintenance of the polar organization of small intestinal absorptive cells

  9. Conformational changes and translocation of tissue-transglutaminase to the plasma membranes: role in cancer cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    membrane fractions and sensitive to intracellular Ca2+ concentration suggesting a calcium requirement in TG2-regulated cell migration. Taken together, we conclude that resveratrol induces conformational changes in TG2, and that Ca2+-mediated TG2 association with the plasma membrane is responsible for the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on cell migration

  10. Opioid-receptor (OR) signaling cascades in rat cerebral cortex and model cell lines: the role of plasma membrane structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujčíková, H; Brejchová, J; Vošahlíková, M; Kagan, D; Dlouhá, K; Sýkora, J; Merta, L; Drastichová, Z; Novotný, J; Ostašov, P; Roubalová, L; Parenti, M; Hof, M; Svoboda, P

    2014-01-01

    Large number of extracellular signals is received by plasma membrane receptors which, upon activation, transduce information into the target cell interior via trimeric G-proteins (GPCRs) and induce activation or inhibition of adenylyl cyclase enzyme activity (AC). Receptors for opioid drugs such as morphine (micro-OR, delta-OR and kappa-OR) belong to rhodopsin family of GPCRs. Our recent results indicated a specific up-regulation of AC I (8-fold) and AC II (2.5-fold) in plasma membranes (PM) isolated from rat brain cortex exposed to increasing doses of morphine (10-50 mg/kg) for 10 days. Increase of ACI and ACII represented the specific effect as the amount of ACIII-ACIX, prototypical PM marker Na, K-ATPase and trimeric G-protein alpha and beta subunits was unchanged. The up-regulation of ACI and ACII faded away after 20 days since the last dose of morphine. Proteomic analysis of these PM indicated that the brain cortex of morphine-treated animals cannot be regarded as being adapted to this drug because significant up-regulation of proteins functionally related to oxidative stress and alteration of brain energy metabolism occurred. The number of delta-OR was increased 2-fold and their sensitivity to monovalent cations was altered. Characterization of delta-OR-G-protein coupling in model HEK293 cell line indicated high ability of lithium to support affinity of delta-OR response to agonist stimulation. Our studies of PM structure and function in context with desensitization of GPCRs action were extended by data indicating participation of cholesterol-enriched membrane domains in agonist-specific internalization of delta-OR. In HEK293 cells stably expressing delta-OR-G(i)1alpha fusion protein, depletion of PM cholesterol was associated with the decrease in affinity of G-protein response to agonist stimulation, whereas maximum response was unchanged. Hydrophobic interior of isolated PM became more "fluid", chaotically organized and accessible to water molecules

  11. Physical association between a novel plasma-membrane structure and centrosome orients cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Takefumi; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    In the last mitotic division of the epidermal lineage in the ascidian embryo, the cells divide stereotypically along the anterior-posterior axis. During interphase, we found that a unique membrane structure invaginates from the posterior to the centre of the cell, in a microtubule-dependent manner. The invagination projects toward centrioles on the apical side of the nucleus and associates with one of them. Further, a cilium forms on the posterior side of the cell and its basal body remains associated with the invagination. A laser ablation experiment suggests that the invagination is under tensile force and promotes the posterior positioning of the centrosome. Finally, we showed that the orientation of the invaginations is coupled with the polarized dynamics of centrosome movements and the orientation of cell division. Based on these findings, we propose a model whereby this novel membrane structure orchestrates centrosome positioning and thus the orientation of cell division axis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16550.001 PMID:27502556

  12. The Membrane Receptor for Plasma Retinol Binding Protein, a New Type of Cell-Surface Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hui; KAWAGUCHI, RIKI

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin A is essential for diverse aspects of life ranging from embryogenesis to the proper functioning of most adult organs. Its derivatives (retinoid) have potent biological activities such as regulating cell growth and differentiation. Plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is the specific vitamin A carrier protein in the blood that binds to vitamin A with high affinity and delivers it to target organs. A large amount of evidence has accumulated over the past decades supporting the existence...

  13. Lipid domains in intact fiber-cell plasma membranes isolated from cortical and nuclear regions of human eye lenses of donors from different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2015-03-01

    The results reported here clearly document changes in the properties and the organization of fiber-cell membrane lipids that occur with age, based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis of lens membranes of clear lenses from donors of age groups from 0 to 20, 21 to 40, and 61 to 80 years. The physical properties, including profiles of the alkyl chain order, fluidity, hydrophobicity, and oxygen transport parameter, were investigated using EPR spin-labeling methods, which also provide an opportunity to discriminate coexisting lipid domains and to evaluate the relative amounts of lipids in these domains. Fiber-cell membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments: bulk lipid domain, which appears minimally affected by membrane proteins, and two domains that appear due to the presence of membrane proteins, namely boundary and trapped lipid domains. In nuclear membranes the amount of boundary and trapped phospholipids as well as the amount of cholesterol in trapped lipid domains increased with the donors' age and was greater than that in cortical membranes. The difference between the amounts of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins in nuclear and cortical membranes increased with the donors' age. It was also shown that cholesterol was to a large degree excluded from trapped lipid domains in cortical membranes. It is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes was greater than that of cortical membranes for all age groups. The amount of lipids in domains of low oxygen permeability, mainly in trapped lipid domains, were greater in nuclear than cortical membranes and increased with the age of donors. These results indicate that the nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes were less permeable to oxygen than cortical membranes and become less permeable to oxygen with age. In clear lenses, age-related changes in the lens lipid and protein composition and organization appear to occur in ways that increase fiber

  14. Multiphoton-generated localized electron plasma for membrane permeability modification in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, T.; Leblanc, M.; McMillan, J.; Westwood, J.; Khodaparast, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    Successful incorporation of a specific macromolecule into a single cell would be ideal for characterizing trafficking dynamics through plasmodesmata or for studying intracellular localizations. Here, we demonstrate NIR femtosecond laser-mediated infiltration of a membrane impermeable dextran-conjugated dye into living cells of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling stems. Based on the reactions of fluorescing vacuoles of transgenic cells and artificial cell walls comprised of nanocellulose, laser intensity and exposure time were adjusted to avoid deleterious effects. Using these plant-tailored laser parameters, cells were injected with the fluorophores and long-term dye retention was observed, all while preserving vital cell functions. This method is ideal for studies concerning cell-to-cell interactions and potentially paves the way for introducing transgenes to specific cells. This work was supported by NSF award IOS-0843372 to JHW, with additional support from and U.S. Department of Agriculture Hatch Project no. 135997, and by the Institute of Critical Technology and Applied Sciences (ICTAS) at Virginia Tech.

  15. Phosphorylation-dependent Trafficking of Plasma Membrane Proteins in Animal and Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Remko Offringa; and Fang Huang

    2013-01-01

    In both unicellular and multicellular organisms, transmembrane (TM) proteins are sorted to and retained at specific membrane domains by endomembrane trafficking mechanisms that recognize sorting signals in the these proteins. The trafficking and distribution of plasma membrane (PM)-localized TM proteins (PM proteins), especially of those PM proteins that show an asymmetric distribution over the PM, has received much attention, as their proper PM localization is crucial for elementary signaling and transport processes, and defects in their localization often lead to severe disease symptoms or developmental defects. The subcellular localization of PM proteins is dynamically regulated by post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination. These modificaitons mostly occur on sorting signals that are located in the larger cytosolic domains of the cargo proteins. Here we review the effects of phosphorylation of PM proteins on their trafficking, and present the key examples from the animal field that have been subject to studies for already several decades, such as that of aquaporin 2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Our knowledge on cargo trafficking in plants is largely based on studies of the family of PIN FORMED (PIN) carriers that mediate the efflux of the plant hormone auxin. We will review what is known on the subcellular distribution and trafficking of PIN proteins, with a focus on how this is modulated by phosphorylation, and identify and discuss analogies and differences in trafficking with the well-studied animal examples.

  16. Extensive determination of glycan heterogeneity reveals an unusual abundance of high mannose glycans in enriched plasma membranes of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hyun Joo; Gip, Phung; Kim, Jaehan; Wu, Shuai; Park, Kun Wook; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Schaffer, David V; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2012-04-01

    Most cell membrane proteins are known or predicted to be glycosylated in eukaryotic organisms, where surface glycans are essential in many biological processes including cell development and differentiation. Nonetheless, the glycosylation on cell membranes remains not well characterized because of the lack of sensitive analytical methods. This study introduces a technique for the rapid profiling and quantitation of N- and O-glycans on cell membranes using membrane enrichment and nanoflow liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry of native structures. Using this new method, the glycome analysis of cell membranes isolated from human embryonic stem cells and somatic cell lines was performed. Human embryonic stem cells were found to have high levels of high mannose glycans, which contrasts with IMR-90 fibroblasts and a human normal breast cell line, where complex glycans are by far the most abundant and high mannose glycans are minor components. O-Glycosylation affects relatively minor components of cell surfaces. To verify the quantitation and localization of glycans on the human embryonic stem cell membranes, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry were performed. Proteomics analyses were also performed and confirmed enrichment of plasma membrane proteins with some contamination from endoplasmic reticulum and other membranes. These findings suggest that high mannose glycans are the major component of cell surface glycosylation with even terminal glucoses. High mannose glycans are not commonly presented on the surfaces of mammalian cells or in serum yet may play important roles in stem cell biology. The results also mean that distinguishing stem cells from other mammalian cells may be facilitated by the major difference in the glycosylation of the cell membrane. The deep structural analysis enabled by this new method will enable future mechanistic studies on the biological significance of high mannose glycans on stem cell membranes and provide a general tool to examine

  17. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the YxxPhi domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1(NL4.3) compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and increase of

  18. Identification of squalamine in the plasma membrane of white blood cells in the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sang-Seon; Li, Weiming

    2007-12-01

    It is well established that innate mechanisms play an important role in the immunity of fish. Antimicrobial peptides have been isolated and characterized from several species of teleosts. Here, we report the isolation of an antimicrobial compound from the blood of bacterially challenged sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus. An acetic acid extract from the blood cells of challenged fish was subjected to solid-phase extraction, cation-exchange chromatography, gel-filtration chromatography, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, with the purified fractions assayed for antimicrobial activity. Surprisingly, antimicrobial activity in these fractions originated from squalamine, an aminosterol previously identified in the dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias. Further chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses confirmed the identity of squalamine, an antimicrobial and antiangiogenic agent, in the active fraction from the sea lamprey blood cells. Immunocytochemical analysis localized squalamine to the plasma membrane of white blood cells. Therefore, we postulate that squalamine has an important role in the innate immunity that defends the lamprey against microbial invasion. The full biochemical and immunological roles of squalamine in the white blood cell membrane remain to be investigated. PMID:17726196

  19. Remodeling of the Host Cell Plasma Membrane by HIV-1 Nef and Vpu: A Strategy to Ensure Viral Fitness and Persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Sugden

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane protects the cell from its surroundings and regulates cellular communication, homing, and metabolism. Not surprisingly, the composition of this membrane is highly controlled through the vesicular trafficking of proteins to and from the cell surface. As intracellular pathogens, most viruses exploit the host plasma membrane to promote viral replication while avoiding immune detection. This is particularly true for the enveloped human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, which assembles and obtains its lipid shell directly at the plasma membrane. HIV-1 encodes two proteins, negative factor (Nef and viral protein U (Vpu, which function primarily by altering the quantity and localization of cell surface molecules to increase virus fitness despite host antiviral immune responses. These proteins are expressed at different stages in the HIV-1 life cycle and employ a variety of mechanisms to target both unique and redundant surface proteins, including the viral receptor CD4, host restriction factors, immunoreceptors, homing molecules, tetraspanins and membrane transporters. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the study of the Nef and Vpu targeting of host membrane proteins with an emphasis on how remodeling of the cell membrane allows HIV-1 to avoid host antiviral immune responses leading to the establishment of systemic and persistent infection.

  20. Photosensitized damage inflicted on plasma membranes of live cells by an extracellular generator of singlet oxygen--a linear dependence of a lethal dose on light intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarębski, Mirosław; Kordon, Magdalena; Dobrucki, Jurek W

    2014-01-01

    We describe a study of the influence of a dose rate, i.e. light intensity or photon flux, on the efficiency of induction of a loss of integrity of plasma membranes of live cells in culture. The influence of a photon flux on the size of the light dose, which was capable of causing lethal effects, was measured in an experimental system where singlet oxygen was generated exclusively outside of live cells by ruthenium(II) phenantroline complex. Instantaneous, sensitive detection of a loss of integrity of a plasma membrane was achieved by fluorescence confocal imaging of the entry of this complex into a cell interior. We demonstrate that the size of the lethal dose of light is directly proportional to the intensity of the exciting light. Thus, the probability of a photon of the exciting light inflicting photosensitized damage on plasma membranes diminishes with increasing density of the incident photons. PMID:24279807

  1. Effect of ultrasonic exposure on Ca2+-ATPase activity in plasma membrane from Aloe arborescens callus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiyao; Yang, Hong; Takatsuki, Hideyo; Sakanishi, Akio

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the effect of ultrasound on plasma membrane (PM) Ca2+-ATPase activity of Aloe arborescens callus cells in solid culture. The calluses were exposed by a 20 kHz digital sonifier at the powers of 2 and 10 W from the effective exposure times of 2-10 s. PM Ca2+-ATPase activity was almost significantly higher at 2 W both in continuous wave and 10% duty cycle than that of the control (no ultrasound) at effective exposure times of 5 and 10 s. However, its activity decreased at 10 W in continuous wave exposure. It is possible that the PM Ca2+-ATPase configuration or structure may be partly damaged by high-energy ultrasound at 10 W. Our results showed that low-energy ultrasound exposure was a useful physical field to stimulate A. arborescens callus cells to adapt environmental stress through PM Ca2+-ATPase activity increase. PMID:15936236

  2. Fusion of liposomes with the plasma membrane of epithelial cells: Fate of incorporated lipids as followed by freeze fracture and autoradiography of plastic sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoll, G.; Burger, K.N.J.; Bron, R.; van Meer, G.; Verkleij, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    The fusion of liposomes with the plasma membrane of influenza virus-infected monolayers of an epithelial cell line, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (van Meer et al., 1985. Biochemistry, 24: 3593-3602), has been analyzed by morphological techniques. The distribution of liposomal lipids over the apica

  3. Chloroquine Increases Glucose Uptake via Enhancing GLUT4 Translocation and Fusion with the Plasma Membrane in L6 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chloroquine can induce an increase in the cellular uptake of glucose; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Methods: In this study, translocation of GLUT4 and intracellular Ca2+ changes were simultaneously observed by confocal microscope in L6 cells stably over-expressing IRAP-mOrange. The GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane (PM was traced using HA-GLUT4-GFP. Glucose uptake was measured using a cell-based glucose uptake assay. GLUT4 protein was detected by Western blotting and mRNA level was detected by RT-PCR. Results: We found that chloroquine induced significant increases in glucose uptake, glucose transporter GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane (GTPM, GLUT4 fusion with the PM, and intracellular Ca2+ in L6 muscle cells. Chloroquine-induced increases of GTPM and intracellular Ca2+ were inhibited by Gallein (Gβγ inhibitor and U73122 (PLC inhibitor. However, 2-APB (IP3R blocker only blocked the increase in intracellular Ca2+ but did not inhibit GTPM increase. These results indicate that chloroquine, via the Gβγ-PLC-IP3-IP3R pathway, induces elevation of Ca2+, and this Ca2+ increase does not play a role in chloroqui-ne-evoked GTPM increase. However, GLUT4 fusion with the PM and glucose uptake were significantly inhibited with BAPTA-AM. This suggests that Ca2+ enhances GLUT4 fusion with the PM resulting in glucose uptake increase. Conclusion: Our data indicate that chloroquine via Gβγ-PLC-IP3-IP3R induces Ca2+ elevation, which in turn promotes GLUT4 fusion with the PM. Moreover, chloroquine can enhance GLUT4 trafficking to the PM. These mechanisms eventually result in glucose uptake increase in control and insulin-resistant L6 cells. These findings suggest that chloroquine might be a potential drug for improving insulin tolerance in diabetic patients.

  4. Cell-penetrating compounds preferentially bind glycosaminoglycans over plasma membrane lipids in a charge density- and stereochemistry-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevette, Lisa E; Benish, Nicolas C; Schoenecker, Amber R; Braden, Kristin J

    2015-12-01

    Cell-penetrating compounds (CPCs) are often conjugated to drugs and genes to facilitate cellular uptake. We hypothesize that the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged amines of the cell-penetrating compounds and the negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) extending from cell surfaces is the initiating step in the internalization process. The interactions of generation 5 PAMAM dendrimer, Tat peptide and 25 kDa linear PEI with four different GAGs have been studied using isothermal titration calorimetry to elucidate structure-function relationships that could lead to improved drug and gene delivery methods to a wide variety of cell types. Detailed thermodynamic analysis has determined that CPC-GAG binding constants range from 8.7×10(3) to 2.4×10(6)M(-1) and that affinity is dependent upon GAG charge density and stereochemistry and CPC molecular weight. The effect of GAG composition on affinity is likely due to hydrogen bonding between CPC amines and amides and GAG hydroxyl and amine groups. These results were compared to the association of CPCs with lipid vesicles of varying composition as model plasma membranes to finally clarify the relative importance of each cell surface component in initial cell recognition. CPC-lipid affinity increases with anionic lipid content, but GAG affinity is higher for all cell-penetrating compounds, confirming the role these heterogeneous polysaccharides play in cellular association and clustering.

  5. Rice Stomatal Closure Requires Guard Cell Plasma Membrane ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter RCN1/OsABCG5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Shuichi; Takano, Sho; Sato, Moeko; Furukawa, Kaoru; Nagasawa, Hidetaka; Yoshikawa, Shoko; Kasuga, Jun; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Nakazono, Mikio; Takamure, Itsuro; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2016-03-01

    Water stress is one of the major environmental stresses that affect agricultural production worldwide. Water loss from plants occurs primarily through stomatal pores. Here, we report that an Oryza sativa half-size ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily G protein, RCN1/OsABCG5, is involved in stomatal closure mediated by phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in guard cells. We found that the GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5-fusion protein was localized at the plasma membrane in guard cells. The percentage of guard cell pairs containing both ABA and GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5 increased after exogenous ABA treatment, whereas they were co-localized in guard cell pairs regardless of whether exogenous ABA was applied. ABA application resulted in a smaller increase in the percentage of guard cell pairs containing ABA in rcn1 mutant (A684P) and RCN1-RNAi than in wild-type plants. Furthermore, polyethylene glycol (drought stress)-inducible ABA accumulation in guard cells did not occur in rcn1 mutants. Stomata closure mediated by exogenous ABA application was strongly reduced in rcn1 mutants. Finally, rcn1 mutant plants had more rapid water loss from detached leaves than the wild-type plants. These results indicate that in response to drought stress, RCN1/OsABCG5 is involved in accumulation of ABA in guard cells, which is indispensable for stomatal closure. PMID:26708605

  6. Reduced red cell membrane potential and acidification of the plasma in response to contrast materials: time course of the alteration in plasma pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtman, M.A.; Murphy, M.S.

    1976-11-01

    Radiographic contrast materials added to blood reduce the red cell membrane potential by balancing the internal impenetrable anions, hemoglobin and organic phosphates. In so doing, a redistribution of protons occurs such that plasma is acidified. The time course of acidification of plasma is measured in seconds, with a nadir of pH occurring 12 to 15 seconds after addition of Hypaque (1.5 to 3.0 ml/10 ml blood) and a half-time of acidification requiring about 6 seconds. The acidification process is slowed in part by an initial alkalosis due to Hypaque. The acidification of blood is more rapid after addition of Renografin (1.5 to 3.0 ml/10 ml blood) than after addition of Hypaque since the former solution is slightly acidic. The time course of plasma acidification indicates that a maximal reduction in blood pH may not occur in the capillaries of a regional circulation following injection of contrast materials into its afferent vessel, since the transit time of the contrast material may be less than the time required for maximal acidification of plasma.

  7. Scanning STED-FCS reveals spatiotemporal heterogeneity of lipid interaction in the plasma membrane of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honigmann, Alf; Mueller, Veronika; Ta, Haisen; Schoenle, Andreas; Sezgin, Erdinc; Hell, Stefan W.; Eggeling, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The interaction of lipids and proteins plays an important role in plasma membrane bioactivity, and much can be learned from their diffusion characteristics. Here we present the combination of super-resolution STED microscopy with scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (scanning STED-FCS, sSTED-FCS) to characterize the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of lipid interactions. sSTED-FCS reveals transient molecular interaction hotspots for a fluorescent sphingolipid analogue. The interaction sites are smaller than 80 nm in diameter and lipids are transiently trapped for several milliseconds in these areas. In comparison, newly developed fluorescent phospholipid and cholesterol analogues with improved phase-partitioning properties show more homogenous diffusion, independent of the preference for liquid-ordered or disordered membrane environments. Our results do not support the presence of nanodomains based on lipid-phase separation in the basal membrane of our cultured nonstimulated cells, and show that alternative interactions are responsible for the strong local trapping of our sphingolipid analogue.

  8. Dynamic trafficking and delivery of connexons to the plasma membrane and accretion to gap junctions in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauf, Undine; Giepmans, Ben N G; Lopez, Patricia; Braconnot, Sebastien; Chen, Shu-Chih; Falk, Matthias M

    2002-01-01

    Certain membrane channels including acetylcholine receptors, gap junction (GJ) channels, and aquaporins arrange into large clusters in the plasma membrane (PM). However, how these channels are recruited to the clusters is unknown. To address this question, we have investigated delivery of GJ channel

  9. Cancer cell gene expression modulated from plasma membrane integrin αvβ3 by thyroid hormone and nanoparticulate tetrac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eDavis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrin αvβ3 is generously expressed by cancer cells and rapidly dividing endothelial cells. The principal ligands of the integrin are extracellular matrix proteins, but we have described a cell surface small molecule receptor on αvβ3 that specifically binds thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone analogues. From this receptor, thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3’-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3 and tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac regulate expression of specific genes by a mechanism that is initiated nongenomically. At the integrin, T4 and T3 at physiological concentrations are pro-angiogenic by multiple mechanisms that include gene expression, and T4 supports tumor cell proliferation. Tetrac blocks the transcriptional activities directed by T4 and T3 at αvβ3, but, independently of T4 and T3, tetrac modulates transcription of cancer cell genes that are important to cell survival pathways, control of the cell cycle, angiogenesis, apoptosis, cell export of chemotherapeutic agents and repair of double-strand DNA breaks. We have covalently bound tetrac to a 200 nm biodegradable nanoparticle that prohibits cell entry of tetrac and limits its action to the hormone receptor on the extracellular domain of plasma membrane αvβ3. This reformulation has greater potency than unmodified tetrac at the integrin and affects a broader range of cancer-relevant genes. In addition to these actions on intracellular kinase-mediated regulation of gene expression, hormone analogues at αvβ3 have additional effects on intracellular protein-trafficking (cytosol compartment to nucleus, nucleoprotein phosphorylation and generation of nuclear coactivator complexes that are relevant to traditional genomic actions of T3. Thus, previously unrecognized cell surface-initiated actions of thyroid hormone and tetrac formulations at αvβ3 offer opportunities to regulate angiogenesis and multiple aspects of cancer cell behavior.

  10. Pannexin2 oligomers localize in the membranes of endosomal vesicles in mammalian cells while Pannexin1 channels traffic to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boassa, Daniela; Nguyen, Phuong; Hu, Junru; Ellisman, Mark H; Sosinsky, Gina E

    2014-01-01

    Pannexin2 (Panx2) is the largest of three members of the pannexin proteins. Pannexins are topologically related to connexins and innexins, but serve different functional roles than forming gap junctions. We previously showed that pannexins form oligomeric channels but unlike connexins and innexins, they form only single membrane channels. High levels of Panx2 mRNA and protein in the Central Nervous System (CNS) have been documented. Whereas Pannexin1 (Panx1) is fairly ubiquitous and Pannexin3 (Panx3) is found in skin and connective tissue, both are fully glycosylated, traffic to the plasma membrane and have functions correlated with extracellular ATP release. Here, we describe trafficking and subcellular localizations of exogenous Panx2 and Panx1 protein expression in MDCK, HeLa, and HEK 293T cells as well as endogenous Panx1 and Panx2 patterns in the CNS. Panx2 was found in intracellular localizations, was partially N-glycosylated, and localizations were non-overlapping with Panx1. Confocal images of hippocampal sections immunolabeled for the astrocytic protein GFAP, Panx1 and Panx2 demonstrated that the two isoforms, Panx1 and Panx2, localized at different subcellular compartments in both astrocytes and neurons. Using recombinant fusions of Panx2 with appended genetic tags developed for correlated light and electron microscopy and then expressed in different cell lines, we determined that Panx2 is localized in the membrane of intracellular vesicles and not in the endoplasmic reticulum as initially indicated by calnexin colocalization experiments. Dual immunofluorescence imaging with protein markers for specific vesicle compartments showed that Panx2 vesicles are early endosomal in origin. In electron tomographic volumes, cross-sections of these vesicles displayed fine structural details and close proximity to actin filaments. Thus, pannexins expressed at different subcellular compartments likely exert distinct functional roles, particularly in the nervous system.

  11. Antibodies to the estrogen receptor-α modulate rapid prolactin release from rat pituitary tumor cells through plasma membrane estrogen receptors

    OpenAIRE

    NORFLEET, ANDREA M.; Clarke, Charlotte H.; Gametchu, Bahiru; Watson, Cheryl S.

    2000-01-01

    Antibodies (Abs) raised against the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) were used to investigate the role of ERα proteins located at the plasma membrane in mediating the rapid, estrogen-stimulated secretion of prolactin (PRL) from rat pituitary GH3/B6/F10 cells. Exposure of the cells to 1 nM 17β-estradiol (E2) significantly increased PRL release after 3 or 6 min. When ERα Abs that bind specifically to ERα but are too large to diffuse into cells were tested for activity at the cell membrane, Ab R4, targ...

  12. Pannexin2 oligomers localize into endosomal vesicles in mammalian cells while Pannexin1 channels traffic to the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eBoassa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pannexin2 (Panx2 is the largest of three members of the pannexin proteins. Pannexins are topologically related to connexins and innexins, but serve different functional roles than forming gap junctions. We previously showed that pannexins form oligomeric channels but unlike connexins and innexins, they form only single membrane channels. High levels of Panx2 mRNA and protein in the Central Nervous System (CNS have been documented. Whereas Pannexin1 (Panx1 is fairly ubiquitous and Pannexin3 (Panx3 is found in skin and connective tissue, both are fully glycosylated, traffic to the plasma membrane and have functions correlated with extracellular ATP release. Here, we describe trafficking and subcellular localizations of exogenous Panx2 and Panx1 protein expression in MDCK, HeLa and HEK293T cells as well as endogenous Panx1 and Panx2 patterns in the CNS. Panx2 was found in intracellular localizations, was partially N-glycosylated, and localizations were non-overlapping with Panx1. Confocal images of hippocampal sections immunolabeled for the astrocytic protein GFAP, Panx1 and Panx2 demonstrated that the two isoforms, Panx1 and Panx2, localized at different subcellular compartments in both astrocytes and neurons. Using recombinant fusions of Panx2 with appended genetic tags developed for correlated light and electron microscopy and then expressed in different cell lines, we determined that Panx2 is localized in the membrane of intracellular vesicles and not in the endoplasmic reticulum as initially indicated by calnexin colocalization experiments. Dual immunofluorescence imaging with protein markers for specific vesicle compartments showed that Panx2 vesicles are early endosomal in origin. In electron tomographic volumes, cross-sections of these vesicles displayed fine structural details and close proximity to actin filaments. Thus, pannexins expressed at different subcellular compartments likely exert distinct functional roles, particularly in the

  13. Effect of a GABA agonist on the expression and distribution of GABAA receptors in the plasma membrane of cultured cerebellar granule cells: an immunocytochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, G H; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP, 150 microM) on the localization and density of GABAA receptors in the plasma membrane of rat cerebellar granule cells in primary cultures was studied at the electron microscope (EM) level...

  14. Apical Scaffolding Protein NHERF2 Modulates the Localization of Alternatively Spliced Plasma Membrane Ca2+ Pump 2B Variants in Polarized Epithelial Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Padányi, Rita; Xiong, Yuning; Antalffy, Géza; Lór, Krisztina; Pászty, Katalin; STREHLER, EMANUEL E.; Enyedi, Ágnes

    2010-01-01

    The membrane localization of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (PMCA2) in polarized cells is determined by alternative splicing; the PMCA2w/b splice variant shows apical localization, whereas the PMCA2z/b and PMCA2x/b variants are mostly basolateral. We previously reported that PMCA2b interacts with the PDZ protein Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 2 (NHERF2), but the role of this interaction for the specific membrane localization of PMCA2 is not known. Here we show that co-expressio...

  15. Benzoyl peroxide increases UVA-induced plasma membrane damage and lipid oxidation in murine leukemia L1210 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbotson, S H; Lambert, C R; Moran, M N; Lynch, M C; Kochevar, I E

    1998-01-01

    Ultraviolet A radiation induces oxidative stress and cell damage. The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether ultraviolet A-induced cell injury was amplified by the presence of a non-ultraviolet A absorbing molecule capable of generating free radicals. Benzoyl peroxide was used as a lipid soluble potential radical-generating agent. Plasma membrane permeability assessed by trypan blue uptake was used to measure cell damage in murine leukemia L1210 cells. Cells were irradiated with a pulsed Nd/YAG laser at 355 nm using 0-160 J per cm2. The ratio of the fluence-response slope in the presence of 40 microM benzoyl peroxide to that of irradiated controls was 4.3 +/- 2.6. Benzoyl peroxide alone or benzoyl peroxide added after irradiation did not cause increased trypan blue uptake. The ratio of the fluence-response slopes in the presence of 40 microM benzoyl peroxide to that of irradiated controls was 4.7 +/- 1.4 when cells were irradiated (0-43 J per cm2) with a xenon lamp, filtered to remove wavelengths butylated hydroxytoluene, vitamin E, and trolox, a water-soluble vitamin E derivative. Lipid oxidation, assessed as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, was significantly increased in samples irradiated with ultraviolet A in the presence of benzoyl peroxide at fluences >34 J per cm2. The increased trypan blue uptake and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene. These results suggest that agents not absorbing ultraviolet A radiation may enhance ultraviolet A-initiated oxidative stress in cells. PMID:9424093

  16. The Plasma Membrane Sialidase NEU3 Regulates the Malignancy of Renal Carcinoma Cells by Controlling β1 Integrin Internalization and Recycling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringali, Cristina; Lupo, Barbara; Silvestri, Ilaria; Papini, Nadia; Anastasia, Luigi; Tettamanti, Guido; Venerando, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The human plasma membrane sialidase NEU3 is a key enzyme in the catabolism of membrane gangliosides, is crucial in the regulation of cell surface processes, and has been demonstrated to be significantly up-regulated in renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). In this report, we show that NEU3 regulates β1 integrin trafficking in RCC cells by controlling β1 integrin recycling to the plasma membrane and controlling activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. NEU3 silencing in RCC cells increased the membrane ganglioside content, in particular the GD1a content, and changed the expression of key regulators of the integrin recycling pathway. In addition, NEU3 silencing up-regulated the Ras-related protein RAB25, which directs internalized integrins to lysosomes, and down-regulated the chloride intracellular channel protein 3 (CLIC3), which induces the recycling of internalized integrins to the plasma membrane. In this manner, NEU3 silencing enhanced the caveolar endocytosis of β1 integrin, blocked its recycling and reduced its levels at the plasma membrane, and, consequently, inhibited EGFR and FAK/AKT. These events had the following effects on the behavior of RCC cells: they (a) decreased drug resistance mediated by the block of autophagy and the induction of apoptosis; (b) decreased metastatic potential mediated by down-regulation of the metalloproteinases MMP1 and MMP7; and (c) decreased adhesion to collagen and fibronectin. Therefore, our data identify NEU3 as a key regulator of the β1 integrin-recycling pathway and FAK/AKT signaling and demonstrate its crucial role in RCC malignancy. PMID:23139422

  17. Lipid organization of the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Melo, Manuel N; van Eerden, Floris J; Arnarez, Clément; Lopez, Cesar A; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; Periole, Xavier; de Vries, Alex H; Tieleman, D Peter; Marrink, Siewert J

    2014-01-01

    The detailed organization of cellular membranes remains rather elusive. Based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we provide a high-resolution view of the lipid organization of a plasma membrane at an unprecedented level of complexity. Our plasma membrane model consists of 63 different li

  18. Recycling from endosomes to the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, E.M. van

    2001-01-01

    Summary V Chapter?Summary Many membrane proteins are, after endocytic uptake, efficiently recycled back to the plasma membrane. The aim of the studies presented in this thesis was to determine pathways and molecular mechanisms that are involved in recycling. Plasma membrane-derived clathrin-coated v

  19. TIP-1 translocation onto the cell plasma membrane is a molecular biomarker of tumor response to ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailun Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor response to treatment has been generally assessed with anatomic and functional imaging. Recent development of in vivo molecular and cellular imaging showed promise in time-efficient assessment of the therapeutic efficacy of a prescribed regimen. Currently, the in vivo molecular imaging is limited with shortage of biomarkers and probes with sound biological relevance. We have previously shown in tumor-bearing mice that a hexapeptide (HVGGSSV demonstrated potentials as a molecular imaging probe to distinguish the tumors responding to ionizing radiation (IR and/or tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment from those of non-responding tumors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we have studied biological basis of the HVGGSSV peptide binding within the irradiated tumors by use of tumor-bearing mice and cultured cancer cells. The results indicated that Tax interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1BP3 is a molecular target that enables the selective binding of the HVGGSSV peptide within irradiated xenograft tumors. Optical imaging and immunohistochemical staining indicated that a TIP-1 specific antibody demonstrated similar biodistribution as the peptide in tumor-bearing mice. The TIP-1 antibody blocked the peptide from binding within irradiated tumors. Studies on both of human and mouse lung cancer cells showed that the intracellular TIP-1 relocated to the plasma membrane surface within the first few hours after exposure to IR and before the onset of treatment associated apoptosis and cell death. TIP-1 relocation onto the cell surface is associated with the reduced proliferation and the enhanced susceptibility to the subsequent IR treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study by use of tumor-bearing mice and cultured cancer cells suggested that imaging of the radiation-inducible TIP-1 translocation onto the cancer cell surface may predict the tumor responsiveness to radiation in a time-efficient manner and thus tailor

  20. Uterine receptivity and the plasma membrane transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher R MURPHY

    2004-01-01

    This review begins with a brief commentary on the diversity of placentation mechanisms, and then goes on to examine the extensive alterations which occur in the plasma membrane of uterine epithelial cells during early pregnancy across species. Ultrastructural, biochemical and more general morphological data reveal that strikingly common phenomena occur in this plasma membrane during early pregnancy despite the diversity of placental types-from epitheliochorial to hemochorial, which ultimately form in different species. To encapsulate the concept that common morphological and molecular alterations occur across species, that they are found basolaterally as well as apically, and that moreover they are an ongoing process during much of early pregnancy, not just an event at the time attachment,brane during early pregnancy are key to uterine receptivity.

  1. The cyclic nucleotide gated cation channel AtCNGC10 traffics from the ER via Golgi vesicles to the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis root and leaf cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Marilou A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels (CNGCs maintain cation homeostasis essential for a wide range of physiological processes in plant cells. However, the precise subcellular locations and trafficking of these membrane proteins are poorly understood. This is further complicated by a general deficiency of information about targeting pathways of membrane proteins in plants. To investigate CNGC trafficking and localization, we have measured Atcngc5 and Atcngc10 expression in roots and leaves, analyzed AtCNGC10-GFP fusions transiently expressed in protoplasts, and conducted immunofluorescence labeling of protoplasts and immunoelectron microscopic analysis of high pressure frozen leaves and roots. Results AtCNGC10 mRNA and protein levels were 2.5-fold higher in roots than leaves, while AtCNGC5 mRNA and protein levels were nearly equal in these tissues. The AtCNGC10-EGFP fusion was targeted to the plasma membrane in leaf protoplasts, and lightly labeled several intracellular structures. Immunofluorescence microscopy with affinity purified CNGC-specific antisera indicated that AtCNGC5 and AtCNGC10 are present in the plasma membrane of protoplasts. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that AtCNGC10 was associated with the plasma membrane of mesophyll, palisade parenchyma and epidermal cells of leaves, and the meristem, columella and cap cells of roots. AtCNCG10 was also observed in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi cisternae and vesicles of 50–150 nm in size. Patch clamp assays of an AtCNGC10-GFP fusion expressed in HEK293 cells measured significant cation currents. Conclusion AtCNGC5 and AtCNGC10 are plasma membrane proteins. We postulate that AtCNGC10 traffics from the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi apparatus and associated vesicles to the plasma membrane. The presence of the cation channel, AtCNGC10, in root cap meristem cells, cell plate, and gravity-sensing columella cells, combined with the previously reported

  2. Functional roles of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, S; Thampan, RaghavaVarman

    2003-07-01

    A series of emerging data supports the existence and importance of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors in a variety of cells that are targets for the steroid hormone action. When estradiol (E2) binds to the cell surface protein, the ensuing signal transduction event triggers downstream signaling cascades that contribute to important biological functions. Aside from the classical signaling through nuclear estrogen receptors, we have provided evidence for the functional roles of an estrogen receptor localized in the plasma membrane. This review highlights some of the recent advances made in the understanding of the genomic/non-genomic actions of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors. PMID:15255376

  3. Cationic Au Nanoparticle Binding with Plasma Membrane-like Lipid Bilayers: Potential Mechanism for Spontaneous Permeation to Cells Revealed by Atomistic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.;

    2014-01-01

    Despite being chemically inert as a bulk material, nanoscale gold can pose harmful side effects to living organisms. In particular, cationic Au nanoparticles (AuNP+) of 2 nm diameter or less permeate readily through plasma membranes and induce cell death. We report atomistic simulations of cationic...... Au nanoparticles interacting with realistic membranes and explicit solvent using a model system that comprises two cellular compartments, extracellular and cytosolic, divided by two asymmetric lipid bilayers. The membrane-AuNP+ binding and membrane reorganization processes are discovered...... of the zwitterionic lipids and nanoparticle side groups in the contact area, giving rise to the initial stage of pore formation on the membrane surface. Such behavior is not seen on the cytosolic side, where AuNP+ is spontaneously captured by the negatively charged phosphatidylserine lipids that diffuse to enrich...

  4. Cellular processes and pathways that protect Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against the plasma membrane-perturbing compound chitosan.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Zakrzewska; A. Boorsma; D. Delneri; S. Brul; S.G. Oliver; F.M. Klis

    2007-01-01

    Global fitness analysis makes use of a genomic library of tagged deletion strains. We used this approach to study the effect of chitosan, which causes plasma membrane stress. The data were analyzed using T-profiler, which was based on determining the sensitivities of groups of deletion strains to ch

  5. Protein-mediated inward translocation of phospholipids occurs in both the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains of epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomorski, T.; Herrmann, A.; Müller, P.; van Meer, G.F.B.P.; Burger, K.N.J.

    1999-01-01

    The translocation of spin-labeled analogues of phosphatidylcholine (4- doxylpentanoyl-PC, SLPC), phosphatidylethanolamine (SL-PE), phosphatidylserine (SL-PS), and sphingomyelin (SL-SM) from the outer to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane bilayer was investigated in dog kidney MDCK II and human

  6. Chloride channels in the plasma membrane of a foetal Drosophila cell line, S2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Margit; Willumsen, Niels J.

    2000-01-01

    S2 cells, Cl- Channels, Expression system, Drosophila, Inward rectifier, Outward rectifier, Patch clamp......S2 cells, Cl- Channels, Expression system, Drosophila, Inward rectifier, Outward rectifier, Patch clamp...

  7. Quantifying mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in intact pulmonary arterial endothelial cells based on extracellular disposition of rhodamine dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhuohui; Audi, Said H; Bongard, Robert D; Gauthier, Kathryn M; Merker, Marilyn P

    2011-05-01

    Our goal was to quantify mitochondrial and plasma potential (Δψ(m) and Δψ(p)) based on the disposition of rhodamine 123 (R123) or tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) in the medium surrounding pulmonary endothelial cells. Dyes were added to the medium, and their concentrations in extracellular medium ([R(e)]) were measured over time. R123 [R(e)] fell from 10 nM to 6.6 ± 0.1 (SE) nM over 120 min. TMRE [R(e)] fell from 20 nM to a steady state of 4.9 ± 0.4 nM after ∼30 min. Protonophore or high K(+) concentration ([K(+)]), used to manipulate contributions of membrane potentials, attenuated decreases in [R(e)], and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibition had the opposite effect, demonstrating the qualitative impact of these processes on [R(e)]. A kinetic model incorporating a modified Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz model was fit to [R(e)] vs. time data for R123 and TMRE, respectively, under various conditions to obtain (means ± 95% confidence intervals) Δψ(m) (-130 ± 7 and -133 ± 4 mV), Δψ(p) (-36 ± 4 and -49 ± 4 mV), and a Pgp activity parameter (K(Pgp), 25 ± 5 and 51 ± 11 μl/min). The higher membrane permeability of TMRE also allowed application of steady-state analysis to obtain Δψ(m) (-124 ± 6 mV). The consistency of kinetic parameter values obtained from R123 and TMRE data demonstrates the utility of this experimental and theoretical approach for quantifying intact cell Δψ(m) and Δψ(p.) Finally, steady-state analysis revealed that although room air- and hyperoxia-exposed (95% O(2) for 48 h) cells have equivalent resting Δψ(m), hyperoxic cell Δψ(m) was more sensitive to depolarization with protonophore, consistent with previous observations of pulmonary endothelial hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  8. Regulation of Plasma Membrane Recycling by CFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Neil A.; Jilling, Tamas; Berta, Gabor; Sorscher, Eric J.; Bridges, Robert J.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    1992-04-01

    The gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is defective in patients with cystic fibrosis. Although the protein product of the CFTR gene has been proposed to function as a chloride ion channel, certain aspects of its function remain unclear. The role of CFTR in the adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent regulation of plasma membrane recycling was examined. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate is known to regulate endocytosis and exocytosis in chloride-secreting epithelial cells that express CFTR. However, mutant epithelial cells derived from a patient with cystic fibrosis exhibited no cAMP-dependent regulation of endocytosis and exocytosis until they were transfected with complementary DNA encoding wild-type CFTR. Thus, CFTR is critical for cAMP-dependent regulation of membrane recycling in epithelial tissues, and this function of CFTR could explain in part the pleiotropic nature of cystic fibrosis.

  9. Alumina-carbon nanofibers nanocomposites obtained by spark plasma sintering for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrell, A.; Torrecillas, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN) Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Oviedo, Principado de Asturias, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera Asturias (Spain); Rocha, V.G.; Fernandez, A. [ITMA Materials Technology, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera Asturias (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    There is an increasing demand of multifunctional materials for a wide variety of technological developments. Bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells are an example of complex functionality components that must show among other properties high mechanical strength, electrical, and thermal conductivity. The present research explored the possibility of using alumina-carbon nanofibers (CNFs) nanocomposites for this purpose. In this study, it was studied for the first time the whole range of powder compositions in this system. Homogeneous powders mixtures were prepared and subsequently sintered by spark plasma sintering. The materials obtained were thoroughly characterized and compared in terms of properties required to be used as bipolar plates. The control on material microstructure and composition allows designing materials where mechanical or electrical performances are enhanced. A 50/50 vol.% alumina-CNFs composite appears to be a very promising material for this kind of application. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Efficient Isolation and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Cancer Cell Plasma Membrane Proteins for Identification of Metastasis-Associated Cell Surface Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Jensen, Ole N;

    2009-01-01

    Cell surface membrane proteins are involved in central processes such as cell signaling, cell-cell interactions, ion and solute transport, and they seem to play a pivotal role in several steps of the metastatic process of cancer cells. The low abundance and hydrophobic nature of cell surface...... membrane proteins complicate their purification and identification by MS. We used two isogenic cell lines with opposite metastatic capabilities in nude mice to optimize cell surface membrane protein purification and to identify potential novel markers of metastatic cancer. The cell surface membrane...... proteins were isolated by centrifugation/ultracentrifugation steps, followed by membrane separation using a Percoll/sucrose density gradient. The gradient fractions containing the cell surface membrane proteins were identified by enzymatic assays. Stable isotope labeling of the proteome of the metastatic...

  11. Cooperative interaction of benzo[a]pyrene and ethanol on plasma membrane remodeling is responsible for enhanced oxidative stress and cell death in primary rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Aurore; Hardonnière, Kevin; Chevanne, Martine; Vuillemin, Julie; Podechard, Normand; Burel, Agnès; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Sergent, Odile

    2014-07-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have shown an interactive effect of heavy smoking and heavy alcohol drinking on the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. It has also been recently described that chronic hepatocyte death can trigger excessive compensatory proliferation resulting later in the formation of tumors in mouse liver. As we previously demonstrated that both benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), an environmental agent found in cigarette smoke, and ethanol possess similar targets, especially oxidative stress, to trigger death of liver cells, we decided to study here the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the effects of B[a]P/ethanol coexposure on cell death. After an 18-h incubation with 100nM B[a]P, primary rat hepatocytes were supplemented with 50mM ethanol for 5 or 8h. B[a]P/ethanol coexposure led to a greater apoptotic cell death that could be linked to an increase in lipid peroxidation. Plasma membrane remodeling, as depicted by membrane fluidity elevation and physicochemical alterations in lipid rafts, appeared to play a key role, because both toxicants acted with specific complementary effects. Membrane remodeling was shown to induce an accumulation of lysosomes leading to an important increase in low-molecular-weight iron cellular content. Finally, ethanol metabolism, but not that of B[a]P, by providing reactive oxygen species, induced the ultimate toxic process. Indeed, in lysosomes, ethanol promoted the Fenton reaction, lipid peroxidation, and membrane permeabilization, thereby triggering cell death. To conclude, B[a]P exposure, by depleting hepatocyte membrane cholesterol content, would constitute a favorable ground for a later toxic insult such as ethanol intoxication. Membrane stabilization of both plasma membrane and lysosomes might be a potential target for further investigation considering cytoprotective strategies. PMID:24681337

  12. Nuclear myosin I regulates cell membrane tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Dzijak, Rastislav; Pastorek, Lukáš; Rohožková, Jana; Malohlava, Jakub; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane tension is an important feature that determines the cell shape and influences processes such as cell motility, spreading, endocytosis and exocytosis. Unconventional class 1 myosins are potent regulators of plasma membrane tension because they physically link the plasma membrane with adjacent cytoskeleton. We identified nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) - a putative nuclear isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) - as a new player in the field. Although having specific nuclear functions, NM1 localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane. Deletion of NM1 causes more than a 50% increase in the elasticity of the plasma membrane around the actin cytoskeleton as measured by atomic force microscopy. This higher elasticity of NM1 knock-out cells leads to 25% higher resistance to short-term hypotonic environment and rapid cell swelling. In contrast, overexpression of NM1 in wild type cells leads to an additional 30% reduction of their survival. We have shown that NM1 has a direct functional role in the cytoplasm as a dynamic linker between the cell membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, regulating the degree of effective plasma membrane tension. PMID:27480647

  13. Glycan Moieties as Bait to Fish Plasma Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fei; Zhao, Qun; Sui, Zhigang; Liang, Yu; Jiang, Hao; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-05-17

    Plasma membrane proteome analysis is of significance for screening candidate biomarkers and drug targets. However, due to their low abundance and lack of specific groups that can enable their capture, the plasma membrane proteins (PMPs) are under-represented. On the basis of the fact that PMPs are embedded in or anchored to the phospholipid bilayer of the plasma membrane and the glycan moieties of proteins and lipids located on the plasma membrane are exposed outside of the cell surface, we proposed a strategy to capture PMPs, termed as glycan moieties-directed PMPs enrichment (GMDPE). With the glycan moieties exposed outside of the cells as bait to ensure the selectivity and the phospholipid bilayer as raft to provide the sensitivity, we applied this strategy into the plasma membrane proteome analysis of HeLa cells, and in total, 772 PMPs were identified, increased by 4.5 times compared to those identified by the reported cell surface biotinylation method. Notably, among them, 86 CD antigens and 16 ion channel proteins were confidently identified. All these results demonstrated that our proposed approach has great potential in the large scale plasma membrane proteome profiling.

  14. Glucose generates sub-plasma membrane ATP microdomains in single islet beta-cells. Potential role for strategically located mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, H J; Pouli, A E; Ainscow, E K; Jouaville, L S; Rizzuto, R; Rutter, G A

    1999-05-01

    Increases in the concentration of free ATP within the islet beta-cell may couple elevations in blood glucose to insulin release by closing ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels and activating Ca2+ influx. Here, we use recombinant targeted luciferases and photon counting imaging to monitor changes in free [ATP] in subdomains of single living MIN6 and primary beta-cells. Resting [ATP] in the cytosol ([ATP]c), in the mitochondrial matrix ([ATP]m), and beneath the plasma membrane ([ATP]pm) were similar ( approximately 1 mM). Elevations in extracellular glucose concentration (3-30 mM) increased free [ATP] in each domain with distinct kinetics. Thus, sustained increases in [ATP]m and [ATP]pm were observed, but only a transient increase in [ATP]c. However, detectable increases in [ATP]c and [ATP]pm, but not [ATP]m, required extracellular Ca2+. Enhancement of glucose-induced Ca2+ influx with high [K+] had little effect on the apparent [ATP]c and [ATP]m increases but augmented the [ATP]pm increase. Underlying these changes, glucose increased the mitochondrial proton motive force, an effect mimicked by high [K+]. These data support a model in which glucose increases [ATP]m both through enhanced substrate supply and by progressive Ca2+-dependent activation of mitochondrial enzymes. This may then lead to a privileged elevation of [ATP]pm, which may be essential for the sustained closure of KATP channels. Luciferase imaging would appear to be a useful new tool for dynamic in vivo imaging of free ATP concentration.

  15. Exploration of lipid metabolism in relation with plasma membrane properties of Duchenne muscular dystrophy cells: influence of L-carnitine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Le Borgne

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD arises as a consequence of mutations in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a membrane-spanning protein that connects the cytoskeleton and the basal lamina. The most distinctive features of DMD are a progressive muscular dystrophy, a myofiber degeneration with fibrosis and metabolic alterations such as fatty infiltration, however, little is known on lipid metabolism changes arising in Duchenne patient cells. Our goal was to identify metabolic changes occurring in Duchenne patient cells especially in terms of L-carnitine homeostasis, fatty acid metabolism both at the mitochondrial and peroxisomal level and the consequences on the membrane structure and function. In this paper, we compared the structural and functional characteristics of DMD patient and control cells. Using radiolabeled L-carnitine, we found, in patient muscle cells, a marked decrease in the uptake and the intracellular level of L-carnitine. Associated with this change, a decrease in the mitochondrial metabolism can be seen from the analysis of mRNA encoding for mitochondrial proteins. Probably, associated with these changes in fatty acid metabolism, alterations in the lipid composition of the cells were identified: with an increase in poly unsaturated fatty acids and a decrease in medium chain fatty acids, mono unsaturated fatty acids and in cholesterol contents. Functionally, the membrane of cells lacking dystrophin appeared to be less fluid, as determined at 37°C by fluorescence anisotropy. These changes may, at least in part, be responsible for changes in the phospholipids and cholesterol profile in cell membranes and ultimately may reduce the fluidity of the membrane. A supplementation with L-carnitine partly restored the fatty acid profile by increasing saturated fatty acid content and decreasing the amounts of MUFA, PUFA, VLCFA. L-carnitine supplementation also restored muscle membrane fluidity. This suggests that regulating lipid metabolism

  16. Visualization of particle complexes in the plasma membrane of Micrasterias denticulata associated with the formation of cellulose fibrils in primary and secondary cell walls

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Highly ordered arrays of intramembrane particles are observed in freeze- fractured plasma membranes of the green alga Micrasterias denticulata during the synthesis of the secondary cell wall. The observable architecture of the complex consists primarily of a precise hexagonal array of from 3 to 175 rosettes, consisting of 6 particles each, which fracture with the P-face. The complexes are observed at the ends of impressions of cellulose fibrils. The distance between rows of rosettes is equal ...

  17. Topography and functional information of plasma membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    By using atomic force microscope (AFM), the topography and function of the plasmalemma surface of the isolated protoplasts from winter wheat mesophyll cells were observed, and compared with dead protoplasts induced by dehydrating stress. The observational results revealed that the plasma membrane of living protoplasts was in a state of polarization. Lipid layers of different cells and membrane areas exhibited distinct active states. The surfaces of plasma membranes were unequal, and were characterized of regionalisation. In addition, lattice structures were visualized in some regions of the membrane surface. These typical structures were assumed to be lipid molecular complexes, which were measured to be 15.8±0.09 nm in diameter and 1.9±0.3 nm in height. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging showed that the plasmalemma surfaces of winter wheat protoplasts were covered with numerous protruding particles. In order to determine the chemical nature of the protruding particles, living protoplasts were treated by proteolytic enzyme. Under the effect of enzyme, large particles became relatively looser, resulting that their width was increased and their height decreased. The results demonstrated that these particles were likely to be of protein nature. These protein particles at plasmalemma surface were different in size and unequal in distribution. The diameter of large protein particles ranged from 200 to 440 nm, with a central micropore, and the apparent height of them was found to vary from 12 to 40 nm. The diameter of mid-sized protein particles was between 40―60 nm, and a range of 1.8―5 nm was given for the apparent height of them. As for small protein particles, obtained values were 12―40 nm for their diameter and 0.7―2.2 nm for height. Some invaginated pits were also observed at the plasma membrane. They were formed by the endocytosis of protoplast. Distribution density of them at plasmalemma was about 16 pits per 15 μm2. According to their

  18. Topography and functional information of plasma membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN DeLan; CHEN JianMin; SONG YanMei; ZHU ChuanFeng; PAN GeBo; WAN LiJun

    2008-01-01

    By using atomic force microscope (AFM), the topography and function of the plasmalemma surface of the isolated protoplasta from winter wheat mesophyll cells were observed, and compared with dead protoplssts induced by dehydrating stress. The observational results revealed that the plasma membrane of living protoplasta was in a state of polarization. Lipid layers of different cells and membrane areas exhibited distinct active states. The surfaces of plasma membranes were unequal, and were characterized of regionalisation. In addition, lattice structures were visualized in some regions of the membrane surface. These typical structures were assumed to be lipid molecular complexes, which were measured to be 15.8±0.09 nm in diameter and 1.9±0.3 nm in height. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging showed that the plasmalemma surfaces of winter wheat protoplasta were covered with numerous protruding particles. In order to determine the chemical nature of the protruding particles, living protoplasts were treated by proteolytic enzyme. Under the effect of enzyme, large particles became relatively looser, resulting that their width was increased and their height decreased.The results demonstrated that these particles were likely to be of protein nature. These protein particles at plasmalemma surface were different in size and unequal in distribution. The diameter of large protein particles ranged from 200 to 440 nm, with a central micropore, and the apparent height of them was found to vary from 12 to 40 nm. The diameter of mid-sized protein particles was between 40-60 nm,and a range of 1.8-5 nm was given for the apparent height of them. As for small protein particles, obtained values were 12-40 nm for their diameter and 0.7-2.2 nm for height. Some invaginated pits were also observed at the plasma membrane. They were formed by the endocytosis of protoplsst. Distributlon density of them at plasmalemma was about 16 pits per 15 μm2. According to their size, we

  19. Distinct plasma-membrane PtdIns(4)P and PtdIns(4,5)P2 dynamics in secretagogue-stimulated beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Anne; Sågetorp, Jenny; Tengholm, Anders

    2010-05-01

    Phosphoinositides regulate numerous processes in various subcellular compartments. Whereas many stimuli trigger changes in the plasma-membrane PtdIns(4,5)P(2) concentration, little is known about its precursor, PtdIns(4)P, in particular whether there are stimulus-induced alterations independent of those of PtdIns(4,5)P(2). We investigated plasma-membrane PtdIns(4)P and PtdIns(4,5)P(2) dynamics in insulin-secreting MIN6 cells using fluorescent translocation biosensors and total internal reflection microscopy. Loss of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) induced by phospholipase C (PLC)-activating receptor agonists or stimulatory glucose concentrations was paralleled by increased PtdIns(4)P levels. In addition, glucose-stimulated cells regularly showed anti-synchronous oscillations of the two lipids. Whereas glucose-induced PtdIns(4)P elevation required voltage-gated Ca(2+) entry and was mimicked by membrane-depolarizing stimuli, the receptor-induced response was Ca(2+) independent, but sensitive to protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition and mimicked by phorbol ester stimulation. We conclude that glucose and PLC-activating receptor stimuli trigger Ca(2+)- and PKC-dependent changes in the plasma-membrane PtdIns(4)P concentration that are independent of the effects on PtdIns(4,5)P(2). These findings indicate that enhanced formation of PtdIns(4)P, apart from ensuring efficient replenishment of the PtdIns(4,5)P(2) pool, might serve an independent signalling function by regulating the association of PtdIns(4)P-binding proteins with the plasma membrane.

  20. Visualization of particle complexes in the plasma membrane of Micrasterias denticulata associated with the formation of cellulose fibrils in primary and secondary cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, T H; Brower, D L; Staehelin, L A

    1980-02-01

    Highly ordered arrays of intramembrane particles are observed in freeze-fractured plasma membranes of the green alga Micrasterias denticulata during the synthesis of the secondary cell wall. The observable architecture of the complex consists primarily of a precise hexagonal array of from 3 to 175 rosettes, consisting of 6 particles each, which fracture with the P-face. The complexes are observed at the ends of impressions of cellulose fibrils. The distance between rows of rosettes is equal to the center-to-center distance between parallel cellulose fibrils of the secondary wall. Correlation of the structure of the complex with the pattern of deposition indicates that the size of a given fibril is proportional to the number of rosettes engaged in its formation. Vesicles containing hexagonal arrays of rosettes are found in the cytoplasm and can be observed in the process of fusing with the plasma membrane, suggesting that the complexes are first assembled in the cytoplasm and then incorporated into the plasma membrane, where they become active in fibril formation. Single rosettes appear to be responsible for the synthesis of microfibrils during primary wall growth. Similar rosettes have now been detected in a green alga, in fern protonemata, and in higher plant cells. This structure, therefore, probably represents a significant component of the cellulose synthesizing mechanism in a large variety of plant cells. PMID:7189756

  1. LysoPC acyltransferase/PC transacylase activities in plant plasma membrane and plasma membrane-associated endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjellström Henrik

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phospholipids of the plant plasma membrane are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. The majority of these lipids reach the plasma membrane independently of the secretory vesicular pathway. Phospholipid delivery to the mitochondria and chloroplasts of plant cells also bypasses the secretory pathway and here it has been proposed that lysophospholipids are transported at contact sites between specific regions of the ER and the respective organelle, followed by lysophospholipid acylation in the target organelle. To test the hypothesis that a corresponding mechanism operates to transport phospholipids to the plasma membrane outside the secretory pathway, we investigated whether lysolipid acylation occurs also in the plant plasma membrane and whether this membrane, like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, is in close contact with the ER. Results The plant plasma membrane readily incorporated the acyl chain of acyl-CoA into phospholipids. Oleic acid was preferred over palmitic acid as substrate and acyl incorporation occurred predominantly into phosphatidylcholine (PC. Phospholipase A2 stimulated the reaction, as did exogenous lysoPC when administered in above critical micellar concentrations. AgNO3 was inhibitory. The lysophospholipid acylation reaction was higher in a membrane fraction that could be washed off the isolated plasma membranes after repeated freezing and thawing cycles in a medium with lowered pH. This fraction exhibited several ER-like characteristics. When plasma membranes isolated from transgenic Arabidopsis expressing green fluorescent protein in the ER lumen were observed by confocal microscopy, membranes of ER origin were associated with the isolated plasma membranes. Conclusion We conclude that a lysoPC acylation activity is associated with plant plasma membranes and cannot exclude a PC transacylase activity. It is highly plausible that the enzyme(s resides in a fraction of the ER, closely

  2. Molecular mechanisms involved in secretory vesicle recruitment to the plasma membrane in beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadi, Aniko; Ainscow, E K; Allan, V J; Rutter, G A

    2002-04-01

    Glucose stimulates the release of insulin in part by activating the recruitment of secretory vesicles to the cell surface. While this movement is known to be microtubule-dependent, the molecular motors involved are undefined. Active kinesin was found to be essential for vesicle translocation in live beta-cells, since microinjection of cDNA encoding dominant-negative KHC(mut) (motor domain of kinesin heavy chain containing a Thr(93)-->Asn point mutation) blocked vesicular movements. Moreover, expression of KHC(mut) strongly inhibited the sustained, but not acute, stimulation of secretion by glucose. Thus, vesicles released during the first phase of insulin secretion exist largely within a translocation-independent pool. Kinesin-driven anterograde movement of vesicles is then necessary for the sustained (second phase) of insulin release. Kinesin may, therefore, represent a novel target for increases in intracellular ATP concentrations in response to elevated extracellular glucose and may be involved in the ATP-sensitive K+channel-independent stimulation of secretion by the sugar.

  3. Plasma membrane proteomics and its application in clinical cancer biomarker discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lund, Rikke; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2010-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins that are exposed on the cell surface have important biological functions, such as signaling into and out of the cells, ion transport, and cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The expression level of many of the plasma membrane proteins involved in these key functions i...

  4. Organization and Dynamics of Receptor Proteins in a Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-11-25

    The interactions of membrane proteins are influenced by their lipid environment, with key lipid species able to regulate membrane protein function. Advances in high-resolution microscopy can reveal the organization and dynamics of proteins and lipids within living cells at resolutions membranes of in vivo-like complexity. We explore the dynamics of proteins and lipids in crowded and complex plasma membrane models, thereby closing the gap in length and complexity between computations and experiments. Our simulations provide insights into the mutual interplay between lipids and proteins in determining mesoscale (20-100 nm) fluctuations of the bilayer, and in enabling oligomerization and clustering of membrane proteins.

  5. Composite plasma polymerized sulfonated polystyrene membrane for PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Bhabesh Kumar; Khan, Aziz; Chutia, Joyanti, E-mail: jchutiaiasst@gmail.com

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) is used as the sulfonating agent. • The proton conductivity of the membrane is found to be 0.141 S cm{sup −1}. • Power density of fuel cell with styrene/MMS membrane is 0.5 W cm{sup −2}. • The membrane exhibits thermal stability up to 140 °C. - Abstract: This work presents the introduction of an organic compound methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) for the first time in fabrication of polystyrene based proton exchange membrane (PEM) by plasma polymerization process. The membrane is fabricated by co-polymerizing styrene and MMS in capacitively coupled continuous RF plasma. The chemical composition of the plasma polymerized polymer membrane is investigated using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy which reveals the formation of composite structure of styrene and MMS. The surface morphology studied using AFM and SEM depicts the effect of higher partial pressure of MMS on surface topography of the membrane. The proton transport property of the membrane studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows the achievement of maximum proton conductivity of 0.141 S cm{sup −1} which is comparable to Nafion 117 membrane. Fuel cell performance test of the synthesized membrane shows a maximum power density of 500 mW cm{sup −2} and current density of 0.62 A cm{sup −2} at 0.6 V.

  6. Composite plasma polymerized sulfonated polystyrene membrane for PEMFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) is used as the sulfonating agent. • The proton conductivity of the membrane is found to be 0.141 S cm−1. • Power density of fuel cell with styrene/MMS membrane is 0.5 W cm−2. • The membrane exhibits thermal stability up to 140 °C. - Abstract: This work presents the introduction of an organic compound methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) for the first time in fabrication of polystyrene based proton exchange membrane (PEM) by plasma polymerization process. The membrane is fabricated by co-polymerizing styrene and MMS in capacitively coupled continuous RF plasma. The chemical composition of the plasma polymerized polymer membrane is investigated using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy which reveals the formation of composite structure of styrene and MMS. The surface morphology studied using AFM and SEM depicts the effect of higher partial pressure of MMS on surface topography of the membrane. The proton transport property of the membrane studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows the achievement of maximum proton conductivity of 0.141 S cm−1 which is comparable to Nafion 117 membrane. Fuel cell performance test of the synthesized membrane shows a maximum power density of 500 mW cm−2 and current density of 0.62 A cm−2 at 0.6 V

  7. Membrane Organization and Dynamics in Cell Polarity

    OpenAIRE

    Orlando, Kelly; Guo, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of cell polarity is important to a wide range of biological processes ranging from chemotaxis to embryogenesis. An essential feature of cell polarity is the asymmetric organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane. In this article, we discuss how polarity regulators such as small GTP-binding proteins and phospholipids spatially and kinetically control vesicular trafficking and membrane organization. Conversely, we discuss how membrane trafficking...

  8. Ca2+-dependent cessation of cytoplasmic streaming induced by hypertonic treatment in Vallisneria mesophyll cells: possible role of cell wall-plasma membrane adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Teruyuki; Takagi, Shingo

    2003-10-01

    In mesophyll cells of the aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, a rapid and transient inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming was induced by hypertonic treatment with sorbitol. Higher concentrations of sorbitol induced the response more rapidly and in more cells. The response to hypertonic treatment was strictly dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ and was sensitive to Ca2+-channel blockers, including the stretch-activated Ca2+-channel blocker Gd3+. Deplasmolyzed cells never responded to a second hypertonic treatment administered immediately after plasmolysis and subsequent deplasmolysis. Responsiveness was gradually recovered during 24 h of incubation; however, cycloheximide, cordycepin, and trypsin completely suppressed the recovery. Although an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) hexapeptide markedly disturbed the pattern of cytoplasmic streaming, it exhibited no specific effects on the response to hypertonic treatment or on the recovery of responsiveness. Taken together, our results demonstrate that leaf mesophyll cells in a multicellular plant can respond to mechanical stimuli and that a Ca2+ influx through stretch-activated Ca2+ channels plays an indispensable role in the response. Furthermore, the possible involvement of RGD-insensitive but trypsin-sensitive protein factor(s), whose function is impaired by detachment of the plasma membrane from the cell wall, is suggested. PMID:14581627

  9. 1/f ruffle oscillations in plasma membranes of amphibian epithelial cells under normal and inverted gravitational orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, H S; Martins, M L; Vilela, M J; Jaeger, Ruy; Kachar, B

    2006-10-01

    Membrane ruffle fluctuations of amphibian epithelial cells A6 (CCL102) cultured in normal and upside down oriented plates have been analyzed through video microscopy. Our results reveal that their edge ruffle fluctuations exhibit a stochastic dynamics with 1/f(alpha) power spectrum over at least two decades at low frequencies and long range correlated, self-affine lateral border profiles. In a few and small areas of the membrane, probably nearby focal contacts, we found periodic oscillations which could be induced by myosin driven contraction of stress fibers. Furthermore, whereas the different gravitational orientations had none or little effect on the structure (power spectra and surface roughness) of these membrane ruffle fluctuations, their dynamic parameters were differentially affected. Indeed, the decay time of ruffles remained unchanged, but the period of lamellipodia oscillations near the focal adhesion points was significantly altered in A6 cells cultured upside down. PMID:17155092

  10. Heme-binding plasma membrane proteins of K562 erythroleukemia cells: Adsorption to heme-microbeads, isolation with affinity chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majuri, R. (Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki (Finland))

    1989-01-01

    Heme-microbeads attached themselves to the surface of viable K562 cells in a manner inhibitable by free hemin, indicating heme-recptor interaction. The microbeads were at first evenly distributed, but after prolonged incubation at 37 deg. C they formed a cap on one pole of the cells indicating clustering of the membrane heme receptors. Membrane proteins were labeled by culturing the cells in the presence of {sup 35}S-methionine and were then solubilized with Triton X-114. The hydrophobic proteins contained about 20% of the total bound label. The solubilized membrane proteins were subsequently adsorbed to a heme-Sepharose affinity gel. According to SDS-electrophorsis and subsequent autoradiography, the immobilized heme captures two proteins or a protein with two polypeptides of 20 000 and 32 000 daltons. The larger of these was only wekly labeled with {sup 35}S. The same two bands were observed if the cell surface proteins were labeled with {sup 125}I by the lactoperoxidase method and the subsequently solubilized membrane proteins were isolated with heme-Sepharose. (author).

  11. FLIM studies of 22- and 25-NBD-cholesterol in living HEK293 cells: plasma membrane change induced by cholesterol depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostašov, Pavel; Sýkora, Jan; Brejchová, Jana; Olżyńska, Agnieszka; Hof, Martin; Svoboda, Petr

    2013-01-01

    HEK293 cells stably expressing δ-opioid receptor were labeled first with fluorescent analog of cholesterol, 22-NBD-cholesterol, exposed to cholesterol-depleting agent β-cyclodextrin (β-CDX) and analyzed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In accordance with chemical analysis of cholesterol level, the total cellular signal of this probe was decreased to half. Distribution of lifetime (τtot) values of 22-NBD-cholesterol, however, when screened over the whole cell area indicated no significant difference between control (τtot=4.9±0.1 ns) and β-CDX-treated (τtot=4.8±0.1 ns) cells. On the contrary, comparison of control (τtot=5.1±0.1 ns) and β-CDX-treated (τtot=4.4±0.1 ns) cells by analysis of 25-NBD-cholesterol fluorescence implied highly significant decrease of lifetime values of this probe. The observation that 22-NBD-cholesterol appears to be indifferent to the changes in the membrane packing in living cells is in agreement with previous studies in model membranes. However, our data indicate that the alternation of plasma membrane structure induced by decrease of cholesterol level by β-CDX makes the membrane environment of NBD moiety of 25-NBD-cholesterol probe a significantly more hydrated. This finding not only encourages using 25-NBD-cholesterol in living cells, but also demonstrates that previously drawn discouraging conclusions on the use of 25-NBD-cholesterol in model membranes are not valid for living cells. PMID:23466534

  12. Alamethicin permeabilizes the plasma membrane and mitochondria but not the tonoplast in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow) suspension cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matic, S.; Geisler, D.A.; Møller, I.M.;

    2005-01-01

    The ion channel-forming peptide AlaM (alamethicin) is known to permeabilize isolated mitochondria as well as animal cells. When intact tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) Bright Yellow-2 cells were treated with AlaM, the cells became permeable for low-molecular-mass molecules as shown by induced leakage...... remained intact, as indicated by an unaffected tonoplast proton gradient. Low-flux permeabilization of plasma membranes and mitochondria at moderate AlaM concentrations was reversible and did not affect cell vigour. Higher AlaM concentrations induced cell death. After the addition of catalase that removes...... the H2O2 necessary for NADH oxidation by apoplastic peroxidases, mitochondrial oxygen consumption could be measured in permeabilized cells. Inhibitor-sensitive oxidation of the respiratory substrates succinate, malate and NADH was observed after the addition of the appropriate coenzymes (ATP, NAD...

  13. Characterization of plant plasma membrane antigens: [Annual] progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protoplast plasma membranes were used to raise antibodies in mice to cell surface antigens. Monoclonal antibodies were selected from those produced and used for indirect immunofluorescence microscopic analysis of N. tabacum cells. In parallel studies cDNA expression libraries were prepared. (DT)

  14. Macroscopic domain formation in the platelet plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bali, Rachna; Savino, Laura; Ramirez, Diego A.;

    2009-01-01

    There has been ample debate on whether cell membranes can present macroscopic lipid domains as predicted by three-component phase diagrams obtained by fluorescence microscopy. Several groups have argued that membrane proteins and interactions with the cytoskeleton inhibit the formation of large...... phase behavior of the platelet plasma membrane by FTIR, and compare it to a POPC/Sphingomyelin/Cholesterol model representing the outer leaflet composition. We find that this model closely reflects the platelet phase behavior. Previous work has shown that the platelet plasma membrane presents...... domains. In contrast, some polarizable cells do show large regions with qualitative differences in lipid fluidity. It is important to ask more precisely, based on the current phase diagrams, under what conditions would large domains be expected to form in cells. In this work we study the thermotropic...

  15. Spatial Organization of the Cytoskeleton enhances Cargo Delivery to Specific Target Areas on the Plasma Membrane of Spherical Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Hafner, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular transport is vital for the proper functioning and survival of a cell. Cargo (proteins, vesicles, organelles, etc.) is transferred from its place of creation to its target locations via molecular motor assisted transport along cytoskeletal filaments. The transport efficiency is strongly affected by the spatial organization of the cytoskeleton, which constitutes an inhomogeneous, complex network. In cells with a centrosome microtubules grow radially from the central microtubule organizing center towards the cell periphery whereas actin filaments form a dense meshwork, the actin cortex, underneath the cell membrane with a broad range of orientations. The emerging ballistic motion along filaments is frequently interrupted due to constricting intersection nodes or cycles of detachment and reattachment processes in the crowded cytoplasm. In order to investigate the efficiency of search strategies established by the cell's specific spatial organization of the cytoskeleton we formulate a random velocity...

  16. Perforin rapidly induces plasma membrane phospholipid flip-flop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil S Metkar

    Full Text Available The cytotoxic cell granule secretory pathway is essential for host defense. This pathway is fundamentally a form of intracellular protein delivery where granule proteases (granzymes from cytotoxic lymphocytes are thought to diffuse through barrel stave pores generated in the plasma membrane of the target cell by the pore forming protein perforin (PFN and mediate apoptotic as well as additional biological effects. While recent electron microscopy and structural analyses indicate that recombinant PFN oligomerizes to form pores containing 20 monomers (20 nm when applied to liposomal membranes, these pores are not observed by propidium iodide uptake in target cells. Instead, concentrations of human PFN that encourage granzyme-mediated apoptosis are associated with pore structures that unexpectedly favor phosphatidylserine flip-flop measured by Annexin-V and Lactadherin. Efforts that reduce PFN mediated Ca influx in targets did not reduce Annexin-V reactivity. Antigen specific mouse CD8 cells initiate a similar rapid flip-flop in target cells. A lipid that augments plasma membrane curvature as well as cholesterol depletion in target cells enhance flip-flop. Annexin-V staining highly correlated with apoptosis after Granzyme B (GzmB treatment. We propose the structures that PFN oligomers form in the membrane bilayer may include arcs previously observed by electron microscopy and that these unusual structures represent an incomplete mixture of plasma membrane lipid and PFN oligomers that may act as a flexible gateway for GzmB to translocate across the bilayer to the cytosolic leaflet of target cells.

  17. Association of n3 and n6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in red blood cell membrane and plasma with severity of normal tension glaucoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Man; Yu; Bo; Chen; Bo; Gong; Ping; Shuai; Zheng-Zheng; Wu; Wei; Lin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether red blood cell(RBC)membrane and plasma lipids, particularly long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid(EPA), docosahexaenoic acid(DHA), arachidonic acid(AA) are significantly correlated with severity of normal tension glaucoma(NTG).METHODS: This study included 35 patients with NTG and 12 healthy normal control subjects, matched for age and sex with the study group. The stage of glaucoma was determined according to the Hodapp-Parrish-Anderson classification. Lipids were extracted from RBC membranes and plasma, and fatty acid methyl esters prepared and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(GC-MS).RESULTS: When RBC lipids were analyzed, the levels of EPA, the levels of DHA and the ratio of n3 to n6 were positively associated with the Humphrey Perimetry mean Deviation(MD) score(r =0.617, P <0.001; r =0.727, P <0.001 and r =0.720, P <0.001, respectively), while the level of AA was negatively associated with the MD score(r =-0.427, P =0.001). When plasma lipids were analyzed,there was a significant positive relationship between the levels of EPA and the MD score(r =0.648, P <0.001), and the levels of AA were inversely correlated with the MD score(r =-0.638, P <0.001). CONCLUSION: The levels of n3 and n6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in RBC membrane and plasma lipids were associated with severity of NTG.

  18. How cholesterol homeostasis is regulated by plasma membrane cholesterol in excess of phospholipids

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, Yvonne; Ye, Jin; Steck, Theodore L.

    2004-01-01

    How do cells sense and control their cholesterol levels? Whereas most of the cell cholesterol is located in the plasma membrane, the effectors of its abundance are regulated by a small pool of cholesterol in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The size of the ER compartment responds rapidly and dramatically to small changes in plasma membrane cholesterol around the normal level. Consequently, increasing plasma membrane cholesterol in vivo from just below to just above the basal level evoked an ac...

  19. Membrane fusion by VAMP3 and plasma membrane t-SNAREs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pairing of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins on vesicles (v-SNAREs) and SNARE proteins on target membranes (t-SNAREs) mediates intracellular membrane fusion. VAMP3/cellubrevin is a v-SNARE that resides in recycling endosomes and endosome-derived transport vesicles. VAMP3 has been implicated in recycling of transferrin receptors, secretion of α-granules in platelets, and membrane trafficking during cell migration. Using a cell fusion assay, we examined membrane fusion capacity of the ternary complexes formed by VAMP3 and plasma membrane t-SNAREs syntaxin1, syntaxin4, SNAP-23 and SNAP-25. VAMP3 forms fusogenic pairing with t-SNARE complexes syntaxin1/SNAP-25, syntaxin1/SNAP-23 and syntaxin4/SNAP-25, but not with syntaxin4/SNAP-23. Deletion of the N-terminal domain of syntaxin4 enhanced membrane fusion more than two fold, indicating that the N-terminal domain negatively regulates membrane fusion. Differential membrane fusion capacities of the ternary v-/t-SNARE complexes suggest that transport vesicles containing VAMP3 have distinct membrane fusion kinetics with domains of the plasma membrane that present different t-SNARE proteins

  20. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  1. Exclusive photorelease of signalling lipids at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, André; Yushchenko, Dmytro A; Müller, Rainer; Stein, Frank; Feng, Suihan; Mulle, Christophe; Carta, Mario; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-12-21

    Photoactivation of caged biomolecules has become a powerful approach to study cellular signalling events. Here we report a method for anchoring and uncaging biomolecules exclusively at the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane by employing a photocleavable, sulfonated coumarin derivative. The novel caging group allows quantifying the reaction progress and efficiency of uncaging reactions in a live-cell microscopy setup, thereby greatly improving the control of uncaging experiments. We synthesized arachidonic acid derivatives bearing the new negatively charged or a neutral, membrane-permeant coumarin caging group to locally induce signalling either at the plasma membrane or on internal membranes in β-cells and brain slices derived from C57B1/6 mice. Uncaging at the plasma membrane triggers a strong enhancement of calcium oscillations in β-cells and a pronounced potentiation of synaptic transmission while uncaging inside cells blocks calcium oscillations in β-cells and causes a more transient effect on neuronal transmission, respectively. The precise subcellular site of arachidonic acid release is therefore crucial for signalling outcome in two independent systems.

  2. The loss of plasma membrane lysopip and an increase of PIP2 result from treatment of carrot cells with fungal enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plasma membranes of carrot cells grown in suspension culture are enriched with PIP, lysoPIP, and PIP2. To determine whether or not these lipids are involved in signal transduction, we have challenged the cells with a mixture of fungal cellulases, Driselase, and monitored the changes in the phosphoinositides and in the phosphoinositide kinase activity. With cell prelabeled with [3H]inositol, two major changes are observed: (1) lysoPIP decreases 30% compared to the sorbitol control and (2) PIP2 doubles. There is no increase in IP, IP2, or IP3. In vitro phosphorylation studies using [γ-32P]ATP indicate that the increase in PIP2 is due in part to activation of the PIP kinase. These data suggest that the role of the polyphosphoinositides in signal transduction in plants may involve activation of the PIP kinase and/or activation of A type phospholipases rather than C type phospholipases

  3. Cell membrane softening in human breast and cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Chris; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Schiller, Jürgen; Dietrich, Undine; Möhn, Till; Kießling, Tobias R.; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Horn, Lars-Christian; Briest, Susanne; Höckel, Michael; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical properties are key to many cellular functions such as cell division and cell motility and thus are crucial in the development and understanding of several diseases, for instance cancer. The mechanics of the cellular cytoskeleton have been extensively characterized in cells and artificial systems. The rigidity of the plasma membrane, with the exception of red blood cells, is unknown and membrane rigidity measurements only exist for vesicles composed of a few synthetic lipids. In this study, thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells, as well as breast cell lines, are analyzed. Cell blebs or GPMVs were studied via thermal membrane fluctuations and mass spectrometry. It will be shown that cancer cell membranes are significantly softer than their non-malignant counterparts. This can be attributed to a loss of fluid raft forming lipids in malignant cells. These results indicate that the reduction of membrane rigidity promotes aggressive blebbing motion in invasive cancer cells.

  4. Bile acids modulate signaling by functional perturbation of plasma membrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Maxwell, Kelsey N; Sezgin, Erdinc; Lu, Maryia; Liang, Hong; Hancock, John F; Dial, Elizabeth J; Lichtenberger, Lenard M; Levental, Ilya

    2013-12-13

    Eukaryotic cell membranes are organized into functional lipid and protein domains, the most widely studied being membrane rafts. Although rafts have been associated with numerous plasma membrane functions, the mechanisms by which these domains themselves are regulated remain undefined. Bile acids (BAs), whose primary function is the solubilization of dietary lipids for digestion and absorption, can affect cells by interacting directly with membranes. To investigate whether these interactions affected domain organization in biological membranes, we assayed the effects of BAs on biomimetic synthetic liposomes, isolated plasma membranes, and live cells. At cytotoxic concentrations, BAs dissolved synthetic and cell-derived membranes and disrupted live cell plasma membranes, implicating plasma membrane damage as the mechanism for BA cellular toxicity. At subtoxic concentrations, BAs dramatically stabilized domain separation in Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles without affecting protein partitioning between coexisting domains. Domain stabilization was the result of BA binding to and disordering the nonraft domain, thus promoting separation by enhancing domain immiscibility. Consistent with the physical changes observed in synthetic and isolated biological membranes, BAs reorganized intact cell membranes, as evaluated by the spatial distribution of membrane-anchored Ras isoforms. Nanoclustering of K-Ras, related to nonraft membrane domains, was enhanced in intact plasma membranes, whereas the organization of H-Ras was unaffected. BA-induced changes in Ras lateral segregation potentiated EGF-induced signaling through MAPK, confirming the ability of BAs to influence cell signal transduction by altering the physical properties of the plasma membrane. These observations suggest general, membrane-mediated mechanisms by which biological amphiphiles can produce their cellular effects.

  5. Magnetic apatite for structural insights on the plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The iron oxide-hydroxyapatite (FeOxHA) nanoparticles reported here differ from those reported before by their advantage of homogeneity and simple preparation; moreover, the presence of carboxymethyldextran (CMD), together with hydroxyapatite (HA), allows access to the cellular membrane, which makes our magnetic apatite unique. These nanoparticles combine magnetic behavior, Raman label ability and the property of interaction with the cellular membrane; they therefore represent an interesting material for structural differentiation of the cell membrane. It was observed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy that FeOxHA adheres to the plasma membrane and does not penetrate the membrane. These insights make the nanoparticles a promising material for magnetic cell sorting, e.g. in microfluidic device applications. (paper)

  6. On the puzzling distribution of cholesterol in the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, H; Schick, M

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of cholesterol between the two leaves of the plasma membrane in mammalian cells presents a conundrum; given cholesterol's known affinity for sphingomyelin, which resides predominantly in the exoplasmic leaf, why is it that experiment finds a majority of the cholesterol in the cytoplasmic leaf? This article reviews a recently proposed solution to this puzzle. PMID:26724709

  7. Influence of platelet-activating factor, lyso-platelet-activating factor and edelfosine on Langmuir monolayers imitating plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to anti-cancer treatment: the effect of plasmalogen level

    OpenAIRE

    Flasiński, Michał; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Wydro, Paweł; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2014-01-01

    Three structurally related but differing in biological activities single-chained ether phospholipids (PAF (platelet-activating factor) and lyso-PAF) and an anti-cancer drug (edelfosine (ED)) were investigated in Langmuir monolayers imitating natural membranes. The aim of the undertaken experiments was to study the influence of these lipids on monolayers mimicking plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to the anti-cancer activity of ED, i.e. promyelocytic leukaemia cells (H...

  8. Autoinhibitory Regulation of Plasma Membrane H+-ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Torbøl

    Electrochemical gradients across cell membranes are essential for nutrient uptake. In plant and fungal cells the electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane (PM) can build much higher than in mammalian cells. The protein responsible for this gradient is the essential PM H+-ATPase that uses...... of plant PM H+-ATPases developed with the first land plants and has remained conserved ever since. Beside phosphorylation in the terminal domains, lipid homeostasis also influences the autoinhibitory regulation. A group of lipids called lyso-phospholipids have been identified as signaling molecules...

  9. Effect of a GABA agonist on the expression and distribution of GABAA receptors in the plasma membrane of cultured cerebellar granule cells: an immunocytochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP, 150 microM) on the localization and density of GABAA receptors in the plasma membrane of rat cerebellar granule cells in primary cultures was studied at the electron microscope (EM) level......, the density of the GABAA receptors was significantly increased in the THIP-treated cultures as compared to the control cultures and this effect of THIP was particularly pronounced in the processes. GABAA receptors were occasionally observed to form 'hot spots' in process-like structures and again...... at the EM level using the preembedding immunogold technique. It is likely that low-affinity GABAA receptors are preferentially located in the cell processes and to a considerable extent in the form of 'hot spots'. However, these 'hot spots' also contain high-affinity receptors....

  10. Inside job: ligand-receptor pharmacology beneath the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Joseph J; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    Most drugs acting on the cell surface receptors are membrane permeable and thus able to engage their target proteins in different subcellular compartments. However, these drugs' effects on cell surface receptors have historically been studied on the plasma membrane alone. Increasing evidence suggests that small molecules may also modulate their targeted receptors through membrane trafficking or organelle-localized signaling inside the cell. These additional modes of interaction have been reported for functionally diverse ligands of GPCRs, ion channels, and transporters. Such intracellular drug-target engagements affect cell surface expression. Concurrent intracellular and cell surface signaling may also increase the complexity and therapeutic opportunities of small molecule modulation. Here we discuss examples of ligand-receptor interactions that are present in both intra- and extracellular sites, and the potential therapeutic opportunities presented by this phenomenon. PMID:23685953

  11. Inside job: ligand-receptor pharmacology beneath the plasma membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph J BABCOCK; Min LI

    2013-01-01

    Most drugs acting on the cell surface receptors are membrane permeable and thus able to engage their target proteins in different subcellular compartments.However,these drugs' effects on cell surface receptors have historically been studied on the plasma membrane alone.Increasing evidence suggests that small molecules may also modulate their targeted receptors through membrane trafficking or organelle-localized signaling inside the cell.These additional modes of interaction have been reported for functionally diverse ligands of GPCRs,ion channels,and transporters.Such intracellular drug-target engagements affect cell surface expression.Concurrent intracellular and cell surface signaling may also increase the complexity and therapeutic opportunities of small molecule modulation.Here we discuss examples of ligand-receptor interactions that are present in both intra- and extracellular sites,and the potential therapeutic opportunities presented by this phenomenon.

  12. Sulfate transport in Penicillium chrysogenum plasma membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillenga, Dirk J.; Versantvoort, Hanneke J.M.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1996-01-01

    Transport studies with Penicillium chrysogenum plasma membranes fused with cytochrome c oxidase liposomes demonstrate that sulfate uptake is driven by the transmembrane pH gradient and not by the transmembrane electrical potential. Ca2+ and other divalent cations are not required. It is concluded th

  13. The odyssey of Hsp60 from tumor cells to other destinations includes plasma membrane-associated stages and Golgi and exosomal protein-trafficking modalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Campanella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a previous work we showed for the first time that human tumor cells secrete Hsp60 via exosomes, which are considered immunologically active microvesicles involved in tumor progression. This finding raised questions concerning the route followed by Hsp60 to reach the exosomes, its location in them, and whether Hsp60 can be secreted also via other mechanisms, e.g., by the Golgi. We addressed these issues in the work presented here. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that Hsp60 localizes in the tumor cell plasma membrane, is associated with lipid rafts, and ends up in the exosomal membrane. We also found evidence that Hsp60 localizes in the Golgi apparatus and its secretion is prevented by an inhibitor of this organelle. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose a multistage process for the translocation of Hsp60 from the inside to the outside of the cell that includes a combination of protein traffic pathways and, ultimately, presence of the chaperonin in the circulating blood. The new information presented should help in designing future strategies for research and for developing diagnostic-monitoring means useful in clinical oncology.

  14. SGLT1 protein expression in plasma membrane of acinar cells correlates with the sympathetic outflow to salivary glands in diabetic and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino-Silva, Robinson; Alves-Wagner, Ana B T; Burgi, Katia; Okamoto, Maristela M; Alves, Adilson S; Lima, Guilherme A; Freitas, Helayne S; Antunes, Vagner R; Machado, Ubiratan F

    2010-12-01

    Salivary gland dysfunction is a feature in diabetes and hypertension. We hypothesized that sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) participates in salivary dysfunctions through a sympathetic- and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. In Wistar-Kyoto (WKY), diabetic WKY (WKY-D), spontaneously hypertensive (SHR), and diabetic SHR (SHR-D) rats, PKA/SGLT1 proteins were analyzed in parotid and submandibular glands, and the sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to the glands was monitored. Basal SNA was threefold higher in SHR (P acinar cells were regulated in parallel to the SNA. Electrical stimulation of the sympathetic branch to salivary glands increased (∼30%, P acinar cells. Taken together, our results show highly coordinated regulation of sympathetic activity upon PKA activity and plasma membrane SGLT1 content in salivary glands. Furthermore, the present findings show that diabetic- and/or hypertensive-induced changes in the sympathetic activity correlate with changes in SGLT1 expression in basolateral membrane of acinar cells, which can participate in the salivary glands dysfunctions reported by patients with these pathologies.

  15. Organized living: formation mechanisms and functions of plasma membrane domains in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E; Christiano, Romain; Walther, Tobias C

    2012-03-01

    Plasma membrane proteins and lipids organize into lateral domains of specific composition. Domain formation is achieved by a combination of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions, membrane-binding protein scaffolds and protein fences. The resulting domains function in membrane protein turnover and homeostasis, as well as in cell signaling. We review the mechanisms generating plasma membrane domains and the functional consequences of this organization, focusing on recent findings from research on the yeast model system.

  16. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S Itano

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (~80 nm on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to four hours. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150-175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal nanodomain structure, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of < 30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen.

  17. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itano, Michelle; Graus, Matthew; Pehlke, Carolyn; Wester, Michael; Liu, Ping; Lidke, Keith; Thompson, Nancy; Jacobson, Ken; Neumann, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs) that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (~80 nm) on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to four hours. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150-175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal nanodomain structure, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of < 30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen.

  18. A plasma-membrane E-MAP reveals links of the eisosome with sphingolipid metabolism and endosomal trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguilar, Pablo S; Fröhlich, Florian; Rehman, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane delimits the cell and controls material and information exchange between itself and the environment. How different plasma-membrane processes are coordinated and how the relative abundance of plasma-membrane lipids and proteins is homeostatically maintained are not yet understo...

  19. Free-cholesterol loading does not trigger phase separation of the fluorescent sterol dehydroergosterol in the plasma membrane of macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    membrane distribution of the fluorescent cholesterol-mimicking sterol dehydroergosterol (DHE) was investigated in FC-loaded J774 macrophages. Wide field fluorescence and deconvolution microscopy were combined with quantitative assessment of sterol distribution in straightened plasma membrane image segments....... DHE's surface distribution matched exactly large ruffles and membrane protrusions which were pronounced in FC-loaded cells. Plasma membrane blebs, however, formed in FC-loaded J774 cells had a homogenous staining along the membrane bilayer at 20 degrees C. The results show that even in FC-loaded cells...... with increased membrane cholesterol content, sterols do not form a separate phase in the plasma membrane....

  20. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 translocates protein kinase C beta to nucleus and enhances plasma membrane association of protein kinase C alpha in renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simboli-Campbell, M; Gagnon, A; Franks, D J; Welsh, J

    1994-02-01

    1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)2-D3) increases membrane-associated protein kinase C (PKC) activity and immunoreactivity in renal epithelial (Madin Darby bovine kidney, MDBK) cells (Simboli-Campbell, M., Franks, D. J., and Welsh, J. E. (1992) Cell Signalling 4, 99-109). We have now characterized the effects of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 on the subcellular localization of three individual isozymes by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. Although the total amount of PKC alpha, PKC beta, and PKC zeta are unaffected by 1,25-(OH)2-D3, this steroid hormone induces subcellular redistribution of both PKC alpha and PKC beta. Treatment with 1,25-(OH)2-D3 (100 nM, 24 h) enhances plasma membrane association of PKC alpha and induces translocation of PKC beta to the nuclear membrane. The effects of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 appear to be limited to the calcium-dependent PKC isozymes, since 1,25-(OH)2-D3 has no effect on the calcium independent isozyme, PKC zeta. In contrast to rapid transient PKC translocation seen in response to agents which interact with membrane receptors to induce phospholipid hydrolysis, modulation of PKC alpha and PKC beta is observed after 24 h treatment with 1,25-(OH)2-D3. In MDBK cells, the phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (100 nM, 24 h) down-regulates PKC alpha and, to a lesser extent, PKC zeta, without altering their subcellular distribution. TPA also induces translocation of PKC beta to the nuclear membrane. MDBK cells treated with 1,25-(OH)2-D3, but not TPA, exhibit enhanced phosphorylation of endogenous nuclear proteins. In addition to the distinct effects of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 and TPA on PKC isozyme patterns, 1,25-(OH)2-D3 up-regulates both the vitamin D receptor and calbindin D-28K, whereas TPA down-regulates the expression of both proteins. These data support the involvement of PKC in the mechanism of action of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 and specifically implicate PKC beta in 1,25-(OH)2-D3-mediated nuclear events. PMID:8106362

  1. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  2. Reconstitution of clathrin-coated pit budding from plasma membranes

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis begins with the binding of ligand to receptors in clathrin-coated pits followed by the budding of the pits away from the membrane. We have successfully reconstituted this sequence in vitro. Highly purified plasma membranes labeled with gold were obtained by incubating cells in the presence of anti-LDL receptor IgG-gold at 4 degrees C, attaching the labeled cells to a poly-L-lysine- coated substratum at 4 degrees C and then gently sonicating them to remove everyth...

  3. Phosphorylation and activation of the plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1 during osmotic cell shrinkage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert R Rigor

    Full Text Available The Na(+/H(+Exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1 is a highly versatile, broadly distributed and precisely controlled transport protein that mediates volume and pH regulation in most cell types. NHE1 phosphorylation contributes to Na(+/H(+ exchange activity in response to phorbol esters, growth factors or protein phosphatase inhibitors, but has not been observed during activation by osmotic cell shrinkage (OCS. We examined the role of NHE1 phosphorylation during activation by OCS, using an ideal model system, the Amphiuma tridactylum red blood cell (atRBC. Na(+/H(+ exchange in atRBCs is mediated by an NHE1 homolog (atNHE1 that is 79% identical to human NHE1 at the amino acid level. NHE1 activity in atRBCs is exceptionally robust in that transport activity can increase more than 2 orders of magnitude from rest to full activation. Michaelis-Menten transport kinetics indicates that either OCS or treatment with the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin-A (CLA increase Na(+ transport capacity without affecting transport affinity (K(m=44 mM in atRBCs. CLA and OCS act non-additively to activate atNHE1, indicating convergent, phosphorylation-dependent signaling in atNHE1 activation. In situ(32P labeling and immunoprecipitation demonstrates that the net phosphorylation of atNHE1 is increased 4-fold during OCS coinciding with a more than 2-order increase in Na(+ transport activity. This is the first reported evidence of increased NHE1 phosphorylation during OCS in any vertebrate cell type. Finally, liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analysis of atNHE1 immunoprecipitated from atRBC membranes reveals 9 phosphorylated serine/threonine residues, suggesting that activation of atNHE1 involves multiple phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation events.

  4. Generation of Long-Lived Bone Marrow Plasma Cells Secreting Antibodies Specific for the HIV-1 gp41 Membrane-Proximal External Region in the Absence of Polyreactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donius, Luke R.; Cheng, Yuxing; Choi, Jaewon; Sun, Zhen-Yu J.; Hanson, Melissa; Zhang, Michael; Gierahn, Todd M.; Marquez, Susanna; Uduman, Mohammed; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Irvine, Darrell; Love, J. Christopher; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An effective preventive vaccine is highly sought after in order to stem the current HIV-1 pandemic. Both conservation of contiguous gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) amino acid sequences across HIV-1 clades and the ability of anti-MPER broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs) to block viral hemifusion/fusion establish the MPER as a prime vaccination target. In earlier studies, we described the development of an MPER vaccine formulation that takes advantage of liposomes to array the MPER on a lipid bilayer surface, paralleling its native configuration on the virus membrane while also incorporating molecular adjuvant and CD4 T cell epitope cargo. Here we demonstrate that several immunizations with MPER/liposomes induce high levels of bone marrow long-lived plasma cell (LLPC) antibody production. Single-cell immunoglobulin gene retrieval analysis shows that these plasma cells are derived from a germ line repertoire of B cells with a diverse representation of immunoglobulin genes, exhibiting antigen-driven positive selection. Characterization of LLPC recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rMAbs) indicates that antigen recognition is achieved through convergence on a common epitopic focus by utilizing various complementarity-determining region H3 (CDRH3) lengths. Importantly, the vast majority of rMAbs produced from these cells lack polyreactivity yet manifest antigen specificity in the context of lipids, shaping MPER-specific paratopes through selective pressure. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the MPER is a vaccine target with minimal risk of generating off-target autoimmunity. IMPORTANCE A useful vaccine must generate desired long-term, antigen-specific antibody responses devoid of polyreactivity or autoreactivity. The common polyreactive features of some HIV-1 BNAbs have raised concern about elicitation of anti-MPER antibodies. Utilizing single-LLPC repertoire analysis and biophysical characterization of anti-MPER rMAbs, we show that

  5. Isolation and characterization of the plasma membrane from the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillitsch, Karlheinz; Tarazona, Pablo; Klug, Lisa; Wriessnegger, Tamara; Zellnig, Günther; Leitner, Erich; Feussner, Ivo; Daum, Günther

    2014-07-01

    Despite similarities of cellular membranes in all eukaryotes, every compartment displays characteristic and often unique features which are important for the functions of the specific organelles. In the present study, we biochemically characterized the plasma membrane of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris with emphasis on the lipids which form the matrix of this compartment. Prerequisite for this effort was the design of a standardized and reliable isolation protocol of the plasma membrane at high purity. Analysis of isolated plasma membrane samples from P. pastoris revealed an increase of phosphatidylserine and a decrease of phosphatidylcholine compared to bulk membranes. The amount of saturated fatty acids in the plasma membrane was higher than in total cell extracts. Ergosterol, the final product of the yeast sterol biosynthetic pathway, was found to be enriched in plasma membrane fractions, although markedly lower than in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A further characteristic feature of the plasma membrane from P. pastoris was the enrichment of inositol phosphorylceramides over neutral sphingolipids, which accumulated in internal membranes. The detailed analysis of the P. pastoris plasma membrane is discussed in the light of cell biological features of this microorganism especially as a microbial cell factory for heterologous protein production.

  6. Evaluation of strategy for analyzing mouse liver plasma membrane proteome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Ping; ZHANG; LiJun; LI; XuanWen; WANG; XiE; CAO; Rui; LIU; Zhen; XIONG; JiXian; PENG; Xia; WEI; YingJuan; YING; XingFeng; WANG; XianChun; LIANG; SongPing

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) proteome is one of the major subproteomes present in the cell,and is very important in liver function. In the present work, C57 mouse liver PM was purified by density-gradient centrifugation. The purified PM was verified by electron microscope analysis and Western blotting. The results showed that the PM was enriched by more than 20-fold and the contamination of mitochondria was reduced by 2-fold compared with the homogenization fraction. Proteins were separated by 2DE and 1DE, trypsin-digested and submitted to ESI-Q-TOF and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry or directly digested in solution and analyzed by LC-ESI ion trap mass spectrometry. In all, 547 non-redundant mouse liver PM proteins were identified, of which 34% contributed to plasma membrane or plasma membrane-related proteins. This study optimized and evaluated the HLPP plasma membrane proteome analysis method and made a systematic analysis on PM proteome.

  7. Influence of platelet-activating factor, lyso-platelet-activating factor and edelfosine on Langmuir monolayers imitating plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to anti-cancer treatment: the effect of plasmalogen level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasiński, Michał; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Wydro, Paweł; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2014-06-01

    Three structurally related but differing in biological activities single-chained ether phospholipids (PAF (platelet-activating factor) and lyso-PAF) and an anti-cancer drug (edelfosine (ED)) were investigated in Langmuir monolayers imitating natural membranes. The aim of the undertaken experiments was to study the influence of these lipids on monolayers mimicking plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to the anti-cancer activity of ED, i.e. promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60) and promyeloblastic leukaemia cells (K-562). As these cells differ essentially in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and plasmalogen concentration in the membrane, we have carried out systematic investigations in artificial systems of various compositions. The results for model leukaemia cell membrane were compared with data acquired for systems imitating normal leucocytes. Our results show that the level of plasmalogens significantly modulates the influence of the single-chained phospholipids on the investigated systems. The experiments confirmed also that the interactions of ether lipids with a model membrane of HL-60 cells (in biological tests sensitive to ED) have opposite character when compared with K-562, being resistant to ED. Moreover, the values of the parameters characterizing monolayers serving as membrane models (strength of interactions, monolayers fluidity and morphology) proved both sensitivity of these cells to ED and lack of their susceptibility towards PAF. Interestingly, it has been found that lyso-PAF, which is usually described as an inactive precursor of PAF, displays a stronger effect on HL-60 model membranes than ED.

  8. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoforms composition regulates cellular pH homeostasis in differentiating PC12 cells in a manner dependent on cytosolic Ca2+ elevations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boczek, Tomasz; Lisek, Malwina; Ferenc, Bozena;

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) by extruding Ca2+ outside the cell, actively participates in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Acting as Ca2+/H+ counter-transporter, PMCA transports large quantities of protons which may affect organellar pH homeostasis. PMCA exists in four is...

  9. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transpor...

  10. Interaction between La(III) and proteins on the plasma membrane of horseradish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang-Mei; Chu, Yun-Xia; Lv, Xiao-Fen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiao-Hua

    2012-06-01

    Lanthanum (La) is an important rare earth element in the ecological environment of plant. The proteins on the plasma membrane control the transport of molecules into and out of cell. It is very important to investigate the effect of La(III) on the proteins on the plasma membrane in the plant cell. In the present work, the interaction between La(III) and proteins on the plasma membrane of horseradish was investigated using optimization of the fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is found that the fluorescence of the complex system of protoplasts and 1-aniline Kenai-8-sulfonic acid in horseradish treated with the low concentration of La(III) is increased compared with that of the control horseradish. The opposite effect is observed in horseradish treated with the high concentration of La(III). These results indicated that the low concentration of La(III) can interact with the proteins on the plasma membrane of horseradish, causing the improvement in the structure of proteins on the plasma membrane. The high concentration of La(III) can also interact with the proteins on the plasma membrane of horseradish, leading to the destruction of the structure of proteins on the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that the proteins on the plasma membrane are the targets of La(III) action on plant cell.

  11. One-step isolation of plasma membrane proteins using magnetic beads with immobilized concanavalin A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Block, Gregory; Chen, Huiwen;

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a simple method for isolating and purifying plasma membrane proteins from various cell types. This one-step affinity-chromatography method uses the property of the lectin concanavalin A (ConA) and the technique of magnetic bead separation to obtain highly purified plasma membrane...... proteins from crude membrane preparations or cell lines. ConA is immobilized onto magnetic beads by binding biotinylated ConA to streptavidin magnetic beads. When these ConA magnetic beads were used to enrich plasma membranes from a crude membrane preparation, this procedure resulted in 3.7-fold enrichment...... was enriched about threefold relative to that of the original membranes. In similar experiments, this method produced 13-fold enrichment of 5'-nucleotidase activity with 45% recovery of the activity from a total cell lysate of PC-3 cells and 7.1-fold enrichment of 5'-nucleotidase activity with 33% recovery...

  12. Properties of the K+ inward rectifier in the plasma membrane of xylem parenchyma cells from barley roots: effects of TEA+, Ca2+, Ba2+ and La3+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, L H; De Boer, A H; Raschke, K

    1994-12-01

    Xylem parenchyma cells are situated around the (apoplastic) xylem vessels and are involved in the control of the composition of the xylem sap by exporting and resorbing solutes. We investigated properties of the K+ inward rectifier in the plasma membrane of these cells by performing patch clamp experiments on protoplasts in the whole-cell configuration. Inward currents were sensitive to the K+ channel blocker TEA+ at a high concentration (20 mM). Barium, another "classical" K+ channel blocker, inhibited K+ currents with a Ki of about 1.3 mM. In contrast to guard cells, the cytosolic Ca2+ level proved to be ineffective in regulating the K+ conductance at hyperpolarization. External Ca2+ blocked currents weakly in a voltage-dependent manner. From instantaneous current-voltage curves, we identified a binding site in the channel pore with an electrical distance of about 0.2 to 0.5. Lanthanum ions reduced the inward current in a voltage-dependent manner and simultaneously displaced the voltage at which half of the channels are in the open state to more positive values. This finding was interpreted as resulting from a sum of two molecular effects, an interaction with the mouth of the channel that causes a reduction of current, and a binding to the voltage sensor, leading to a shielding of surface charges and, subsequently, a modulation of channel gating. A comparison between the K+ inward rectifier in xylem parenchyma cells, guard cells and KAT1 from Arabidopsis leads to the conclusion that these rectifiers form subtypes within one class of ion channels. The ineffectiveness of Ca2+ to control K+ influx in xylem parenchyma cells is interpreted in physiological terms. PMID:7707363

  13. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  14. Quantitative changes in adipocyte plasma membrane in response to nutritional manipulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of changes in adipocyte size and the effects of nutritional manipulations on the quantity of plasma membrane per adipocyte were investigated. A method for estimating the quantity of plasma membrane was developed based on the specific labeling of adipocyte plasma membrane protein with the nonpermeable labeling agent 125I-labeled diazotized diiodosulfanilic acid. By studying rats (ranging in age from 50 to 125 days) fed a standard laboratory chow or a low fat diet or a high fat diet, a wide range of mean fat cell sizes was obtained. It was found that as the volume of the fat cell increased, the amount of plasma membrane increased in a linear fashion and that this linear relationship had the same slope whether the size of the adipocyte increased slowly with age or rapidly in response to a high fat diet. In contrast, fasting for up to 3 days caused a marked decrease in the mean volume of the adipocytes, but either no change or much less change in the amount of plasma membrane per cell than would have been predicted from the linear relationship between adipocytes, but either no change or much less change in the amount of plasma membrane per cell than would have been predicted form the linear relationship between adipocyte volume and amount of plasma membrane per cell obtained with fed rats, i.e., adipocytes from fasted rats contain more plasma membrane per cell than do fat cells of the same size from fed rats. Neither feeding a high fat diet nor fasting caused detectable changes in the protein and lipid composition of the adipocyte plasma membrane

  15. Quantitative changes in adipocyte plasma membrane in response to nutritional manipulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D.S.; Masoro, E.J.; Yu, B.P.

    1981-09-01

    The effects of changes in adipocyte size and the effects of nutritional manipulations on the quantity of plasma membrane per adipocyte were investigated. A method for estimating the quantity of plasma membrane was developed based on the specific labeling of adipocyte plasma membrane protein with the nonpermeable labeling agent 125I-labeled diazotized diiodosulfanilic acid. By studying rats (ranging in age from 50 to 125 days) fed a standard laboratory chow or a low fat diet or a high fat diet, a wide range of mean fat cell sizes was obtained. It was found that as the volume of the fat cell increased, the amount of plasma membrane increased in a linear fashion and that this linear relationship had the same slope whether the size of the adipocyte increased slowly with age or rapidly in response to a high fat diet. In contrast, fasting for up to 3 days caused a marked decrease in the mean volume of the adipocytes, but either no change or much less change in the amount of plasma membrane per cell than would have been predicted from the linear relationship between adipocytes, but either no change or much less change in the amount of plasma membrane per cell than would have been predicted form the linear relationship between adipocyte volume and amount of plasma membrane per cell obtained with fed rats, i.e., adipocytes from fasted rats contain more plasma membrane per cell than do fat cells of the same size from fed rats. Neither feeding a high fat diet nor fasting caused detectable changes in the protein and lipid composition of the adipocyte plasma membrane.

  16. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes control...

  17. The isolation and partial characterization of the plasma membrane from Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorheis, H P; Gale, J S; Owen, M J; Edwards, W

    1979-04-15

    Whole sheets of plasma membrane, each with their attached flagellum, were purified from Trypanosoma brucei. The method devised for their isolation included a new technique of cell breakage that used a combination of osmotic stress followed by mechanical sheer and avoided the problem of extreme vesiculation as well as the trapping of organelles in cell 'ghosts'. The purified membranes all contained the pellicular microtubular array. The antigenic surface coat was completely released from the plasma membrane during the isolation procedure. The membranes had a very high cholesterol/phospholipid ratio (1.54). A large proportion (42%) of the cellular DNA was recovered in the plasma-membrane fraction unless a step involving deoxyribonuclease treatment, which decreased the DNA content to less than 13%, was included before secrose-density gradient centrifugation. This step also aided the separation of plasma membranes from other cellular components. The ouabain-sensitive Na+ + K+-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase and adenylate cyclase co-purified with the plasma membranes. Although 5'-nucleotidase was thought to be a plasma-membrane component, it was easily detached from the membrane. The purified membranes were essentially free of L-alanine-alpha-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, L-asparte-alpha-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, malate dehydrogenase, oligomycin-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase, glucose 6-phosphatase, Mg2+-stimulated p-nitrophenyl phosphatase and catalase. PMID:486094

  18. Plasma Cell Cheilitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thami Gurvinder P

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of plasma cell cheilitis with good response to glucocorticoids, is described for its rarity and probable aetiological correlation with habit of use of nasal snuff is discussed.

  19. Involvement of the Cdc42 pathway in CFTR post-translational turnover and in its plasma membrane stability in airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Ferru-Clément

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR is a chloride channel that is expressed on the apical plasma membrane (PM of epithelial cells. The most common deleterious allele encodes a trafficking-defective mutant protein undergoing endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD and presenting lower PM stability. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the Cdc42 pathway in CFTR turnover and trafficking in a human bronchiolar epithelial cell line (CFBE41o- expressing wild-type CFTR. Cdc42 is a small GTPase of the Rho family that fulfils numerous cell functions, one of which is endocytosis and recycling process via actin cytoskeleton remodelling. When we treated cells with chemical inhibitors such as ML141 against Cdc42 and wiskostatin against the downstream effector N-WASP, we observed that CFTR channel activity was inhibited, in correlation with a decrease in CFTR amount at the cell surface and an increase in dynamin-dependent CFTR endocytosis. Anchoring of CFTR to the cortical cytoskeleton was then presumably impaired by actin disorganization. When we performed siRNA-mediated depletion of Cdc42, actin polymerization was not impacted, but we observed actin-independent consequences upon CFTR. Total and PM CFTR amounts were increased, resulting in greater activation of CFTR. Pulse-chase experiments showed that while CFTR degradation was slowed, CFTR maturation through the Golgi apparatus remained unaffected. In addition, we observed increased stability of CFTR in PM and reduction of its endocytosis. This study highlights the involvement of the Cdc42 pathway at several levels of CFTR biogenesis and trafficking: (i Cdc42 is implicated in the first steps of CFTR biosynthesis and processing; (ii it contributes to the stability of CFTR in PM via its anchoring to cortical actin; (iii it promotes CFTR endocytosis and presumably its sorting toward lysosomal degradation.

  20. Involvement of the Cdc42 pathway in CFTR post-translational turnover and in its plasma membrane stability in airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferru-Clément, Romain; Fresquet, Fleur; Norez, Caroline; Métayé, Thierry; Becq, Frédéric; Kitzis, Alain; Thoreau, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that is expressed on the apical plasma membrane (PM) of epithelial cells. The most common deleterious allele encodes a trafficking-defective mutant protein undergoing endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) and presenting lower PM stability. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the Cdc42 pathway in CFTR turnover and trafficking in a human bronchiolar epithelial cell line (CFBE41o-) expressing wild-type CFTR. Cdc42 is a small GTPase of the Rho family that fulfils numerous cell functions, one of which is endocytosis and recycling process via actin cytoskeleton remodelling. When we treated cells with chemical inhibitors such as ML141 against Cdc42 and wiskostatin against the downstream effector N-WASP, we observed that CFTR channel activity was inhibited, in correlation with a decrease in CFTR amount at the cell surface and an increase in dynamin-dependent CFTR endocytosis. Anchoring of CFTR to the cortical cytoskeleton was then presumably impaired by actin disorganization. When we performed siRNA-mediated depletion of Cdc42, actin polymerization was not impacted, but we observed actin-independent consequences upon CFTR. Total and PM CFTR amounts were increased, resulting in greater activation of CFTR. Pulse-chase experiments showed that while CFTR degradation was slowed, CFTR maturation through the Golgi apparatus remained unaffected. In addition, we observed increased stability of CFTR in PM and reduction of its endocytosis. This study highlights the involvement of the Cdc42 pathway at several levels of CFTR biogenesis and trafficking: (i) Cdc42 is implicated in the first steps of CFTR biosynthesis and processing; (ii) it contributes to the stability of CFTR in PM via its anchoring to cortical actin; (iii) it promotes CFTR endocytosis and presumably its sorting toward lysosomal degradation.

  1. Plasma cell leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Gertz, Moria A.; Buadi, Francis K.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare, yet aggressive plasma cell (PC) neoplasm, variant of multiple myeloma (MM), characterized by high levels of PCs circulating in the peripheral blood. PCL can either originate de novo (primary PCL) or as a secondary leukemic transformation of MM (secondary PCL). Presenting signs and symptoms are similar to those seen in MM such as renal insufficiency, hypercalcemia, lytic bone lesions, anemia, and thrombocytopenia, but can also include hepatomegaly and sple...

  2. Analysis of lipid-composition changes in plasma membrane microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiso, Hideo; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Sphingolipids accumulate in plasma membrane microdomain sites, such as caveolae or lipid rafts. Such microdomains are considered to be important nexuses for signal transduction, although changes in the microdomain lipid components brought about by signaling are poorly understood. Here, we applied a cationic colloidal silica bead method to analyze plasma membrane lipids from monolayer cells cultured in a 10 cm dish. The detergent-resistant fraction from the silica bead-coated membrane was analyzed by LC-MS/MS to evaluate the microdomain lipids. This method revealed that glycosphingolipids composed the microdomains as a substitute for sphingomyelin (SM) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (tMEFs) from an SM synthase 1/2 double KO (DKO) mouse. The rate of formation of the detergent-resistant region was unchanged compared with that of WT-tMEFs. C2-ceramide (Cer) stimulation caused greater elevations in diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid levels than in Cer levels within the microdomains of WT-tMEFs. We also found that lipid changes in the microdomains of SM-deficient DKO-tMEFs caused by serum stimulation occurred in the same manner as that of WT-tMEFs. This practical method for analyzing membrane lipids will facilitate future comprehensive analyses of membrane microdomain-associated responses.

  3. An auxin-binding protein is localized to the plasma membrane of maize coleoptile cells: Identification by photoaffinity labeling and purification of a 23-kDa polypeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldwisch, J.; Zettl, R.; Hesse, F.; Schell, J.; Palme, K. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Zuechtungsforschung, Koeln (West Germany))

    1992-01-15

    Plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptile tissue by aqueous two-phase partitioning and assayed for homogeneity by the use of membrane-specific enzymatic assays. Using 5-azido-(7-{sup 3}H)indole-3-acetic acid (({sup 3}H)N{sub 3}IAA), the authors identified several IAA-binding proteins with the molecular masses of 60 kDa (pm60), 58 kDa (pm58), and 23 kDa (pm23). Using Triton X-114, they were able to selectively extract pm23 from the plasma membrane. They show that auxins and functional analogues compete with ({sup 3}H)N{sub 3}IAA for binding to pm23. They found that PAB130, a polyclonal antibody raised against auxin-binding protein 1 (ABP-1), recognized ABP-1 as well as pm23. This suggests that pm23 shares common epitopes with ABP-1. In addition, they identified an auxin-binding protein with a molecular mass of 24 kDa (pm24), which was detected in microsomal but not in plasma membrane vesicle preparations. Like pm23 this protein was extracted from membrane vesicles with Triton X-114. They designed a purification scheme allowing simultaneous purification of pm23 and pm24. Homogeneous pm23 and pm24 were obtained from coleoptile extracts after 7,000-fold purification.

  4. Patterning and lifetime of plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase is dependent on actin organization in Arabidopsis interphase cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampathkumar, A.; Gutierrez, R.; McFarlane, H.E.; Bringmann, M.; Lindeboom, J.J.; Emons, A.M.C.; Samuels, L.; Ketelaar, T.; Ehrhardt, D.W.; Persson, S.

    2013-01-01

    The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons regulate cell shape across phyla, from bacteria to metazoans. In organisms with cell walls, the wall acts as a primary constraint of shape, and generation of specific cell shape depends on cytoskeletal organization for wall deposition and/or cell expansion. In

  5. Feeder-free monolayer cultures of human embryonic stem cells express an epithelial plasma membrane protein profile.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, D.; Braam, S.R.; Dormeyer, W.; Ward-van Oostwaard, D.; Heck, A.; Krijgsveld, J.; Mummery, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are often cocultured on mitotically inactive fibroblast feeder cells to maintain their undifferentiated state. Under these growth conditions, hESCs form multilayered colonies of morphologically heterogeneous cells surrounded by flattened mesenchymal cells. In contr

  6. Opposing effects of cAMP and T259 phosphorylation on plasma membrane diffusion of the water channel aquaporin-5 in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koffman, Jennifer Skaarup; Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Marlar, Saw;

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-5 (AQP5) facilitates passive water transport in glandular epithelia in response to secretory stimuli via intracellular pathways involving calcium release, cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA). In epithelial plasma membranes, AQP5 may be acutely regulated to facilitate water transport...... in response to physiological stimuli by changes in protein modifications, interactions with proteins and lipids, nanoscale membrane domain organization, and turnover rates. Such regulatory mechanisms could potentially be associated with alteration of diffusion behavior, possibly resulting in a change...... in the plasma membrane diffusion coefficient of AQP5. We aimed to test the short-term regulatory effects of the above pathways, by measuring lateral diffusion of AQP5 and an AQP5 phospho-mutant, T259A, using k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy of quantum dot- and EGFP-labeled AQP5. Elevated cAMP and PKA...

  7. RNAi-mediated downregulation of poplar plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) changes plasma membrane proteome composition and affects leaf physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zhen; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Uehlein, Norbert; Zimmer, Ina; Mühlhans, Stefanie; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Palme, Klaus; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Block, Katja

    2015-10-14

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are one subfamily of aquaporins that mediate the transmembrane transport of water. To reveal their function in poplar, we generated transgenic poplar plants in which the translation of PIP genes was downregulated by RNA interference investigated these plants with a comprehensive leaf plasma membrane proteome and physiome analysis. First, inhibition of PIP synthesis strongly altered the leaf plasma membrane protein composition. Strikingly, several signaling components and transporters involved in the regulation of stomatal movement were differentially regulated in transgenic poplars. Furthermore, hormonal crosstalk related to abscisic acid, auxin and brassinosteroids was altered, in addition to cell wall biosynthesis/cutinization, the organization of cellular structures and membrane trafficking. A physiological analysis confirmed the proteomic results. The leaves had wider opened stomata and higher net CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates as well as greater mesophyll conductance for CO2 (gm) and leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf). Based on these results, we conclude that PIP proteins not only play essential roles in whole leaf water and CO2 flux but have important roles in the regulation of stomatal movement. PMID:26248320

  8. Flow in a rotating membrane plasma separator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueptow, R M; Hajiloo, A

    1995-01-01

    Rotating filter separators are very effective in the separation of plasma from whole blood, but details of the flow field in the device have not been investigated. The flow in a commercial device has been modeled computationally using the finite element code FIDAP. Taylor vortices appear in the upstream end of the annulus but disappear in the downstream end because of increasing blood viscosity as plasma is removed. Fluid transport at the upstream end of the annulus results from both translation of Taylor vortices and fluid winding around the vortices. If the inertial effects of the axial flow are reduced, less fluid winds around the vortices and more fluid is transported by the translation of the vortices. The pressure at the membrane is nonuniform in the region where vortices appear, although the relative magnitude of the fluctuations is small.

  9. Influence of nonequilibrium lipid transport, membrane compartmentalization, and membrane proteins on the lateral organization of the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jun; Sammalkorpi, Maria; Haataja, Mikko

    2010-01-01

    Compositional lipid domains (lipid rafts) in plasma membranes are believed to be important components of many cellular processes. The mechanisms by which cells regulate the sizes, lifetimes, and spatial localization of these domains are rather poorly understood at the moment. We propose a robust mechanism for the formation of finite-sized lipid raft domains in plasma membranes, the competition between phase separation in an immiscible lipid system and active cellular lipid transport processes naturally leads to the formation of such domains. Simulations of a continuum model reveal that the raft size distribution is broad and the average raft size is strongly dependent on the rates of cellular and interlayer lipid transport processes. We demonstrate that spatiotemporal variations in the recycling may enable the cell to localize larger raft aggregates at specific parts along the membrane. Moreover, we show that membrane compartmentalization may further facilitate spatial localization of the raft domains. Finally, we demonstrate that local interactions with immobile membrane proteins can spatially localize the rafts and lead to further clustering.

  10. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhakar; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD). Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH) and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP). Results show that curcumin significantly (p < 0.01) downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b 5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP) of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects. PMID:26904287

  11. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD. Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP. Results show that curcumin significantly (p<0.01 downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects.

  12. Modification-specific proteomics of plasma membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elortza, Felix; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bunkenborg, Jakob;

    2006-01-01

    that phospholipase D (PLD) treatment of human and plant plasma membrane fractions leads to the release of GPI-anchored proteins that were identified and characterized by capillary liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. In contrast to phospholipase C, the PLD enzyme is not affected by structural......-recognized as they are candidate cell surface biomarker molecules with potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications in molecular medicine. GPI-APs have also attracted interest in plant biotechnology because of their role in root development and cell remodeling. Using a shave-and-conquer concept, we demonstrate...

  13. Plasma cell leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M;

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic......-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds...... regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding...

  14. [Kinetics of inhibitory effect of calix[4]arene C-90 on activity of transporting plasma membrane Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase of smooth muscle cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veklich, T O; Shkrabak, O A; Mazur, Iu Iu; Rodik, R V; Kal'chenko, V I; Kosterin, S O

    2014-01-01

    In experiments on the suspension of myometrium cell plasma membrane, processed by 0.1% digitonin, the inhibitory action of calix[4]arene C-90 (5,11,17,23-tetra(threeftor)methyl(phenilsulphonilimino)-methylamino-25,26,27,28-tetrapropoxy-calix[4]arene) on the activity of Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase was investigated. The authors also examined the influence of calix[4]arene in different concentration on affinity of enzyme (Ca2,Mg2+-ATPase) for the ATP and ions of Mg and Ca, and its influence on cooperative effect and maximum velocity of ATP hydrolysis. It is shown that calix[4]arene does not influence the affinity of Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase for the ATP, which means that these two compounds have different binding centers. Also calix[4]arene has no influence on affinity and cooperative effect of Ca ions, if it is used in concentration lower than 50 μM. Calix[4]arene slightly increases coefficient of Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase activation by magnesium chloride. In all three cases, where ATP, Mg and Ca ions are used to test the impact of calix[4]arene, maximum velocity of ATP hydrolysis significantly decreases. All these results clarify that calix[4]arene implements its inhibitory action through mechanism of uncompetitive inhibition of Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase activity.

  15. Plant lipid environment and membrane enzymes: the case of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cedillo, Francisco; González-Solís, Ariadna; Gutiérrez-Angoa, Lizbeth; Cano-Ramírez, Dora Luz; Gavilanes-Ruiz, Marina

    2015-04-01

    Several lipid classes constitute the universal matrix of the biological membranes. With their amphipathic nature, lipids not only build the continuous barrier that confers identity to every cell and organelle, but they are also active actors that modulate the activity of the proteins immersed in the lipid bilayer. The plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, an enzyme from plant cells, is an excellent example of a transmembrane protein whose activity is influenced by the hydrophilic compartments at both sides of the membrane and by the hydrophobic domains of the lipid bilayer. As a result, an extensive documentation of the effect of numerous amphiphiles in the enzyme activity can be found. Detergents, membrane glycerolipids, and sterols can produce activation or inhibition of the enzyme activity. In some cases, these effects are associated with the lipids of the membrane bulk, but in others, a direct interaction of the lipid with the protein is involved. This review gives an account of reports related to the action of the membrane lipids on the H(+)-ATPase activity.

  16. Electrochemical proton gradient in Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells and membrane vesicles.

    OpenAIRE

    Friedberg, I.; Kaback, H R

    1980-01-01

    Using the distribution of weak acids to measure the pH gradient (delta pH; interior alkaline) and the distribution of the lipophilic cation [3H]tetraphenylphosphonium+ to monitor the membrane potential (delta psi; interior negative), we studied the electrochemical gradient or protons (delta mu- H+) across the membrane of Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells and plasma membrane vesicles. With reduced phenazine methosulfate as electron donor, intact cells exhibited a relatively constant delta mu- H+...

  17. The apical plasma membrane of chitin-synthesizing epithelia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bernard Moussian

    2013-01-01

    Chitin is the second most abundant polysaccharide on earth.It is produced at the apical side of epidermal,tracheal,fore-,and hindgut epithelial cells in insects as a central component of the protective and supporting extracellular cuticle.Chitin is also an important constituent of the midgut peritrophic matrix that encases the food supporting its digestion and protects the epithelium against invasion by possibly ingested pathogens.The enzyme producing chitin is a glycosyltransferase that resides in the apical plasma membrane forming a pore to extrude the chains of chitin into the extracellular space.The apical plasma membrane is not only a platform for chitin synthases but,probably through its shape and equipment with distinct factors,also plays an important role in orienting and organizing chitin fibers.Here,I review findings on the cellular and molecular constitution of the apical plasma membrane of chitin-producing epithelia mainly focusing on work done in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

  18. Preparation of pure and intact Plasmodium falciparum plasma membrane vesicles and partial characterisation of the plasma membrane ATPase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Pete J

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In host erythrocytes, the malaria parasite must contend with ion and drug transport across three membranes; its own plasma membrane, the parasitophorous membrane and the host plasma membrane. Isolation of pure and intact Plasmodium falciparum plasma membrane would provide a suitable model to elucidate the possible role played by the parasite plasma membrane in ion balance and drug transport. Results This study describes a procedure for isolating parasite plasma membrane from P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. With this method, the trophozoites released by saponin treatment were cleansed of erythrocyte membranes using anti-erythrocyte antibodies fixed to polystyrene beads. These trophozoites were then biotinylated and the parasite plasma membrane was disrupted by nitrogen cavitation. This process allows the membranes to reform into vesicles. The magnetic streptavidin beads bind specifically to the biotinylated parasite plasma membrane vesicles facilitating their recovery with a magnet. These vesicles can then be easily released from the magnetic beads by treatment with dithiotreithol. The parasite plasma membrane showed optimal ATPase activity at 2 mM ATP and 2 mM Mg2+. It was also found that Ca2+ could not substitute for Mg2+ ATPase activity in parasite plasma membranes whereas activity was completely preserved when Mn2+ was used instead of Mg2+. Other nucleoside triphosphates tested were hydrolysed as efficiently as ATP, while the nucleoside monophosphate AMP was not. Conclusions We have described the successful isolation of intact P. falciparum plasma membrane vesicles free of contaminating organelles and determined the experimental conditions for optimum ATPase activity.

  19. Fatty acid and peptide profiles in plasma membrane and membrane rafts of PUFA supplemented RAW264.7 macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schumann

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic cell membrane possesses numerous complex functions, which are essential for life. At this, the composition and the structure of the lipid bilayer are of particular importance. Polyunsaturated fatty acids may modulate the physical properties of biological membranes via alteration of membrane lipid composition affecting numerous physiological processes, e.g. in the immune system. In this systematic study we present fatty acid and peptide profiles of cell membrane and membrane rafts of murine macrophages that have been supplemented with saturated fatty acids as well as PUFAs from the n-3, the n-6 and the n-9 family. Using fatty acid composition analysis and mass spectrometry-based peptidome profiling we found that PUFAs from both the n-3 and the n-6 family have an impact on lipid and protein composition of plasma membrane and membrane rafts in a similar manner. In addition, we found a relation between the number of bis-allyl-methylene positions of the PUFA added and the unsaturation index of plasma membrane as well as membrane rafts of supplemented cells. With regard to the proposed significance of lipid microdomains for disease development and treatment our study will help to achieve a targeted dietary modulation of immune cell lipid bilayers.

  20. Lysinuric protein intolerance mutation is expressed in the plasma membrane of cultured skin fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D. W.; Scriver, C R; Tenenhouse, H S; Simell, O.

    1987-01-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is an autosomal recessive phenotype consistent with impaired transport of cationic amino acids at the basolateral membrane of intestinal and renal epithelia. On the assumption that the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and plasma membrane of parenchymal cells are functional analogues, we studied transport of cationic amino acids by cultured skin fibroblasts from LPI and control subjects matched for age, sex, and site of biopsy. We measured Na+-indepe...

  1. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-05-01

    Plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H(+)-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H(+)-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H(+)-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H(+)-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H(+)-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  2. Preliminary study on plasma membrane fluidity of Psychrophilic Yeast Rhodotorula sp. NJ298 in low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The ability of cell to modulate the fluidity of plasma membrane was crucial to the survival of microorganism at low temperature. Plasma membrane proteins, fatty acids and carotenoids profiles of Antarctic psychrophilc yeast Rhodotorula sp. NJ298 were investigated at -3 ℃, 0 ℃ and 8 ℃. The results showed that plasma membrane protein content was greater at -3 ℃ than that at 8 ℃, and a unique membrane polypeptide composition with an apparent molecular mass of 94.7 kDa was newly synthesized with SDS-PAGE analysis; GC analysis showed that the main changes of fatty acids were the percentage of unsaturated fatty acids (C18∶ 1 and C18∶ 2) and shorter chain saturated fatty acid (C10∶ 0) increased along with the decrease of the culture temperature from 8 ℃ to -3 ℃; HPLC analysis indicated that astaxanthin was the major functional carotenoids of the plasma membrane, percentage of which increased from 54.6±1.5% at 8 ℃ to 81.9±2.1% at -3 ℃. However the fluidity of plasma membrane which was determined by measuring fluorescence anisotropy was similar at -3 ℃, 0 ℃ and 8 ℃. Hence these changes in plasma membrane's characteristics were involved in the cellular cold-adaptation by which NJ298 could maintain normal plasma membrane fluidity at near-freezing temperature.

  3. Fluorescence interference contrast based approach to study real time interaction of melittin with plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Gui, Dong; Zandi, Roya; Gill, Sarjeet; Mohideen, Umar

    2014-03-01

    Melittin is an anti-bacterial and hemolytic toxic peptide found in bee venom. Cell lysis behavior of peptides has been widely investigated, but the exact interaction mechanism of lytic peptides with lipid membranes and its constituents has not been understood completely. In this paper we study the melittin interaction with lipid plasma membranes in real time using non-invasive and non-contact fluorescence interference contrast microscopy (FLIC). Particularly the interaction of melittin with plasma membranes was studied in a controlled molecular environment, where these plasma membrane were composed of saturated lipid, 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) and unsaturated lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine(DOPC) with and without cholesterol. We found out that melittin starts to form nanometer size pores in the plasma membranes shortly after interacting with membranes. But the addition of cholesterol in plasma membrane slows down the pore formation process. Our results show that inclusion of cholesterol to the plasma membranes make them more resilient towards pore formation and lysis of membrane.

  4. Nanoscale cell membrane organization : a near-field optical view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Marjolein

    2006-01-01

    The cell plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is a lipid bi-layer that separates the cell cytosol from the extracellular environment. The composition and organization of proteins and lipids within this bi-layer have a direct impact on many cellular processes, since they form the senses of the cell. T

  5. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for real-time imaging of nanoparticle-cell plasma membrane interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Moghimi, Seyed Moien

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticulate systems are widely used for site-specific drug and gene delivery as well as for medical imaging. The mode of nanoparticle-cell interaction may have a significant effect on the pathway of nanoparticle internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking. Total internal reflection...

  6. Breast cancer resistance protein is localized at the plasma membrane in mitoxantrone- and topotecan-resistant cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, GL; Maliepaard, M; Pijnenborg, ACLM; van Gastelen, MA; Schroeijers, AB; Allen, JD; Ross, DD; van der Valk, P; Dalton, WS; Schellens, JHM; Scheper, RJ; de Jong, MC

    2000-01-01

    Tumor cells may display a multidrug resistant phenotype by overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporters such as multidrug resistance (,MDR1) P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The presence of BCRP has thus far been reported sole

  7. PSD-95 mediates membrane clustering of the human plasma membrane Ca2+ pump isoform 4b

    OpenAIRE

    Padányi, Rita; Pászty, Katalin; STREHLER, EMANUEL E.; Enyedi, Ágnes

    2008-01-01

    Besides the control of global calcium changes, specific plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) isoforms are involved in the regulation of local calcium signals. Although local calcium signaling requires the confinement of signaling molecules into microdomains, little is known about the specific organization of PMCA molecules within the plasma membrane. Here we show that co-expression with the postsynaptic–density-95 (PSD-95) scaffolding protein increased the plasma membrane expression of PMCA4...

  8. Receptor kinase-mediated control of primary active proton pumping at the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, AT; Kristensen, A; Cuin, TA;

    2014-01-01

    Acidification of the cell wall space outside the plasma membrane is required for plant growth and is the result of proton extrusion by the plasma membrane-localized H+ -ATPases. Here we show that the major plasma membrane proton pumps in Arabidopsis, AHA1 and AHA2, interact directly in vitro...... heterologous expression system, the introduction of a negative charge at this position caused pump activation. Application of PSY1 to plant seedlings induced rapid in planta phosphorylation at Thr-881, concomitant with an instantaneous increase in proton efflux from roots. The direct interaction between AHA2...

  9. Exocytosis and endocytosis in neurodocrine cells: inseparable membranes !

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eHouy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although much has been learned concerning the mechanisms of secretory vesicle formation and fusion at donor and acceptor membrane compartments, relatively little attention has been paid towards understanding how cells maintain a homeostatic membrane balance through vesicular trafficking. In neurons and neuroendocrine cells, release of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones occurs through calcium-regulated exocytosis at the plasma membrane. To allow recycling of secretory vesicle components and to preserve organelles integrity, cells must initiate and regulate compensatory membrane uptake. This review relates the fate of secretory granule membranes after full fusion exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells. In particular, we focus on the potential role of lipids in preserving and sorting secretory granule membranes after exocytosis and we discuss the potential mechanisms of membrane retrieval.

  10. Revisiting transbilayer distribution of lipids in the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murate, Motohide; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    Whereas asymmetric transbilayer lipid distribution in the plasma membrane is well recognized, methods to examine the precise localization of lipids are limited. In this review, we critically evaluate the methods that are applied to study transbilayer asymmetry of lipids, summarizing the factors that influence the measurement. Although none of the present methods is perfect, the current application of immunoelectron microscopy-based technique provides a new picture of lipid asymmetry. Next, we summarize the transbilayer distribution of individual lipid in both erythrocytes and nucleated cells. Finally we discuss the concept of the interbilayer communication of lipids.

  11. New cytotoxic benzo(b)thiophenilsulfonamide 1,1-dioxide derivatives inhibit a NADH oxidase located in plasma membranes of tumour cells

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, M M; I. Encío; Martínez-Merino, V; M. Gil; Migliaccio, M.

    2001-01-01

    A series of benzo(b)thiophenesulfonamide 1,1-dioxide derivatives (BTS) have been designed and synthesized as candidate antineoplastic drugs. Several of these compounds have shown in vitro cytotoxic activity on leukaemic CCRF-CEM cells. The cytotoxic BTS, but not the inactive ones, were able to inhibit a tumour cell-specific NADH oxidase activity present in the membrane of CCRF-CEM cells. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign

  12. Membrane tension and cytoskeleton organization in cell motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell membrane shape changes are important for many aspects of normal biological function, such as tissue development, wound healing and cell division and motility. Various disease states are associated with deregulation of how cells move and change shape, including notably tumor initiation and cancer cell metastasis. Cell motility is powered, in large part, by the controlled assembly and disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton. Much of this dynamic happens in close proximity to the plasma membrane due to the fact that actin assembly factors are membrane-bound, and thus actin filaments are generally oriented such that their growth occurs against or near the membrane. For a long time, the membrane was viewed as a relatively passive scaffold for signaling. However, results from the last five years show that this is not the whole picture, and that the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are intimately linked to the mechanics of the cell membrane. In this review, we summarize recent findings concerning the role of plasma membrane mechanics in cell cytoskeleton dynamics and architecture, showing that the cell membrane is not just an envelope or a barrier for actin assembly, but is a master regulator controlling cytoskeleton dynamics and cell polarity. (topical review)

  13. Membrane Compartment Occupied by Can1 (MCC and Eisosome Subdomains of the Fungal Plasma Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B. Konopka

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have revealed that fungal plasma membranes are organized into different subdomains. One new domain termed MCC/eisosomes consists of stable punctate patches that are distinct from lipid rafts. The MCC/eisosome domains correspond to furrows in the plasma membrane that are about 300 nm long and 50 nm deep. The MCC portion includes integral membrane proteins, such as the tetraspanners Sur7 and Nce102. The adjacent eisosome includes proteins that are peripherally associated with the membrane, including the BAR domains proteins Pil1 and Lsp1 that are thought to promote membrane curvature. Genetic analysis of the MCC/eisosome components indicates these domains broadly affect overall plasma membrane organization. The mechanisms regulating the formation of MCC/eisosomes in model organisms will be reviewed as well as the role of these plasma membrane domains in fungal pathogenesis and response to antifungal drugs.

  14. Multi-protein assemblies underlie the mesoscale organization of the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Sinem K.; Honigmann, Alf; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; Lang, Thorsten; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2014-07-01

    Most proteins have uneven distributions in the plasma membrane. Broadly speaking, this may be caused by mechanisms specific to each protein, or may be a consequence of a general pattern that affects the distribution of all membrane proteins. The latter hypothesis has been difficult to test in the past. Here, we introduce several approaches based on click chemistry, through which we study the distribution of membrane proteins in living cells, as well as in membrane sheets. We found that the plasma membrane proteins form multi-protein assemblies that are long lived (minutes), and in which protein diffusion is restricted. The formation of the assemblies is dependent on cholesterol. They are separated and anchored by the actin cytoskeleton. Specific proteins are preferentially located in different regions of the assemblies, from their cores to their edges. We conclude that the assemblies constitute a basic mesoscale feature of the membrane, which affects the patterning of most membrane proteins, and possibly also their activity.

  15. Role of the membrane skeleton in preventing the shedding of procoagulant-rich microvesicles from the platelet plasma membrane

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The platelet plasma membrane is lined by a membrane skeleton that appears to contain short actin filaments cross-linked by actin-binding protein. Actin-binding protein is in turn associated with specific plasma membrane glycoproteins. The aim of this study was to determine whether the membrane skeleton regulates properties of the plasma membrane. Platelets were incubated with agents that disrupted the association of the membrane skeleton with membrane glycoproteins. The consequences of this c...

  16. Sorting Nexin 11 Regulates Lysosomal Degradation of Plasma Membrane TRPV3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caiyue; Ma, Wenbo; Yin, Shikui; Liang, Xin; Shu, Xiaodong; Pei, Duanqing; Egan, Terrance M; Huang, Jufang; Pan, Aihua; Li, Zhiyuan

    2016-05-01

    The trafficking of ion channels to/from the plasma membrane is considered an important mechanism for cellular activity and an interesting approach for disease therapies. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) ion channel is widely expressed in skin keratinocytes, and its trafficking mechanism to/from the plasma membrane is unknown. Here, we report that the vesicular trafficking protein sorting nexin 11 (SNX11) downregulates the level of the TRPV3 plasma membrane protein. Overexpression of SNX11 causes a decrease in the level of TRPV3 current and TRPV3 plasma membrane protein in TRPV3-transfected HEK293T cells. Subcellular localizations and western blots indicate that SNX11 interacts with TRPV3 and targets it to lysosomes for degradation, which is blocked by the lysosomal inhibitors chloroquine and leupeptin. Both TRPV3 and SNX11 are highly expressed in HaCaT cells. We show that TRPV3 agonists-activated Ca(2+) influxes and the level of native TRPV3 total protein in HaCaT cells are decreased by overexpression of SNX11 and increased by knockdown of SNX11. Our findings reveal that SNX11 promotes the trafficking of TRPV3 from the plasma membrane to lysosomes for degradation via protein-protein interactions, which demonstrates a previously unknown function of SNX11 as a regulator of TRPV3 trafficking from the plasma membrane to lysosomes. PMID:26818531

  17. Eisosomes promote the ability of Sur7 to regulate plasma membrane organization in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong X.; Douglas, Lois M.; Veselá, Petra; Rachel, Reinhard; Malinsky, Jan; Konopka, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans forms a protective barrier that also mediates many processes needed for virulence, including cell wall synthesis, invasive hyphal morphogenesis, and nutrient uptake. Because compartmentalization of the plasma membrane is believed to coordinate these diverse activities, we examined plasma membrane microdomains termed eisosomes or membrane compartment of Can1 (MCC), which correspond to ∼200-nm-long furrows in the plasma membrane. A pil1∆ lsp1∆ mutant failed to form eisosomes and displayed strong defects in plasma membrane organization and morphogenesis, including extensive cell wall invaginations. Mutation of eisosome proteins Slm2, Pkh2, and Pkh3 did not cause similar cell wall defects, although pkh2∆ cells formed chains of furrows and pkh3∆ cells formed wider furrows, identifying novel roles for the Pkh protein kinases in regulating furrows. In contrast, the sur7∆ mutant formed cell wall invaginations similar to those for the pil1∆ lsp1∆ mutant even though it could form eisosomes and furrows. A PH-domain probe revealed that the regulatory lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate was enriched at sites of cell wall invaginations in both the sur7∆ and pil1∆ lsp1∆ cells, indicating that this contributes to the defects. The sur7∆ and pil1∆ lsp1∆ mutants displayed differential susceptibility to various types of stress, indicating that they affect overlapping but distinct functions. In support of this, many mutant phenotypes of the pil1∆ lsp1∆ cells were rescued by overexpressing SUR7. These results demonstrate that C. albicans eisosomes promote the ability of Sur7 to regulate plasma membrane organization. PMID:27009204

  18. Tetracyclines increase lipid phosphate phosphatase expression on plasma membranes and turnover of plasma lysophosphatidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoyun; Zhao, Yuan Y; Dewald, Jay; Curtis, Jonathan M; Brindley, David N

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular lysophosphatidate and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) are important bioactive lipids, which signal through G-protein-coupled receptors to stimulate cell growth and survival. The lysophosphatidate and S1P signals are terminated partly by degradation through three broad-specificity lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs) on the cell surface. Significantly, the expression of LPP1 and LPP3 is decreased in many cancers, and this increases the impact of lysophosphatidate and S1P signaling. However, relatively little is known about the physiological or pharmacological regulation of the expression of the different LPPs. We now show that treating several malignant and nonmalignant cell lines with 1 μg/ml tetracycline, doxycycline, or minocycline significantly increased the extracellular degradation of lysophosphatidate. S1P degradation was also increased in cells that expressed high LPP3 activity. These results depended on an increase in the stabilities of the three LPPs and increased expression on the plasma membrane. We tested the physiological significance of these results and showed that treating rats with doxycycline accelerated the clearance of lysophosphatidate, but not S1P, from the circulation. However, administering 100 mg/kg/day doxycycline to mice decreased plasma concentrations of lysophosphatidate and S1P. This study demonstrates a completely new property of tetracyclines in increasing the plasma membrane expression of the LPPs.

  19. Tetracyclines increase lipid phosphate phosphatase expression on plasma membranes and turnover of plasma lysophosphatidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoyun; Zhao, Yuan Y; Dewald, Jay; Curtis, Jonathan M; Brindley, David N

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular lysophosphatidate and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) are important bioactive lipids, which signal through G-protein-coupled receptors to stimulate cell growth and survival. The lysophosphatidate and S1P signals are terminated partly by degradation through three broad-specificity lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs) on the cell surface. Significantly, the expression of LPP1 and LPP3 is decreased in many cancers, and this increases the impact of lysophosphatidate and S1P signaling. However, relatively little is known about the physiological or pharmacological regulation of the expression of the different LPPs. We now show that treating several malignant and nonmalignant cell lines with 1 μg/ml tetracycline, doxycycline, or minocycline significantly increased the extracellular degradation of lysophosphatidate. S1P degradation was also increased in cells that expressed high LPP3 activity. These results depended on an increase in the stabilities of the three LPPs and increased expression on the plasma membrane. We tested the physiological significance of these results and showed that treating rats with doxycycline accelerated the clearance of lysophosphatidate, but not S1P, from the circulation. However, administering 100 mg/kg/day doxycycline to mice decreased plasma concentrations of lysophosphatidate and S1P. This study demonstrates a completely new property of tetracyclines in increasing the plasma membrane expression of the LPPs. PMID:26884614

  20. Plasma membrane calcium pump regulation by metabolic stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jason; IE; Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase(PMCA)is an ATPdriven pump that is critical for the maintenance of low resting[Ca2+]i in all eukaryotic cells.Metabolic stress, either due to inhibition of mitochondrial or glycolytic metabolism,has the capacity to cause ATP depletion and thus inhibit PMCA activity.This has potentially fatal consequences,particularly for non-excitable cells in which the PMCA is the major Ca2+efflux pathway.This is because inhibition of the PMCA inevitably leads to cytosolic Ca2+ overload and the consequent cell death.However,the relationship between metabolic stress,ATP depletion and inhibition of the PMCA is not as simple as one would have originally predicted.There is increasing evidence that metabolic stress can lead to the inhibition of PMCA activity independent of ATP or prior to substantial ATP depletion.In particular,there is evidence that the PMCA has its own glycolytic ATP supply that can fuel the PMCA in the face of impaired mitochondrial function.Moreover, membrane phospholipids,mitochondrial membrane potential,caspase/calpain cleavage and oxidative stress have all been implicated in metabolic stress-induced inhibition of the PMCA.The major focus of this review is to challenge the conventional view of ATP-dependent regulation of the PMCA and bring together some of the alternative or additional mechanisms by which metabolic stress impairs PMCA activity resulting in cytosolic Ca2+ overload and cytotoxicity.

  1. Opposing Effects of cAMP and T259 Phosphorylation on Plasma Membrane Diffusion of the Water Channel Aquaporin-5 in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffman, Jennifer S; Arnspang, Eva C; Marlar, Saw; Nejsum, Lene N

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-5 (AQP5) facilitates passive water transport in glandular epithelia in response to secretory stimuli via intracellular pathways involving calcium release, cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA). In epithelial plasma membranes, AQP5 may be acutely regulated to facilitate water transport in response to physiological stimuli by changes in protein modifications, interactions with proteins and lipids, nanoscale membrane domain organization, and turnover rates. Such regulatory mechanisms could potentially be associated with alteration of diffusion behavior, possibly resulting in a change in the plasma membrane diffusion coefficient of AQP5. We aimed to test the short-term regulatory effects of the above pathways, by measuring lateral diffusion of AQP5 and an AQP5 phospho-mutant, T259A, using k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy of quantum dot- and EGFP-labeled AQP5. Elevated cAMP and PKA inhibition significantly decreased lateral diffusion of AQP5, whereas T259A mutation showed opposing effects; slowing diffusion without stimulation and increasing diffusion to basal levels after cAMP elevation. Thus, lateral diffusion of AQP5 is significantly regulated by cAMP, PKA, and T259 phosphorylation, which could be important for regulating water flow in glandular secretions. PMID:26218429

  2. Opposing Effects of cAMP and T259 Phosphorylation on Plasma Membrane Diffusion of the Water Channel Aquaporin-5 in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S Koffman

    Full Text Available Aquaporin-5 (AQP5 facilitates passive water transport in glandular epithelia in response to secretory stimuli via intracellular pathways involving calcium release, cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA. In epithelial plasma membranes, AQP5 may be acutely regulated to facilitate water transport in response to physiological stimuli by changes in protein modifications, interactions with proteins and lipids, nanoscale membrane domain organization, and turnover rates. Such regulatory mechanisms could potentially be associated with alteration of diffusion behavior, possibly resulting in a change in the plasma membrane diffusion coefficient of AQP5. We aimed to test the short-term regulatory effects of the above pathways, by measuring lateral diffusion of AQP5 and an AQP5 phospho-mutant, T259A, using k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy of quantum dot- and EGFP-labeled AQP5. Elevated cAMP and PKA inhibition significantly decreased lateral diffusion of AQP5, whereas T259A mutation showed opposing effects; slowing diffusion without stimulation and increasing diffusion to basal levels after cAMP elevation. Thus, lateral diffusion of AQP5 is significantly regulated by cAMP, PKA, and T259 phosphorylation, which could be important for regulating water flow in glandular secretions.

  3. Effect of stress on the membrane capacitance of the auditory outer hair cell.

    OpenAIRE

    Iwasa, K H

    1993-01-01

    The membrane capacitance of the outer hair cell, which has unique membrane potential-dependent motility, was monitored during application of membrane tension. It was found that the membrane capacitance of the cell decreased when stress was applied to the membrane. This result is the opposite of stretching the lipid bilayer in the plasma membrane. It thus indicates the importance of some other capacitance component that decreases on stretching. It has been known that charge movement across the...

  4. Direct Capture of Functional Proteins from Mammalian Plasma Membranes into Nanodiscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jahnabi; Pondenis, Holly; Fan, Timothy M; Das, Aditi

    2015-10-20

    Mammalian plasma membrane proteins make up the largest class of drug targets yet are difficult to study in a cell free system because of their intransigent nature. Herein, we perform direct encapsulation of plasma membrane proteins derived from mammalian cells into a functional nanodisc library. Peptide fingerprinting was used to analyze the proteome of the incorporated proteins in nanodiscs and to further demonstrate that the lipid composition of the nanodiscs directly affects the class of protein that is incorporated. Furthermore, the functionality of the incorporated membrane proteome was evaluated by measuring the activity of membrane proteins: Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and receptor tyrosine kinases. This work is the first report of the successful establishment and characterization of a cell free functional library of mammalian membrane proteins into nanodiscs.

  5. Membrane potential governs lateral segregation of plasma membrane proteins and lipids in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Guido; Opekarová, Miroslava; Malinsky, Jan; Weig-Meckl, Ina; Tanner, Widmar

    2007-01-10

    The plasma membrane potential is mainly considered as the driving force for ion and nutrient translocation. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, we have discovered a novel role of the membrane potential in the organization of the plasma membrane. Within the yeast plasma membrane, two non-overlapping sub-compartments can be visualized. The first one, represented by a network-like structure, is occupied by the proton ATPase, Pma1, and the second one, forming 300-nm patches, houses a number of proton symporters (Can1, Fur4, Tat2 and HUP1) and Sur7, a component of the recently described eisosomes. Evidence is presented that sterols, the main lipid constituent of the plasma membrane, also accumulate within the patchy compartment. It is documented that this compartmentation is highly dependent on the energization of the membrane. Plasma membrane depolarization causes reversible dispersion of the H(+)-symporters, not however of the Sur7 protein. Mitochondrial mutants, affected in plasma membrane energization, show a significantly lower degree of membrane protein segregation. In accordance with these observations, depolarized membranes also considerably change their physical properties (detergent sensitivity).

  6. Dielectric breakdown of cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, U; Pilwat, G; Riemann, F

    1974-11-01

    With human and bovine red blood cells and Escherichia coli B, dielectric breakdown of cell membranes could be demonstrated using a Coulter Counter (AEG-Telefunken, Ulm, West Germany) with a hydrodynamic focusing orifice. In making measurements of the size distributions of red blood cells and bacteria versus increasing electric field strength and plotting the pulse heights versus the electric field strength, a sharp bend in the otherwise linear curve is observed due to the dielectric breakdown of the membranes. Solution of Laplace's equation for the electric field generated yields a value of about 1.6 V for the membrane potential at which dielectric breakdown occurs with modal volumes of red blood cells and bacteria. The same value is also calculated for red blood cells by applying the capacitor spring model of Crowley (1973. Biophys. J. 13:711). The corresponding electric field strength generated in the membrane at breakdown is of the order of 4 . 10(6) V/cm and, therefore, comparable with the breakdown voltages for bilayers of most oils. The critical detector voltage for breakdown depends on the volume of the cells. The volume-dependence predicted by Laplace theory with the assumption that the potential generated across the membrane is independent of volume, could be verified experimentally. Due to dielectric breakdown the red blood cells lose hemoglobin completely. This phenomenon was used to study dielectric breakdown of red blood cells in a homogeneous electric field between two flat platinum electrodes. The electric field was applied by discharging a high voltage storage capacitor via a spark gap. The calculated value of the membrane potential generated to produce dielectric breakdown in the homogeneous field is of the same order as found by means of the Coulter Counter. This indicates that mechanical rupture of the red blood cells by the hydrodynamic forces in the orifice of the Coulter Counter could also be excluded as a hemolysing mechanism. The detector

  7. Fatty acid profiles from the plasma membrane and detergent resistant membranes of two plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Salazar, Laura; El Hafidi, Mohammed; Gutiérrez-Nájera, Nora; Noyola-Martínez, Liliana; González-Solís, Ariadna; Gavilanes-Ruíz, Marina

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to establish the composition of the plant plasma membrane in order to understand its organization and behavior under continually changing environments. Knowledge of the lipid phase, in particular the fatty acid (FA) complex repertoire, is important since FAs determine many of the physical-chemical membrane properties. FAs are constituents of the membrane glycerolipid and sphingolipid backbones and can also be linked to some sterols. In addition, FAs are components of complex lipids that can constitute membrane micro-domains, and the use of detergent-resistant membranes is a common approach to study their composition. The diversity and cellular allocation of the membrane lipids containing FAs are very diverse and the approaches to analyze them provide only general information. In this work, a detailed FA analysis was performed using highly purified plasma membranes from bean leaves and germinating maize embryos and their respective detergent-resistant membrane preparations. The analyses showed the presence of a significant amount of very long chain FAs (containing 28C, 30C and 32C), in both plasma membrane preparations from bean and maize, that have not been previously reported. Herein is demonstrated that a significant enrichment of very long chain saturated FAs and saturated FAs can occur in detergent-resistant membrane preparations, as compared to the plasma membranes from both plant species. Considering that a thorough analysis of FAs is rarely performed in purified plasma membranes and detergent-resistant membranes, this work provides qualitative and quantitative evidence on the contributions of the length and saturation of FAs to the organization of the plant plasma membrane and detergent-resistant membranes.

  8. Towards structural and functional analysis of the plant plasma membrane proton pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Bo Højen

    of plasma membrane H+-ATPases. Studies on the plasma membrane H+-ATPases have involved both in vivo and in vitro approaches, with the latter employing either solubilisation by detergent micelles, or reconstitution into lipid vesicles. Despite resulting in a large body of information on structure, function...... into soluble nanoscale lipid bilayers, also termed nanodiscs. Extensive analysis confirms the correct assembly and reconstitution of active proton pump into nanodiscs. The pump inserts as a monomer, which through activity analysis confirms this as the minimal functional unit of the plasma membrane H......The plasma membrane H+-ATPase is a proton pump essential for several physiological important processes in plants. Through the extrusion of protons from the cell, the PM H+-ATPase establishes and maintains a proton gradient used by proton coupled transporters and secondary active transport...

  9. Involvement of Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase in Adaption of Rice to Ammonium Nutrient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yi-yong; LIAN Juan; ZENG Hou-qing; LIU GAN; DI Ting-jun; SHEN Qi-rong; XU Guo-hua

    2011-01-01

    The preference of paddy rice for NH4+ rather than NO3- is associated with its tolerance to low pH since a rhizosphere acidification occurs during NH4+ absorption.However,the adaptation of rice root to low pH has not been fully elucidated.The plasma membrane H+-ATPase is a universal electronic H+ pump,which uses ATP as energy source to pump H+ across the plasma membranes into the apoplast.The key function of this enzyme is to keep pH homeostasis of plant cells and generate a H+ electrochemical gradient,thereby providing the driving force for the active influx and efflux of ions and metabolites across the plasma membrane.This study investigated the acclimation of plasma membrane H+-ATPase of rice root to low pH.This mechanism might be partly responsible for the preference of rice plants to NH4+ nutrition.

  10. Plasma cell vulvitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin R Bharatia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell vulvitis is a very rare inflammatory disorder of vulva, characterized by a bright-red mucosal lesion of significant chronicity, which may be symptomatic. Very few case studies of this condition are reported in literature. We describe one such classical patient, who presented with slight dyspareunia. The diagnosis was confirmed on histopathological examination. It is important for clinicians to accurately diagnose this alarming condition in time.

  11. Gangliosides in cell recognition and membrane protein regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Pablo H. H.; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    Gangliosides, sialic acid-bearing glycosphingolipids, are expressed on all vertebrate cells, and are the major glycans on nerve cells. They are anchored to the plasma membrane through their ceramide lipids with their varied glycans extending into the extracellular space. Through sugar-specific interactions with glycan binding proteins on apposing cells, gangliosides function as receptors in cell-cell recognition, regulating natural killer cell cytotoxicity via Siglec-7 binding, myelin-axon in...

  12. Copper toxicity towards Saccharomyces cerevisiae: dependence on plasma membrane fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, S V; Howlett, N G; Radice, S

    1996-01-01

    One major mechanism of copper toxicity towards microorganisms is disruption of plasma membrane integrity. In this study, the influence of plasma membrane fatty acid composition on the susceptibility of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Cu2+ toxicity was investigated. Microbial fatty acid composition is highly variable, depending on both intrinsic and environmental factors. Manipulation was achieved in this study by growth in fatty acid-supplemented medium. Whereas cells grown under standard conditions contained only saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, considerable incorporation of the diunsaturated fatty acid linoleate (18:2) (to more than 65% of the total fatty acids) was observed in both whole-cell homogenates and plasma membrane-enriched fractions from cells grown in linoleate-supplemented medium. Linoleate enrichment had no discernible effect on the growth of S. cerevisiae. However, linoleate-enriched cells were markedly more susceptible to copper-induced plasma membrane permeabilization. Thus, after addition of Cu(NO3)2, rates of cellular K+ release (loss of membrane integrity) were at least twofold higher from linoleate-supplemented cells than from unsupplemented cells; this difference increased with reductions in the Cu2+ concentration supplied. Levels of cellular Cu accumulation were also higher in linoleate-supplemented cells. These results were correlated with a very marked dependence of whole-cell Cu2+ toxicity on cellular fatty acid unsaturation. For example, within 10 min of exposure to 5 microM Cu2+, only 3% of linoleate-enriched cells remained viable (capable of colony formation). In contrast, 100% viability was maintained in cells previously grown in the absence of a fatty acid supplement. Cells displaying intermediate levels of linoleate incorporation showed intermediate Cu2+ sensitivity, while cells enriched with the triunsaturated fatty acid linolenate (18:3) were most sensitive to Cu2+. These results demonstrate for the first time that changes

  13. Supramolecular architecture of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén

    2016-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) forms membrane contact sites (MCS) with most other cellular organelles and the plasma membrane (PM). These ER-PM MCS, where the membranes of the ER and PM are closely apposed, were discovered in the early days of electron microscopy (EM), but only recently are we starting to understand their functional and structural diversity. ER-PM MCS are nowadays known to mediate excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) in striated muscle cells and to play crucial roles in Ca(2+)and lipid homoeostasis in all metazoan cells. A common feature across ER-PM MCS specialized in different functions is the preponderance of cooperative phenomena that result in the formation of large supramolecular assemblies. Therefore, characterizing the supramolecular architecture of ER-PM MCS is critical to understand their mechanisms of function. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is a powerful EM technique uniquely positioned to address this issue, as it allows 3D imaging of fully hydrated, unstained cellular structures at molecular resolution. In this review I summarize our current structural knowledge on the molecular organization of ER-PM MCS and its functional implications, with special emphasis on the emerging contributions of cryo-ET. PMID:27068966

  14. Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.

    2013-09-30

    One of the most challenging aspects of traditional PEM fuel cell stacks is the difficulty achieving the platinum catalyst utilization target of 0.2 gPt/kWe set forth by the DOE. Good catalyst utilization can be achieved with state-of-the-art catalyst coated membranes (CCM) when low catalyst loadings (<0.3 mg/cm2) are used at a low current. However, when low platinum loadings are used, the peak power density is lower than conventional loadings, requiring a larger total active area and a larger bipolar plate. This results in a lower overall stack power density not meeting the DOE target. By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

  15. 鼻咽癌5-8F细胞膜蛋白质组初步分析%A Preliminary Analysis of Plasma Membrane Proteome of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cell 5-8F

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏飞; 曾谷清; 易红; 梁宋平; 陈主初; 肖志强

    2012-01-01

    The proteins on the membrane act as"doorbells"and"doorways"playing crucial roles in cell function including intercellular communication, cellular development, cell migration, and immune response. To comprehensively identify metastasis associated proteins of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell 5-8F plasma membrane, we have adopted a proteomics strategy that utilizes differential centrifugation combined with aqueous two-phase partition for plasma membrane purification, followed by SDS-PAGE for protein isolation, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics for proteins identification. After LC-MS/MS analysis, a total of 316 proteins of 5-8F cell plasma membrane preparations were identified. Of the identified proteins 152 were plasma membrane and membrane-associated proteins (accounting for 48.5%). Through differentially expressed proteins in human cancers database (dbDEPD) searching, 49 kinds of membrane proteins in 114 i-dentified membrane proteins were tumor related proteins, of which 21 membrane proteins associated with tumor metastasis. Further analysis found that CD 104, VDAC2, CD298 and SLC25A3 were head and neck cancer (oral cancer) metastasis related proteins, suggesting that these membrane proteins may be potential metastasis associated proteins in NPC. The present experimental results accumulated valuable data for understanding the carcinogenesis mechanism of NPC and constructing the protein database specific for NPC cell.%细胞膜蛋白是细胞的重要组成部分,作为细胞的“门铃”与“门户”,参与细胞内外物质交换、信息转换、细胞生长发育、细胞迁移以及免疫应答等重要生理活动.为鉴定鼻咽癌转移相关膜蛋白,运用差速离心联合双水相方法分离纯化鼻咽癌高转移细胞5-8F的细胞膜,SDS-PAGE分离膜蛋白,液相色谱/电喷雾串联质谱分析(LC-MS/MS)结合生物信息学分析鉴定出316种非冗余蛋白质,其中152种(48.5%)被注释为膜蛋白或膜相关蛋白.通过肿瘤

  16. Identification and role of plasma membrane aquaporin in maize root

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Using antiserum against expressed aquaporin fusion protein, GST-RD28, the distribution of aquaporin in the plasma membrane of maize root protoplasts has been examined under confocal laser scanning microscopy by indirect fluorescence staining. Results indicate that there are abundant aquaporins in maize roots, which are distributed in plasma membrane unevenly. Western blotting analysis of total protein solubilized from maize root plasma membrane shows that antiserum against GST-RD28 can cross-react with one protein around 55 ku. Another 28 ku protein can also be detected when the concentration of SDS and DTT in SDS-PAGE sample buffer is increased. The 55 and 28 ku proteins may be dimeric and monomeric of aquaporin respectively. Functional experiments show that aquaporin blocker HgCl2 and aquaporin antiserum can suppress the swelling of maize root protoplasts in hypotonic solution, indicating that aquaporin in plasma membrane of protoplast facilitates rapid transmembrane water flow.

  17. Characterization of Membrane Protein Interactions in Plasma Membrane Derived Vesicles with Quantitative Imaging FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Del Piccolo, Nuala; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Here we describe an experimental tool, termed Quantitative Imaging Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (QI-FRET), which enables the quantitative characterization of membrane protein interactions. The QI-FRET methodology allows us to acquire binding curves and calculate association constants for complex membrane proteins in the native plasma membrane environment. The method utilizes FRET detection, and thus requires that the proteins of interest are labeled with florescent proteins, either FRET donors or FRET acceptors. Since plasma membranes of cells have complex topologies precluding the acquisition of two-dimensional binding curves, the FRET measurements are performed in plasma membrane derived vesicles which bud off cells as a result of chemical or osmotic stress. The results overviewed here are acquired in vesicles produced with an osmotic vesiculation buffer developed in our laboratory, which does not utilize harsh chemicals. The concentrations of the donor-labeled and the acceptor-labeled proteins are determined, along with the FRET efficiencies, in each vesicle. The experiments utilize transient transfection, such that a wide variety of concentrations is sampled. Then, data from hundreds of vesicles are combined to yield dimerization curves. Here we discuss recent findings about the dimerization of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), membrane proteins that control cell growth and differentiation via lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane. We focus on the dimerization of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), an RTK that plays a critically important role in skeletal development. We study the role of different FGFR3 domains in FGFR3 dimerization in the absence of ligand, and we show that FGFR3 extracellular domains inhibit unliganded dimerization, while contacts between the juxtamembrane domains, which connect the transmembrane domains to the kinase domains, stabilize the unliganded FGFR3 dimers. Since FGFR3 has been documented to harbor

  18. Zymosterol is located in the plasma membrane of cultured human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zymosterol (5 alpha-cholesta-8(9),24-dien-3 beta-ol) comprised a negligible fraction of the mass of sterol in cultured human fibroblasts but was well labeled biosynthetically with radioactive acetate. Treatment of cells with triparanol, a potent inhibitor of sterol delta 24-reductase, led to a marked increase in labeled zymosterol while its mass rose to 1 mol% of total sterol. All of this sterol could be chased into cholesterol. Furthermore, cell homogenates converted exogenous radiolabeled zymosterol to cholesterol. Three lines of evidence suggested that biosynthetically labeled zymosterol was associated with the plasma membrane. (1) About 80% of radiolabeled zymosterol was oxidized by the impermeant enzyme, cholesterol oxidase, in glutaraldehyde-fixed intact cells. (2) Sucrose density gradient analysis of homogenates showed that the equilibrium buoyant density profile of newly synthesized zymosterol was identical with that of the plasma membrane. (3) Newly synthesized zymosterol was transferred as readily from fixed intact fibroblasts to exogenous acceptors as was cholesterol. Given that cholesterol is synthesized within the cell, it is unclear why most of the zymosterol is in the plasma membrane. The pathway of cholesterol biosynthesis may compel zymosterol to flux through the plasma membrane. Alternatively, plasma membrane zymosterol may represent a separate pool, in equilibrium with the zymosterol in the intracellular biosynthetic pool

  19. Zymosterol is located in the plasma membrane of cultured human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echevarria, F.; Norton, R.A.; Nes, W.D.; Lange, Y. (Rush Medical College, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-05-25

    Zymosterol (5 alpha-cholesta-8(9),24-dien-3 beta-ol) comprised a negligible fraction of the mass of sterol in cultured human fibroblasts but was well labeled biosynthetically with radioactive acetate. Treatment of cells with triparanol, a potent inhibitor of sterol delta 24-reductase, led to a marked increase in labeled zymosterol while its mass rose to 1 mol% of total sterol. All of this sterol could be chased into cholesterol. Furthermore, cell homogenates converted exogenous radiolabeled zymosterol to cholesterol. Three lines of evidence suggested that biosynthetically labeled zymosterol was associated with the plasma membrane. (1) About 80% of radiolabeled zymosterol was oxidized by the impermeant enzyme, cholesterol oxidase, in glutaraldehyde-fixed intact cells. (2) Sucrose density gradient analysis of homogenates showed that the equilibrium buoyant density profile of newly synthesized zymosterol was identical with that of the plasma membrane. (3) Newly synthesized zymosterol was transferred as readily from fixed intact fibroblasts to exogenous acceptors as was cholesterol. Given that cholesterol is synthesized within the cell, it is unclear why most of the zymosterol is in the plasma membrane. The pathway of cholesterol biosynthesis may compel zymosterol to flux through the plasma membrane. Alternatively, plasma membrane zymosterol may represent a separate pool, in equilibrium with the zymosterol in the intracellular biosynthetic pool.

  20. Delayed effects of cold atmospheric plasma on vascular cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Eva; Roks, Anton J. M.; Deelmm, Leo E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the long-term behaviour of vascular cells (endothelial and smooth muscle) after exposure to a cold atmospheric plasma source. The cells were treated through a gas-permeable membrane, in order to simulate intravenous treatment with a gas plasma-filled catheter. Such indirect treatment

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of the endothelial cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon W Fogarty

    Full Text Available We applied surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS to cationic gold-labeled endothelial cells to derive SERS-enhanced spectra of the bimolecular makeup of the plasma membrane. A two-step protocol with cationic charged gold nanoparticles followed by silver-intensification to generate silver nanoparticles on the cell surface was employed. This protocol of post-labelling silver-intensification facilitates the collection of SERS-enhanced spectra from the cell membrane without contribution from conjugated antibodies or other molecules. This approach generated a 100-fold SERS-enhancement of the spectral signal. The SERS spectra exhibited many vibrational peaks that can be assigned to components of the cell membrane. We were able to carry out spectral mapping using some of the enhanced wavenumbers. Significantly, the spectral maps suggest the distribution of some membrane components are was not evenly distributed over the cells plasma membrane. These results provide some possible evidence for the existence of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane and show that SERS has great potential for the study and characterization of cell surfaces.

  2. Plasma cell granuloma of lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sabarinath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cells are medium-sized round-to-oval cells with eccentrically placed nuclei, usually found in the red pulp of the spleen, tonsils, medulla of the lymph nodes, nasal mucosa, upper airway, lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract, and sites of inflammation. Plasma cell granuloma is a rare reactive tumor-like proliferation composed chiefly of plasmacytic infiltrate. Here, we present a case of plasma cell granuloma of lip in a female patient.

  3. The separation of gastric epithelium mucosae cells and Identification of plasma membrane proteins%胃黏膜上皮细胞的分离及其质膜蛋白质的初步分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小兰; 龚建平; 徐向上; 闵江; 邹游; 于冬冬; 张永红; 肖徽; 陶德定; 胡俊波

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the method of separating gastric epithelium mucosae cells and analyze the cell membrane proteins. Methods Get rid of the mucus of the gastric tissues by 0. 1% pepsin solution, scrape the mucous membrane, shear the tissues by mechanical method and then after filtering and centrifugation, the gastric epithelium mucosae cells was obtained. Extract membrane proteins by Triton-114,perform SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and choose some protein straps to do mass spectrography analysis. Results We obtained gastric epithelium mucosae cells successfully,the cell plasma membrane proteins were separated from total proteins, and we acquired some membrane proteins information by mass spectrography analysis. Conclusion Gastric epithelium mucosae cells can be separated by the combination of physical and chemical methods,plasma membrane proteins can be extracted by lyses buffer containing Triton-114.%目的 探讨分离胃黏膜上皮细胞的方法及对其细胞膜蛋白质的初步分析.方法 采用0.1%的胃蛋白酶溶液消化掉附在胃黏膜上的黏液,刮取黏膜,用机械法将黏膜剪碎,过滤,离心,从而获得胃黏膜上皮细胞;用Triton-114方法提取细胞质膜蛋白质,SDS-PAGE电泳,并对其中的几个条带质谱分析.结果 成功获得了胃黏膜上皮细胞;胃黏膜上皮细胞质膜蛋白质得到了较好的分离;SDS-PAGE电泳细胞膜蛋白质得到了清晰的条带;用质谱分析条带获得了一些细胞膜蛋白信息.结论 利用物理和化学相结合的方法可以分离得到胃黏膜上皮细胞,成功提取胃黏膜上皮细胞质膜蛋白质并进行了初步鉴定.

  4. Lipids and glycosphingolipids in caveolae and surrounding plasma membrane of primary rat adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortegren, Unn; Karlsson, Margareta; Blazic, Natascha; Blomqvist, Maria; Nystrom, Fredrik H; Gustavsson, Johanna; Fredman, Pam; Strålfors, Peter

    2004-05-01

    We have made a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of the lipid composition of caveolae from primary rat fat cells and compared the composition of plasma membrane inside and outside caveolae. We isolated caveolae from purified plasma membranes using ultrasonication in carbonate buffer to disrupt the membrane, or extraction with nonionic detergent, followed by density gradient ultracentrifugation. The carbonate-isolated caveolae fraction was further immunopurified using caveolin antibodies. Carbonate-isolated caveolae were enriched in cholesterol and sphingomyelin, and the concentration was three- and twofold higher, respectively, in caveolae compared to the surrounding plasma membrane. The concentration of glycerophospholipids was similar suggesting that glycerophospholipids constitute a constant core throughout the plasma membrane. The composition of detergent-insoluble fractions of the plasma membrane was very variable between preparations, but strongly enriched in sphingomyelin and depleted of glycerophospholipids compared to carbonate-isolated caveolae; indicating that detergent extraction is not a suitable technique for caveolae preparation. An average adipocyte caveola contained about 22 x 10(3) molecules of cholesterol, 7.5 x 10(3) of sphingomyelin and 23 x 10(3) of glycerophospholipid. The glycosphingolipid GD3 was highly enriched in caveolae, whereas GM3, GM1 and GD1a were present inside as well as outside the caveolae membrane. GD1b, GT1b, GM2, GQ1b, sulfatide and lactosylceramide sulfate were not detected in caveolae.

  5. The plasma membrane proteome of germinating barley embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hynek, Radovan; Svensson, Birte; Jensen, O.N.;

    2009-01-01

    with amphiphilicity and low abundance of membrane proteins. A fraction enriched in plasma membranes was prepared from embryos dissected from 18 h germinated barley seeds using aqueous two-phase partitioning. Reversed-phase chromatography on C-4 resin performed in micro-spin columns with stepwise elution by 2-propanol...

  6. Detecting Nanodomains in Living Cell Membrane by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hai-Tao; Marguet, Didier

    2011-05-01

    Cell membranes actively participate in numerous cellular functions. Inasmuch as bioactivities of cell membranes are known to depend crucially on their lateral organization, much effort has been focused on deciphering this organization on different length scales. Within this context, the concept of lipid rafts has been intensively discussed over recent years. In line with its ability to measure diffusion parameters with great precision, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements have been made in association with innovative experimental strategies to monitor modes of molecular lateral diffusion within the plasma membrane of living cells. These investigations have allowed significant progress in the characterization of the cell membrane lateral organization at the suboptical level and have provided compelling evidence for the in vivo existence of raft nanodomains. We review these FCS-based studies and the characteristic structural features of raft nanodomains. We also discuss the findings in regards to the current view of lipid rafts as a general membrane-organizing principle.

  7. Plasma Membrane Repair Is Regulated Extracellularly by Proteases Released from Lysosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Castro-Gomes

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells rapidly repair wounds on their plasma membrane. Resealing is Ca(2+-dependent, and involves exocytosis of lysosomes followed by massive endocytosis. Extracellular activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid sphingomyelinase was previously shown to promote endocytosis and wound removal. However, whether lysosomal proteases released during cell injury participate in resealing is unknown. Here we show that lysosomal proteases regulate plasma membrane repair. Extracellular proteolysis is detected shortly after cell wounding, and inhibition of this process blocks repair. Conversely, surface protein degradation facilitates plasma membrane resealing. The abundant lysosomal cysteine proteases cathepsin B and L, known to proteolytically remodel the extracellular matrix, are rapidly released upon cell injury and are required for efficient plasma membrane repair. In contrast, inhibition of aspartyl proteases or RNAi-mediated silencing of the lysosomal aspartyl protease cathepsin D enhances resealing, an effect associated with the accumulation of active acid sphingomyelinase on the cell surface. Thus, secreted lysosomal cysteine proteases may promote repair by facilitating membrane access of lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase, which promotes wound removal and is subsequently downregulated extracellularly by a process involving cathepsin D.

  8. Plasma Membrane Repair Is Regulated Extracellularly by Proteases Released from Lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Gomes, Thiago; Corrotte, Matthias; Tam, Christina; Andrews, Norma W

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells rapidly repair wounds on their plasma membrane. Resealing is Ca(2+)-dependent, and involves exocytosis of lysosomes followed by massive endocytosis. Extracellular activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid sphingomyelinase was previously shown to promote endocytosis and wound removal. However, whether lysosomal proteases released during cell injury participate in resealing is unknown. Here we show that lysosomal proteases regulate plasma membrane repair. Extracellular proteolysis is detected shortly after cell wounding, and inhibition of this process blocks repair. Conversely, surface protein degradation facilitates plasma membrane resealing. The abundant lysosomal cysteine proteases cathepsin B and L, known to proteolytically remodel the extracellular matrix, are rapidly released upon cell injury and are required for efficient plasma membrane repair. In contrast, inhibition of aspartyl proteases or RNAi-mediated silencing of the lysosomal aspartyl protease cathepsin D enhances resealing, an effect associated with the accumulation of active acid sphingomyelinase on the cell surface. Thus, secreted lysosomal cysteine proteases may promote repair by facilitating membrane access of lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase, which promotes wound removal and is subsequently downregulated extracellularly by a process involving cathepsin D. PMID:27028538

  9. Preparation of artificial plasma membrane mimicking vesicles with lipid asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Lipid asymmetry, the difference in lipid distribution across the lipid bilayer, is one of the most important features of eukaryotic cellular membranes. However, commonly used model membrane vesicles cannot provide control of lipid distribution between inner and outer leaflets. We recently developed methods to prepare asymmetric model membrane vesicles, but facile incorporation of a highly controlled level of cholesterol was not possible. In this study, using hydroxypropyl-α-cyclodextrin based lipid exchange, a simple method was devised to prepare large unilamellar model membrane vesicles that closely resemble mammalian plasma membranes in terms of their lipid composition and asymmetry (sphingomyelin (SM) and/or phosphatidylcholine (PC) outside/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) inside), and in which cholesterol content can be readily varied between 0 and 50 mol%. We call these model membranes "artificial plasma membrane mimicking" ("PMm") vesicles. Asymmetry was confirmed by both chemical labeling and measurement of the amount of externally-exposed anionic lipid. These vesicles should be superior and more realistic model membranes for studies of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles that of mammalian plasma membranes.

  10. NKCC1 and NHE1 are abundantly expressed in the basolateral plasma membrane of secretory coil cells in rat, mouse, and human sweat glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nejsum, Lene Niemann; Prætorius, Jeppe; Nielsen, Søren

    2005-01-01

    1 (NHE1) protein has been localized to both the duct and secretory coil of human sweat duct; however, the NHE1 abundance in the duct was not compared with that in the secretory coil. The aim of this study was to test whether mRNA encoding NKCC1, NKCC2, and Na(+)-coupled acid-base transporters...... palmar skin by immunoblotting, whereas NKCC2, NHE2, and NHE3 proteins were not detected. Immunohistochemistry was performed using sections from rat, mouse, and human palmar tissue. Immunoperoxidase labeling revealed abundant expression of NKCC1 and NHE1 in the basolateral domain of secretory coils of rat......, mouse, and human sweat glands and low expression was found in the coiled part of the ducts. In contrast, NKCC1 and NHE1 labeling was absent from rat, mouse, and human epidermis. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated abundant NKCC1 and NHE1 labeling of the basolateral plasma membrane of mouse sweat...

  11. There Is No Simple Model of the Plasma Membrane Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Eggeling, Christian; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Ever since technologies enabled the characterization of eukaryotic plasma membranes, heterogeneities in the distributions of its constituents were observed. Over the years this led to the proposal of various models describing the plasma membrane organization such as lipid shells, picket-and-fences, lipid rafts, or protein islands, as addressed in numerous publications and reviews. Instead of emphasizing on one model we in this review give a brief overview over current models and highlight how current experimental work in one or the other way do not support the existence of a single overarching model. Instead, we highlight the vast variety of membrane properties and components, their influences and impacts. We believe that highlighting such controversial discoveries will stimulate unbiased research on plasma membrane organization and functionality, leading to a better understanding of this essential cellular structure. PMID:27747212

  12. A theory of Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump stimulation and activity

    CERN Document Server

    Graupner, M; Meyer-Hermann, M; Erler, Frido; Graupner, Michael; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The ATP-driven Plasma Membrane Calcium (PMCA) pump is characterized by a high affinity to calcium and a low transport rate compared to other transmembrane calcium transport proteins. It plays a crucial role for calcium extrusion from cells. Calmodulin is an intracellular calcium buffering protein which is capable in its Calcium-liganded form to stimulate the PMCA pump by increasing both, the affinity to calcium and the maximum calcium transport rate. We introduce a new model of this stimulation process and deduce analytical expressions for experimental observables in order to determine the model parameter on the basis of specific experiments. Furthermore a model for the pumping activity is developed. In contrast to the biological process we have to describe the pumping rate behavior by assuming a ATP:Calcium stoichiometry of 2 in order to reproduce experimental data. The conjunction of the description of calcium pumping and the stimulation model fully and correctly simulates PMCA pump function. Therewith the ...

  13. Effects of non-thermal plasma on the electrical properties of an erythrocyte membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Young; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Tae Soo; Lim, Jaekwan; Uhm, Han S.; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-09-01

    Non-thermal plasma is used here for membrane oxidation and permeabilization in which the electrical properties of an erythrocyte membrane are investigated after treatments. The zeta potential as measured by electrophoresis shows the increased negativity of the membrane surface potential (Ψs). The secondary electron emission coefficient ( γ) measured by a focused ion beam shows a decrease in the dipole potential (Ψd) of lipid molecules. The voltage-sensitive fluorescent intensity as measured by flow cytometry shows a decrease in the trans-membrane potential (ΔΨ) through the lipid bilayer membrane. These results allow us to take a step forward to unveil the complex events occurring in plasma-treated cells.

  14. Difference in Membrane Repair Capacity Between Cancer Cell Lines and a Normal Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; McNeil, Anna K; Novak, Ivana; McNeil, Paul L; Gehl, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Electroporation-based treatments and other therapies that permeabilize the plasma membrane have been shown to be more devastating to malignant cells than to normal cells. In this study, we asked if a difference in repair capacity could explain this observed difference in sensitivity. Membrane repair was investigated by disrupting the plasma membrane using laser followed by monitoring fluorescent dye entry over time in seven cancer cell lines, an immortalized cell line, and a normal primary cell line. The kinetics of repair in living cells can be directly recorded using this technique, providing a sensitive index of repair capacity. The normal primary cell line of all tested cell lines exhibited the slowest rate of dye entry after laser disruption and lowest level of dye uptake. Significantly, more rapid dye uptake and a higher total level of dye uptake occurred in six of the seven tested cancer cell lines (p electroporation. Viability in the primary normal cell line (98 % viable cells) was higher than in the three tested cancer cell lines (81-88 % viable cells). These data suggest more effective membrane repair in normal, primary cells and supplement previous explanations why electroporation-based therapies and other therapies permeabilizing the plasma membrane are more effective on malignant cells compared to normal cells in cancer treatment. PMID:27312328

  15. Isolation and chemical characterization of plasma membranes from the yeast and mycelial forms of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, M S

    1975-01-01

    It has been possible to induce the yeast-mycelium transformation in Candida albicans by growth of the organism under completely defined conditions in batch culture. Protoplasts have been obtained from the two forms by using a lytic enzyme preparation from Streptomyces violaceus. A plasma membrane fraction was prepared by osmotic lysis of these protoplasts and fractionated by using a combination of differential and discontinuous sucrose density-gradient flotation centrifugation. The purity of this fraction was determined by radioactive dansylation and iodination of plasma membranes of intact protoplasts followed by localization of the radioactivity upon fractionation. This procedure demonstrated less than 4% contamination of the plasma membrane fraction with other cell membranes. Chemical analysis of this fraction revealed that the major components were protein and lipid. Membranes from the yeast form contained (w/w): 50% protein, 45% lipid, 9% carbohydrate and 0.3% nucleic acid. Plasma membranes from the mycelial form contained significantly more carbohydrate and were found to be composed of (w/w): 43% protein, 31% lipid, 25% carbohydrate and 0.5% nucleic acid. Marked differences were also observed between the phospholipid, free and esterified sterols, and total fatty acids of membranes from the two forms of the organism. PMID:1089750

  16. Cryobehavior of the plasma membrane in protoplasts isolated from cold-acclimated Arabidopsis leaves is related to surface area regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2008-06-01

    Extracellular freezing in plants results in dehydration and mechanical stresses upon the plasma membrane. Plants that acquire enhanced freezing tolerance after cold acclimation can withstand these two physical stresses. To understand the tolerance to freeze-induced physical stresses, the cryobehavior of the plasma membrane was observed using protoplasts isolated from cold-acclimated Arabidopsis thaliana leaves with the combination of a lipophilic fluorescent dye FM 1-43 and cryomicroscopy. We found that many vesicular structures appeared in the cytoplasmic region near the plasma membrane just after extracellular freezing occurred. These structures, referred to as freeze-induced vesicular structures (FIVs), then developed horizontally near the plasma membrane during freezing. There was a strong correlation between the increase in individual FIV size and the decrease in the surface area of the protoplasts during freezing. Some FIVs fused with their neighbors as the temperature decreased. Occasionally, FIVs fused with the plasma membrane, which may be necessary to relax the stress upon the plasma membrane during freezing. Vesicular structures resembling FIVs were also induced when protoplasts were mechanically pressed between a coverslip and slide glass. Fewer FIVs formed when protoplasts were subjected to hyperosmotic solution, suggesting that FIV formation is associated with mechanical stress rather than dehydration. Collectively, these results suggest that cold-acclimated plant cells may balance membrane tension in the plasma membrane by regulating the surface area. This enables plant cells to withstand the direct mechanical stress imposed by extracellular freezing.

  17. Proteomics and the dynamic plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2010-01-01

    membrane proteome is crucial for understanding fundamental biological processes, disease mechanisms and for finding drug targets. Protein identification, characterization of dynamic PTMs and protein-ligand interactions, and determination of transient changes in protein expression and composition are among...

  18. Discs-Large and Strabismus are functionally linked to plasma membrane formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ok-Kyung; Frese, Kristopher K.; James, Jennifer S.; Chadda, Darshana; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Javier, Ronald T.; Cho, Kyung-Ok

    2003-01-01

    During early embryogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster, extensive vesicle transport occurs to build cell boundaries for 6,000 nuclei. Here we show that this important process depends on a functional complex formed between the tumour suppressor and adaptor protein Discs-Large (Dlg)1 and the integral membrane protein Strabismus (Stbm)/Van Gogh (Vang)2,3. In support of this idea, embryos with mutations in either dlg or stbm displayed severe defects in plasma membrane formation. Conversely, overex...

  19. Inhibition of sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) affects intracellular sphingomyelin accumulation and plasma membrane lipid organization

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhiqiang; Hailemariam, Tiruneh K.; Zhou, Hongwen; Li, Yan; Duckworth, Dale C.; Peake, David A.; Zhang, Youyan; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Cao, Guoqing; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Sphingomyelin plays a very important role both in cell membrane formation that may well have an impact on the development of diseases like atherosclerosis and diabetes. However, the molecular mechanism that governs intracellular and plasma membrane SM levels is largely unknown. Recently, two isoforms of sphingomyelin synthase (SMS1 and SMS2), the last enzyme for SM de novo synthesis, have been cloned. We have hypothesized that SMS1 and SMS2 are the two most likely candidates responsible for t...

  20. Selective regulation of maize plasma membrane aquaporin trafficking and activity by the SNARE SYP121.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Arnaud; Burnotte, Emeline; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chevalier, Adrien S; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Grefen, Christopher; Blatt, Michael R; Chaumont, François

    2012-08-01

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are aquaporins facilitating the diffusion of water through the cell membrane. We previously showed that the traffic of the maize (Zea mays) PIP2;5 to the plasma membrane is dependent on the endoplasmic reticulum diacidic export motif. Here, we report that the post-Golgi traffic and water channel activity of PIP2;5 are regulated by the SNARE (for soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor protein attachment protein receptor) SYP121, a plasma membrane resident syntaxin involved in vesicle traffic, signaling, and regulation of K(+) channels. We demonstrate that the expression of the dominant-negative SYP121-Sp2 fragment in maize mesophyll protoplasts or epidermal cells leads to a decrease in the delivery of PIP2;5 to the plasma membrane. Protoplast and oocyte swelling assays showed that PIP2;5 water channel activity is negatively affected by SYP121-Sp2. A combination of in vitro (copurification assays) and in vivo (bimolecular fluorescence complementation, Förster resonance energy transfer, and yeast split-ubiquitin) approaches allowed us to demonstrate that SYP121 and PIP2;5 physically interact. Together with previous data demonstrating the role of SYP121 in regulating K(+) channel trafficking and activity, these results suggest that SYP121 SNARE contributes to the regulation of the cell osmotic homeostasis.

  1. Selective Regulation of Maize Plasma Membrane Aquaporin Trafficking and Activity by the SNARE SYP121[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Arnaud; Burnotte, Emeline; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chevalier, Adrien S.; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Grefen, Christopher; Blatt, Michael R.; Chaumont, François

    2012-01-01

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are aquaporins facilitating the diffusion of water through the cell membrane. We previously showed that the traffic of the maize (Zea mays) PIP2;5 to the plasma membrane is dependent on the endoplasmic reticulum diacidic export motif. Here, we report that the post-Golgi traffic and water channel activity of PIP2;5 are regulated by the SNARE (for soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor protein attachment protein receptor) SYP121, a plasma membrane resident syntaxin involved in vesicle traffic, signaling, and regulation of K+ channels. We demonstrate that the expression of the dominant-negative SYP121-Sp2 fragment in maize mesophyll protoplasts or epidermal cells leads to a decrease in the delivery of PIP2;5 to the plasma membrane. Protoplast and oocyte swelling assays showed that PIP2;5 water channel activity is negatively affected by SYP121-Sp2. A combination of in vitro (copurification assays) and in vivo (bimolecular fluorescence complementation, Förster resonance energy transfer, and yeast split-ubiquitin) approaches allowed us to demonstrate that SYP121 and PIP2;5 physically interact. Together with previous data demonstrating the role of SYP121 in regulating K+ channel trafficking and activity, these results suggest that SYP121 SNARE contributes to the regulation of the cell osmotic homeostasis. PMID:22942383

  2. G protein-coupled receptor 30 is an estrogen receptor in the plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, GPR30 was reported to be a novel estrogen receptor; however, its intracellular localization has remained controversial. To investigate the intracellular localization of GPR30 in vivo, we produced four kinds of polyclonal antibodies for distinct epitopes on GPR30. Immunocytochemical observations using anti-GPR30 antibody and anti-FLAG antibody show that FLAG-GPR30 localizes to the plasma membrane 24 h after transfection. Treatment with estrogen (17β-estradiol or E2) causes an elevation in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) within 10 s in HeLa cells expressing FLAG-GPR30. In addition, E2 induces the translocation of GPR30 from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm by 1 h after stimulation. Immunohistochemical analysis shows that GPR30 exists on the cell surface of CA2 pyramidal neuronal cells. The images on transmission electron microscopy show that GPR30 is localized to a particular region associated with the plasma membranes of the pyramidal cells. These data indicate that GPR30, a transmembrane receptor for estrogen, is localized to the plasma membrane of CA2 pyramidal neuronal cells of the hippocampus in rat brain

  3. STUDYING MEMBRANE ANCHOR ORGANIZATION IN LIVING CELL MEMBRANES

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hector Han-Li

    2011-01-01

    The cell membrane is a complex mixture of various lipids, proteins and other biomolecules that are all organized into a fluid 2-dimensional bilayer. A rather unique trait of this organelle is the lateral mobility of the component molecules. Surprisingly, these molecules are not necessarily distributed homogeneously in the membrane. From a physical perspective, these inhomogeneities are interesting because they indicate some level of organization in the membrane. From a biological perspect...

  4. Effect of oxidative stress on plasma membrane fluidity of THP-1 induced macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Martínez, Paz; Morros, Antoni

    2013-02-01

    Plasma membrane is one of the preferential targets of reactive oxygen species which cause lipid peroxidation. This process modifies membrane properties such as membrane fluidity, a very important physical feature known to modulate membrane protein localization and function. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of oxidative stress on plasma membrane fluidity regionalization of single living THP-1 macrophages. These cells were oxidized with H(2)O(2) at different concentrations, and plasma membrane fluidity was analyzed by two-photon microscopy in combination with the environment-sensitive probe Laurdan. Results show a significant H(2)O(2) concentration dependent increase in the frequency of rigid lipid regions, mainly attributable to lipid rafts, at the expense of the intermediate fluidity regions. A novel statistical analysis evaluated changes in size and number of lipid raft domains under oxidative stress conditions, as lipid rafts are platforms aiding cell signaling and are thought to have relevant roles in macrophage functions. It is shown that H(2)O(2) causes an increase in the number, but not the size, of raft domains. As macrophages are highly resistant to H(2)O(2), these new raft domains might be involved in cell survival pathways.

  5. Identification of type-2 phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase (PAPH-2) in neutrophil plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, E; Taylor, G; Akard, L; Jansen, J; English, D

    1994-11-01

    Plasma membrane phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase (PAPH) plays an important role in signal transduction by converting phosphatidic acid to diacylglycerol. PAPH-2, a Mg(2+)-independent, detergent-dependent enzyme involved in cellular signal transduction, is reportedly absent from the plasma membranes of neutrophilic leukocytes, a cell that responds to metabolic stimulation with abundant phospholipase D-dependent diacylglycerol generation. The present study was designed to resolve this discrepancy, focusing on the influence of cellular disruption techniques, detergent availability and cation sensitivity on the apparent distribution of PAPH in neutrophil subcellular fractions. The results clearly indicate the presence of two distinct types of PAPH within the particulate and cytosolic fractions of disrupted cells. Unlike the cytosolic enzyme, the particulate enzymes was not potentiated by magnesium and was strongly detergent-dependent. The soluble and particulate enzymes displayed dissimilar pH profiles. Separation of neutrophil particulate material into fractions rich in plasma membranes, specific granules and azurophilic granules by high speed discontinuous density gradient centrifugation revealed that the majority of the particulate activity was confined to plasma membranes. This activity was not inhibited by pretreatment with n-ethyl-maleimide in concentrations as high as 25 mM. PAPH activity recovered in the cytosolic fraction of disrupted neutrophils was almost completely inhibited by 5.0 mM n-ethylmaleimide. We conclude that resting neutrophils possess n-ethylmaleimide-resistant PAPH (type 2) within their plasma membranes. This enzyme may markedly influence the kinetics of cell activation by metabolizing second messengers generated as a result of activation of plasma membrane phospholipase D.

  6. Detection of glycoproteins in the Acanthamoeba plasma membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paatero, G.I.L. (Abo Akademi (Finland)); Gahmberg, C.G. (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland))

    1988-11-01

    In the present study the authors have shown that glycoproteins are present in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii by utilizing different radioactive labeling techniques. Plasma membrane proteins in the amoeba were iodinated by {sup 125}I-lactoperoxidase labeling and the solubilized radiolabeled glycoproteins were separated by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The periodate/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} and galactose oxidase/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} labeling techniques were used for labeling of surface carbohydrates in the amoeba. Several surface-labeled glycoproteins were observed in addition to a diffusely labeled region with M{sub r} of 55,000-75,000 seen on electrophoresis, which could represent glycolipids. The presence of glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii was confirmed by metabolic labeling with ({sup 35}S)methionine followed by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  7. Fuel-Cell Structure Prevents Membrane Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, J.

    1986-01-01

    Embossed plates direct flows of reactants and coolant. Membrane-type fuel-cell battery has improved reactant flow and heat removal. Compact, lightweight battery produces high current and power without drying of membranes.

  8. Plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA) isoform 4 is targeted to the apical membrane by the w-splice insert from PMCA2

    OpenAIRE

    Antalffy, Géza; Mauer, Amy S.; Pászty, Katalin; Hegedus, Luca; Padányi, Rita; Enyedi, Ágnes; STREHLER, EMANUEL E.

    2012-01-01

    Local Ca2+ signaling requires proper targeting of the Ca2+ signaling toolkit to specific cellular locales. Different isoforms of the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump (PMCA) are responsible for Ca2+ extrusion at the apical and basolateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells, but the mechanisms and signals for differential targeting of the PMCAs are not well understood. Recent work demonstrated that the alternatively spliced w-insert in PMCA2 directs this pump to the apical membrane. We now show th...

  9. Adenosine triphosphate-dependent calcium pump in the plasma membrane of guinea pig and human neutrophils.

    OpenAIRE

    Lagast, H; Lew, P D; Waldvogel, F A

    1984-01-01

    Changes in cytosolic free Ca may function as a second messenger in neutrophils. Since the plasma membrane seems to be a major regulator of intracellular Ca in many cells, we characterized an energy-dependent Ca transport system in plasma membrane-enriched fractions ("podosomes") from phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated guinea pig and human neutrophils. The active Ca transport system in guinea pig podosomes exhibited a high affinity for Ca (Michaelis constant [Km]Ca 280 +/- 120 nM) and a maxi...

  10. Gateway to understanding microparticles: standardized isolation and identification of plasma membrane-derived vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinkla, S.; Brock, R.; Joosten, I.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are small plasma membrane-derived vesicles that can expose molecules originating from their parental cells. As vectors of biological information they are likely to play an active role in both homeostasis and pathogenesis, making them promising biomarkers and nanomedicine tools.

  11. Activation of Raf as a result of recruitment to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokoe, D; Macdonald, S G; Cadwallader, K; Symons, M; Hancock, J F

    1994-06-01

    The small guanine nucleotide binding protein Ras participates in a growth promoting signal transduction pathway. The mechanism by which interaction of Ras with the protein kinase Raf leads to activation of Raf was studied. Raf was targeted to the plasma membrane by addition of the COOH-terminal localization signals of K-ras. This modified form of Raf (RafCAAX) was activated to the same extent as Raf coexpressed with oncogenic mutant Ras. Plasma membrane localization rather than farnesylation or the presence of the additional COOH-terminal sequence accounted for the activation of RafCAAX. The activation of RafCAAX was completely independent of Ras; it was neither potentiated by oncogenic mutant Ras nor abrogated by dominant negative Ras. Raf, once recruited to the plasma membrane, was not anchored there by Ras; most activated Raf in cells was associated with plasma membrane cytoskeletal elements, not the lipid bilayer. Thus, Ras functions in the activation of Raf by recruiting Raf to the plasma membrane where a separate, Ras-independent, activation of Raf occurs.

  12. POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    thermoplastic polymers for high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells have also been developed. Miscible blends are used for solution casting of polymer membranes (solid electrolytes). High conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength were obtained for the blend polymer solid electrolytes....... With the thermally resistant polymer, e.g., polybenzimidazole or a mixture of polybenzimidazole and other thermoplastics as binder, the carbon-supported noble metal catalyst is tape-cast onto a hydrophobic supporting substrate. When doped with an acid mixture, electrodes are assembled with an acid doped solid...

  13. Superficial treatment of mammalian cells using plasma needle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoffels, E; Kieft, I E; Sladek, R E J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2003-12-07

    Interactions of a small-size, non-thermal plasma (plasma needle) with living cells in culture are studied. We have demonstrated the non-destructive character of the plasma needle: under moderate conditions (low-power and low concentration of molecular species) the plasma needle does not heat biological samples and does not induce cell death. Treatment of living cells is restricted to the cell exterior (membrane). As a result of the interactions of plasma radicals with cell adhesion molecules, cell attachment is temporarily interrupted; the loose cells can be removed, reattached or transferred. This effect may prove very useful in fine surgery, where a part of the tissue must be removed with high-precision, without damage to the adjacent cells and without inflammatory reaction.

  14. Plasma membrane calcium pumps and their emerging roles in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah; J; Roberts-Thomson; Merril; C; Curry; Gregory; R; Monteith

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in calcium signaling and/or the expression of calcium pumps and channels are an increasingly recognized property of some cancer cells.Alterations in the expression of plasma membrane calcium ATPase(PMCA) isoforms have been reported in a variety of cancer types,including those of breast and colon,with some studies of cancer cell line differentiation identifying specific PMCA isoforms,which may be altered in some cancers.Some studies have also begun to assess levels of PMCA isoforms in clinical tumor samples and to address mechanisms of altered PMCA expression in cancers.Both increases and decreases in PMCA expression have been reported in different cancer types and in many cases these alterations are isoform specific.In this review,we provide an overview of studies investigating the expression of PMCA in cancer and discuss how both the overexpression and reduced expression of a PMCA isoform in a cancer cell could bestow a growth advantage,through augmenting responses to proliferative stimuli or reducing sensitivity to apoptosis.

  15. Plasma membrane electron transport in frog blood vessels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rashmi P Rao; K Nalini; J Prakasa Rao

    2009-12-01

    In an attempt to see if frog blood vessels possess a plasma membrane electron transport system, the postcaval vein and aorta isolated from Rana tigrina were tested for their ability to reduce ferricyanide, methylene blue, and 2,6-dichloroindophenol. While the dyes remained unchanged, ferricyanide was reduced to ferrocyanide. This reduction was resistant to inhibition by cyanide and azide. Heptane extraction or formalin fixation of the tissues markedly reduced the capability to reduce ferricyanide. Denuded aortas retained only 30% of the activity of intact tissue. Our results indicate that the amphibian postcaval vein and aorta exhibit plasma membrane electron transport

  16. Transbilayer dynamics of phospholipids in the plasma membrane of the Leishmania genus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Gonzaga dos Santos

    Full Text Available Protozoans of the Leishmania genus are the etiological agents of a wide spectrum of diseases commonly known as leishmaniases. Lipid organization of the plasma membrane of the parasite may mimic the lipid organization of mammalian apoptotic cells and play a role in phagocytosis and parasite survival in the mammal host. Here, we analyzed the phospholipid dynamics in the plasma membrane of both the L. (Leishmania and the L. (Viannia subgenera. We found that the activity and substrate specificity of the inward translocation machinery varied between Leishmania species. The differences in activity of inward phospholipid transport correlated with the different sensitivities of the various species towards the alkyl-phospholipid analogue miltefosine. Furthermore, all species exhibited a phospholipid scramblase activity in their plasma membranes upon stimulation with calcium ionophores. However, binding of annexin V to the parasite surface was only detected for a subpopulation of parasites during the stationary growth phase and only marginally enhanced by scramblase activation.

  17. Crystal structure of the plasma membrane proton pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Bjørn P; Buch-Pedersen, Morten J; Morth, J Preben; Palmgren, Michael G; Nissen, Poul

    2007-12-13

    A prerequisite for life is the ability to maintain electrochemical imbalances across biomembranes. In all eukaryotes the plasma membrane potential and secondary transport systems are energized by the activity of P-type ATPase membrane proteins: H+-ATPase (the proton pump) in plants and fungi, and Na+,K+-ATPase (the sodium-potassium pump) in animals. The name P-type derives from the fact that these proteins exploit a phosphorylated reaction cycle intermediate of ATP hydrolysis. The plasma membrane proton pumps belong to the type III P-type ATPase subfamily, whereas Na+,K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase are type II. Electron microscopy has revealed the overall shape of proton pumps, however, an atomic structure has been lacking. Here we present the first structure of a P-type proton pump determined by X-ray crystallography. Ten transmembrane helices and three cytoplasmic domains define the functional unit of ATP-coupled proton transport across the plasma membrane, and the structure is locked in a functional state not previously observed in P-type ATPases. The transmembrane domain reveals a large cavity, which is likely to be filled with water, located near the middle of the membrane plane where it is lined by conserved hydrophilic and charged residues. Proton transport against a high membrane potential is readily explained by this structural arrangement. PMID:18075595

  18. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L.;

    2015-01-01

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This "protein-centric" view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains...... in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range...... of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a "receptor independent" transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET...

  19. Simultaneous monitoring of ionophore- and inhibitor-mediated plasma and mitochondrial membrane potential changes in cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, David G

    2006-05-26

    Although natural and synthetic ionophores are widely exploited in cell studies, for example, to influence cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations and to depolarize in situ mitochondria, their inherent lack of membrane selectivity means that they affect the ion permeability of both plasma and mitochondrial membranes. A similar ambiguity affects the interpretation of signals from fluorescent membrane-permeant cations (usually termed "mitochondrial membrane potential indicators"), because the accumulation of these probes is influenced by both plasma and mitochondrial membrane potentials. To resolve some of these problems a technique is developed to allow simultaneous monitoring of plasma and mitochondrial membrane potentials at single-cell resolution using a cationic and anionic fluorescent probe. A computer program is described that transforms the fluorescence changes into dynamic estimates of changes in plasma and mitochondrial potentials. Exploiting this technique, primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons display a concentration-dependent response to ionomycin: low concentrations mimic nigericin by hyperpolarizing the mitochondria while slowly depolarizing the plasma membrane and maintaining a stable elevated cytoplasmic calcium. Higher ionomycin concentrations induce a stochastic failure of calcium homeostasis that precedes both mitochondrial depolarization and an enhanced rate of plasma membrane depolarization. In addition, the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone only selectively depolarizes mitochondria at submicromolar concentrations. ATP synthase reversal following respiratory chain inhibition depolarizes the mitochondria by 26 mV. PMID:16551630

  20. Transition metal ion FRET to measure short-range distances at the intracellular surface of the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sharona E; Senning, Eric N; Aman, Teresa K; Zagotta, William N

    2016-02-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of lipids and proteins that serve as platforms for cell signaling. We have developed a novel method for measuring the structure and dynamics of the membrane based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The method marries four technologies: (1) unroofing cells to isolate and access the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane; (2) patch-clamp fluorometry (PCF) to measure currents and fluorescence simultaneously from a membrane patch; (3) a synthetic lipid with a metal-chelating head group to decorate the membrane with metal-binding sites; and (4) transition metal ion FRET (tmFRET) to measure short distances between a fluorescent probe and a transition metal ion on the membrane. We applied this method to measure the density and affinity of native and introduced metal-binding sites in the membrane. These experiments pave the way for measuring structural rearrangements of membrane proteins relative to the membrane.

  1. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions

  2. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yoong-Kee [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan); Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 endocytosis allows lipid mixing at the plasma membrane, but not complete fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Vega Michelle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently provided evidence that HIV-1 enters HeLa-derived TZM-bl and lymphoid CEMss cells by fusing with endosomes, whereas its fusion with the plasma membrane does not proceed beyond the lipid mixing step. The mechanism of restriction of HIV-1 fusion at the cell surface and/or the factors that aid the virus entry from endosomes remain unclear. Results We examined HIV-1 fusion with a panel of target cells lines and with primary CD4+ T cells. Kinetic measurements of fusion combined with time-resolved imaging of single viruses further reinforced the notion that HIV-1 enters the cells via endocytosis and fusion with endosomes. Furthermore, we attempted to deliberately redirect virus fusion to the plasma membrane, using two experimental strategies. First, the fusion reaction was synchronized by pre-incubating the viruses with cells at reduced temperature to allow CD4 and coreceptors engagement, but not the virus uptake or fusion. Subsequent shift to a physiological temperature triggered accelerated virus uptake followed by entry from endosomes, but did not permit fusion at the cell surface. Second, blocking HIV-1 endocytosis by a small-molecule dynamin inhibitor, dynasore, resulted in transfer of viral lipids to the plasma membrane without any detectable release of the viral content into the cytosol. We also found that a higher concentration of dynasore is required to block the HIV-endosome fusion compared to virus internalization. Conclusions Our results further support the notion that HIV-1 enters disparate cell types through fusion with endosomes. The block of HIV-1 fusion with the plasma membrane at a post-lipid mixing stage shows that this membrane is not conducive to fusion pore formation and/or enlargement. The ability of dynasore to interfere with the virus-endosome fusion suggests that dynamin could be involved in two distinct steps of HIV-1 entry - endocytosis and fusion within intracellular compartments.

  4. In-membrane micro fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omosebi, Ayokunle; Besser, Ronald

    2016-09-06

    An in-membrane micro fuel cell comprises an electrically-insulating membrane that is permissive to the flow of cations, such as protons, and a pair of electrodes deposited on channels formed in the membrane. The channels are arranged as conduits for fluids, and define a membrane ridge between the channels. The electrodes are porous and include catalysts for promoting the liberation of a proton and an electron from a chemical species and/or or the recombination of a proton and an electron with a chemical specie. The fuel cell may be provided a biosensor, an electrochemical sensor, a microfluidic device, or other microscale devices fabricated in the fuel cell membrane.

  5. Generation and Identification of Monoclonal Antibody Against Porcine Adipocyte Plasma Membrane Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jin-ling; CHEN Jian-jie; WANG Zhi-rui; WANG Jun-dong

    2007-01-01

    Production of monoclonal antibody against porcine adipocyte plasma membrane proteins to explore a new way of controlling body fat deposition and improving carcass quality is discussed in this article. Membrane proteins of pig adipocyte plasma membrane proteins were extracted with the help of sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and two kinds of proteins were obtained. The monoclonal antibody (designated 3B2 and 3F3) of IgGl and IgG2b subclass against adipocyte membrane proteins were produced by immunization, with adipocyte membrane proteins as an antigen, and its titer was 1:105 detected by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA). The cell strains were identified by analyzing the number of chromosomes, the heat stability, the acid and alkali, the types and subtypes of immnoglobulin, and its peculiarities and affinities. Through identification, the chromosome number of hybridoma cell strains was from 80 to 100 and the strains formed good hybridomas colonies. The strains' affinity constants were 4.63×109 and 3.75×109 (mol L-1)-1, respectively. At the same time, the McAb secreted was stable to environmental factors, such as, temperature, acid, alkali and so on. The monoclonal antibodies had been obtained and their specificity to porcine adipocyte plasma membrane proteins had been identified.

  6. Rapid actions of plasma membrane estrogen receptors regulate motility of mouse embryonic stem cells through a profilin-1/cofilin-1-directed kinase signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seung Pil; Ryu, Jung Min; Kim, Mi Ok; Park, Jae Hong; Han, Ho Jae

    2012-08-01

    Long-term estrogen actions are vital for driving cell growth, but more recent evidence suggests that estrogen mediates more rapid cellular effects. However, the function of estradiol-17β (E(2))-BSA in mouse embryonic stem cells has not been reported. Therefore, we examined the role of E(2)-BSA in mouse embryonic stem cell motility and its related signal pathways. E(2)-BSA (10(-8) m) significantly increased motility after 24 h incubation and increased filamentous (F)-actin expression; these effects were inhibited by the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780, indicating that E(2)-BSA bound membrane estrogen receptors and initiated a signal. E(2)-BSA increased c-Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation, which was attenuated by ICI 182,780. The E(2)-BSA-induced increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation was inhibited by Src inhibitor PP2. As a downstream signal molecule, E(2)-BSA activated cdc42 and increased formation of a complex with the neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP)/cdc42/transducer of cdc42-dependent actin assembly-1 (TOCA-1), which was inhibited by FAK small interfering RNA (siRNA) and EGFR inhibitor AG 1478. In addition, E(2)-BSA increased profilin-1 expression and cofilin-1 phosphorylation, which was blocked by cdc42 siRNA. Subsequently, E(2)-BSA induced an increase in F-actin expression, and cell motility was inhibited by each signal pathway-related siRNA molecule or inhibitors but not by cofilin-1 siRNA. A combined treatment of cofilin-1 siRNA and E(2)-BSA increased F-actin expression and cell motility more than that of E(2)-BSA alone. These data demonstrate that E(2)-BSA stimulated motility by interacting with profilin-1/cofilin-1 and F-actin through FAK- and c-Src/EGFR transactivation-dependent N-WASP/cdc42/TOCA-1 complex.

  7. Evidence for a plasma-membrane-bound nitrate reductase involved in nitrate uptake of Chlorella sorokiniana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischner, R.; Ward, M. R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Anti-nitrate-reductase (NR) immunoglobulin-G (IgG) fragments inhibited nitrate uptake into Chlorella cells but had no affect on nitrate uptake. Intact anti-NR serum and preimmune IgG fragments had no affect on nitrate uptake. Membrane-associated NR was detected in plasma-membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The PM-associated NR was not removed by sonicating PM vesicles in 500 mM NaCl and 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and represented up to 0.8% of the total Chlorella NR activity. The PM NR was solubilized by Triton X-100 and inactivated by Chlorella NR antiserum. Plasma-membrane NR was present in ammonium-grown Chlorella cells that completely lacked soluble NR activity. The subunit sizes of the PM and soluble NRs were 60 and 95 kDa, respectively, as determined by sodium-dodecyl-sulfate electrophoresis and western blotting.

  8. Cellulose microfibril deposition: coordinated activity at the plant plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, J.J.; Mulder, B.; Vos, J.W.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Plant cell wall production is a membrane-bound process. Cell walls are composed of cellulose microfibrils, embedded inside a matrix of other polysaccharides and glycoproteins. The cell wall matrix is extruded into the existing cell wall by exocytosis. This same process also inserts the cellulose syn

  9. Plasma membrane association of three classes of bacterial toxins is mediated by a basic-hydrophobic motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Brett; Ahrens, Sebastian; Satchell, Karla J F

    2012-02-01

    Plasma membrane targeting is essential for the proper function of many bacterial toxins. A conserved fourhelical bundle membrane localization domain (4HBM) was recently identified within three diverse families of toxins: clostridial glucosylating toxins, MARTX toxins and Pasteurella multocida-like toxins. When expressed in tissue culture cells or in yeast, GFP fusions to at least one 4HBM from each toxin family show significant peripheral membrane localization but with differing profiles. Both in vivo expression and in vitro binding studies reveal that the ability of these domains to localize to the plasma membrane and bind negatively charged phospholipids requires a basic-hydrophobic motif formed by the L1 and L3 loops. The different binding capacity of each 4HBM is defined by the hydrophobicity of an exposed residue within the motif. This study establishes that bacterial effectors utilize a normal host cell mechanism to locate the plasma membrane where they can then access their intracellular targets.

  10. Lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in dividing Xenopus eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, S.W. de; Tetteroo, P.A.T.; Bluemink, J.G.; Dictus, W.J.A.G.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van

    1984-01-01

    The lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids was analyzed during first cleavage of Xaopus Levis eggs by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) measurements, using the lipid analogs 5-(N-hexadecanoyl)aminofluorescein (“HEDAF”) and 5-(N-tetradecanoyl)aminofluorescein (“TEDAF”) as probes. The pre

  11. The Plasma Membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae : Structure, Function, and Biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERREST, ME; KAMMINGA, AH; NAKANO, A; ANRAKU, Y; POOLMAN, B; KONINGS, WN

    1995-01-01

    The composition of phospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols in the plasma membrane has a strong influence on the activity of the proteins associated or embedded in the lipid bilayer. Since most lipid-synthesizing enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are located in intracellular organelles, an extens

  12. A plasma membrane association module in yeast amino acid transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Bianchi, Frans; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Meutiawati, Febrina; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid permeases (AAPs) in the plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are responsible for the uptake of amino acids and involved in regulation of their cellular levels. Here, we report on a strong and complex module for PM association found in the C-terminal tail of AAPs. Using in sili

  13. Membrane Compartmentalization Reducing the Mobility of Lipids and Proteins within a Model Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Reddy, Tyler; Fowler, Philip W; Duncan, Anna L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-01

    The cytoskeleton underlying cell membranes may influence the dynamic organization of proteins and lipids within the bilayer by immobilizing certain transmembrane (TM) proteins and forming corrals within the membrane. Here, we present coarse-grained resolution simulations of a biologically realistic membrane model of asymmetrically organized lipids and TM proteins. We determine the effects of a model of cytoskeletal immobilization of selected membrane proteins using long time scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing compartments with varying degrees of restraints within the membrane models, we are able to reveal how compartmentalization caused by cytoskeletal immobilization leads to reduced and anomalous diffusional mobility of both proteins and lipids. This in turn results in a reduced rate of protein dimerization within the membrane and of hopping of membrane proteins between compartments. These simulations provide a molecular realization of hierarchical models often invoked to explain single-molecule imaging studies of membrane proteins.

  14. Ca2+-Transport through Plasma Membrane as a Test of Auxin Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia A. Kirpichnikova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Auxin is one of the crucial regulators of plant growth and development. The discovered auxin cytosolic receptor (TIR1 is not involved in the perception of the hormone signal at the plasma membrane. Instead, another receptor, related to the ABP1, auxin binding protein1, is supposed to be responsible for the perception at the plasma membrane. One of the fast and sensitive auxin-induced reactions is an increase of Ca2+ cytosolic concentration, which is suggested to be dependent on the activation of Ca2+ influx through the plasma membrane. This investigation was carried out with a plasmalemma enriched vesicle fraction, obtained from etiolated maize coleoptiles. The magnitude of Ca2+ efflux through the membrane vesicles was estimated according to the shift of potential dependent fluorescent dye diS-C3-(5. The obtained results showed that during coleoptiles ageing (3rd, 4th and 5th days of seedling etiolated growth the magnitude of Ca2+ efflux from inside-out vesicles was decreased. Addition of ABP1 led to a recovery of Ca2+ efflux to the level of the youngest and most sensitive cells. Moreover, the efflux was more sensitive, responding from 10−8 to 10−6 M 1-NAA, in vesicles containing ABP1, whereas native vesicles showed the highest efflux at 10−6 M 1-NAA. We suggest that auxin increases plasma membrane permeability to Ca2+ and that ABP1 is involved in modulation of this reaction.

  15. Ssh4, Rcr2 and Rcr1 affect plasma membrane transporter activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Jhansi; Melin-Larsson, Monika; Ljungdahl, Per O; Forsberg, Hanna

    2007-04-01

    Nutrient uptake in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a highly regulated process. Cells adjust levels of nutrient transporters within the plasma membrane at multiple stages of the secretory and endosomal pathways. In the absence of the ER-membrane-localized chaperone Shr3, amino acid permeases (AAP) inefficiently fold and are largely retained in the ER. Consequently, shr3 null mutants exhibit greatly reduced rates of amino acid uptake due to lower levels of AAPs in their plasma membranes. To further our understanding of mechanisms affecting AAP localization, we identified SSH4 and RCR2 as high-copy suppressors of shr3 null mutations. The overexpression of SSH4, RCR2, or the RCR2 homolog RCR1 increases steady-state AAP levels, whereas the genetic inactivation of these genes reduces steady-state AAP levels. Additionally, the overexpression of any of these suppressor genes exerts a positive effect on phosphate and uracil uptake systems. Ssh4 and Rcr2 primarily localize to structures associated with the vacuole; however, Rcr2 also localizes to endosome-like vesicles. Our findings are consistent with a model in which Ssh4, Rcr2, and presumably Rcr1, function within the endosome-vacuole trafficking pathway, where they affect events that determine whether plasma membrane proteins are degraded or routed to the plasma membrane.

  16. Tumor-specific Hsp70 plasma membrane localization is enabled by the glycosphingolipid Gb3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Gehrmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human tumors differ from normal tissues in their capacity to present Hsp70, the major stress-inducible member of the HSP70 family, on their plasma membrane. Membrane Hsp70 has been found to serve as a prognostic indicator of overall patient survival in leukemia, lower rectal and non small cell lung carcinomas. Why tumors, but not normal cells, present Hsp70 on their cell surface and the impact of membrane Hsp70 on cancer progression remains to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Although Hsp70 has been reported to be associated with cholesterol rich microdomains (CRMs, the partner in the plasma membrane with which Hsp70 interacts has yet to be identified. Herein, global lipid profiling demonstrates that Hsp70 membrane-positive tumors differ from their membrane-negative counterparts by containing significantly higher amounts of globotriaoslyceramide (Gb3, but not of other lipids such as lactosylceramide (LacCer, dodecasaccharideceramide (DoCer, galactosylceramide (GalCer, ceramide (Cer, or the ganglioside GM1. Apart from germinal center B cells, normal tissues are Gb3 membrane-negative. Co-localization of Hsp70 and Gb3 was selectively determined in Gb3 membrane-positive tumor cells, and these cells were also shown to bind soluble Hsp70-FITC protein from outside in a concentration-dependent manner. Given that the latter interaction can be blocked by a Gb3-specific antibody, and that the depletion of globotriaosides from tumors reduces the amount of membrane-bound Hsp70, we propose that Gb3 is a binding partner for Hsp70. The in vitro finding that Hsp70 predominantly binds to artificial liposomes containing Gb3 (PC/SM/Chol/Gb3, 17/45/33/5 confirms that Gb3 is an interaction partner for Hsp70. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that the presence of Gb3 enables anchorage of Hsp70 in the plasma membrane of tumors and thus they might explain tumor-specific membrane localization of Hsp70.

  17. Biomechanics and thermodynamics of nanoparticle interactions with plasma and endosomal membrane lipids in cellular uptake and endosomal escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Jin, Shihua; Weimer, Jonathan; Elegbede, Adekunle; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2014-07-01

    To be effective for cytoplasmic delivery of therapeutics, nanoparticles (NPs) taken up via endocytic pathways must efficiently transport across the cell membrane and subsequently escape from the secondary endosomes. We hypothesized that the biomechanical and thermodynamic interactions of NPs with plasma and endosomal membrane lipids are involved in these processes. Using model plasma and endosomal lipid membranes, we compared the interactions of cationic NPs composed of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) modified with the dichain surfactant didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) or the single-chain surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) vs anionic unmodified NPs of similar size. We validated our hypothesis in doxorubicin-sensitive (MCF-7, with relatively fluid membranes) and resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR, with rigid membranes). Despite their cationic surface charges, DMAB- and CTAB-modified NPs showed different patterns of biophysical interaction: DMAB-modified NPs induced bending of the model plasma membrane, whereas CTAB-modified NPs condensed the membrane, thereby resisted bending. Unmodified NPs showed no effects on bending. DMAB-modified NPs also induced thermodynamic instability of the model endosomal membrane, whereas CTAB-modified and unmodified NPs had no effect. Since bending of the plasma membrane and destabilization of the endosomal membrane are critical biophysical processes in NP cellular uptake and endosomal escape, respectively, we tested these NPs for cellular uptake and drug efficacy. Confocal imaging showed that in both sensitive and resistant cells DMAB-modified NPs exhibited greater cellular uptake and escape from endosomes than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs. Further, paclitaxel-loaded DMAB-modified NPs induced greater cytotoxicity even in resistant cells than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs or drug in solution, demonstrating the potential of DMAB-modified NPs to overcome the transport barrier in resistant cells. In

  18. THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PLASMA CHOLESTEROL、TRIGLYCERIDE、HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN AND ION TRANSPORT ENZYMES IN ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符云峰; 王素敏; 卢振敏; 李红

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationships between levels of plasma cholesterol (Ch), triglyceride (TG)、high density lipoprotein(HDL) and ion transport enzyme activities in red cell membranes of essential hypertensive patients.Methods Plasma Ch, TG, HDL-c, activites of Na+ -K+ -ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase, Ca2+-binding capacity of interior membrane surface, and membrane Ch, phospholipid(PL) were measured in 32 normotensive (NT) subjects and 55 essential hypertensive patients(HT).Results ①Mean artery pressure(MAP), plasma Ch、TG and membrane Ch levels, and membrane cholesterol/phospholipid(C/P) molar ratio were significantly increased compared with those in NT group, respectively; ②The plasma HDL-c level, the activities of Na+-K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase, and the Ca2+-binding capacity of the interior membrane surface in HT group were significantly lower than those in NT group, respectively.Conclusion The depressed activities of Na+-K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase, and Ca2+-binding capacity of the interior surface in cell membranes are the major evidence of ion transport abnormalities in essential hypertension. The plasma TG and membrance C/P molar ratio-dependent changes in membrane microviscosity seem to be responsible for the modulation of particular ion transport pathways.

  19. Force Balance and Membrane Shedding at the Red-Blood-Cell Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sens, Pierre; Gov, Nir

    2007-01-01

    During the aging of the red-blood cell, or under conditions of extreme echinocytosis, membrane is shed from the cell plasma membrane in the form of nanovesicles. We propose that this process is the result of the self-adaptation of the membrane surface area to the elastic stress imposed by the spectrin cytoskeleton, via the local buckling of membrane under increasing cytoskeleton stiffness. This model introduces the concept of force balance as a regulatory process at the cell membrane and quantitatively reproduces the rate of area loss in aging red-blood cells.

  20. Fuel cell and membrane therefore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aindow, Tai-Tsui

    2016-08-09

    A fuel cell includes first and second flow field plates, and an anode electrode and a cathode electrode between the flow field plates. A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is arranged between the electrodes. At least one of the flow field plates influences, at least in part, an in-plane anisotropic physical condition of the PEM that varies in magnitude between a high value direction and a low value direction. The PEM has an in-plane physical property that varies in magnitude between a high value direction and a low value direction. The PEM is oriented with its high value direction substantially aligned with the high value direction of the flow field plate.

  1. INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT. PI4P/phosphatidylserine countertransport at ORP5- and ORP8-mediated ER-plasma membrane contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jeeyun; Torta, Federico; Masai, Kaori; Lucast, Louise; Czapla, Heather; Tanner, Lukas B; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Wenk, Markus R; Nakatsu, Fubito; De Camilli, Pietro

    2015-07-24

    Lipid transfer between cell membrane bilayers at contacts between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and other membranes help to maintain membrane lipid homeostasis. We found that two similar ER integral membrane proteins, oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-related protein 5 (ORP5) and ORP8, tethered the ER to the plasma membrane (PM) via the interaction of their pleckstrin homology domains with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) in this membrane. Their OSBP-related domains (ORDs) harbored either PI4P or phosphatidylserine (PS) and exchanged these lipids between bilayers. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments showed that ORP5 and ORP8 could mediate PI4P/PS countertransport between the ER and the PM, thus delivering PI4P to the ER-localized PI4P phosphatase Sac1 for degradation and PS from the ER to the PM. This exchange helps to control plasma membrane PI4P levels and selectively enrich PS in the PM.

  2. Interaction of tau with the neural plasma membrane mediated by tau's amino-terminal projection domain

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The neuronal microtubule-associated protein tau is required for the development of cell polarity in cultured neurons. Using PC12 cells that stably express tau and tau amino-terminal fragments, we report that tau interacts with the neural plasma membrane through its amino-terminal projection domain. In differentiated PC12 transfectants, tau is found in growth cone-like structures in a nonmicrotubule-dependent manner. In hippocampal neurons, tau is differentially extracted by detergent and enri...

  3. Membrane Mechanics of Endocytosis in Cells with Turgor

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitrieff, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis is an essential process by which cells internalize a piece of plasma membrane and material from the outside. In cells with turgor, pressure opposes membrane defor- mations, and increases the amount of force that has to be generated by the endocytic machinery. To determine this force, and calculate the shape of the membrane, we used physical theory to model an elastic surface under pressure. Accurate fits of experimental profiles are obtained assuming that the coated membrane is highly rigid and preferentially curved at the endocytic site. The forces required from the actin machinery peaks at the onset of deformation, indicating that once invagination has been initiated, endocytosis is unlikely to stall before completion. Coat proteins do not lower the initiation force but may affect the process by the curvature they induce. In the presence of isotropic curvature inducers, pulling the tip of the invagination can trigger the formation of a neck at the base of the invagination. Hence direct neck cons...

  4. Live cell imaging of membrane / cytoskeleton interactions and membrane topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chierico, Luca; Joseph, Adrian S.; Lewis, Andrew L.; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    We elucidate the interaction between actin and specific membrane components, using real time live cell imaging, by delivering probes that enable access to components, that cannot be accessed genetically. We initially investigated the close interplay between Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and the F-actin network. We show that, during the early stage of cell adhesion, PIP2 forms domains within the filopodia membrane. We studied these domains alongside cell spreading and observed that these very closely follow the actin tread-milling. We show that this mechanism is associated with an active transport of PIP2 rich organelles from the cell perinuclear area to the edge, along actin fibers. Finally, mapping other phospholipids and membrane components we observed that the PIP2 domains formation is correlated with sphingosine and cholesterol rafts.

  5. PLASMA POLYMERIZATION OF HYDROPHILIC AND HYDROPHOBIC MONOMERS FOR SURFACE MODIFICATION OF NUCLE-MICROPOROUS MEMBRANE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuefen; LI Zhifen; CHEN Chuanfu; WU Wenhui

    1990-01-01

    Surface modification of nucle-microporous membrane by plasma polymerization of HEMA, NVP and D4 has been studied. The hydrophilicity of membranes was increased with increasing of plasma polymerization time of hydrophilic monomers HEMA and NVP. The flow rate of water through the membrane was increased remarkably after plasma polymerization of HEMA on it.

  6. [Effect of plasma membrane ion permeability modulators on respiration and heat output of wheat roots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, V A; Gordon, L Kh; Loseva, N L; Rakhimova, G G; Tsentsevitskiĭ, A N

    2006-01-01

    A study was made of changes in the rates of respiration, heat production, and membrane characteristics in cells of excised roots of wheat seedlings under the modulation of plasma membrane ion permeability by two membrane active compounds: valinomycin (20 microM (V50)) and chlorpromazine (50 microM (CP50) and 100 microM (CP100)). Both compounds increased the loss of potassium ions, which correlated with the lowering of membrane potential, rate of respiration, and heat production after a 2 h exposure. The differences in alteration of these parameters were due to specific action of either compound on the membrane and to the extent of ion homeostasis disturbance. V20 had a weak effect on the studied parameters. V50 caused an increase of the rate of respiration and heat production, which enhanced following a prolonged action (5 h) and were associated with ion homeostatis restoration. The extent of alteration of membrane characteristics (an increase of potassium loss by roots, and lowering of cell membrane potential) as well as energy expense under the action of CP50 during the first period were more pronounced than in the presence of V50. During a prolonged action of CP50, the increase of respiration intensity and heat production correlated with partial recovery of ion homeostatis in cells. Essential lowering of membrane potential and substantial loss of potassium by cells, starting from the early stages of their response reaction, were followed by inhibition of respiration rate and heat production. Alterations of the structure and functional characteristics of excised root cells indicate the intensification of the membrane-tropic effect of a prolonged action of CP100, and the lack of cell energy resources.

  7. Membrane lipidome of an epithelial cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampaio, Julio L; Gerl, Mathias J; Klose, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Tissue differentiation is an important process that involves major cellular membrane remodeling. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney cells as a model for epithelium formation and investigated the remodeling of the total cell membrane lipidome during the transition from a nonpolarized morphology...

  8. Interaction of Defensins with Model Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lori K.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Yang, Lihua; Mishra, Abhijit; Gordon, Vernita D.; Selsted, Michael E.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2009-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) comprise a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. For many AMPs, activity comes from their ability to selectively disrupt and lyse bacterial cell membranes. There are a number of proposed models for this action, but the detailed molecular mechanism of selective membrane permeation remains unclear. Theta defensins are circularized peptides with a high degree of selectivity. We investigate the interaction of model bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes with theta defensins RTD-1, BTD-7, and compare them to protegrin PG-1, a prototypical AMP, using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The relationship between membrane composition and peptide induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. By comparing the membrane phase behavior induced by these different peptides we will discuss the importance of amino acid composition and placement on membrane rearrangement.

  9. Membrane-based, sedimentation-assisted plasma separator for point-of-care applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael; Gross, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Collman, Ronald G.; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Often, high sensitivity, point of care, clinical tests, such as HIV viral load, require large volumes of plasma. Although centrifuges are ubiquitously used in clinical laboratories to separate plasma from whole blood, centrifugation is generally inappropriate for on-site testing. Suitable alternatives are not readily available to separate the relatively large volumes of plasma from milliliters of blood that may be needed to meet stringent limit-of-detection specifications for low abundance target molecules. We report on a simple to use, low-cost, pump-free, membrane-based, sedimentation-assisted plasma separator capable of separating a relatively large volume of plasma from undiluted whole blood within minutes. This plasma separator consists of an asymmetric, porous, polysulfone membrane housed in a disposable chamber. The separation process takes advantage of both gravitational sedimentation of blood cells and size exclusion-based filtration. The plasma separator demonstrated a “blood in-plasma out” capability, consistently extracting 275 ±33.5 μL of plasma from 1.8 mL of undiluted whole blood in less than 7 min. The device was used to separate plasma laden with HIV viruses from HIV virus-spiked whole blood with recovery efficiencies of 95.5% ± 3.5%, 88.0% ± 9.5%, and 81.5% ± 12.1% for viral loads of 35,000, 3,500 and 350 copies/mL, respectively. The separation process is self-terminating to prevent excessive hemolysis. The HIV-laden plasma was then injected into our custom-made microfluidic chip for nucleic acid Testing And Was Successfully Subjected To Reverse Transcriptase Loop mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), demonstrating that the plasma is sufficiently pure to support high efficiency nucleic acid amplification. PMID:24099566

  10. Plasma membranes as heat stress sensors: from lipid-controlled molecular switches to therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, Zsolt; Crul, Tim; Maresca, Bruno; Schütz, Gerhard J; Viana, Felix; Dindia, Laura; Piotto, Stefano; Brameshuber, Mario; Balogh, Gábor; Péter, Mária; Porta, Amalia; Trapani, Alfonso; Gombos, Imre; Glatz, Attila; Gungor, Burcin; Peksel, Begüm; Vigh, László; Csoboz, Bálint; Horváth, Ibolya; Vijayan, Mathilakath M; Hooper, Phillip L; Harwood, John L; Vigh, László

    2014-06-01

    The classic heat shock (stress) response (HSR) was originally attributed to protein denaturation. However, heat shock protein (Hsp) induction occurs in many circumstances where no protein denaturation is observed. Recently considerable evidence has been accumulated to the favor of the "Membrane Sensor Hypothesis" which predicts that the level of Hsps can be changed as a result of alterations to the plasma membrane. This is especially pertinent to mild heat shock, such as occurs in fever. In this condition the sensitivity of many transient receptor potential (TRP) channels is particularly notable. Small temperature stresses can modulate TRP gating significantly and this is influenced by lipids. In addition, stress hormones often modify plasma membrane structure and function and thus initiate a cascade of events, which may affect HSR. The major transactivator heat shock factor-1 integrates the signals originating from the plasma membrane and orchestrates the expression of individual heat shock genes. We describe how these observations can be tested at the molecular level, for example, with the use of membrane perturbers and through computational calculations. An important fact which now starts to be addressed is that membranes are not homogeneous nor do all cells react identically. Lipidomics and cell profiling are beginning to address the above two points. Finally, we observe that a deregulated HSR is found in a large number of important diseases where more detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved may offer timely opportunities for clinical interventions and new, innovative drug treatments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy.

  11. Liquid general anesthetics lower critical temperatures in plasma membrane vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Ellyn; Machta, Benjamin B; Veatch, Sarah L

    2013-01-01

    A large and diverse array of small hydrophobic molecules induce general anesthesia. Their efficacy as anesthetics has been shown to correlate both with their affinity for a hydrophobic environment and with their potency in inhibiting certain ligand gated ion channels. Here we explore the effects that n-alcohols and other liquid anesthetics have on the two-dimensional miscibility critical point observed in cell derived giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs). We show that anesthetics depress the critical temperature (Tc) of these GPMVs without strongly altering the ratio of the two liquid phases found below Tc. The magnitude of this affect is consistent across n-alcohols when their concentration is rescaled by the median anesthetic concentration (AC50) for tadpole anesthesia, but not when plotted against the overall concentration in solution. At AC50 we see a 4{\\deg}C downward shift in Tc, much larger than is typically seen in the main chain transition at these anesthetic concentrations. GPMV miscibility critic...

  12. Segregation of PIP2 and PIP3 into distinct nanoscale regions within the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2012-07-01

    PIP2 and PIP3 are implicated in a wide variety of cellular signaling pathways at the plasma membrane. We have used STORM imaging to localize clusters of PIP2 and PIP3 to distinct nanoscale regions within the plasma membrane of PC12 cells. With anti-phospholipid antibodies directly conjugated with AlexaFluor 647, we found that PIP2 clusters in membrane domains of 64.5±27.558 nm, while PIP3 clusters had a size of 125.6±22.408 nm. With two color direct STORM imaging we show that >99% of phospholipid clusters have only one or other phospholipid present. These results indicate that lipid nano-domains can be readily identified using super-resolution imaging techniques, and that the lipid composition and size of clusters is tightly regulated.

  13. Crystal structure of the plasma membrane proton pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn P.; Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Morth, J. Preben;

    2007-01-01

    -3, and Na1,K1-ATPase (the sodium-potassium pump) in animals4. The name P-type derives from the fact that these proteins exploit a phosphorylated reaction cycle intermediate of ATP hydrolysis5.The plasma membrane proton pumps belong to the type III P-type ATPase subfamily, whereas Na1,K1-ATPase and Ca21...... where it is lined by conserved hydrophilic and charged residues. Proton transport against a high membrane potential is readily explained by this structural arrangement....

  14. A mechanism of raft formation on both plasma membrane layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornbundit, Kan; Modchang, Charin; Triampo, Wannapong; Triampo, Darapond; Nuttavut, Narin

    2013-10-01

    A double-layered membrane model is proposed to explain raft formation and induction on extracellular (outer) and cytoplasmic (inner) leaflets of plasma membranes in a situation where only the outer layer has a tendency to phase-separate. In the model, lipid exchange with the surrounding medium is allowed on both layers, but lipid exchange between layers is not allowed. Simulations display domain stabilization on both layers. The effect of the lipid recycling frequencies on stationary domain sizes is also investigated. It is found that stationary domain sizes decrease when lipid recycling frequencies are stronger. Linear stability analysis is used to verify the results.

  15. Stage-specific synthesis and fucosylation of plasma membrane proteins by mouse pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little is known about the ability of mammalian spermatogenic cells to synthesize plasma membrane components in the presence or absence of Sertoli cells. In this study, purified populations (greater than 90%) of pachytene spermatocytes or round spermatids were isolated by unit gravity sedimentation and cultured for 20-24 h in the presence of [35S]methionine or [3H] fucose. Cell viabilities remained over 90% during the course of these experiments. Plasma membranes were purified from these cells and analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Qualitatively, the same plasma membrane proteins were synthesized by both cell types with the exception of the major Concanavalin A-binding glycoprotein, p151; the synthesis of p151 is greatly diminished or inhibited after meiosis. [3H]Fucose was incorporated into at least 6 common glycoproteins of both cells. Eight components fucosylated with molecular weights from 35,000 to 120,000 were specific to pachytene spermatocyte membranes. One fast-migrating fucosylated component may represent an uncharacterized lipid whose synthesis is terminated after meiosis. Round spermatids specifically fucosylated two components with molecular weights of 45,000 and 80,000. These results demonstrate the viability of germ cells of the male mouse in short-term culture and show that they are capable of synthesizing and fucosylating plasma membrane components in the absence of Sertoli cells

  16. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane and secretory vesicles from human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Kevin P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN constitute an essential cellular component of innate host defense against microbial invasion and exhibit a wide array of responses both to particulate and soluble stimuli. As the cells recruited earliest during acute inflammation, PMN respond rapidly and release a variety of potent cytotoxic agents within minutes of exposure to microbes or their products. PMN rely on the redistribution of functionally important proteins, from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and phagosome, as the means by which to respond quickly. To determine the range of membrane proteins available for rapid recruitment during PMN activation, we analyzed the proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for plasma membrane and secretory vesicles recovered from the light membrane fraction of resting PMN after Percoll gradient centrifugation and free-flow electrophoresis purification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods. Results To identify the proteins light membrane fractions enriched for plasma membrane vesicles and secretory vesicles, we employed a proteomic approach, first using MALDI-TOF (peptide mass fingerprinting and then by HPLC-MS/MS using a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the two vesicle populations from resting PMN. We identified several proteins that are functionally important but had not previously been recovered in PMN secretory vesicles. Two such proteins, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP and dysferlin were further validated by immunoblot analysis. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the broad array of proteins present in secretory vesicles that provides the PMN with the capacity for remarkable and rapid reorganization of its plasma membrane after exposure to proinflammatory agents or stimuli.

  17. Superhydrophilic poly(L-lactic acid) electrospun membranes for biomedical applications obtained by argon and oxygen plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, D. M.; Ribeiro, C.; Botelho, G.; Borges, J.; Lopes, C.; Vaz, F.; Carabineiro, S. A. C.; Machado, A. V.; Lanceros-Méndez, S.

    2016-05-01

    Poly(L-lactic acid), PLLA, electrospun membranes and films were plasma treated at different times and power with argon (Ar) and oxygen (O2), independently, in order to modify the hydrophobic nature of the PLLA membranes. Both Ar and O2 plasma treatments promote an increase in fiber average size of the electrospun membranes from 830 ± 282 nm to 866 ± 361 and 1179 ± 397 nm, respectively, for the maximum exposure time (970 s) and power (100 W). No influence of plasma treatment was detected in the physical-chemical characteristics of PLLA, such as chemical structure, polymer phase or degree of crystallinity. On the other hand, an increase in the roughness of the films was obtained both with argon and oxygen plasma treatments. Surface wettability studies revealed a decrease in the contact angle with increasing plasma treatment time for a given power and with increasing power for a given time in membranes and films and superhydrophilic electrospun fiber membranes were obtained. Results showed that the argon and oxygen plasma treatments can be used to tailor hydrophilicity of PLLA membranes for biomedical applications. MTT assay results indicated that plasma treatments under Ar and O2 do not influence the metabolic activity of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells.

  18. The effect of MEP pathway and other inhibitors on the intracellular localization of a plasma membrane-targeted, isoprenylable GFP reporter protein in tobacco BY-2 cells [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/yx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hartmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We have established an in vivo visualization system for the geranylgeranylation of proteins in a stably transformed tobacco BY-2 cell line, based on the expression of a dexamethasone-inducible GFP fused to the carboxy-terminal basic domain of the rice calmodulin CaM61, which naturally bears a CaaL geranylgeranylation motif (GFP-BD-CVIL. By using pathway-specific inhibitors it was demonstrated that inhibition of the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway with known inhibitors like oxoclomazone and fosmidomycin, as well as inhibition of the protein geranylgeranyltransferase type 1 (PGGT-1, shifted the localization of the GFP-BD-CVIL protein from the membrane to the nucleus. In contrast, the inhibition of the mevalonate (MVA pathway with mevinolin did not affect the localization. During the present work, this test system has been used to examine the effect of newly designed inhibitors of the MEP pathway and inhibitors of sterol biosynthesis such as squalestatin, terbinafine and Ro48-8071. In addition, we also studied the impact of different post-prenylation inhibitors or those suspected to affect the transport of proteins to the plasma membrane on the localization of the geranylgeranylable fusion protein GFP-BD-CVIL.

  19. Insulin and hypertonicity recruit GLUT4 to the plasma membrane of muscle cells by using N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-dependent SNARE mechanisms but different v-SNAREs: role of TI-VAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Varinder K; Thong, Farah S L; Lim, Dawn Y; Li, Dailin; Garg, Rami R; Rudge, Rachel; Galli, Thierry; Rudich, Assaf; Klip, Amira

    2004-12-01

    Insulin and hypertonicity each increase the content of GLUT4 glucose transporters at the surface of muscle cells. Insulin enhances GLUT4 exocytosis without diminishing its endocytosis. The insulin but not the hypertonicity response is reduced by tetanus neurotoxin, which cleaves vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)2 and VAMP3, and is rescued upon introducing tetanus neurotoxin-resistant VAMP2. Here, we show that hypertonicity enhances GLUT4 recycling, compounding its previously shown ability to reduce GLUT4 endocytosis. To examine whether the canonical soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) mechanism is required for the plasma membrane fusion of the tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive GLUT4 vesicles, L6 myoblasts stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4 (GLUT4myc) were transiently transfected with dominant negative N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) (DN-NSF) or small-interfering RNA to tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive VAMP (TI-VAMP siRNA). Both strategies markedly reduced the basal level of surface GLUT4myc and the surface gain of GLUT4myc in response to hypertonicity. The insulin effect was abolished by DN-NSF, but only partly reduced by TI-VAMP siRNA. We propose that insulin and hypertonicity recruit GLUT4myc from partly overlapping, but distinct sources defined by VAMP2 and TI-VAMP, respectively.

  20. Ca2+- and Mg2+-ATPase activities in winter wheat root plasma membranes as affected by NaCl stress during growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansour, MMF; van Hasselt, PR; Kuiper, PJC

    1998-01-01

    Winter wheat seedlings were grown in Hoagland nutrient solution with or without 100 mmol/L NaCl added. Plasma membranes from root cells were prepared by aqueous polymer two phase partitioning and the stimulation of plasma membrane ATPase activity by Mg2+ and Ca2+ was investigated. The enzyme was act

  1. Effect of microstructure of TiN film on properties as bipolar plate coatings in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell prepared by inductively coupled plasma assisted magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As potential application in bipolar plate of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, the microstructure, corrosion resistance and the electrical conductivity of titanium nitride (TiN) and Si doped titanium nitride (Ti0.9Si0.1N) films deposited by magnetron sputtering with different bias voltages are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), electrochemical test and four-point probe method, respectively. XRD, SEM and AFM results reveal that the texture and topography of TiN film depend on the bias voltage and incorporation of Si. When the bias voltage is − 20 V and − 30 V, the TiN and Ti0.9Si0.1N films exhibit a dense (111) plane preferred growth, denser structure and smoother surface topography. The potentiodynamic test results indicate that the TiN and Ti0.9Si0.1N films have higher chemical inertness and better corrosion resistance. The films can satisfy the requirement of current density for bipolar plate materials. Incorporation of Si element into TiN film makes the passive current density more stable. Four-point probe measurement results show that the resistivity of both TiN and Ti0.9Si0.1N films reaches minimum when the deposition bias voltage is − 20 V. - Highlights: • Dense TiN and Ti0.9Si0.1N films are deposited by magnetron sputtering. • Preferred growth orientation of TiN depends on the bias voltage and Si doping. • TiN and Ti0.9Si0.1N films have excellent corrosion resistance. • Surface conductivity of TiN and Ti0.9Si0.1N films evolves with bias voltage

  2. Plasma membrane lipid-protein interactions affect signaling processes in sterol-biosynthesis mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik eZauber

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane is an important organelle providing structure, signaling and transport as major biological functions. Being composed of lipids and proteins with different physicochemical properties, the biological functions of membranes depend on specific protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. Interactions of proteins with their specific sterol and lipid environment were shown to be important factors for protein recruitment into sub-compartmental structures of the plasma membrane. System-wide implications of altered endogenous sterol levels for membrane functions in living cells were not studied in higher plant cells. In particular, little is known how alterations in membrane sterol composition affect protein and lipid organization and interaction within membranes. Here, we conducted a comparative analysis of the plasma membrane protein and lipid composition in Arabidopsis sterol-biosynthesis mutants smt1 and ugt80A2;B1. smt1 shows general alterations in sterol composition while ugt80A2;B1 is significantly impaired in sterol glycosylation. By systematically analyzing different cellular fractions and combining proteomic with lipidomic data we were able to reveal contrasting alterations in lipid-protein interactions in both mutants, with resulting differential changes in plasma membrane signaling status.

  3. Evaluation of a new microporous filtration membrane system for therapeutic plasma exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, S R; Carey, P M; McGill, M; Pineda, A A; Zaroulis, C G; Case, M T

    1987-01-01

    A new therapeutic plasma exchange device developed by Sarns Inc./3M was evaluated in plasmapheresis of 20 healthy volunteers and in a multicenter clinical study of therapeutic plasma exchange that included 49 patients. Safety and efficacy of plasma separation from whole blood were assessed for a module that contains Durapore microporous surfactant-free polyvinylidene fluoride membrane (Millipore Corp., Bedford, Mass., USA). The extra-corporeal volume was 80 ml. Citrate and heparin anticoagulants were utilized. Mean plasma separation efficiency was 62% with unhindered passage of plasma proteins through the membrane pores and no hemolysis or activation of complement as measured by total hemolytic complement (CH50) and C3 conversion. Mean decrease in platelet count after procedures was 10%. No severe reactions occurred, and citrate effects (13%) were comparable to values reported with centrifugal instruments. The Sarns Inc./3M Therapore device is a rapid, safe and efficient system for plasma exchange and potentially for source plasma collection. The principal benefits are small extracorporeal volume and cell-free filtrate.

  4. Mechanical tension drives cell membrane fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Ren, Yixin; Ng, Win Pin; Li, Shuo; Son, Sungmin; Kee, Yee-Seir; Zhang, Shiliang; Zhang, Guofeng; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Robinson, Douglas N.; Chen, Elizabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an energy-consuming process that requires tight juxtaposition of two lipid bilayers. Little is known about how cells overcome energy barriers to bring their membranes together for fusion. Previously, we have shown that cell-cell fusion is an asymmetric process in which an “attacking” cell drills finger-like protrusions into the “receiving” cell to promote cell fusion. Here we show that the receiving cell mounts a Myosin II (MyoII)-mediated mechanosensory response to its inv...

  5. The lipidomes of vesicular stomatitis virus, semliki forest virus, and the host plasma membrane analyzed by quantitative shotgun mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvodova, Lucie; Sampaio, Julio L; Cordo, Sandra;

    2009-01-01

    kidney cells can be infected by two different viruses, namely, vesicular stomatitis virus and Semliki Forest virus, from the Rhabdoviridae and Togaviridae families, respectively. We purified the host plasma membrane and the two different viruses after exit from the host cells and analyzed the lipid...... compositions of the membranes by quantitative shotgun mass spectrometry. We observed that the lipid compositions of these otherwise structurally different viruses are virtually indistinguishable, and only slight differences were detected between the viral lipid composition and that of the plasma membrane....... Taken together, the facts that the lipid compositions of the two viruses are so similar and that they strongly resemble the composition of the plasma membrane suggest that these viruses exert little selection in including lipids in their envelopes....

  6. Isolation of radio-iodinated apical and basal-lateral plasma membranes of toad bladder epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, H J; Edelman, I S

    1979-04-01

    The apical and basal-lateral plasma membranes of toad bladder epithelium were radio-iodinated with the glucose-glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase system. The covalently bound radio iodine was used as a marker during subcellular fractionation and membrane isolation. Homogenization conditions that ensured rupture of more than 80% of the cells without substantial nuclear damage were defined by Normarski optics. The nuclei were separated by differential centrifugation and the apical and basal-lateral components were resolved by differential and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The apical components yielded two radioactive bands that were identified as glycocalyx and plasma membrane labeled with 125I. The basal-lateral components yielded a hetero-disperse pattern made up of at least 3 radioactive bands, but the bulk of the activity of ouabain-sensitive ATPase comigrated with only one of these bands. The mitochondia, identified by assays for cytochrome oxidase and NADH cytochrome c reductase activities, were separated from the radio-iodine labeled by centrifugation in sucrose density gradients under isokinetic conditions. The labeled glycocalyx and the slowly migrating components of basal-lateral labeling were separated from the radio-iodinated membranes by centrifugation at 100,000 x g x 1 hr after removal of the mitochrondria by the isokinetic method. The labeled membranes were then subjected to ultracentrifugation in sucrose density gradients under isopycnic conditions; the basal-lateral membranes containing ouabain-sensitive ATP-ase were well resolved from the apical membranes by this method. These results provide a relatively rapid method of attaining partial purification of the apical and basal-lateral plasma membranes of toad bladder epithelium. PMID:222911

  7. Production of selective membranes using plasma deposited nanochanneled thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Amorim Motta Carvalho; Alexsander Tressino Carvalho; Maria Lúcia Pereira da Silva; Nicole Raymond Demarquette

    2006-01-01

    The hydrolization of thin films obtained by tetraethoxysilane plasma polymerization results in the formation of a nanochanneled silicone like structure that could be useful for the production of selective membranes. Therefore, the aim of this work is to test the permeation properties of hydrolyzed thin films. The films were tested for: 1) permeation of polar organic compounds and/or water in gaseous phase and 2) permeation of salt in liquid phase. The efficiency of permeation was tested using...

  8. Anaphylactoid reactions due to haemodialysis, haemofiltration, or membrane plasma separation.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholls, A J; Platts, M. M.

    1982-01-01

    A previously undescribed anaphylactoid reaction to haemodialysis, haemofiltration, or membrane plasma separation occurred in 15 patients receiving regular dialysis. The illness varied in severity from urticaria, sneezing, and watering of the eyes to severe bronchospasm and cardiovascular collapse, and began within a minute of blood being returned from the dialyser or filtration device to the patient. Reactions developed only when a dialyser sterilised with ethylene oxide was used for the firs...

  9. Plasma membrane lipids and their role in fungal virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Antonella; Farnoud, Amir M; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable evidence in recent years suggesting that plasma membrane lipids are important regulators of fungal pathogenicity. Various glycolipids have been shown to impart virulent properties in several fungal species, while others have been shown to play a role in host defense. In addition to their role as virulence factors, lipids also contribute to other virulence mechanisms such as drug resistance, biofilm formation, and release of extracellular vesicles. In addition, lipids also affect the mechanical properties of the plasma membrane through the formation of packed microdomains composed mainly of sphingolipids and sterols. Changes in the composition of lipid microdomains have been shown to disrupt the localization of virulence factors and affect fungal pathogenicity. This review gathers evidence on the various roles of plasma membrane lipids in fungal virulence and how lipids might contribute to the different processes that occur during infection and treatment. Insight into the role of lipids in fungal virulence can lead to an improved understanding of the process of fungal pathogenesis and the development of new lipid-mediated therapeutic strategies.

  10. Nanosecond electric pulses affect a plant-specific kinesin at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Sebastian; Liu, Qiong; Eing, Christian; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Electric pulses with high field strength and durations in the nanosecond range (nsPEFs) are of considerable interest for biotechnological and medical applications. However, their actual cellular site of action is still under debate--due to their extremely short rise times, nsPEFs are thought to act mainly in the cell interior rather than at the plasma membrane. On the other hand, nsPEFs can induce membrane permeability. We have revisited this issue using plant cells as a model. By mapping the cellular responses to nsPEFs of different field strength and duration in the tobacco BY-2 cell line, we could define a treatment that does not impinge on short-term viability, such that the physiological responses to the treatment can be followed. We observe, for these conditions, a mild disintegration of the cytoskeleton, impaired membrane localization of the PIN1 auxin-efflux transporter and a delayed premitotic nuclear positioning followed by a transient mitotic arrest. To address the target site of nsPEFs, we made use of the plant-specific KCH kinesin, which can assume two different states with different localization (either near the nucleus or at the cell membrane) driving different cellular functions. We show that nsPEFs reduce cell expansion in nontransformed cells but promote expansion in a line overexpressing KCH. Since cell elongation and cell widening are linked to the KCH localized at the cell membrane, the inverted response in the KCH overexpressor provides evidence for a direct action of nsPEFs, also at the cell membrane. PMID:24062185

  11. Independent mobility of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenninger, Anja; Mastroianni, Giulia; Robson, Alexander; Lenn, Tchern; Xue, Quan; Leake, Mark C; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2014-06-01

    Fluidity is essential for many biological membrane functions. The basis for understanding membrane structure remains the classic Singer-Nicolson model, in which proteins are embedded within a fluid lipid bilayer and able to diffuse laterally within a sea of lipid. Here we report lipid and protein diffusion in the plasma membrane of live cells of the bacterium Escherichia coli, using Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to measure lateral diffusion coefficients. Lipid and protein mobility within the membrane were probed by visualizing an artificial fluorescent lipid and a simple model membrane protein consisting of a single membrane-spanning alpha-helix with a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) tag on the cytoplasmic side. The effective viscosity of the lipid bilayer is strongly temperature-dependent, as indicated by changes in the lipid diffusion coefficient. Surprisingly, the mobility of the model protein was unaffected by changes in the effective viscosity of the bulk lipid, and TIRF microscopy indicates that it clusters in segregated, mobile domains. We suggest that this segregation profoundly influences the physical behaviour of the protein in the membrane, with strong implications for bacterial membrane function and bacterial physiology.

  12. The plasma membrane as a capacitor for energy and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Supriyo; Kassan, Adam; Busija, Anna R; Rangamani, Padmini; Patel, Hemal H

    2016-02-01

    When considering which components of the cell are the most critical to function and physiology, we naturally focus on the nucleus, the mitochondria that regulate energy and apoptotic signaling, or other organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, ribosomes, etc. Few people will suggest that the membrane is the most critical element of a cell in terms of function and physiology. Those that consider the membrane critical will point to its obvious barrier function regulated by the lipid bilayer and numerous ion channels that regulate homeostatic gradients. What becomes evident upon closer inspection is that not all membranes are created equal and that there are lipid-rich microdomains that serve as platforms of signaling and a means of communication with the intracellular environment. In this review, we explore the evolution of membranes, focus on lipid-rich microdomains, and advance the novel concept that membranes serve as "capacitors for energy and metabolism." Within this framework, the membrane then is the primary and critical regulator of stress and disease adaptation of the cell.

  13. Triggered Ca2+ influx is required for extended synaptotagmin 1-induced ER-plasma membrane tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idevall-Hagren, Olof; Lü, Alice; Xie, Beichen; De Camilli, Pietro

    2015-09-01

    The extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts) are ER proteins that act as Ca(2+)-regulated tethers between the ER and the plasma membrane (PM) and have a putative role in lipid transport between the two membranes. Ca(2+) regulation of their tethering function, as well as the interplay of their different domains in such function, remains poorly understood. By exposing semi-intact cells to buffers of variable Ca(2+) concentrations, we found that binding of E-Syt1 to the PI(4,5)P2-rich PM critically requires its C2C and C2E domains and that the EC50 of such binding is in the low micromolar Ca(2+) range. Accordingly, E-Syt1 accumulation at ER-PM contact sites occurred only upon experimental manipulations known to achieve these levels of Ca(2+) via its influx from the extracellular medium, such as store-operated Ca(2+) entry in fibroblasts and membrane depolarization in β-cells. We also show that in spite of their very different physiological functions, membrane tethering by E-Syt1 (ER to PM) and by synaptotagmin (secretory vesicles to PM) undergo a similar regulation by plasma membrane lipids and cytosolic Ca(2+).

  14. Thermal Fluctuations of Red Blood Cell Membrane via a Constant-Area Particle-Dynamics Model

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelli, Gianluca; Parker, Kim H.; Winlove, C. Peter

    2005-01-01

    We describe a model of the mechanical properties of the cell plasma membrane using a finite-temperature particle-dynamics simulation of the whole cell, in which a two-dimensional network of virtual particles embedded in a three-dimensional closed surface represents the membrane. The particles interact via harmonic potential and dihedral angle potential and are subject to a constant area constraint. The evolution of the positions of the particles yields the equilibrium state of the membrane an...

  15. Vascular endothelial cell membranes differentiate between stretch and shear stress through transitions in their lipid phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kimiko; Ando, Joji

    2015-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) respond to the hemodynamic forces stretch and shear stress by altering their morphology, functions, and gene expression. However, how they sense and differentiate between these two forces has remained unknown. Here we report that the plasma membrane itself differentiates between stretch and shear stress by undergoing transitions in its lipid phases. Uniaxial stretching and hypotonic swelling increased the lipid order of human pulmonary artery EC plasma membranes, thereby causing a transition from the liquid-disordered phase to the liquid-ordered phase in some areas, along with a decrease in membrane fluidity. In contrast, shear stress decreased the membrane lipid order and increased membrane fluidity. A similar increase in lipid order occurred when the artificial lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles were stretched by hypotonic swelling, indicating that this is a physical phenomenon. The cholesterol content of EC plasma membranes significantly increased in response to stretch but clearly decreased in response to shear stress. Blocking these changes in the membrane lipid order by depleting membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by adding cholesterol resulted in a marked inhibition of the EC response specific to stretch and shear stress, i.e., phosphorylation of PDGF receptors and phosphorylation of VEGF receptors, respectively. These findings indicate that EC plasma membranes differently respond to stretch and shear stress by changing their lipid order, fluidity, and cholesterol content in opposite directions and that these changes in membrane physical properties are involved in the mechanotransduction that activates membrane receptors specific to each force.

  16. Proton conducting membrane for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Daniel G.; Krumpelt, Michael; Myers, Deborah J.; Kopasz, John P.

    2007-03-27

    An ion conducting membrane comprising dendrimeric polymers covalently linked into a network structure. The dendrimeric polymers have acid functional terminal groups and may be covalently linked via linking compounds, cross-coupling reactions, or copolymerization reactions. The ion conducting membranes may be produced by various methods and used in fuel cells.

  17. Diffuse Charge Effects in Fuel Cell Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Franco, A.A.; Bazant, M.Z.

    2009-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that electrolyte membranes in fuel cells are electrically neutral, except in unsteady situations, when the double-layer capacitance is heuristically included in equivalent circuit calculations. Indeed, the standard model for electron transfer kinetics at the membrane/electrode

  18. The C2 domains of granuphilin are high-affinity sensors for plasma membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhova, Tatyana A; Knight, Jefferson D

    2014-09-01

    Membrane-targeting proteins are crucial components of many cell signaling pathways, including the secretion of insulin. Granuphilin, also known as synaptotagmin-like protein 4, functions in tethering secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane prior to exocytosis. Granuphilin docks to insulin secretory vesicles through interaction of its N-terminal domain with vesicular Rab proteins; however, the mechanisms of granuphilin plasma membrane targeting and release are less clear. Granuphilin contains two C2 domains, C2A and C2B, that interact with the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. The goal of this study was to determine membrane-binding mechanisms, affinities, and kinetics of both granuphilin C2 domains using fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Results indicate that both C2A and C2B bind anionic lipids in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. The C2A domain binds liposomes containing a physiological mixture of lipids including 2% PI(4,5)P2 or PI(3,4,5)P3 with high affinity (apparent K(d, PIPx) of 2-5 nM), and binds nonspecifically with moderate affinity to anionic liposomes lacking phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIPx) lipids. The C2B domain binds with sub-micromolar affinity to liposomes containing PI(4,5)P2 but does not have a measurable affinity for background anionic lipids. Both domains can be competed away from their target lipids by the soluble PIPx analog inositol-(1,2,3,4,5,6)-hexakisphosphate (IP6), which is a positive regulator of insulin secretion. Potential roles of these interactions in the docking and release of granuphilin from the plasma membrane are discussed.

  19. Arf6 recruits the Rac GEF Kalirin to the plasma membrane facilitating Rac activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaldson Julie G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies implicate Arf6 activity in Rac-mediated membrane ruffling and cytoskeletal reorganization. Although Arf6 facilitates the trafficking of Rac1 to the plasma membrane and in many cases Arf6 activation leads to the activation of Rac1, the details of how Arf6 influences Rac function remain to be elucidated. Results We demonstrate in binding assays and by co-immunoprecipitation that GDP-bound Arf6 binds to Kalirin5, a Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor, through interaction with the spectrin repeat region. In cells, expression of wild type Arf6 recruits spectrin repeat 5 and Kalirin to the plasma membrane and leads to enhanced Kalirin5-induced ruffling. By contrast, expression of an Arf6 mutant that cannot become activated, Arf6 T27N, still recruits spectrin repeat 5 and Kalirin to membranes but inhibits Kalirin5-induced ruffling in HeLa cells. Kalirin5-induced Rac1 activation is increased by the expression of wild type Arf6 and decreased by Arf6T27N. Furthermore, expression of a catalytically-inactive mutant of Kalirin5 inhibits cytoskeletal changes observed in cells expressing EFA6, an Arf6 guanine nucleotide exchange factor that leads to activation of Rac. Conclusion We show here with over-expressed proteins that the GDP-bound form of Arf6 can bind to the spectrin repeat regions in Kalirin Rho family GEFs thereby recruiting Kalirin to membranes. Although Kalirin is recruited onto membranes by Arf6-GDP, subsequent Rac activation and membrane ruffling requires Arf6 activation. From these results, we suggest that Arf6 can regulate through its GTPase cycle the activation of Rac.

  20. ABP1: An auxin receptor for fast responses at the plasma membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlke, Renate I.; Luethen, Hartwig; Steffens, Bianka

    2010-01-01

    Auxin-binding protein 1 (ABP1) is an auxin receptor for responses not primarily regulated by gene regulation. One fast response is protoplast swelling. By using immunological ABP1 tools we showed that the highly conserved box a is not alone important for auxin binding. Box c is another part of the auxin binding domain.1 Here we present a novel method to analyze auxin-induced, ABP1-mediated effects at the plasma membrane on single cell level in vivo. The fluorescence of FM4-64 in the plasma me...

  1. Arabidopsis cortical microtubules position cellulose synthase delivery to the plasma membrane and interact with cellulose synthase trafficking compartments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, R.; Lindeboom, J.J.; Paredez, A.R.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ehrhardt, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis relies on the organization and function of two polymer arrays separated by the plasma membrane: the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton and cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. Studies using in vivo markers confirmed that one function of the cortical microtubule array is t

  2. Membrane elastic properties and cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pontes

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the cell membrane, interacting with its attached cytoskeleton, is an important regulator of cell function, exerting and responding to forces. We investigate this relationship by looking for connections between cell membrane elastic properties, especially surface tension and bending modulus, and cell function. Those properties are measured by pulling tethers from the cell membrane with optical tweezers. Their values are determined for all major cell types of the central nervous system, as well as for macrophage. Astrocytes and glioblastoma cells, which are considerably more dynamic than neurons, have substantially larger surface tensions. Resting microglia, which continually scan their environment through motility and protrusions, have the highest elastic constants, with values similar to those for resting macrophage. For both microglia and macrophage, we find a sharp softening of bending modulus between their resting and activated forms, which is very advantageous for their acquisition of phagocytic functions upon activation. We also determine the elastic constants of pure cell membrane, with no attached cytoskeleton. For all cell types, the presence of F-actin within tethers, contrary to conventional wisdom, is confirmed. Our findings suggest the existence of a close connection between membrane elastic constants and cell function.

  3. HIV-1 Vpu promotes release and prevents endocytosis of nascent retrovirus particles from the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type-1 viral protein U (Vpu protein enhances the release of diverse retroviruses from human, but not monkey, cells and is thought to do so by ablating a dominant restriction to particle release. Here, we determined how Vpu expression affects the subcellular distribution of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus (MLV Gag proteins in human cells where Vpu is, or is not, required for efficient particle release. In HeLa cells, where Vpu enhances HIV-1 and MLV release approximately 10-fold, concentrations of HIV-1 Gag and MLV Gag fused to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP were initially detected at the plasma membrane, but then accumulated over time in early and late endosomes. Endosomal accumulation of Gag-CFP was prevented by Vpu expression and, importantly, inhibition of plasma membrane to early endosome transport by dominant negative mutants of Rab5a, dynamin, and EPS-15. Additionally, accumulation of both HIV and MLV Gag in endosomes required a functional late-budding domain. In human HOS cells, where HIV-1 and MLV release was efficient even in the absence of Vpu, Gag proteins were localized predominantly at the plasma membrane, irrespective of Vpu expression or manipulation of endocytic transport. While these data indicated that Vpu inhibits nascent virion endocytosis, Vpu did not affect transferrin endocytosis. Moreover, inhibition of endocytosis did not restore Vpu-defective HIV-1 release in HeLa cells, but instead resulted in accumulation of mature virions that could be released from the cell surface by protease treatment. Thus, these findings suggest that a specific activity that is present in HeLa cells, but not in HOS cells, and is counteracted by Vpu, traps assembled retrovirus particles at the cell surface. This entrapment leads to subsequent endocytosis by a Rab5a- and clathrin-dependent mechanism and intracellular sequestration of virions in endosomes.

  4. Helicobacter pylori Disrupts Host Cell Membranes, Initiating a Repair Response and Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Fen Juan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, the human stomach pathogen, lives on the inner surface of the stomach and causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Plasma membrane repair response is a matter of life and death for human cells against physical and biological damage. We here test the hypothesis that H. pylori also causes plasma membrane disruption injury, and that not only a membrane repair response but also a cell proliferation response are thereby activated. Vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA have been considered to be major H. pylori virulence factors. Gastric cancer cells were infected with H. pylori wild type (vacA+/cagA+, single mutant (ΔvacA or ΔcagA or double mutant (ΔvacA/ΔcagA strains and plasma membrane disruption events and consequent activation of membrane repair components monitored. H. pylori disrupts the host cell plasma membrane, allowing localized dye and extracellular Ca2+ influx. Ca2+-triggered members of the annexin family, A1 and A4, translocate, in response to injury, to the plasma membrane, and cell surface expression of an exocytotic maker of repair, LAMP-2, increases. Additional forms of plasma membrane disruption, unrelated to H. pylori exposure, also promote host cell proliferation. We propose that H. pylori activation of a plasma membrane repair is pro-proliferative. This study might therefore provide new insight into potential mechanisms of H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  5. Membrane tether formation from voltage-clamped outer hair cells using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Murdock, David R.; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-06-01

    Outer hair cells contribute an active mechanical feedback to the vibrations of the cochlear structures resulting in the high sensitivity and frequency selectivity of normal hearing. We have designed and implemented a novel experimental setup that combines optical tweezers with patch-clamp apparatus to investigate the electromechanical properties of cellular plasma membranes. A micron-size bead trapped by the optical tweezers is brought in contact with the membrane of a voltage-clamped cell, and subsequently moved away to form a plasma membrane tether. Bead displacement during tether elongation is monitored by a quadrant photodetector to obtain time-resolved measurements of the tethering force. Salient information associated with the mechanical properties of the membrane tether can thus be obtained. Tethers can be pulled from the cell membrane at different holding potentials, and the tether force response can be measured while changing transmembrane potential. Experimental results from outer hair cells and human embryonic kidney cells are presented.

  6. Advanced membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Seung; Pivovar, Bryan S

    2014-02-25

    A method of preparing advanced membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) for use in fuel cells. A base polymer is selected for a base membrane. An electrode composition is selected to optimize properties exhibited by the membrane electrode assembly based on the selection of the base polymer. A property-tuning coating layer composition is selected based on compatibility with the base polymer and the electrode composition. A solvent is selected based on the interaction of the solvent with the base polymer and the property-tuning coating layer composition. The MEA is assembled by preparing the base membrane and then applying the property-tuning coating layer to form a composite membrane. Finally, a catalyst is applied to the composite membrane.

  7. Insulin-stimulated Plasma Membrane Fusion of Glut4 Glucose Transporter-containing Vesicles Is Regulated by Phospholipase D1D⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ping; Altshuller, Yelena M.; Hou, June Chunqiu; Jeffrey E Pessin; Frohman, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in fat and muscle by mobilizing Glut4 glucose transporters from intracellular membrane storage sites to the plasma membrane. This process requires the trafficking of Glut4-containing vesicles toward the cell periphery, docking at exocytic sites, and plasma membrane fusion. We show here that phospholipase D (PLD) production of the lipid phosphatidic acid (PA) is a key event in the fusion process. PLD1 is found on Glut4-containing vesicles, is activated by insu...

  8. FLUORESCENT, SHORT-CHAIN C-6-NBD-SPHINGOMYELIN, BUT NOT C-6-NBD-GLUCOSYLCERAMIDE, IS SUBJECT TO EXTENSIVE DEGRADATION IN THE PLASMA-MEMBRANE - IMPLICATIONS FOR SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION RELATED TO CELL-DIFFERENTIATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOK, JW; BABIA, T; KLAPPE, K; HOEKSTRA, D

    1995-01-01

    The involvement of the plasma membrane in the metabolism of the sphingolipids sphingomyelin (SM) and glucosylceramide (GlcCer) was studied, employing fluorescent short-chain analogues of these lipids, 6-[N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]hexanoylsphingosylphosphorylcholine (C-6-NBD-SM), C-6-

  9. Lipid raft-dependent plasma membrane repair interferes with the activation of B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Heather; Castro-Gomes, Thiago; Corrotte, Matthias; Tam, Christina; Maugel, Timothy K; Andrews, Norma W; Song, Wenxia

    2015-12-21

    Cells rapidly repair plasma membrane (PM) damage by a process requiring Ca(2+)-dependent lysosome exocytosis. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) released from lysosomes induces endocytosis of injured membrane through caveolae, membrane invaginations from lipid rafts. How B lymphocytes, lacking any known form of caveolin, repair membrane injury is unknown. Here we show that B lymphocytes repair PM wounds in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Wounding induces lysosome exocytosis and endocytosis of dextran and the raft-binding cholera toxin subunit B (CTB). Resealing is reduced by ASM inhibitors and ASM deficiency and enhanced or restored by extracellular exposure to sphingomyelinase. B cell activation via B cell receptors (BCRs), a process requiring lipid rafts, interferes with PM repair. Conversely, wounding inhibits BCR signaling and internalization by disrupting BCR-lipid raft coclustering and by inducing the endocytosis of raft-bound CTB separately from BCR into tubular invaginations. Thus, PM repair and B cell activation interfere with one another because of competition for lipid rafts, revealing how frequent membrane injury and repair can impair B lymphocyte-mediated immune responses.

  10. Different ionic conditions prompt NHE2 and NHE3 translocation to the plasma membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Gens, J. Scott; Dou, Hongwei; Tackett, Lixuan; Kong, Shen-Shen; Chu, Shaoyou; Montrose, Marshall H.

    2007-01-01

    We tested whether NHE3 and NHE2 Na+/H+ exchanger isoforms were recruited to the plasma membrane (PM) in response to changes in ion homeostasis. NHE2-CFP or NHE3-CFP fusion proteins were functional Na+/H+ exchangers when transiently expressed in NHE-deficient PS120 fibroblasts. Confocal morphometry of cells whose PM was labeled with FM4-64 measured the fractional amount of fusion protein at the cell surface. In resting cells, 10–20% of CFP fluorescence was at PM and stable over time. A protoco...

  11. BEHAVIOR OF CHO CELLS ON MODIFIED POLYPROPYLENE BY LOW TEMPERATURE AMMONIA PLASMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong; YU Yaoting; PAN Jilun; XU Yuanping; ZHU Hesun

    2001-01-01

    The surface of polypropylene (PP) membrane was modified by low temperature plasma with ammonia. The effect of exposure time was investigated by means of contact angle measurement. The results show that low temperature ammonia plcsma treatment can enhance its hydrophilicity. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells attachment on the modified membrane was enhanced and the growth rate on the membrane was faster than unmodified one.

  12. Effects of freezing and cold acclimation on the plasma membrane of isolated protoplasts, progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steponkus, P L

    1993-01-01

    Our goal is to provide a mechanistic understanding of the cellular and molecular aspects of freezing injury and cold acclimation from a perspective of the structural and functional integrity of the plasma membrane -- the primary site of freezing injury in winter cereals. We have utilized protoplasts isolated from leaves of winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv Puma) to study the cryobehavior of the plasma membrane during a freeze/thaw cycle. The focus of our current studies is on lesions in the plasma membrane that result from severe freeze-induced dehydration and result in the alteration of the semipermeable characteristics of the plasma membrane so that the protoplasts are osmotically unresponsive. In protoplasts isolated from non-acclimated rye leaves (NA protoplasts), injury is associated with the formation of aparticulate domains in the plasma membrane, aparticulate lamellae subtending the plasma membrane, and lamellar-to-hexagonal II phase transitions in the plasma membrane and the subtending lamellae. However, lamellar-to-hexagonal II phase transitions are not observed following severe dehydration of protoplasts isolated from cold-acclimated rye leaves (ACC protoplasts). Rather, injury is associated with the fracture-jump lesion,'' which, in freeze-fracture electron microscopy studies, is manifested as localized deviations in the fracture face of the plasma membrane. The fracture plane jumps'' from the plasma membrane to either subtending aparticulate lamellae or aparticulate regions of various endomembranes (predominantly chloroplast envelopes) that are in close apposition with the plasma membrane.

  13. Methods of staining and visualization of sphingolipid enriched and non-enriched plasma membrane regions of Arabidopsis thaliana with fluorescent dyes and lipid analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blachutzik Jörg O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sterols and Sphingolipids form lipid clusters in the plasma membranes of cell types throughout the animal and plant kingdoms. These lipid domains provide a medium for protein signaling complexes at the plasma membrane and are also observed to be principal regions of membrane contact at the inception of infection. We visualized different specific fluorescent lipophilic stains of the both sphingolipid enriched and non-sphingolipid enriched regions in the plasma membranes of live protoplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Lipid staining protocols for several fluorescent lipid analogues in plants are presented. The most emphasis was placed on successful protocols for the single and dual staining of sphingolipid enriched regions and exclusion of sphingolipid enriched regions on the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts. A secondary focus was placed to ensure that these staining protocols presented still maintain cell viability. Furthermore, the protocols were successfully tested with the spectrally sensitive dye Laurdan. Conclusion Almost all existing staining procedures of the plasma membrane with fluorescent lipid analogues are specified for animal cells and tissues. In order to develop lipid staining protocols for plants, procedures were established with critical steps for the plasma membrane staining of Arabidopsis leaf tissue and protoplasts. The success of the plasma membrane staining protocols was additionally verified by measurements of lipid dynamics by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique and by the observation of new phenomena such as time dependent lipid polarization events in living protoplasts, for which a putative physiological relevance is suggested.

  14. Measuring distances between TRPV1 and the plasma membrane using a noncanonical amino acid and transition metal ion FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagotta, William N; Gordon, Moshe T; Senning, Eric N; Munari, Mika A; Gordon, Sharona E

    2016-02-01

    Despite recent advances, the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins in cell membranes remain elusive. We implemented transition metal ion fluorescence resonance energy transfer (tmFRET) to measure distances between sites on the N-terminal ankyrin repeat domains (ARDs) of the pain-transducing ion channel TRPV1 and the intracellular surface of the plasma membrane. To preserve the native context, we used unroofed cells, and to specifically label sites in TRPV1, we incorporated a fluorescent, noncanonical amino acid, L-ANAP. A metal chelating lipid was used to decorate the plasma membrane with high-density/high-affinity metal-binding sites. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiencies between L-ANAP in TRPV1 and Co(2+) bound to the plasma membrane were consistent with the arrangement of the ARDs in recent cryoelectron microscopy structures of TRPV1. No change in tmFRET was observed with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin. These results demonstrate the power of tmFRET for measuring structure and rearrangements of membrane proteins relative to the cell membrane.

  15. Partitioning, diffusion, and ligand binding of raft lipid analogs in model and cellular plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Levental, Ilya; Grzybek, Michal; Schwarzmann, Günter; Mueller, Veronika; Honigmann, Alf; Belov, Vladimir N; Eggeling, Christian; Coskun, Unal; Simons, Kai; Schwille, Petra

    2012-07-01

    Several simplified membrane models featuring coexisting liquid disordered (Ld) and ordered (Lo) lipid phases have been developed to mimic the heterogeneous organization of cellular membranes, and thus, aid our understanding of the nature and functional role of ordered lipid-protein nanodomains, termed "rafts". In spite of their greatly reduced complexity, quantitative characterization of local lipid environments using model membranes is not trivial, and the parallels that can be drawn to cellular membranes are not always evident. Similarly, various fluorescently labeled lipid analogs have been used to study membrane organization and function in vitro, although the biological activity of these probes in relation to their native counterparts often remains uncharacterized. This is particularly true for raft-preferring lipids ("raft lipids", e.g. sphingolipids and sterols), whose domain preference is a strict function of their molecular architecture, and is thus susceptible to disruption by fluorescence labeling. Here, we analyze the phase partitioning of a multitude of fluorescent raft lipid analogs in synthetic Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) and cell-derived Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles (GPMVs). We observe complex partitioning behavior dependent on label size, polarity, charge and position, lipid headgroup, and membrane composition. Several of the raft lipid analogs partitioned into the ordered phase in GPMVs, in contrast to fully synthetic GUVs, in which most raft lipid analogs mis-partitioned to the disordered phase. This behavior correlates with the greatly enhanced order difference between coexisting phases in the synthetic system. In addition, not only partitioning, but also ligand binding of the lipids is perturbed upon labeling: while cholera toxin B binds unlabeled GM1 in the Lo phase, it binds fluorescently labeled GMI exclusively in the Ld phase. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) by stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy on intact

  16. Surface monofunctionalized polymethyl pentene hollow fiber membranes by plasma treatment and hemocompatibility modification for membrane oxygenators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Wang, Weiping; Zheng, Zhi; Fan, Wenling; Mao, Chun; Shi, Jialiang; Li, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The hemocompatibility of polymethyl pentene (PMP) hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) was improved through surface modification for membrane oxygenator applications. The modification was performed stepwise with the following: (1) oxygen plasma treatment, (2) functionalization of monosort hydroxyl groups through NaBH4 reduction, and (3) grafting 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) or heparin. SEM, ATR-FTIR, and XPS analyses were conducted to confirm successful grafting during the modification. The hemocompatibility of PMP HFMs was analyzed and compared through protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and coagulation tests. Pure CO2 and O2 permeation rates, as well as in vitro gas exchange rates, were determined to evaluate the mass transfer properties of PMP HFMs. SEM results showed that different nanofibril topographies were introduced on the HFM surface. ATR-FTIR and XPS spectra indicated the presence of functionalization of monosort hydroxyl group and the grafting of MPC and heparin. Hemocompatibility evaluation results showed that the modified PMP HFMs presented optimal hemocompatibility compared with pristine HFMs. Gas permeation results revealed that gas permeation flux increased in the modified HFMs because of dense surface etching during the plasma treatment. The results of in vitro gas exchange rates showed that all modified PMP HFMs presented decreased gas exchange rates because of potential surface fluid wetting. The proposed strategy exhibits a potential for fabricating membrane oxygenators for biomedical applications to prevent coagulation formation and alter plasma-induced surface topology and composition.

  17. Duration of ultrasound-mediated enhanced plasma membrane permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammertink, Bart; Deckers, RHR; Storm, Gert; Moonen, Chrit; Bos, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) induced cavitation can be used to enhance the intracellular delivery of drugs by transiently increasing the cell membrane permeability. The duration of this increased permeability, termed temporal window, has not been fully elucidated. In this study, the temporal window was investiga

  18. Solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane comprising plasma etched porous support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; LaConti, Anthony B.

    2010-10-05

    A solid polymer electrolyte composite membrane and method of manufacturing the same. According to one embodiment, the composite membrane comprises a rigid, non-electrically-conducting support, the support preferably being a sheet of polyimide having a thickness of about 7.5 to 15 microns. The support has a plurality of cylindrical pores extending perpendicularly between opposing top and bottom surfaces of the support. The pores, which preferably have a diameter of about 0.1 to 5 microns, are made by plasma etching and preferably are arranged in a defined pattern, for example, with fewer pores located in areas of high membrane stress and more pores located in areas of low membrane stress. The pores are filled with a first solid polymer electrolyte, such as a perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer. A second solid polymer electrolyte, which may be the same as or different than the first solid polymer electrolyte, may be deposited over the top and/or bottom of the first solid polymer electrolyte.

  19. Characterization of membrane protein interactions in plasma membrane derived vesicles with quantitative imaging Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Del Piccolo, Nuala; Hristova, Kalina

    2015-08-18

    Here we describe an experimental tool, termed quantitative imaging Förster resonance energy transfer (QI-FRET), that enables the quantitative characterization of membrane protein interactions. The QI-FRET methodology allows us to acquire binding curves and calculate association constants for complex membrane proteins in the native plasma membrane environment. The method utilizes FRET detection, and thus requires that the proteins of interest are labeled with florescent proteins, either FRET donors or FRET acceptors. Since plasma membranes of cells have complex topologies precluding the acquisition of two-dimensional binding curves, the FRET measurements are performed in plasma membrane derived vesicles that bud off cells as a result of chemical or osmotic stress. The results overviewed here are acquired in vesicles produced with an osmotic vesiculation buffer developed in our laboratory, which does not utilize harsh chemicals. The concentrations of the donor-labeled and the acceptor-labeled proteins are determined, along with the FRET efficiencies, in each vesicle. The experiments utilize transient transfection, such that a wide variety of concentrations is sampled. Then, data from hundreds of vesicles are combined to yield dimerization curves. Here we discuss recent findings about the dimerization of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), membrane proteins that control cell growth and differentiation via lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane. We focus on the dimerization of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), a RTK that plays a critically important role in skeletal development. We study the role of different FGFR3 domains in FGFR3 dimerization in the absence of ligand, and we show that FGFR3 extracellular domains inhibit unliganded dimerization, while contacts between the juxtamembrane domains, which connect the transmembrane domains to the kinase domains, stabilize the unliganded FGFR3 dimers. Since FGFR3 has been documented to harbor many pathogenic

  20. Elevated cAMP increases aquaporin-3 plasma membrane diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marlar, Saw; Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Koffman, Jennifer Skaarup;

    2014-01-01

    .05)]. Immunoelectron microscopy showed no obvious difference in AQP3-EGFP expression levels or localization in the plasma membrane upon forskolin stimulation. Thus AQP3-EGFP diffusion is altered upon increased cAMP, which may correspond to basolateral adaptations in response to the increased apical water readsorption......Regulated urine concentration takes place in the renal collecting duct upon arginine vasopressin (AVP) stimulation, where subapical vesicles containing aquaporin-2 (AQP2) are inserted into the apical membrane instantly increasing water reabsorption and urine concentration. The reabsorped water...... be short-term regulated via changes in protein-protein interactions, incorporation into lipid rafts, and/or changes in steady-state turnover, which could result in changes in the diffusion behavior of AQP3. Thus we measured AQP3 diffusion coefficients upon stimulation with the AVP mimic forskolin to reveal...

  1. Building a patchwork - The yeast plasma membrane as model to study lateral domain formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuberth, Christian; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2015-04-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) has to fulfill a wide range of biological functions including selective uptake of substances, signal transduction and modulation of cell polarity and cell shape. To allow efficient regulation of these processes many resident proteins and lipids of the PM are laterally segregated into different functional domains. A particularly striking example of lateral segregation has been described for the budding yeast PM, where integral membrane proteins as well as lipids exhibit very slow translational mobility and form a patchwork of many overlapping micron-sized domains. Here we discuss the molecular and physical mechanisms contributing to the formation of a multi-domain membrane and review our current understanding of yeast PM organization. Many of the fundamental principles underlying membrane self-assembly and organization identified in yeast are expected to equally hold true in other organisms, even for the more transient and elusive organization of the PM in mammalian cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nanoscale membrane organisation and signalling.

  2. Calmodulin effects on steroids-regulated plasma membrane calcium pump activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylinska, Ludmila; Kowalska, Iwona; Ferenc, Bozena

    2009-03-01

    It is now generally accepted that non-genomic steroids action precedes their genomic effects by modulation of intracellular signaling pathways within seconds after application. Ca(2+) is a very potent and ubiquitous ion in all cells, and its concentration is precisely regulated. The most sensitive on Ca(2+) increase is ATP-consuming plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA). The enzyme is coded by four genes, but isoforms diversity was detected in excitable and non-excitable cells. It is the only ion pump stimulated directly by calmodulin (CaM). We examined the role of PMCA isoforms composition and CaM effect in regulation of Ca(2+) uptake by estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), pregnenolone (PREG), and their sulfates in a concentration range from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M, using the membranes from rat cortical synaptosomes, differentiated PC12 cells, and human erythrocytes. In excitable membranes with full set of PMCAs steroids apparently increased Ca(2+) uptake, although to a variable extent. In most of the cases, CaM decreased transport by 30-40% below controls. Erythrocyte PMCA was regulated by the steroids somewhat differently than excitable cells. CaM strongly increased the potency for Ca(2+) extrusion in membranes incubated with 17-beta-estradiol and PREG. Our results indicated that steroids may sufficiently control cytoplasmic calcium concentration within physiological and therapeutic range. The response depended on the cell type, PMCA isoforms expression profile, CaM presence, and the steroids structure. PMID:19226536

  3. BEHAVIOR OF CHO CELLS ON MODIFIED POLYPROPYLENE BY LOW TEMPERATURE AMMONIA PLASMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGHong; ZHUHesun; 等

    2001-01-01

    The surface of polypropylene(PP) membrane was modified by low temperature plasma with ammonia.The effect of exposure time was investigated by means of contact angle measurement.The results show that low temperature ammonia plasma treatment can enhance its hydrophilicity.Chinese hamster ovary(CHO)cells attachment on the modified membrane was enhanced and the growth rate on the membrane was faster than unmodified one.

  4. Spatial and temporal superresolution concepts to study plasma membrane organization by single molecule fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescence microscopy techniques are currently among the most important experimental tools to study cellular processes. Ultra-sensitive detection devices nowadays allow for measuring even individual farnesylacetate labeled target molecules with nanometer spatial accuracy and millisecond time resolution. The emergence of single molecule fluorescence techniques especially contributed to the field of membrane biology and provided basic knowledge on structural and dynamic features of the cellular plasma membrane. However, we are still confronted with a rather fragmentary understanding of the complex architecture and functional interrelations of membrane constituents. In this thesis new concepts in one- and dual-color single molecule fluorescence techniques are presented that allow for addressing organization principles and interaction dynamics in the live cell plasma membrane. Two complementary experimental strategies are described which differ in their detection principle: single molecule fluorescence imaging and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The presented methods are discussed in terms of their implementation, accuracy, quantitative and statistical data analysis, as well as live cell applications. State-of-the-art dual color single molecule imaging is introduced as the most direct experimental approach to study interaction dynamics between differently labeled target molecules. New analytical estimates for robust data analysis are presented that facilitate quantitative recording and identification of co localizations in dual color single molecule images. A novel dual color illumination scheme is further described that profoundly extends the current range and sensitivity of conventional dual color single molecule experiments. The method enables working at high surface densities of fluorescent molecules - a feature typically incommensurable with single molecule imaging - and is especially suited for the detection of rare interactions by tracking co localized

  5. Effects of freezing and cold acclimation on the plasma membrane of isolated protoplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steponkus, P.L.

    1991-01-01

    This project focuses on lesions in the plasma membrane of protoplasts that occur during freezing to temperatures below {minus}5{degrees} which result in changes in the semipermeablity of the plasma membrane. This injury, referred to as loss of osmotic responsiveness, is associated with the formation of large, aparticulate domains in the plasma membrane, aparticulate lamellae subtending the plasma membrane, and lamellar-to-hexagonal{sub II} phase transitions in the plasma membrane and subtending lamellar. The goals of this project are to provide a mechanistic understanding of the mechanism by which freeze-induced dehydration effects the formation of aparticulate domains and lamellar-to-hexagonal{sub II} phase transitions and to determine the mechanisms by which cold acclimation and cryoprotectants preclude or diminish these ultrastructural changes. Our working hypothesis is the formation of aparticulate domains and lamellar-to-hexagon{sub II} phase transitions in the plasma membrane and subtending lamellae are manifestations of hydration-dependent bilayer-bilayer interactions.

  6. C8-glycosphingolipids preferentially insert into tumor cell membranes and promote chemotherapeutic drug uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro Pedrosa, Lília R; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Steurer, Barbara; Ciceri, Dalila; ten Hagen, Timo L M; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Verheij, Marcel; Goñi, Felix María; Koning, Gerben A; Contreras, F-Xabier

    2015-08-01

    Insufficient drug delivery into tumor cells limits the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy. Co-delivery of liposome-encapsulated drug and synthetic short-chain glycosphingolipids (SC-GSLs) significantly improved drug bioavailability by enhancing intracellular drug uptake. Investigating the mechanisms underlying this SC-GSL-mediated drug uptake enhancement is the aim of this study. Fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize the cell membrane lipid transfer intracellular fate of fluorescently labeled C6-NBD-GalCer incorporated in liposomes in tumor and non-tumor cells. Additionally click chemistry was applied to image and quantify native SC-GSLs in tumor and non-tumor cell membranes. SC-GSL-mediated flip-flop was investigated in model membranes to confirm membrane-incorporation of SC-GSL and its effect on membrane remodeling. SC-GSL enriched liposomes containing doxorubicin (Dox) were incubated at 4°C and 37°C and intracellular drug uptake was studied in comparison to standard liposomes and free Dox. SC-GSL transfer to the cell membrane was independent of liposomal uptake and the majority of the transferred lipid remained in the plasma membrane. The transfer of SC-GSL was tumor cell-specific and induced membrane rearrangement as evidenced by a transbilayer flip-flop of pyrene-SM. However, pore formation was measured, as leakage of hydrophilic fluorescent probes was not observed. Moreover, drug uptake appeared to be mediated by SC-GSLs. SC-GSLs enhanced the interaction of doxorubicin (Dox) with the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of tumor cells at 4°C. Our results demonstrate that SC-GSLs preferentially insert into tumor cell plasma membranes enhancing cell intrinsic capacity to translocate amphiphilic drugs such as Dox across the membrane via a biophysical process.

  7. C8-glycosphingolipids preferentially insert into tumor cell membranes and promote chemotherapeutic drug uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro Pedrosa, Lília R; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Steurer, Barbara; Ciceri, Dalila; ten Hagen, Timo L M; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Verheij, Marcel; Goñi, Felix María; Koning, Gerben A; Contreras, F-Xabier

    2015-08-01

    Insufficient drug delivery into tumor cells limits the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy. Co-delivery of liposome-encapsulated drug and synthetic short-chain glycosphingolipids (SC-GSLs) significantly improved drug bioavailability by enhancing intracellular drug uptake. Investigating the mechanisms underlying this SC-GSL-mediated drug uptake enhancement is the aim of this study. Fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize the cell membrane lipid transfer intracellular fate of fluorescently labeled C6-NBD-GalCer incorporated in liposomes in tumor and non-tumor cells. Additionally click chemistry was applied to image and quantify native SC-GSLs in tumor and non-tumor cell membranes. SC-GSL-mediated flip-flop was investigated in model membranes to confirm membrane-incorporation of SC-GSL and its effect on membrane remodeling. SC-GSL enriched liposomes containing doxorubicin (Dox) were incubated at 4°C and 37°C and intracellular drug uptake was studied in comparison to standard liposomes and free Dox. SC-GSL transfer to the cell membrane was independent of liposomal uptake and the majority of the transferred lipid remained in the plasma membrane. The transfer of SC-GSL was tumor cell-specific and induced membrane rearrangement as evidenced by a transbilayer flip-flop of pyrene-SM. However, pore formation was measured, as leakage of hydrophilic fluorescent probes was not observed. Moreover, drug uptake appeared to be mediated by SC-GSLs. SC-GSLs enhanced the interaction of doxorubicin (Dox) with the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of tumor cells at 4°C. Our results demonstrate that SC-GSLs preferentially insert into tumor cell plasma membranes enhancing cell intrinsic capacity to translocate amphiphilic drugs such as Dox across the membrane via a biophysical process. PMID:25917957

  8. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Nonthermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris Argyle; John Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Gui-Bing Zhao; Sanil John; Ji-Jun Zhang; Linna Wang

    2007-09-30

    The goal of this experimental project was to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a nonthermal plasma and to recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), but it was not achieved at the moderate pressure conditions used in this study. However, H{sub 2}S was successfully decomposed at energy efficiencies higher than any other reports for the high H{sub 2}S concentration and moderate pressures (corresponding to high reactor throughputs) used in this study.

  9. Reduction in lateral lipid mobility of lipid bilayer membrane by atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Yusa, Kota; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging research field in which various applications of electrical discharge, especially in the form of nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, are examined, for example, the application of plasma to biological targets for various purposes such as selective killing of tumor cells and blood stanching. We have focused on the behavior of an artificial cell membrane system at the solid-liquid interface. To evaluate the lateral lipid mobility, we measured the diffusion coefficient of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found that the diffusion coefficient was decreased by plasma irradiation and that the diffusion coefficient decreasing rate proceeded with increasing plasma power. We investigated the effects of stimulation with an equilibrium chemical, H2O2, on the SLB and confirmed that the diffusion coefficient did not change at least up to a H2O2 concentration of 5 mM. These results indicate that transient active species generated by plasma play critical roles in the reduction in SLB fluidity. The effects of the two generated major oxidized lipid species, hydroxyl- or hydroperoxy-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and acyl-chain-truncated PCs terminated with aldehyde or carboxyl group, on lateral lipid mobility are discussed.

  10. Metric dynamics for membrane transformation through regulated cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Hiroshi C.

    2016-01-01

    This study develops an equation for describing three-dimensional membrane transformation through proliferation of its component cells regulated by morphogen density distributions on the membrane. The equation is developed in a two-dimensional coordinate system mapped on the membrane, referred to as the membrane coordinates. When the membrane expands, the membrane coordinates expand in the same manner so that the membrane is invariant in the coordinates. In the membrane coordinate system, the ...

  11. Reactivation from latency displays HIV particle budding at plasma membrane, accompanying CD44 upregulation and recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sano Kouichi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been accepted that HIV buds from the cell surface in T lymphocytes, whereas in macrophages it buds into intracellular endosomes. Recent studies, on the other hand, suggest that HIV preferentially buds from the cell surface even in monocytic cells. However, most studies are based on observations in acutely infected cells and little is known about HIV budding concomitant with reactivation from latency. Such studies would provide a better understanding of a reservoir for HIV. Results We observed HIV budding in latently infected T lymphocytic and monocytic cell lines following TNF-α stimulation and examined the upregulation of host factors that may be involved in particle production. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that reactivation of latently infected J1.1 cells (latently infected Jurkat cells with HIV-1 and U1 cells (latently infected U937 cells with HIV-1 displayed HIV particle budding predominantly at the plasma membrane, a morphology that is similar to particle budding in acutely infected Jurkat and U937 cells. When mRNA expression levels were quantified by qRT-PCR, we found that particle production from reactivated J1.1 and U1 cells was accompanied by CD44 upregulation. This upregulation was similarly observed when Jurkat and U937 cells were acutely infected with HIV-1 but not when just stimulated with TNF-α, suggesting that CD44 upregulation was linked with HIV production but not with cell stimulation. The molecules in endocytic pathways such as CD63 and HRS were also upregulated when U1 cells were reactivated and U937 cells were acutely infected with HIV-1. Confocal microscopy revealed that these upregulated host molecules were recruited to and accumulated at the sites where mature particles were formed at the plasma membrane. Conclusion Our study indicates that HIV particles are budded at the plasma membrane upon reactivation from latency, a morphology that is similar to particle budding in acute

  12. High temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is a comprehensive review of high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). PEMFCs are the preferred fuel cells for a variety of applications such as automobiles, cogeneration of heat and power units, emergency power and portable electronics. The first 5 chapters...

  13. Biophysical determinants of alveolar epithelial plasma membrane wounding associated with mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Omar; Walters, Bruce; Stroetz, Randolph; Valencia, Paul; McCall, Deborah; Hubmayr, Rolf D

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical ventilation may cause harm by straining lungs at a time they are particularly prone to injury from deforming stress. The objective of this study was to define the relative contributions of alveolar overdistension and cyclic recruitment and "collapse" of unstable lung units to membrane wounding of alveolar epithelial cells. We measured the interactive effects of tidal volume (VT), transpulmonary pressure (PTP), and of airspace liquid on the number of alveolar epithelial cells with plasma membrane wounds in ex vivo mechanically ventilated rat lungs. Plasma membrane integrity was assessed by propidium iodide (PI) exclusion in confocal images of subpleural alveoli. Cyclic inflations of normal lungs from zero end-expiratory pressure to 40 cmH2O produced VT values of 56.9 ± 3.1 ml/kg and were associated with 0.12 ± 0.12 PI-positive cells/alveolus. A preceding tracheal instillation of normal saline (3 ml) reduced VT to 49.1 ± 6 ml/kg but was associated with a significantly greater number of wounded alveolar epithelial cells (0.52 ± 0.16 cells/alveolus; P < 0.01). Mechanical ventilation of completely saline-filled lungs with saline (VT = 52 ml/kg) to pressures between 10 and 15 cmH2O was associated with the least number of wounded epithelial cells (0.02 ± 0.02 cells/alveolus; P < 0.01). In mechanically ventilated, partially saline-filled lungs, the number of wounded cells increased substantially with VT, but, once VT was accounted for, wounding was independent of maximal PTP. We found that interfacial stress associated with the generation and destruction of liquid bridges in airspaces is the primary biophysical cell injury mechanism in mechanically ventilated lungs. PMID:23997173

  14. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

  15. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress. PMID:27341663

  16. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes injure the plasma membrane of macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging nanotechnology materials which are likely to be mass-produced in the near future. However, prior to mass-production, certain health-related concerns should first be addressed. For example, when inhaled, the thin-fibrous shape and the biopersistent characteristics of CNTs may cause pulmonary diseases, in a manner similar to asbestos. In the present study, mouse macrophages (J774.1) were exposed to highly-purified multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs, 67 nm) or to UICC crocidolite in order to evaluate the toxicity of these nano-size fibers. The cytotoxicity of MWCNTs was found to be higher than that of crocidolite. The toxic effect of MWCNTs was not affected by N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, or buthionine sulfoximine, a glutathione synthesis inhibitor. cDNA microarray analyses suggested that the cytotoxicity of MWCNTs could not be explained satisfactorily by either an increase or decrease of gene expression, although mRNA levels of some cytokines were slightly increased by MWCNTs. Moreover, MWCNTs did not significantly activate either MAP kinases such as ERK, JNK and p38, nor common apoptosis pathways such as caspase 3 and PARP. Electron microscopic studies indicated that MWCNTs associate with the plasma membrane of macrophages and disrupt the integrity of the membrane. Several proteins were found to adsorb onto MWCNTs when MWCNT-exposed macrophages were gently lysed. One of these proteins was macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO). MARCO-transfected CHO-K1 cells associated with MWCNTs more rapidly than mock-transfected cells. These results indicate that MWCNTs probably trigger cytotoxic effects in phagocytotic cells by reacting with MARCO on the plasma membrane and rupturing the plasma membrane

  17. Effect of cold plasma on glial cell morphology studied by atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Recek

    Full Text Available The atomic force microscope (AFM is broadly used to study the morphology of cells. The morphological characteristics and differences of the cell membrane between normal human astrocytes and glial tumor cells are not well explored. Following treatment with cold atmospheric plasma, evaluation of the selective effect of plasma on cell viability of tumor cells is poorly understood and requires further evaluation. Using AFM we imaged morphology of glial cells before and after cold atmospheric plasma treatment. To look more closely at the effect of plasma on cell membrane, high resolution imaging was used. We report the differences between normal human astrocytes and human glioblastoma cells by considering the membrane surface details. Our data, obtained for the first time on these cells using atomic force microscopy, argue for an architectural feature on the cell membrane, i.e. brush layers, different in normal human astrocytes as compared to glioblastoma cells. The brush layer disappears from the cell membrane surface of normal E6/E7 cells and is maintained in the glioblastoma U87 cells after plasma treatment.

  18. [Radiation-induced changes in structural state of membranes of human blood cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlakova, E B; Atkarskaia, M V; Fatkullina, L D; Andreev, S G

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate radiation-induced changes in the structural state of the membranes, blood samples of healthy donors were subjected to gamma radiation in the range of small (1-10 cGy) and medium doses (50 cGy-2 Gy). After irradiation, the microviscosity of lipid membranes of red and white blood cells was measured by ESR spin probe method. At doses exceeding 1 cGy, statistically significant changes of the degree of spontaneous erythrocyte hemolysis and of the lymphocyte plasma membrane microviscosity were observed. Under identical irradiation conditions, the stability of lymphocyte membranes was less as compared to erythrocyte membranes.

  19. Solanaceae XIPs are plasma membrane aquaporins that facilitate the transport of many uncharged substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Bienert, Manuela Désirée; Jahn, Thomas Paul; Boutry, Marc; Chaumont, François

    2011-04-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) transport water and uncharged solutes across membranes in all kingdoms of life. Recently, an uncharacterized MIP subfamily was identified in the genomes of plants and fungi and named X Intrinsic Proteins (XIPs). Here, we describe the genetic features, localization, expression, and functions of a group of Solanaceae XIPs. XIP cDNA and gDNA were cloned from tobacco, potato, tomato, and morning glory. A conserved sequence motif in the first intron of Solanaceae XIPs initiates an RNA-processing mechanism that results in two splice variants (α and β). When transiently or stably expressed in tobacco plants, yellow fluorescent protein-tagged NtXIP1;1α and NtXIP1;1β were both localized in the plasma membrane. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing NtXIP1;1-promoter-GUS constructs and RT-PCR studies showed that NtXIP1;1 was expressed in all organs. The NtXIP1;1 promoter was mainly active in cell layers facing the environment in all above-ground tissues. Heterologous expression of Solanaceae XIPs in Xenopus laevis oocytes and various Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants demonstrated that these isoforms facilitate the transport of bulky solutes, such as glycerol, urea, and boric acid. In contrast, permeability for water was undetectable. These data suggest that XIPs function in the transport of uncharged solutes across the cell plasma membrane in specific plant tissues, including at the interface between the environment and external cell layers.

  20. Polarized membrane traffic and cell polarity development is dependent on dihydroceramide synthase-regulated sphinganine turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ijzendoorn, SCD; van der Wouden, JM; Liebisch, G; Schmitz, G; Hoekstra, D

    2004-01-01

    Sphingoid bases have been implicated in various cellular processes including cell growth, apoptosis and cell differentiation. Here, we show that the regulated turnover of sphingoid bases is crucial for cell polarity development, i.e., the biogenesis of apical plasma membrane domains, in well-differe

  1. Olopatadine Inhibits Exocytosis in Rat Peritoneal Mast Cells by Counteracting Membrane Surface Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuka Baba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud/Aims: Besides its anti-allergic properties as a histamine receptor antagonist, olopatadine stabilizes mast cells by inhibiting the release of chemokines. Since olopatadine bears amphiphilic features and is preferentially partitioned into the lipid bilayers of the plasma membrane, it would induce some morphological changes in mast cells and thus affect the process of exocytosis. Methods: Employing the standard patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we examined the effects of olopatadine and other anti-allergic drugs on the membrane capacitance (Cm in rat peritoneal mast cells during exocytosis. Using confocal imaging of a water-soluble fluorescent dye, lucifer yellow, we also examined their effects on the deformation of the plasma membrane. Results: Low concentrations of olopatadine (1 or 10 µM did not significantly affect the GTP-γ-S-induced increase in the Cm. However, 100 µM and 1 mM olopatadine almost totally suppressed the increase in the Cm. Additionally, these doses completely washed out the trapping of the dye on the cell surface, indicating that olopatadine counteracted the membrane surface deformation induced by exocytosis. As shown by electron microscopy, olopatadine generated inward membrane bending in mast cells. Conclusion: This study provides electrophysiological evidence for the first time that olopatadine dose-dependently inhibits the process of exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells. Such mast cell stabilizing properties of olopatadine may be attributed to its counteracting effects on the plasma membrane deformation in degranulating mast cells.

  2. An Adaptable Spectrin/Ankyrin-Based Mechanism for Long-Range Organization of Plasma Membranes in Vertebrate Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Vann; Lorenzo, Damaris N

    2016-01-01

    Ankyrins are membrane-associated proteins that together with their spectrin partners are responsible for micron-scale organization of vertebrate plasma membranes, including those of erythrocytes, excitable membranes of neurons and heart, lateral membrane domains of columnar epithelial cells, and striated muscle. Ankyrins coordinate functionally related membrane transporters and cell adhesion proteins (15 protein families identified so far) within plasma membrane compartments through independently evolved interactions of intrinsically disordered sequences with a highly conserved peptide-binding groove formed by the ANK repeat solenoid. Ankyrins are coupled to spectrins, which are elongated organelle-sized proteins that form mechanically resilient arrays through cross-linking by specialized actin filaments. In addition to protein interactions, cellular targeting and assembly of spectrin/ankyrin domains also critically depend on palmitoylation of ankyrin-G by aspartate-histidine-histidine-cysteine 5/8 palmitoyltransferases, as well as interaction of beta-2 spectrin with phosphoinositide lipids. These lipid-dependent spectrin/ankyrin domains are not static but are locally dynamic and determine membrane identity through opposing endocytosis of bulk lipids as well as specific proteins. A partnership between spectrin, ankyrin, and cell adhesion molecules first emerged in bilaterians over 500 million years ago. Ankyrin and spectrin may have been recruited to plasma membranes from more ancient roles in organelle transport. The basic bilaterian spectrin-ankyrin toolkit markedly expanded in vertebrates through gene duplications combined with variation in unstructured intramolecular regulatory sequences as well as independent evolution of ankyrin-binding activity by ion transporters involved in action potentials and calcium homeostasis. In addition, giant vertebrate ankyrins with specialized roles in axons acquired new coding sequences by exon shuffling. We speculate that

  3. An Adaptable Spectrin/Ankyrin-Based Mechanism for Long-Range Organization of Plasma Membranes in Vertebrate Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Vann; Lorenzo, Damaris N

    2016-01-01

    Ankyrins are membrane-associated proteins that together with their spectrin partners are responsible for micron-scale organization of vertebrate plasma membranes, including those of erythrocytes, excitable membranes of neurons and heart, lateral membrane domains of columnar epithelial cells, and striated muscle. Ankyrins coordinate functionally related membrane transporters and cell adhesion proteins (15 protein families identified so far) within plasma membrane compartments through independently evolved interactions of intrinsically disordered sequences with a highly conserved peptide-binding groove formed by the ANK repeat solenoid. Ankyrins are coupled to spectrins, which are elongated organelle-sized proteins that form mechanically resilient arrays through cross-linking by specialized actin filaments. In addition to protein interactions, cellular targeting and assembly of spectrin/ankyrin domains also critically depend on palmitoylation of ankyrin-G by aspartate-histidine-histidine-cysteine 5/8 palmitoyltransferases, as well as interaction of beta-2 spectrin with phosphoinositide lipids. These lipid-dependent spectrin/ankyrin domains are not static but are locally dynamic and determine membrane identity through opposing endocytosis of bulk lipids as well as specific proteins. A partnership between spectrin, ankyrin, and cell adhesion molecules first emerged in bilaterians over 500 million years ago. Ankyrin and spectrin may have been recruited to plasma membranes from more ancient roles in organelle transport. The basic bilaterian spectrin-ankyrin toolkit markedly expanded in vertebrates through gene duplications combined with variation in unstructured intramolecular regulatory sequences as well as independent evolution of ankyrin-binding activity by ion transporters involved in action potentials and calcium homeostasis. In addition, giant vertebrate ankyrins with specialized roles in axons acquired new coding sequences by exon shuffling. We speculate that

  4. Spatiotemporal mapping of diffusion dynamics and organization in plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Nirmalya; Ng, Xue Wen; Sankaran, Jagadish; Wohland, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    Imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and the related FCS diffusion law have been applied in recent years to investigate the diffusion modes of lipids and proteins in membranes. These efforts have provided new insights into the membrane structure below the optical diffraction limit, new information on the existence of lipid domains, and on the influence of the cytoskeleton on membrane dynamics. However, there has been no systematic study to evaluate how domain size, domain density, and the probe partition coefficient affect the resulting imaging FCS diffusion law parameters. Here, we characterize the effects of these factors on the FCS diffusion law through simulations and experiments on lipid bilayers and live cells. By segmenting images into smaller 7  ×  7 pixel areas, we can evaluate the FCS diffusion law on areas smaller than 2 µm and thus provide detailed maps of information on the membrane structure and heterogeneity at this length scale. We support and extend this analysis by deriving a mathematical expression to calculate the mean squared displacement (MSDACF) from the autocorrelation function of imaging FCS, and demonstrate that the MSDACF plots depend on the existence of nanoscopic domains. Based on the results, we derive limits for the detection of domains depending on their size, density, and relative viscosity in comparison to the surroundings. Finally, we apply these measurements to bilayers and live cells using imaging total internal reflection FCS and single plane illumination microscopy FCS.

  5. Paracrine diffusion of PrP(C and propagation of prion infectivity by plasma membrane-derived microvesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Mattei

    Full Text Available Cellular prion protein (PrP(C is a physiological constituent of eukaryotic cells. The cellular pathways underlying prions spread from the sites of prions infection/peripheral replication to the central nervous system are still not elucidated. Membrane-derived microvesicles (MVs are submicron (0.1-1 microm particles, that are released by cells during plasma membrane shedding processes. They are usually liberated from different cell types, mainly upon activation as well as apoptosis, in this case, one of their hallmarks is the exposure of phosphatidylserine in the outer leaflet of the membrane. MVs are also characterized by the presence of adhesion molecules, MHC I molecules, as well as of membrane antigens typical of their cell of origin. Evidence exists that MVs shedding provide vehicles to transfer molecules among cells, and that MVs are important modulators of cell-to-cell communication. In this study we therefore analyzed the potential role of membrane-derived MVs in the mechanism(s of PrP(C diffusion and prion infectivity transmission. We first identified PrP(C in association with the lipid raft components Fyn, flotillin-2, GM1 and GM3 in MVs from plasma of healthy human donors. Similar findings were found in MVs from cell culture supernatants of murine neuronal cells. Furthermore we demonstrated that PrP(Sc is released from infected murine neuronal cells in association with plasma membrane-derived MVs and that PrP(Sc-bearing MVs are infectious both in vitro and in vivo. The data suggest that MVs may contribute both to the intercellular mechanism(s of PrP(C diffusion and signaling as well as to the process of prion spread and neuroinvasion.

  6. 14C-glucose binding assay of the glucose transporter binding sites in muscular cell membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of determining the binding sites of glucose transporter in rat muscular cell membrane was introduced. The crude products of cell membrane form the skeletal muscle of control and insulin treated rats were prepared, and then fractionated in sucrose gradient. Both plasma membrane and microsome membrane were incubated with D-[U-14C] glucose respectively for the measurement of radioactivity and Scatchard plot analysis. It was found that the binding sites of glucose transporter in plasma membrane and intracellular membrane were 5.6 nmol 14C-glucose/mg protein and 8.7 nmol 14C-glucose-mg protein respectively at basic state. Insulin treatment in experimental groups caused approximately 146% increase in plasma membrane fraction and 88% decrease in intracellular membrane fraction. Moreover, the kinetic data of Scatchard plot curve were similar to those of the [3H]-cytochalasin B binding assay. D-[U-14C] glucose binding assay of glucose transporter binding sites in muscular cell membrane is simple, easy and practicable. The D-[U-14C] glucose is commercially available

  7. Comparative kinetics of damage to the plasma and mitochondrial membranes by intra-cellularly synthesized and externally-provided photosensitizers using multi-color FACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Sara; Malik, Zvi; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer involves inflicting lethal damage to the cells of malignant tumors, primarily by singlet oxygen that is generated following light-absorption in a photosensitizer molecule. Dysfunction of cells is manifested in many ways, including peroxidation of cellular components, membrane rupture, depolarization of electric potentials, termination of mitochondrial activity, onset of apoptosis and necrosis and eventually cell lysis. These events do not necessarily occur in linear fashion and different types of damage to cell components occur, most probably, in parallel. In this report we measured the relative rates of damage to two cellular membranes: the plasma membrane and the mitochondrial membrane. We employed photosensitizers of diverse hydrophobicities and used different incubation procedures, which lead to their different intra-cellular localizations. We monitored the damage that was inflicted on these membranes, by employing optical probes of membrane integrity, in a multi-color FACS experiment. The potentiometric indicator JC-1 monitored the electric cross-membrane potential of the mitochondria and the fluorometric indicator Draq7 monitored the rupture of the plasma membrane. We show that the electric depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and the damage to the enveloping plasma membrane proceed with different kinetics that reflect the molecular character and intracellular location of the sensitizer: PpIX that is synthesized in the cells from ALA causes rapid mitochondrial damage and very slow damage to the plasma membrane, while externally added PpIX has an opposite effect. The hydrophilic sensitizer HypS4 can be taken up by the cells by different incubation conditions, and these affect its intracellular location, and as a consequence either the plasma membrane or the mitochondria is damaged first. A similar correlation was found for additional extracellularly-provided photosensitizers HP and PpIX. PMID:24173598

  8. Electrically Conductive, Hydrophilic Porous Membrane for Fuel Cell Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I effort seeks to produce a conductive polyethersulfone (PES) microporous membrane for fuel cell water management applications. This membrane will...

  9. The two neutrophil plasma membrane markers alkaline phosphatase and HLA class I antigen localize differently in granule-deficient cytoplasts. An ideal plasma membrane marker in human neutrophils is still lacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellmé, Sara; Dahlgren, Claes; Karlsson, Anna

    2007-08-31

    Neutrophil function relies largely on the ability of the cell to mobilize its different granules and vesicles to the cell surface and thereby expose and/or release effector molecules to the surrounding tissue. To properly identify these subcellular compartments is thus a prerequisite for studies of neutrophil physiology. A range of specific markers for the classical granules is available, but finding optimal markers for the secretory vesicles and plasma membrane has historically been more challenging. Latent and non-latent alkaline phosphatase activities are often used to distinguish these two light membrane structures, but the outcome using this technique depends on the level of cellular activation. Therefore, HLA-I was introduced some years ago as a specific, stimulation-independent marker for the plasma membrane. In this study we however report that detailed fractionation studies of neutrophil cytoplasts, lacking secretory vesicles, granules and other dense organelles, reveal that the HLA-I antigen is not only co-localizing with the plasma membrane marker ALP, but is also present in other, more dense organelles. Further, we found the mixed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA), detecting the beta(2)-microglobulin/HLA-I complex, to be negatively influenced by uncomplexed beta(2)-microglobulin present in the specific granules and secretory vesicles, making it difficult to use HLA-I as a plasma membrane marker during maturation of for example phagolysosomes. PMID:17673253

  10. Mixed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA) for HLA class I antigen: a plasma membrane marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerrum, O W; Borregaard, N

    1990-03-01

    This study introduces a simple, reproducible assay for HLA class I antigen using antibodies against beta 2-microglobulin and the heavy chain on HLA. The sandwich technique was named mixed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA), and was designed for identification of plasma membranes in neutrophil subcellular fractions. The subcellular localization of HLA was identical to that of other plasma membrane markers, [3H]concanavalin A and detergent-independent alkaline phosphatase, and was unchanged by stimulation of cells by weak and strong secretagogues. In addition to the presence as part of the HLA complex in the plasma membrane uncomplexed beta 2-microglobulin is present in the specific granules of neutrophils. However, the release of beta 2-microglobulin from intact neutrophils stimulated with formyl-methionylleucylphenylalanine was much higher than could be explained by exocytosis of specific granules. Subcellular fractionation studies demonstrated that beta 2-microglobulin is localized in fractions characterized by latent alkaline phosphatase and released from this novel secretory compartment in response to stimulation with formyl-methionylleucylphenylalanine. PMID:2181625

  11. Drosophila Lipophorin Receptors Recruit the Lipoprotein LTP to the Plasma Membrane to Mediate Lipid Uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Míriam Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipophorin, the main Drosophila lipoprotein, circulates in the hemolymph transporting lipids between organs following routes that must adapt to changing physiological requirements. Lipophorin receptors expressed in developmentally dynamic patterns in tissues such as imaginal discs, oenocytes and ovaries control the timing and tissular distribution of lipid uptake. Using an affinity purification strategy, we identified a novel ligand for the lipophorin receptors, the circulating lipoprotein Lipid Transfer Particle (LTP. We show that specific isoforms of the lipophorin receptors mediate the extracellular accumulation of LTP in imaginal discs and ovaries. The interaction requires the LA-1 module in the lipophorin receptors and is strengthened by a contiguous region of 16 conserved amino acids. Lipophorin receptor variants that do not interact with LTP cannot mediate lipid uptake, revealing an essential role of LTP in the process. In addition, we show that lipophorin associates with the lipophorin receptors and with the extracellular matrix through weak interactions. However, during lipophorin receptor-mediated lipid uptake, LTP is required for a transient stabilization of lipophorin in the basolateral plasma membrane of imaginal disc cells. Together, our data suggests a molecular mechanism by which the lipophorin receptors tether LTP to the plasma membrane in lipid acceptor tissues. LTP would interact with lipophorin particles adsorbed to the extracellular matrix and with the plasma membrane, catalyzing the exchange of lipids between them.

  12. Contribution of plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase to cerebellar synapse function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena; Huang; Raghavendra; Y; Nagaraja; Molly; L; Garside; Walther; Akemann; Thomas; Knpfel; Ruth; M; Empson

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellum expresses one of the highest levels of the plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase,isoform 2 in the mammalian brain.This highly efficient plasma membrane calcium transporter protein is enriched within the main output neurons of the cerebellar cortex;i.e. the Purkinje neurons(PNs) .Here we review recent evidence,including electrophysiological and calcium imaging approaches using the plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2(PMCA2) knockout mouse,to show that PMCA2 is critical for the physiological control of calcium at cerebellar synapses and cerebellar dependent behaviour.These studies have also revealed that deletionof PMCA2 throughout cerebellar development in the PMCA2 knockout mouse leads to permanent signalling and morphological alterations in the PN dendrites. Whilst these findings highlight the importance of PMCA2 during cerebellar synapse function and development,they also reveal some limitations in the use of the PMCA2 knockout mouse and the need for additional experimental approaches including cell-specific and reversible manipulation of PMCAs.

  13. Localization at high resolution of antibody-induced mobilization of vaccinia virus hemagglutinin and the major histocompatibility antigens on the plasma membrane of infected cells

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    We examined the consequence of simultaneous or independent binding of monospecific antibody to the hemagglutinin (HA) of vaccinia virus and the A-, B- and -determinants of HLA on HeLa or Raji cells or KkDk determinants of H-2 on L929 cells. The bound antibodies were marked by goat-anti-mouse (GAM) or goat-anti-rabbit (GAR) fluorochrome conjugates suitable for light microscopy and GAM or GAR gold conjugates, used in electron microscopy. Specificity and amount of antibody adsorbed was ascertain...

  14. Bright and photostable push-pull pyrene dye visualizes lipid order variation between plasma and intracellular membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niko, Yosuke; Didier, Pascal; Mely, Yves; Konishi, Gen-Ichi; Klymchenko, Andrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging lipid organization in cell membranes requires advanced fluorescent probes. Here, we show that a recently synthesized push-pull pyrene (PA), similarly to popular probe Laurdan, changes the emission maximum as a function of lipid order, but outperforms it by spectroscopic properties. In addition to red-shifted absorption compatible with common 405 nm diode laser, PA shows higher brightness and much higher photostability than Laurdan in apolar membrane environments. Moreover, PA is compatible with two-photon excitation at wavelengths >800 nm, which was successfully used for ratiometric imaging of coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases in giant unilamellar vesicles. Fluorescence confocal microscopy in Hela cells revealed that PA efficiently stains the plasma membrane and the intracellular membranes at >20-fold lower concentrations, as compared to Laurdan. Finally, ratiometric imaging using PA reveals variation of lipid order within different cellular compartments: plasma membranes are close to liquid ordered phase of model membranes composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, while intracellular membranes are much less ordered, matching well membranes composed of unsaturated phospholipids without cholesterol. These differences in the lipid order were confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) at the blue edge of PA emission band. PA probe constitutes thus a new powerful tool for biomembrane research.

  15. New insights into the organization of plasma membrane and its role in signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenichi G N

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membranes have heterogeneous structures for efficient signal transduction, required to perform cell functions. Recent evidence indicates that the heterogeneous structures are produced by (1) compartmentalization by actin-based membrane skeleton, (2) raft domains, (3) receptor-receptor interactions, and (4) the binding of receptors to cytoskeletal proteins. This chapter provides an overview of recent studies on diffusion, clustering, raft association, actin binding, and signal transduction of membrane receptors, especially glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored receptors. Studies on diffusion of GPI-anchored receptors suggest that rafts may be small and/or short-lived in plasma membranes. In steady state conditions, GPI-anchored receptors form transient homodimers, which may represent the "standby state" for the stable homodimers and oligomers upon ligation. Furthermore, It is proposed that upon ligation, the binding of GPI-anchored receptor clusters to cytoskeletal actin filaments produces a platform for downstream signaling, and that the pulse-like signaling easily maintains the stability of the overall signaling activity.

  16. Plasma-induced Styrene Grafting onto the Surface of Polytetrafluoroethylene Powder for Proton Exchange Membrane Application%Plasma-induced Styrene Grafting onto the Surface of Polytetrafluoroethylene Powder for Proton Exchange Membrane Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰彦; 程诚; 张素贞; 倪国华; 陈龙威; 杨光杰; M.NAGATSU; 孟月东

    2011-01-01

    Low-temperature plasma treatment was adopted to graft styrene onto polytetrafluo- roethylene (PTFE) powder, which is widely used in the fabrication of proton exchange membrane (PEM). The grafted PTFE powder was sulfonated in chlorosulfonic acid and fabricated into a membrane, which was used as inexpensive PEM material for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis were used to characterize the structure of the sulfonated PTFE powder. The results showed that all the PTFE powders were successfully grafted by nitrogen plasma and then sulfonated under such experimental conditions. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image indicated that the fabricated membrane exhibits flat morphology and homogenous structure. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of this kind of PEM was also investigated.

  17. Plasma membrane Ca2+ pumping plays a prominent role in adenosine A(1) receptor mediated changes in [Ca2+](i) in DDT1 MF-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipma, H; Fredholm, BB; DenHertog, A; Nelemans, A

    1996-01-01

    Adenosine A(1) receptor mediated formation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P-3) and accumulation of cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+](i)) were investigated in DDT1 MF-2 smooth muscle cells. A strong reduction of the adenosine and N-6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) induced rise in [Ca2+](i) was observe

  18. Amphipaths Differentially Modulate Membrane Surface Deformation in Rat Peritoneal Mast Cells During Exocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsuro Kazama

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Salicylate and chlorpromazine exert differential effects on the chemokine release from mast cells. Since these drugs are amphiphilic and preferentially partitioned into the lipid bilayers of the plasma membranes, they would induce some morphological changes in mast cells and thus affect the process of exocytosis. Methods: Employing the standard patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we examined the effects of salicylate and chlorpromazine on the membrane capacitance (Cm during exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells. Using confocal imaging of a water-soluble fluorescent dye, lucifer yellow, we also examined their effects on plasma membrane deformation of the cells. Results: Salicylate dramatically accelerated the GTP-γ-S-induced increase in the Cm immediately after its application, whereas chlorpromazine significantly suppressed the increase. Treatment with salicylate increased the trapping of the dye on the cell surface, while treatment with chlorpromazine completely washed it out, indicating that both drugs induced membrane surface deformation in mast cells. Conclusion: This study demonstrated for the first time that membrane amphipaths, such as salicylate and chlorpromazine, may oppositely modulate the process of exocytosis in mast cells, as detected by the changes in the Cm. The plasma membrane deformation induced by the drugs was thought to be responsible for their differential effects.

  19. Single-molecule imaging technique to study the dynamic regulation of GPCR function at the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snaar-Jagalska, B.E.; Cambi, A.; Schmidt, T.; Keijzer, de S.

    2013-01-01

    The lateral diffusion of a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in the plasma membrane determines its interaction capabilities with downstream signaling molecules and critically modulates its function. Mechanisms that control GPCR mobility, like compartmentalization, enable a cell to fine-tune its resp

  20. Super-Resolution Imaging of Plasma Membrane Proteins with Click Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Letschert, Sebastian; Doose, Sören; Sauer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Besides its function as a passive cell wall, the plasma membrane (PM) serves as a platform for different physiological processes such as signal transduction and cell adhesion, determining the ability of cells to communicate with the exterior, and form tissues. Therefore, the spatial distribution of PM components, and the molecular mechanisms underlying it, have important implications in various biological fields including cell development, neurobiology, and immunology. The existence of confined compartments in the plasma membrane that vary on many length scales from protein multimers to micrometer-size domains with different protein and lipid composition is today beyond all questions. As much as the physiology of cells is controlled by the spatial organization of PM components, the study of distribution, size, and composition remains challenging. Visualization of the molecular distribution of PM components has been impeded mainly due to two problems: the specific labeling of lipids and proteins without perturbing their native distribution and the diffraction-limit of fluorescence microscopy restricting the resolution to about half the wavelength of light. Here, we present a bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy based on click chemistry and metabolic labeling for efficient and specific visualization of PM proteins and glycans with organic fluorophores in combination with super-resolution fluorescence imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) with single-molecule sensitivity. PMID:27668214

  1. Alternate Fuel Cell Membranes for Energy Independence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storey, Robson, F.; Mauritz, Kenneth, A.; Patton, Derek, L.; Savin, Daniel, A.

    2012-12-18

    The overall objective of this project was the development and evaluation of novel hydrocarbon fuel cell (FC) membranes that possess high temperature performance and long term chemical/mechanical durability in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells (FC). The major research theme was synthesis of aromatic hydrocarbon polymers of the poly(arylene ether sulfone) (PAES) type containing sulfonic acid groups tethered to the backbone via perfluorinated alkylene linkages and in some cases also directly attached to the phenylene groups along the backbone. Other research themes were the use of nitrogen-based heterocyclics instead of acid groups for proton conduction, which provides high temperature, low relative humidity membranes with high mechanical/thermal/chemical stability and pendant moieties that exhibit high proton conductivities in the absence of water, and synthesis of block copolymers consisting of a proton conducting block coupled to poly(perfluorinated propylene oxide) (PFPO) blocks. Accomplishments of the project were as follows: 1) establishment of a vertically integrated program of synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of FC membranes, 2) establishment of benchmark membrane performance data based on Nafion for comparison to experimental membrane performance, 3) development of a new perfluoroalkyl sulfonate monomer, N,N-diisopropylethylammonium 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl) pentafluoropropanesulfonate (HPPS), 4) synthesis of random and block copolymer membranes from HPPS, 5) synthesis of block copolymer membranes containing high-acid-concentration hydrophilic blocks consisting of HPPS and 3,3'-disulfonate-4,4'-dichlorodiphenylsulfone (sDCDPS), 6) development of synthetic routes to aromatic polymer backbones containing pendent 1H-1,2,3-triazole moieties, 7) development of coupling strategies to create phase-separated block copolymers between hydrophilic sulfonated prepolymers and commodity polymers such as PFPO, 8) establishment of basic

  2. A Comparative Study of Hydrophilic Modification of Polypropylene Membranes by Remote and Direct Ar Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Suzhen; CHENG Cheng; LAN Yan; MENG Yuedong

    2009-01-01

    Surface modification of polypropylene membrane by argon (Ar) plasma-induced graft polymerization with hydrophilic monomer [acrylic acid (AA) in this work]was investigated.It was found that both the distance of the membrane from the Ar plasma center and the plasma power had a strong influence on the surface modification,hydrophilicity and graft yield (GY) of the treated membrane.Results suggest that remote plasma treatment with a proper sample position,plasma power and graft polymerization leads to a membrane surface with not only less damage,but also more permanent hydrophilicity,than direct plasma treatment does.By analyzing the morphology and the chemical composition of the membrane surface by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),as well as Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) respectively,a possible mechanism was tentatively revealed.

  3. An early nodulin-like protein accumulates in the sieve element plasma membrane of Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Junaid A.; Wang, Qi; Sjölund, Richard D.;

    2007-01-01

    Membrane proteins within the sieve element-companion cell complex have essential roles in the physiological functioning of the phloem. The monoclonal antibody line RS6, selected from hybridomas raised against sieve elements isolated from California shield leaf (Streptanthus tortuosus; Brassicaceae......) tissue cultures, recognizes an antigen in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotype Columbia that is associated specifically with the plasma membrane of sieve elements, but not companion cells, and accumulates at the earliest stages of sieve element differentiation. The identity of the RS6 antigen...... floral and vegetative tissues, the sieve element-specific ENOD is expressed only within the phloem. Members of the ENOD subfamily of the cupredoxin superfamily do not appear to bind copper and have unknown functions. Phenotypic analysis of homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants for the gene At3g20570 shows...

  4. Resting microglial cells exhibit tubular membrane protrusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Gimsa

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Nano- and microtubular structures have recently become a subject of increasing interest due to their importance in biology and medicine as well as their technological potential. Such structures have been observed in anorganic (Iijima, 1991 as well as in organic (Schnur 1993; Oda et al. 1991 systems. Micro- and nanotubular protrusions of bilayer membranes have been found in cells (Kralj-Iglic et al. 1998; Kralj-Iglic et al. 2001a and phospholipid vesicles (Kralj-Iglic et al. 2002; Kralj-Iglic et al. 2001b. In this work we describe membrane protrusions in microglial cells.

  5. Anti-cancer efficacy of nonthermal plasma dissolved in a liquid, liquid plasma in heterogeneous cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Hoan; Park, Hyung Jun; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of nonthermal plasma for cancer treatment has been reported recently. The heterogeneity of cancer cells need to be addressed to design effective anticancer treatments. Here, we show that treatment with nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma dissolved in a liquid (liquid plasma) induces oxidative stress in heterogeneous populations of cancer cells and ultimately kills these cells via apoptosis, regardless of genetic status, e.g., mutations in p53 and other DNA-damage-response genes. We found that liquid plasma markedly increased the concentration of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), reflecting an influx from the extracellular milieu. Liquid plasma contributed to mitochondrial accumulation of ROS and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential with consequent cell death. Healthy normal cells, however, were hardly affected by the liquid-plasma treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine blocked liquid-plasma-induced cell death. A knockdown of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or Mn-SOD enhanced the plasma-induced cell death, whereas expression of exogenous CuZn-SOD, Mn-SOD, or catalase blocked the cell death. These results suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction mediated by ROS production is a key contributor to liquid-plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, regardless of genetic variation. Thus, liquid plasma may have clinical applications, e.g., the development of therapeutic strategies and prevention of disease progression despite tumor heterogeneity. PMID:27364630

  6. Easy measurement of diffusion coefficients of EGFP-tagged plasma membrane proteins using k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Koffman, Jennifer Skaarup; Marlar, Saw;

    2014-01-01

    Lateral diffusion and compartmentalization of plasma membrane proteins are tightly regulated in cells and thus, studying these processes will reveal new insights to plasma membrane protein function and regulation. Recently, k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS)1 was developed to enable...... available code to measure diffusion coefficients of proteins. kICS calculates a time correlation function from a fluorescence microscopy image stack after Fourier transformation of each image to reciprocal (k-) space. Subsequently, circular averaging, natural logarithm transform and linear fits...... to the correlation function yields the diffusion coefficient. This paper provides a step-by-step guide to the image analysis and measurement of diffusion coefficients via kICS. First, a high frame rate image sequence of a fluorescently labeled plasma membrane protein is acquired using a fluorescence microscope Then...

  7. Phosphosite mapping of P-type plasma membrane H+-ATPase in homologous and heterologous environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudashevskaya, Elena; Ye, Juanying; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard;

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an important posttranslational modification of proteins in living cells and primarily serves regulatory purposes. Several methods were employed for isolating phosphopeptides from proteolytically digested plasma membranes of Arabidopsis thaliana. After a mass spectrometric...... analysis of the resulting peptides we could identify 10 different phosphorylation sites in plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases AHA1, AHA2, AHA3, and AHA4/11, five of which have not been reported before, bringing the total number of phosphosites up to 11, which is substantially higher than reported so far for any...... phosphosites identified in AHA2 were identical in the plant and fungal systems even though none of the target sequences in AHA2 show homology to proteins of the fungal host. These findings suggest an unexpected accessibility of the terminal regulatory domain of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase to protein kinase...

  8. Identification of frog photoreceptor plasma and disk membrane proteins by radioiodination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, P.L.; Bownds, M.D.

    1987-03-24

    Several functions have been identified for the plasma membrane of the rod outer segment, including control of light-dependent changes in sodium conductance and a sodium-calcium exchange mechanism. However, little is known about its constituent proteins. Intact rod outer segments substantially free of contaminants were prepared in the dark and purified on a density gradient of Percoll. Surface proteins were then labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination, and intact rod outer segments were reisolated. Membrane proteins were identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. The surface proteins labeled included rhodopsin, the major membrane protein, and 12 other proteins. To compare the protein composition of plasma membrane with that of the internal disk membrane, purified rod outer segments were lysed by hypotonic disruption or freeze-thawing, and plasma plus disk membranes were radioiodinated. In these membrane preparations, rhodopsin was the major iodinated constituent, with 12 other proteins also labeled. Autoradiographic evidence indicated some differences in protein composition between disk and plasma membranes. A quantitative comparison of the two samples showed that labeling of two proteins, 24 kilodaltons (kDa) and 13 kDa, was enriched in the plasma membrane, while labeling of a 220-kDa protein was enriched in the disk membrane. These plasma membrane proteins may be associated with important functions such as the light-sensitive conductance and the sodium-calcium exchanger.

  9. TFEB activation promotes the recruitment of lysosomal glycohydrolases β-hexosaminidase and β-galactosidase to the plasma membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magini, Alessandro [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Department of Medical and Biological Sciences (DSMB), University of Udine, Udine (Italy); Polchi, Alice; Urbanelli, Lorena [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Cesselli, Daniela; Beltrami, Antonio [Department of Medical and Biological Sciences (DSMB), University of Udine, Udine (Italy); Tancini, Brunella [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Emiliani, Carla, E-mail: carla.emiliani@unipg.it [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •TFEB activation promotes the increase of Hex and Gal activities. •The increase of Hex and Gal activities is related to transcriptional regulation. •TFEB promotes the recruitment of mature Hex and Gal on cell surface. -- Abstract: Lysosomes are membrane-enclosed organelles containing acid hydrolases. They mediate a variety of physiological processes, such as cellular clearance, lipid homeostasis, energy metabolism and pathogen defence. Lysosomes can secrete their content through a process called lysosome exocytosis in which lysosomes fuse with the plasma membrane realising their content into the extracellular milieu. Lysosomal exocytosis is not only responsible for the secretion of lysosomal enzymes, but it also has a crucial role in the plasma membrane repair. Recently, it has been demonstrated that lysosome response to the physiologic signals is regulated by the transcription factor EB (TFEB). In particular, lysosomal secretion is transcriptionally regulated by TFEB which induces both the docking and fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane. In this work we demonstrated that TFEB nuclear translocation is accompanied by an increase of mature glycohydrolases β-hexosaminidase and β-galactosidase on cell surface. This evidence contributes to elucidate an unknown TFEB biological function leading the lysosomal glycohydrolases on plasma membrane.

  10. Photosynthetic control of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in Vallisneria leaves. I. Regulation of activity during light-induced membrane hyperpolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Akiko; Okazaki, Yoshiji; Takagi, Shingo

    2002-04-01

    In mesophyll cells of the aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, red, blue, or blue plus far-red light induced a typical membrane hyperpolarization, whereas far-red light alone had little effect. Both N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, a potent inhibitor of H+-ATPase, and carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, an uncoupler, produced a considerable membrane depolarization in the dark-adapted cells and a complete suppression of the light-induced hyperpolarization. Although 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, did not affect the membrane potential in darkness, it completely inhibited the light-induced membrane hyperpolarization. In vivo illumination of the leaves with red light caused a substantial decrease in the Km for ATP, not only of the vanadate-sensitive ATP-hydrolyzing activity in leaf homogenate, but also of the ATP-dependent H+-transporting activity in plasma membrane (PM) vesicles isolated from the leaves by aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning methods. The effects of red light were negated by the presence of DCMU during illumination. In vivo illumination with far-red light had no effect on the Km for ATP of H+-transporting activity. These results strongly suggest that an electrogenic component in the membrane potential of the mesophyll cell is generated by the PM H+-ATPase, and that photosynthesis-dependent modulation of the enzymatic activity of the PM H+-ATPase is involved in the light-induced membrane hyperpolarization. PMID:11941462

  11. Synchronous plasma membrane electrochemical potential oscillations during yeast colony development and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palková, Zdena; Váchová, Libuse; Gásková, Dana; Kucerová, Helena

    2009-05-01

    Microorganisms that survive in natural environments form organized multicellular communities, biofilms and colonies with specific properties. During stress and nutrient limitation, slow growing and senescent cells in such communities retain vital processes by maintaining plasma membrane integrity and retaining the ability to generate transmembrane electrochemical gradients. We report the use of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonial model to show that population growth in a multicellular community depends on nutrient diffusion and that resting cells start to accumulate from the beginning of the second acidic phase of colony development. Despite differentiation of colony members, synchronous transmembrane potential oscillation was detected in the organized colony. The electrochemical membrane potential periodically oscillated at frequencies between those for circadian to infradian rhythms during colony aging and transiently decreased at time points previously linked with rebuilding of yeast metabolism. Despite extensive decreases in the intracellular ATP concentration and in the amount and activity of the plasma membrane proton pump during nutrient limited growth and colony aging, the transmembrane electrochemical potential appeared to be maintained above a level critical for population survival.

  12. Immunoelectron microscopic evidence for Tetherin/BST2 as the physical bridge between HIV-1 virions and the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Hammonds

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST2 was identified in 2008 as the cellular factor responsible for restricting HIV-1 replication at a very late stage in the lifecycle. Tetherin acts to retain virion particles on the plasma membrane after budding has been completed. Infected cells that express large amounts of tetherin display large strings of HIV virions that remain attached to the plasma membrane. Vpu is an HIV-1 accessory protein that specifically counteracts the restriction to virus release contributed by tetherin. Tetherin is an unusual Type II transmembrane protein that contains a GPI anchor at its C-terminus and is found in lipid rafts. The leading model for the mechanism of action of tetherin is that it functions as a direct physical tether bridging virions and the plasma membrane. However, evidence that tetherin functions as a physical tether has thus far been indirect. Here we demonstrate by biochemical and immunoelectron microscopic methods that endogenous tetherin is present on the viral particle and forms a bridge between virion particles and the plasma membrane. Endogenous tetherin was found on HIV particles that were released by partial proteolytic digestion. Immunoelectron microscopy performed on HIV-infected T cells demonstrated that tetherin forms an apparent physical link between virions and connects patches of virions to the plasma membrane. Linear filamentous strands that were highly enriched in tetherin bridged the space between some virions. We conclude that tetherin is the physical tether linking HIV-1 virions and the plasma membrane. The presence of filaments with which multiple molecules of tetherin interact in connecting virion particles is strongly suggested by the morphologic evidence.

  13. PIST regulates the intracellular trafficking and plasma membrane expression of Cadherin 23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshima Kazuo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The atypical cadherin protein cadherin 23 (CDH23 is crucial for proper function of retinal photoreceptors and inner ear hair cells. As we obtain more and more information about the specific roles of cadherin 23 in photoreceptors and hair cells, the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the transport of this protein to the plasma membrane are largely unknown. Results PIST, a Golgi-associated, PDZ domain-containing protein, interacted with cadherin 23 via the PDZ domain of PIST and the C-terminal PDZ domain-binding interface (PBI of cadherin 23. By binding to cadherin 23, PIST retained cadherin 23 in the trans-Golgi network of cultured cells. The retention was released when either of the two known cadherin 23-binding proteins MAGI-1 and harmonin was co-expressed. Similar to MAGI-1 and harmonin, PIST was detected in mouse inner ear sensory hair cells. Conclusions PIST binds cadherin 23 via its PDZ domain and retains cadherin 23 in trans-Golgi network. MAGI-1 and harmonin can compete with PIST for binding cadherin 23 and release cadherin 23 from PIST's retention. Our finding suggests that PIST, MAGI-1 and harmonin collaborate in intracellular trafficking of cadherin 23 and regulate the plasma membrane expression of cadherin 23.

  14. Myosin light chain kinase and Src control membrane dynamics in volume recovery from cell swelling

    OpenAIRE

    Barfod, Elisabeth T.; Moore, Ann L.; Van de Graaf, Benjamin G.; Steven D Lidofsky

    2011-01-01

     The expansion of the plasma membrane, which occurs during osmotic swelling of epithelia, must be retrieved for volume recovery, but the mechanisms are unknown. Here we have identified myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) as a regulator of membrane internalization in response to osmotic swelling in a model liver cell line. On hypotonic exposure, we found that there was time-dependent phosphorylation of the MLCK substrate myosin II regulatory light chain. At the sides of the cell, MLCK and myosin ...

  15. PLASMA-MEMBRANE LIPID ALTERATIONS INDUCED BY NACL IN WINTER-WHEAT ROOTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANSOUR, MMF; VANHASSELT, PR; KUIPER, PJC

    1994-01-01

    A highly enriched plasma membrane fraction was isolated by two phase partitioning from wheat roots (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Vivant) grown with and without 100 mM NaCl. The lipids of the plasma membrane fraction were extracted and characterized. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were

  16. Monitoring the native phosphorylation state of plasma membrane proteins from a single mouse cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schindler, J.; Ye, J. Y.; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard;

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal processing in the cerebellum involves the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of various plasma membrane proteins such as AMPA or NMDA receptors. Despite the importance of changes in phosphorylation pattern, no global phospho-proteome analysis has yet been performed. As plasma membrane...

  17. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  18. The effects of applied electric fields on Micrasterias. II. The distributions of cytoplasmic and plasma membrane components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, D L; Giddings, T H

    1980-04-01

    The accompanying paper describes the effects of applied electric fields on the morphogenesis and patterns of wall deposition of growing cells of Micrasterias denticulata. This paper details the effects of electric fields (approximately 14 V cm-1) on the subcellular components of Micrasterias, including a description of the plasma membrane of growing semi-cells as visualized by freeze-fracturing. There are no gross cytoplasmic abnormalities or asymmetrics in the distributions of cytoplasmic organelles caused by the fields. In particular, neither the Large Vesicles nor Dark Vesicles are concentrated in the cathode-facing (CF) halves of lobes oriented perpendicular to the fields, where extra deposition of wall material has been shown to occur. In freeze-fracture replicas, there are about twice as many plasma membrane particles near the tips of growing lobes as there are in proximal regions of the lobes. Additionally, rosettes, consisting of 6 membrane particles, are seen predominantly in the distal parts of the lobes, and these rosettes are believed to be important in the synthesis of cell wall microfibrils. The applied fields cause a large asymmetry in the distributions of membrane particles, with larger numbers being found on the CF sides of lobes oriented perpendicular to the fields. We were not able to detect a specific effect on any class of particles. Taken all together, the data support the hypothesis that some of the factors responsible for growth localization in Micrasterias reside in the plasma membrane. PMID:7400237

  19. Lithium. Effects on excitable cell membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeger, Egbert Johan

    1974-01-01

    LITHIUM: Effects on excitable cell membranes. Lithium salts have been used in the treatment of manic-depressive psychosis for many years but their mechanism of action is not well understood. Many workers assume that the action of lithium on catecholamine metabolism and/or on electrolyte distribution

  20. Production of selective membranes using plasma deposited nanochanneled thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Amorim Motta Carvalho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydrolization of thin films obtained by tetraethoxysilane plasma polymerization results in the formation of a nanochanneled silicone like structure that could be useful for the production of selective membranes. Therefore, the aim of this work is to test the permeation properties of hydrolyzed thin films. The films were tested for: 1 permeation of polar organic compounds and/or water in gaseous phase and 2 permeation of salt in liquid phase. The efficiency of permeation was tested using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM technique in gas phase and conductimetric analysis (CA in liquid phase. The substrates used were: silicon for characterization of the deposited films, piezoelectric quartz crystals for tests of selective membranes and cellophane paper for tests of permeation. QCM analysis showed that the nanochannels allow the adsorption and/or permeation of polar organic compounds, such as acetone and 2-propanol, and water. CA showed that the films allow salt permeation after an inhibition time needed for hydrolysis of the organic radicals within the film. Due to their characteristics, the films can be used for grains protection against microorganism proliferation during storage without preventing germination.

  1. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization. PMID:27180904

  2. Liposome-based engineering of cells to package hydrophobic compounds in membrane vesicles for tumor penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junsung; Kim, Jiyoung; Jeong, Moonkyoung; Lee, Hyoungjin; Goh, Unbyeol; Kim, Hyaeyeong; Kim, Byungji; Park, Ji-Ho

    2015-05-13

    Natural membrane vesicles (MVs) derived from various types of cells play an essential role in transporting biological materials between cells. Here, we show that exogenous compounds are packaged in the MVs by engineering the parental cells via liposomes, and the MVs mediate autonomous intercellular migration of the compounds through multiple cancer cell layers. Hydrophobic compounds delivered selectively to the plasma membrane of cancer cells using synthetic membrane fusogenic liposomes were efficiently incorporated into the membrane of MVs secreted from the cells and then transferred to neighboring cells via the MVs. This liposome-mediated MV engineering strategy allowed hydrophobic photosensitizers to significantly penetrate both spheroids and in vivo tumors, thereby enhancing the therapeutic efficacy. These results suggest that innate biological transport systems can be in situ engineered via synthetic liposomes to guide the penetration of chemotherapeutics across challenging tissue barriers in solid tumors.

  3. ACTIVE CALCIUM TRANSPORT IN PLASMA MEMBRANE VESICLES FROM DEVELOPING COTYLEDONS OF COMMON BEAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄建中; 陈子元

    1995-01-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles were prepared from the developing cotyledons of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L cv Diyundou)by aqueous two-phase partitioning and characterized as to their purity by assaying marker enzymes for other membranes.The putative plasma membrane fraction was minimalyy contaminated by membranes other than plasma membrane and hence was of high purity,It exhibited a Ca2+-dependent ATPase activity,which was inhibited by 1umol/L EB and promoted by calcium ionophore A23187.Such an activity was responsible for the observed ATP dependent 45Ca2+ uptake into inside-out plasma membrane vesicles.This process was stimulated by 0.5μmol/L CaM and 20μmol/L IAA but inhibited by 2μmol/L ABA and abolished by A23187,Possible role of cytoplasmic Ca2+ in mediating phytohormones activity is discussed.

  4. Telomerase activity in plasma cell dyscrasias

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, D; Zheng, C.; Bergenbrant, S; Holm, G; Björkholm, M.; Yi, Q; Gruber, A

    2001-01-01

    Activation of telomerase is essential for in vitro cellular immortalization and tumorigenesis. In the present study, we investigated telomerase activation and its implications in plasma cell dyscrasias including monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), multiple myeloma (MM) and plasma cell leukaemia (PCL). All 5 patients with MGUS exhibited normal levels of telomerase activity in their plasma cells. Elevated telomerase activity was found in the samples from 21/27 patients wi...

  5. Visualization of plasma membrane compartmentalization by high-speed quantum dot tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M. P.; Lagerholm, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have imaged plasma membrane molecules labeled with quantum dots in live cells using a conventional wide-field microscope with high spatial precision at sampling frequencies of 1.75 kHz. Many of the resulting single molecule trajectories are sufficiently long (up to several...... thousand steps) to allow for robust single trajectory analysis. This analysis indicates that a majority of the investigated molecules are transiently confined in nanoscopic compartments with a mean size of (100-150 nm)(2) for a mean duration of 50-100 ms....

  6. Exploring the stochastic dynamics of correlated movement of receptor proteins in plasma membranes in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization plays a crucial role in the signaling process of living cells. In this study, we developed a theoretical model and performed single-molecule tracking to explore the correlated diffusion processes of liganded epidermal growth factor receptors prior to dimer formation. We disclosed that both an attractive potential between liganded receptor proteins in proximity and correlated fluctuations in the local environments of the proteins play an important role to produce the observed correlated movement of the receptors. This result can serve as the foundation to shed light on the way in which receptor functions are regulated in plasma membranes in vivo

  7. Changes in plasma membrane state of thymocytes during spontaneous and radiation-induced leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in plasma membrane properties characteristic for malignant cells were reviewed. Investigations of spontaneous (in AKR mice) and radiation-induced (in C57Bl) leukemogenesis were carried out; changes in properties of Na+, K+ ATPase and alkaline phosphatase were characterized. On the basis of the results reported a pre-leukemic stage was distinguished, corresponding to the following features at the cellular level: increase in activity of alkaline phosphatase; decrease in relative activity of Na+, K+ ATPase; decrease in efficiency of the Na+ K+ pump; decrease in cAMP content. 473 refs. (author)

  8. Usefulness of microporous hydrophobic polypropylene membranes after plasma-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid for high-power nickel-cadmium batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial microporous polypropylene (PP) membranes were modified by plasma-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid (AAc) under UV irradiation. Under optimized conditions obtained membranes are hydrophilic and may be serviceable as separator in nickel-cadmium cell. Electrolytic resistance of modified membranes is evaluated and compared with that of commercial separators: conventional cellophane separation and hydrophilic polypropylene separation (Celgard 3501). This paper reports the maximum power test data for nickel-cadmium cells equipped with different separators. Cells with modified PP membrane show very good high-rate performance

  9. Carbohydrate incorporation in plasma membranes of mouse thymocytes stimulated by concanavalin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thymocytes from CBA/J mice were stimulated with concanavalin A. Incorporation of various carbohydrates labelled with 14C and T, leucine and thymidine into trichloroacetic-acid-precipitable material was compared in stimulated and control cells. Incorporation of all carbohydrates, was enhanced in concanavalin-A-treated cells. Leucine and thymidine incorporation was increased 2 and 50-fold in stimulated cultures. The kinetics of fucose, galactose, glucosamine, leucine and thymidine incorporation were studied using 10-h pulses at various times during the cultivation. The incorporation of fucose, galactose and thymidine showed two maxima 5 and 30 h after the beginning of the cultivation. No pronounced maxima were seen with glucosamine and leucine. Plasma membranes from stimulated cells were prepared by a modified procedure of McCollester. When prepared from cells radioactively labelled with fucose or galactose, the plasma membrane fraction was enriched incarbohydrate label. Gel filtration experiments showed that fucose was only attached to glycoprotein, while other carbohydrate label was distributed between glycoprotein and a fraction containing glycolipids. Analysis of hydrolysed, carbohydrate-labelled membranes by paper chromatography and paper electrophoresis revealed that the bulk of the fucose and galactose label had not been converted into other substances, although some (10%) galactose is converted into glucose. Mannose label had been partially (14%) converted into fucose. Glucosamine label was found to be distributed in sialic acid (25%), glucosamine (40%), galactosamine (30%) and neutral compounds (5%). The data are discussed in relation to the sequence of biochemical events occurring at the cell surface during stimulation of thymocytes with concanavalin A. (orig.)

  10. Imaging approaches for analysis of cholesterol distribution and dynamics in the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Modzel, Maciej; Lund, Frederik W; Lomholt, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol is an important lipid component of the plasma membrane (PM) of mammalian cells, where it is involved in control of many physiological processes, such as endocytosis, cell migration, cell signalling and surface ruffling. In an attempt to explain these functions of cholesterol, several models have been put forward about cholesterol's lateral and transbilayer organization in the PM. In this article, we review imaging techniques developed over the last two decades for assessing the distribution and dynamics of cholesterol in the PM of mammalian cells. Particular focus is on fluorescence techniques to study the lateral and inter-leaflet distribution of suitable cholesterol analogues in the PM of living cells. We describe also several methods for determining lateral cholesterol dynamics in the PM including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), single particle tracking (SPT) and spot variation FCS coupled to stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. For proper interpretation of such measurements, we provide some background in probe photophysics and diffusion phenomena occurring in cell membranes. In particular, we show the equivalence of the reaction-diffusion approach, as used in FRAP and FCS, and continuous time random walk (CTRW) models, as often invoked in SPT studies. We also discuss mass spectrometry (MS) based imaging of cholesterol in the PM of fixed cells and compare this method with fluorescence imaging of sterols. We conclude that evidence from many experimental techniques converges towards a model of a homogeneous distribution of cholesterol with largely free and unhindered diffusion in both leaflets of the PM. PMID:27016337

  11. Key steps in type III secretion system (T3SS) towards translocon assembly with potential sensor at plant plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongtao; Dong, Hansong

    2015-09-01

    Many plant- and animal-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria employ the type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins from bacterial cells into the cytosol of eukaryotic host cells. The effector translocation occurs through an integral component of T3SS, the channel-like translocon, assembled by hydrophilic and hydrophobic proteinaceous translocators in a two-step process. In the first, hydrophilic translocators localize to the tip of a proteinaceous needle in animal pathogens, or a proteinaceous pilus in plant pathogens, and associate with hydrophobic translocators, which insert into host plasma membranes in the second step. However, the pilus needs to penetrate plant cell walls in advance. All hydrophilic translocators so far identified in plant pathogens are characteristic of harpins: T3SS accessory proteins containing a unitary hydrophilic domain or an additional enzymatic domain. Two-domain harpins carrying a pectate lyase domain potentially target plant cell walls and facilitate the penetration of the pectin-rich middle lamella by the bacterial pilus. One-domain harpins target plant plasma membranes and may play a crucial role in translocon assembly, which may also involve contrapuntal associations of hydrophobic translocators. In all cases, sensory components in the target plasma membrane are indispensable for the membrane recognition of translocators and the functionality of the translocon. The conjectural sensors point to membrane lipids and proteins, and a phosphatidic acid and an aquaporin are able to interact with selected harpin-type translocators. Interactions between translocators and their sensors at the target plasma membrane are assumed to be critical for translocon assembly.

  12. Preparation and characteristics of acrylic acid/styrene composite plasma polymerized membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma polymerization has gained increasing interest for the deposition of functional plasma-polymerized membranes suitable for a wide range of applications on account of its advantageous features. In this work, acrylic acid/styrene composite plasma polymerized membranes were synthesized by plasma polymerization of a mixture of acrylic acid and styrene monomers in a low-frequency after-glow capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) discharge process. The structure and composition of the plasma polymerized membranes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the partial pressure ratio between acrylic acid (AA) and styrene (St), applied discharge power and the energy of the extracted particles have considerable effects on the structure and the content of functional groups of the deposited membranes.

  13. Characterization of freeze-fractured epithelial plasma membranes on nanometer scale with ToF-SIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draude, Felix; Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Müthing, Johannes; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F

    2015-03-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to characterize the freeze-fracturing process of human epithelial PANC-1 and UROtsa cells. For this purpose, phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine standard samples were investigated to find specific signals with both high specificity and signal intensity. The results were used to investigate single cells of subconfluent cell layers prepared with a special silicon wafer sandwich preparation technique. This freeze-fracturing technique strips cell membranes off the cells, isolating them on opposing silicon wafer substrates. Criteria were found for defining regions with stripped off cell membranes and, on the opposing wafer, complementary regions with the remaining cells. Measured ethanolamine/choline and serine/choline ratios in these regions clearly showed that in the freeze-fracturing process, the lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane is split along its central zone. Accordingly, only the outer lipid monolayer is stripped off the cell, while the inner lipid monolayer remains attached to the cell on the opposing wafer, thus allowing detailed analysis of a single lipid monolayer. Furthermore, it could be shown that using different washing procedures did not influence the transmembrane lipid distribution. Under optimized preparation conditions, it became feasible to detect lipids with a lateral resolution of approximately 100 nm. The data indicate that ToF-SIMS would be a very useful technique to study with very high lateral resolution changes in lipid composition caused, for example, by lipid storage diseases or pharmaceuticals that interfere with the lipid metabolism.

  14. A plasma membrane H+-ATPase is required for the formation of proanthocyanidins in the seed coat endothelium of Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan R Baxter; Young, Jeffery C.; Armstrong, Gordon; Foster, Nathan; Bogenschutz, Naomi; Cordova, Tatiana; Peer, Wendy Ann; Hazen, Samuel P.; Murphy, Angus S.; Harper, Jeffrey F.

    2005-01-01

    The plasma membrane in plant cells is energized with an electrical potential and proton gradient generated through the action of H+ pumps belonging to the P-type ATPase superfamily. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 11 plasma membrane H+ pumps. Auto-inhibited H+-ATPase isoform 10 (AHA10) is expressed primarily in developing seeds. Here we show that four independent gene disruptions of AHA10 result in seed coats with a transparent testa (tt) phenotype (light-colored seeds). A quantitative analysi...

  15. Flow cytometric immunophenotypic characteristics of plasma cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kruk

    2011-04-01

    > CD29 > CD56 > CD18 > CD11b > CD11a. Immuno-phenotyping of plasma cells in PCL, as in multiple myeloma, might be useful in detecting minimal residual disease in cases with aberrant antigen expression and for selecting therapeutic agents towards specific membrane targets. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 1, pp. 168–182

  16. Stomatocyte–discocyte–echinocyte sequence of the human red blood cell: Evidence for the bilayer– couple hypothesis from membrane mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim H. W., Gerald; Wortis, Michael; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2002-01-01

    Red-cell shape is encoded in the mechanical properties of the membrane. The plasma membrane contributes bending rigidity; the protein-based membrane skeleton contributes stretch and shear elasticity. When both effects are included, membrane mechanics can reproduce in detail the full stomatocyte–discocyte–echinocyte sequence by variation of a single parameter related to the bilayer couple originally introduced by Sheetz and Singer [Sheetz, M. P. & Singer, S. J. (1974) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 71, 4457–4461]. PMID:12471152

  17. Properties of Plasma Membrane from Pea Root Seedlings under Altered Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchuk, D.; Baranenko, V.; Vorobyova, T. V.; Kurylenko, I.; Chyzhykova, O.; Dubovoy, V.

    In this study, the properties of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plasma membrane were examined to determine how the membrane structure and functions are regulated in response to clinorotation (2 rev/min) conditions. Membrane preparations enriched by plasma membrane vesicles were obtained by aqueous two-phase partitioning from 6-day seedling roots. The specific characteristics of H^+-ATPase, lípid composition and peroxidation intensity as well as fluidity of lipid bilayer were analysed. ATP hydrolytic activity was inhibited by ortovanadate and was insensitive to aside and nitrate in sealed plasma membrane vesicles isolated from both clinorotated and control seedlings. Plasma membrane vesicles from clinorotated seedlings in comparison to controls were characterised by increase in the total lipid/protein ratio, ATP hydrolytic activity and intensifying of lipid peroxidation. Sitosterol and campesterol were the predominant free sterol species. Clinorotated seedlings contained a slightly higher level of unsaturated fatty acid than controls. Plasma membrane vesicles were labelled with pyrene and fluorescence originating from monomeric (I_M) molecules and excimeric (I_E) aggregates were measured. The calculated I_E/I_M values were higher in clinorotated seedlings compared with controls reflecting the reduction in membrane microviscosity. The involvement of the changes in plasma membrane lipid content and composition, fluidity and H^+-ATPase activity in response of pea seedlings to altered gravity is discussed.

  18. Imaging lipid domains in cell membranes: the advent of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan Myers Owen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The lipid bilayer of model membranes, liposomes reconstituted from cell lipids, and plasma membrane vesicles and spheres can separate into two distinct liquid phases to yield lipid domains with liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered properties. These observations are the basis of the lipid raft hypothesis that postulates the existence of cholesterol-enriched ordered-phase lipid domains in cell membranes that could regulate protein mobility, localization and interaction. Here we review the evidence that nano-scaled lipid complexes and meso-scaled lipid domains exist in cell membranes and how new fluorescence microscopy techniques that overcome the diffraction limit provide new insights into lipid organization in cell membranes.

  19. The Synthetic Amphipathic Peptidomimetic LTX109 Is a Potent Fungicide That Disturbs Plasma Membrane Integrity in a Sphingolipid Dependent Manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus; Torbensen, Rasmus; Larsen, Camilla Eggert;

    2013-01-01

    The peptidomimetic LTX109 (arginine-tertbutyl tryptophan-arginine-phenylethan) was previously shown to have antibacterial properties. Here, we investigated the activity of this novel antimicrobial peptidomimetic on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that LTX109 was an efficient fungicid...... observations are consistent with a model in which LTX109 kills S. cerevisiae by nonspecific destabilization of the plasma membrane through direct or indirect interaction with the sphingolipids....... that killed all viable cells in an exponentially growing population as well as a large proportion of cells in biofilm formed on an abiotic surface. LTX109 had similar killing kinetics to the membrane-permeabilizing fungicide amphotericin B, which led us to investigate the ability of LTX109 to disrupt plasma...... membrane integrity. S. cerevisiae cells exposed to a high concentration of LTX109 showed rapid release of potassium and amino acids, suggesting that LTX109 acted by destabilizing the plasma membrane. This was supported by the finding that cells were permeable to the fluorescent nucleic acid stain SYTOX...

  20. Microfluidic microbial fuel cells: from membrane to membrane free

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ye, Dingding; Li, Jun; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang; Zhang, Biao

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidic microbial fuel cells (MMFCs) are small carbon-neutral devices that use self-organized bacteria to degrade organic substrates and harness energy from the waste water. Conventional MMFCs have made great strides in the past decade and have overcome some limitations, such as high capital costs and low energy output. A co-laminar flow MFC has been first proposed in 2011 with the potential to be an attractively power source to niche applications. Co-laminar MFCs typically operate without any physical membranes separating the reactants, and bacterial ecosystems can be easily manipulated by regulating the inlet conditions. This paper highlights recent accomplishments in the development of co-laminar MFCs, emphasizing basic principles, mass transport and fluid dynamics including boundary layer theory, entrance conditions and mixing zone issues. Furthermore, the development of current techniques, major challenges and the potential research directions are discussed.

  1. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical localization of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4 in Ca2+-transporting epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Beggs, Megan R; Zamani, Reza;

    2015-01-01

    role in transcellular Ca(2+) flux and investigated the localization and regulation of Pmca4 in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia. Using antibodies directed specifically against Pmca4, we found it expressed only in the smooth muscle layer of mouse and human intestine, while pan-specific Pmca antibodies...... the cortical thick ascending limbs, macula densa, and early distal tubules as well as smooth muscle layers surrounding renal vessels. In human kidney, a similar pattern of distribution was observed, with highest PMCA4 expression in NCC positive tubules. Electron microscopy demonstrated Pmca4 localization...... in distal nephron cells at both the basolateral membrane and intracellular perinuclear compartments, but not submembranous vesicles, suggesting rapid trafficking to the plasma membrane is unlikely to occur in vivo. Pmca4 expression was not altered by perturbations in Ca(2+) balance, pointing...

  2. The Role of the Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase in Plant-Microbe Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James Mitch Elmore; Gitta Coaker

    2011-01-01

    T Plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPases are the primary pumps responsible for the establishment of cellular membrane potential in plants. In addition to regulating basic aspects of plant cell function, these enzymes contribute to signaling events in response to diverse environmental stimuli. Here, we focus on the roles of the PM H+-ATPase during plantpathogen interactions. PM H+-ATPases are dynamically regulated during plant immune responses and recent quantitative proteomics studies suggest complex spatial and temporal modulation of PM H+-ATPase activity during early pathogen recognition events. Additional data indicate that PM H+-ATPases cooperate with the plant immune signaling protein RIN4 to regulate stomatal apertures during bacterial invasion of leaf tissue. Furthermore, pathogens have evolved mechanisms to manipulate PM H+-ATPase activity during infection. Thus, these ubiquitous plant enzymes contribute to plant immune responses and are targeted by pathogens to increase plant susceptibility.

  3. Determination of CFTR densities in erythrocyte plasma membranes using recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebner, Andreas; Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Nikova, Dessy; Lange, Tobias; Bruns, Reimer; Oberleithner, Hans; Schillers, Hermann [Institute of Physiology II, University of Muenster, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Haeberle, Johannes; Falk, Sabine; Duebbers, Angelika [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals of Muenster, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)], E-mail: schille@uni-muenster.de

    2008-09-24

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl{sup -}) channel that plays an important role in salt and fluid movement across epithelia. Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR. The most predominant mutation, F508del, disturbs CFTR protein trafficking, resulting in a reduced number of CFTR in the plasma membrane. Recent studies indicate that CFTR is not only found in epithelia but also in human erythrocytes. Although considerable attempts have been made to quantify CFTR in cells, conclusions on numbers of CFTR molecules localized in the plasma membrane have been drawn indirectly. AFM has the power to provide the needed information, since both sub-molecular spatial resolution and direct protein recognition via antibody-antigen interaction can be observed. We performed a quantification study of the CFTR copies in erythrocyte membranes at the single molecule level, and compared the difference between healthy donors and CF patients. We detected that the number of CFTR molecules is reduced by 70% in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients.

  4. Determination of CFTR densities in erythrocyte plasma membranes using recognition imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Andreas; Nikova, Dessy; Lange, Tobias; Häberle, Johannes; Falk, Sabine; Dübbers, Angelika; Bruns, Reimer; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Schillers, Hermann

    2008-09-01

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl-) channel that plays an important role in salt and fluid movement across epithelia. Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR. The most predominant mutation, F508del, disturbs CFTR protein trafficking, resulting in a reduced number of CFTR in the plasma membrane. Recent studies indicate that CFTR is not only found in epithelia but also in human erythrocytes. Although considerable attempts have been made to quantify CFTR in cells, conclusions on numbers of CFTR molecules localized in the plasma membrane have been drawn indirectly. AFM has the power to provide the needed information, since both sub-molecular spatial resolution and direct protein recognition via antibody-antigen interaction can be observed. We performed a quantification study of the CFTR copies in erythrocyte membranes at the single molecule level, and compared the difference between healthy donors and CF patients. We detected that the number of CFTR molecules is reduced by 70% in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients.

  5. A conserved cysteine residue is involved in disulfide bond formation between plant plasma membrane aquaporin monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd P; Cavez, Damien; Besserer, Arnaud; Berny, Marie C; Gilis, Dimitri; Rooman, Marianne; Chaumont, François

    2012-07-01

    AQPs (aquaporins) are conserved in all kingdoms of life and facilitate the rapid diffusion of water and/or other small solutes across cell membranes. Among the different plant AQPs, PIPs (plasma membrane intrinsic proteins), which fall into two phylogenetic groups, PIP1 and PIP2, play key roles in plant water transport processes. PIPs form tetramers in which each monomer acts as a functional channel. The intermolecular interactions that stabilize PIP oligomer complexes and are responsible for the resistance of PIP dimers to denaturating conditions are not well characterized. In the present study, we identified a highly conserved cysteine residue in loop A of PIP1 and PIP2 proteins and demonstrated by mutagenesis that it is involved in the formation of a disulfide bond between two monomers. Although this cysteine seems not to be involved in regulation of trafficking to the plasma membrane, activity, substrate selectivity or oxidative gating of ZmPIP1s (Zm is Zea mays), ZmPIP2s and hetero-oligomers, it increases oligomer stability under denaturating conditions. In addition, when PIP1 and PIP2 are co-expressed, the loop A cysteine of ZmPIP1;2, but not that of ZmPIP2;5, is involved in the mercury sensitivity of the channels.

  6. Confined diffusion of transmembrane proteins and lipids induced by the same actin meshwork lining the plasma membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, Takahiro K.; Iwasawa, Kokoro; Kalay, Ziya; Tsunoyama, Taka A.; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yasuhiro M Umemura; Murakoshi, Hideji; Suzuki, Kenichi G. N.; Nemoto, Yuri L.; Morone, Nobuhiro; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the diffusion rate in the plasma membrane (PM) is regulated remain unresolved, despite their importance in spatially regulating the reaction rates in the PM. Proposed models include entrapment in nanoscale noncontiguous domains found in PtK2 cells, slow diffusion due to crowding, and actin-induced compartmentalization. Here, by applying single-particle tracking at high time resolutions, mainly to the PtK2-cell PM, we found confined diffusion plus hop movements (termed ...

  7. A structural overview of the plasma membrane Na+,K+-ATPase and H+-ATPase ion pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morth, Jens Preben; Pedersen, Bjørn Panella; Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe;

    2011-01-01

    transport systems that are responsible for uptake and extrusion of metabolites and other ions. The ion gradients are also both directly and indirectly used to control pH homeostasis and to regulate cell volume. The plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase maintains a proton gradient in plants and fungi and the Na......(+),K(+)-ATPase maintains a Na(+) and K(+) gradient in animal cells. Structural information provides insight into the function of these two distinct but related P-type pumps....

  8. Construction of an artificial cell memb