WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell physiological phenomena

  1. Mechanisms and effective control of physiological browning phenomena in plant cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan-Shan; Fu, Chun-Hua; Su, Peng; Xu, Xiang-Ping; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Chun-Fang; Yu, Long-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Browning phenomena are ubiquitous in plant cell cultures that severely hamper scientific research and widespread application of plant cell cultures. Up to now, this problem still has not been well controlled due to the unclear browning mechanisms in plant cell cultures. In this paper, the mechanisms were investigated using two typical materials with severe browning phenomena, Taxus chinensis and Glycyrrhiza inflata cells. Our results illustrated that the browning is attributed to a physiological enzymatic reaction, and phenolic biosynthesis regulated by sugar plays a decisive role in the browning. Furthermore, to confirm the specific compounds which participate in the enzymatic browning reaction, transcriptional profile and metabolites of T. chinensis cells, and UV scanning and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) profile of the browning compounds extracted from the brown-turned medium were analyzed, flavonoids derived from phenylpropanoid pathway were found to be the main compounds, and myricetin and quercetin were deduced to be the main substrates of the browning reaction. Inhibition of flavonoid biosynthesis can prevent the browning occurrence, and the browning is effectively controlled via blocking flavonoid biosynthesis by gibberellic acid (GA3 ) as an inhibitor, which further confirms that flavonoids mainly contribute to the browning. On the basis above, a model elucidating enzymatic browning mechanisms in plant cell cultures was put forward, and effective control approaches were presented. PMID:26333689

  2. Biomedical Signals and Sensors I Linking Physiological Phenomena and Biosignals

    CERN Document Server

    Kaniusas, Eugenijus

    2012-01-01

    This two-volume set focuses on the interface between physiologic mechanisms and diagnostic human engineering. Today numerous biomedical sensors are commonplace in clinical practice. The registered biosignals reflect mostly vital physiologic phenomena. In order to adequately apply biomedical sensors and reasonably interpret the corresponding biosignals, a proper understanding of the involved physiologic phenomena, their influence on the registered biosignals, and the technology behind the sensors is necessary. The first volume is devoted to the interface between physiologic mechanisms and arising biosignals, whereas the second volume is focussed on the interface between biosignals and biomedical sensors. The physiologic mechanisms behind the biosignals are described from the basic cellular level up to their advanced mutual coordination level during sleep. The arising biosignals are discussed within the scope of vital physiologic phenomena to foster their understanding and comprehensive analysis.

  3. Epigenetics: new concepts of old phenomena in vascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Bernardo; Sobrevia, Luis; Casanello, Paola

    2009-10-01

    The hypothesis of 'Developmental Origins of Health and Disease' (DOHaD) relies on the presence of mechanisms sensing and signalling a diversity of stimuli during fetal development. The mechanisms that have been broadly suggested to be involved in these processes are the epigenetic modifications that could 'record' perinatal stimuli. Since the definition of epigenetic and the associated mechanisms are conflictive, in this review epigenetic was defined as 'chromosome-based mechanisms that can change the phenotypic plasticity in a cell or organism'. The most understood epigenetic mechanisms (i.e. DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications (PTM), ATP-dependent chromatin modifications and non-coding RNAs) and reported evidence for their role in fetal programming were briefly reviewed. The development of the vascular system is strongly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms. For that reason vascular cells are good candidates to be explored regarding epigenetic programming since its proved susceptibility to be imprinted. This has been described in pregnancy diseases such as intra-uterine growth restriction, gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia, where changes in vascular function are preserved in vitro. PMID:19485890

  4. From physiological psychology to psychological physiology: Postnonclassical approach to ethnocultural phenomena.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmolov, A.G.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In modern science, along with the “classic” and “non-classical” approach to solving fundamental and applied problems, there is an actively developing “postnonclassical” research paradigm. This renovation of general scientific methodology has been accompanied by the emergence of new experimental technologies and new scientific research directions based on them. “Social psychophysiology” is one such direction. It is formed within the frame of postnonclassical methodology at the intersection of neuroscience and psychology. This work is devoted to the analytical review of the methods, achievements and prospects of contemporary social neuroscience and social psychophysiology studying brain structures that are specifically related to the implementation of social forms of behavior and intercultural communication. Physiological studies of brain activity during social interaction processes, which are simulated using virtual reality environments, are analyzed, and the physiological approach to the study of the brain mechanisms associated with social perception, social cognition and social behavior is used. Along with the analysis of psychophysiological studies of the mechanisms of social perception and social cognition, we discuss the theories of “Brain Reading” and “Theory of Mind” and the underlying data concerning “Gnostic neurons recognition of persons and recognition of emotional facial expressions”, “mirror neurons”, “emotional resonance” and “cognitive resonance”. Particular emphasis is placed on the discussion of a fundamentally new trend in the study of the relationship between the brain and culture (i.e., “cultural neuroscience”. Related to this connection, the following topics are raised: physiological mechanisms protecting the “individual distance” in communication between members of a personified community, psychophysiological approaches to the study of cross-cultural differences, physiological

  5. Isolated muscle cells as a physiological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, M; Hauschka, S D; Hall, Z W; Eisenberg, B R; Horn, R; Walsh, J V; Tsien, R W; Jones, A W; Walker, J L; Poenie, M

    1987-09-01

    Summary of a symposium presented by the American Physiological Society (Cell and General Physiology Section and Muscle Group) at the 70th Annual Meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, St. Louis, Missouri, April 15, 1986, chaired by M. Lieberman and F. Fay. This symposium reflects a growing interest in seeking new technologies to study the basic physiological and biophysical properties of cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle cells. Recognizing that technical and analytical problems associated with multicellular preparations limit the physiological significance of many experiments, investigators have increasingly focused on efforts to isolate single, functional embryonic, and adult muscle cells. Progress in obtaining physiologically relevant preparations has been both rapid and significant even though problems regarding cell purification and viability are not fully resolved. The symposium draws attention to a broad, though incomplete, range of studies using isolated or cultured muscle cells. Based on the following reports, investigators should be convinced that a variety of experiments can be designed with preparations of isolated cells and those in tissue culture to resolve questions about fundamental physiological properties of muscle cells. PMID:2443014

  6. Cell volume regulation: physiology and pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, I H; Hoffmann, E K; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig

    2008-01-01

    Cell volume perturbation initiates a wide array of intracellular signalling cascades, leading to protective and adaptive events and, in most cases, activation of volume-regulatory osmolyte transport, water loss, and hence restoration of cell volume and cellular function. Cell volume is challenged....../hypernatremia. On the other hand, it has recently become clear that an increase or reduction in cell volume can also serve as a specific signal in the regulation of physiological processes such as transepithelial transport, cell migration, proliferation and death. Although the mechanisms by which cell volume...... perturbations are sensed are still far from clear, significant progress has been made with respect to the nature of the sensors, transducers and effectors that convert a change in cell volume into a physiological response. In the present review, we summarize recent major developments in the field, and emphasize...

  7. Macroscopic Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian

    An increasing need for energy efficiency and high energy density has sparked a growing interest in direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications. This type of fuel cell directly generates electricity from a fuel mixture consisting of methanol and water. Although this technology...... surpasses batteries in important areas, fundamental research is still required to improve durability and performance. Particularly the transport of methanol and water within the cell structure is difficult to study in-situ. A demand therefore exist for the fundamental development of mathematical models for...... studying their transport. In this PhD dissertation the macroscopic transport phenomena governing direct methanol fuel cell operation are analyzed, discussed and modeled using the two-fluid approach in the computational fluid dynamics framework of CFX 14. The overall objective of this work is to extend the...

  8. Fluid models and simulations of biological cell phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, H. P.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamics of coated droplets are examined within the context of biofluids. Of specific interest is the manner in which the shape of a droplet, the motion within it as well as that of aggregates of droplets can be controlled by the modulation of surface properties and the extent to which such fluid phenomena are an intrinsic part of cellular processes. From the standpoint of biology, an objective is to elucidate some of the general dynamical features that affect the disposition of an entire cell, cell colonies and tissues. Conventionally averaged field variables of continuum mechanics are used to describe the overall global effects which result from the myriad of small scale molecular interactions. An attempt is made to establish cause and effect relationships from correct dynamical laws of motion rather than by what may have been unnecessary invocation of metabolic or life processes. Several topics are discussed where there are strong analogies droplets and cells including: encapsulated droplets/cell membranes; droplet shape/cell shape; adhesion and spread of a droplet/cell motility and adhesion; and oams and multiphase flows/cell aggregates and tissues. Evidence is presented to show that certain concepts of continuum theory such as suface tension, surface free energy, contact angle, bending moments, etc. are relevant and applicable to the study of cell biology.

  9. Computer support for physiological cell modelling using an ontology on cell physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Shimayoshi; Kazuhiro, Komurasaki; Akira, Amano; Takeshi, Iwashita; Masanori, Kanazawa; Tetsuya, Matsuda

    2006-01-01

    The development of electrophysiological whole cell models to support the understanding of biological mechanisms is increasing rapidly. Due to the complexity of biological systems, comprehensive cell models, which are composed of many imported sub-models of functional elements, can get quite complicated as well, making computer modification difficult. Here, we propose a computer support to enhance structural changes of cell models, employing the markup languages CellML and our original PMSML (physiological model structure markup language), in addition to a new ontology for cell physiological modelling. In particular, a method to make references from CellML files to the ontology and a method to assist manipulation of model structures using markup languages together with the ontology are reported. Using these methods three software utilities, including a graphical model editor, are implemented. Experimental results proved that these methods are effective for the modification of electrophysiological models. PMID:17946607

  10. Prohibitin( PHB) roles in granulosa cell physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Indrajit; Thomas, Kelwyn; Thompson, Winston E

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian granulosa cells (GC) play an important role in the growth and development of the follicle in the process known as folliculogenesis. In the present review, we focus on recent developments in prohibitin (PHB) research in relation to GC physiological functions. PHB is a member of a highly conserved eukaryotic protein family containing the repressor of estrogen activity (REA)/stomatin/PHB/flotillin/HflK/C (SPFH) domain (also known as the PHB domain) found in diverse species from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. PHB is ubiquitously expressed in a circulating free form or is present in multiple cellular compartments including mitochondria, nucleus and plasma membrane. In mitochondria, PHB is anchored to the mitochondrial inner membrane and forms complexes with the ATPases associated with proteases having diverse cellular activities. PHB continuously shuttles between the mitochondria, cytosol and nucleus. In the nucleus, PHB interacts with various transcription factors and modulates transcriptional activity directly or through interactions with chromatin remodeling proteins. Many functions have been attributed to the mitochondrial and nuclear PHB complexes such as cellular differentiation, anti-proliferation, morphogenesis and maintenance of the functional integrity of the mitochondria. However, to date, the regulation of PHB expression patterns and GC physiological functions are not completely understood. PMID:26496733

  11. Using measures of single-cell physiology and physiological state to understand organismic aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Alexander; Driscoll, Monica; Brent, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Genetically identical organisms in homogeneous environments have different lifespans and healthspans. These differences are often attributed to stochastic events, such as mutations and 'epimutations', changes in DNA methylation and chromatin that change gene function and expression. But work in the last 10 years has revealed differences in lifespan- and health-related phenotypes that are not caused by lasting changes in DNA or identified by modifications to DNA or chromatin. This work has demonstrated persistent differences in single-cell and whole-organism physiological states operationally defined by values of reporter gene signals in living cells. While some single-cell states, for example, responses to oxygen deprivation, were defined previously, others, such as a generally heightened ability to make proteins, were, revealed by direct experiment only recently, and are not well understood. Here, we review technical progress that promises to greatly increase the number of these measurable single-cell physiological variables and measureable states. We discuss concepts that facilitate use of single-cell measurements to provide insight into physiological states and state transitions. We assert that researchers will use this information to relate cell level physiological readouts to whole-organism outcomes, to stratify aging populations into groups based on different physiologies, to define biomarkers predictive of outcomes, and to shed light on the molecular processes that bring about different individual physiologies. For these reasons, quantitative study of single-cell physiological variables and state transitions should provide a valuable complement to genetic and molecular explanations of how organisms age. PMID:26616110

  12. Physiological alterations in UV-irradiated cells: liquid holding recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biochemical and physiological alterations that occur in ultraviolet irradiated cells, during liquid holding have been studied. Incubation in buffer acts not to interfer directly with the mechanic repairs but by promoting metabolic alterations that would block some irreversible and lethal physiological responses. (L.M.J.)

  13. Physiological significance of ECL-cell histamine.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, K.; Chen, D; Mattsson, H.; Sundler, F; Håkanson, R

    1998-01-01

    In the oxyntic mucosa of the mammalian stomach, histamine is stored in ECL cells and in mucosal mast cells. In the rat, at least 80 percent of oxyntic mucosal histamine resides in the ECL cells. Histamine is a key factor in the regulation of gastric acid secretion. Following depletion of ECL-cell histamine by treatment with alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (alpha-FMH), basal acid secretion was reduced, and gastrin-stimulated acid secretion was abolished. Vagally-induced acid secretion (by insulin ...

  14. Modelling solar cells with thermal phenomena taken into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is devoted to modelling properties of solar cells. The authors' electrothermal model of such cells is described. This model takes into account the influence of temperature on its characteristics. Some results of calculations and measurements of selected solar cells are presented and discussed. The good agreement between the results of calculations and measurements was obtained, which proves the correctness of the elaborated model.

  15. [Physiological regulation of hematopoietic stem cell and its molecular basis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fang; Hao, Sha; Cheng, Hui; Cheng, Tao

    2016-08-25

    As a classical type of tissue stem cells, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is the earliest discovered and has been widely applied in the clinic as a great successful example for stem cell therapy. Thus, HSC research represents a leading field in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Self-renewal, differentiation, quiescence, apoptosis and trafficking constitute major characteristics of functional HSCs. These characteristics also signify different dynamic states of HSC through physiological interactions with the microenvironment cues in vivo. This review covers our current knowledge on the physiological regulation of HSC and its underlying molecular mechanisms. It is our hope that this review will not only help our colleagues to understand how HSC is physiologically regulated but also serve as a good reference for the studies on stem cell and regenerative medicine in general. PMID:27546503

  16. Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  17. Physiology of cell volume regulation in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else K; Lambert, Ian H; Pedersen, Stine F

    2009-01-01

    cases, activation of volume regulatory osmolyte transport. After acute swelling, cell volume is regulated by the process of regulatory volume decrease (RVD), which involves the activation of KCl cotransport and of channels mediating K(+), Cl(-), and taurine efflux. Conversely, after acute shrinkage...... regulation by, e.g., membrane deformation, ionic strength, Ca(2+), protein kinases and phosphatases, cytoskeletal elements, GTP binding proteins, lipid mediators, and reactive oxygen species, upon changes in cell volume. We also discuss the nature of the upstream elements in volume sensing in vertebrate...

  18. Effect of solar-terrestrial phenomena on solar cell's efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is assumed that the solar cell efficiency of PV device is closely related to the solar irradiance, consider the solar parameter Global Solar Irradiance (G) and the meteorological parameters like daily data of Earth Skin Temperature (E), Average Temperature (T), Relative Humidity (H) and Dew Frost Point (D), for the coastal city Karachi and a non-coastal city Jacobabad, K and J is used as a subscripts for parameters of Karachi and Jacobabad respectively. All variables used here are dependent on the location (latitude and longitude) of our stations except G. To employ ARIMA modeling, the first eighteen years data is used for modeling and forecast is done for the last five years data. In most cases results show good correlation among monthly actual and monthly forecasted values of all the predictors. Next, multiple linear regression is employed to the data obtained by ARIMA modeling and models for mean monthly observed G values are constructed. For each station, two equations are constructed, the R values are above 93% for each model, showing adequacy of the fit. Our computations show that solar cell efficiency can be increased if better modeling for meteorological predictors governs the process. (author)

  19. Physiological conditions influencing regenerative potential of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaltro, Gabriella; Avitabile, Daniele; De Falco, Elena; Gambini, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are being used in the treatment of cardivovascular diseases. Here, we review the physiologic and pathologic conditions that impact the regenerative potential of stem cells in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases which include the influence of donor age and the presence of metabolic syndromes. We will also discuss strategies such as pretreatment of the recipient tissue or autologous or allogeneic stem cells by growth factors or drugs and by providing a synthetic scaffold and genetic modifications that impact the regenerative potential of stem cells. Finally, we will evaluate the current state of treatment of acute or chronic cardiovascular diseases with allogeneic stem cells. PMID:27100496

  20. Cell Physiology and Interactions of Biomaterials and Matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hunkeler, D.; Vaňková, Radomíra

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 6 (2003), s. 193-197. ISSN 0032-3918 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 840.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Biomaterials * Cell physiology * Encapsulation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  1. Solutes and cells - aspects of advection-diffusion-reaction phenomena in biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren

    2012-01-01

    the overall title of the project is Solutes and cells — aspects of advection-diffusion-reaction phenomena in biochips. The work has consisted of several projects focusing on theory, and to some extend analysis of experimental data, with advection-diffusion-reaction phenomena of solutes as the...... recurring theme. Presented in this thesis is selected parts of the results obtained, which in some cases have also been published in peer-reviewed journals or presented at conferences and meetings, as listed in Sec. 1.2. The studies of the distributions of solutes are motivated by microbiological phenomena...... distributions, as well as the biological function that is achieved from these varying solute concentration fields. While the basic equations of solute transport have been known for one and a half century, the novelty of cell-controlled high-resolution experimental data on the biological systems obtained from e...

  2. Cell volume regulation in epithelial physiology and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The physiological function of epithelia is transport of ions, nutrients, and fluid either in secretory or absorptive direction. All of these processes are closely related to cell volume changes, which are thus an integrated part of epithelial function. Transepithelial transport and cell volume re...... transporters and channels with key physiological functions in epithelia and known roles in the development of cancer in these tissues. Their roles in cell survival, cell cycle progression, and development of drug resistance in epithelial cancers will be discussed.......The physiological function of epithelia is transport of ions, nutrients, and fluid either in secretory or absorptive direction. All of these processes are closely related to cell volume changes, which are thus an integrated part of epithelial function. Transepithelial transport and cell volume...... regulation both rely on the spatially and temporally coordinated function of ion channels and transporters. In healthy epithelia, specific ion channels/transporters localize to the luminal and basolateral membranes, contributing to functional epithelial polarity. In pathophysiological processes such as...

  3. Simulation of the Internal Transport Phenomena for PEM Fuel Cells with Different Modes of Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡鸣若; 朱新坚; 顾安忠

    2004-01-01

    A numerical model for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is developed, which can simulate such basic transport phenomena as gas-liquid two-phase flow in a working fuel cell. Boundary conditions for both the conventional and the interdigitated modes of flow are presented on a three-dimensional basis. Numerical techniques for this model are discussed in detail. Validation shows good agreement between simulating results and experimental data. Furthermore, internal transport phenomena are discussed and compared for PEM fuel cells with conventional and interdigitated flows. It is found that the dead-ended structure of an interdigitated flow does increase the oxygen mass fraction and decrease the liquid water saturation in the gas diffusion layer as compared to the conventional mode of flow. However, the cathode humidification is important for an interdigitated flow to acquire better performance than a conventional flow fuel cell.

  4. Molecular anatomy and physiology of exocytosis in sensory hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Mark A; Pangršič, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Hair cells mediate our senses of hearing and balance by synaptic release of glutamate from somatic active zones (AZs). They share conserved mechanisms of exocytosis with neurons and other secretory cells of diverse form and function. Concurrently, AZs of these neuro-epithelial hair cells employ several processes that differ remarkably from those of neuronal synaptic terminals of the brain. Their unique molecular anatomy enables them to better respond to small, graded changes in membrane potential and to produce unsurpassed rates of exocytosis. Here, we focus on the AZs of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs). As in other hair cells, these AZs are occupied by a cytoplasmic extension of the presynaptic density, called the synaptic ribbon: a specialized protein complex required for normal physiological function. Some proteins found at IHC synapses are uniquely expressed or enriched there, where their disruption can beget deafness in humans and in animal models. Other proteins, essential for regulation of conventional neuronal Ca(2+)-triggered fusion, are apparently absent from IHCs. Certain common synaptic proteins appear to have extra significance at ribbon-type AZs because of their interactions with unique molecules, their unusual concentrations, or their atypical localization and regulation. We summarize the molecular-anatomical specializations that underlie the unique synaptic physiology of hair cells. PMID:22682011

  5. Analysis of transport phenomena and electrochemical reactions in a micro PEM fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-fuel cells are considered as promising electrochemical power sources in portable electronic devices. The presence of microelectromechanical system (MEMS technology makes it possible to manufacture the miniaturized fuel cell systems. The majority of research on micro-scale fuel cells is aimed at micro-power applications. Performance of micro-fuel cells are closely related to many factors, such as designs and operating conditions. CFD modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro PEM fuel cells are being used extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of the fundamental processes and to optimize the micro fuel cell designs before building a prototype for engineering application. In this research, full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a micro proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell has been developed. This comprehensive model accounts for the major transport phenomena such as convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer, electrode kinetics, transport and phase-change mechanism of water, and potential fields in a micro PEM fuel cell. The model explains many interacting, complex electrochemical, and transport phenomena that cannot be studied experimentally. Three-dimensional results of the species profiles, temperature distribution, potential distribution, and local current density distribution are presented and analysed, with the focus on the physical insight and fundamental understanding.

  6. Analysis of transport phenomena and electrochemical reactions in a micro PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadiq Al-Baghdadi, Maher A.R. [Fuel Cell Research Center, International Energy and Environment Foundation, Najaf, P.O.Box 39 (Iraq)

    2013-07-01

    Micro-fuel cells are considered as promising electrochemical power sources in portable electronic devices. The presence of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology makes it possible to manufacture the miniaturized fuel cell systems. The majority of research on micro-scale fuel cells is aimed at micro-power applications. Performance of micro-fuel cells are closely related to many factors, such as designs and operating conditions. CFD modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro PEM fuel cells are being used extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of the fundamental processes and to optimize the micro fuel cell designs before building a prototype for engineering application. In this research, full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a micro proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has been developed. This comprehensive model accounts for the major transport phenomena such as convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer, electrode kinetics, transport and phase-change mechanism of water, and potential fields in a micro PEM fuel cell. The model explains many interacting, complex electrochemical, and transport phenomena that cannot be studied experimentally. Three-dimensional results of the species profiles, temperature distribution, potential distribution, and local current density distribution are presented and analysed, with the focus on the physical insight and fundamental understanding.

  7. A Synopsis of Interfacial Phenomena in Lithium-Based Polymer Electrolyte Electrochemical Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Richard S.; Bennett, William R.

    2007-01-01

    The interfacial regions between electrode materials, electrolytes and other cell components play key roles in the overall performance of lithium-based batteries. For cell chemistries employing lithium metal, lithium alloy or carbonaceous materials (i.e., lithium-ion cells) as anode materials, a "solid electrolyte interphase" (SEI) layer forms at the anode/electrolyte interface, and the properties of this "passivating" layer significantly affect the practical cell/battery quality and performance. A thin, ionically-conducting SEI on the electrode surface can beneficially reduce or eliminate undesirable side reactions between the electrode and the electrolyte, which can result in a degradation in cell performance. The properties and phenomena attributable to the interfacial regions existing at both anode and cathode surfaces can be characterized to a large extent by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and related techniques. The intention of the review herewith is to support the future development of lithium-based polymer electrolytes by providing a synopsis of interfacial phenomena that is associated with cell chemistries employing either lithium metal or carbonaceous "composite" electrode structures which are interfaced with polymer electrolytes (i.e., "solvent-free" as well as "plasticized" polymer-binary salt complexes and single ion-conducting polyelectrolytes). Potential approaches to overcoming poor cell performance attributable to interfacial effects are discussed.

  8. Nitric oxide and thermogenesis--challenge in molecular cell physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otasevic, Vesna; Korac, Aleksandra; Buzadzic, Biljana; Stancic, Ana; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Korac, Bato

    2011-01-01

    Only recently we can link thermogenesis, mitochondria, nitric oxide, and redox regulation in biochemical terms. Currently, we are discussing these processes from the aspect of fundamental principles of molecular physiology. Thus, the present article highlights both cell physiology and the principles of the maintenance of energy homeostasis in organisms. Energy homeostasis means much more than simple combustion; adipose tissues at this point of evolution development are related to a broad spectrum of metabolic disturbances and all aspects of cellular remodeling (i.e. structural, metabolic and endocrine changes). Therefore, this paper addresses not only thermogenesis but also energy homeostasis, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production, proliferation and differentiation of brown adipocytes, their life and death, mitochondriogenesis and angiogenesis. These processes will be united by molecular players of oxidation/reduction reactions, thus creating the principles based on the redox regulation. PMID:21622264

  9. Molecular cell biology and physiology of solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Michael J.; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; Zhang, Li

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review An enormous body of research has been focused on exploring the mechanisms through which epithelial cells establish their characteristic polarity. It is clear that under normal circumstances cell–cell contacts mediated by the calcium-dependent adhesion proteins of the intercellular adhesion junctions are required to initiate complete polarization. Furthermore, formation of the tight, or occluding, junctions that limit paracellular permeability has long been thought to help to establish polarity by preventing the diffusion of membrane proteins between the two plasmalemmal domains. This review will discuss several selected kinases and protein complexes and highlight their relevance to transporting epithelial cell polarization. Recent findings Recent work has shed new light on the roles of junctional complexes in establishing and maintaining epithelial cell polarity. In addition, work from several laboratories, suggests that the formation of these junctions is tied to processes that regulate cellular energy metabolism. Summary Junctional complexes and energy sensing kinases constitute a novel class of machinery whose capacity to generate and modulate epithelial cell polarity is likely to have wide ranging and important physiological ramifications. PMID:18695392

  10. Numerical simulation of mass and energy transport phenomena in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpino, F. [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Strutture, Ambiente e Territorio (DiMSAT), University of Cassino, via Di Biasio 43, Cassino (Italy); Massarotti, N. [Dipertimento per le Tecnologie (DiT), University of Naples ' ' Parthenope' ' , Centro Direzionale, isola C4, 80143 Napoli (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) represent a very promising technology for near future energy conversion thanks to a number of advantages, including the possibility of using different fuels. In this paper, a detailed numerical model, based on a general mathematical description and on a finite element Characteristic based Split (CBS) algorithm code is employed to simulate mass and energy transport phenomena in SOFCs. The model predicts the thermodynamic quantity of interest in the fuel cell. Full details of the numerical solution obtained are presented both in terms of heat and mass transfer in the cell and in terms of electro-chemical reactions that occur in the system considered. The results obtained with the present algorithm is compared with the experimental data available in the literature for validation, showing an excellent agreement. (author)

  11. Deleterious effects of tributyltin on porcine vascular stem cells physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Chiara; Zannoni, Augusta; Bertocchi, Martina; Bianchi, Francesca; Salaroli, Roberta; Botelho, Giuliana; Bacci, Maria Laura; Ventrella, Vittoria; Forni, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The vascular functional and structural integrity is essential for the maintenance of the whole organism and it has been demonstrated that different types of vascular progenitor cells resident in the vessel wall play an important role in this process. The purpose of the present research was to observe the effect of tributyltin (TBT), a risk factor for vascular disorders, on porcine Aortic Vascular Precursor Cells (pAVPCs) in term of cytotoxicity, gene expression profile, functionality and differentiation potential. We have demonstrated that pAVPCs morphology deeply changed following TBT treatment. After 48h a cytotoxic effect has been detected and Annexin binding assay demonstrated that TBT induced apoptosis. The transcriptional profile of characteristic pericyte markers has been altered: TBT 10nM substantially induced alpha-SMA, while, TBT 500nM determined a significant reduction of all pericyte markers. IL-6 protein detected in the medium of pAVPCs treated with TBT at both doses studied and with a dose response. TBT has interfered with normal pAVPC functionality preventing their ability to support a capillary-like network. In addition TBT has determined an increase of pAVPC adipogenic differentiation. In conclusion in the present paper we have demonstrated that TBT alters the vascular stem cells in terms of structure, functionality and differentiating capability, therefore effects of TBT in blood should be deeply explored to understand the potential vascular risk associated with the alteration of vascular stem cell physiology. PMID:26965667

  12. Synchronization phenomena in mixed media of passive, excitable, and oscillatory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, A. K.; Petrov, V. S.; Averyanova, L. S.; Osipov, G. V.; Chen, W.; Drugova, O.; Chan, C. K.

    2008-09-01

    We study collective phenomena in highly heterogeneous cardiac cell culture and its models. A cardiac culture is a mixture of passive (fibroblasts), oscillatory (pacemakers), and excitable (myocytes) cells. There is also heterogeneity within each type of cell as well. Results of in vitro experiments are modelled by Luo-Rudy and FitzHugh-Nagumo systems. For oscillatory and excitable media, we focus on the transitions from fully incoherent behavior to partially coherent behavior and then to global synchronization as the coupling strength is increased. These regimes are characterized qualitatively by spatiotemporal diagrams and quantitatively by profiles of dependence of individual frequencies on coupling. We find that synchronization clusters are determined by concentric and spiral waves. These waves arising due to the heterogeneity of medium push covered cells to oscillate in synchrony. We are also interested in the influence of passive and excitable elements on the oscillatory characteristics of low- and high-dimensional ensembles of cardiac cells. The mixture of initially silent excitable and passive cells shows the transitions to oscillatory behavior. In the media of oscillatory and passive or excitable cells, the effect of oscillation death is observed.

  13. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyuan Ren

    Full Text Available A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  14. On macroscopic quantum phenomena in biomolecules and cells: from Levinthal to Hopfield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raković, Dejan; Dugić, Miroljub; Jeknić-Dugić, Jasmina; Plavšić, Milenko; Jaćimovski, Stevo; Setrajčić, Jovan

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the macroscopic quantum phenomena of the second kind, we hereby seek for a solution-in-principle of the long standing problem of the polymer folding, which was considered by Levinthal as (semi)classically intractable. To illuminate it, we applied quantum-chemical and quantum decoherence approaches to conformational transitions. Our analyses imply the existence of novel macroscopic quantum biomolecular phenomena, with biomolecular chain folding in an open environment considered as a subtle interplay between energy and conformation eigenstates of this biomolecule, governed by quantum-chemical and quantum decoherence laws. On the other hand, within an open biological cell, a system of all identical (noninteracting and dynamically noncoupled) biomolecular proteins might be considered as corresponding spatial quantum ensemble of these identical biomolecular processors, providing spatially distributed quantum solution to a single corresponding biomolecular chain folding, whose density of conformational states might be represented as Hopfield-like quantum-holographic associative neural network too (providing an equivalent global quantum-informational alternative to standard molecular-biology local biochemical approach in biomolecules and cells and higher hierarchical levels of organism, as well). PMID:25028662

  15. On Macroscopic Quantum Phenomena in Biomolecules and Cells: From Levinthal to Hopfield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Raković

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the macroscopic quantum phenomena of the second kind, we hereby seek for a solution-in-principle of the long standing problem of the polymer folding, which was considered by Levinthal as (semiclassically intractable. To illuminate it, we applied quantum-chemical and quantum decoherence approaches to conformational transitions. Our analyses imply the existence of novel macroscopic quantum biomolecular phenomena, with biomolecular chain folding in an open environment considered as a subtle interplay between energy and conformation eigenstates of this biomolecule, governed by quantum-chemical and quantum decoherence laws. On the other hand, within an open biological cell, a system of all identical (noninteracting and dynamically noncoupled biomolecular proteins might be considered as corresponding spatial quantum ensemble of these identical biomolecular processors, providing spatially distributed quantum solution to a single corresponding biomolecular chain folding, whose density of conformational states might be represented as Hopfield-like quantum-holographic associative neural network too (providing an equivalent global quantum-informational alternative to standard molecular-biology local biochemical approach in biomolecules and cells and higher hierarchical levels of organism, as well.

  16. The emerging roles of inositol pyrophosphates in eukaryotic cell physiology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swarna Gowri Thota; Rashna Bhandari

    2015-09-01

    Inositol pyrophosphates are water soluble derivatives of inositol that contain pyrophosphate or diphosphate moieties in addition to monophosphates. The best characterised inositol pyrophosphates, are IP7 (diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate or PP-IP5), and IP8 (bisdiphosphoinositol tetrakisphosphate or (PP)2-IP4). These energy-rich small molecules are present in all eukaryotic cells, from yeast to mammals, and are involved in a wide range of cellular functions including apoptosis, vesicle trafficking, DNA repair, osmoregulation, phosphate homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, immune signalling, cell cycle regulation, and ribosome synthesis. Identified more than 20 years ago, there is still only a rudimentary understanding of the mechanisms by which inositol pyrophosphates participate in these myriad pathways governing cell physiology and homeostasis. The unique stereochemical and bioenergetic properties these molecules possess as a consequence of the presence of one or two pyrophosphate moieties in the vicinity of densely packed monophosphates are likely to form the molecular basis for their participation in multiple signalling and metabolic pathways. The aim of this review is to provide first time researchers in this area with an introduction to inositol pyrophosphates and a comprehensive overview on their cellular functions.

  17. The stem cell niche: tissue physiology at a single cell level

    OpenAIRE

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Scadden, David T.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are the critical unit affecting tissue maintenance, regeneration, and repair, with particular relevance to the tissues with high cell turnover. Stem cell regulation accommodates the conflicting needs of prompt responsiveness to injury and long-term preservation through quiescence. They are, in essence, the fundamental unit by which a tissue handles changing physiologic needs throughout the lifetime of the organism. As such, they are the focal point of dynamic tissue function, and t...

  18. Investigation of transport phenomena in a 7-serpentine channel PEM fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the past decade, numerical modeling and investigation of PEM fuel cells has received great attention. Many two- and three-dimensional models have been developed in which the computational fluid dynamics -CFD method - has been rigorously coupled with electrochemical phenomena in order to identify, understand, predict, control and optimize various transport and electro-chemical processes that occur at different length scales in the fuel cells. Tremendous progress, both engineering and scientific, made until now has helped to improve the electrochemical performance of PEM fuel cells. Nevertheless, there is an increasing consensus on the need to further improve the performance of PEM fuel cell through design optimization of fuel cell components. Mathematical modeling of PEM fuel cells, based on an accurate description of the mechanisms of various processes occurring within a fuel cell, is an indispensable tool for exploring various architectures for fuel cells and their components. Channel geometry (path length, size, shape) has a tremendous impact on PEMFC performance. Distributions of the reactant species concentration in a PEM fuel cell due to fuel consumption and local transport of water through the membrane can cause changes in current density, temperature and water concentration. Water distribution can lead to flooding or drying of the membrane that may shorten the PEMFC components life. Finding a flow field pattern that distribute the gas more evenly is one method in minimizing these problems and optimising the PEM fuel cell performance. The paper describes our approach in modeling the transport of relevant quantities (mass, chemical species, and charged species) in all components of a fuel cell. The PEM fuel cell simulated in this work consists of two flow-field patterns separated by gas diffusion layers (GDL) and a membrane electrode assembly (MEA). Serpentine flow fields are common, yet the underlying reason for their success has yet to be

  19. Study on flooding phenomena at various stoichiometries in transparent PEM unit fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the cathode channel flooding effects at different stoichiometries in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells by using visualization techniques. The phenomena of liquid water formation and removal caused by current variations were also examined experimentally. Tests were conducted at cathode stoichiometries of 1.5 and 2.0, and the anode stoichiometry was fixed at 1.5. It is found that at an air side stoichiometry of 2.0, liquid water begins to form and the flooding occurs faster than at an air side stoichiometry of 1.5. Also, when the air side stoichiometry of 1.5 is maintained, the dry out phenomena is observed in the dry out area 7.8A following the field of flooding. Thus, a stoichiometry of 1.5 produced better performance in terms of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) durability and hydrogen ion conductivity than did a stoichiometry of 2.0, in which dry out occurs beyond 8A

  20. The Cell Nucleus in Physiological and Experimentally Induced Hypometabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, M.

    The main problem for manned space mission is, at present, represented by the mass penalty associated to the human presence. An efficient approach could be the induction of a hypometabolic stasis in the astronauts, thus drastically reducing the physical and psychological requirements of the crew. On the other hand, in the wild, a reduction in resource consumptions physiologi- cally occurs in certain animals which periodically enter hibernation, a hypometabolic state in which both the energy need and energy offer are kept at a minimum. During the last twelve years, we have been studying different tissues of hibernating dormice, with the aim of analyzing their features during the euthermia -hibernation-arousal cycle as well as getting insight into the mechanisms allowing adaptation to hypometabolism. We paid particular attention to the cell nucleus, as it is the site of chief metabolic functions, such as DNA replication and RNA transcription. Our observations revealed no significant modification in the basic features of cell nuclei during hibernation; however, the cell nuclei of hibernating dormice showed unusual nuclear bodies containing molecules involved in RNA pathways. Therefore, we supposed that they could represent storage/assembly sites of several factors for processing some RNA which could be slowly synthesised during hibernation and rapidly and abundantly released in early arousal in order to meet the increased metabolic needs of the cell. The nucleolus also underwent structural and molecular modifications during hibernation, maybe to continue important nucleolar functions, or, alternatively, permit a most efficient reactivation upon arousal. On the basis of the observations made in vivo , we recently tried to experimentally induce a reversible hypometabolic state in in vitro models, using cell lines derived from hibernating and non-hibernating species. By administering the synthetic opioid DADLE, we could significantly reduce both RNA transcrip- tion and

  1. Physiological properties of vertebrate nerve cells in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, M A

    1975-01-01

    Vertebrate neurons in tissue culture are providing us with a new model system for studying the complex events which occur during neuronal differentiation, synaptogenesis, and neural network formation. It is already apparent that dissociated embryo neurons are capable of differentiating both morphologically and physiologically along predetermined lines in the absence of external influences. These neurons can form new connections with one another but retain some specificity in their selections. Both simple and complex neural networks can be seen. At the present time, the development of the invitro model system is just being explored. The potential value of a system of this kind at a variety of investigative levels should be appreciated. Questions of a fundamental nature in neurobiology, such as how synapses form, what rules govern such interaction, how cells recognize one another, and the nature of the basic two-, three-, or four-cell circuits that comprise the more complex neurons tissue can be approached with this system. Studies of the neurons and synapses themselves can lead to a more basic understanding of vertebrate nervous system functioning. The development of certain pathophysiological processes and the effects of neuroactive drugs on vertebrate neurons may be studied at the cellular level. Finally, the basic mechanism of some genetic abnormalities which produce abnormal nervous structure and function may be more easily determined in a simplified in vitro model than in the intact central nervous system. The value of any model is not inherent in the elegance of the model itseld, but only in its ability to suggest answers to fundamental questions about the system being modeled. Many fundamental questions about brain mechanisms in mental retardation remain unanswered. Perhaps some day the model of nerve cells in tissue culture will bring us closer to the answers to these questions. PMID:173059

  2. Physics of Transport and Traffic Phenomena in Biology: from molecular motors and cells to organisms

    CERN Document Server

    Chowdhury, D; Nishinari, K; Chowdhury, Debashish; Schadschneider, Andreas; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2005-01-01

    Traffic-like collective movements are observed at almost all levels of biological systems. Molecular motor proteins like, for example, kinesin and dynein, which are the vehicles of almost all intra-cellular transport in eukayotic cells, sometimes encounter traffic jam that manifests as a disease of the organism. Similarly, traffic jam of collagenase MMP-1, which moves on the collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix of vertebrates, has also been observed in recent experiments. Traffic-like movements of social insects like ants and termites on trails are, perhaps, more familiar in our everyday life. Experimental, theoretical and computational investigations in the last few years have led to a deeper understanding of the generic or common physical principles involved in these phenomena. In particular, some of the methods of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, pioneered almost a hundred years ago by Einstein, Langevin and others, turned out to be powerful theoretical tools for quantitaive analysis of model...

  3. Experimental study and modelling of degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cell stacks for use in CHP systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2009-01-01

    Degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cells for use in CHP systems were investigated experimentally and by modelling. It was found that the two main degradation mechanisms in HTPEM fuel cells are carbon corrosion and Pt agglomeration. On basis of this conclusion a mechanistic model, describing the...

  4. Experimental study and modeling of degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cell stacks for use in CHP systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Rasmussen, Peder Lund;

    2009-01-01

    Degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cells for use in CHP systems were investigated experimentally and by modeling. It was found that the two main degradation mechanisms in HTPEM fuel cells are carbon corrosion and Pt agglomeration. On basis of this conclusion a mechanistic model, describing the...

  5. The Endocrine Regulation of Stem Cells: Physiological Importance and Pharmacological Potentials for Cell-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Ahmad; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat

    2016-01-01

    Throughout life, different types of stem cells participate in tissue generation, maintenance, plasticity, and repair. Their abilities to secrete growth factors, to proliferate and differentiate into several cell lineages, and to migrate and home into the damaged tissues have made them attractive candidates for cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. Normal stem cell function is tied to the cell-intrinsic mechanisms and extrinsic signals derived from the surrounding microenvironment or circulation. Understanding the regulatory signals that govern stem cell functions is essential in order to have full knowledge about organogenesis, tissue maintenance and tissue plasticity in the physiological condition. It is also important for optimizing tissue engineering and improving the therapeutic efficiency of stem cells in regenerative medicine. A growing body of evidence indicates that hormonal signals can critically influence stem cell functions in fetal, postnatal, and adult tissues. This review focuses on recent studies revealing how growth hormone, insulin, thyroid hormone, parathormone, adrenocorticotropin, glucocorticoids, erythropoietin, and gastrointestinal hormones control stem cell behavior through influencing survival, proliferation, migration, homing, and differentiation of these cells. Moreover, how environmental factors such as exercise, hypoxia, and nutrition might affect stem cell functions through influencing the endocrine system is discussed. Some of the current limitations of cell therapy and how hormones can help overcoming these limitations are briefly outlined. PMID:26337380

  6. Modeling of the Transport Phenomena in Passive Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Using a Two-Phase Anisotropic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Miao; Jin-Liang Xu; Ya-Ling He

    2014-01-01

    The transport phenomena in a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) were numerically simulated by the proposed two-dimensional two-phase nonisothermal mass transport model. The anisotropic transport characteristic and deformation of the gas diffusion layer (GDL) were considered in this model. The natural convection boundary conditions were adopted for the transport of methanol, oxygen, and heat at the GDL outer surface. The effect of methanol concentration in the reservoir on cell performan...

  7. On Macroscopic Quantum Phenomena in Biomolecules and Cells: From Levinthal to Hopfield

    OpenAIRE

    Dejan Raković; Miroljub Dugić; Jasmina Jeknić-Dugić; Milenko Plavšić; Stevo Jaćimovski; Jovan Šetrajčić

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the macroscopic quantum phenomena of the second kind, we hereby seek for a solution-in-principle of the long standing problem of the polymer folding, which was considered by Levinthal as (semi)classically intractable. To illuminate it, we applied quantum-chemical and quantum decoherence approaches to conformational transitions. Our analyses imply the existence of novel macroscopic quantum biomolecular phenomena, with biomolecular chain folding in an open environment consider...

  8. W-cells in the cat retina: correlated morphological and physiological evidence for two distinct classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, L R

    1987-01-01

    Intracellular recording and iontophoresis of horseradish peroxidase were used to study the morphology of physiologically characterized W-cells in the cat retina. The recording experiments were performed in an in vivo preparation to allow the responses of these retinal ganglion cells to be compared with previous functional studies of these neurons. The physiological and morphological characteristics of 16 injected and recovered retinal W-cells were compared with similar data from 14 retinal X-cells injected in the same preparations. The soma sizes of retinal W-cells were found to fall into two distinct groups. The somata of the phasic W-cells, at every eccentricity, were smaller than the somata of tonic W-cells, with no overlap between the two distributions. Soma sizes of the tonic W-cells fell into the previously described "medium-sized" range of retinal ganglion cell soma sizes and were similar to, although slightly larger than, the soma sizes of physiologically identified beta- or X-cells. The dendritic arbors of all of the cells physiologically classified as tonic W-cells were similar. Every example of this type had four to five primary dendrites that branched a short distance from the soma to form a circular or cruciate dendritic arbor. The dendritic arrays of these cells were easily distinguishable from the compact dendritic arbors of the physiologically identified X-cells. The dendritic arbors of the phasic W-cells were much more heterogeneous, ranging from sparse, wide dendritic arbors to very compact dendritic arbors with many fine branches. No significant correlation was found between the extent of the dendritic arbor and the distance from the area centralis for either the tonic W-cells or the phasic W-cells. The axons of the tonic and phasic W-cells differed from one another and from X-cells on a number of different morphological and physiological measures. The intraretinal segments of the axons of the phasic W-cells had the smallest diameters of the

  9. Stem cell research: from molecular physiology to therapeutic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyu Jiang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Stem cell research promises remedies to many devastating diseases that are currently incurable, ranging from diabetes and Parkinson's disease to paralysis. Totipotent embryonic stem cells have great potential for generating a wide range of different human cells that can be used to restore malfunctioning or damaged cells and tissues in patients. Recent studies have shown that pluripotent stem cells derived from adult bone marrow, the umbilical cord and the placenta could also be induced to differentiate into a variety of different tissues. In this issue, we have invited several scientists in China to summarize their pioneering works in the stem cell research field.

  10. Analysis of transport phenomena and electrochemical reactions in a micro PEM fuel cell with serpentine gas flow channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-fuel cells are considered as promising electrochemical power sources in portable electronic devices. The presence of microelectromechanical system (MEMS technology makes it possible to manufacture the miniaturized fuel cell systems. The majority of research on micro-scale fuel cells is aimed at micro-power applications. Performance of micro-fuel cells are closely related to many factors, such as designs and operating conditions. CFD modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro PEM fuel cells are being used extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of the fundamental processes and to optimize the micro fuel cell designs before building a prototype for engineering application. In this research, full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a micro proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell with serpentine gas flow channels has been developed. This comprehensive model accounts for the major transport phenomena such as convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer, electrode kinetics, transport and phase-change mechanism of water, and potential fields in a micro PEM fuel cell. The model explains many interacting, complex electrochemical, and transport phenomena that cannot be studied experimentally.

  11. Analysis of transport phenomena and electrochemical reactions in a micro PEM fuel cell with nature inspired flow field design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-fuel cells are considered as promising electrochemical power sources in portable electronic devices. The presence of microelectromechanical system (MEMS technology makes it possible to manufacture the miniaturized fuel cell systems. The majority of research on micro-scale fuel cells is aimed at micro-power applications. Performance of micro-fuel cells are closely related to many factors, such as designs and operating conditions. CFD modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro PEM fuel cells are being used extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of the fundamental processes and to optimize the micro fuel cell designs before building a prototype for engineering application. In this research, full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a micro proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell with nature inspired flow field designs has been developed. The design inspired from the existed biological fluid flow patterns in the leaf. This comprehensive model accounts for the major transport phenomena such as convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer, electrode kinetics, transport and phase-change mechanism of water, and potential fields in a micro PEM fuel cell. The model explains many interacting, complex electrochemical, and transport phenomena that cannot be studied experimentally.

  12. Stem cell research:from molecular physiology to therapeutic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell research promises remedies to many devastating diseases that are currently incurable, ranging from diabetes and Parkinson’s disease to paralysis. Totipotent embryonic stem cells have great potential for generating a wide

  13. Amnion-Epithelial-Cell-Derived Exosomes Demonstrate Physiologic State of Cell under Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheller, Samantha; Papaconstantinou, John; Urrabaz-Garza, Rheanna; Richardson, Lauren; Saade, George; Salomon, Carlos; Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-01-01

    At term, the signals of fetal maturity and feto-placental tissue aging prompt uterine readiness for delivery by transitioning quiescent myometrium to an active stage. It is still unclear how the signals reach the distant myometrium. Exosomes are a specific type of extracellular vesicle (EVs) that transport molecular signals between cells, and are released from a wide range of cells, including the maternal and fetal cells. In this study, we hypothesize that i) exosomes act as carriers of signals in utero-placental compartments and ii) exosomes reflect the physiologic status of the origin cells. The primary aims of this study were to determine exosomal contents in exosomes derived from primary amnion epithelial cells (AEC). We also determined the effect of oxidative stress on AEC derived exosomal cargo contents. AEC were isolated from amniotic membrane obtained from normal, term, not in labor placentae at delivery, and culture under standard conditions. Oxidative stress was induced using cigarette smoke extract for 48 hours. AEC-conditioned media were collected and exosomes isolated by differential centrifugations. Both growth conditions (normal and oxidative stress induced) produced cup shaped exosomes of around 50 nm, expressed exosomes enriched markers, such as CD9, CD63, CD81 and HSC70, embryonic stem cell marker Nanog, and contained similar amounts of cell free AEC DNA. Using confocal microscopy, the colocalization of histone (H) 3, heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and activated form of pro-senescence and term parturition associated marker p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) (P-p38 MAPK) co-localized with exosome enrich marker CD9. HSP70 and P-p38 MAPK were significantly higher in exosomes from AEC grown under oxidative stress conditions than standard conditions (pmass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis identified 221 different proteins involved in immunomodulatory response and cell-to-cell communication. This study determined AEC exosome

  14. The Influence of Physical and Physiological Cues on Atomic Force Microscopy-Based Cell Stiffness Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Wei Chiou; Hsiu-Kuan Lin; Ming-Jer Tang; Hsi-Hui Lin; Ming-Long Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All...

  15. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  16. Amnion-Epithelial-Cell-Derived Exosomes Demonstrate Physiologic State of Cell under Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheller, Samantha; Papaconstantinou, John; Urrabaz-Garza, Rheanna; Richardson, Lauren; Saade, George; Salomon, Carlos; Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-01-01

    At term, the signals of fetal maturity and feto-placental tissue aging prompt uterine readiness for delivery by transitioning quiescent myometrium to an active stage. It is still unclear how the signals reach the distant myometrium. Exosomes are a specific type of extracellular vesicle (EVs) that transport molecular signals between cells, and are released from a wide range of cells, including the maternal and fetal cells. In this study, we hypothesize that i) exosomes act as carriers of signals in utero-placental compartments and ii) exosomes reflect the physiologic status of the origin cells. The primary aims of this study were to determine exosomal contents in exosomes derived from primary amnion epithelial cells (AEC). We also determined the effect of oxidative stress on AEC derived exosomal cargo contents. AEC were isolated from amniotic membrane obtained from normal, term, not in labor placentae at delivery, and culture under standard conditions. Oxidative stress was induced using cigarette smoke extract for 48 hours. AEC-conditioned media were collected and exosomes isolated by differential centrifugations. Both growth conditions (normal and oxidative stress induced) produced cup shaped exosomes of around 50 nm, expressed exosomes enriched markers, such as CD9, CD63, CD81 and HSC70, embryonic stem cell marker Nanog, and contained similar amounts of cell free AEC DNA. Using confocal microscopy, the colocalization of histone (H) 3, heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and activated form of pro-senescence and term parturition associated marker p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) (P-p38 MAPK) co-localized with exosome enrich marker CD9. HSP70 and P-p38 MAPK were significantly higher in exosomes from AEC grown under oxidative stress conditions than standard conditions (pexosome characteristics and their cargo reflected the physiologic status of the cell of origin and suggests that AEC-derived exosomal p38 MAPK plays a major role in determining the fate of pregnancy

  17. Real-time imaging of endothelial cell-cell junctions during neutrophil transmigration under physiological flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Jeffrey; Daniel, Anna E; Hoogenboezem, Mark; van Buul, Jaap D

    2014-01-01

    During inflammation, leukocytes leave the circulation and cross the endothelium to fight invading pathogens in underlying tissues. This process is known as leukocyte transendothelial migration. Two routes for leukocytes to cross the endothelial monolayer have been described: the paracellular route, i.e., through the cell-cell junctions and the transcellular route, i.e., through the endothelial cell body. However, it has been technically difficult to discriminate between the para- and transcellular route. We developed a simple in vitro assay to study the distribution of endogenous VE-cadherin and PECAM-1 during neutrophil transendothelial migration under physiological flow conditions. Prior to neutrophil perfusion, endothelial cells were briefly treated with fluorescently-labeled antibodies against VE-cadherin and PECAM-1. These antibodies did not interfere with the function of both proteins, as was determined by electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing and FRAP measurements. Using this assay, we were able to follow the distribution of endogenous VE-cadherin and PECAM-1 during transendothelial migration under flow conditions and discriminate between the para- and transcellular migration routes of the leukocytes across the endothelium. PMID:25146919

  18. A CFD analysis of transport phenomena and electrochemical reactions in a tubular-shaped PEM fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A fuel cell is most interesting new power source because it solves not only the environment problem but also natural resource exhaustion problem. CFD modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in PEM fuel cells are being used extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of the fundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype for engineering application. In this research, full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a tubular-shaped proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell has been developed. This comprehensive model accounts for the major transport phenomena such as convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer, electrode kinetics, transport and phase-change mechanism of water, and potential fields in a tubular-shaped PEM fuel cell. The model explains many interacting, complex electrochemical, and transport phenomena that cannot be studied experimentally. Three-dimensional results of the species profiles, temperature distribution, potential distribution, and local current density distribution are presented and analysed, with the focus on the physical insight and fundamental understanding.

  19. A CFD analysis of transport phenomena and electrochemical reactions in a tubular-shaped PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadiq Al-Baghdadi, Maher A.R. [Fuel Cell Research Center, International Energy and Environment Foundation, Al-Najaf, P.O.Box 39 (Iraq)

    2013-07-01

    A fuel cell is most interesting new power source because it solves not only the environment problem but also natural resource exhaustion problem. CFD modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in PEM fuel cells are being used extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of the fundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype for engineering application. In this research, full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a tubular-shaped proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has been developed. This comprehensive model accounts for the major transport phenomena such as convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer, electrode kinetics, transport and phase-change mechanism of water, and potential fields in a tubular-shaped PEM fuel cell. The model explains many interacting, complex electrochemical, and transport phenomena that cannot be studied experimentally. Three-dimensional results of the species profiles, temperature distribution, potential distribution, and local current density distribution are presented and analysed, with the focus on the physical insight and fundamental understanding.

  20. Ca2+ signaling in pancreatic acinar cells: physiology and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.H. Petersen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic acinar cell is a classical model for studies of secretion and signal transduction mechanisms. Because of the extensive endoplasmic reticulum and the large granular compartment, it has been possible - by direct measurements - to obtain considerable insights into intracellular Ca2+ handling under both normal and pathological conditions. Recent studies have also revealed important characteristics of stimulus-secretion coupling mechanisms in isolated human pancreatic acinar cells. The acinar cells are potentially dangerous because of the high intra-granular concentration of proteases, which become inappropriately activated in the human disease acute pancreatitis. This disease is due to toxic Ca2+ signals generated by excessive liberation of Ca2+ from both the endoplasmic reticulum and the secretory granules.

  1. Bone marrow-derived cells are differentially involved in pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to play roles in angiogenesis. Although these cells have been shown to promote angiogenesis, it is not yet clear whether these cells affect all types of angiogenesis. This study investigated the involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in pathological and physiological angiogenesis in the murine retina. Materials and methods: The oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model was used as a retinal angiogenesis model in newborn mice. To block the influence of bone marrow-derived cells, the mice were irradiated with a 4-Gy dose of radiation from a 137Cs source. Irradiation was performed in four different conditions with radio dense 2-cm thick lead disks; (1) H group, the head were covered with these discs to protect the eyes from radiation; (2) A group, all of the body was covered with these discs; (3) N group, mice were completely unshielded; (4) C group, mice were put in the irradiator but were not irradiated. On P17, the retinal areas showing pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis were measured and compared to the retinas of nonirradiated mice. Results: Although irradiation induced leukocyte depletion, it did not affect the number of other cell types or body weight. Retinal nonperfusion areas were significantly larger in irradiated mice than in control mice (P < 0.05), indicating that physiological angiogenesis was impaired. However, the formation of tuft-like angiogenesis processes was more prominent in the irradiated mice (P < 0.05), indicating that pathological angiogenesis was intact. Conclusions: Bone marrow-derived cells seem to be differentially involved in the formation of physiological and pathological retinal vessels. Pathological angiogenesis in the murine retina does not require functional bone marrow-derived cells, but these cells are important for the formation of physiological vessels. Our results add a new insight into the pathology of retinal angiogenesis and bolster the hypothesis that bone

  2. Changes in ganglion cell physiology during retinal degeneration influence excitability by prosthetic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Alice; Ratliff, Charles; Sampath, Alapakkam; Weiland, James

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Here we investigate ganglion cell physiology in healthy and degenerating retina to test its influence on threshold to electrical stimulation. Approach. Age-related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa cause blindness via outer retinal degeneration. Inner retinal pathways that transmit visual information to the central brain remain intact, so direct electrical stimulation from prosthetic devices offers the possibility for visual restoration. Since inner retinal physiology changes during degeneration, we characterize physiological properties and responses to electrical stimulation in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of both wild type mice and the rd10 mouse model of retinal degeneration. Main results. Our aggregate results support previous observations that elevated thresholds characterize diseased retinas. However, a physiology-driven classification scheme reveals distinct sub-populations of ganglion cells with thresholds either normal or strongly elevated compared to wild-type. When these populations are combined, only a weakly elevated threshold with large variance is observed. The cells with normal threshold are more depolarized at rest and exhibit periodic oscillations. Significance. During degeneration, physiological changes in RGCs affect the threshold stimulation currents required to evoke action potentials.

  3. Physiological tests for yeast brewery cells immobilized on modified chamotte carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Berlowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    In this study yeast cell physiological activity was assessed on the basis of the in situ activity of two important enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. FUN1 dye bioconversion and cellular ATP content were also taken as important indicators of yeast cell activity. The study was conducted on six brewing yeast strains, which were either free cells or immobilized on a chamotte carrier. The experimental data obtained indicate clearly that, in most cases, the immobilized cel...

  4. New observations on the integrity, structure and physiology of flesh cells from fully ripened grape berry

    OpenAIRE

    Fontes, N.; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Gerós, H.

    2011-01-01

    The physiological/structural status of the soft ripened berry is still a matter of debate. In this paper isolated mesocarp cells from ripened berries of both wine and table varieties were studied by bright-field, fluorescence and confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to highlight the organization of berry flesh cell, function and viability. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that protoplasting from grape berry mesocarp tissue yields a single heterogenous population of intact and viable cells....

  5. The influence of physical and physiological cues on atomic force microscopy-based cell stiffness assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chiou

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All of these cues show a significant influence on the cell elasticity assessment. Sharp AFM tips create a two-fold increase in the value of the effective Young's modulus (E(eff relative to that of the blunt tips. Higher indenting force at the same loading rate generates higher estimated cell elasticity. Increasing the operation temperature of the AFM leads to decreases in the cell stiffness because the structure of actin filaments becomes disorganized. The physiological cues include the presence of fetal bovine serum or extracellular matrix-coated surfaces, the culture passage number, and the culture density. Both fetal bovine serum and the extracellular matrix are critical for cells to maintain the integrity of actin filaments and consequently exhibit higher elasticity. Unlike primary cells, mouse kidney progenitor cells can be passaged and maintain their morphology and elasticity for a very long period without a senescence phenotype. Finally, cell elasticity increases with increasing culture density only in MDCK epithelial cells. In summary, for researchers who use AFM to assess cell elasticity, our results provide basic and significant information about the suitable selection of physical and physiological cues.

  6. Cancer and malignant resistance of cells as phenomena of adaptation to damaging factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monceviciute-Eringiene, E

    1996-05-01

    I propose the hypothesis that mechanisms of general biological persistent resistance to damaging factors are closely related to the development of tumour cells. This phenomenon is characteristic of bacterial variants whose resistance to antibiotics and other chemotherapeutic drugs appears through L-transformation. As somatic cells are exposed to carcinogens and develop into tumour cells, they also acquire resistance to the toxic effects of carcinogens through multistage malignant transformation. Many cancerous cells, which have acquired persistent resistance to chemotherapy drugs or irradiation, often reappear locally or in metastases after courses of treatment. Thus, these cells undergo a kind of repeated development of malignancy. After a certain remission period, they begin to multiply more intensively locally, and are more likely to spread by metastasis. All resistant cells have the following characteristics: simplified metabolism, genetic, biochemical and morphological properties; lower requirements from their nutrient medium; rapid growth; parasitic qualities; invasiveness. It is as if they regress into a more primitive mode of existence (atavism) to survive under unfavourable circumstances. Somatic cells, resistant to carcinogens and the cells which undergo progression to more malignant types under the influence of drugs become similar to unicellular organisms or to forms of the latter which are resistant to damaging factors. The more primitive the cells become, the better they survive. Thus, cancer is a special case of the general resistance of cells to damaging factors. PMID:8735884

  7. The corrosion phenomena in the coin cell BR2325 of the ``superstoichiometric fluorocarbon-lithium'' system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitkin, V.N.; Galkin, P.S.; Denisova, T.N. [and others

    1998-07-01

    It was noted at the earlier study and at the longer observations of the novel various types of superstoichiometric fluorocarbon materials CF{sub 1+x}, where x = 0.1--0.33 (FCM) and their behavior, that despite of their known hygroscopity during a storage of samples in laboratory and technological utensils nevertheless occurs an appreciable sorption of atmospheric moisture. The color of samples does not change but sometimes there appears a smell of hydrogen fluoride and even corrosion of glasswares at a long storage. On the basis of these facts was assumed that at a long storage the slow reactions of HF producing with a sorption moisture can proceed. This phenomena is necessary to take into account for successful manufacturing of long life lithium cells based on superstoichiometric fluorocarbon composite cathodes (FCC). The chemistry of such slow hydrolytic process and especially of processes which can proceed at manufacturing of FCC earlier was not investigated also of any data in the literature in this occasion is not present. Just for this reason the authors undertook a study of the corrosion phenomena which can proceed in industrial sources of a current at a long storage under influence of slow hydrolysis of C-F bonds by moisture. The goal of the study was to search long term damages in the slightly wet FCM and based on these materials cathodic composites for fluorocarbon-lithium cells. As a model for corrosion process investigation they have chosen a standard coin lithium battery of a type BR2325.

  8. Effects of physiological levels of the green tea extract Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG on breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eZeng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Physiological concentrations of the green tea extract EGCG caused growth inhibition in oestrogen receptor α (ERα-positive MCF7 cells, that was associated with down-regulation of the ERα and reduced insulin-like growth factor (IGF binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2 abundance and increased protein abundance of the tumour suppressor genes p53/p21. In contrast to MCF7 cells that have wt p53, EGCG alone did not change cell proliferation or death significantly in another ERα-positive cell line T47D that possesses mutant p53. EGCG increased ERα protein levels and as a consequence, the cells responded significantly better to an ERα antagonist Tamoxifen (TAM in the presence of EGCG. EGCG significantly increased cell death in an ERα-negative cell line, MDA-MB-231 that also possesses mutant p53. EGCG significantly increased the ERα and IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR levels and thereby enhanced the sensitivities of the cells to Tamoxifen and a blocking antibody targeting the IGF-1R (αIR3. In contrast to MCF7, T47D and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that exhibited significant changes in key molecules involved in breast growth and survival upon treatment with physiological levels of EGCG, the growth, survival and levels of these proteins in non-malignant breast epithelial cells, MCF10A cells, were not affected.

  9. Heat science and transport phenomena in fuel cells; Thermique et phenomenes de transport dans les piles a combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberatore, P.M.; Boillot, M. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique de Nancy, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Bonnet, C.; Didieerjean, S.; Lapicque, F.; Deseure, J.; Lottin, O.; Maillet, D.; Oseen-Senda, J. [Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee, 54 - Vandoeuvre Les Nancy (France); Alexandre, A. [Laboratoire d' Etudes Thermiques, ENSMA, 86 Poitiers (France); Topin, F.; Occelli, R.; Daurelle, J.V. [IUSTI / Polytech' Marseille, Institut universitaire des Systemes Thermiques Industriels Ecole, 13 - Marseille (France); Pauchet, J.; Feidt, M. [CEA Grenoble, Groupement pour la recherche sur les echangeurs thermiques (Greth), 38 (France); Voarino, C. [CEA Centre d' Etudes du Ripault, 37 - Tours (France); Morel, B.; Laurentin, J.; Bultel, Y.; Lefebvre-Joud, F. [CEA Grenoble, LEPMI, 38 (France); Auvity, B.; Lasbet, Y.; Castelain, C.; Peerohossaini, H. [Ecole Centrale de Nantes, Laboratoire de Thermocinetique de Nantes (LTN), 44 - Nantes (France)

    2005-07-01

    In this work are gathered the transparencies of the lectures presented at the conference 'heat science and transport phenomena in fuel cells'. The different lectures have dealt with 1)the gas distribution in the bipolar plates of a fuel cell: experimental studies and computerized simulations 2)two-phase heat distributors in the PEMFC 3)a numerical study of the flow properties of the backing layers on the transfers in a PEMFC 4)modelling of the heat and mass transfers in a PEMFC 5)two-phase cooling of the PEMFC with pentane 6)stationary thermodynamic model of the SOFC in the GECOPAC system 7)modelling of the internal reforming at the anode of the SOFC 8)towards a new thermal design of the PEMFC bipolar plates. (O.M.)

  10. Physiological and pathological role of local and immigrating colonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferenc Sipos; Gábor Valcz; Béla Molnár

    2012-01-01

    The latest avenue of research is revealing the existence of and role for the colonic stem cells in the physiological renewal of the mucosa and in pathological circumstances where they have both positive and negative effects. In the case of human colon, different levels of stem cell compartments exist. First, the crypt epithelial stem cells, which have a role in the normal crypt epithelial cell dynamics and in colorectal carcinogenesis. Close to the crypts, the second layer of stem cells can be found; the local subepithelial stem cell niche, including the pericryptic subepithelial myofibroblasts that regulate the epithelial cell differentiation and have a crucial role in cancer progression and chronic inflammation-related fibrosis. The third level of stem cell compartment is the immigrating bone-marrow-derived stem cells, which have an important role in wound healing after severe mucosal inflammation, but are also involved in cancer invasion. This paper focuses on stem cell biology in the context of physiological and pathological processes in the human colon.

  11. Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic Membraneless Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abruna, Hector Daniel [Cornell University

    2013-08-01

    Our work is focused on membraneless laminar flow fuel cells, an unconventional fuel cell technology, intended to create a system that not only avoids most typical fuel cell drawbacks, but also achieves the highest power density yet recorded for a non-H{sub 2} fuel cell. We have employed rigorous electrochemistry to characterize the high-energy- density fuel BH4-, providing important mechanistic insight for anode catalyst choice and avoiding deleterious side reactions. Numerous fuel cell oxidants, used in place of O{sub 2}, are compared in a detailed, uniform manner, and a powerful new oxidant, cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN), is described. The high-voltage BH{sub 4}{sup -}/CAN fuel/oxidant combination is employed in a membraneless, room temperature, laminar-flow fuel cell, with herringbone micromixers which provide chaotic-convective flow which, in turn, enhances both the power output and efficiency of the device. We have also been involved in the design of a scaled-up version of the membraneless laminar flow fuel cell intended to provide a 10W output.

  12. Fluctuation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluctuation phenomena are the ''tip of the iceberg'' revealing the existence, behind even the most quiescent appearing macroscopic states, of an underlying world of agitated, ever-changing microscopic processes. While the presence of these fluctuations can be ignored in some cases, e.g. if one is satisfied with purely thermostatic description of systems in equilibrium, they are central to the understanding of other phenomena, e.g. the nucleation of a new phase following the quenching of a system into the co-existence region. This volume contains a collection of review articles, written by experts in the field, on the subject of fluctuation phenomena. Some of the articles are of a very general nature discussing the modern mathematical formulation of the problems involved, while other articles deal with specific topics such as kinetics of phase transitions and conductivity in solids. The juxtaposition of the variety of physical situations in which fluctuation phenomena play an important role is novel and should give the reader an insight into this subject

  13. Survival-related DNA repair phenomena in cultured rat-kangaroo cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cultured cells (line PtK-2) from the marsupial mammal rat-kangaroo, or potoroo (Potorous tridactylis), which photoreactivate (PR) both UV-induced dimers and lethality, excise few dimers, and are only slightly sensitized by post-UV exposure to caffeine, were subjected to caffeine and hydroxyurea (HU) treatments during the 30-min PR period. It was found that neither caffeine nor HU inhibited PR of lethality as measured by colony-forming ability. Further, the cells exhibited no photoprotective properties and 3 mM caffeine potentiated the same slight survival decrease in both photoreactivated and unphotoreactivated cells

  14. Investigation of wave emission phenomena in dual frequency capacitive discharges using particle-in-cell simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual frequency capacitively coupled discharges are widely used during fabrication of modern-day integrated circuits, because of low cost and robust uniformity over broad areas. At low pressure, stochastic or collisionless electron heating is important in such discharges. The stochastic heating occurs adjacent to the sheath edge due to energy transfer from the oscillating high voltage electron sheath to electrons. The present research discusses evidence of wave emission from the sheath in such discharges, with a frequency near the electron plasma frequency. These waves are damped very promptly as they propagate away from the sheath towards the bulk plasma, by Landau damping or some related mechanism. In this work, the occurrence of strong wave phenomena during the expanding and collapsing phase of the low frequency sheath has been investigated. This is the result of a progressive breakdown of quasi-neutrality close to the electron sheath edge. The characteristics of waves in the dual-frequency case are entirely different from the single-frequency case studied in earlier works. The existence of a field reversal phenomenon, occurring several times within a lower frequency period in the proximity of the sheath is also reported. Electron trapping near to the field reversal regions also occurs many times during a lower frequency period. The emission of waves is associated with these field reversal regions. It is observed that the field reversal and electron trapping effects appear under conditions typical of many recent experiments, and are consequently of much greater practical interest than similar effects in single frequency discharges, which occur only under extreme conditions that are not usually realized in experiments. (paper)

  15. Design, Fabrication and Characterization of an In Silico Cell Physiology lab for Bio Sensing Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, A ul; Rokkam, M; De Carlo, A R; Wereley, S T; Wells, H W; McLamb, W T; Roux, S J; Irazoqui, P P; Porterfield, D M

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we report the design, fabrication and characterization of an In Silico cell physiology biochip for measuring Ca{sup 2+} ion concentrations and currents around single cells. This device has been designed around specific science objectives of measuring real time multidimensional calcium flux patterns around sixteen Ceratopteris richardii fern spores in microgravity flight experiments and ground studies. The sixteen microfluidic cell holding pores are 150 by 150 {mu}m each and have 4 Ag/AgCl electrodes leading into them. An SU-8 structural layer is used for insulation and packaging purposes. The In Silico cell physiology lab is wire bonded on to a custom PCB for easy interface with a state of the art data acquisition system. The electrodes are coated with a Ca{sup 2+} ion selective membrane based on ETH-5234 ionophore and operated against an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Initial characterization results have shown Nernst slopes of 30mv/decade that were stable over a number of measurement cycles. While this work is focused on technology to enable basic research on the Ceratopteris richardii spores, we anticipate that this type of cell physiology lab-on-a-chip will be broadly applied in biomedical and pharmacological research by making minor modifications to the electrode material and the measurement technique. Future applications include detection of glucose, hormones such as plant auxin, as well as multiple analyte detection on the same chip.

  16. Design, Fabrication and Characterization of an In Silico Cell Physiology lab for Bio Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, A. ul; Rokkam, M.; DeCarlo, A. R.; Wereley, S. T.; Wells, H. W.; McLamb, W. T.; Roux, S. J.; Irazoqui, P. P.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we report the design, fabrication and characterization of an In Silico cell physiology biochip for measuring Ca2+ ion concentrations and currents around single cells. This device has been designed around specific science objectives of measuring real time multidimensional calcium flux patterns around sixteen Ceratopteris richardii fern spores in microgravity flight experiments and ground studies. The sixteen microfluidic cell holding pores are 150 by 150 µm each and have 4 Ag/AgCl electrodes leading into them. An SU-8 structural layer is used for insulation and packaging purposes. The In Silico cell physiology lab is wire bonded on to a custom PCB for easy interface with a state of the art data acquisition system. The electrodes are coated with a Ca2+ ion selective membrane based on ETH-5234 ionophore and operated against an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Initial characterization results have shown Nernst slopes of 30mv/decade that were stable over a number of measurement cycles. While this work is focused on technology to enable basic research on the Ceratopteris richardii spores, we anticipate that this type of cell physiology lab-on-a-chip will be broadly applied in biomedical and pharmacological research by making minor modifications to the electrode material and the measurement technique. Future applications include detection of glucose, hormones such as plant auxin, as well as multiple analyte detection on the same chip.

  17. Microfluidic device to study cell transmigration under physiological shear stress conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Moresco, Jacob Lange;

    2011-01-01

    the membrane under flow conditions. The 3D environment of migrating cells is imitated by injecting cell adhesion proteins to coat the membrane in the device. We tested the developed device with Jurkat cells migration towards medium supplemented with serum, and with chemokine induced lymphocytes...... natural migration process. Here we describe a novel in vitro cell transmigration microfluidic assay, which mimicks physiological shear flow conditions in blood vessels. The device was designed to incorporate the principles of both the Boyden chamber and the shear flow chamber assay, i.e. migration through...... migration. The applied continuous flow of cell suspension and chemoattractant ensures that the concentration gradient is maintained in time and space. The cell adhesion proteins used to enhance cell migration in the device were fibronectin and VCAM-1. We successfully observed a multistep transmigration...

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Polymer Electrolyte and Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Erik

    2004-02-01

    This thesis deals with modeling of two types of fuel cells: the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) and the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), for which we address four major issues: a) mass transport limitations; b) water management (PEFC); c) gas management (DMFC); d) thermal management. Four models have been derived and studied for the PEFC, focusing on the cathode. The first exploits the slenderness of the cathode for a two-dimensional geometry, leading to a reduced model, where several non dimensional parameters capture the behavior of the cathode. The model was extended to three dimensions, where four different flow distributors were studied for the cathode. A quantitative comparison shows that the interdigitated channels can sustain the highest current densities. These two models, comprising isothermal gas phase flow, limit the studies to (a). Returning to a two-dimensional geometry of the PEFC, the liquid phase was introduced via a separate flow model approach for the cathode. In addition to conservation of mass, momentum and species, the model was extended to consider simultaneous charge and heat transfer for the whole cell. Different thermal, flow fields, and hydrodynamic conditions were studied, addressing (a), (b) and (d). A scale analysis allowed for predictions of the cell performance prior to any computations. Good agreement between experiments with a segmented cell and the model was obtained. A liquid-phase model, comprising conservation of mass, momentum and species, was derived and analyzed for the anode of the DMFC. The impact of hydrodynamic, electrochemical and geometrical features on the fuel cell performance were studied, mainly focusing on (a). The slenderness of the anode allows the use of a narrow-gap approximation, leading to a reduced model, with benefits such as reduced computational cost and understanding of the physical trends prior to any numerical computations. Adding the gas-phase via a multiphase mixture approach, the gas

  19. Transport phenomena in solid oxide fuel cell electrodes focusing on heat transfer related to chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navasa, M.; Andersson, M.; Yuan, J.; Sundén, B.

    2012-11-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are widely studied for their advantages especially at high temperatures. However, operating at high temperatures represents a high cost due to the strict requirements the materials are expected to fulfill. Thus, the main goal in SOFC research has been to decrease the operating temperature so that the range of available materials is widened and hence, the operating cost can be reduced. In this paper, the different heat sources that contribute to the cell energy balance are presented with strong emphasis on the chemical reactions that take place in SOFCs. The knowledge of which heat sources or sinks taking place and their locations within the SOFC can provide useful information for further design and efficiency improvements.

  20. Transport phenomena in the cathode of a molten carbonate fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text': A Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) is an electro-chemical energy conversion technology that runs on natural gas and employs a molten salt electrolyte. In order to keep the electrolyte in this state, the cell must be kept at a temperature above 500 C, eliminating the need for noble catalysts. There has been only a limited amount of research on modelling the transport processes inside this device, mainly due to its limited ability for mobile applications. A model for the reaction-diffusion processes within the cathode of a MCFC is developed using Fick's Law for diffusion and incorporating Darcy's Law for convection. A model for Binary Diffusion is also discussed and compared to those for Fickian diffusion. It can be shown that there exists a limiting case for diffusion across the cathode that depends on the conductivity for the liquid potential, for which there exists an analytical solution. Results are also discussed for varying diffusivities and permeabilities. Ultimately, this research focuses on the optimization of the electrode porosity to increase the power output of the fuel cell. The porosity is considered as a function of position, and is optimized using the software package MATLAB. (author)

  1. The application of multi-parameter flow cytometry to monitor individual microbial cell physiological state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Christopher J; Nebe-Von-Caron, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    The development of multi-parameter flow cytometric techniques in our laboratories has led to a functional classification of the physiological state of single celled micro-organisms, including both yeast and bacteria. This classification is based on the presence or absence of an intact fully polarized cytoplasmic membrane and the transport systems across it. Using these techniques it is possible to resolve a cells physiological state, beyond culturability to include metabolic activity enabling assessment of population heterogeneity. Importantly results are available in real-time, 1-2 min after a sample is taken, enabling informed decisions to be taken about a process. These techniques have been extensively applied by us for monitoring the stress responses of micro-organisms in such diverse areas as brewing, bio-remediation, bio-transformation, food processing and pharmaceutical fermentation, some of which are discussed here. PMID:15217160

  2. Resveratrol production in bioreactor: Assessment of cell physiological states and plasmid segregational stability

    OpenAIRE

    Margarida S. Afonso; Susana Ferreira; Domingues, Fernanda C.; Filomena Silva

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a plant secondary metabolite commonly found in peanuts and grapevines with significant health benefits. Recombinant organisms can produce large amounts of resveratrol and, in this work, Escherichia coli BW27784 was used to produce resveratrol in bioreactors while monitoring cell physiology and plasmid stability through flow cytometry and real-time qPCR, respectively. Initially, the influence of culture conditions and precursor addition was evaluated in screening assays and the ...

  3. Apoptosis as the focus of an authentic research experience in a cell physiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Shere K

    2016-06-01

    Curriculum-embedded independent research is a high-impact teaching practice that has been shown to increase student engagement and learning. This article describes a multiweek laboratory project for an upper-division undergraduate cell physiology laboratory using apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway as the overarching theme. Students did literature research on apoptotic agents that acted via the mitochondrial pathway. Compounds ranged from natural products such as curcumin to synthetic compounds such as etoposide. Groups of two to three students planned a series of experiments using one of three cultured cell lines that required them to 1) learn to culture cells; 2) determine treatment conditions, including apoptotic agent solubility and concentration ranges that had been reported in the literature; 3) choose two methods to validate/quantify apoptotic capacity of the reagent; and 4) attempt to "rescue" cells from undergoing apoptosis using one of several available compounds/methods. In essence, given some reagent and equipment constraints, students designed an independent experiment to highlight the effects of different apoptotic agents on cells in culture. Students presented their experimental designs as in a laboratory group meeting and their final findings as a classroom "symposium." This exercise can be adapted to many different types of laboratories with greater or lesser equipment and instrumentation constraints, incorporates several core cell physiology methods, and encourages key experimental design and critical thinking components of independent research. PMID:27231261

  4. Physiological tests for yeast brewery cells immobilized on modified chamotte carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2013-11-01

    In this study yeast cell physiological activity was assessed on the basis of the in situ activity of two important enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. FUN1 dye bioconversion and cellular ATP content were also taken as important indicators of yeast cell activity. The study was conducted on six brewing yeast strains, which were either free cells or immobilized on a chamotte carrier. The experimental data obtained indicate clearly that, in most cases, the immobilized cells showed lower enzyme activity than free cells from analogous cultures. Pyruvate decarboxylase activity in immobilized cells was higher than in planktonic cell populations only in the case of the Saccharomyces pastorianus 680 strain. However, in a comparative assessment of the fermentation process, conducted with the use of free and immobilized cells, much more favorable dynamics and carbon dioxide productivity were observed in immobilized cells, especially in the case of brewing lager yeast strains. This may explain the higher total cell density per volume unit of the fermented medium and the improved resistance of immobilized cells to environmental changes. PMID:23887884

  5. [Cooperative phenomena in the membrane potential of parathyroid cells induced by divalent cations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, T

    1985-01-01

    Membrane potentials of mouse parathyroid cells were measured by means of the intracellular microelectrode method. The membrane potential in external Krebs solution containing 2.5 mM of Ca++ was -23.6 +/- 0.4 mV (mean +/- standard error of mean). The low concentration of Ca++ (1.0 mM) caused hyperpolarization of the membrane potential to -61.7 +/- 0.8 mV. The membrane potential was proportional to the logarithm of the concentration of K ion in the solution of low Ca ion. The concentration of external Na+, C1- and HPO4-- had no effect on the membrane potential. The sigmoidal transition of membrane potentials was induced by the change of Ca ion concentration in the range from 2.5 to 1.0 mM. The change of the membrane potentials in low Ca ion is originated from increase in potassium permeability of the cell membrane. The similar sigmoidal changes of the membrane potentials were observed in the solution containing 4 to 3 mM of Sr ion. The Mg and Ba ion showed smaller effect on the membrane potential. The Goldman equation was extended to divalent ions. Appling the extended membrane potential equation, ratios of the permeability coefficients were obtained as follows: PK/PCa = 0.067 for 2.5 mM Ca++, 0.33 for 1.0 mM Ca++; PK/PSr = 0.08 for 4 mM Sr++ and 0.4 for 3 mM Sr++; PK/PMg = 0.5; PK/PBa = 0.67 for all range of concentration. The Hill constants of Sr ion and Ca ion were 20; the relationship between Sr ion and Ca ion was competitive. The Hill constants of Mg and Ba ion were 1 each. The Hill constant of Ca ion was depend of the temperature; nmax = 20 at 36 degrees C, n = 9 at 27 degrees C, n = 2 at 22 degrees C. The enthalpy of Ca-binding reaction was obtained from the Van't Hoff plot as 0.58 kcal. The activation energies of the K+ permeability increase were obtained from the Arrhenius plots as 3.3 kcal and 4 kcal. The difference, 0.7 kcal, corresponds to the enthalpy change of this reaction, of which value is close to that of the Ca-binding reaction. PMID:4093891

  6. Plasmid DNA fermentation strategies: influence on plasmid stability and cell physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Filomena; Queiroz, João A; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2012-03-01

    In order to provide sufficient pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA material, it is essential to gain a comprehensive knowledge of the bioprocesses involved; so, the development of protocols and techniques that allow a fast monitoring of process performance is a valuable tool for bioprocess design. Regarding plasmid DNA production, the metabolic stress of the host strain as well as plasmid stability have been identified as two of the key parameters that greatly influence plasmid DNA yields. The present work describes the impact of batch and fed-batch fermentations using different C/N ratios and different feeding profiles on cell physiology and plasmid stability, investigating the potential of these two monitoring techniques as valuable tools for bioprocess development and design. The results obtained in batch fermentations showed that plasmid copy number values suffered a pronounced increase at the end of almost all fermentation conditions tested. Regarding fed-batch fermentations, the strategies with exponential feeding profiles, in contrast with those with constant feeding, showed higher biomass and plasmid yields, the maximum values obtained for these two parameters being 95.64 OD(600) and 344.3 mg plasmid DNA (pDNA)/L, respectively, when using an exponential feed rate of 0.2 h(-1). Despite the results obtained, cell physiology and plasmid stability monitoring revealed that, although higher pDNA overall yields were obtained, this fermentation exhibited lower plasmid stability and percentage of viable cells. In conclusion, this study allowed clarifying the bioprocess performance based on cell physiology and plasmid stability assessment, allowing improvement of the overall process and not only plasmid DNA yield and cell growth. PMID:22089386

  7. Using CellML with OpenCMISS to simulate multi-scale physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Phillip Nickerson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OpenCMISS is an open-source modeling environment aimed, in particular, at the solution of bioengineering problems. OpenCMISS consists of two main parts: a computational library (OpenCMISS-Iron and a field manipulation and visualisation library (OpenCMISS-Zinc. OpenCMISS is designed for the solution of coupled multi-scale, multi-physics problems in a general-purpose parallel environment.CellML is an XML format designed to encode biophysically based systems of ordinary differential equations and both linear and non-linear algebraic equations. A primary design goal of CellML is to allow mathematical models to be encoded in a modular and reusable format to aide reproducibility and interoperability of modeling studies.In OpenCMISS we make use of CellML models to enable users to configure various aspects of their multi-scale physiological models. This avoids the need for users to be familiar with the OpenCMISS internal code in order to perform customised computational experiments. Examples of this are: cellular electrophysiology models embedded in tissue electrical propagation models; material constitutive relationships for mechanical growth and deformation simulations; time-varying boundary conditions for various problem domains; fluid constitutive relationships and lumped parameter models. In this paper we provide implementation details describing how CellML models are integrated into multi-scale physiological models in OpenCMISS. The external interface OpenCMISS presents to users will also be described, including specific examples exemplifying the extensibility and usability these tools provide the physiological modelling and simulation community. We conclude with some thoughts on future extension of OpenCMISS to make use other community developed information standards, such as FieldML, SED-ML, and BioSignalML. Plans for the integration of accelerator code (GPU and FPGA generated from CellML models is also discussed.

  8. Corrosion phenomena of alloys and electrode materials in molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedenkopf, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffe und Verfahren der Energietechnik; Bischoff, M.M. [MTU-Friedrichshafen GmbH, - Neue Technologien - ZEB -, Muenchen (Germany); Wochner, T. [MTU-Friedrichshafen GmbH, Abt. TQZ, Friedrichshafen (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    The corrosion behavior of different alloys and the electrical conductivity of the growing corrosion scales was investigated under simulated and real molten carbonate fuel cell conditions. The corrosion of the usually used NiO cathode material was also investigated. In several exposure tests in oxidizing atmospheres, the FeCrMnNi steel 1.3965 showed a higher corrosion resistance to the aggressive carbonate media than the FeCrNi alloy 1.4404 (SS316L). This superior corrosion resistance is explained by the formation of a mixed (Fe,Ni,Mn){sub x}Cr{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} spinel layer, which reduces the outward diffusion of iron ions more than the mixed (Fe,Ni)Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel formed on austenitic FeCrNi steels. Oxide debris, which spalls off the current collectors, was investigated by XRD. The corrosion scales spalled off mainly at the curved area of the current collector and not at the cathode/current collector interface. The debris was strongly magnetic and consisted of several, in some cases lithiated iron oxides, whereby {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite), {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (maghemite) and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite) formed most of the debris. The investigations of the electrical conductivity of the corrosion scales have shown that the electrical conductivity is limited by the inner, Cr-containing oxide of the multi-layered corrosion scale. Cr-rich alloys which contain more than 20 wt.% Cr showed extremely high ohmic resistance of the corrosion scale, much higher than that of alloys containing less than 20 wt.% Cr due to the formation of highly conductive mixed spinel layers. Small additions of Al in the alloy increased the ohmic resistance of the corrosion scale by many orders of magnitude. Corrosion tests in the fuel environment showed, that common uncoated stainless steels are not suitable for the use as anodic current collectors.

  9. Resveratrol production in bioreactor: Assessment of cell physiological states and plasmid segregational stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida S. Afonso

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a plant secondary metabolite commonly found in peanuts and grapevines with significant health benefits. Recombinant organisms can produce large amounts of resveratrol and, in this work, Escherichia coli BW27784 was used to produce resveratrol in bioreactors while monitoring cell physiology and plasmid stability through flow cytometry and real-time qPCR, respectively. Initially, the influence of culture conditions and precursor addition was evaluated in screening assays and the data gathered was used to perform the bioreactor assays, allowing the production of 160 μg/mL of resveratrol. Cellular physiology and plasmid instability affected the final resveratrol production, with lower viability and plasmid copy numbers associated with lower yields. In sum, this study describes new tools to monitor the bioprocess, evaluating the effect of culture conditions, and its correlation with cell physiology and plasmid segregational stability, in order to define a viable and scalable bioprocess to fulfill the need for larger quantities of resveratrol.

  10. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles as Vehicles for Brain Cell-to-Cell Interactions in Physiological as well as Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Schiera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are involved in a great variety of physiological events occurring in the nervous system, such as cross talk among neurons and glial cells in synapse development and function, integrated neuronal plasticity, neuronal-glial metabolic exchanges, and synthesis and dynamic renewal of myelin. Many of these EV-mediated processes depend on the exchange of proteins, mRNAs, and noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, which occurs among glial and neuronal cells. In addition, production and exchange of EVs can be modified under pathological conditions, such as brain cancer and neurodegeneration. Like other cancer cells, brain tumours can use EVs to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance, and to transfer molecules into the surrounding cells, thus transforming their phenotype. Moreover, EVs can function as a way to discard material dangerous to cancer cells, such as differentiation-inducing proteins, and even drugs. Intriguingly, EVs seem to be also involved in spreading through the brain of aggregated proteins, such as prions and aggregated tau protein. Finally, EVs can carry useful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of diseases. Herein we summarize possible roles of EVs in brain physiological functions and discuss their involvement in the horizontal spreading, from cell to cell, of both cancer and neurodegenerative pathologies.

  11. Physiological and morphological characterization of ganglion cells in the salamander retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Jacoby, Roy; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) integrate visual information from the retina and transmit collective signals to the brain. A systematic investigation of functional and morphological characteristics of various types of RGCs is important to comprehensively understand how the visual system encodes and transmits information via various RGC pathways. This study evaluated both physiological and morphological properties of 67 RGCs in dark-adapted flat-mounted salamander retina by examining light-evoked cation and chloride current responses via voltage-clamp recordings and visualizing morphology by Lucifer yellow fluorescence with a confocal microscope. Six groups of RGCs were described: asymmetrical ON-OFF RGCs, symmetrical ON RGCs, OFF RGCs, and narrow-, medium- and wide-field ON-OFF RGCs. Dendritic field diameters of RGCs ranged 102-490 μm: narrow field (300 μm, 24%). Dendritic ramification patterns of RGCs agree with the sublamina A/B rule. 34% of RGCs were monostratified, 24% bistratified and 42% diffusely stratified. 70% of ON RGCs and OFF RGCs were monostratified. Wide-field RGCs were diffusely stratified. 82% of RGCs generated light-evoked ON-OFF responses, while 11% generated ON responses and 7% OFF responses. Response sensitivity analysis suggested that some RGCs obtained separated rod/cone bipolar cell inputs whereas others obtained mixed bipolar cell inputs. 25% of neurons in the RGC layer were displaced amacrine cells. Although more types may be defined by more refined classification criteria, this report is to incorporate more physiological properties into RGC classification. PMID:26731645

  12. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1-1% O2), physioxia or physoxia (∼1-13%), and normoxia (∼20%) are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia) or excess oxygen (hyperoxia) could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude) and pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation, solid tumor formation, lung disease, or myocardial infarction). Hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of heart disease, cancers, stroke, and other causes of mortality. Hypoxia inducible factor(s) (HIFs) are key oxygen sensors that mediate the ability of the cell to cope with decreased oxygen tension. These transcription factors regulate cellular adaptation to hypoxia and protect cells by responding acutely and inducing production of endogenous metabolites and proteins to promptly regulate metabolic pathways. Here, we review the role of the HIF pathway as a metabolic adaptation pathway and how this pathway plays a role in cell survival. We emphasize the roles of the HIF pathway in physiological adaptation, cell death, pH regulation, and adaptation during exercise. PMID:26491231

  13. Intrinsic optical signal imaging of glucose-stimulated physiological responses in the insulin secreting INS-1 β-cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Chao; Cui, Wan-Xing; Wang, Xu-Jing; Amthor, Franklin; Yao, Xin-Cheng

    2011-03-01

    Intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging has been established for noninvasive monitoring of stimulus-evoked physiological responses in the retina and other neural tissues. Recently, we extended the IOS imaging technology for functional evaluation of insulin secreting INS-1 cells. INS-1 cells provide a popular model for investigating β-cell dysfunction and diabetes. Our experiments indicate that IOS imaging allows simultaneous monitoring of glucose-stimulated physiological responses in multiple cells with high spatial (sub-cellular) and temporal (sub-second) resolution. Rapid image sequences reveal transient optical responses that have time courses comparable to glucose-evoked β-cell electrical activities.

  14. Physiological, pathological, and engineered cell identity reprogramming in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Derek K; Wang, Lei-Lei; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2016-07-01

    Multipotent neural stem cells persist in restricted regions of the adult mammalian central nervous system. These proliferative cells differentiate into diverse neuron subtypes to maintain neural homeostasis. This endogenous process can be reprogrammed as a compensatory response to physiological cues, traumatic injury, and neurodegeneration. In addition to innate neurogenesis, recent research has demonstrated that new neurons can be engineered via cell identity reprogramming in non-neurogenic regions of the adult central nervous system. A comprehensive understanding of these reprogramming mechanisms will be essential to the development of therapeutic neural regeneration strategies that aim to improve functional recovery after injury and neurodegeneration. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:499-517. doi: 10.1002/wdev.234 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27258392

  15. Flow phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few aspects of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are as potentially confusing as the effect of motion on the MR image. While the MR image is anatomically similar to the image produced by CT, the MR appearance of flowing blood has no correlate in CT. Flowing blood can appear bright or dark, depending on the velocity and direction of flow. To a first approximation, rapidly flowing blood appears dark ('flow void') and slowly flowing blood appears bright. This phenomenon is illustrated. This appearance is markedly influenced by factors related to the imaging sequence and to the MR imager itself. The signal from flowing blood depends on the position of the slice relative to the rest of the multislice imaging volume. It depends on the repetition time TR, the echo-delay time TE, the echo number, and the slice thickness. In fast scanning techniques with short repetition times, gradient echoes, and flip angles less than 90 degrees, flow has a different appearance than on standard 90 degrees/180 degrees spin-echo images. The principles which affect the appearance of flowing blood also affect the appearance of flowing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Examples of CSF flow phenomena are given

  16. Novel magnesium alloy Mg–2La caused no cytotoxic effects on cells in physiological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizbauer, Andreas, E-mail: weizbauer.andreas@mh-hannover.de [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Straße 1-7, 30625 Hannover (Germany); CrossBIT, Center for Biocompatibility and Implant-Immunology, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 31, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Seitz, Jan-Marten [Institute of Materials Science, Leibniz Universität Hannover, An der Universität 2, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Werle, Peter [ABB AG, Trafoweg 4, 06112 Halle (Germany); Hegermann, Jan [Institute of Functional and Applied Anatomy, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Straße 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Willbold, Elmar [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Straße 1-7, 30625 Hannover (Germany); CrossBIT, Center for Biocompatibility and Implant-Immunology, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 31, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Eifler, Rainer [Institute of Materials Science, Leibniz Universität Hannover, An der Universität 2, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Windhagen, Henning [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Straße 1-7, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Reifenrath, Janin [Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany); Waizy, Hazibullah [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Straße 1-7, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    Using several different in vitro assays, a new biodegradable magnesium alloy Mg–2La, composed of 98% magnesium and 2% lanthanum, was investigated as a possible implant material for biomedical applications. An in vitro cytotoxicity test, according to EN ISO 10993-5/12, with L929 and human osteoblastic cells identified no toxic effects on cell viability at physiological concentrations (at 50% dilutions and higher). The metabolic activity of human osteoblasts in the 100% extract was decreased to < 70% and was therefore rated as cytotoxic. The degradation rates of Mg–2La were evaluated in phosphate buffered saline and four different cell culture media. The degradation rates were shown to be influenced by the composition of the solution, and the addition of fetal bovine serum slightly accelerated the corrosive process. The results of these in vitro experiments suggest that Mg–2La is a promising candidate for use as an orthopedic implant material. - Highlights: • A new magnesium alloy (Mg–2La) has been developed. • Magnesium alloy Mg–2La revealed no toxic effect in physiological concentrations. • Degradation rates were influenced by the corrosion media. • The addition of fetal bovine serum increased the corrosive process slightly.

  17. Novel magnesium alloy Mg–2La caused no cytotoxic effects on cells in physiological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using several different in vitro assays, a new biodegradable magnesium alloy Mg–2La, composed of 98% magnesium and 2% lanthanum, was investigated as a possible implant material for biomedical applications. An in vitro cytotoxicity test, according to EN ISO 10993-5/12, with L929 and human osteoblastic cells identified no toxic effects on cell viability at physiological concentrations (at 50% dilutions and higher). The metabolic activity of human osteoblasts in the 100% extract was decreased to < 70% and was therefore rated as cytotoxic. The degradation rates of Mg–2La were evaluated in phosphate buffered saline and four different cell culture media. The degradation rates were shown to be influenced by the composition of the solution, and the addition of fetal bovine serum slightly accelerated the corrosive process. The results of these in vitro experiments suggest that Mg–2La is a promising candidate for use as an orthopedic implant material. - Highlights: • A new magnesium alloy (Mg–2La) has been developed. • Magnesium alloy Mg–2La revealed no toxic effect in physiological concentrations. • Degradation rates were influenced by the corrosion media. • The addition of fetal bovine serum increased the corrosive process slightly

  18. Differentiation induced by physiological and pharmacological stimuli leads to increased antigenicity of human neuroblastoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lena-Maria Carlson; Sven P(a)hlman; Anna De Geer; Per Kogner; Jelena Levitskaya

    2008-01-01

    Sympathetic neuronal differentiation is associated with favorable prognosis of neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of early childhood. Differentiation agents have proved useful in clinical protocols of NB treatment, but using them as a sole treatment is not sufficient to induce tumor elimination in patients. Therefore, complementary approaches, such as immunotherapy, are warranted. Here we demonstrate that differentiation of NB cell lines and ex vivo isolated tumor cells in response to physiological or pharmacological stimuli is associated with acquisition of increased antigenicity. This manifests as increased expression of surface major histocompatibility class I complexes and ICAM-1 molecules and translates into increased sensitivity of NB cells to lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells. The latter is paralleled by enhanced ability of differentiated cells to form immune conjugates and bind increased amounts of granzyme B to the cell surface. We demonstrate, for the first time, that, regardless of the stimulus applied, the differentiation state in NBs is associated with increased tumor antigenicity that enables more efficient elimination of tumor cells by cytotoxic lymphocytes and paves the way for combined application of differentiation-inducing agents and immunotherapy as an auxiliary approach in NB patients.

  19. Cancer stem cell hypotheses: Impact on modern molecular physiology and pharmacology research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Igor Pantic

    2011-12-01

    Although questioned on several occasions, the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been confirmed by a number of studies on experimental animal models. Nevertheless, it was shown that CSC hypotheses have several limitations and inconsistencies regarding the explanation of CSC origin, CSC identification and isolation, possible heterogeneity within CSC population, as well as methodology issues in some studies that were carried out in order to prove CSC existence. The aim of this article is to give a short and comprehensive review of recent advances concerning CSC hypothesis and to describe its impact on modern molecular physiology and pharmacology research.

  20. Cancer stem cell hypotheses: impact on modern molecular physiology and pharmacology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Igor

    2011-12-01

    Although questioned on several occasions, the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been confirmed by a number of studies on experimental animal models. Nevertheless, it was shown that CSC hypotheses have several limitations and inconsistencies regarding the explanation of CSC origin, CSC identification and isolation, possible heterogeneity within CSC population, as well as methodology issues in some studies that were carried out in order to prove CSC existence. The aim of this article is to give a short and comprehensive review of recent advances concerning CSC hypothesis and to describe its impact on modern molecular physiology and pharmacology research. PMID:22116294

  1. Interferon-gamma sensitizes colonic epithelial cell lines to physiological and therapeutic inducers of colonocyte apoptosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, J

    2012-02-03

    Homeostasis in the colonic epithelium is achieved by a continuous cycle of proliferation and apoptosis, in which imbalances are associated with disease. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colon cancer are associated with either excessive or insufficient apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, respectively. By using two colonic epithelial cell lines, HT29 and SW620, we investigated how the epithelial cell\\'s sensitivity to apoptosis was regulated by the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). We found that IFN-gamma sensitized HT29 cells, and to a lesser extent SW620, to diverse inducers of apoptosis of physiologic or therapeutic relevance to the colon. These apoptosis inducers included Fas (CD95\\/APO-1) ligand (FasL), short-chain fatty acids, and chemotherapeutic drugs. The extent of IFN-gamma-mediated apoptosis sensitization in these two cell lines correlated well with the degree of IFN-gamma-mediated upregulation of the proapoptotic protease caspase-1. Although IFN-gamma alone effectively sensitized HT29 cells to apoptosis, inclusion of the protein synthesis inhibitor cyclohexamide (CHX) during apoptotic challenge was necessary for maximal sensitization of SW620. The requirement of CHX to sensitize SW620 cells to apoptosis implies a need to inhibit translation of antiapoptotic proteins absent from HT29. In particular, the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 was strongly expressed in SW620 cells but absent from HT29. Our results indicate that IFN-gamma increases the sensitivity of colonic epithelial cells to diverse apoptotic stimuli in concert, via upregulation of caspase-1. Our findings implicate caspase-1 and Bcl-2 as important central points of control determining the general sensitivity of colonic epithelial cells to apoptosis.

  2. Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slice Culture Facilitates Long-Term Studies of Exocrine and Endocrine Cell Physiology in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Speier, Stephan; Marciniak, Anja; Selck, Claudia; Friedrich, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Studies on pancreatic cell physiology rely on the investigation of exocrine and endocrine cells in vitro. Particularly, in the case of the exocrine tissue these studies have suffered from a reduced functional viability of acinar cells in culture. As a result not only investigations on dispersed acinar cells and isolated acini were limited in their potential, but also prolonged studies on pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells in an intact pancreatic tissue environment were unfeasible. To ove...

  3. Transcriptome analysis and physiology of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 cells under continuous culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzetti, V; Grattepanche, F; Moine, D; Berger, B; Rezzonico, E; Arigoni, F; Lacroix, C

    2012-12-01

    A central issue in the use of probiotics in food and food supplements is their sensitivity to many environmental stress factors. The resistance of probiotic cells to lethal stress can be improved by application of homologous or heterologous sub-lethal stress during culture. This screening procedure is generally performed using batch cultures. Continuous cultures could be a suitable and more efficient method to test different stress factors on one culture instead of repeating several batch cultures. However, before testing stresses using continuous cultures, the physiological stability of continuously produced cells over a considered time period must be first evaluated. A continuous culture of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 was maintained for 211 h at a dilution rate of 0.1 per h, mimicking a deceleration growth phase culture. Stable viable cell counts were measured over the culture period, decreasing only moderately from 8.8 to 8.6 log10 cfu/ml. A slight shift in metabolite production, characterized by increased lactate and decreased acetate, formate and ethanol concentrations was observed. Susceptibilities to antibiotics and stress conditions were stable (cefotaxim, ampicillin, ceftazidime) or moderately affected (simulated gastric juices, heat, bile salts, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, penicillin, vancomycin and neomycin) over culturing time. Comparison of gene transcription profiles between samples collected after 31 h of continuous culture and samples collected after 134 and 211 h revealed only limited changes in expression of 1.0 and 3.8% of total genes, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that continuous culture can be used to produce bacterial cells with stable physiological properties suitable for fast and efficient screening of sub-lethal stress conditions. PMID:23234728

  4. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The third semi-annual period of the MTP project has been involved with performing experiments using the Membrane Transport Apparatus (MTA), development of analysis techniques for the experiment results, analytical modeling of the osmotic transport phenomena, and completion of a DC-9 microgravity flight to test candidate fluid cell geometries. Preparations were also made for the MTP Science Concept Review (SCR), held on 13 June 1997 at Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver. These activities are detailed in the report.

  5. Single-Cell Behavior and Population Heterogeneity: Solving an Inverse Problem to Compute the Intrinsic Physiological State Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Spetsieris, Konstantinos; Zygourakis, Kyriacos

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of isogenic cell populations can be described by cell population balance models that account for phenotypic heterogeneity. To utilize the predictive power of these models, however, we must know the rates of single-cell reaction and division and the bivariate partition probability density function. These three intrinsic physiological state (IPS) functions can be obtained by solving an inverse problem that requires knowledge of the phenotypic distributions for the overall cell popu...

  6. Exposure of endothelial cells to physiological levels of myeloperoxidase-modified LDL delays pericellular fibrinolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Zouaoui Boudjeltia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blood fluidity is maintained by a delicate balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis. The endothelial cell surface is a key player in this equilibrium and cell surface disruptions can upset the balance. We investigated the role of pericellular myeloperoxidase oxidized LDLs (Mox-LDLs in this balance. METHODS AND RESULTS: We designed a technical device that enabled us to monitor fibrinolysis in real-time at the surface of an endothelial cell line (EA.hy926, and showed that Mox-LDL decreased pericellular fibrinolysis. There were no changes in fibrinolysis when EA.hy926 endothelial cells were exposed to native LDL (24 hours at doses of 10, 50, 100 and up to 1250 µg/ml. However, treatment of EA.hy926 endothelial cells with 10 and 50 µg/ml of Mox-LDL (physiological serum concentrations increased the lysis time by 15 and 13%, respectively (p<0.001, although this effect was not present at higher concentrations of 100 µg/ml. This effect was not correlated with any changes in PAI-1 or t-PA or PA Receptor (PAR expression. No effect was observed at the surface of smooth muscle cells used as controls. CONCLUSION: Our data link the current favorite hypothesis that modified LDL has a causal role in atheroma plaque formation with an old suggestion that fibrin may also play a causal role. Our data help complete the paradigm of atherosclerosis: Modified LDL locally enhances fibrin deposition (present work; fibrin deposits enhance endothelial permeability; this effect allows subendothelial accumulation of lipid and foam cells.

  7. Physiological problems in patients undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgisun Kapucu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stem cell transplantation is usually performed in an effort to extend the patient′s life span and to improve their quality of life. This study was conducted to determine the postoperative physiological effects experienced by patients who had undergone autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Methods: The research is a descriptive study conducted with a sample of 60 patients at Stem Cell Transplantation Units in Ankara. Percentile calculation and chi-square tests were used to evaluate the data. Results: When a comparison was made between patients who had undergone allogeneic Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and those who had undergone autologous HSCT, results indicated that problems occurred more often for the allogeneic HSCT patients. The problems included: Digestion (94.3%, dermatological (76.7%, cardiac and respiratory (66.7%, neurological (66.7%, eye (56.7%, infections (26.7% and Graft Versus Host Disease (5 patients. Furthermore, the problems with pain (50%, numbness and tingling (40%, and speech disorders (3 patients were observed more often in autologous BMT patients. Conclusion: Autologous and allogeneic patients experienced most of physical problems due to they receive high doses of chemotherapy. Therefore, it is recommended that an interdisciplinary support team approach should be usedtohelp reduce and manage the problems that may arise during patient care.

  8. A model combining cell physiology and population genetics to explain Escherichia coli laboratory evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acerenza Luis

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laboratory experiments under controlled conditions during thousands of generations are useful tools to assess the processes underlying bacterial evolution. As a result of these experiments, the way in which the traits change in time is obtained. Under these conditions, the bacteria E. coli shows a parallel increase in cell volume and fitness. Results To explain this pattern it is required to consider organismic and population contributions. For this purpose we incorporate relevant information concerning bacterial structure, composition and transformations in a minimal modular model. In the short time scale, the model reproduces the physiological responses of the traits to changes in nutrient concentration. The decay of unused catabolic functions, found experimentally, is introduced in the model using simple population genetics. The resulting curves representing the evolution of volume and fitness in time are in good agreement with those obtained experimentally. Conclusions This study draws attention on physiology when studying evolution. Moreover, minimal modular models appear to be an adequate strategy to unite these barely related disciplines of biology.

  9. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent

  10. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheard, Michael A., E-mail: msheard@chla.usc.edu [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Ghent, Matthew V., E-mail: mattghent@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Health Sciences Campus, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Cabral, Daniel J., E-mail: dcabral14@gmail.com [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Lee, Joanne C., E-mail: joannebarnhart@gmail.com [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Khankaldyyan, Vazgen, E-mail: khangaldian@yahoo.com [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Ji, Lingyun, E-mail: lingyun.ji@med.usc.edu [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Wu, Samuel Q., E-mail: swu@chla.usc.edu [Medical Genetics, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Kang, Min H., E-mail: min.kang@ttuhsc.edu [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent.

  11. Gastrointestinal B-cell lymphomas: From understanding B-cell physiology to classification and molecular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaert, Xavier; Tousseyn, Thomas; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2012-12-15

    The gut is the most common extranodal site where lymphomas arise. Although all histological lymphoma types may develop in the gut, small and large B-cell lymphomas predominate. The sometimes unexpected finding of a lymphoid lesion in an endoscopic biopsy of the gut may challenge both the clinician (who is not always familiar with lymphoma pathogenesis) and the pathologist (who will often be hampered in his/her diagnostic skill by the limited amount of available tissue). Moreover, the past 2 decades have spawned an avalanche of new data that encompasses both the function of the reactive B-cell as well as the pathogenic pathways that lead to its neoplastic counterpart, the B-cell lymphoma. Therefore, this review aims to offer clinicians an overview of B-cell lymphomas in the gut, and their pertinent molecular features that have led to new insights regarding lymphomagenesis. It addresses the question as how to incorporate all presently available information on normal and neoplastic B-cell differentiation, and how this knowledge can be applied in daily clinical practice (e.g., diagnostic tools, prognostic biomarkers or therapeutic targets) to optimalise the managment of this heterogeneous group of neoplasms. PMID:23443141

  12. TXNDC5, a Newly Discovered Disulfide Isomerase with a Key Role in Cell Physiology and Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Horna-Terrón

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin domain-containing 5 (TXNDC5 is a member of the protein disulfide isomerase family, acting as a chaperone of endoplasmic reticulum under not fully characterized conditions As a result, TXNDC5 interacts with many cell proteins, contributing to their proper folding and correct formation of disulfide bonds through its thioredoxin domains. Moreover, it can also work as an electron transfer reaction, recovering the functional isoform of other protein disulfide isomerases, replacing reduced glutathione in its role. Finally, it also acts as a cellular adapter, interacting with the N-terminal domain of adiponectin receptor. As can be inferred from all these functions, TXNDC5 plays an important role in cell physiology; therefore, dysregulation of its expression is associated with oxidative stress, cell ageing and a large range of pathologies such as arthritis, cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, vitiligo and virus infections. Its implication in all these important diseases has made TXNDC5 a susceptible biomarker or even a potential pharmacological target.

  13. Perspective of harnessing energy from landfill leachate via microbial fuel cells: novel biofuels and electrogenic physiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong; Wang, Ting; Huang, Xinghua; Dolfing, Jan; Xie, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Organic carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur are highly concentrated in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill leachate, which usually frustrates conventional leachate treatment technologies from the perspective of energy costs. Therefore, the possibility of converting leachate to a new energy source via microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has been examined recently. This paper summarizes the power output and energy recovery efficiency of the leachate-fed MFCs according to different feeding patterns, cell structures, and loading rates. Also, we assess potential energy-generating chemicals in leachate like nitrogen and sulfur compounds and propose alternative pathways, which may lift strict ratios between organic carbon and nitrogen content in conventional denitrification of leachate and are expected to achieve a higher voltage than traditional organic-oxygen based cells. Although currently power output of leachate-fed MFCs is limited, it seems well possible that dynamic characteristics of MSW leachates and microbial physiologies underlying some bio-electrochemically efficient activities (e.g., direct interspecies electron transfer) could be stimulated in MFC systems to improve the present status. PMID:26239072

  14. Circulating cell-free DNA: an up-coming molecular marker in exercise physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbach, Sarah; Tug, Suzan; Simon, Perikles

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) concentrations is of importance for many biomedical disciplines including the field of exercise physiology. Increases of cfDNA due to exercise are described to be a potential hallmark for the overtraining syndrome and might be related to, or trigger adaptations of, immune function induced by strenuous exercise. At the same time, exercise provides a practicable model for studying the phenomenon of cfDNA that is described to be of pathophysiological relevance for different topics in clinical medicine like autoimmune diseases and cancer. In this review, we are summarizing the current knowledge of exercise-based acute and chronic alterations in cfDNA levels and their physiological significance. The effects of acute exercise on cfDNA concentrations have been investigated in resistance exercises and in continuous, stepwise and interval endurance exercises of different durations. cfDNA concentrations peaked immediately after acute exercise and showed a rapid return to baseline levels. Typical markers of skeletal muscle damage (creatine kinase, uric acid, C-reactive protein) show delayed kinetics compared with the cfDNA peak response. Exercise parameters such as intensity, duration or average energy expenditure do not explain the extent of increasing cfDNA concentrations after strenuous exercise. This could be due to complex processes inside the human organism during and after physical activity. Therefore, we hypothesize composite effects of different physiological stress parameters that come along with exercise to be responsible for increasing cfDNA concentrations. We suggest that due to acute stress, cfDNA levels increase rapidly by a spontaneous active or passive release mechanism that is not yet known. As a result of the rapid and parallel increase of cfDNA and lactate in an incremental treadmill test leading to exhaustion within 15-20 minutes, it is unlikely that cfDNA is released into the plasma by typical necrosis

  15. LABILE IRON IN CELLS AND BODY FLUIDS . Physiology, Pathology and Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi Ioav Cabantchik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In living systems iron appears predominantly associated with proteins, but can also be detected in forms referred as labile iron, which denotes the combined redox properties of iron and its amenability to exchange between ligands, including chelators. The labile cell iron (LCI composition varies with metal concentration and substances with chelating groups but also with pH and the redox potential. Although physiologically in the lower µM range, LCI plays a key role in cell iron economy as cross-roads of metabolic pathways. LCI levels are continually regulated by an iron-responsive machinery that balances iron uptake versus deposition into ferritin. However, LCI rises aberrantly in some cell types due to faulty cell utilization pathways or infiltration by pathological iron forms that are found in hemosiderotic plasma. As LCI attains pathological levels, it can catalyze reactive O species (ROS formation that, at particular threshold, can surpass cellular anti-oxidant capacities and seriously damage its constituents. While in normal plasma and interstitial fluids, virtually all iron is securely carried by circulating transferrin (that renders iron essentially non-labile, in systemic iron overload (IO, the total plasma iron binding capacity is often surpassed by a massive iron influx from hyperabsorptive gut or from erythrocyte overburdened spleen and/or liver. As plasma transferrin approaches iron saturation, labile plasma iron (LPI emerges in forms that can infiltrate cells by unregulated routes and raise LCI to toxic levels. Despite the limited knowledge available on LPI speciation in different types and degrees of iron overload, LPI measurements can be and are in fact used for identifying systemic IO and for initiating/adjusting chelation regimens to attain full-day LPI protection. A recent application of labile iron assay is the detection of labile components in iv iron formulations per se as well as in plasma (LPI following parenteral iron

  16. CALCIUM SIGNALING, ION CHANNELS AND MORE: THE DT40 SYSTEM AS A MODEL OF VERTEBRATE ION HOMEOSTASIS AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Perraud, Anne-Laure; Schmitz, Carsten; Scharenberg, Andrew M.

    2006-01-01

    The DT40 B-lymphocyte cell line is a chicken bursal lymphocyte tumor cell line which grows rapidly, expresses a variety of types of constitutive and signal dependent ion transport systems., and supports the efficient use of stable and conditional genetic manipulations. Below, we review the use of DT40 cells in dissecting molecular mechanisms involved in Ca2+, Mg2+, and Zn2+ transport physiology. These studies highlight the flexibility and advantages the DT40 environment offers to investigator...

  17. Transformed human mesenchymal stem cells are more radiosensitive compared to their cells of origin in normoxia and in physiological hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full text of the publication follows. Purpose: The presence of hypoxic regions in tumours is associated with the recurrence of solid tumours after treatment with radiotherapy and thought to be an important element in defining the stem cell niche. We studied the effect of hypoxia on the response to radiation in sequentially transformed human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to investigate how the genetic events that lead to tumorigenicity influence the cellular response to radiation under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Experimental Design: Human bone marrow derived SH2+, SH4+, Stro-1+ MSC were transformed step-wise by retroviral transfection of hTERT, HPV-16 E6 and E7, SV40 small T antigen and oncogenic H-ras. Cells were grown and irradiated with 0, 1 to 5 Gy, X-Ray at 20%, 5% and 1% oxygen tensions. Cytotoxicity, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and checkpoint signalling were compared between cells at three different stages of transformation and in different oxygen concentrations. Results: MSCs became more radiosensitive at each point during step-wise transformation, and this effect persisted when cells were irradiated in physiological hypoxia. Increased cytotoxicity of radiation was associated with increased residual DNA DSB at 24 post X-irradiation assessed by gamma-H2AX foci. Growth and irradiation in 1% but not 5% oxygen promoted increased radioresistance compared to growth in 20% oxygen but did not change the relative sensitivity of tumorigenic cells compared to parental cells. Activation of checkpoint signalling before and after single radiation doses is more marked in tumorigenic cells compared to parental lines, and is not altered when cells are irradiated and grown in hypoxic conditions. Conclusions: These data show that tumorigenic cells are more radiosensitive compared to non-tumorigenic parental cells in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. 1% hypoxia promotes radioresistance in all cells. Checkpoint signalling is up-regulated in tumorigenic

  18. Thrombospondin-1, -2 and -5 have differential effects on vascular smooth muscle cell physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helkin, Alex; Maier, Kristopher G. [SUNY Upstate Medical University, Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Services, Syracuse, NY (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs VA Healthcare Network Upstate New York at Syracuse, Syracuse, NY (United States); Gahtan, Vivian, E-mail: gahtanv@upstate.edu [SUNY Upstate Medical University, Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Services, Syracuse, NY (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs VA Healthcare Network Upstate New York at Syracuse, Syracuse, NY (United States)

    2015-09-04

    Introduction: The thrombospondins (TSPs) are matricellular proteins that exert multifunctional effects by binding cytokines, cell-surface receptors and other proteins. TSPs play important roles in vascular pathobiology and are all expressed in arterial lesions. The differential effects of TSP-1, -2, and -5 represent a gap in knowledge in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) physiology. Our objective is to determine if structural differences of the TSPs imparted different effects on VSMC functions critical to the formation of neointimal hyperplasia. We hypothesize that TSP-1 and -2 induce similar patterns of migration, proliferation and gene expression, while the effects of TSP-5 are different. Methods: Human aortic VSMC chemotaxis was tested for TSP-2 and TSP-5 (1–40 μg/mL), and compared to TSP-1 and serum-free media (SFM) using a modified Boyden chamber. Next, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2 or TSP-5 (0.2–40 μg/mL). Proliferation was assessed by MTS assay. Finally, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2, TSP-5 or SFM for 3, 6 or 24 h. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed on 96 genes using a microfluidic card. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA or t-test, with p < 0.05 being significant. Results: TSP-1, TSP-2 and TSP-5 at 20 μg/mL all induce chemotaxis 3.1 fold compared to serum-free media. TSP-1 and TSP-2 induced proliferation 53% and 54% respectively, whereas TSP-5 did not. In the gene analysis, overall, cardiovascular system development and function is the canonical pathway most influenced by TSP treatment, and includes multiple growth factors, cytokines and proteases implicated in cellular migration, proliferation, vasculogenesis, apoptosis and inflammation pathways. Conclusions and relevance: The results of this study indicate TSP-1, -2, and -5 play active roles in VSMC physiology and gene expression. Similarly to TSP-1, VSMC chemotaxis to TSP-2 and -5 is dose-dependent. TSP-1 and -2 induces VSMC proliferation, but TSP-5 does not, likely

  19. Thrombospondin-1, -2 and -5 have differential effects on vascular smooth muscle cell physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The thrombospondins (TSPs) are matricellular proteins that exert multifunctional effects by binding cytokines, cell-surface receptors and other proteins. TSPs play important roles in vascular pathobiology and are all expressed in arterial lesions. The differential effects of TSP-1, -2, and -5 represent a gap in knowledge in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) physiology. Our objective is to determine if structural differences of the TSPs imparted different effects on VSMC functions critical to the formation of neointimal hyperplasia. We hypothesize that TSP-1 and -2 induce similar patterns of migration, proliferation and gene expression, while the effects of TSP-5 are different. Methods: Human aortic VSMC chemotaxis was tested for TSP-2 and TSP-5 (1–40 μg/mL), and compared to TSP-1 and serum-free media (SFM) using a modified Boyden chamber. Next, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2 or TSP-5 (0.2–40 μg/mL). Proliferation was assessed by MTS assay. Finally, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2, TSP-5 or SFM for 3, 6 or 24 h. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed on 96 genes using a microfluidic card. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA or t-test, with p < 0.05 being significant. Results: TSP-1, TSP-2 and TSP-5 at 20 μg/mL all induce chemotaxis 3.1 fold compared to serum-free media. TSP-1 and TSP-2 induced proliferation 53% and 54% respectively, whereas TSP-5 did not. In the gene analysis, overall, cardiovascular system development and function is the canonical pathway most influenced by TSP treatment, and includes multiple growth factors, cytokines and proteases implicated in cellular migration, proliferation, vasculogenesis, apoptosis and inflammation pathways. Conclusions and relevance: The results of this study indicate TSP-1, -2, and -5 play active roles in VSMC physiology and gene expression. Similarly to TSP-1, VSMC chemotaxis to TSP-2 and -5 is dose-dependent. TSP-1 and -2 induces VSMC proliferation, but TSP-5 does not, likely

  20. Gastrointestinal B-cell lymphomas: From understanding B-cell physiology to classification and molecular pathology

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The gut is the most common extranodal site where lymphomas arise. Although all histological lymphoma types may develop in the gut, small and large B-cell lymphomas predominate. The sometimes unexpected finding of a lymphoid lesion in an endoscopic biopsy of the gut may challenge both the clinician (who is not always familiar with lymphoma pathogenesis) and the pathologist (who will often be hampered in his/her diagnostic skill by the limited amount of available tissue). Moreover, the past 2 d...

  1. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagan, Jonathan, E-mail: jdpagan@uams.edu; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Gupta, Kalpna [Vascular Biology Center and Division of Hematology-Oncology Transplantation, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, MN 72223 (United States); Griffin, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-02-18

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm{sup 3}) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  2. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpna Gupta

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm3 grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve

  3. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm3) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the oxygenation

  4. Mathematical physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sneyd, James

    2009-01-01

    There has been a long history of interaction between mathematics and physiology. This book looks in detail at a wide selection of mathematical models in physiology, showing how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models give rise to interesting and challenging mathematical questions. With its coverage of many recent models it gives an overview of the field, while many older models are also discussed, to put the modern work in context. In this second edition the coverage of basic principles has been expanded to include such topics as stochastic differential equations, Markov models and Gibbs free energy, and the selection of models has also been expanded to include some of the basic models of fluid transport, respiration/perfusion, blood diseases, molecular motors, smooth muscle, neuroendrocine cells, the baroreceptor loop, turboglomerular oscillations, blood clotting and the retina. Owing to this extensive coverage, the second edition is published in two volumes. ...

  5. Plant physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Duca, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of plant physiology: plant cell physiology, water regime of plants, photosynthesis, mineral nutrition, plant respiration, plant growth and development, movements in plants, signal perception and transduction etc. It focuses on the fundamental principles of plant physiology and biochemistry from the molecular level to whole plants, on the mechanisms of plant-environment interactions. The book is intended for students (biologists, physiologists, biochemists, biophysicists, ecologists, geneticists), teachers and researchers. Particular emphasis is given to recent research advances made on national and international levels, as well as to personal experimental results of the author that are relevant for a deeper understanding of processes and for practical implementation of gained knowledge. An essential amount of illustrative material (graphics, images, schemes, illustrations) completes the text and supplies additional information in an accessible manner. At the end of each chapter...

  6. Gene expression profiling of dendritic cells in different physiological stages under Cordyceps sinensis treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yang Li

    Full Text Available Cordyceps sinensis (CS has been commonly used as herbal medicine and a health supplement in China for over two thousand years. Although previous studies have demonstrated that CS has benefits in immunoregulation and anti-inflammation, the precise mechanism by which CS affects immunomodulation is still unclear. In this study, we exploited duplicate sets of loop-design microarray experiments to examine two different batches of CS and analyze the effects of CS on dendritic cells (DCs, in different physiology stages: naïve stage and inflammatory stage. Immature DCs were treated with CS, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, or LPS plus CS (LPS/CS for two days, and the gene expression profiles were examined using cDNA microarrays. The results of two loop-design microarray experiments showed good intersection rates. The expression level of common genes found in both loop-design microarray experiments was consistent, and the correlation coefficients (Rs, were higher than 0.96. Through intersection analysis of microarray results, we identified 295 intersecting significantly differentially expressed (SDE genes of the three different treatments (CS, LPS, and LPS/CS, which participated mainly in the adjustment of immune response and the regulation of cell proliferation and death. Genes regulated uniquely by CS treatment were significantly involved in the regulation of focal adhesion pathway, ECM-receptor interaction pathway, and hematopoietic cell lineage pathway. Unique LPS regulated genes were significantly involved in the regulation of Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, systemic lupus erythematosus pathway, and complement and coagulation cascades pathway. Unique LPS/CS regulated genes were significantly involved in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation pathway. These results could provide useful information in further study of the pharmacological mechanisms of CS. This study also demonstrates that with a rigorous experimental design, the biological effects

  7. A laccase-glucose oxidase biofuel cell prototype operating in a physiological buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we report on the design and study of a biofuel cell consisting of a glucose oxidase-based anode (Aspergillus niger) and a laccase-based cathode (Trametes versicolor) using osmium-based redox polymers as mediators of the biocatalysts' electron transfer at graphite electrode surfaces. The graphite electrodes of the device are modified with the deposition and immobilization of the appropriate enzyme and the osmium redox polymer mediator. A redox polymer [Os(4,4'-diamino-2,2'bipyridine)2(poly{N-vinylimidazole})-(poly{ N-vinylimidazole})9Cl]Cl (E ' = -0.110 V versus Ag/AgCl) of moderately low redox potential is used for the glucose oxidizing anode and a redox polymer [Os(phenanthroline)2(poly{N-vinylimidazole})2-(poly{N-vinylimidazole})8]Cl2 (E ' = 0.49 V versus Ag/AgCl) of moderately high redox potential is used at the dioxygen reducing cathode. The enzyme and redox polymer are cross-linked with polyoxyethylene bis(glycidyl ether). The working biofuel cell was studied under air at 37 deg. C in a 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution of pH range 4.4-7.4, containing 0.1 M sodium chloride and 10 mM glucose. Under physiological conditions (pH 7.4) maximum power density, evaluated from the geometric area of the electrode, reached 16 μW/cm2 at a cell voltage of 0.25 V. At lower pH values maximum power density was 40 μW/cm2 at 0.4 V (pH 5.5) and 10 μW/cm2 at 0.3 V (pH 4.4)

  8. Investigations of Protein Structure and Function Using the Scientific Literature: An Assignment for an Undergraduate Cell Physiology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulnix, Amy B.

    2003-01-01

    Undergraduate biology curricula are being modified to model and teach the activities of scientists better. The assignment described here, one that investigates protein structure and function, was designed for use in a sophomore-level cell physiology course at Earlham College. Students work in small groups to read and present in poster format on…

  9. Endogenous resident c-Kit cardiac stem cells increase in mice with an exercise-induced, physiologically hypertrophied heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Ferreira Leite

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity evokes well-known adaptations in the cardiovascular system. Although exercise training induces cardiac remodeling, whether multipotent stem cells play a functional role in the hypertrophic process remains unknown. To evaluate this possibility, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to swimming training aimed at achieving cardiac hypertrophy, which was morphologically and electrocardiographically characterized. Subsequently, c-Kit+Lin− and Sca-1+Lin− cardiac stem cells (CSCs were quantified using flow cytometry while cardiac muscle-derived stromal cells (CMSCs, also known as cardiac-derived mesenchymal stem cells were assessed using in vitro colony-forming unit fibroblast assay (CFU-F. Only the number of c-Kit+Lin− cells increased in the hypertrophied heart. To investigate a possible extracardiac origin of these cells, a parabiotic eGFP transgenic/wild-type mouse model was used. The parabiotic pairs were subjected to swimming, and the wild-type heart in particular was tested for eGFP+ stem cells. The results revealed a negligible number of extracardiac stem cells in the heart, allowing us to infer a cardiac origin for the increased amount of detected c-Kit+ cells. In conclusion, the number of resident Sca-1+Lin− cells and CMSCs was not changed, whereas the number of c-Kit+Lin− cells was increased during physiological cardiac hypertrophy. These c-Kit+Lin− CSCs may contribute to the physiological cardiac remodeling that result from exercise training.

  10. Genomic, genetic and physiological effects of bio-electrospraying on live cells of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to directly engineer living cells is rapidly becoming a hot field of research for a wide range of applications within the life sciences. 'Bio-electrospraying' cells, a recently developed technique, has great potential in this area. In this paper, we quantify genetic, genomic and physiological effects of bio-electrospraying cells of a model eukaryote, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results demonstrate that yeast cells bio-electrosprayed at 30 kV have not incurred any detectable damage at a genomic or genetic level, and that the detectable physiological stress of the procedure is negligible. These results support our proposal to use yeast as a model system to develop bio-electrospray devices and protocols

  11. Physiological analysis of yeast cells by flow cytometry during serial-repitching of low-malt beer fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shioya, Suteaki

    2007-05-01

    At the end of beer brewing fermentation, yeast cells are collected and repitched for economical reasons. Although it is generally accepted that the physiological state of inoculated yeast cells affects their subsequent fermentation performance, the effect of serial-repitching on the physiological state of such yeast cells has not been well clarified. In this study, the fermentation performance of yeast cells during serial-repitching was investigated. After multiple repitchings, the specific growth rate and maximum optical density (OD(660)) decreased, and increases in isoamyl alcohol, which causes an undesirable flavor, and residual free amino acid nitrogen (FAN) concentrations were observed. The physiological state of individual cells before inoculation was characterized by flow cytometry using the fluorescent dyes dehydrorhodamine 123 (DHR) and bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol (OXN). The fluorescence intensities of DHR, an indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROSs), and OXN, which indicates membrane potential, gradually increased as the number of serial-repitching cycles increased. Fluorescence intensity correlated strongly with cell growth. The subsequent fermentation performance can be predicted from this correlation. PMID:17609161

  12. Biomechanics of red blood cells in human spleen and consequences for physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivkin, Igor V; Peng, Zhangli; Karniadakis, George E; Buffet, Pierre A; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra

    2016-07-12

    Red blood cells (RBCs) can be cleared from circulation when alterations in their size, shape, and deformability are detected. This function is modulated by the spleen-specific structure of the interendothelial slit (IES). Here, we present a unique physiological framework for development of prognostic markers in RBC diseases by quantifying biophysical limits for RBCs to pass through the IES, using computational simulations based on dissipative particle dynamics. The results show that the spleen selects RBCs for continued circulation based on their geometry, consistent with prior in vivo observations. A companion analysis provides critical bounds relating surface area and volume for healthy RBCs beyond which the RBCs fail the "physical fitness test" to pass through the IES, supporting independent experiments. Our results suggest that the spleen plays an important role in determining distributions of size and shape of healthy RBCs. Because mechanical retention of infected RBC impacts malaria pathogenesis, we studied key biophysical parameters for RBCs infected with Plasmodium falciparum as they cross the IES. In agreement with experimental results, surface area loss of an infected RBC is found to be a more important determinant of splenic retention than its membrane stiffness. The simulations provide insights into the effects of pressure gradient across the IES on RBC retention. By providing quantitative biophysical limits for RBCs to pass through the IES, the narrowest circulatory bottleneck in the spleen, our results offer a broad approach for developing quantitative markers for diseases such as hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia, and malaria. PMID:27354532

  13. Physiological characteristics of the extreme thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus: an efficient hydrogen cell factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeidan Ahmad A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Global concerns about climate changes and their association with the use of fossil fuels have accelerated research on biological fuel production. Biological hydrogen production from hemicellulose-containing waste is considered one of the promising avenues. A major economical issue for such a process, however, is the low substrate conversion efficiency. Interestingly, the extreme thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus can produce hydrogen from carbohydrate-rich substrates at yields close to the theoretical maximum of the dark fermentation process (i.e., 4 mol H2/mol hexose. The organism is able to ferment an array of mono-, di- and polysaccharides, and is relatively tolerant to high partial hydrogen pressures, making it a promising candidate for exploitation in a biohydrogen process. The behaviour of this Gram-positive bacterium bears all hallmarks of being adapted to an environment sparse in free sugars, which is further reflected in its low volumetric hydrogen productivity and low osmotolerance. These two properties need to be improved by at least a factor of 10 and 5, respectively, for a cost-effective industrial process. In this review, the physiological characteristics of C. saccharolyticus are analyzed in view of the requirements for an efficient hydrogen cell factory. A special emphasis is put on the tight regulation of hydrogen production in C. saccharolyticus by both redox and energy metabolism. Suggestions for strategies to overcome the current challenges facing the potential use of the organism in hydrogen production are also discussed.

  14. Autoregressive description of biological phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Morariu, Vasile V; Pop, Alexadru; Soltuz, Stefan M; Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza; Zainea, Oana

    2008-01-01

    Many natural phenomena can be described by power-laws. A closer look at various experimental data reveals more or less significant deviations from a 1/f spectrum. We exemplify such cases with phenomena offered by molecular biology, cell biophysics, and cognitive psychology. Some of these cases can be described by first order autoregressive (AR) models or by higher order AR models which are short range correlation models. The calculations are checked against astrophysical data which were fitted to a an AR model by a different method. We found that our fitting method of the data give similar results for the astrhophysical data and therefore applied the method for examples mentioned above. Our results show that such phenomena can be described by first or higher order of AR models. Therefore such examples are described by short range correlation properties while they can be easily confounded with long range correlation phenomena.

  15. Physiological and clinical significance of enterochromaffin-like cell activation in the regulation of gastric acid secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanglin Cui; Helge L Waldum

    2007-01-01

    Gastric acid plays an important role in digesting food (especially protein), iron absorption, and destroying swallowed micro-organisms. H+ is secreted by the oxyntic parietal cells and its secretion is regulated by endocrine, neurocrine and paracrine mechanisms.Gastrin released from the antral G cell is the principal physiological stimulus of gastric acid secretion. Activation of the enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell is accepted as the main source of histamine participating in the regulation of acid secretion and is functionally and trophically controlled by gastrin, which is mediated by gastrin/CCK-2 receptors expressed on the ECL cell. However, longterm hypergastrinemia will induce ECL cell hyperplasia and probably carcinoids. Clinically, potent inhibitors of acid secretion have been prescribed widely to patients with acid-related disorders. Long-term potent acid inhibition evokes a marked increase in plasma gastrin levels,leading to enlargement of oxyntic mucosa with ECL cell hyperplasia. Accordingly, the induction of ECL cell hyperplasia and carcinoids remains a topic of considerable concern, especially in long-term use. In addition, the activation of ECL cells also induces another clinical concern, i.e., rebound acid hypersecretion after acid inhibition. Recent experimental and clinical findings indicate that the activation of ECL cells plays a critical role both physiologically and clinically in the regulation of gastric acid secretion.

  16. Environmental physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summaries of research projects conducted during 1978 and 1979 are presented. Subject areas include: the effects of environmental pollutants on homeostasis of the hematopoietic system; pollutant effects on steroid metabolism; pollutant effects on pulmonary macrophages; effects of toxic gases on lung cells; the development of immunological methods for assessing lung damage at the cellular level; the response of erythropoietin concentration to various physiological changes; and the study of actinide metabolism in monkey skeletons

  17. Physiological Functions and Regulation of the Na+/H+ Exchanger [NHE1] in Renal Tubule Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia G Vallés

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform-1 [NHE1] is a ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane protein that plays a central role in intracellular pH and cell volume homeostasis by catalyzing an electroneutral exchange of extracellular sodium and intracellular hydrogen. Outside of this important physiological function, the NHE1 cytosolic tail domain acts as a molecular scaffold regulating cell survival and actin cytoskeleton organization through NHE1-dependent signaling proteins. NHE1 plays main roles in response to physiological stress conditions which in addition to cell shrinkage and acidification, include hypoxia and mechanical stimuli, such as cell stretch. NHE1-mediated modulation of programmed cell death results from the exchanger-mediated changes in pHi, cell volume, and/or [Na+]I; and, it has recently become known that regulation of cellular signaling pathways are involved as well. This review focuses on NHE1 functions and regulations. We describe evidence showing how these structural actions integrate with ion translocation in regulating renal tubule epithelial cell survival.

  18. Physiological role of Kv1.3 channel in T lymphocyte cell investigated quantitatively by kinetic modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Hou

    Full Text Available Kv1.3 channel is a delayed rectifier channel abundant in human T lymphocytes. Chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disorders lead to the over-expression of Kv1.3 in T cells. To quantitatively study the regulatory mechanism and physiological function of Kv1.3 in T cells, it is necessary to have a precise kinetic model of Kv1.3. In this study, we firstly established a kinetic model capable to precisely replicate all the kinetic features for Kv1.3 channels, and then constructed a T-cell model composed of ion channels including Ca2+-release activated calcium (CRAC channel, intermediate K+ (IK channel, TASK channel and Kv1.3 channel for quantitatively simulating the changes in membrane potentials and local Ca2+ signaling messengers during activation of T cells. Based on the experimental data from current-clamp recordings, we successfully demonstrated that Kv1.3 dominated the membrane potential of T cells to manipulate the Ca2+ influx via CRAC channel. Our results revealed that the deficient expression of Kv1.3 channel would cause the less Ca2+ signal, leading to the less efficiency in secretion. This was the first successful attempt to simulate membrane potential in non-excitable cells, which laid a solid basis for quantitatively studying the regulatory mechanism and physiological role of channels in non-excitable cells.

  19. Synchronization Phenomena and Epoch Filter of Electroencephalogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matani, Ayumu

    Nonlinear electrophysiological synchronization phenomena in the brain, such as event-related (de)synchronization, long distance synchronization, and phase-reset, have received much attention in neuroscience over the last decade. These phenomena contain more electrical than physiological keywords and actually require electrical techniques to capture with electroencephalography (EEG). For instance, epoch filters, which have just recently been proposed, allow us to investigate such phenomena. Moreover, epoch filters are still developing and would hopefully generate a new paradigm in neuroscience from an electrical engineering viewpoint. Consequently, electrical engineers could be interested in EEG once again or from now on.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of the silicon content and physiological parameters by FTIR spectroscopy in diatoms with siliceous cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungandreas, Anne; Wagner, Heiko; Wilhelm, Christian

    2012-12-01

    Diatoms are the most successful biomass producers worldwide. Therefore, physiological and chemical methods to measure the cell response to a variety of abiotic factors are the focus of recent research. We used the two model diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana and Skeletonema costatum for the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy-based methods to measure simultaneously the elemental composition of the cells and their cell-specific physiological properties. The cells were grown in chemostat cultures to study the response of Si limitation. The model organisms showed different reactions in terms of their cell properties. Si limitation was accompanied by a drop in the growth rate, a reduced content in Si per cell and a decreased Si : C ratio. Furthermore, the C allocation pattern was changed in both diatoms under Si limitation, as shown by FTIR spectroscopy. Moreover, we used FTIR spectra to develop PLS (partial least square) regression methods to predict the Si content and the Si : C ratio for single as well as multiple species. All PLS regression models were validated by standard chemical methods and showed good prediction accuracy, with the coefficient of determination R(2) being ≥0.93. We could show that it is possible to monitor phytoplankton properties such as C allocation, the Si content and the Si : C ratio at the same time via FTIR spectroscopy. PMID:23104763

  1. Development of a novel, physiologically relevant cytotoxicity model: Application to the study of chemotherapeutic damage to mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing need for development of physiologically relevant in-vitro models for testing toxicity, however determining toxic effects of agents which undergo extensive hepatic metabolism can be particularly challenging. If a source of such metabolic enzymes is inadequate within a model system, toxicity from prodrugs may be grossly underestimated. Conversely, the vast majority of agents are detoxified by the liver, consequently toxicity from such agents may be overestimated. In this study we describe the development of a novel in-vitro model, which could be adapted for any toxicology setting. The model utilises HepG2 liver spheroids as a source of metabolic enzymes, which have been shown to more closely resemble human liver than traditional monolayer cultures. A co-culture model has been developed enabling the effect of any metabolised agent on another cell type to be assessed. This has been optimised to enable the study of damaging effects of chemotherapy on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), the supportive stem cells of the bone marrow. Several optimisation steps were undertaken, including determining optimal culture conditions, confirmation of hepatic P450 enzyme activity and ensuring physiologically relevant doses of chemotherapeutic agents were appropriate for use within the model. The developed model was subsequently validated using several chemotherapeutic agents, both prodrugs and active drugs, with resulting MSC damage closely resembling effects seen in patients following chemotherapy. Minimal modifications would enable this novel co-culture model to be utilised as a general toxicity model, contributing to the drive to reduce animal safety testing and enabling physiologically relevant in-vitro study. -- Highlights: ► An in vitro model was developed for study of drugs requiring hepatic metabolism ► HepG2 spheroids were utilised as a physiologically relevant source of liver enzymes ► The model was optimised to enable study of chemotherapeutic

  2. Development of a novel, physiologically relevant cytotoxicity model: Application to the study of chemotherapeutic damage to mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Jennifer E., E-mail: Jennifer2.May@uwe.ac.uk; Morse, H. Ruth, E-mail: Ruth.Morse@uwe.ac.uk; Xu, Jinsheng, E-mail: Jinsheng.Xu@uwe.ac.uk; Donaldson, Craig, E-mail: Craig.Donaldson@uwe.ac.uk

    2012-09-15

    There is an increasing need for development of physiologically relevant in-vitro models for testing toxicity, however determining toxic effects of agents which undergo extensive hepatic metabolism can be particularly challenging. If a source of such metabolic enzymes is inadequate within a model system, toxicity from prodrugs may be grossly underestimated. Conversely, the vast majority of agents are detoxified by the liver, consequently toxicity from such agents may be overestimated. In this study we describe the development of a novel in-vitro model, which could be adapted for any toxicology setting. The model utilises HepG2 liver spheroids as a source of metabolic enzymes, which have been shown to more closely resemble human liver than traditional monolayer cultures. A co-culture model has been developed enabling the effect of any metabolised agent on another cell type to be assessed. This has been optimised to enable the study of damaging effects of chemotherapy on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), the supportive stem cells of the bone marrow. Several optimisation steps were undertaken, including determining optimal culture conditions, confirmation of hepatic P450 enzyme activity and ensuring physiologically relevant doses of chemotherapeutic agents were appropriate for use within the model. The developed model was subsequently validated using several chemotherapeutic agents, both prodrugs and active drugs, with resulting MSC damage closely resembling effects seen in patients following chemotherapy. Minimal modifications would enable this novel co-culture model to be utilised as a general toxicity model, contributing to the drive to reduce animal safety testing and enabling physiologically relevant in-vitro study. -- Highlights: ► An in vitro model was developed for study of drugs requiring hepatic metabolism ► HepG2 spheroids were utilised as a physiologically relevant source of liver enzymes ► The model was optimised to enable study of chemotherapeutic

  3. A biomimetic physiological model for human adipose tissue by adipocytes and endothelial cell cocultures with spatially controlled distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in vitro model that recapitulates the characteristics of native human adipose tissue would largely benefit pathology studies and therapy development. In this paper, we fabricated a physiological model composed of both human adipocytes and endothelial cells with spatially controlled distribution that biomimics the structure and composition of human adipose tissue. Detailed studies into the cell–cell interactions between the adipocytes and endothelial cells revealed a mutual-enhanced effect which resembles the in vivo routine. Furthermore, comparisons between planar coculture and model coculture demonstrated improved adipocyte function as well as endothelial cell proliferation under the same conditions. This research provided a reliable model for human adipose tissue development studies and potential obesity-related therapy development. (paper)

  4. Accelerated generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells with retroviral transduction and chemical inhibitors under physiological hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Hidenori [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Hashimoto, Yoshiya [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1, Hanazonocho, Kuzuha, Hirakatashi, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Nakada, Akira; Shigeno, Keiji [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Tatsuo, E-mail: nakamura@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very rapid generation of human iPS cells under optimized conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five chemical inhibitors under hypoxia boosted reprogramming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. -- Abstract: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated from somatic cells by the forced expression of a defined set of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Human iPS cells can be propagated indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body except for extra-embryonic tissues. This technology not only represents a new way to use individual-specific stem cells for regenerative medicine but also constitutes a novel method to obtain large amounts of disease-specific cells for biomedical research. Despite their great potential, the long reprogramming process (up to 1 month) remains one of the most significant challenges facing standard virus-mediated methodology. In this study, we report the accelerated generation of human iPS cells from adipose-derived stem (ADS) cells, using a new combination of chemical inhibitors under a setting of physiological hypoxia in conjunction with retroviral transduction of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and L-Myc. Under optimized conditions, we observed human embryonic stem (ES)-like cells as early as 6 days after the initial retroviral transduction. This was followed by the emergence of fully reprogrammed cells bearing Tra-1-81-positive and DsRed transgene-silencing properties on day 10. The resulting cell lines resembled human ES cells in many respects including proliferation rate, morphology, pluripotency-associated markers, global gene expression patterns, genome-wide DNA methylation states, and the ability to differentiate into all three of the germ layers, both in vitro and in vivo. Our method, when combined with chemical inhibitors under conditions of physiological hypoxia, offers a powerful tool for rapidly

  5. Accelerated generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells with retroviral transduction and chemical inhibitors under physiological hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Very rapid generation of human iPS cells under optimized conditions. ► Five chemical inhibitors under hypoxia boosted reprogramming. ► We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. -- Abstract: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated from somatic cells by the forced expression of a defined set of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Human iPS cells can be propagated indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body except for extra-embryonic tissues. This technology not only represents a new way to use individual-specific stem cells for regenerative medicine but also constitutes a novel method to obtain large amounts of disease-specific cells for biomedical research. Despite their great potential, the long reprogramming process (up to 1 month) remains one of the most significant challenges facing standard virus-mediated methodology. In this study, we report the accelerated generation of human iPS cells from adipose-derived stem (ADS) cells, using a new combination of chemical inhibitors under a setting of physiological hypoxia in conjunction with retroviral transduction of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and L-Myc. Under optimized conditions, we observed human embryonic stem (ES)-like cells as early as 6 days after the initial retroviral transduction. This was followed by the emergence of fully reprogrammed cells bearing Tra-1-81-positive and DsRed transgene-silencing properties on day 10. The resulting cell lines resembled human ES cells in many respects including proliferation rate, morphology, pluripotency-associated markers, global gene expression patterns, genome-wide DNA methylation states, and the ability to differentiate into all three of the germ layers, both in vitro and in vivo. Our method, when combined with chemical inhibitors under conditions of physiological hypoxia, offers a powerful tool for rapidly generating bona fide human iPS cells and facilitates the application of i

  6. In vitro investigations of Cynara scolymus L. extract on cell physiology of HepG2 liver cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesine Löhr

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was the investigation of a potential influence of artichoke leaf extract (ALE on the cell physiology and gene expression of phase I/II enzymes of human liver cells HepG2 and investigation on potential cell protective effects against ethanol-induced cell toxicity against HepG2 cells. Cell biological assays under in vitro conditions using HepG2 liver cells and investigation of mitochondrial activity (MTT test, proliferation assay (BrdU incorporation ELISA, LDH as toxicity marker, gene expression analysis by RT-PCR and enzyme activity of glutationtransferase. Artichocke extract, containing 27% caffeoylquinic acids and 7% flavonoids induced mitochondrial activity, proliferation and total protein content under in vitro conditions in human liver cells HepG2. These effects could not be correlated to the well-known artichoke secondary compounds cynarin, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, luteolin and luteolin-7-O-glucoside. The flavones luteolin and luteolin-7-O-glucoside had inhibitory effects at 100 µg/mL level on HepG2 cells, with luteolin being a significant stronger inhibitor compared to the respective glucoside. Artichoke leaf extract had minor stimulating effect on gene expression of CYP1A2, while CYP3A4, GGT, GPX2, GSR and GST were slightly inhibited. GST inhibition under in vitro conditions was also shown by quantification of GST enzyme activity. Induction of gene expression of CYP1A2 was shown to be supraadditive after simultaneous application of ethanol plus artichoke extract. Artichoke leaf extract exhibited cell protective effects against ethanol-induced toxicity within cotreatment under in vitro conditions. Also H2O2 damage was significantly inhibited by simultaneous artichoke incubation. Pre- and posttreatments did not exert protective effects. DMSO-induced toxicity was significantly reduced by pre-, post- and cotreatment with artichoke extract and especially with luteolin-7-O-glucoside, indicating a direct

  7. Photoelectric phenomena in ZnO(ITO)/α-Si:H(n)/c-Si(p)/Al solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar cells (Sc) AlZnO/α-Si:H(n)/c-Si(p)/Al and Al/ITO/α-Si:H(n)/c-Si(p)/Al on silicon substrate have been obtained. Photoelectrical properties of SC under natural and linearly polarized light (LPL) at 300 K were investigated. The polarized photosensitivity of SC arising under inclined linearly polarized irradiation was detected. The nature of induced photopleochroism of SC with ZnO and ITO coatings was established

  8. Three dimensional modeling of an solid oxide fuel cell coupling charge transfer phenomena with transport processes and heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel cells are promising for future energy systems, because they are energy efficient and able to use renewable fuels. However, there is still a need for improvement and a fully coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach based on the finite element method, in three-dimensions, is developed to describe an anode-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Governing equations are solved for electron, ion, heat, gas-phase species and momentum transport, and implemented and coupled to kinetics describing electrochemical reactions. It is shown that the heat generation due to the electrochemical reactions results in an increased temperature distribution and further current density along the main flow direction. This increase is limited due to the consumption of electrochemical reactants within the cell. For cases with a high current density generation, the resistance to electron transport and the oxygen gas-phase flow is high for positions (within the cathode) under the interconnect ribs, which gives a high current density gradient in the direction normal to the electrode/electrolyte interface. The increase in the current density is accelerated by an increased temperature along the main flow direction, due to the strong coupling between the local current density and the local temperature. It is shown that an increase of the anode active area-to-volume ratio with a factor of two transfers around 20 mV of (activation) polarization from the anode to the cathode side, for the case investigated in this study

  9. Anatomy & Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review ...

  10. Application of a continuous bioreactor cascade to study the effect of linoleic acid on hybridoma cell physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisztelinski, Dominik; Alink, Gerrit M; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Bielecki, Stanislaw; Tramper, Johannes; Martens, Dirk E

    2006-10-20

    The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the use of controlled bioreactors for toxicological studies. As a model system the effect of linoleic acid on hybridoma cells is studied in two well-controlled continuously operated bioreactors placed in series. In the first reactor the effect on rapid proliferating cells can be studied, while in the second reactor a special steady state is created, which allows studying the effect on apoptotic cells. Experiments are done at 0, 25, and 50 microM linoleic acid. At the end of the experiment with 50 microM linoleic acid, the concentration of linoleic acid is increased stepwise to determine the cytotoxic level. For rapid proliferating cells exposed to 25 and 50 microM stimulation of growth was observed. At 50 microM there was at the same time an increase in cell death through apoptosis. For stressed apoptotic cells linoleic acid caused partial growth inhibition at 25 and 50 microM and arrest of cell proliferation in the G(2)/M phase at 50 microM. For both, rapid proliferating cells and stressed apoptotic cells, complete growth inhibition occurred at 85 microM, with cells being arrested in the G(2)/M phase and dying mainly through necrosis. Cells in the bioreactor system appeared to be more sensitive towards linoleic acid than cells grown in multi-well plates. (IC(50) = 300 microM; IC(100) = 400 microM). Altogether the results of the present study reveal that the biostat experiments allow detailed analysis of the effect of a bioactive ingredient on cell physiology and behavior. PMID:16894630

  11. Mouse pancreas tissue slice culture facilitates long-term studies of exocrine and endocrine cell physiology in situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Marciniak

    Full Text Available Studies on pancreatic cell physiology rely on the investigation of exocrine and endocrine cells in vitro. Particularly, in the case of the exocrine tissue these studies have suffered from a reduced functional viability of acinar cells in culture. As a result not only investigations on dispersed acinar cells and isolated acini were limited in their potential, but also prolonged studies on pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells in an intact pancreatic tissue environment were unfeasible. To overcome these limitations, we aimed to establish a pancreas tissue slice culture platform to allow long-term studies on exocrine and endocrine cells in the intact pancreatic environment. Mouse pancreas tissue slice morphology was assessed to determine optimal long-term culture settings for intact pancreatic tissue. Utilizing optimized culture conditions, cell specificity and function of exocrine acinar cells and endocrine beta cells were characterized over a culture period of 7 days. We found pancreas tissue slices cultured under optimized conditions to have intact tissue specific morphology for the entire culture period. Amylase positive intact acini were present at all time points of culture and acinar cells displayed a typical strong cell polarity. Amylase release from pancreas tissue slices decreased during culture, but maintained the characteristic bell-shaped dose-response curve to increasing caerulein concentrations and a ca. 4-fold maximal over basal release. Additionally, endocrine beta cell viability and function was well preserved until the end of the observation period. Our results show that the tissue slice culture platform provides unprecedented maintenance of pancreatic tissue specific morphology and function over a culture period for at least 4 days and in part even up to 1 week. This analytical advancement now allows mid -to long-term studies on the cell biology of pancreatic disorder pathogenesis and therapy in an intact surrounding in situ.

  12. Artificial fish skin of self-powered micro-electromechanical systems hair cells for sensing hydrodynamic flow phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadnia, Mohsen; Kottapalli, Ajay Giri Prakash; Miao, Jianmin; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Triantafyllou, Michael S

    2015-10-01

    Using biological sensors, aquatic animals like fishes are capable of performing impressive behaviours such as super-manoeuvrability, hydrodynamic flow 'vision' and object localization with a success unmatched by human-engineered technologies. Inspired by the multiple functionalities of the ubiquitous lateral-line sensors of fishes, we developed flexible and surface-mountable arrays of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) artificial hair cell flow sensors. This paper reports the development of the MEMS artificial versions of superficial and canal neuromasts and experimental characterization of their unique flow-sensing roles. Our MEMS flow sensors feature a stereolithographically fabricated polymer hair cell mounted on Pb(Zr(0.52)Ti(0.48))O3 micro-diaphragm with floating bottom electrode. Canal-inspired versions are developed by mounting a polymer canal with pores that guide external flows to the hair cells embedded in the canal. Experimental results conducted employing our MEMS artificial superficial neuromasts (SNs) demonstrated a high sensitivity and very low threshold detection limit of 22 mV/(mm s(-1)) and 8.2 µm s(-1), respectively, for an oscillating dipole stimulus vibrating at 35 Hz. Flexible arrays of such superficial sensors were demonstrated to localize an underwater dipole stimulus. Comparative experimental studies revealed a high-pass filtering nature of the canal encapsulated sensors with a cut-off frequency of 10 Hz and a flat frequency response of artificial SNs. Flexible arrays of self-powered, miniaturized, light-weight, low-cost and robust artificial lateral-line systems could enhance the capabilities of underwater vehicles. PMID:26423435

  13. Cellular and molecular basis of adipose tissue development: from stem cells to adipocyte physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Louveau, Isabelle; Perruchot, Marie-Hélène; Gondret, Florence

    2014-01-01

    White adipose tissue plays a key role in the regulation of energy balance in vertebrates. Its primary function is to store and release energy. It is also recognized to secrete a variety of factors called adipokines that are involved in a wide range of physiological and metabolic functions. Unlike other tissues, adipose tissue mass has large capacity to expand and can be seen as a dynamic tissue able to adapt to a variety of environmental and genetic factors. The aim of this review...

  14. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1–1% O2), physioxia or physoxia (∼1–13%), and normoxia (∼20%) are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia) or excess oxygen (hyperoxia) could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude) and pathological conditions (e.g...

  15. Environmental physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Section 3 of this annual report the Environmental Physiology Group reports progress in several areas of research: a study of erythropoietin biogenesis and regulation of hematopoesis; the in vitro production of erythropoietin by cloned lines of erythroleukemic cells; endocrine interactions with lung tissue, and hormonal changes in response to ozone exposure; an in vitro cell culture technique for the detection and enumeration of thymic lymphocyte progenitors in the bone marrow of experimental animals; the study of magnetic field bioeffects; the study of actinide element distribution and retention in primates; and a comparison of the efficiencies of various chelating agents in facilitating the removal of Pu-238 from the skeleton, the liver, and the whole body

  16. The dynamics of p53 in single cells: physiologically based ODE and reaction-diffusion PDE models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliaš, Ján; Dimitrio, Luna; Clairambault, Jean; Natalini, Roberto

    2014-08-01

    The intracellular signalling network of the p53 protein plays important roles in genome protection and the control of cell cycle phase transitions. Recently observed oscillatory behaviour in single cells under stress conditions has inspired several research groups to simulate and study the dynamics of the protein with the aim of gaining a proper understanding of the physiological meanings of the oscillations. We propose compartmental ODE and PDE models of p53 activation and regulation in single cells following DNA damage and we show that the p53 oscillations can be retrieved by plainly involving p53-Mdm2 and ATM-p53-Wip1 negative feedbacks, which are sufficient for oscillations experimentally, with no further need to introduce any delays into the protein responses and without considering additional positive feedback.

  17. The dynamics of p53 in single cells: physiologically based ODE and reaction–diffusion PDE models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intracellular signalling network of the p53 protein plays important roles in genome protection and the control of cell cycle phase transitions. Recently observed oscillatory behaviour in single cells under stress conditions has inspired several research groups to simulate and study the dynamics of the protein with the aim of gaining a proper understanding of the physiological meanings of the oscillations. We propose compartmental ODE and PDE models of p53 activation and regulation in single cells following DNA damage and we show that the p53 oscillations can be retrieved by plainly involving p53–Mdm2 and ATM–p53–Wip1 negative feedbacks, which are sufficient for oscillations experimentally, with no further need to introduce any delays into the protein responses and without considering additional positive feedback. (paper)

  18. New physiologically-relevant liver tissue model based on hierarchically cocultured primary rat hepatocytes with liver endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wenjin; Perry, Guillaume; Komori, Kikuo; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2015-11-01

    To develop an in vitro liver tissue equivalent, hepatocytes should be cocultured with liver non-parenchymal cells to mimic the in vivo physiological microenvironments. In this work, we describe a physiologically-relevant liver tissue model by hierarchically organizing layers of primary rat hepatocytes and human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (TMNK-1) on an oxygen-permeable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane, which facilitates direct oxygenation by diffusion through the membrane. This in vivo-mimicking hierarchical coculture was obtained by simply proceeding the overlay of TMNK-1 cells on the hepatocyte layer re-formed on the collagen immobilized PDMS membranes. The comparison of hepatic functionalities was achieved between coculture and sandwich culture with Matrigel, in the presence and absence of direct oxygenation. A complete double-layered structure of functional liver cells with vertical contact between hepatocytes and TMNK-1 was successfully constructed in the coculture with direct oxygen supply and was well-maintained for 14 days. The hepatocytes in this hierarchical culture exhibited improved survival, functional bile canaliculi formation, cellular level polarization and maintenance of metabolic activities including Cyp1A1/2 activity and albumin production. By contrast, the two cell populations formed discontinuous monolayers on the same surfaces in the non-oxygen-permeable cultures. These results demonstrate that (i) the direct oxygenation through the PDMS membranes enables very simple formation of a hierarchical structure consisting of a hepatocyte layer and a layer of TMNK-1 and (ii) we may include other non-parenchymal cells in this format easily, which can be widely applicable to other epithelial organs. PMID:26304784

  19. Molecular Crowding Defines a Common Origin for the Warburg Effect in Proliferating Cells and the Lactate Threshold in Muscle Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Alexei; Oltvai, Zoltán N.

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis is a seemingly wasteful mode of ATP production that is seen both in rapidly proliferating mammalian cells and highly active contracting muscles, but whether there is a common origin for its presence in these widely different systems is unknown. To study this issue, here we develop a model of human central metabolism that incorporates a solvent capacity constraint of metabolic enzymes and mitochondria, accounting for their occupied volume densities, while assuming glucose and/or fatty acid utilization. The model demonstrates that activation of aerobic glycolysis is favored above a threshold metabolic rate in both rapidly proliferating cells and heavily contracting muscles, because it provides higher ATP yield per volume density than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. In the case of muscle physiology, the model also predicts that before the lactate switch, fatty acid oxidation increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases to zero with concomitant increase in glucose utilization, in agreement with the empirical evidence. These results are further corroborated by a larger scale model, including biosynthesis of major cell biomass components. The larger scale model also predicts that in proliferating cells the lactate switch is accompanied by activation of glutaminolysis, another distinctive feature of the Warburg effect. In conclusion, intracellular molecular crowding is a fundamental constraint for cell metabolism in both rapidly proliferating- and non-proliferating cells with high metabolic demand. Addition of this constraint to metabolic flux balance models can explain several observations of mammalian cell metabolism under steady state conditions. PMID:21559344

  20. Molecular crowding defines a common origin for the Warburg effect in proliferating cells and the lactate threshold in muscle physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Vazquez

    Full Text Available Aerobic glycolysis is a seemingly wasteful mode of ATP production that is seen both in rapidly proliferating mammalian cells and highly active contracting muscles, but whether there is a common origin for its presence in these widely different systems is unknown. To study this issue, here we develop a model of human central metabolism that incorporates a solvent capacity constraint of metabolic enzymes and mitochondria, accounting for their occupied volume densities, while assuming glucose and/or fatty acid utilization. The model demonstrates that activation of aerobic glycolysis is favored above a threshold metabolic rate in both rapidly proliferating cells and heavily contracting muscles, because it provides higher ATP yield per volume density than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. In the case of muscle physiology, the model also predicts that before the lactate switch, fatty acid oxidation increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases to zero with concomitant increase in glucose utilization, in agreement with the empirical evidence. These results are further corroborated by a larger scale model, including biosynthesis of major cell biomass components. The larger scale model also predicts that in proliferating cells the lactate switch is accompanied by activation of glutaminolysis, another distinctive feature of the Warburg effect. In conclusion, intracellular molecular crowding is a fundamental constraint for cell metabolism in both rapidly proliferating- and non-proliferating cells with high metabolic demand. Addition of this constraint to metabolic flux balance models can explain several observations of mammalian cell metabolism under steady state conditions.

  1. Genes expressed in the Drosophila head reveal a role for fat cells in sex-specific physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Shinsuke; Amrein, Hubert

    2002-01-01

    The downstream effectors of the Drosophila sex determination cascade are mostly unknown and thought to mediate all aspects of sexual differentiation, physiology and behavior. Here, we employed serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) to identify male and female effectors expressed in the head, and report 46 sex-biased genes (>4-fold/P < 0.01). We characterized four novel, male- or female-specific genes and found that all are expressed mainly in the fat cells in the head. Tsx (turn on sex-spe...

  2. Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 Plays as a Physiological Glucose Sensor and Regulates Cellular Contractility in Rat Mesangial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Wakisaka

    Full Text Available Mesangial cells play an important role in regulating glomerular filtration by altering their cellular tone. We report the presence of a sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT in rat mesangial cells. This study in rat mesangial cells aimed to evaluate the expression and role of SGLT2.The SGLT2 expression in rat mesangial cells was assessed by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Changes in the mesangial cell surface area at different glucose concentrations and the effects of extracellular Na+ and Ca2+ and of SGLT and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX inhibitors on cellular size were determined. The cellular sizes and the contractile response were examined during a 6-day incubation with high glucose with or without phlorizin, an SGLT inhibitor.Western blotting revealed an SGLT2 band, and RT-PCR analysis of SGLT2 revealed the predicted 422-bp band in both rat mesangial and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. The cell surface area changed according to the extracellular glucose concentration. The glucose-induced contraction was abolished by the absence of either extracellular Na+ or Ca2+ and by SGLT and NCX inhibitors. Under the high glucose condition, the cell size decreased for 2 days and increased afterwards; these cells did not contract in response to angiotensin II, and the SGLT inhibitor restored the abolished contraction.These data suggest that SGLT2 is expressed in rat mesangial cells, acts as a normal physiological glucose sensor and regulates cellular contractility in rat mesangial cells.

  3. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: I. Phenotype and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Thomas Lindebo; Nielsen, Janne; Claesson, Mogens H

    2004-01-01

    it has become increasingly clear that regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg cells) play an important role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance, and that this cell subset exerts its function by suppressing the proliferation or function of autoreactive T cells. Based on human and murine...... observations, this review presents a characterization of the phenotype and functions of the Treg cells in vitro and in vivo. An overview of the surface molecules associated with and the cytokines produced by the Treg cells is given and the origin, activation requirements and mode of action of the Treg cells...... are discussed. Finally, we address the possibility that Treg cells may play a central role in immune homeostasis, regulating not only autoimmune responses, but also immune responses toward foreign antigens....

  4. The Role of Aerobic and Anaerobic Training Programs on CD34+ Stem Cells and Chosen Physiological Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, Mohammed Nader; Saad, Mohammed; Akar, Samy; Reda, Mubarak Abdelreda Ali; Shalgham, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Exercise is one of the most powerful non-pharmacological strategies, which can affect nearly all cells and organs in the body. Changes in the behavior of adult stem cells have been shown to occur in response to exercise. Exercise may act on regenerative potential of tissues by altering the ability to generate new stem cells and differentiated cells that are able to carry out tissue specific functions. The purpose of this study was to reveal the role of aerobic and anaerobic training programs on CD34+ Stem Cells and chosen physiological variables. Twenty healthy male athletes aged 18–24 years were recruited for this study. Healthy low active males and BMI matched participants (n=10) aged 20–22 years were recruited as controls. Aerobic and anaerobic training programs for 12 weeks were conducted. VO2max pulse observation was carried out using the Astrand Rhyming protocol. RBCs, WBCs, HB and hematocrit were estimated using a coulter counter, lactate by the Accusport apparatus, CD34+ stem cells by flow cytometry. VO2max was increased significantly in case of the aerobic training program compared to anaerobic one (62±2.2 ml/kg/min vs. 54±2.1 ml/kg/min). Haemotological values increased significantly in the anaerobic program when compared to the aerobic one, RBCs (5.3±0.3 and 4.9±0.2 mln/ul), WBCs (6.6±0.5 and 6.1±0.4 thous/ul), HB (15.4±0.4 and 14.2±0.5 g/de), Hematocrit (4.6±1.2 and 4.4±1.1 %), CD34+ stem cells count increased significantly in case of the anaerobic program compared to the aerobic (251.6±21.64 and 130±14.61) and sedentary one (172±24.10). These findings suggest that anaerobic training programs provoke better adaptation to exercise and stem cell counts may differ between trained and sedentary subjects. Circulating immature cells are likely to be involved in angiogenesis and repair process, both mechanisms being associated with strenuous exercise. Knowledge of the physiological effects of training on stem cells might be of potential

  5. The interactive effects of multiple stressors on physiological stress responses and club cell investment in fathead minnows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manek, Aditya K., E-mail: aditya.manek@usask.ca [Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5E2 SK (Canada); Ferrari, Maud C.O. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, WCVM, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4 (Canada); Niyogi, Som; Chivers, Douglas P. [Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5E2 SK (Canada)

    2014-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities have dramatically increased over the past decades, with the consequence that many organisms are simultaneously exposed to multiple stressors. Understanding how organisms respond to these stressors is a key focus for scientists from many disciplines. Here we investigated the interactive effects of two stressors, UV radiation (UVR) and cadmium (Cd) exposure on a common freshwater fish, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). UVR is known to influence the density of epidermal club cells (ECCs), which are not only a key component of the innate immune system of fishes, but are also the source of chemical alarm cues that serve to warn other fishes of nearby predators. In contrast, Cd impairs the physiological stress response and ability of fish to respond to alarm cues. We used an integrative approach to examine physiological stress response as well as investment in ECCs. Fish exposed to UVR had higher levels of cortisol than non-exposed controls, but Cd reduced cortisol levels substantially for fish exposed to UVR. Fish exposed to UVR, either in the presence or absence of Cd, showed consistent decreases in ECC investment compared to non-exposed controls. Despite differences in ECC number, there was no difference in the potency of alarm cues prepared from the skin of UVR and Cd exposed or non-exposed fish indicating that UVR and Cd exposure combined may have little influence on chemically-mediated predator–prey interactions. - Highlights: • UV radiation caused a physiological stress response (cortisol release) in fish. • Cd reduced cortisol levels substantially for fish exposed to UV. • Fish exposed to UV, with or without Cd, showed decreases in club cell investment. • There was no difference in alarm cues potency from UV and Cd exposed fish. • Our work highlights the difficulty of untangling effects of multiple stressors.

  6. Fixed endothelial cells exhibit physiologically relevant nanomechanics of the cortical actin web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been unknown whether cells retain their mechanical properties after fixation. Therefore, this study was designed to compare the stiffness properties of the cell cortex (the 50–100 nm thick zone below the plasma membrane) before and after fixation. Atomic force microscopy was used to acquire force indentation curves from which the nanomechanical cell properties were derived. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of actin destabilizing agent cytochalasin D, which results in a gradual softening of the cell cortex. Then cells were studied ‘alive’ or ‘fixed’. We show that the cortical stiffness of fixed endothelial cells still reports functional properties of the actin web qualitatively comparable to those of living cells. Myosin motor protein activity, tested by blebbistatin inhibition, can only be detected, in terms of cortical mechanics, in living but not in fixed cells. We conclude that fixation interferes with motor proteins while maintaining a functional cortical actin web. Thus, fixation of cells opens up the prospect of differentially studying the actions of cellular myosin and actin. (papers)

  7. Cx43-hemichannel function and regulation in physiology and pathophysiology: insights from the bovine corneal endothelial cell system and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CatheleyneD'hondt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular communication in primary bovine corneal endothelial cells (BCECs is mainly driven by the release of extracellular ATP through Cx43 hemichannels. Studying the characteristics of Ca2+-wave propagation in BCECs, an important form of intercellular communication, in response to physiological signaling events has led to the discovery of important insights in the functional properties and regulation of native Cx43 hemichannels. Together with ectopic expression models for Cx43 hemichannels and truncated/mutated Cx43 versions, it became very clear that loop/tail interactions play a key role in controlling the activity of Cx43 hemichannels. Interestingly, the negative regulation of Cx43 hemichannels by enhanced actin/myosin contractility seems to impinge upon loss of these loop/tail interactions essential for opening Cx43 hemichannels. Finally, these molecular insights have spurred the development of novel peptide tools that can selectively inhibit Cx43 hemichannels but not Cx43 gap junctions or hemichannels formed by other Cx isoforms. These tools now set the stage to hunt for novel physiological functions for Cx43 hemichannels in primary cells and tissues and to tackle disease conditions associated with excessive, pathological Cx43-hemichannel openings.

  8. Matrix-dependent adhesion mediates network responses to physiological stimulation of the osteocyte cell process

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Danielle; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Weinbaum, Sheldon; SPRAY, DAVID C.

    2013-01-01

    Osteocytes are bone cells that form cellular networks that sense mechanical loads distributed throughout the bone tissue. Interstitial fluid flow in the lacunar canalicular system produces focal strains at localized attachment sites around the osteocyte cell process. These regions of periodic attachment between the osteocyte cell membrane and its canalicular wall are sites where pN-level fluid-flow induced forces are generated in vivo. In this study, we show that focally applied forces of thi...

  9. Physiological and structural properties of saponin-skinned single smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The study of the fundamental events underlying the generation and regulation of force in smooth muscle would be greatly facilitated if the permeability of the cell membrane were increased so that the intracellular environment of the contractile apparatus could be manipulated experimentally. To initiate such an analysis, we developed a saponin permeabilization procedure that was used to "skin" isolated smooth muscle cells from the stomach of the toad, Bufo marinus. Suspensions of single cells ...

  10. Matrix-dependent adhesion mediates network responses to physiological stimulation of the osteocyte cell process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Danielle; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Spray, David C

    2013-07-16

    Osteocytes are bone cells that form cellular networks that sense mechanical loads distributed throughout the bone tissue. Interstitial fluid flow in the lacunar canalicular system produces focal strains at localized attachment sites around the osteocyte cell process. These regions of periodic attachment between the osteocyte cell membrane and its canalicular wall are sites where pN-level fluid-flow induced forces are generated in vivo. In this study, we show that focally applied forces of this magnitude using a newly developed Stokesian fluid stimulus probe initiate rapid and transient intercellular electrical signals in vitro. Our experiments demonstrate both direct gap junction coupling and extracellular purinergic P2 receptor signaling between MLO-Y4 cells in a connected bone cell network. Intercellular signaling was initiated by pN-level forces applied at integrin attachment sites along both appositional and distal unapposed cell processes, but not initiated at their cell bodies with equivalent forces. Electrical coupling was evident in 58% of all cell pairs tested with appositional connections; coupling strength increased with the increasing number of junctional connections. Apyrase, a nucleotide-degrading enzyme, suppressed and abolished force-induced effector responses, indicating a contribution from ATP released by the stimulated cell. This work extends the understanding of how osteocytes modulate their microenvironment in response to mechanical signals and highlights mechanisms of intercellular relay of mechanoresponsive signals in the bone network. PMID:23818616

  11. Nonlinear surface electromagnetic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Ponath, H-E

    1991-01-01

    In recent years the physics of electromagnetic surface phenomena has developed rapidly, evolving into technologies for communications and industry, such as fiber and integrated optics. The variety of phenomena based on electromagnetism at surfaces is rich and this book was written with the aim of summarizing the available knowledge in selected areas of the field. The book contains reviews written by solid state and optical physicists on the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves at and with surfaces and films. Both the physical phenomena and some potential applications are

  12. Dropout Phenomena at Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Søgaard; Kornbeck, Kasper Pihl; Kristensen, Rune;

    Dropout from university studies comprises a number of complex phenomena with serious complex consequences and profound political attention. Further analysis of the field is, therefore, warranted. Such an analysis is offered here as a systematic review which gives answers based on the best possible...... evidence found in the research field comprised by the three review questions to be addressed. The aims of this systematic review can, thus, be summarized like this: Which answers can be offered from research in relation to the following questions: What is dropout from university studies? Why do such...... dropout phenomena occur at universities? What can be done by the universities to prevent or reduce such dropout phenomena?...

  13. Keeping the intracellular vitamin C at a physiologically relevant level in endothelial cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Henriette Rønne; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the addition of vitamin C to cell culture medium improves cell growth. However, once added, the vitamin C concentration declines rapidly. This situation differs from the in vivo environment where the endothelium is constantly supplied with ascorbate from the blood...

  14. Physiological Role of TNF in MucosalImmunology: Regulation of Macrophage/Dendritic Cell Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Marsal, J.; Agace, William Winston

    Intestinal mononuclear phagocytes, comprising macrophages(Mϕs) and dendritic cells (DCs), play important roles in the generation and the regulation of immune responses to intestinal antigens, and alterations in the development and/or the function of these cells are thought to contribute to the pa...

  15. Impacts of X-ray irradiation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells growth and physiological-biochemical characteristic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹国珍; 张苗苗; 李文建; 缪建顺; 陆栋; 张文德

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the growth curves of yeast cells exposed to X-rays were detected, and then fitted by Gompertz equation. The yeast cells treated with 50–125 Gy showed an increased exponential growth rate, and lower total biomass at plateau. At doses ≥ 150 Gy, cells showed a decreased exponential growth rate and higher total biomass at plateau. DNA lesions were detected by comet assay. Meanwhile, intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (∆Ψm) and cell membrane integrity were evaluated. We conclude that X-ray irradiation results in DNA lesions, ROS accumulation and∆Ψm decline in a dose-dependent manner, and that these changes may be one of causes of X-rays-induced apoptosis in yeast. Furthermore, yeast cell membrane integrity appeared compromised following irradiation, suggesting that membrane damage may also have a role in the biological effects of radiation.

  16. Interfacial transport phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Slattery, John C; Oh, Eun-Suok

    2007-01-01

    Revised and updated extensively from the previous editionDiscusses transport phenomena at common lines or three-phase lines of contactProvides a comprehensive summary about the extensions of continuum mechanics to the nanoscale

  17. Introduction to wetting phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In these lectures the field of wetting phenomena is introduced from the point of view of statistical physics. The phase transition from partial to complete wetting is discussed and examples of relevant experiments in binary liquid mixtures are given. Cahn's concept of critical-point wetting is examined in detail. Finally, a connection is drawn between wetting near bulk criticality and the universality classes of surface critical phenomena. (author)

  18. Complex fission phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W

    2005-01-01

    Complex fission phenomena can be studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle-point) nuclear shapes, may be obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in cold fission phenomena can be explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are outlined. Predictions of two alpha accompanied fission are experimentally confirmed.

  19. Severe accident phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severe accidents are nuclear reactor accidents in which the reactor core is substantially damaged. The report describes severe reactor accident phenomena and their significance for the safety of nuclear power plants. A comprehensive set of phenomena ranging from accident initiation to containment behaviour and containment integrity questions are covered. The report is based on expertise gained in the severe accident assessment projects conducted at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). (49 refs., 32 figs., 12 tabs.)

  20. Tissue engineering approaches for studying the effect of biochemical and physiological stimuli on cell behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Vergara, Andrea Carolina

    Tissue engineering (TE) approaches have emerged as an alternative to traditional tissue and organ replacements. The aim of this work was to contribute to the understanding of the effects of cell-material and endothelial cell (EC) paracrine signaling on cell responses using poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels as a material platform. Three TE applications were explored. First, the effect of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) identity was evaluated for vocal fold restoration. Second, the influence of GAG identity was explored and a novel approach for stable endothelialization was developed for vascular graft applications. Finally, EC paracrine signaling in the presence of cyclic stretch, and hydrophobicity and inorganic content were studied for osteogenic applications. In terms of vocal fold restoration, it was found that vocal fold fibroblast (VFF) phenotype and extracellular matrix (ECM) production were impacted by GAG identity. VFF phenotype was preserved in long-term cultured hydrogels containing high molecular weight hyaluronan (HAHMW). Furthermore, collagen I deposition, fibronectin production and smooth muscle α-actin (SM-α-actin) expression in PEG-HA, PEG-chondroitin sulfate C and PEG-heparan sulfate (HS) gels suggest that CSC and HS may be undesirable for vocal fold implants. Regarding vascular graft applications, the impact of GAG identity on smooth muscle cell (SMC) foam cell formation was explored. Results support the increasing body of literature that suggests a critical role for dermatan sulfate (DS)-bearing proteoglycans in early atherosclerosis. In addition, an approach for fabricating bi-layered tissue engineering vascular grafts (TEVGs) with stable endothelialization was validated using PEGDA as an intercellular “cementing” agent between adjacent endothelial cells (ECs). Finally, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation toward osteogenic like cells was evaluated. ECM and cell phenotypic data showed that elevated scaffold inorganic

  1. Molecular Physiology of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Insulin Secretagogue Action in Pancreatic β Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Leech, Colin A.; Dzhura, Igor; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Kang, Guoxin; Schwede, Frank; Genieser, Hans-G.; Holz, George G.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells is stimulated by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a blood glucose-lowering hormone that is released from enteroendocrine L cells of the distal intestine after the ingestion of a meal. GLP-1 mimetics (e.g., Byetta) and GLP-1 analogs (e.g., Victoza) activate the β cell GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), and these compounds stimulate insulin secretion while also lowering levels of blood glucose in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). An additio...

  2. Physiology for engineers applying engineering methods to physiological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chappell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to qualitative and quantitative aspects of human physiology. It looks at biological and physiological processes and phenomena, including a selection of mathematical models, showing how physiological problems can be mathematically formulated and studied. It also illustrates how a wide range of engineering and physics topics, including electronics, fluid dynamics, solid mechanics and control theory can be used to describe and understand physiological processes and systems. Throughout the text there are introductions to measuring and quantifying physiological processes using both signal and imaging technologies. Physiology for Engineers describes the basic structure and models of cellular systems, the structure and function of the cardiovascular system, the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart and provides an overview of the structure and function of the respiratory and nervous systems. It also includes an introduction to the basic concepts and applications of reacti...

  3. Recent SIFT-MS Studies of Volatile Compounds in Physiology, Medicine and Cell Biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    1. Amsterdam: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2013, s. 49-76. ISBN 978-0-444-62620-2 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : ION FLOW-TUBE * TRACE GAS-ANALYSIS * LUNG - CANCER CELLS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  4. Physiology: Kinetics of Acetyl Coenzyme A: Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase from Human Cumulus Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chi-Chen; Hsieh, Yao-Yuan; CHUNG, JING-GUNG; Tsai, Horng-Der; Tsai, Chang-Hai

    2001-01-01

    Purpose:N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity is involved in the detoxification of exogenous amines. We aimed to evaluate the kinetics of acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA): arylamine NAT for human cumulus cells.

  5. Physiologically structured cell population dynamic models with applications to combined drug delivery optimisation in oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Clairambault, Jean; Fercoq, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a model for drug delivery optimisation in a chronotherapeu-tics framework. We present a pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics model for oxaliplatin and 5-Fluorouracil, a classic therapeutic association in the treatment of colorectal cancer. We derive the phar-macokinetics model using law of mass action and enzyme kinetics. We design an age-structured cell cycle PDE model with drug damage and repair phases to account for the effect of the drugs on proliferating cell...

  6. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    OpenAIRE

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; LÜTZ-MEINDL, URSULA

    2012-01-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essent...

  7. Mitochondrial Gene Therapy Augments Mitochondrial Physiology in a Parkinson's Disease Cell Model

    OpenAIRE

    Keeney, Paula M; Quigley, Caitlin K.; Dunham, Lisa D.; Papageorge, Christina M.; Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R.; Schwarz, Kathleen M.; Trimmer, Patricia A; Khan, Shaharyar M.; Portell, Francisco R.; Bergquist, Kristen E.; Bennett, James P.

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) affects mainly dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, where age-related, increasing percentages of cells lose detectable respiratory activity associated with depletion of intact mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Replenishment of mtDNA might improve neuronal bioenergetic function and prevent further cell death. We developed a technology (“ProtoFection”) that uses recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) engineered with an N-ter...

  8. Algal wastewater treatment and biomass producing potential: nutrient removal efficiency and cell physiological responses

    OpenAIRE

    Samorì, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae are sun - light cell factories that convert carbon dioxide to biofuels, foods, feeds, and other bioproducts. The concept of microalgae cultivation as an integrated system in wastewater treatment has optimized the potential of the microalgae - based biofuel production. These microorganisms contains lipids, polysaccharides, proteins, pigments and other cell compounds, and their biomass can provide different kinds of biofuels such as biodiesel, biomethane and ethanol. The algal biomas...

  9. Physiology and pathophysiology of oxLDL uptake by vascular wall cells in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Natalia; Formoso, Gloria; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease in which endothelial cell dysfunction, macrophage foam cell formation, and smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation, lead to the loss of vascular homeostasis. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) may play a pre-eminent function in atherosclerotic lesion formation, even if their role is still debated. Several types of scavenger receptors (SRs) such as SR-AI/II, SRBI, CD36, lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), toll-like receptors (TLRs) and others can promote the internalization of oxLDL. They are expressed on the surface of vascular wall cells (endothelial cells, macrophages and smooth muscle cells) and they mediate the cellular effects of oxLDL. The key influence of both oxLDL and SRs on the atherogenic process has been established in atherosclerosis-prone animals, in which antioxidant treatment and/or silencing of SRs has been shown to reduce atherogenesis. Despite some discrepancies, the indication from cohort studies that there is an association between oxLDL and cardiovascular (CV) events seems to point toward a role for oxLDL in atherosclerotic plaque progress and disruption. Finally, randomized clinical trials using antioxidants have demonstrated benefits only in high-risk patients, suggesting that additional proofs are still needed to better define the involvement of each type of modified LDL in the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:27256928

  10. Physiological and Molecular Genetic Effects of Time-Varying Electromagnetic Fields on Human Neuronal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    The present investigation details the development of model systems for growing two- and three-dimensional human neural progenitor cells within a culture medium facilitated by a time-varying electromagnetic field (TVEMF). The cells and culture medium are contained within a two- or three-dimensional culture vessel, and the electromagnetic field is emitted from an electrode or coil. These studies further provide methods to promote neural tissue regeneration by means of culturing the neural cells in either configuration. Grown in two dimensions, neuronal cells extended longitudinally, forming tissue strands extending axially along and within electrodes comprising electrically conductive channels or guides through which a time-varying electrical current was conducted. In the three-dimensional aspect, exposure to TVEMF resulted in the development of three-dimensional aggregates, which emulated organized neural tissues. In both experimental configurations, the proliferation rate of the TVEMF cells was 2.5 to 4.0 times the rate of the non-waveform cells. Each of the experimental embodiments resulted in similar molecular genetic changes regarding the growth potential of the tissues as measured by gene chip analyses, which measured more than 10,000 human genes simultaneously.

  11. Simulation of the Internal Transport Phenomena for PEM Fuel Cells with Different Modes of Flow%采用不同流场的质子交换膜燃料电池内部传递现象模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡鸣若; 朱新坚; 顾安忠

    2004-01-01

    A numerical model for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is developed, which can simulate such basic transport phenomena as gas-liquid two-phase flow in a working fuel cell. Boundary conditions for both the conventional and the interdigitated modes of flow are presented on a three-dimensional basis. Numerical techniques for this model are discussed in detail. Validation shows good agreement between simulating results and experimental data. Furthermore, internal transport phenomena are discussed and compared for PEM fuel cells with conventional and interdigitated flows. It is found that the dead-ended structure of an interdigitated flow does increase the oxygen mass fraction and decrease the liquid water saturation in the gas diffusion layer as compared to the conventional mode of flow. However, the cathode humidification is important for an interdigitated flow to acquire better performance than a conventional flow fuel cell.

  12. A novel chemosensor with visible light excitability for sensing Zn2+ in physiological medium and in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Barun Kumar; Thiyagarajan, Durairaj; Samanta, Soham; Ramesh, Aiyagari; Das, Gopal

    2014-07-21

    In the present study a novel imine-hydrazone based fluorescent chemosensor () for efficient and selective sensing of Zn(2+) over other biologically important metal ions under physiological conditions is reported. An enhancement in fluorescence emission intensity of the developed probe with a red shift of ∼25 nm was observed for Zn(2+), whereas other metal ions failed to reveal any significant change in the emission spectra. Interestingly, the receptor functioned under completely physiological conditions (99.7% HEPES buffer) and has visible light excitability. Sensing of Zn(2+) was investigated in detail by absorption spectroscopy, emission spectroscopy, DFT calculation, (1)H-NMR titration experiment and ESI-MS experiment. The association constant between and Zn(2+) was found to be 5.58 × 10(5) M(-1). The receptor could detect as low as 69 ppb Zn(2+). Sensing of Zn(2+) is proposed through switch-on of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and chelation enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) processes after the introduction of Zn(2+) into the free ligand. The developed receptor was non-toxic and rendered intracellular sensing of Zn(2+) in HeLa cells through fluorescence imaging studies. PMID:24879606

  13. Physiological factors in childhood epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeWinn, E B

    1980-08-01

    The identification and correction of adverse physiological changes that lead to seizures in children can improve the effectiveness of current therapeutic practices in epilepsy. It is proposed that various circadian rhythms (respiration, hormones, water balance, electrolytes, intracranial pressure, blood pressure), meteorological phenomena (barometric presure, ambient environmental temperature, relative humidity), and developmental processes can profoundly influence the precipitation or prevention of seizures through their physiological effects. PMID:7190490

  14. Physiological characterization of formyl peptide receptor expressing cells in the mouse vomeronasal organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackels, Tobias; von der Weid, Benoît; Rodriguez, Ivan; Spehr, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) is a chemosensory structure that detects both hetero- and conspecific social cues. Based on largely monogenic expression of either type 1 or 2 vomeronasal receptors (V1Rs/V2Rs) or members of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family, the vomeronasal sensory epithelium harbors at least three neuronal subpopulations. While various neurophysiological properties of both V1R- and V2R-expressing neurons have been described using genetically engineered mouse models, the basic biophysical characteristics of the more recently identified FPR-expressing vomeronasal neurons have not been studied. Here, we employ a transgenic mouse strain that coexpresses an enhanced variant of yellow fluorescent protein together with FPR-rs3 allowing to identify and analyze FPR-rs3-expressing neurons in acute VNO tissue slices. Single neuron electrophysiological recordings allow comparative characterization of the biophysical properties inherent to a prototypical member of the FPR-expressing subpopulation of VNO neurons. In this study, we provide an in-depth analysis of both passive and active membrane properties, including detailed characterization of several types of voltage-activated conductances and action potential discharge patterns, in fluorescently labeled vs. unmarked vomeronasal neurons. Our results reveal striking similarities in the basic (electro) physiological architecture of both transgene-expressing and non-expressing neurons, confirming the suitability of this genetically engineered mouse model for future studies addressing more specialized issues in vomeronasal FPR neurobiology. PMID:25484858

  15. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron–oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  16. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volland, Stefanie, E-mail: Stefanie.Volland@stud.sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Luetz, Cornelius, E-mail: cornelius.luetz@uibk.ac.at [Institute of Botany, University of Innsbruck, Sternwartestrasse 15, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Michalke, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.michalke@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Luetz-Meindl, Ursula, E-mail: ursula.luetz-meindl@sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 {mu}M Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron-oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  17. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2012-03-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron-oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  18. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron–oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  19. Synthetic mRNA: Production, Introduction into Cells, and Physiological Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances have made it possible to synthesize mRNA in vitro that is relatively stable when introduced into mammalian cells, has a diminished ability to activate the innate immune response against exogenous (virus-like) RNA, and can be efficiently translated into protein. Synthetic methods have also been developed to produce mRNA with unique investigational properties such as photo-cross-linking, fluorescence emission, and attachment of ligands through click chemistry. Synthetic mRNA has been proven effective in numerous applications beneficial for human health such as immunizing patients against cancer and infections diseases, alleviating diseases by restoring deficient proteins, converting somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells to use in regenerative medicine therapies, and engineering the genome by making specific alterations in DNA. This introductory chapter provides background information relevant to the following 20 chapters of this volume that present protocols for these applications of synthetic mRNA. PMID:27236789

  20. The effect of space microgravity on the physiological activity of mammalian resident cardiac stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belostotskaya, Galina; Zakharov, Eugeny

    Prolonged exposure to weightlessness during space flights is known to cause depression of heart function in mammals. The decrease in heart weight and its remodeling under the influence of prolonged weightlessness (or space microgravity) is assumed to be due to both morphological changes of working cardiomyocytes and their progressive loss, as well as to possible depletion of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) population, or their inability to self-renewal and regeneration of muscle tissue under conditions of weightlessness. We have previously shown that the presence of different maturity clones formed by resident CSCs not only in culture but also in the mammalian myocardium can be used as an indicator of the regenerative activity of myocardial cells [Belostotskaya, et al., 2013: 2014]. In this study, we were interested to investigate whether the 30-day near-Earth space flight on the spacecraft BION-M1 affects the regenerative potential of resident CSCs. Immediately after landing of the spacecraft, we had examined the presence of resident c-kit+, Sca-1+ and Isl1+ CSCs and their development in suspension of freshly isolated myocardial cells of C57BL mice in comparison to controls. Cardiac cell suspension was obtained by enzymatic digestion of the heart [Belostotskaya and Golovanova, 2014]. Immunocytochemically stained preparations of fixed cells were analyzed with confocal microscope Leica TCS SP5 (Germany) in the Resource Center of St-Petersburg State University. CSCs were labeled with appropriate antibodies. CSCs differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes was verified using antibodies to Sarcomeric α-Actinin and Cardiac Troponin T. Antibodies to Connexin43 were used to detect cell-cell contacts. All antibodies were conjugated with Alexa fluorochromes (488, 532, 546, 568, 594 and/or 647 nm), according to Zenon-technology (Invitrogen). It has been shown that, under identical conditions of cell isolation, more complete digestion of heart muscle was observed in

  1. Molecular physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 insulin secretagogue action in pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, Colin A; Dzhura, Igor; Chepurny, Oleg G; Kang, Guoxin; Schwede, Frank; Genieser, Hans-G; Holz, George G

    2011-11-01

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells is stimulated by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a blood glucose-lowering hormone that is released from enteroendocrine L cells of the distal intestine after the ingestion of a meal. GLP-1 mimetics (e.g., Byetta) and GLP-1 analogs (e.g., Victoza) activate the β cell GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), and these compounds stimulate insulin secretion while also lowering levels of blood glucose in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). An additional option for the treatment of T2DM involves the administration of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors (e.g., Januvia, Galvus). These compounds slow metabolic degradation of intestinally released GLP-1, thereby raising post-prandial levels of circulating GLP-1 substantially. Investigational compounds that stimulate GLP-1 secretion also exist, and in this regard a noteworthy advance is the demonstration that small molecule GPR119 agonists (e.g., AR231453) stimulate L cell GLP-1 secretion while also directly stimulating β cell insulin release. In this review, we summarize what is currently known concerning the signal transduction properties of the β cell GLP-1R as they relate to insulin secretion. Emphasized are the cyclic AMP, protein kinase A, and Epac2-mediated actions of GLP-1 to regulate ATP-sensitive K⁺ channels, voltage-dependent K⁺ channels, TRPM2 cation channels, intracellular Ca⁺ release channels, and Ca⁺-dependent exocytosis. We also discuss new evidence that provides a conceptual framework with which to understand why GLP-1R agonists are less likely to induce hypoglycemia when they are administered for the treatment of T2DM. PMID:21782840

  2. Glutamine transporters in mammalian cells and their functions in physiology and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-10-01

    The SLC (solute carrier)-type transporters (~400 in number) in mammalian cells consist of 52 distinct gene families, grouped solely based on the amino acid sequence (primary structure) of the transporter proteins and not on their transport function. Among them are the transporters for amino acids. Fourteen of them, capable of transporting glutamine across the plasma membrane, are found in four families: SLC1, SLC6, SLC7, and SLC38. However, it is generally thought that the members of the SLC38 family are the principal transporters for glutamine. Some of the glutamine transporters are obligatory exchangers whereas some function as active transporters in one direction. While most glutamine transporters mediate the influx of the amino acid into cells, some actually mediate the efflux of the amino acid out of the cells. Glutamine transporters play important roles in a variety of tissues, including the liver, brain, kidney, and placenta, as clearly evident from the biological and biochemical phenotypes resulting from the deletion of specific glutamine transporters in mice. Owing to the obligatory role of glutamine in growth and proliferation of tumor cells, there is increasing attention on glutamine transporters in cancer biology as potential drug targets for cancer treatment. Selective blockers of certain glutamine transporters might be effective in preventing the entry of glutamine and other important amino acids into tumor cells, thus essentially starving these cells to death. This could represent the beginning of a new era in the discovery of novel anticancer drugs with a previously unexplored mode of action. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:26724577

  3. WASPs and WAVEs: from molecular function to physiology in hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Atsushi; Eto, Koji

    2013-04-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is critically involved in a variety of cell functions. The Arp2/3 complex mediates branching of filamentous actin. The members of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family are major regulators of the complex. As such, the family proteins are also involved in numerous aspects of cell biology. In this short review, we first define the expanding WASP family. Next, we compare the domain structure of the members, and explain the known or proposed functions of each domain or region. Finally, we demonstrate the well-characterized roles of the proteins in specific cellular functions. PMID:23499790

  4. Single or group housing altered hormonal physiology and affected pituitary and interstitial cell kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A significant negative correlation between testicular interstitial cell tumors and pituitary tumors in control male F344 rats has been reported associated with the number of animals per cage. Change in numbers of animals per cage may cause stress and increased serum corticosteroi...

  5. Genomic and physiological analysis of oxygen sensitivity and hypoxia tolerance in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seta, Karen; Kim, Hie-Won; Ferguson, Tsuneo; Kim, Richard; Pathrose, Peterson; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Gang; Spicer, Zachary; Millhorn, David E

    2002-10-01

    The mechanisms by which cells adapt and respond to changes in oxygen tension remain largely unknown. Our laboratory has used the PC12 cell line to study both biophysical and molecular responses to hypoxia. This chapter summarizes our findings. We found that membrane depolarization that occurred when PC12 cells were exposed to reduced O(2) was mediated by a specific potassium channel, the Kv1.2 channel. The membrane depolarization leads to increased Ca(2+) conductance through a voltage-sensitive channel, which in turn mediates the release of the neurotransmitters dopamine, adenosine, glutamate, and GABA. In addition, increased intracellular Ca(2+) and other signaling systems regulate hypoxia-induced gene expression, which contributes to the adaptive response to reduced O(2+). We identified several critical signaling pathways that regulate a complex gene expression profile in PC12 cells during hypoxia. These include the cAMP-protein kinase A, Ca(2+)-calmodulin, p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK; p38 kinase), and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT as regulators of gene expression. Several of these pathways regulate hypoxia-specific transcription factors that are members of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family. Recently, we have successfully used subtractive cDNA libraries and microarray analysis to identify the genomic profile that mediates the cellular response to hypoxia. PMID:12438156

  6. Dr. Josef Steiner Cancer Research Prize Lecture: the role of physiological cell death in neoplastic transformation and in anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, A

    1999-05-17

    Cell death is a physiological process which is required for normal development and existence of multi-cellular organisms. Physiological cell death, or apoptosis, is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Abnormalities in this process are implicated as a cause or contributing factor in a variety of diseases. Inhibition of apoptosis can promote neoplastic transformation, particularly in combination with dysregulated cell-cycle control, and can influence the response of tumour cells to anti-cancer therapy. Molecular biological and biochemical approaches are used to find missing cell-death regulators and to define signalling cascades, while experiments in genetically modified mice will identify the essential function of these molecules. Discoveries from cell death research should provide clues for designing therapies for a variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders, auto-immunity and cancer. PMID:10225436

  7. Ion exchange phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  8. Immobilization of Electroporated Cells for Fabrication of Cellular Biosensors: Physiological Effects of the Shape of Calcium Alginate Matrices and Foetal Calf Serum

    OpenAIRE

    Nikos Katsanakis; Andreas Katsivelis; Spiridon Kintzios

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effect of transfected cell immobilization in calcium alginate gels, we immobilized electroporated Vero cells in gels shaped either as spherical beads or as thin membrane layers. In addition, we investigated whether serum addition had a positive effect on cell proliferation and viability in either gel configuration. The gels were stored for four weeks in a medium supplemented or not with 20% (v/v) foetal calf serum. Throughout a culture period of four ...

  9. Gene Expression Profiling of Dendritic Cells in Different Physiological Stages under Cordyceps sinensis Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chia-Yang; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Wang, Shu-Chi; Cheng, Hung-Tsu; Chen, Chaang-Ray; Shu, Wun-Yi; Tsai, Min-Lung; Hseu, Ruey-Shyang; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Huang, Chao-Ying; Fang, Shih-Hua; Ian C Hsu

    2012-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis (CS) has been commonly used as herbal medicine and a health supplement in China for over two thousand years. Although previous studies have demonstrated that CS has benefits in immunoregulation and anti-inflammation, the precise mechanism by which CS affects immunomodulation is still unclear. In this study, we exploited duplicate sets of loop-design microarray experiments to examine two different batches of CS and analyze the effects of CS on dendritic cells (DCs), in diffe...

  10. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models: Integration of In Silico Approaches with Micro Cell Culture Analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, A.; Yarmush, M L; Maguire, T.

    2012-01-01

    There is a large emphasis within the pharmaceutical industry to provide tools that will allow early research and development groups to better predict dose ranges for and metabolic responses of candidate molecules in a high throughput manner, prior to entering clinical trials. These tools incorporate approaches ranging from PBPK, QSAR, and molecular dynamics simulations in the in silico realm, to micro cell culture analogue (CCAs)s in the in vitro realm. This paper will serve to review these a...

  11. Epidermal stem cells in physiological tissue regeneration, wound healing and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Füllgrabe, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian skin is a versatile organ that protects from external harm, regulates the body temperature, and provides the touch sensation. Its epithelium, the epidermis, forms several highly regenerative structures as the hair follicle (HF), the sebaceous gland (SG), and the interfollicular epidermis (IFE). Lineage tracing experiments in mice have demonstrated that several basal cell populations in the IFE and HF have the capacity to renew the epidermis during homeostasis, and also contribut...

  12. Physiological consequences of ionic concentration changes in cardiac cell tubular system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pásek, Michal; Christé, G.; Šimurda, J.

    Plzeň : Západočeká universita v Plzni, 2004 - (Horák, M.), s. 1-4 ISBN 80-7043-315-9. [Biomechanics of Man 2004. hotel Horizont, Šumava (CZ), 16.11.2004-19.11.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/02/D129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : cardiac cell * tubular system * quantitative modelling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  13. Rheological phenomena in focus

    CERN Document Server

    Boger, DV

    1993-01-01

    More than possibly any other scientific discipline, rheology is easily visualized and the relevant literature contains many excellent photographs of unusual and often bizarre phenomena. The present book brings together these photographs for the first time. They are supported by a full explanatory text. Rheological Phenomena in Focus will be an indispensable support manual to all those who teach rheology or have to convince colleagues of the practical relevance of the subject within an industrial setting. For those who teach fluid mechanics, the book clearly illustrates the difference be

  14. Effects of orbital spaceflight on human osteoblastic cell physiology and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S. A.; Zhang, M.; Kidder, L. S.; Evans, G. L.; Spelsberg, T. C.; Turner, R. T.

    2000-01-01

    During long-term spaceflight, astronauts lose bone, in part due to a reduction in bone formation. It is not clear, however, whether the force imparted by gravity has direct effects on bone cells. To examine the response of bone forming cells to weightlessness, human fetal osteoblastic (hFOB) cells were cultured during the 17 day STS-80 space shuttle mission. Fractions of conditioned media were collected during flight and shortly after landing for analyses of glucose utilization and accumulation of type I collagen and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Total cellular RNA was isolated from flight and ground control cultures after landing. Measurement of glucose levels in conditioned media indicated that glucose utilization occurred at a similar rate in flight and ground control cultures. Furthermore, the levels of type I collagen and PGE(2) accumulation in the flight and control conditioned media were indistinguishable. The steady-state levels of osteonectin, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin messenger RNA (mRNA) were not significantly changed following spaceflight. Gene-specific reductions in mRNA levels for cytokines and skeletal growth factors were detected in the flight cultures using RNase protection assays. Steady-state mRNA levels for interleukin (IL)-1alpha and IL-6 were decreased 8 h following the flight and returned to control levels at 24 h postflight. Also, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta(2) and TGF-beta(1) message levels were modestly reduced at 8 h and 24 h postflight, although the change was not statistically significant at 8 h. These data suggest that spaceflight did not significantly affect hFOB cell proliferation, expression of type I collagen, or PGE(2) production, further suggesting that the removal of osteoblastic cells from the context of the bone tissue results in a reduced ability to respond to weightlessness. However, spaceflight followed by return to earth significantly impacted the expression of cytokines and skeletal growth factors

  15. In vitro and in vivo correlates of physiological and neoplastic human Fallopian tube stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howitt, Brooke E; Mehra, Karishma; Wu, Lingyan; Wang, Xia; Hong, Yue; Kern, Florian; Wei, Tay Seok; Zhang, Ting; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Basuli, Debargha; Torti, Suzy; Brewer, Molly; Choolani, Mahesh; McKeon, Frank; Crum, Christopher P; Xian, Wa

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous cancer (HGSC) progresses to advanced stages without symptoms and the 5-year survival rate is a dismal 30%. Recent studies of ovaries and Fallopian tubes in patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations have documented a pre-metastatic intramucosal neoplasm that is found almost exclusively in the Fallopian tube, termed ‘serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma’ or STIC. Moreover, other proliferations, termed p53 signatures, secretory cell outgrowths (SCOUTs), and lower-grade serous tubal intraepithelial neoplasms (STINs) fall short of STIC but share similar alterations in expression, in keeping with an underpinning of genomic disturbances involved in, or occurring in parallel with, serous carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the cellular origins of this unique tubal pathway to high-grade serous cancer, we cloned and both immortalized and transformed Fallopian tube stem cells (FTSCs). We demonstrated that pedigrees of FTSCs were capable of multipotent differentiation and that the tumours derived from transformed FTSCs shared the histological and molecular features of HGSC. We also demonstrated that altered expression of some biomarkers seen in transformed FTSCs and HGSCs (stathmin, EZH2, CXCR4, CXCL12, and FOXM1) could be seen as well in immortalized cells and their in vivo counterparts SCOUTs and STINs. Thus, a whole-genome transcriptome analysis comparing FTSCs, immortalized FTSCs, and transformed FTSCs showed a clear molecular progression sequence that is recapitulated by the spectrum of accumulated perturbations characterizing the range of proliferations seen in vivo. Biomarkers unique to STIC relative to normal tubal epithelium provide a basis for novel detection approaches to early HGSC, but must be viewed critically given their potential expression in lesser proliferations. Perturbations shared by both immortalized and transformed FTSCs may provide unique early targets for prevention strategies. Central to these efforts has been the ability to

  16. Combinatorial polymer electrospun matrices promote physiologically-relevant cardiomyogenic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh K Gupta

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction results in extensive cardiomyocyte death which can lead to fatal arrhythmias or congestive heart failure. Delivery of stem cells to repopulate damaged cardiac tissue may be an attractive and innovative solution for repairing the damaged heart. Instructive polymer scaffolds with a wide range of properties have been used extensively to direct the differentiation of stem cells. In this study, we have optimized the chemical and mechanical properties of an electrospun polymer mesh for directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs towards a cardiomyogenic lineage. A combinatorial polymer library was prepared by copolymerizing three distinct subunits at varying molar ratios to tune the physicochemical properties of the resulting polymer: hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG, hydrophobic poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL, and negatively-charged, carboxylated PCL (CPCL. Murine ESCs were cultured on electrospun polymeric scaffolds and their differentiation to cardiomyocytes was assessed through measurements of viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, α-myosin heavy chain expression (α-MHC, and intracellular Ca(2+ signaling dynamics. Interestingly, ESCs on the most compliant substrate, 4%PEG-86%PCL-10%CPCL, exhibited the highest α-MHC expression as well as the most mature Ca(2+ signaling dynamics. To investigate the role of scaffold modulus in ESC differentiation, the scaffold fiber density was reduced by altering the electrospinning parameters. The reduced modulus was found to enhance α-MHC gene expression, and promote maturation of myocyte Ca(2+ handling. These data indicate that ESC-derived cardiomyocyte differentiation and maturation can be promoted by tuning the mechanical and chemical properties of polymer scaffold via copolymerization and electrospinning techniques.

  17. Oxidative folding in the mitochondrial intermembrane space: A regulated process important for cell physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzi, Afroditi; Manganas, Phanee; Tokatlidis, Kostas

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are fundamental organelles with a complex internal architecture that fulfill important diverse functions including iron-sulfur cluster assembly and cell respiration. Intense work for more than 30years has identified the key protein import components and the pathways involved in protein targeting and assembly. More recently, oxidative folding has been discovered as one important mechanism for mitochondrial proteostasis whilst several human disorders have been linked to this pathway. We describe the molecular components of this pathway in view of their putative redox regulation and we summarize available evidence on the connections of these pathways to human disorders. PMID:27033519

  18. Strange phenomena in Cuban sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Several unusual phenomena that occur in certain Cuban sands flows (and some other parts of the world) are presented . First, the phenomenon occurs revolving rivers, explained by a phenomenological model. Several open questions were discussed on the 'microscopic' causes of the phenomenon. Uphill lonely waves are shown in second, in streams of the same type of sand that occur in a cell in Hele-Shaw. The 'microscopic' necessary conditions are explored for these waves emerge as solution of Saint-Venant equations modified hydrodynamic type. (author)

  19. Physiological restraint of Bak by Bcl-xL is essential for cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erinna F; Grabow, Stephanie; Chappaz, Stephane; Dewson, Grant; Hockings, Colin; Kluck, Ruth M; Debrincat, Marlyse A; Gray, Daniel H; Witkowski, Matthew T; Evangelista, Marco; Pettikiriarachchi, Anne; Bouillet, Philippe; Lane, Rachael M; Czabotar, Peter E; Colman, Peter M; Smith, Brian J; Kile, Benjamin T; Fairlie, W Douglas

    2016-05-15

    Due to the myriad interactions between prosurvival and proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, establishing the mechanisms that regulate the intrinsic apoptotic pathway has proven challenging. Mechanistic insights have primarily been gleaned from in vitro studies because genetic approaches in mammals that produce unambiguous data are difficult to design. Here we describe a mutation in mouse and human Bak that specifically disrupts its interaction with the prosurvival protein Bcl-xL Substitution of Glu75 in mBak (hBAK Q77) for leucine does not affect the three-dimensional structure of Bak or killing activity but reduces its affinity for Bcl-xL via loss of a single hydrogen bond. Using this mutant, we investigated the requirement for physical restraint of Bak by Bcl-xL in apoptotic regulation. In vitro, Bak(Q75L) cells were significantly more sensitive to various apoptotic stimuli. In vivo, loss of Bcl-xL binding to Bak led to significant defects in T-cell and blood platelet survival. Thus, we provide the first definitive in vivo evidence that prosurvival proteins maintain cellular viability by interacting with and inhibiting Bak. PMID:27198225

  20. A physiologic three-dimensional cell culture system to investigate the role of decorin in matrix organisation and cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo cells exist in a three-dimensional environment generated and maintained by multiple cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Proteoglycans, like decorin, affect these complex interactions. Thus, we sought to investigate the role of decorin in a three-dimensional environment where the matrix was generated over time by decorin-deficient fibroblasts in the presence of L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate. The cells were viable and proliferated in response to FGF2. Decorin was incorporated in the matrix and caused a ∼2 nm shift in the average diameter of the collagen fibrils, and the range and distribution of the fibrils became narrower and more uniform. Although there were no appreciable changes in collagen composition, we found that exogenous decorin induced the de novo synthesis of collagen I and V and cross-linked β (I). In the early phases of the three-dimensional culture, decorin reduced apoptosis. However, following the establishment of a three-dimensional matrix, the cells did not require decorin for their survival

  1. Sawtooth phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of experimental and theoretical investigaions of sawtooth phenomena in tokamaks is presented. Different types of sawtooth oscillations, scaling laws and methods of interanl disruption stabilization are described. Theoretical models of the sawtooth instability are discussed. 122 refs.; 4 tabs

  2. Bioelectrochemistry II membrane phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, M

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the lectures of the second course devoted to bioelectro­ chemistry, held within the framework of the International School of Biophysics. In this course another very large field of bioelectrochemistry, i. e. the field of Membrane Phenomena, was considered, which itself consists of several different, but yet related subfields. Here again, it can be easily stated that it is impossible to give a complete and detailed picture of all membrane phenomena of biological interest in a short course of about one and half week. Therefore the same philosophy, as the one of the first course, was followed, to select a series of lectures at postgraduate level, giving a synthesis of several membrane phenomena chosen among the most'important ones. These lectures should show the large variety of membrane-regulated events occurring in living bodies, and serve as sound interdisciplinary basis to start a special­ ized study of biological phenomena, for which the investigation using the dual approach, physico-che...

  3. Indole-3-Acetic Acid Is Produced by Emiliania huxleyi Coccolith-Bearing Cells and Triggers a Physiological Response in Bald Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labeeuw, Leen; Khey, Joleen; Bramucci, Anna R.; Atwal, Harjot; de la Mata, A. Paulina; Harynuk, James; Case, Rebecca J.

    2016-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is an auxin produced by terrestrial plants which influences development through a variety of cellular mechanisms, such as altering cell orientation, organ development, fertility, and cell elongation. IAA is also produced by bacterial pathogens and symbionts of plants and algae, allowing them to manipulate growth and development of their host. They do so by either producing excess exogenous IAA or hijacking the IAA biosynthesis pathway of their host. The endogenous production of IAA by algae remains contentious. Using Emiliania huxleyi, a globally abundant marine haptophyte, we investigated the presence and potential role of IAA in algae. Homologs of genes involved in several tryptophan-dependent IAA biosynthesis pathways were identified in E. huxleyi. This suggests that this haptophyte can synthesize IAA using various precursors derived from tryptophan. Addition of L-tryptophan to E. huxleyi stimulated IAA production, which could be detected using Salkowski's reagent and GC × GC-TOFMS in the C cell type (coccolith bearing), but not in the N cell type (bald). Various concentrations of IAA were exogenously added to these two cell types to identify a physiological response in E. huxleyi. The N cell type, which did not produce IAA, was more sensitive to it, showing an increased variation in cell size, membrane permeability, and a corresponding increase in the photosynthetic potential quantum yield of Photosystem II (PSII). A roseobacter (bacteria commonly associated with E. huxleyi) Ruegeria sp. R11, previously shown to produce IAA, was co-cultured with E. huxleyi C and N cells. IAA could not be detected from these co-cultures, and even when stimulated by addition of L-tryptophan, they produced less IAA than axenic C type culture similarly induced. This suggests that IAA plays a novel role signaling between different E. huxleyi cell types, rather than between a bacteria and its algal host.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy and recording of the physiological activity of tracheal ciliated cells treated by fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ciliated epithelium of the rabbit's trachea was irradiated with daily fractions of 2 Gy to an accumulated dose of 20 Gy. The beat frequency of the cilia was recorded and specimens were taken for SEM-, TEM- and LM-investigations. Examination was made 1-10 days after each fractionation schedule. An increased ciliary beat frequency was recorded at 2 Gy and 4 Gy. With increasing dose, there was an inverted relationship to the frequency. Light-microscopy showed edema and an increased amount of goblet cells in relation to the increasing dose. With SEM an increased number of ciliary blebs could be seen. These could be classified according to size and number, and showed a positive correlation to the dose. TEM-investigations showed signs of increased intracellular activity at higher doses in the form of multilobulated nuclei and an increasing number of nuclear pores. At lower doses, an increased amount of mitochondria appeared in the apical part of the cell. It is at present difficult to evaluate any correlation between the physiological activity and the morphology. More biological data are needed to explain the early irradiation effects

  5. Macromolecular crowding meets oxygen tension in human mesenchymal stem cell culture - A step closer to physiologically relevant in vitro organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigognini, Daniela; Gaspar, Diana; Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Alagesan, Senthilkumar; Sanz-Nogués, Clara; Griffin, Matthew; O’Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-08-01

    Modular tissue engineering is based on the cells’ innate ability to create bottom-up supramolecular assemblies with efficiency and efficacy still unmatched by man-made devices. Although the regenerative potential of such tissue substitutes has been documented in preclinical and clinical setting, the prolonged culture time required to develop an implantable device is associated with phenotypic drift and/or cell senescence. Herein, we demonstrate that macromolecular crowding significantly enhances extracellular matrix deposition in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture at both 20% and 2% oxygen tension. Although hypoxia inducible factor - 1α was activated at 2% oxygen tension, increased extracellular matrix synthesis was not observed. The expression of surface markers and transcription factors was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. The multilineage potential was also maintained, albeit adipogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in low oxygen tension cultures, chondrogenic differentiation was significantly increased in macromolecularly crowded cultures and osteogenic differentiation was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. Collectively, these data pave the way for the development of bottom-up tissue equivalents based on physiologically relevant developmental processes.

  6. Rowing Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, W. L.

    This review of the literature discusses and examines the methods used in physiological assessment of rowers, results of such assessments, and future directions emanating from research in the physiology of rowing. The first section discusses the energy demands of rowing, including the contribution of the energy system, anaerobic metabolism, and the…

  7. JNK pathway inhibition selectively primes pancreatic cancer stem cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis without affecting the physiology of normal tissue resident stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, P. Robyn; Kettlun, Claudia; Heinemann, Mitja L.; Ruetering, Jennifer; Vykoukal, Jody; Alt, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Successful treatment of solid cancers mandates targeting cancer stem cells (CSC) without impact on the physiology of normal tissue resident stem cells. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling has been shown to be of importance in cancer. We test whether JNK inhibition would sensitize pancreatic CSCs to induction of apoptosis via low-dose TNFα-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Design Effects of JNK inhibition (JNKi) were evaluated in vitro in functional assays, through mRNA and protein expression analysis, and in in vivo mouse studies. CSCs were enriched in anoikis-resistant spheroid culture and analyzed accordingly. Results We confirmed that the JNK pathway is an important regulatory pathway in pancreatic cancer stem cells and further found that JNK inhibition downregulates the decoy receptor DcR1 through IL-8 signaling while upregulating pro-apoptotic death receptors DR4/5, thereby sensitizing cells - even with acquired TRAIL-resistance - to apoptosis induction. Treatment of orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts with either gemcitabine, JNKi or TRAIL alone for 4 weeks showed only modest effects compared to control, while the combination of JNKi and TRAIL resulted in significantly lower tumor burden (69%; p animals. Conclusions The combination of JNKi and TRAIL significantly impacts on CSCs, but leaves regular tissue-resident stem cells unaffected – even under hypoxic stress conditions. This concept of selective treatment of pancreatic CSCs warrants further evaluation. PMID:26840266

  8. Regulation of Spermatogenic Cell T-Type Ca(2+) Currents by Zn(2+): Implications in Male Reproductive Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-González, Ignacio; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Zn(2+) is a trace metal which is important for spermatogenesis progression; its deficiency causes atrophy or malignant growth of the testis. Although testis, epididymis, and prostate contain high Zn(2+) concentrations, the molecular entities which are modulated by this metal are still under study. Interestingly, spermatogenic cells mainly express CaV 3.2-encoded T-type Ca(2+) currents (ICaT) which are positively or negatively modulated by Zn(2+) in other tissues. To explore whether ICaT could be regulated by Zn(2+) and albumin, its main physiological carrier, we performed whole cell electrophysiological recordings of spermatogenic cell ICaT in the absence or presence of different Zn(2+) concentrations. Zn(2+) decreased ICaT in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50  = 2 μM) and this inhibition could only be completely removed in presence of albumin. Differently to previous reports, ICaT did not show a tonic inhibition by Zn(2+) . Further analysis showed that Zn(2+) did not affect the voltage dependency or the kinetics of current activation, but right shifted the steady-state inactivation curve and slowed inactivation and deactivation kinetics. Recovery from inactivation was also altered. However, these apparent alterations in gating properties are not enough to explain the strong ICaT reduction. Using non-stationary fluctuation analysis, we found that Zn(2+) mainly reduced the number of available Ca(2+) channels without changing the single channel current amplitude. ICaT modulation by Zn(2+) could be relevant for spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations during spermatogenesis and in pathophysiological conditions such as diabetes. PMID:26222306

  9. Fundamentals of Fire Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintiere, James

    discipline. It covers thermo chemistry including mixtures and chemical reactions; Introduces combustion to the fire protection student; Discusses premixed flames and spontaneous ignition; Presents conservation laws for control volumes, including the effects of fire; Describes the theoretical bases for......Understanding fire dynamics and combustion is essential in fire safety engineering and in fire science curricula. Engineers and students involved in fire protection, safety and investigation need to know and predict how fire behaves to be able to implement adequate safety measures and hazard...... analyses. Fire phenomena encompass everything about the scientific principles behind fire behaviour. Combining the principles of chemistry, physics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid dynamics necessary to understand the fundamentals of fire phenomena, this book integrates the subject into a clear...

  10. Transport phenomena II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Transport Phenomena II covers forced convention, temperature distribution, free convection, diffusitivity and the mechanism of mass transfer, convective mass transfer, concentration

  11. Complex fission phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Poenaru, Dorin N.; Gherghescu, Radu A.; Greiner, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Complex fission phenomena are studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle point) nuclear shapes are obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in binary cold fission of Th and U isotopes is explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are ou...

  12. Blood Flow Multiscale Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Agić, Ante; Mijović, Budimir; Nikolić, Tatjana

    2007-01-01

    The cardiovascular disease is one of most frequent cause deaths in modern society. The objective of this work is analyse the effect of dynamic vascular geometry (curvature, torsion,bifurcation) and pulsatile blood nature on secondary flow, wall shear stress and platelet deposition. The problem was examined as multi-scale physical phenomena using perturbation analysis and numerical modelling. The secondary flow determined as influence pulsatile pressure, vascular tube time-dependen...

  13. A glucose anode for enzymatic fuel cells optimized for current production under physiological conditions using a design of experiment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Leech, Dónal

    2015-12-01

    This study reports a design of experiment methodology to investigate and improve the performance of glucose oxidizing enzyme electrodes. Enzyme electrodes were constructed by co-immobilization of amine-containing osmium redox complexes, multiwalled carbon nanotubes and glucose oxidase in a carboxymethyldextran matrix at graphite electrode surfaces to provide a 3-dimensional matrix for electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose. Optimization of the amount of the enzyme electrode components to produce the highest current density under pseudo-physiological conditions of 5 mM glucose in saline buffer at 37 °C was performed using response surface methodology. A statistical analysis showed that the proposed model had a good fit with the experimental results. From the validated model, the addition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and carboxymethyldextran components was identified as major contributing factors to the improved performance. Based on the optimized amount of components, enzyme electrodes display current densities of 1.2±0.1 mA cm(-2) and 5.2±0.2 mA cm(-2) at 0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl in buffer containing 5 mM and 100 mM glucose, respectively, largely consistent with the predicted values. This demonstrates that use of a design of experiment approach can be applied effectively and efficiently to improve the performance of enzyme electrodes as anodes for biofuel cell device development. PMID:26116416

  14. Unity in diversity, a systems approach to regulating plant cell physiology by 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha eKundu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Could a disjoint group of enzymes synchronize their activities and execute a complex multi-step, measurable, and reproducible response ? Here, I surmise that the alpha-ketoglutarate dependent superfamily of non-haem iron (II dioxygenases could influence cell physiology as a cohesive unit, and that the broad spectra of substrates transformed is an absolute necessity to this portrayal.This eclectic group comprises members from all major taxa, and participates in pesticide breakdown, hypoxia signaling, and osmotic stress neutralization. The oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to succinate is coupled with a concomitant substrate hydroxylation and, in most cases, is followed by an additional specialized conversion. The domain profile of a protein sequence was used as an index of miscellaneous reaction chemistry and combined with available kinetic data to form a linear model of integrated function. Statistical parameters were inferred by the creation of a novel, empirically motivated flat-file database of over 3800 sequences (DB2OG with putative 2-oxoglutarate dependent activity. The collated information was categorized on the basis of existing annotation schema. The data suggests that the 2OG-dependent superfamily incorporates several desirable features of a systems level player. DB2OG, is free, accessible without a login to all users, and available at the following URL (http://comp-biol.theacms.in/DB2OG.html.

  15. Physiological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physiological characteristics of man depend on the intake, metabolism and excretion of stable elements from food, water, and air. The physiological behavior of natural radionuclides and radionuclides from nuclear weapons testing and from the utilization of nuclear energy is believed to follow the pattern of stable elements. Hence information on the normal physiological processes occurring in the human body plays an important role in the assessment of the radiation dose received by man. Two important physiological parameters needed for internal dose determination are the pulmonary function and the water balance. In the Coordinated Research Programme on the characterization of Asian population, five participants submitted data on these physiological characteristics - China, India, Japan, Philippines and Viet Nam. During the CRP, data on other pertinent characteristics such as physical and dietary were simultaneously being collected. Hence, the information on the physiological characteristics alone, coming from the five participants were not complete and are probably not sufficient to establish standard values for the Reference Asian Man. Nonetheless, the data collected is a valuable contribution to this research programme

  16. Quantification of natural phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The science is like a great spider's web in which unexpected connections appear and therefore it is frequently difficult to already know the consequences of new theories on those existent. The physics is a clear example of this. The Newton mechanics laws describe the physical phenomena observable accurately by means of our organs of the senses or by means of observation teams not very sophisticated. After their formulation at the beginning of the XVIII Century, these laws were recognized in the scientific world as a mathematical model of the nature. Together with the electrodynamics law, developed in the XIX century, and the thermodynamic one constitutes what we call the classic physics. The state of maturity of the classic physics at the end of last century it was such that some scientists believed that the physics was arriving to its end obtaining a complete description of the physical phenomena. The spider's web of the knowledge was supposed finished, or at least very near its termination. It ended up saying, in arrogant form, that if the initial conditions of the universe were known, we could determine the state of the same one in any future moment. Two phenomena related with the light would prove in firm form that mistaken that they were, creating unexpected connections in the great spider's web of the knowledge and knocking down part of her. The thermal radiation of the bodies and the fact that the light spreads to constant speed in the hole, without having an absolute system of reference with regard to which this speed is measured, they constituted the decisive factors in the construction of a new physics. The development of sophisticated of measure teams gave access to more precise information and it opened the microscopic world to the observation and confirmation of existent theories

  17. Phylogeny of Aging and Related Phenoptotic Phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libertini, G

    2015-12-01

    The interpretation of aging as adaptive, i.e. as a phenomenon genetically determined and modulated, and with an evolutionary advantage, implies that aging, as any physiologic mechanism, must have phylogenetic connections with similar phenomena. This review tries to find the phylogenetic connections between vertebrate aging and some related phenomena in other species, especially within those phenomena defined as phenoptotic, i.e. involving the death of one or more individuals for the benefit of other individuals. In particular, the aim of the work is to highlight and analyze similarities and connections, in the mechanisms and in the evolutionary causes, between: (i) proapoptosis in prokaryotes and apoptosis in unicellular eukaryotes; (ii) apoptosis in unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes; (iii) aging in yeast and in vertebrates; and (iv) the critical importance of the DNA subtelomeric segment in unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes. In short, there is strong evidence that vertebrate aging has clear similarities and connections with phenomena present in organisms with simpler organization. These phylogenetic connections are a necessary element for the sustainability of the thesis of aging explained as an adaptive phenomenon, and, on the contrary, are incompatible with the opposite view of aging as being due to the accumulation of random damages of various kinds. PMID:26638678

  18. Birefringence phenomena revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, Dante D; Gonçalves, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves is investigated in the context of the isotropic and nonlinear dielectric media at rest in the eikonal limit of the geometrical optics. Taking into account the functional dependence $\\varepsilon=\\varepsilon(E,B)$ and $\\mu=\\mu(E,B)$ for the dielectric coefficients, a set of phenomena related to the birefringence of the electromagnetic waves induced by external fields are derived and discussed. Our results contemplate the known cases already reported in the literature: Kerr, Cotton-Mouton, Jones and magnetoelectric effects. Moreover, new effects are presented here as well as the perspectives of its experimental confirmations.

  19. Transport phenomena I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Transport Phenomena I includes viscosity, flow of Newtonian fluids, velocity distribution in laminar flow, velocity distributions with more than one independent variable, thermal con

  20. Thermal Wave Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This map from the MGS Horizon Sensor Assembly (HORSE) shows middle atmospheric temperatures near the 1 mbar level of Mars between Ls 170 to 175 (approx. July 14 - 23, 1999). Local Mars times between 1:30 and 4:30 AM are included. Infrared radiation measured by the Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly was used to make the map. That device continuously views the 'limb' of Mars in four directions, to help orient the spacecraft instruments to the nadir: straight down. The map shows thermal wave phenomena that are caused by the large topographic variety of Mars' surface, as well the latitudinally symmetric behavior expected at this time of year near the equinox.

  1. Solid state phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrance, R

    1972-01-01

    Solid State Phenomena explores the fundamentals of the structure and their influence on the properties of solids. This book is composed of five chapters that focus on the electrical and thermal conductivities of crystalline solids. Chapter 1 describes the nature of solids, particularly metals and crystalline materials. This chapter also presents a model to evaluate crystal structure, the forces between atom pairs, and the mechanism of plastic and elastic deformation. Chapter 2 demonstrates random vibrations of atoms in a solid using a one-dimensional array, while Chapter 3 examines the resista

  2. MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. BISHOP

    2000-09-01

    This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

  3. Phenomena Associated With EIT Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, B. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss phenomena associated with "EIT Wave" transients. These phenomena include coronal mass ejections, flares, EUV/SXR dimmings, chromospheric waves, Moreton waves, solar energetic particle events, energetic electron events, and radio signatures. Although the occurrence of many phenomena correlate with the appearance of EIT waves, it is difficult to mfer which associations are causal. The presentation will include a discussion of correlation surveys of these phenomena.

  4. Physiological breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew; Langridge, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Physiological breeding crosses parents with different complex but complementary traits to achieve cumulative gene action for yield, while selecting progeny using remote sensing, possibly in combination with genomic selection. Physiological approaches have already demonstrated significant genetic gains in Australia and several developing countries of the International Wheat Improvement Network. The techniques involved (see Graphical Abstract) also provide platforms for research and refinement of breeding methodologies. Recent examples of these include screening genetic resources for novel expression of Calvin cycle enzymes, identification of common genetic bases for heat and drought adaptation, and genetic dissection of trade-offs among yield components. Such information, combined with results from physiological crosses designed to test novel trait combinations, lead to more precise breeding strategies, and feed models of genotype-by-environment interaction to help build new plant types and experimental environments for future climates. PMID:27161822

  5. Regulatory Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  6. Data on how several physiological parameters of stored red blood cells are similar in glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient and sufficient donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzounakas, Vassilis L; Kriebardis, Anastasios G; Georgatzakou, Hara T; Foudoulaki-Paparizos, Leontini E; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wither, Matthew J; Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Papassideri, Issidora S; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Antonelou, Marianna H

    2016-09-01

    This article contains data on the variation in several physiological parameters of red blood cells (RBCs) donated by eligible glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient donors during storage in standard blood bank conditions compared to control, G6PD sufficient (G6PD(+)) cells. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cell fragility and membrane exovesiculation were measured in RBCs throughout the storage period, with or without stimulation by oxidants, supplementation of N-acetylcysteine and energy depletion, following incubation of stored cells for 24 h at 37 °C. Apart from cell characteristics, the total or uric acid-dependent antioxidant capacity of the supernatant in addition to extracellular potassium concentration was determined in RBC units. Finally, procoagulant activity and protein carbonylation levels were measured in the microparticles population. Further information can be found in "Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient subjects may be better "storers" than donors of red blood cells" [1]. PMID:27437434

  7. Immobilization of Electroporated Cells for Fabrication of Cellular Biosensors: Physiological Effects of the Shape of Calcium Alginate Matrices and Foetal Calf Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Katsanakis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the physiological effect of transfected cell immobilization in calcium alginate gels, we immobilized electroporated Vero cells in gels shaped either as spherical beads or as thin membrane layers. In addition, we investigated whether serum addition had a positive effect on cell proliferation and viability in either gel configuration. The gels were stored for four weeks in a medium supplemented or not with 20% (v/v foetal calf serum. Throughout a culture period of four weeks, cell proliferation and cell viability were assayed by optical microscopy after provision of Trypan Blue. Non-elaborate culture conditions (room temperature, non-CO2 enriched culture atmosphere were applied throughout the experimental period in order to evaluate cell viability under less than optimal storage conditions. Immobilization of electroporated cells was associated with an initially reduced cell viability, which was gradually increased. Immobilization was associated with maintenance of cell growth for the duration of the experimental period, whereas electroporated cells essentially died after a week in suspension culture. Considerable proliferation of immobilized cells was observed in spherical alginate beads. In both gel configurations, addition of serum was associated with increased cell proliferation. The results of the present study could contribute to an improvement of the storability of biosensors based on electroporated, genetically or membrane-engineered cells.

  8. Crystallization phenomena in slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrling, Carl Folke

    2000-09-01

    The crystallization of the mold slag affects both the heat transfer and the lubrication between the mold and the strand in continuous casting of steel. In order for mold slag design to become an engineering science rather than an empirical exercise, a fundamental understanding of the melting and solidification behavior of a slag must be developed. Thus it is necessary to be able to quantify the phenomena that occur under the thermal conditions that are found in the mold of a continuous caster. The double hot thermocouple technique (DHTT) and the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope used in this study are two novel techniques for investigating melting and solidification phenomena of transparent slags. Results from these techniques are useful in defining the phenomena that occur when the slag film infiltrates between the mold and the shell of the casting. TTT diagrams were obtained for various slags and indicated that the onset of crystallization is a function of cooling rate and slag chemistry. Crystal morphology was found to be dependent upon the experimental temperature and four different morphologies were classified based upon the degree of melt undercooling. Continuous cooling experiments were carried out to develop CCT diagrams and it was found that the amount and appearance of the crystalline fraction greatly depends on the cooling conditions. The DHTT can also be used to mimic the cooling profile encountered by the slag in the mold of a continuous caster. In this differential cooling mode (DCT), it was found that the details of the cooling rate determine the actual response of the slag to a thermal gradient and small changes can lead to significantly different results. Crystal growth rates were measured and found to be in the range between 0.11 mum/s to 11.73 mum/s depending on temperature and slag chemistry. Alumina particles were found to be effective innoculants in oxide melts reducing the incubation time for the onset of crystallization and also extending

  9. Physiological properties of astroglial cell lines derived from mice with high (SAMP8 and low (SAMR1, ICR levels of endogenous retrovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Eun-Kyoung

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous studies have reported that various inbred SAM mouse strains differ markedly with regard to a variety of parameters, such as capacity for learning and memory, life spans and brain histopathology. A potential cause of differences seen in these strains may be based on the fact that some strains have a high concentration of infectious murine leukemia virus (MuLV in the brain, whereas other strains have little or no virus. To elucidate the effect of a higher titer of endogenous retrovirus in astroglial cells of the brain, we established astroglial cell lines from SAMR1 and SAMP8 mice, which are, respectively, resistant and prone to deficit in learning and memory and shortened life span. MuLV-negative astroglial cell lines established from ICR mice served as controls. Comparison of these cell lines showed differences in: 1 levels of the capsid antigen CAgag in both cell lysates and culture media, 2 expression of genomic retroelements, 3 the number of virus particles, 4 titer of infectious virus, 5 morphology, 6 replication rate of cells in culture and final cell concentrations, 7 expression pattern of proinflammatory cytokine genes. The results show that the expression of MuLV is much higher in SAMP8 than SAMR1 astrocyte cultures and that there are physiological differences in astroglia from the 2 strains. These results raise the possibility that the distinct physiological differences between SAMP8 and SAMR1 are a function of activation of endogenous retrovirus.

  10. The XIIIth International Physiological Congress in Boston in 1929: American Physiology Comes of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    In the 19th century, the concept of experimental physiology originated in France with Claude Bernard, evolved in Germany stimulated by the teaching of Carl Ludwig, and later spread to Britain and then to the United States. The goal was to develop a physicochemical understanding of physiological phenomena. The first International Physiological…

  11. Workshop on Interface Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the first Workshop on Interface Phenomena, organized jointly by the surface science groups at Dalhousie University and the University of Maine. It was our intention to concentrate on just three topics related to the kinetics of interface reactions which, in our opinion, were frequently obscured unnecessarily in the literature and whose fundamental nature warranted an extensive discussion to help clarify the issues, very much in the spirit of the Discussions of the Faraday Society. Each session (day) saw two principal speakers expounding the different views; the session chairmen were asked to summarize the ensuing discussions. To understand the complexity of interface reactions, paradigms must be formulated to provide a framework for the interpretation of experimen­ tal data and for the construction of theoretical models. Phenomenological approaches have been based on a small number of rate equations for the concentrations or mole numbers of the various species involved i...

  12. Fast fission phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of fast fission phenomena are presented. The paper is divided into three parts. In the first part, problems associated with fast fission processes are examined in terms of interaction potentials and a dynamic model is presented in which highly elastic collisions, the formation of compound nuclei and fast fission appear naturally. In the second part, a description is given of the experimental methods employed, the observations made and the preliminary interpretation of measurements suggesting the occurence of fast fission processes. In the third part, our dynamic model is incorporated in a general theory of the dissipative processes studied. This theory enables fluctuations associated with collective variables to be calculated. It is applied to highly inelastic collisions, to fast fission and to the fission dynamics of compound nuclei (for which a schematic representation is given). It is with these calculations that the main results of the second part can be interpreted

  13. Vacuum arc anode phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of anode phenomena in vacuum arcs is presented. Discussed in succession are: the transition of the arc into the anode spot mode; the temperature of the anode before, during and after the anode spot forms; and anode ions. Characteristically the anode spot has a temperature of the order of the atmospheric boiling point of the anode material and is a copious source of vapor and energetic ions. The dominant mechanism controlling the transition of the vacuum arc into the anode spot mode appears to depend upon the electrode geometry, the electrode material, and the current waveform of the particular vacuum arc being considered. Either magnetic constriction in the gap plasma or gross anode melting can trigger the transition; indeed, a combination of the two is a common cause of anode spot formation

  14. Physiological Concentration of Exogenous Lactate Reduces Antimycin A Triggered Oxidative Stress in Intestinal Epithelial Cell Line IPEC-1 and IPEC-J2 In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Stefan; Junnikkala, Sami; Renner, Lydia; Hynönen, Ulla; Hartig, Roland; Nossol, Constanze; Barta-Böszörményi, Anikó; Dänicke, Sven; Souffrant, Wolfgang-Bernhard; Palva, Airi; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Kluess, Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    Weaning triggers an adaptation of the gut function including luminal lactate generation by lactobacilli, depending on gastrointestinal site. We hypothesized that both lactobacilli and lactate influence porcine intestinal epithelial cells. In vivo experiments showed that concentration of lactate was significantly higher in gastric, duodenal and jejunal chyme of suckling piglets compared to their weaned counterparts. In an in vitro study we investigated the impact of physiological lactate concentration as derived from the in vivo study on the porcine intestinal epithelial cells IPEC-1 and IPEC-J2. We detected direct adherence of lactobacilli on the apical epithelial surface and a modulated F-actin structure. Application of lactobacilli culture supernatant alone or lactate (25 mM) at low pH (pH 4) changed the F-actin structure in a similar manner. Treatment of IPEC cultures with lactate at near neutral pH resulted in a significantly reduced superoxide-generation in Antimycin A-challenged cells. This protective effect was nearly completely reversed by inhibition of cellular lactate uptake via monocarboxylate transporter. Lactate treatment enhanced NADH autofluorescence ratio (Fcytosol/Fnucleus) in non-challenged cells, indicating an increased availability of reduced nucleotides, but did not change the overall ATP content of the cells. Lactobacilli-derived physiological lactate concentration in intestine is relevant for alleviation of redox stress in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:27054581

  15. Starting Physiology: Bioelectrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-01-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The…

  16. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    SunaoUchida; NorikoTakeda

    2012-01-01

    This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS) physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG) waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. The research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960s, with a focus primarily on sleep related EEG changes (CN...

  17. Effect of medical castration on CD4+ CD25+ T cells, CD8+ T cell IFN-gamma expression, and NK cells: a physiological role for testosterone and/or its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stephanie T; Plymate, Stephen R; Bremner, William J; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Hess, David L; Lin, Daniel W; Amory, John K; Nelson, Peter S; Wu, Jennifer D

    2006-05-01

    The higher prevalence of autoimmune disease among women compared with men suggests that steroids impact immune regulation. To investigate how sex steroids modulate cellular immune function, we conducted a randomized trial in 12 healthy men aged 35-55 yr treated for 28 days with placebo, a GnRH antagonist, acyline to induce medical castration, or acyline plus daily testosterone (T) gel to replace serum T, followed by a 28-day recovery period. Serum hormones were measured weekly and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were collected biweekly for analyses of thymus-derived lymphocyte (T cell) subtypes and natural killer (NK) cells. Compared with the other groups and to baseline throughout the drug exposure period, men receiving acyline alone had significant reductions in serum T (near or below castrate levels), dihydrotestosterone, and estradiol (P physiological balance of autoimmunity and protective immunity by preserving the number of regulatory T cells and the activation of CD8+ T cells. In addition, sex steroids suppress NK cell proliferation. This study supports a complex physiological role for T and/or its metabolites in immune regulation. PMID:16352669

  18. Nuclear fuel deformation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel encounters severe thermomechanical environments. Its mechanical response is profoundly influenced by an underlying heterogeneous microstructure but also inherently dependent on the temperature and stress level histories. The ability to adequately simulate the response of such microstructures, to elucidate the associated macroscopic response in such extreme environments is crucial for predicting both performance and transient fuel mechanical responses. This chapter discusses key physical phenomena and the status of current modelling techniques to evaluate and predict fuel deformations: creep, swelling, cracking and pellet-clad interaction. This chapter only deals with nuclear fuel; deformations of cladding materials are discussed elsewhere. An obvious need for a multi-physics and multi-scale approach to develop a fundamental understanding of properties of complex nuclear fuel materials is presented. The development of such advanced multi-scale mechanistic frameworks should include either an explicit (domain decomposition, homogenisation, etc.) or implicit (scaling laws, hand-shaking,...) linkage between the different time and length scales involved, in order to accurately predict the fuel thermomechanical response for a wide range of operating conditions and fuel types (including Gen-IV and TRU). (authors)

  19. Acid Deposition Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acid deposition, commonly known as acid rain, occurs when emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and other industrial processes undergo complex chemical reactions in the atmosphere and fall to the earth as wet deposition (rain, snow, cloud, fog) or dry deposition (dry particles, gas). Rain and snow are already naturally acidic, but are only considered problematic when less than a ph of 5.0 The main chemical precursors leading to acidic conditions are atmospheric concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). When these two compounds react with water, oxygen, and sunlight in the atmosphere, the result is sulfuric (H2SO4) and nitric acids (HNO3), the primary agents of acid deposition which mainly produced from the combustion of fossil fuel and from petroleum refinery. Airborne chemicals can travel long distances from their sources and can therefore affect ecosystems over broad regional scales and in locations far from the sources of emissions. According to the concern of petroleum ministry with the environment and occupational health, in this paper we will discussed the acid deposition phenomena through the following: Types of acidic deposition and its components in the atmosphere Natural and man-made sources of compounds causing the acidic deposition. Chemical reactions causing the acidic deposition phenomenon in the atmosphere. Factors affecting level of acidic deposition in the atmosphere. Impact of acid deposition. Procedures for acidic deposition control in petroleum industry

  20. Genistein at maximal physiologic serum levels induces G0/G1 arrest in MCF-7 and HB4a cells, but not apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboy, Marcela S; Marcarini, Juliana C; de Souza, Alecsandra O; de Paula, Natália A; Dorta, Daniel J; Mantovani, Mário S; Ribeiro, Lucia R

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that a balanced diet can contribute to better human health. For this reason, soy-based food and pure isoflavones (pills) are one of the most consumed. The association of this consumption and lower risks of chronic diseases and cancer is well established for the Asian population and has been attracting the attention of people worldwide, especially women at menopause who seek to alleviate the symptoms associated with the lack of estrogen. Despite positive epidemiological data, concerns still exist because of conflicting results found in scientific literature with relation to the role of isoflavones in breast and hormone-related cancers. The aim of our study was to investigate the cytotoxicity, induction of apoptosis, and changes in apoptosis-related genes of maximal physiological serum levels of the isoflavone genistein (Gen) in MCF-7 tumoral cells and in HB4a non-tumoral cells. In addition, induction of cell cycle arrest was also investigated. Only supraphysiological levels of Gen (50 and 100 μM) were cytotoxic to these cell lines. Concentrations of 10 and 25 μM did not induce apoptosis and significant changes in expression of the studied genes. Positive results were found only in cell cycle analysis: G0/G1 delay of MCF-7 cells in both concentrations of Gen and at 25 μM in HB4a cells. It is the first study investigating effects of Gen in the HB4a cell line. Thus, despite the lack of apoptosis induction (generally found with high concentrations), Gen at physiologically relevant serum levels still exerts chemopreventive effects through the modulation of cell cycle. PMID:24325455

  1. Physiology of B cells in mice with X-linked immunodeficiency. II. Influence of the thymus and mature T cells on B cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence is presented that the in vivo differentiation of B cells expressing X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) is controlled by mature T cells. Normal (C57BL/6 X CBA/J)F1 mice were thymectomized (ATx), heavily irradiated, and reconstituted with CBA/N (xid) or CBA/Ca (nondefective) marrow. In contrast to sham-operated mice, ATx recipients of xid marrow showed an almost total absence of Ig+ B cells in lymph nodes (LN) and thoracic duct lymph at 2 mo post-reconstitution; B cells were markedly reduced in the spleen in some mice but only moderately in others. Addition of mature T cells soon after marrow reconstitution substantially abrogated the B cell depletion. In control experiments with nondefective B cells, the number of B cells developing in ATx irradiated recipients of normal (xid-) marrow cells was not detectably lower than in sham-operated recipients. These data imply that a subset of T-dependent B cells is either missing in normal mice or present in only very small numbers

  2. Plant Physiology and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taiz, Lincoln; Zeiger, Eduardo; Møller, Ian Max;

    widely used upper-division plant biology textbook. In the Sixth Edition, the Growth and Development section (Unit III) has been reorganized and expanded to present the complete life cycle of seed plants from germination to senescence. In recognition of this enhancement, the text has been renamed Plant......Throughout its twenty-two year history, the authors of Plant Physiology have continually updated the book to incorporate the latest advances in plant biology and implement pedagogical improvements requested by adopters. This has made Plant Physiology the most authoritative, comprehensive, and...... Physiology and Development. As before, Unit III begins with updated chapters on Cell Walls and Signals and Signal Transduction. The latter chapter has been expanded to include a discussion of major signaling molecules, such as calcium ions and plant hormones. A new, unified chapter entitled Signals from...

  3. From physiological psychology to psychological physiology: postnonclassical approach to ethnocultural phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    CHERNORIZOV ALEKSANDR M.; ASMOLOV ALEKSANDR G.; SCHECHTER EUGENIYA D.

    2015-01-01

    In modern science, along with the “classic” and “non-classical” approach to solving fundamental and applied problems, there is an actively developing “postnonclassical” research paradigm. This renovation of general scientific methodology has been accompanied by the emergence of new experimental technologies and new scientific research directions based on them. “Social psychophysiology” is one such direction. It is formed within the frame of postnonclassical methodology at the intersection of ...

  4. Cell Migration and Invasion Assays as Tools for Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hulkower, Keren I.; Herber, Renee L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screeni...

  5. A physiological pattern of oxygenation using perfluorocarbon-based culture devices maximizes pancreatic islet viability and enhances β-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraker, Chris A; Cechin, Sirlene; Álvarez-Cubela, Silvia; Echeverri, Felipe; Bernal, Andrés; Poo, Ramón; Ricordi, Camillo; Inverardi, Luca; Domínguez-Bendala, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Conventional culture vessels are not designed for physiological oxygen (O2) delivery. Both hyperoxia and hypoxia-commonly observed when culturing cells in regular plasticware-have been linked to reduced cellular function and death. Pancreatic islets, used for the clinical treatment of diabetes, are especially sensitive to sub- and supraphysiological O2 concentrations. A result of current culture standards is that a high percentage of islet preparations are never transplanted because of cell death and loss of function in the 24-48 h postisolation. Here, we describe a new culture system designed to provide quasiphysiological oxygenation to islets in culture. The use of dishes where islets rest atop a perfluorocarbon (PFC)-based membrane, coupled with a careful adjustment of environmental O2 concentration to target the islet physiological pO2 range, resulted in dramatic gains in viability and function. These observations underline the importance of approximating culture conditions as closely as possible to those of the native microenvironment, and fill a widely acknowledged gap in our ability to preserve islet functionality in vitro. As stem cell-derived insulin-producing cells are likely to suffer from the same limitations as those observed in real islets, our findings are especially timely in the context of current efforts to define renewable sources for transplantation. PMID:23068091

  6. Exercise physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The passing of Professor Bengt Saltin on September 12, 2014 truly marks the end of an era. As editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology and one of Bengt’s many collaborators and colleagues, I wanted the Journal to celebrate his many seminal contributions by means of an Editorial. Professor Bent...... Kiens, who is both a colleague of Bengt’s and a Consulting Editor for the Journal, was asked to write it. Thanks to Bente and her colleagues for the impossible task of distilling an enormous body of work into about 1,000 words. Peter Wagner, Editor...

  7. Occupational physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Toomingas, Allan; Tornqvist, Ewa Wigaeus

    2011-01-01

    In a clear and accessible presentation, Occupational Physiology focuses on important issues in the modern working world. Exploring major public health problems-such as musculoskeletal disorders and stress-this book explains connections between work, well-being, and health based on up-to-date research in the field. It provides useful methods for risk assessment and guidelines on arranging a good working life from the perspective of the working individual, the company, and society as a whole.The book focuses on common, stressful situations in different professions. Reviewing bodily demands and r

  8. Relaxation phenomena in disordered systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciortino, F.; Tartaglia, P.

    1997-02-01

    In this article we discuss how the assumptions of self-similarity imposed on the distribution of independently relaxing modes, as well as on their amplitude and characteristic times, manifest in the global relaxation phenomena. We also review recent applications of such approach to the description of relaxation phenomena in microemulsions and molecular glasses.

  9. Teaching Optical Phenomena with Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M.; Carvalho, P. Simeão

    2014-01-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a…

  10. Interfacial phenomena in electrocatalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Vayenas, Constantinos G

    2011-01-01

    This volume analyzes and summarizes recent developments and breakthroughs in several key interfacial electrochemical systems in fuel cell electrocatatalysis. The chapters are written by internationally recognized experts or rising stars in electrocatatalysis addressing both the fundamental and practical aspects of several emerging key electrochemical technologies.

  11. Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) Plays as a Physiological Glucose Sensor and Regulates Cellular Contractility in Rat Mesangial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Masanori Wakisaka; Tetsuhiko Nagao; Mototaka Yoshinari

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mesangial cells play an important role in regulating glomerular filtration by altering their cellular tone. We report the presence of a sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT) in rat mesangial cells. This study in rat mesangial cells aimed to evaluate the expression and role of SGLT2. Methods The SGLT2 expression in rat mesangial cells was assessed by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Changes in the mesangial cell surface area at different gluc...

  12. Radiation-induced DNA damage in tumors and normal tissues. II. Influence of dose, residual DNA damage and physiological factors in oxygenated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection and quantification of hypoxic cells in solid tumors is important for many experimental and clinical situations. Several laboratories, including ours, have suggested that assays which measure radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) might be used to detect or quantify hypoxic cells in tumors and normal tissues. Recently, we demonstrated the feasibility of using an alkaline elution assay that measures strand breaks and DPCs to detect and/or quantify hypoxic cells in tissues. For this approach to be valid, DPCs must not be formed to any great extent in irradiated oxygenated cells, and the formation and repair of strand breaks and DPCs in oxygenated cells must not be modified appreciably by physiological factors (e.g., temperature, pH and nutrient depletion) that are often found in solid tumors. To address these issues, two sets of experiments were performed. In one set of experiments, oxygenated 9L cells in tissue culture, subcutaneous 9L tumors and rat cerebella were irradiated with doses of 15 or 50 Gy and allowed to repair until the residual strand break damage was low enough to detect DPCs. In another set of experiments, oxygenated exponentially growing or plateau-phase 9L cells in tissue culture were irradiated with a dose of 15 Gy at 37 or 20 degrees C, while the cells were maintained at a pH of either 6.6 or 7.3. DNA-protein crosslinks were formed in oxygenated cells about 100 times less efficiently than in hypoxic cells. In addition, temperature, pH, nutrient depletion and growth phase did not appreciably alter the formation and repair of strand breaks or the formation of DPCs in oxygenated 9L cells. These results support the use of this DNA damage assay for the detection and quantification of hypoxic cells in solid tumors. 27 refs., 5 tabs

  13. The physiological expression of scavenger receptor SR-B1 in canine endometrial and placental epithelial cells and its potential involvement in pathogenesis of pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, C; Becher-Deichsel, A; Hlavaty, J; Mair, G; Walter, I

    2016-06-01

    Pyometra, the purulent inflammation of the uterus, is a common uterine disease of bitches that has potentially life-threatening consequences. The opportunistic bacterial infection of the uterus often progresses into the serious systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In a previous study, we characterized epithelial foam cells in the canine endometrial surface occurring in metestrus, and we regularly observed pronounced epithelial foam-cell formations in pyometra-affected uteri. Therefore, it was assumed that the mechanism behind lipid droplet accumulation in surface epithelial cells might even increase bacterial binding capacity and promote pyometra development. Lipid droplet accumulation in epithelial cells is accomplished via specialized lipid receptors called scavenger receptors (SR). Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is an important receptor for lipid accumulation in diverse cell types, but it is also a strong binding partner for bacteria, and thereby enhances bacterial adhesion and clinical signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In the present study, after the isolation of metestrous surface epithelial cells from canine uteri by laser capture microdissection, SR-B1 was identified at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and also at the protein level by means of immunohistochemistry. In pyometra-affected uteri, SR-B1 mRNA expression was higher than that in the healthy control samples, and SR-B1 protein was expressed in the surface and crypt epithelial cells. Furthermore, to understand the physiological role of SR-B1 expression in the metestrus surface epithelial cells, we investigated its expression in the epithelial cells of the glandular chambers of canine placenta in different stages of gestation because these cells are also characterized by lipid droplet accumulation. SR-B1 was present in the placental epithelial cells of the glandular chambers from 25 to 30 and 45 to 50 days of gestation

  14. Wave phenomena in sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhner-Böttcher, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Context: The dynamic atmosphere of the Sun exhibits a wealth of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In the presence of strong magnetic fields, most spectacular and powerful waves evolve in the sunspot atmosphere. Allover the sunspot area, continuously propagating waves generate strong oscillations in spectral intensity and velocity. The most prominent and fascinating phenomena are the 'umbral flashes' and 'running penumbral waves' as seen in the sunspot chromosphere. Their nature and relation have been under intense discussion in the last decades. Aims: Waves are suggested to propagate upward along the magnetic field lines of sunspots. An observational study is performed to prove or disprove the field-guided nature and coupling of the prevalent umbral and penumbral waves. Comprehensive spectroscopic observations at high resolution shall provide new insights into the wave characteristics and distribution across the sunspot atmosphere. Methods: Two prime sunspot observations were carried out with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory in New Mexico and with the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Teide Observatory on Tenerife. The two-dimensional spectroscopic observations were performed with the interferometric spectrometers IBIS and TESOS. Multiple spectral lines are scanned co-temporally to sample the dynamics at the photospheric and chromospheric layers. The time series (1 – 2.5 h) taken at high spatial and temporal resolution are analyzed according to their evolution in spectral intensities and Doppler velocities. A wavelet analysis was used to obtain the wave power and dominating wave periods. A reconstruction of the magnetic field inclination based on sunspot oscillations was developed. Results and conclusions: Sunspot oscillations occur continuously in spectral intensity and velocity. The obtained wave characteristics of umbral flashes and running penumbral waves strongly support the scenario of slow-mode magnetoacoustic wave propagation along

  15. Use of xenofree matrices and molecularly-defined media to control human embryonic stem cell pluripotency: effect of low physiological TGF-beta concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Isabelle; Barbet, Romain; Zhou, Yi-Ping; Li, Ma-Lin; Monier, Marie-Noëlle; Hatzfeld, Antoinette; Hatzfeld, Jacques A

    2008-06-01

    To monitor human embryonic stem cell (hESC) self-renewal without differentiation, we used quantitative RT-PCR to study a selection of hESC genes, including markers for self-renewal, commitment/differentiation, and members of the TGF-beta superfamily and DAN gene family. Indeed, low commitment/differentiation gene expression, together with a significant self-renewal gene expres sion, provides a better pluripotency index than self-renewal genes alone. We demonstrate that matrices derived from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can advantageously replace murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) or hMSC feeders. Moreover, a xenofree molecularly-defined SBX medium, containing a synthetic lipid carrier instead of albumin, can replace SR medium. The number of selected differentiation genes expressed by hESCs in these culture conditions was significantly lower than those expressed on MEF feeders in SR medium. In SBX, the positive effect of a non-physiological concentration of activin A (10-30 ng/mL) to reduce differentiation during self-renewal could also be obtained by physiological concentrations of TGF-beta(100-300 pg/mL). In contrast, these TGF-beta concentrations added to activin favored differentiation as previously observed with TGF-beta concentrations of 1 ng/mL or more. Compared to SR-containing medium, SBX medium promoted down-regulation of CER1 and LEFTIES and up-regulation of GREM1. Thus these genes better control self-renewal and pluripotency and prevent differentiation. A strategy is proposed to analyze, in more physiological, xenofree, molecularly-defined media and matrices, the numerous genes with still unknown functions controlling hESCs or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). PMID:18513159

  16. Combinations of physiologic estrogens with xenoestrogens alter calcium and kinase responses, prolactin release, and membrane estrogen receptor trafficking in rat pituitary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Cheryl S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenoestrogens such as alkylphenols and the structurally related plastic byproduct bisphenol A have recently been shown to act potently via nongenomic signaling pathways and the membrane version of estrogen receptor-α. Though the responses to these compounds are typically measured individually, they usually contaminate organisms that already have endogenous estrogens present. Therefore, we used quantitative medium-throughput screening assays to measure the effects of physiologic estrogens in combination with these xenoestrogens. Methods We studied the effects of low concentrations of endogenous estrogens (estradiol, estriol, and estrone at 10 pM (representing pre-development levels, and 1 nM (representing higher cycle-dependent and pregnancy levels in combinations with the same levels of xenoestrogens in GH3/B6/F10 pituitary cells. These levels of xenoestrogens represent extremely low contamination levels. We monitored calcium entry into cells using Fura-2 fluorescence imaging of single cells. Prolactin release was measured by radio-immunoassay. Extracellular-regulated kinase (1 and 2 phospho-activations and the levels of three estrogen receptors in the cell membrane (ERα, ERβ, and GPER were measured using a quantitative plate immunoassay of fixed cells either permeabilized or nonpermeabilized (respectively. Results All xenoestrogens caused responses at these concentrations, and had disruptive effects on the actions of physiologic estrogens. Xenoestrogens reduced the % of cells that responded to estradiol via calcium channel opening. They also inhibited the activation (phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases at some concentrations. They either inhibited or enhanced rapid prolactin release, depending upon concentration. These latter two dose-responses were nonmonotonic, a characteristic of nongenomic estrogenic responses. Conclusions Responses mediated by endogenous estrogens representing different life stages are

  17. Physiological Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric D.

    The analysis of physiological sound in the peripheral auditory system solves three important problems. First, sound energy impinging on the head must be captured and presented to the transduction apparatus in the ear as a suitable mechanical signal; second, this mechanical signal needs to be transduced into a neural representation that can be used by the brain; third, the resulting neural representation needs to be analyzed by central neurons to extract information useful to the animal. This chapter provides an overview of some aspects of the first two of these processes. The description is entirely focused on the mammalian auditory system, primarily on human hearing and on the hearing of a few commonly used laboratory animals (mainly rodents and carnivores). Useful summaries of non-mammalian hearing are available [1]. Because of the large size of the literature, review papers are referenced wherever possible.

  18. Advanced diffusion processes and phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas; Belova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    This topical volume on Advanced Diffusion Processes and Phenomena addresses diffusion in a wider sense of not only mass diffusion but also heat diffusion in fluids and solids. Both diffusion phenomena play an important role in the characterization of engineering materials and corresponding structures. Understanding these different transport phenomena at many levels, from atomistic to macro, has therefore long attracted the attention of many researchers in materials science and engineering and related disciplines. The present topical volume captures a representative cross-section of some of the

  19. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  20. The phenomena of social reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Kumelj

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Social reality originates from social interaction in a social group. It is consolidated with social consensus. It is transcendent and relatively stable. Social reality is maintained in relatively isolated, balanced social environment. Majority of members in a social group spontaneously reacts to deviations. These are characteristics which many authors contribute to social reality. If social reality is to be understood as a collection of social-psychological phenomena, of which the important factor is structuring of environment, then these phenomena have to have similar characteristics as social reality itself. In this article various definitions of selected phenomena are presented, such as social norms, group values, stereotypes, prejudice, social representations, etc. The article contends that despite of lack of clear definitions, we can find views that connect the aforementioned characteristics to social-psychological phenomena.

  1. Resonant phenomena in colloidal crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Palberg, Thomas; Würth, Mathias; König, Peter; Simnacher, Erwin; Leiderer, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Colloidal crystals of completely deionized suspensions of latex speres are subjected to oscillatory and steady shear, as well as to homogeneous and inhomogeneous electric fields. Various resonant phenomena observed in such experiments are reported.

  2. Bifurcation phenomena in control flows

    OpenAIRE

    Colonius, Fritz; Fabbri, Roberta; Johnson, Russell; Spadini, Marco

    2007-01-01

    We study bifurcation phenomena in control flows and the bifurcation of control sets. A Mel'nikov method and the Conley index together with exponential dichotomy theory and integral manifold theory are used.

  3. Electroosmotic Phenomena in Organic Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Afshin Asadi; Bujang B.K. Huat; M. M. Hassim; Mohamed, Thamer A.; Hanafi, M. M.; Nader Shariatmadari

    2009-01-01

    Organic soils or peat represent an accumulation of disintegrated plant remains which have been preserved under condition of incomplete aeration and high water content. In order to develop a fundamental understanding of electroosmotic phenomena in peat, initially microelectrophoresis studies were carried out to conceptualize the electrokinetic phenomena. Then electroosmosis experiments were conducted on rigid cube samples containing 0.0001 M NaCl-water saturated peat. The open-anode and open-c...

  4. Nonequilibrium Phenomena in Liquid Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Bechhoefer, John

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes a talk presented at the April NATO ASI on Spatiotemporal Chaos in Complex Fluids, in Santa Fe, NM. The paper gives reasons that make complex fluids good material systems for conducting experiments on pattern formation and other nonequilibrium phenomena. Much of the discussion focuses on the different phenomena observed in solidification and how the increasing complexity of fluid systems decreases the velocity scale for achieving "rapid" solidification. Five systems are c...

  5. Measurement and modelling of local phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells; Messung und Modellierung lokaler Phaenomene in Polymer-Elektrolyt-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckl, R.

    2007-05-15

    Within the scope of this thesis, a new method for in situ current distribution measurement based on printed circuit board technology is developed and applied to polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Using the finite element method, the accuracy of this new approach is compared to conventional techniques and an estimate of the maximum uncertainty of measurement due to lateral currents is given. The effects of variable operating parameters on local electrochemical performance are studied by stationary and dynamic testing of laboratory cells with 100 cm{sup 2} active area. Based on experimental results, load conditions on the anode side are modelled and characteristic water management issues are analysed with the aid of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. (orig.)

  6. The age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an Arabidopsis T87 cell suspension culture during long-term cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra, E-mail: A.Kwiatkows@gmail.com [Department of Botany, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Zebrowski, Jacek [Department of Plant Physiology, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Oklejewicz, Bernadetta [Department of Genetics, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Czarnik, Justyna [Department of Botany, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Halibart-Puzio, Joanna [Department of Plant Physiology, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland); Wnuk, Maciej [Department of Genetics, University of Rzeszow, Kolbuszowa (Poland)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • A decrease in proliferation rate during long-term cultivation of Arabidopsis cells. • Age-dependent increase in senescence-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis cells. • Age-related increase in DNA methylation, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis cells. • High potential of photosynthetic efficiency of long-term cultured Arabidopsis cells. - Abstract: Plant cell suspension cultures represent good model systems applicable for both basic research and biotechnological purposes. Nevertheless, it is widely known that a prolonged in vitro cultivation of plant cells is associated with genetic and epigenetic instabilities, which may limit the usefulness of plant lines. In this study, the age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an asynchronous Arabidopsis T87 cell culture were examined. A prolonged cultivation period was found to be correlated with a decrease in the proliferation rate and a simultaneous increase in the expression of senescence-associated genes, indicating that the aging process started at the late growth phase of the culture. In addition, increases in the heterochromatin-specific epigenetic markers, i.e., global DNA methylation, H3K9 dimethylation, and H3K27 trimethylation, were observed, suggesting the onset of chromatin condensation, a hallmark of the early stages of plant senescence. Although the number of live cells decreased with an increase in the age of the culture, the remaining viable cells retained a high potential to efficiently perform photosynthesis and did not exhibit any symptoms of photosystem II damage.

  7. The age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an Arabidopsis T87 cell suspension culture during long-term cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A decrease in proliferation rate during long-term cultivation of Arabidopsis cells. • Age-dependent increase in senescence-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis cells. • Age-related increase in DNA methylation, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis cells. • High potential of photosynthetic efficiency of long-term cultured Arabidopsis cells. - Abstract: Plant cell suspension cultures represent good model systems applicable for both basic research and biotechnological purposes. Nevertheless, it is widely known that a prolonged in vitro cultivation of plant cells is associated with genetic and epigenetic instabilities, which may limit the usefulness of plant lines. In this study, the age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an asynchronous Arabidopsis T87 cell culture were examined. A prolonged cultivation period was found to be correlated with a decrease in the proliferation rate and a simultaneous increase in the expression of senescence-associated genes, indicating that the aging process started at the late growth phase of the culture. In addition, increases in the heterochromatin-specific epigenetic markers, i.e., global DNA methylation, H3K9 dimethylation, and H3K27 trimethylation, were observed, suggesting the onset of chromatin condensation, a hallmark of the early stages of plant senescence. Although the number of live cells decreased with an increase in the age of the culture, the remaining viable cells retained a high potential to efficiently perform photosynthesis and did not exhibit any symptoms of photosystem II damage

  8. Quantifying the magnitude of the oxygen artefact inherent in culturing airway cells under atmospheric oxygen versus physiological levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhinav; Dailey, Lea Ann; Swedrowska, Magda; Siow, Richard; Mann, Giovanni E; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Arno, Matthew; Mudway, Ian S; Forbes, Ben

    2016-01-01

    To date, in vitro studies assessing the pulmonary toxicity of inhaled particles have provided poor correlation with in vivo results. We explored whether this discrepancy reflected cellular adaptations in pulmonary cells cultured under atmospheric oxygen concentrations (21%) compared with in vivo alveolar concentrations (100 mm Hg, ~ 13%) and whether this blunted cellular responses to nanoparticle challenge. At 21% oxygen, A549 cells had augmented intracellular glutathione concentrations, with evidence of increased tolerance to CuO nanoparticles, with reduced reactive oxygen species production, blunted transcriptional responses and delayed cell death, compared to cells cultured at 13% oxygen. These data support the contention that standard cell culture conditions pre-adapt cells to oxidative insults and emphasize the necessity of ensuring normoxic conditions in model systems to improve their predictive value. PMID:26823171

  9. EDITORIAL: Quantum phenomena in Nanotechnology Quantum phenomena in Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Twenty years ago the Institute of Physics launched the journal Nanotechnology from its publishing house based in the home town of Paul Dirac, a legendary figure in the development of quantum mechanics at the turn of the last century. At the beginning of the 20th century, the adoption of quantum mechanical descriptions of events transformed the existing deterministic world view. But in many ways it also revolutionised the progress of research itself. For the first time since the 17th century when Francis Bacon established inductive reasoning as the means of advancing science from fact to axiom to law, theory was progressing ahead of experiments instead of providing explanations for observations that had already been made. Dirac's postulation of antimatter through purely theoretical investigation before its observation is the archetypal example of theory leading the way for experiment. The progress of nanotechnology and the development of tools and techniques that enabled the investigation of systems at the nanoscale brought with them many fascinating observations of phenomena that could only be explained through quantum mechanics, first theoretically deduced decades previously. At the nanoscale, quantum confinement effects dominate the electrical and optical properties of systems. They also render new opportunities for manipulating the response of systems. For example, a better understanding of these systems has enabled the rapid development of quantum dots with precisely determined properties, which can be exploited in a range of applications from medical imaging and photovoltaic solar cells to quantum computation, a radically new information technology being currently developed in many labs worldwide. As the first ever academic journal in nanotechnology, {\\it Nanotechnology} has been the forum for papers detailing progress of the science through extremely exciting times. In the early years of the journal, the investigation of electron spin led to the formulation

  10. Role of Ink4a/Arf Locus in Beta Cell Mass Expansion under Physiological and Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Salas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ARF/INK4A (Cdkn2a locus includes the linked tumour suppressor genes p16INK4a and p14ARF (p19ARF in mice that trigger the antiproliferative activities of both RB and p53. With beta cell self-replication being the primary source for new beta cell generation in adult animals, the network by which beta cell replication could be increased to enhance beta cell mass and function is one of the approaches in diabetes research. In this review, we show a general view of the regulation points at transcriptional and posttranslational levels of Cdkn2a locus. We describe the molecular pathways and functions of Cdkn2a in beta cell cycle regulation. Given that aging reveals increased p16Ink4a levels in the pancreas that inhibit the proliferation of beta cells and decrease their ability to respond to injury, we show the state of the art about the role of this locus in beta cell senescence and diabetes development. Additionally, we focus on two approaches in beta cell regeneration strategies that rely on Cdkn2a locus negative regulation: long noncoding RNAs and betatrophin.

  11. Role of Ink4a/Arf Locus in Beta Cell Mass Expansion under Physiological and Pathological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Elisabet; Rabhi, Nabil; Froguel, Philippe; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    The ARF/INK4A (Cdkn2a) locus includes the linked tumour suppressor genes p16INK4a and p14ARF (p19ARF in mice) that trigger the antiproliferative activities of both RB and p53. With beta cell self-replication being the primary source for new beta cell generation in adult animals, the network by which beta cell replication could be increased to enhance beta cell mass and function is one of the approaches in diabetes research. In this review, we show a general view of the regulation points at transcriptional and posttranslational levels of Cdkn2a locus. We describe the molecular pathways and functions of Cdkn2a in beta cell cycle regulation. Given that aging reveals increased p16Ink4a levels in the pancreas that inhibit the proliferation of beta cells and decrease their ability to respond to injury, we show the state of the art about the role of this locus in beta cell senescence and diabetes development. Additionally, we focus on two approaches in beta cell regeneration strategies that rely on Cdkn2a locus negative regulation: long noncoding RNAs and betatrophin. PMID:24672805

  12. Mechanosensory responses of osteocytes to physiological forces occur along processes and not cell body and require αVβ3 integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi, Mia M; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Spray, David C

    2013-12-24

    Osteocytes in the lacunar-canalicular system of the bone are thought to be the cells that sense mechanical loading and transduce mechanical strain into biomechanical responses. The goal of this study was to evaluate the extent to which focal mechanical stimulation of osteocyte cell body and process led to activation of the cells, and determine whether integrin attachments play a role in osteocyte activation. We use a novel Stokesian fluid stimulus probe to hydrodynamically load osteocyte processes vs. cell bodies in murine long bone osteocyte Y4 (MLO-Y4) cells with physiological-level forces <10 pN without probe contact, and measured intracellular Ca(2+) responses. Our results indicate that osteocyte processes are extremely responsive to piconewton-level mechanical loading, whereas the osteocyte cell body and processes with no local attachment sites are not. Ca(2+) signals generated at stimulated sites spread within the processes with average velocity of 5.6 μm/s. Using the near-infrared fluorescence probe IntegriSense 750, we demonstrated that inhibition of αVβ3 integrin attachment sites compromises the response to probe stimulation. Moreover, using apyrase, an extracellular ATP scavenger, we showed that Ca(2+) signaling from the osteocyte process to the cell body was greatly diminished, and thus dependent on ATP-mediated autocrine signaling. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that osteocytes in situ are highly polarized cells, where mechanotransduction occurs at substrate attachment sites along the processes at force levels predicted to occur at integrin attachment sites in vivo. We also demonstrate the essential role of αVβ3 integrin in osteocyte-polarized mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. PMID:24324138

  13. Intraoperative engineering of osteogenic grafts combining freshly harvested, human adipose-derived cells and physiological doses of bone morphogenetic protein-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mehrkens

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Engineered osteogenic constructs for bone repair typically involve complex and costly processes for cell expansion. Adipose tissue includes mesenchymal precursors in large amounts, in principle allowing for an intraoperative production of osteogenic grafts and their immediate implantation. However, stromal vascular fraction (SVF cells from adipose tissue were reported to require a molecular trigger to differentiate into functional osteoblasts. The present study tested whether physiological doses of recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2 could induce freshly harvested human SVF cells to generate ectopic bone tissue. Enzymatically dissociated SVF cells from 7 healthy donors (1 x 106 or 4 x 106 were immediately embedded in a fibrin gel with or without 250 ng rhBMP-2, mixed with porous silicated calcium-phosphate granules (Actifuse®, Apatech (final construct size: 0.1 cm3 and implanted ectopically for eight weeks in nude mice. In the presence of rhBMP-2, SVF cells not only supported but directly contributed to the formation of bone ossicles, which were not observed in control cell-free, rhBMP-2 loaded implants. In vitro analysis indicated that rhBMP-2 did not involve an increase in the percentage of SVF cells recruited to the osteogenic lineage, but rather induced a stimulation of the osteoblastic differentiation of the committed progenitors. These findings confirm the feasibility of generating fully osteogenic grafts using an easily accessible autologous cell source and low amounts of rhBMP-2, in a timing compatible with an intraoperative schedule. The study warrants further investigation at an orthotopic site of implantation, where the delivery of rhBMP-2 could be bypassed thanks to the properties of the local milieu.

  14. Avian reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  15. Ultrashort Phenomena in Biochemistry and Biological Signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In biological phenomena there are indications that within the long pulse-length of the action potential on millisecond scale, there is additional ultrashort perturbation encoding that provides the brain with detailed information about the origin (location) and physiological characteristics. The objective is to identify the mechanism-of-action providing the potential for encoding in biological signal propagation. The actual molecular processes involved in the initiation of the action potential have been identified to be in the femtosecond and pico-second scale. The depolarization process of the cellular membrane itself, leading to the onset of the actionpotential that is transmitted to the brain, however is in the millisecond timeframe. One example of the femtosecond chemical interaction is the photoresponse of bacteriorhodopsin. No clear indication for the spatial encoding has so far been verified. Further research will be required on a cellular signal analysis level to confirm or deny the spatial and physiological encoding in the signal wave-trains of intercellular communications and sensory stimuli. The pathological encoding process for cardiac depolarization is however very pronounced and validated, however this electro-chemical process is in the millisecond amplitude and frequency modulation spectrum

  16. Ultrashort Phenomena in Biochemistry and Biological Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splinter, Robert

    2014-11-01

    In biological phenomena there are indications that within the long pulse-length of the action potential on millisecond scale, there is additional ultrashort perturbation encoding that provides the brain with detailed information about the origin (location) and physiological characteristics. The objective is to identify the mechanism-of-action providing the potential for encoding in biological signal propagation. The actual molecular processes involved in the initiation of the action potential have been identified to be in the femtosecond and pico-second scale. The depolarization process of the cellular membrane itself, leading to the onset of the actionpotential that is transmitted to the brain, however is in the millisecond timeframe. One example of the femtosecond chemical interaction is the photoresponse of bacteriorhodopsin. No clear indication for the spatial encoding has so far been verified. Further research will be required on a cellular signal analysis level to confirm or deny the spatial and physiological encoding in the signal wave-trains of intercellular communications and sensory stimuli. The pathological encoding process for cardiac depolarization is however very pronounced and validated, however this electro-chemical process is in the millisecond amplitude and frequency modulation spectrum.

  17. Performance of a glucose/O{sub 2} enzymatic biofuel cell containing a mediated melanocarpus albomyces laccase cathode in a physiological buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavanagh, P.; Boland, S.; Jenkins, P.; Leech, D. [Department of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2009-02-15

    We report on the performance of a prototype glucose/O{sub 2} biofuel cell in a physiological buffer. The cell consists of cathode based on Melanocarpus albomyces laccase (with a reported T1 copper redox potential of +0.26 V vs. Ag/AgCl) co-immobilised with an osmium redox polymer mediating film on glassy carbon (GC) separated by a Nafion 117 membrane from a GC anode in anolyte of glucose oxidase, N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) as a mediator, all immersed in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution containing 0.15 M NaCl and dissolved oxygen, thermostated at 37 C, mimicking physiological conditions. Two osmium redox polymers are employed for cathodic mediation: [Os(2,2'-bipyridine){sub 2}(polyvinylimidazole){sub 10}Cl]{sup +/2+} (E ' 0.22 V vs. Ag/AgCl) and [Os(4,4'-dichloro-2,2'-bipyridine){sub 2}(polyvinylimidazole){sub 10}Cl]{sup +/2+} (E ' 0.35 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Power outputs of 52 {mu}W cm{sup -2} at 0.21 V and 17 {mu}W cm{sup -2} at 0.34 V were obtained for assembled fuel cells containing the respective redox polymer-mediated laccase cathodes, illustrating the increased power obtained as a result of higher biocatalytic efficiency using a redox polymer with redox potential tailored for the enzyme. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Containment severe accident thermohydraulic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes and discusses the containment accident progression and the important severe accident containment thermohydraulic phenomena. The overall objective of the report is to provide a rather detailed presentation of the present status of phenomenological knowledge, including an account of relevant experimental investigations and to discuss, to some extent, the modelling approach used in the MAAP 3.0 computer code. The MAAP code has been used in Sweden as the main tool in the analysis of severe accidents. The dependence of the containment accident progression and containment phenomena on the initial conditions, which in turn are heavily dependent on the in-vessel accident progression and phenomena as well as associated uncertainties, is emphasized. The report is in three parts dealing with: * Swedish reactor containments, the severe accident mitigation programme in Sweden and containment accident progression in Swedish PWRs and BWRs as predicted by the MAAP 3.0 code. * Key non-energetic ex-vessel phenomena (melt fragmentation in water, melt quenching and coolability, core-concrete interaction and high temperature in containment). * Early containment threats due to energetic events (hydrogen combustion, high pressure melt ejection and direct containment heating, and ex-vessel steam explosions). The report concludes that our understanding of the containment severe accident progression and phenomena has improved very significantly over the parts ten years and, thereby, our ability to assess containment threats, to quantify uncertainties, and to interpret the results of experiments and computer code calculations have also increased. (au)

  19. Rescue of heavy metal effects on cell physiology of the algal model system Micrasterias by divalent ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Bayer, Elisabeth; Baumgartner, Verena; Andosch, Ancuela; Lütz, Cornelius; Sima, Evelyn; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2014-01-15

    Recent studies have shown that metals such as copper, zinc, aluminum, cadmium, chromium, iron and lead cause severe dose-dependent disturbances in growth, morphogenesis, photosynthetic and respiratory activity as well as on ultrastructure and function of organelles in the algal model system Micrasterias denticulata (Volland et al., 2011, 2012; Andosch et al., 2012). In the present investigation we focus on amelioration of these adverse effects of cadmium, chromium and lead by supplying the cells with different antioxidants and essential micronutrients to obtain insight into metal uptake mechanisms and subcellular metal targets. This seems particularly interesting as Micrasterias is adapted to extremely low-concentrated, oligotrophic conditions in its natural bog environment. The divalent ions of iron, zinc and calcium were able to diminish the effects of the metals cadmium, chromium and lead on Micrasterias. Iron showed most ameliorating effects on cadmium and chromium in short- and long-term treatments and improved cell morphogenesis, ultrastructure, cell division rates and photosynthesis. Analytical transmission electron microscopic (TEM) methods (electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI)) revealed that chromium uptake was decreased when Micrasterias cells were pre-treated with iron, which resulted in no longer detectable intracellular chromium accumulations. Zinc rescued the detrimental effects of chromium on net-photosynthesis, respiration rates and electron transport in PS II. Calcium and gadolinium were able to almost completely compensate the inhibiting effects of lead and cadmium on cell morphogenesis after mitosis, respectively. These results indicate that cadmium is taken up by calcium and iron transporters, whereas chromium appears to enter the algae cells via iron and zinc carriers. It was shown that lead is not taken up into Micrasterias at all but exerts its adverse effects on cell growth by substituting cell

  20. Rescue of heavy metal effects on cell physiology of the algal model system Micrasterias by divalent ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Bayer, Elisabeth; Baumgartner, Verena; Andosch, Ancuela; Lütz, Cornelius; Sima, Evelyn; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that metals such as copper, zinc, aluminum, cadmium, chromium, iron and lead cause severe dose-dependent disturbances in growth, morphogenesis, photosynthetic and respiratory activity as well as on ultrastructure and function of organelles in the algal model system Micrasterias denticulata (Volland et al., 2011, 2012; Andosch et al., 2012). In the present investigation we focus on amelioration of these adverse effects of cadmium, chromium and lead by supplying the cells with different antioxidants and essential micronutrients to obtain insight into metal uptake mechanisms and subcellular metal targets. This seems particularly interesting as Micrasterias is adapted to extremely low-concentrated, oligotrophic conditions in its natural bog environment. The divalent ions of iron, zinc and calcium were able to diminish the effects of the metals cadmium, chromium and lead on Micrasterias. Iron showed most ameliorating effects on cadmium and chromium in short- and long-term treatments and improved cell morphogenesis, ultrastructure, cell division rates and photosynthesis. Analytical transmission electron microscopic (TEM) methods (electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI)) revealed that chromium uptake was decreased when Micrasterias cells were pre-treated with iron, which resulted in no longer detectable intracellular chromium accumulations. Zinc rescued the detrimental effects of chromium on net-photosynthesis, respiration rates and electron transport in PS II. Calcium and gadolinium were able to almost completely compensate the inhibiting effects of lead and cadmium on cell morphogenesis after mitosis, respectively. These results indicate that cadmium is taken up by calcium and iron transporters, whereas chromium appears to enter the algae cells via iron and zinc carriers. It was shown that lead is not taken up into Micrasterias at all but exerts its adverse effects on cell growth by substituting cell

  1. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos eKagias; Camilla eNehammer; Roger ePocock

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. Physiological stress can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive and reproduce...

  2. Mathematical challenges in integrative physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Brook, B.S.; Waters, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional approaches to biomedical research are based on the subdivision of biological systems—by length (or time) scales (body, organ, tissue, cell, and molecule), discipline (biology, physiology, bioengineering, etc.), or sub-systems (cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, etc.). These subdivisions, however, make it difficult to unravel the systemic nature of the mechanisms that govern many of the (patho-) physiological processes in the human body. The challenge now is to comp...

  3. Critical Phenomena in Gravitational Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gundlach Carsten

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As first discovered by Choptuik, the black hole threshold in the space of initial data for general relativity shows both surprising structure and surprising simplicity. Universality, power-law scaling of the black hole mass, and scale echoing have given rise to the term 'critical phenomena'. They are explained by the existence of exact solutions which are attractors within the black hole threshold, that is, attractors of codimension one in phase space, and which are typically self-similar. This review gives an introduction to the phenomena, tries to summarize the essential features of what is happening, and then presents extensions and applications of this basic scenario. Critical phenomena are of interest particularly for creating surprising structure from simple equations, and for the light they throw on cosmic censorship and the generic dynamics of general relativity.

  4. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment evokes transient oxidative stress in HaCaT keratinocytes and influences cell physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wende, Kristian; Straßenburg, Susanne; Haertel, Beate; Harms, Manuela; Holtz, Sarah; Barton, Annemarie; Masur, Kai; von Woedtke, Thomas; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-04-01

    Modern non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma sources enable controllable interaction with biological systems. Their future applications - e.g. wound management - are based on their unique mixture of reactive components sparking both stimulatory as well as inhibitory processes. To gain detailed understanding of plasma-cell interaction and with respect to risk awareness, key mechanisms need to be identified. This study focuses on the impact of an argon non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (kINPen 09) on human HaCaT keratinocytes. With increasing duration, cell viability decreased. In accordance, cells accumulated in G2/M phase within the following 24 h. DNA single-strand breaks were detected immediately after treatment and receded in the aftermath, returning to control levels after 24 h. No directly plasma-related DNA double-strand breaks were detected over the same time. Concurrently, DNA synthesis decreased. Coincident with treatment time, an increase in intracellular 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H(2)DCFDA) conversion increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. The radical scavenging activity of culture medium crucially influenced these effects. Thus, ROS changed DNA integrity, and the effectiveness of cellular defence mechanisms characterises the interaction of non-thermal plasma and eukaryotic cells. Effects were time-dependent, indicating an active response of the eukaryotic cells. Hence, a stimulation of eukaryotic cells using short-term non-thermal plasma treatment seems possible, eg in the context of chronic wound care. Long-term plasma treatments stopped in cell proliferation and apoptosis, which might be relevant in controlling neoplastic conditions. PMID:24155089

  5. Whistlers and related ionospheric phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Helliwell, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    The investigation of whistlers and related phenomena is a key element in studies of very-low-frequency propagation, satellite communication, the outer ionosphere, and solar-terrestrial relationships. This comprehensive text presents a history of the study of the phenomena and includes all the elements necessary for the calculation of the characteristics of whistlers and whistler-mode signals.An introduction and brief history are followed by a summary of the theory of whistlers and a detailed explanation of the calculation of their characteristics. Succeeding chapters offer a complete atlas of

  6. Complex Phenomena in Nanoscale Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Casati, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale physics has become one of the rapidly developing areas of contemporary physics because of its direct relevance to newly emerging area, nanotechnologies. Nanoscale devices and quantum functional materials are usually constructed based on the results of fundamental studies on nanoscale physics. Therefore studying physical phenomena in nanosized systems is of importance for progressive development of nanotechnologies. In this context study of complex phenomena in such systems and using them for controlling purposes is of great practical importance. Namely, such studies are brought together in this book, which contains 27 papers on various aspects of nanoscale physics and nonlinear dynamics.

  7. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunao eUchida

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. Thus, research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960’s, with a focus primarily on sleep EEG (CNS sleep changes. Those early studies found only small effects of exercise on sleep. More recent sleep research has explored not only CNS functioning, but somatic physiology as well. As physical exercise mostly affects somatic functions, endocrine and autonomic nervous system (ANS changes that occur during sleep should be affected by daytime exercise. Since endocrinological, metabolic and autonomic changes can be measured during sleep, it should be possible to assess exercise effects on somatic physiology in addition to CNS sleep quality, building from standard polysomnographic (PSG techniques. Incorporating measures of somatic physiology in the quantitative assessment of sleep could further our understanding of sleep's function as an auto-regulatory, global phenomenon.

  8. Exercise effects on sleep physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Sunao; Shioda, Kohei; Morita, Yuko; Kubota, Chie; Ganeko, Masashi; Takeda, Noriko

    2012-01-01

    This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS) physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG) waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. The research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960s, with a focus primarily on sleep related EEG changes (CNS sleep). Those early studies found only small effects of exercise on sleep. However, more recent sleep research has explored not only CNS functioning, but somatic physiology as well. Sleep should be affected by daytime exercise, as physical activity alters endocrine, autonomic nervous system (ANS), and somatic functions. Since endocrinological, metabolic, and autonomic changes can be measured during sleep, it should be possible to assess exercise effects on somatic physiology in addition to CNS sleep quality, evaluated by standard polysomnographic (PSG) techniques. Additional measures of somatic physiology have provided enough evidences to conclude that the auto-regulatory, global regulation of sleep is not the exclusive domain of the CNS, but it is heavily influenced by inputs from the rest of the body. PMID:22485106

  9. Changes in gene expression, cell physiology and toxicity of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa at elevated CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eSandrini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rising CO2 concentrations may have large effects on aquatic microorganisms. In this study, we investigated how elevated pCO2 affects the harmful freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. This species is capable of producing dense blooms and hepatotoxins called microcystins. Strain PCC 7806 was cultured in chemostats that were shifted from low to high pCO2 conditions. This resulted in a transition from a C-limited to a light-limited steady state, with a ~2.7 fold increase of the cyanobacterial biomass and ~2.5 fold more microcystin per cell. Cells increased their chlorophyll a and phycocyanin content, and raised their PSI/PSII ratio at high pCO2. Surprisingly, cells had a lower dry weight and contained less carbohydrates, which might be an adaptation to improve the buoyancy of Microcystis when light becomes more limiting at high pCO2. Only 234 of the 4,691 genes responded to elevated pCO2. For instance, expression of the carboxysome, RuBisCO, photosystem and C metabolism genes did not change significantly, and only a few N assimilation genes were expressed differently. The lack of large-scale changes in the transcriptome could suit a buoyant species that lives in eutrophic lakes with strong CO2 fluctuations very well. However, we found major responses in inorganic carbon uptake. At low pCO2, cells were mainly dependent on bicarbonate uptake, whereas at high pCO2 gene expression of the bicarbonate uptake systems was down-regulated and cells shifted to CO2 and low-affinity bicarbonate uptake. These results show that the need for high-affinity bicarbonate uptake systems ceases at elevated CO2. Moreover, the combination of an increased cyanobacterial abundance, improved buoyancy, and higher toxin content per cell indicates that rising atmospheric CO2 levels may increase the problems associated with the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis in eutrophic lakes.

  10. Red blood cell pH, the Bohr effect, and other oxygenation-linked phenomena in blood O2 and CO2 transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, F B

    2004-11-01

    The discovery of the S-shaped O2 equilibrium curve and the Bohr effect in 1904 stimulated a fertile and continued research into respiratory functions of blood and allosteric mechanisms in haemoglobin (Hb). The Bohr effect (influence of pH/CO2 on Hb O2 affinity) and the reciprocal Haldane effect (influence of HbO2 saturation on H+/CO2 binding) originate in the Hb oxy-deoxy conformational change and allosteric interactions between O2 and H+/CO2 binding sites. In steady state, H+ is passively distributed across the vertebrate red blood cell (RBC) membrane, and intracellular pH (pHi) changes are related to changes in extracellular pH, Hb-O2 saturation and RBC organic phosphate content. As the Hb molecule shifts between the oxy and deoxy conformation in arterial-venous gas transport, it delivers O2 and takes up CO2 and H+ in tissue capillaries (elegantly aided by the Bohr effect). Concomitantly, the RBC may sense local O2 demand via the degree of Hb deoxygenation and release vasodilatory agents to match local blood flow with requirements. Three recent hypotheses suggest (1) release of NO from S-nitroso-Hb upon deoxygenation, (2) reduction of nitrite to vasoactive NO by deoxy haems, and (3) release of ATP. Inside RBCs, carbonic anhydrase (CA) provides fast hydration of metabolic CO2 and ensures that the Bohr shift occurs during capillary transit. The formed H+ is bound to Hb (Haldane effect) while HCO3- is shifted to plasma via the anion exchanger (AE1). The magnitude of the oxylabile H+ binding shows characteristic differences among vertebrates. Alternative strategies for CO2 transport include direct HCO3- binding to deoxyHb in crocodilians, and high intracellular free [HCO3-] (due to high pHi) in lampreys. At the RBC membrane, CA, AE1 and other proteins may associate into what appears to be an integrated gas exchange metabolon. Oxygenation-linked binding of Hb to the membrane may regulate glycolysis in mammals and perhaps also oxygen-sensitive ion transport involved in

  11. H2A-DUBbing the mammalian epigenome: expanding frontiers for histone H2A deubiquitinating enzymes in cell biology and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Jad I; Nijnik, Anastasia

    2014-05-01

    Posttranslational modifications of histone H2A through the attachment of ubiquitin or poly-ubiquitin conjugates are common in mammalian genomes and play an important role in the regulation of chromatin structure, gene expression, and DNA repair. Histone H2A deubiquitinases (H2A-DUBs) are a group of structurally diverse enzymes that catalyze the removal ubiquitin from histone H2A. In this review we provide a concise summary of the mechanisms that mediate histone H2A ubiquitination in mammalian cells, and review our current knowledge of mammalian H2A-DUBs, their biochemical activities, and recent developments in our understanding of their functions in mammalian physiology. PMID:24647359

  12. Multiple Regulatory Roles of the Mouse Transmembrane Adaptor Protein NTAL in Gene Transcription and Mast Cell Physiology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polakovičová, Iva; Dráberová, Lubica; Šimíček, Michal; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 8 (2014), e105539. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA MŠk LD12073 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : mast cells * NTAL * microarray gene-expression profiling * spreading * chemotaxis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  13. Activation of Neuropeptide Y Receptors Modulates Retinal Ganglion Cell Physiology and Exerts Neuroprotective Actions In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, João; Elvas, Filipe; Brudzewsky, Dan; Martins, Tânia; Kolomiets, Bogdan; Tralhão, Pedro; Gøtzsche, Casper R; Cavadas, Cláudia; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Woldbye, David P D; Picaud, Serge; Santiago, Ana R; Ambrósio, António F

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is expressed in mammalian retina but the location and potential modulatory effects of NPY receptor activation remain largely unknown. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is a hallmark of several retinal degenerative diseases, particularly glaucoma. Using purified RGCs and ex vivo...

  14. Effect of eggshell temperature and a hole in the air cell on the perinatal development and physiology of layer hatchlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, R.; Vries, de S.; Anker, van den I.; Meijerhof, R.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den H.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of incubation conditions on layer hatchlings, an experiment was performed in which layer eggs were incubated at a normal (37.8°C) or high (38.9°C) eggshell temperature (EST) and a hole was punctured in the air cell of half of the eggs in both EST treatments from d 14 of inc

  15. Transport phenomena in particulate systems

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, José Teixeira; Ferreira, Maria do Carmo

    2012-01-01

    This volume spans 10 chapters covering different aspects of transport phenomena including fixed and fluidized systems, spouted beds, electrochemical and wastewater treatment reactors. This e-book will be valuable for students, engineers and researchers aiming to keep updated on the latest developments on particulate systems.

  16. Nursing phenomena in inpatient psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frauenfelder, F.; Muller-Staub, M.; Needham, I.; Achterberg, T. van

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the question if the nursing diagnosis classification of North American Nursing Association-International (NANDA-I) describes the adult inpatient psychiatric nursing care. The present study aimed to identify nursing phenomena mentioned in journal articles about the psychiatric i

  17. Collective Phenomena in Kidney Autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.

    2004-01-01

    nephron. However, a variety of cooperative phenomena arising through interactions between the nephrons may also be important. We prescut experimental evidence for a coupling between nephrons that are connected via a common piece of afferent arteriole. We also develop a mathematical model that call account...

  18. Strings, fields and critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The connection between field theory and critical phenomena is reviewed. Emphasis is put on the use of Monte Carlo methods in the study of non-perturbative aspects of field theory. String theory is then described as a statistical theory of random surfaces and the critical behaviour is analyzed both by analytical and numerical methods. (orig.)

  19. Graphene tests of Klein phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    De Leo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Graphene is characterized by chiral electronic excitations. As such it provides a perfect testing ground for the production of Klein pairs (electron/holes). If confirmed, the standard results for barrier phenomena must be reconsidered with, as a byproduct, the accumulation within the barrier of holes.

  20. Microbial food web components, bulk metabolism, and single-cell physiology of piconeuston in surface microlayers of high-altitude lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Hugo; Casamayor, Emilio O; Auguet, Jean-Christophe; Vila-Costa, Maria; Felip, Marisol; Camarero, Lluís; Gasol, Josep M

    2015-01-01

    Sharp boundaries in the physical environment are usually associated with abrupt shifts in organism abundance, activity, and diversity. Aquatic surface microlayers (SML) form a steep gradient between two contrasted environments, the atmosphere and surface waters, where they regulate the gas exchange between both environments. They usually harbor an abundant and active microbial life: the neuston. Few ecosystems are subjected to such a high UVR regime as high altitude lakes during summer. Here, we measured bulk estimates of heterotrophic activity, community structure and single-cell physiological properties by flow cytometry in 19 high-altitude remote Pyrenean lakes and compared the biological processes in the SML with those in the underlying surface waters. Phototrophic picoplankton (PPP) populations, were generally present in high abundances and in those lakes containing PPP populations with phycoerythrin (PE), total PPP abundance was higher at the SML. Heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) were also more abundant in the SML. Bacteria in the SML had lower leucine incorporation rates, lower percentages of "live" cells, and higher numbers of highly-respiring cells, likely resulting in a lower growth efficiency. No simple and direct linear relationships could be found between microbial abundances or activities and environmental variables, but factor analysis revealed that, despite their physical proximity, microbial life in SML and underlying waters was governed by different and independent processes. Overall, we demonstrate that piconeuston in high altitude lakes has specific features different from those of the picoplankton, and that they are highly affected by potential stressful environmental factors, such as high UVR radiation. PMID:25999921

  1. Zinc deficiency or excess within the physiological range increases genome instability and cytotoxicity, respectively, in human oral keratinocyte cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Razinah; Thomas, Philip; Zalewski, Peter; Fenech, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential component of Zn-finger proteins and acts as a cofactor for enzymes required for cellular metabolism and in the maintenance of DNA integrity. The study investigated the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Zn deficiency or excess in a primary human oral keratinocyte cell line and determined the optimal concentration of two Zn compounds (Zn Sulphate (ZnSO(4)) and Zn Carnosine (ZnC)) to minimise DNA damage. Zn-deficient medium (0 μM) was produced using Chelex treatment, and the two Zn compounds ZnSO(4) and ZnC were tested at concentrations of 0.0, 0.4, 4.0, 16.0, 32.0 and 100.0 μM. Cell viability was decreased in Zn-depleted cells (0 μM) as well as at 32 μM and 100 μM for both Zn compounds (P < 0.0001) as measured via the MTT assay. DNA strand breaks, as measured by the comet assay, were found to be increased in Zn-depleted cells compared with the other treatment groups (P < 0.05). The Cytokinesis Block Micronucleus Cytome assay showed a significant increase in the frequency of both apoptotic and necrotic cells under Zn-deficient conditions (P < 0.05). Furthermore, elevated frequencies of micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and nuclear buds (NBuds) were observed at 0 and 0.4 μM Zn, whereas these biomarkers were minimised for both Zn compounds at 4 and 16 μM Zn (P < 0.05), suggesting these concentrations are optimal to maintain genome stability. Expression of PARP, p53 and OGG1 measured by western blotting was increased in Zn-depleted cells indicating that DNA repair mechanisms are activated. These results suggest that maintaining Zn concentrations within the range of 4-16 μM is essential for DNA damage prevention in cultured human oral keratinocytes. PMID:21935692

  2. Physiology and physiopathology at CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although CT is essentially a morphological technique, it should theoretically enable investigation of certain physiological and physiopathological phenomena to be made, for example by the study of (i) CT numbers and (ii) the nature and evolution of enhancements. Intravenous injection of iodine contrast agent increases the attenuation coefficients of cerebral parenchyma, which is theoretically due only to the enhancement of the vascular compartment and in direct correlation with the cerebral blood volume (CBV). The authors have measured the attenuation coefficients of the blood and the parenchyma at varying times after contrast injection. Two contrast agents with differing osmolarities were studied. Two scanners were used - an ACTA scanner and an ND 8000. Twenty CTs were performed on five patients after a bolus injection of a solution of 38% iodine: sodium ioxithalamate 25.69 g; methylglucamine oxithalamate 51.3 osmolarity 1800 mosmol/12 ml/kg were injected. Leakage of the iodine contrast agent, however, considerably increases the density coefficient of cerebral parenchyma and rules out any accurate measurement of the CBV. CT study of cerebral physiopathology is also discussed. This is dependent on two techniques - measurement of attenuation coefficients and observation of enhancements - neither of which are shown to give results characteristic of any one physiopathology. The application of CT in physiological and physiopathological cerebral phenomena is currently extremely limited. (Auth.)

  3. Physics and (patho)physiology in confined flows: from colloidal patterns to cytoplasmic rheology and sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, L.

    2015-03-01

    I will discuss a few problems that involve the interaction of fluids and solids in confined spaces. (i) Jamming in pressure-driven suspension flows that show a transition from Stokes flows to Darcy flows as the solids start to lock, as in evaporative patterning in colloids (e.g. coffee stain formation) .(ii) Jamming and clogging of red blood cells, as in sickle-cell pathophysiology, with implications for other diseases that involve jamming. (iii) The mechanical response of crowded networks of filaments bathed in a fluid, as in the cytoskeleton, that can be described by poroelasticity theory. In each case, I will show how simple theories of multiphase flow and deformation can be used to explain a range of experimental observations, while failing to account for others, along with some thoughts on how to improve them.

  4. Molecular Crowding Defines a Common Origin for the Warburg Effect in Proliferating Cells and the Lactate Threshold in Muscle Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, Alexei; Oltvai, Zoltán N

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis is a seemingly wasteful mode of ATP production that is seen both in rapidly proliferating mammalian cells and highly active contracting muscles, but whether there is a common origin for its presence in these widely different systems is unknown. To study this issue, here we develop a model of human central metabolism that incorporates a solvent capacity constraint of metabolic enzymes and mitochondria, accounting for their occupied volume densities, while assuming glucose an...

  5. Palmitoylation of xanthan polysaccharide for self-assembly microcapsule formation and encapsulation of cells in physiological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, Ana Carina; Baran, Erkan Türker; Nunes, Cláudia; Coimbra, Manuel A.; Azevedo, Helena S.; Reis, R. L.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobized polysaccharides have emerged as a promising strategy in the biomedical field due to the versatility to design functional structures through the spontaneous self-assembly in cell-friendly conditions. Based on this concept, xanthan, a bacterial extracellular polysaccharide with potential as encapsulating matrix, was conjugated with hydrophobic palmitoyl groups to obtain an amphiphilic system able to form capsules by self-assembly processes. The conjugation of xanthan was performed...

  6. Physiology of ionophore transport of potassium and sodium ions across cell membranes: valinomycin and 18-crown-6 ether

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Clifford,

    2015-01-01

    The processes involved in transport of K + and Na + by the carrier ionophores valinomycin and 18-crown-6 ether across cell membranes have been elucidated using quantum mechanical modelling: 1. Formation of the {ionophore-M + } complex: desolvation (∆G desolv) of the central cavity of the ionophore, change in configurational energy T∆S, desolvation of the M(H 2 O) 6-7 +. 2. Desolvation of the {ionophore-M + } complex prior to entering the membrane environment. 3. Permeation through the lipophi...

  7. Zinc deficiency or excess within the physiological range increases genome instability and cytotoxicity, respectively, in human oral keratinocyte cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif, Razinah; Thomas, Philip; Zalewski, Peter; Fenech, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential component of Zn-finger proteins and acts as a cofactor for enzymes required for cellular metabolism and in the maintenance of DNA integrity. The study investigated the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Zn deficiency or excess in a primary human oral keratinocyte cell line and determined the optimal concentration of two Zn compounds (Zn Sulphate (ZnSO4) and Zn Carnosine (ZnC)) to minimise DNA damage. Zn-deficient medium (0 μM) was produced using Chelex treatment, and...

  8. Cell Migration and Invasion Assays as Tools for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren I. Hulkower

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screening process. This article will review the effective use of several principle formats for studying cell motility: scratch assays, transmembrane assays, microfluidic devices and cell exclusion zone assays.

  9. The disastrous effects of salt dust deposition on cotton leaf photosynthesis and the cell physiological properties in the Ebinur Basin in Northwest China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilili Abuduwaili

    Full Text Available Salt dust in rump lake areas in arid regions has long been considered an extreme stressor for both native plants and crops. In recent years, research on the harmful effects of salt dust on native plants has been published by many scholars, but the effect on crops has been little studied. In this work, in order to determine the impact of salt dust storms on cotton, we simulated salt dust exposure of cotton leaves in Ebinur Basin in Northwest China, and measured the particle sizes and salt ions in the dust, and the photosynthesis, the structure and the cell physiological properties of the cotton leaves. (1 Analysis found that the salt ions and particle sizes in the salt dust used in the experiments were consistent with the natural salt dust and modeled the salt dust deposition on cotton leaves in this region. (2 The main salt cations on the surface and inside the cotton leaves were Na+, Ca2+, Cl- and SO42-, while the amounts of CO3- and HCO3- were low. From the analysis, we can order the quantity of the salt cations and anions ions present on the surface and inside the cotton leaves as Na+>Ca2+>Mg2+>K+ and Cl->SO42->HCO3->CO3-, respectively. Furthermore, the five salt dust treatment groups in terms of the total salt ions on both the surface and inside the cotton leaves were A(500g.m-2>B(400g.m-2>C(300g.m-2>D(200g.m-2>E(100g.m-2>F(0g.m-2. (3The salt dust that landed on the surface of the cotton leaves can significantly influence the photosynthetic traits of Pn, PE, Ci, Ti, Gs, Tr, WUE, Ls, φ, Amax, k and Rady of the cotton leaves. (4Salt dust can significantly damage the physiological functions of the cotton leaves, resulting in a decrease in leaf chlorophyll and carotenoid content, and increasing cytoplasmic membrane permeability and malondialdehyde (MDA content by increasing the soluble sugar and proline to adjust for the loss of the cell cytosol. This increases the activity of antioxidant enzymes to eliminate harmful materials, such as the

  10. Statistical phenomena in particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle beams are subject to a variety of apparently distinct statistical phenomena such as intrabeam scattering, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, coherent instabilities, and radiofrequency noise diffusion. In fact, both the physics and mathematical description of these mechanisms are quite similar, with the notion of correlation as a powerful unifying principle. In this presentation we will attempt to provide both a physical and a mathematical basis for understanding the wide range of statistical phenomena that have been discussed. In the course of this study the tools of the trade will be introduced, e.g., the Vlasov and Fokker-Planck equations, noise theory, correlation functions, and beam transfer functions. Although a major concern will be to provide equations for analyzing machine design, the primary goal is to introduce a basic set of physical concepts having a very broad range of applicability

  11. Transport phenomena in multiphase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mauri, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    This textbook provides a thorough presentation of the phenomena related to the transport of mass, momentum and energy.  It lays all the basic physical principles, then for the more advanced readers, it offers an in-depth treatment with advanced mathematical derivations and ends with some useful applications of the models and equations in specific settings. The important idea behind the book is to unify all types of transport phenomena, describing them within a common framework in terms of cause and effect, respectively represented by the driving force and the flux of the transported quantity. The approach and presentation are original in that the book starts with a general description of transport processes, providing the macroscopic balance relations of fluid dynamics and heat and mass transfer, before diving into the mathematical realm of continuum mechanics to derive the microscopic governing equations at the microscopic level. The book is a modular teaching tool and can be used either for an introductory...

  12. Association of haematocrit and red blood cell transfusion with outcomes in infants with shunt-dependent pulmonary blood flow and univentricular physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Rahul; Parsons, Andrew; McClelland, Sarenthia; Morgan, Elizabeth; Robertson, Michael J.; Noel, Tommy R.; Schmitz, Michael L.; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Gupta, Punkaj

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and haematocrit values with outcomes in infants with univentricular physiology undergoing surgery for a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt. Material and methods This study included infants ≤ 2 months of age who underwent modified Blalock-Taussig shunt surgery at the Arkansas Children’s Hospital (2006–2012). Infants undergoing a Norwood operation or Damus-Kaye-Stansel operation with modified Blalock-Taussig shunt were excluded. Demographics, pre-operative, operative, daily laboratory data, and post-operative variables were collected. We studied the association between haematocrit and blood transfusion with a composite clinical outcome. Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to study the probability of study outcomes as a function of haematocrit values and RBC transfusions after operation. Results Seventy-three patients qualified for inclusion. All study patients received blood transfusion within the first 48 hours after heart surgery. The median haematocrit was 44.3 (interquartile range [IQR] 42.5–46.2), and the median volume of RBC transfused was 28 mL/kg (IQR, 10–125) in the first 14 days after surgery. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 13.6% (10 patients). A multivariable analysis adjusted for risk factors, including weight, prematurity, cardiopulmonary bypass and postoperative need for nitric oxide and dialysis, revealed no association between haematocrit values and RBC transfusion with the composite clinical outcome. Discussion We did not find an association between higher haematocrit values and increasing RBC transfusions with improved outcomes in infants with shunt-dependent pulmonary blood flow and univentricular physiology. The power of our study was small, which prevents any strong statement on this lack of association. Future multi-centre, randomised controlled trials are needed to investigate this topic in further

  13. Plumbagin, a plant-derived naphthoquinone metabolite induces mitochondria mediated apoptosis-like cell death in Leishmania donovani: an ultrastructural and physiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Bhanu Priya; Kathuria, Manoj; Pant, Garima; Kumari, Neema; Mitra, Kalyan

    2016-08-01

    Naphthoquinones are known to exhibit a broad range of biological activities against microbes, cancer and parasitic diseases and have been widely used in Indian traditional medicine. Plumbagin is a plant-derived naphthoquinone metabolite (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) reported to inhibit trypanothione reductase, the principal enzyme and a validated drug target involved in detoxification of oxidative stress in Leishmania. Here, we report the mechanistic aspects of cell death induced by plumbagin including physiological effects in the promastigote form and ultrastructural alterations in both promastigote and amastigote forms of Leishmania donovani which till now remained largely unknown. Our observations show that oxidative stress induced by plumbagin resulted in depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, depletion in ATP levels, elevation of cytosolic calcium, increase in caspase 3/7-like protease activity and lipid peroxidation in promastigotes. Apoptosis-like cell death induction post plumbagin treatment was confirmed by biochemical assays like Annexin V/FITC staining, TUNEL as well as morphological and ultrastructural studies. These findings collectively highlight the mode of action and importance of oxidative stress inducing agents in effectively killing both forms of the Leishmania parasite and opens up the possibility of exploring plumbagin and its derivatives as promising candidates in the chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis. PMID:27315817

  14. High cell density culture with S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D for IL-1β production: optimization, modeling, and physiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Carmine; Paciello, Lucia; de Alteriis, Elisabetta; Brambilla, Luca; Parascandola, Palma

    2015-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D, a strain auxotrophic for uracil belonging to the CEN.PK family of the yeast S. cerevisiae, was cultured in aerated fed-batch reactor as such and once transformed to express human interleukin-1β (IL-1β), aiming at obtaining high cell densities and optimizing IL-1β production. Three different exponentially increasing glucose feeding profiles were tested, all of them "in theory" promoting respiratory metabolism to obtain high biomass/product yield. A non-structured non-segregated model was developed to describe the performance of S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D during the fed-batch process and, in particular, its capability to metabolize simultaneously glucose and ethanol which derived from the precedent batch growth. Our study showed that the proliferative capacity of the yeast population declined along the fed-batch run, as shown by the exponentially decreasing specific growth rates on glucose. Further, a shift towards fermentative metabolism occurred. This shift took place earlier the higher was the feed rate and was more pronounced in the case of the recombinant strain. Determination of some physiological markers (acetate production, intracellular ROS accumulation, catalase activity and cell viability) showed that neither poor oxygenation nor oxidative stress was responsible for the decreased specific growth rate, nor for the shift to fermentative metabolism. PMID:25106469

  15. New phenomena searches at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aron; /UC, Davis

    2006-04-01

    The authors report on recent results from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment, which is accumulating data from proton-antiproton collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The new phenomena being explored include Higgs, Supersymmetry, and large extra dimensions. They also present the latest results of searches for heavy objects, which would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model.

  16. Critical phenomena in complex networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2007-01-01

    The combination of the compactness of networks, featuring small diameters, and their complex architectures results in a variety of critical effects dramatically different from those in cooperative systems on lattices. In the last few years, researchers have made important steps toward understanding the qualitatively new critical phenomena in complex networks. We review the results, concepts, and methods of this rapidly developing field. Here we mostly consider two closely related classes of t...

  17. Wetting phenomena in electrolyte solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Ibagon, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The present study analyzes wetting phenomena in electrolyte solutions. They are investigated by means of classical density functional theory. First, the wetting of a charged substrate by an electrolyte solution is studied with emphasis on the influence of the substrate charge density and of the ionic strength on the wetting transition temperature and on the order of the wetting transition. The corresponding models consist of solvent particles, anions, and cations. Two mean field approaches ar...

  18. Gravitational anomaly and transport phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Landsteiner, Karl; Megías Fernández, Eugenio; Pena-Benítez, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Quantum anomalies give rise to new transport phenomena. In particular, a magnetic field can induce an anomalous current via the chiral magnetic effect and a vortex in the relativistic fluid can also induce a current via the chiral vortical effect. The related transport coefficients can be calculated via Kubo formulas. We evaluate the Kubo formula for the anomalous vortical conductivity at weak coupling and show that it receives contributions proportional to the gravitational anomaly coefficie...

  19. Foot Anthropometry and Morphology Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Agić, Ante; NIKOLIĆ, VASILIJE; Mijović, Budimir

    2006-01-01

    Foot structure description is important for many reasons. The foot anthropometric morphology phenomena are analyzed together with hidden biomechanical functionality in order to fully characterize foot structure and function. For younger Croatian population the scatter data of the individual foot variables were interpolated by multivariate statistics. Foot structure descriptors are influenced by many factors, as a style of life, race, climate, and things of the great importance in ...

  20. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow pot...

  1. Physiology Applied to Everyday: The Practice of Professional Contextualization of Physiology Concepts as a Way of Facilitating Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Sidnei; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela Billig

    2014-01-01

    The teaching of Physiology is indispensable in many biological and health disciplines. Physiology is one of the major components of the curriculum in a number of life science courses, including the study of life, cells, tissues, and organisms as well as their functions. A bigger challenge for physiology teachers is to make physiological concepts…

  2. Microgravity Transport Phenomena Experiment (MTPE) Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Transport Phenomena Experiment (MTPE) is a fluids experiment supported by the Fundamentals in Biotechnology program in association with the Human Exploration and Development of Space (BEDS) initiative. The MTP Experiment will investigate fluid transport phenomena both in ground based experiments and in the microgravity environment. Many fluid transport processes are affected by gravity. Osmotic flux kinetics in planar membrane systems have been shown to be influenced by gravimetric orientation, either through convective mixing caused by unstably stratified fluid layers, or through a stable fluid boundary layer structure that forms in association with the membrane. Coupled transport phenomena also show gravity related effects. Coefficients associated with coupled transport processes are defined in terms of a steady state condition. Buoyancy (gravity) driven convection interferes with the attainment of steady state, and the measurement of coupled processes. The MTP Experiment measures the kinetics of molecular migration that occurs in fluids, in response to the application of various driving potentials. Three separate driving potentials may be applied to the MTP Experiment fluids, either singly or in combination. The driving potentials include chemical potential, thermal potential, and electrical potential. Two separate fluid arrangements are used to study membrane mediated and bulk fluid transport phenomena. Transport processes of interest in membrane mediated systems include diffusion, osmosis, and streaming potential. Bulk fluid processes of interest include coupled phenomena such as the Soret Effect, Dufour Effect, Donnan Effect, and thermal diffusion potential. MTP Experiments are performed in the Microgravity Transport Apparatus (MTA), an instrument that has been developed specifically for precision measurement of transport processes. Experiment fluids are contained within the MTA fluid cells, designed to create a one dimensional flow geometry

  3. PHYSIOLOGY OF BLOOD COAGULATION (II)

    OpenAIRE

    B. Ţuţuianu

    2007-01-01

    Coagulation cascade was untill recently the only model used to explain the physiological and pathological reactions during clot formation. Dr. Maureane Hoffman and her team suggested a cell-based model for coagulation, which takes place (according to this model) in three phases: initiation, amplification and propagation. This theory does not deny the coagulation cascade. It only says that the leading role in the whole process is held by the cells and that the „intrinsic” and the „extinsic” pa...

  4. Correlated randomness and switching phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Havlin, S.; Mallamace, F.; Kumar, P.; Plerou, V.; Preis, T.

    2010-08-01

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these serious scientific disciplines have no perfect metronome in time and no perfect spatial architecture-crystalline or otherwise. Nonetheless, as if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time and remarkably fine-tuned structures in space. Further, many of these processes and structures have the remarkable feature of “switching” from one behavior to another as if by magic. The past century has, philosophically, been concerned with placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a fine-tuned machine. Here we will address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at some of the many spatial and temporal patterns in biology, medicine, and economics and even begin to characterize the switching phenomena that enables a system to pass from one state to another. Inspired by principles developed by A. Nihat Berker and scores of other statistical physicists in recent years, we discuss some applications of correlated randomness to understand switching phenomena in various fields. Specifically, we present evidence from experiments and from computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water’s anomalies are related to a switching point (which is not unlike the “tipping point” immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell), and that the bubbles in economic phenomena that occur on all scales are not “outliers” (another Gladwell immortalization). Though more speculative, we support the idea of disease as arising from some kind of yet-to-be-understood complex switching phenomenon, by discussing data on selected examples, including heart disease and Alzheimer disease.

  5. Measurements design and phenomena discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of measurements suitable for discriminating signal components produced by phenomena of different types is considered. The required measurements should be capable of cancelling out those signal components which are to be ignored when focusing on a phenomenon of interest. Under the hypothesis that the subspaces hosting the signal components produced by each phenomenon are complementary, their discrimination is accomplished by measurements giving rise to the appropriate oblique projector operator. The subspace onto which the operator should project is selected by nonlinear techniques in line with adaptive pursuit strategies

  6. Measurements design and phenomena discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo-Neira, Laura [Department of Mathematics, Aston University, Birmingham, B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-24

    The construction of measurements suitable for discriminating signal components produced by phenomena of different types is considered. The required measurements should be capable of cancelling out those signal components which are to be ignored when focusing on a phenomenon of interest. Under the hypothesis that the subspaces hosting the signal components produced by each phenomenon are complementary, their discrimination is accomplished by measurements giving rise to the appropriate oblique projector operator. The subspace onto which the operator should project is selected by nonlinear techniques in line with adaptive pursuit strategies.

  7. Measurements design and phenomena discrimination

    CERN Document Server

    Rebollo-Neira, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The construction of measurements suitable for discriminating signal components produced by phenomena of different types is considered. The required measurements should be capable of cancelling out those signal components which are to be ignored when focusing on a phenomenon of interest. Under the hypothesis that the subspaces hosting the signal components produced by each phenomenon are complementary, their discrimination is accomplished by measurements giving rise to the appropriate oblique projector operator. The subspace onto which the operator should project is selected by nonlinear techniques in line with adaptive pursuit strategies.

  8. Flooding phenomena in inclined pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flooding phenomena for air-water counter-current two-phase flow in inclined pipes were investigated experimentally. The inner diameter was 16 mm. The examined pipe inclination were 30deg, 45deg and 60deg from horizontal and the pipe length ranged from 0.5 to 5.5 m respectively. The present results indicate that the pipe length affects the flooding mechanism and the onset of flooding velocity. Finally, a simple correlation to predict the void fraction at the onset of flooding is proposed. (author)

  9. Quantum theory of collective phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Sewell, G L

    2014-01-01

    ""An excellent and competent introduction to the field … [and] … a source of information for the expert."" - Physics Today""This a book of major importance…. I trust that this book will be used as a basis for the teaching of a balanced, modern and rigorous course on statistical mechanics in all universities."" - Bulletin of the London Mathematical Society""This is one of the best introductions to the subject, and it is strongly recommended to anyone interested in collective phenomena."" - Physics Bulletin ""The book may be recommended for students as a well-balanced introduction to this rich s

  10. Phase transitions and critical phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Domb, Cyril

    2000-01-01

    The field of phase transitions and critical phenomena continues to be active in research, producing a steady stream of interesting and fruitful results. No longer an area of specialist interest, it has acquired a central focus in condensed matter studies. The major aim of this serial is to provide review articles that can serve as standard references for research workers in the field, and for graduate students and others wishing to obtain reliable information on important recent developments.The two review articles in this volume complement each other in a remarkable way. Both deal with what m

  11. Precursor films in wetting phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, M. N.; Oshanin, G.; Dietrich, S.; Cazabat, A. -M.

    2012-01-01

    The spontaneous spreading of non-volatile liquid droplets on solid substrates poses a classic problem in the context of wetting phenomena. It is well known that the spreading of a macroscopic droplet is in many cases accompanied by a thin film of macroscopic lateral extent, the so-called precursor film, which emanates from the three-phase contact line region and spreads ahead of the latter with a much higher speed. Such films have been usually associated with liquid-on-solid systems, but in t...

  12. Phase transitions and critical phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Domb, Cyril

    2000-01-01

    The field of phase transitions and critical phenomena continues to be active in research, producing a steady stream of interesting and fruitful results. It has moved into a central place in condensed matter studies.Statistical physics, and more specifically, the theory of transitions between states of matter, more or less defines what we know about 'everyday' matter and its transformations.The major aim of this serial is to provide review articles that can serve as standard references for research workers in the field, and for graduate students and others wishing to obtain reliable in

  13. Violent phenomena in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Jayant V

    2007-01-01

    The serenity of a clear night sky belies the evidence-gathered by balloons, rockets, satellites, and telescopes-that the universe contains centers of furious activity that pour out vast amounts of energy, some in regular cycles and some in gigantic bursts. This reader-friendly book, acclaimed by Nature as ""excellent and uncompromising,"" traces the development of modern astrophysics and its explanations of these startling celestial fireworks.This lively narrative ranges from the gravitational theories of Newton and Einstein to recent exciting discoveries of such violent phenomena as supernova

  14. Nonlinear Dynamic Phenomena in Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Warminski, Jerzy; Cartmell, Matthew P

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear phenomena should play a crucial role in the design and control of engineering systems and structures as they can drastically change the prevailing dynamical responses. This book covers theoretical and applications-based problems of nonlinear dynamics concerned with both discrete and continuous systems of interest in civil and mechanical engineering. They include pendulum-like systems, slender footbridges, shape memory alloys, sagged elastic cables and non-smooth problems. Pendulums can be used as a dynamic absorber mounted in high buildings, bridges or chimneys. Geometrical nonlinear

  15. An update: improvements in imaging perfluorocarbon-mounted plant leaves with implications for studies of plant pathology, physiology, development and cell biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George R Littlejohn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant leaves are optically complex, which makes them difficult to image by light microscopy. Careful sample preparation is therefore required to enable researchers to maximise the information gained from advances in fluorescent protein labelling, cell dyes and innovations in microscope technologies and techniques. We have previously shown that mounting leaves in the non-toxic, non-fluorescent perfluorocarbon (PFC, perfluorodecalin (PFD enhances the optical properties of the leaf with minimal impact on physiology. Here, we assess the use of the perfluorocarbons PFD, and perfluoroperhydrophenanthrene (PP11 for in vivo plant leaf imaging using 4 advanced modes of microscopy: laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM, Two-photon fluorescence (TPF microscopy, second harmonic generation (SHG microscopy and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS microscopy. For every mode of imaging tested, we observed an improved signal when leaves were mounted in PFD or in PP11, compared to mounting the samples in water. Using an image analysis technique based on autocorrelation to quantitatively assess LSCM image deterioration with depth, we show that PP11 outperformed PFD as a mounting medium by enabling the acquisition of clearer images deeper into the tissue. In addition, we show that SRS microscopy can be used to image perfluorocarbons directly in the mesophyll and thereby easily delimit the negative space within a leaf, which may have important implications for studies of leaf development. Direct comparison of on and off resonance SRS micrographs show that PFCs do not to form intracellular aggregates in live plants. We conclude that the application of PFCs as mounting media substantially increases advanced microscopy image quality of living mesophyll and leaf vascular bundle cells.

  16. Electroosmotic Phenomena in Organic Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Asadi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic soils or peat represent an accumulation of disintegrated plant remains which have been preserved under condition of incomplete aeration and high water content. In order to develop a fundamental understanding of electroosmotic phenomena in peat, initially microelectrophoresis studies were carried out to conceptualize the electrokinetic phenomena. Then electroosmosis experiments were conducted on rigid cube samples containing 0.0001 M NaCl-water saturated peat. The open-anode and open-cathode systems were employed to the soil samples. Distilled Water (DW were used as anolyte and catholyte. The experiments were carried out via applications of diffrent DC electrical potentials. The results of microelectrophoresis study showed changes of zeta potential due to the effect of HCl and NaOH. The correlations between zeta potential and pH were found. The negative charge of peat is high pH dependent and the surface charge was dropped to zero at pH around 3. The high degree of decomposition resulted in the higher zeta potential in peat. It was also experimentally found that the electroosmotic flow in peat is feasible. The direction of electroosmotic flows were from the anode to cathode.

  17. Nonstationary Phenomena in the Heliosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Borovikov, S. N.; Ebert, R. W.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Kim, T. K.; Kryukov, I.; Richardson, J. D.; Suess, S. T.; Zank, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    As Voyagers (V1 and V2) are approaching the heliopause (HP), they keep delivering important information about the solar wind (SW) behavior which sometimes appears to be substantially different at V1 and V2 locations. We argue that the observed differences may be attributed to SW variations. In particular, negative values of the radial velocity component derived from V1 observations may be due to the presence of time-dependent magnetic barriers formed due to the slow/fast wind interactions in the vicinity of solar cycle minima. The inner heliosheath is the venue of wave interaction, MHD instabilities, and turbulence. We further investigate these phenomena in the HP vicinity using a new, based on the Ulysses observations, solar cycle model. We show that some puzzling observational data, such as the difference in the heliocentric distances at which V1 and V2 crossed the termination shock, may be attributed to time-dependent effects. We also use other time-dependent sets of observational boundary conditions, e.g., interplanetary scintillation and OMNI data. Phenomena affecting the stability and shape of the HP are also discussed in the context of our time-dependent simulations. The satisfaction of the 2-3 kHz radio emission criteria beyond the HP is analyzed. Numerical results are validated by their comparison with observational data.

  18. Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the natural phenomena hazard loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, and supports development of double-shell tank systems specifications at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The natural phenomena covered are seismic, flood, wind, volcanic ash, lightning, snow, temperature, solar radiation, suspended sediment, and relative humidity

  19. Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, H.Y.

    2012-02-16

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an ideal arena for the study of electronic correlations because the s-electrons of the transition metal ions are removed and transferred to oxygen ions, and hence the strongly correlated d-electrons determine their physical properties such as electrical transport, magnetism, optical response, thermal conductivity, and superconductivity. These electron correlations prohibit the double occupancy of metal sites and induce a local entanglement of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. This gives rise to a variety of phenomena, e.g., Mott insulators, various charge/spin/orbital orderings, metal-insulator transitions, multiferroics, and superconductivity. In recent years, there has been a burst of activity to manipulate these phenomena, as well as create new ones, using oxide heterostructures. Most fundamental to understanding the physical properties of TMOs is the concept of symmetry of the order parameter. As Landau recognized, the essence of phase transitions is the change of the symmetry. For example, ferromagnetic ordering breaks the rotational symmetry in spin space, i.e., the ordered phase has lower symmetry than the Hamiltonian of the system. There are three most important symmetries to be considered here. (i) Spatial inversion (I), defined as r {yields} -r. In the case of an insulator, breaking this symmetry can lead to spontaneous electric polarization, i.e. ferroelectricity, or pyroelectricity once the point group belongs to polar group symmetry. (ii) Time-reversal symmetry (T) defined as t {yields} -t. In quantum mechanics, the time-evolution of the wave-function {Psi} is given by the phase factor e{sup -iEt/{h_bar}} with E being the energy, and hence time-reversal basically corresponds to taking the complex conjugate of the wave-function. Also the spin, which is induced by the 'spinning' of the particle, is reversed by time-reversal. Broken T-symmetry is most naturally associated with magnetism, since the

  20. Critical phenomena in magnetic nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakar, M Venkata; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2009-09-01

    In this paper we report the first experimental study of critical phenomena in case of magnetic nanowires of nickel near the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition from the electrical transport properties. Nickel nanowire arrays, prepared by potentiostatic electrodeposition of nickel inside pores of nanoporous anodic alumina template were well characterized by X-ray Diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy and Energy dispersive Spectroscopy. Precise electrical resistance measurement of the nanowire arrays of wire diameter 20 nm have been done in the temperature range between 300 K to 700 K. We see a drop in the Curie temperature as observed from the resistivity anomaly. We analyzed the resistance data near the critical region and extracted the critical exponent alpha directly from the resistance. We observed a decrease in the critical part of the resistivity including a decrease in the magnitude of the critical exponent alpha and severe modification in the correction to scaling. PMID:19928208

  1. Underwater explosions and cavitation phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamegai, M.

    1979-08-28

    Some aspects of underwater explosions and cavitation phenomena have been studied by using a thermodynamic equation of state for water and a one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrocode. The study showed that surface cavitation is caused by the main blast wave and a bubble pulse from rebound of a release wave moving toward the center of the exploding bubble. Gravity has little effect on the surface cavitation. In nuclear explosions the bubble is bounded by a two-phase region rather than a gas-water interface. The two-phase region cavitates as the bubble expands, changing the optical absorption coefficient by many orders of magnitude and significantly affecting the optical signature. In assessing cavitation damage, it is concluded that a water jet of unstable bubble collapse erodes solid walls. The study leads to suggestions for future research.

  2. Underwater explosions and cavitation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of underwater explosions and cavitation phenomena have been studied by using a thermodynamic equation of state for water and a one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrocode. The study showed that surface cavitation is caused by the main blast wave and a bubble pulse from rebound of a release wave moving toward the center of the exploding bubble. Gravity has little effect on the surface cavitation. In nuclear explosions the bubble is bounded by a two-phase region rather than a gas-water interface. The two-phase region cavitates as the bubble expands, changing the optical absorption coefficient by many orders of magnitude and significantly affecting the optical signature. In assessing cavitation damage, it is concluded that a water jet of unstable bubble collapse erodes solid walls. The study leads to suggestions for future research

  3. Earthquake prediction with electromagnetic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-term earthquake (EQ) prediction is defined as prospective prediction with the time scale of about one week, which is considered to be one of the most important and urgent topics for the human beings. If this short-term prediction is realized, casualty will be drastically reduced. Unlike the conventional seismic measurement, we proposed the use of electromagnetic phenomena as precursors to EQs in the prediction, and an extensive amount of progress has been achieved in the field of seismo-electromagnetics during the last two decades. This paper deals with the review on this short-term EQ prediction, including the impossibility myth of EQs prediction by seismometers, the reason why we are interested in electromagnetics, the history of seismo-electromagnetics, the ionospheric perturbation as the most promising candidate of EQ prediction, then the future of EQ predictology from two standpoints of a practical science and a pure science, and finally a brief summary

  4. Earthquake prediction with electromagnetic phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Masashi, E-mail: hayakawa@hi-seismo-em.jp [Hayakawa Institute of Seismo Electomagnetics, Co. Ltd., University of Electro-Communications (UEC) Incubation Center, 1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu Tokyo, 182-8585 (Japan); Advanced Wireless & Communications Research Center, UEC, Chofu Tokyo (Japan); Earthquake Analysis Laboratory, Information Systems Inc., 4-8-15, Minami-aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 107-0062 (Japan); Fuji Security Systems. Co. Ltd., Iwato-cho 1, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Short-term earthquake (EQ) prediction is defined as prospective prediction with the time scale of about one week, which is considered to be one of the most important and urgent topics for the human beings. If this short-term prediction is realized, casualty will be drastically reduced. Unlike the conventional seismic measurement, we proposed the use of electromagnetic phenomena as precursors to EQs in the prediction, and an extensive amount of progress has been achieved in the field of seismo-electromagnetics during the last two decades. This paper deals with the review on this short-term EQ prediction, including the impossibility myth of EQs prediction by seismometers, the reason why we are interested in electromagnetics, the history of seismo-electromagnetics, the ionospheric perturbation as the most promising candidate of EQ prediction, then the future of EQ predictology from two standpoints of a practical science and a pure science, and finally a brief summary.

  5. Phenomena of flooding with condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The penetration of ECC water in the downcomer region of PWRs has recently been the subject of considerable research due to its importance in the safety analysis of a hypothetical LOCA. The difficulties in such analysis lie in the lack of understanding of the basic phenomena of counter-current two-phase flow, complicated also by the condensation effect and the geometry effect of a PWR. This thesis is aimed at developing an understanding of the basic phenomena of counter-current steam-water flow in a simple vertical tube geometry and the effect of condensation on the flow behavior. An experimental system with a transparent test section was designed to study the behavior of steam-water counter-current flow. Steam is injected at the bottom. Saturated or subcooled water is then injected through a weir type device at the midheight of a 3.8 cm I.D. vertical pyrex glass tube of 241 cm total height. Flow patterns of steam and water in the tube below and above the water injection level are observed visually and photographically to identify flow regimes. Analyses and correlations have been developed for predicting flow regime transitions. Water penetration rates are measured and correlated. When the steam flow is lower than the Wallis flooding limit, i.e., the lowest flow which will cause initiation of liquid upflow when the liquid is saturated, the injected liquid falls as a smooth film to the lower plenum whether the injected liquid is subcooled or not. If the injected water subcooling is more than sufficient to condense the steam completely, a liquid oscillating plug forms. Motion of the plug is analyzed and solved numerically

  6. PREFACE Integrability and nonlinear phenomena Integrability and nonlinear phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ullate, David; Lombardo, Sara; Mañas, Manuel; Mazzocco, Marta; Nijhoff, Frank; Sommacal, Matteo

    2010-10-01

    Back in 1967, Clifford Gardner, John Greene, Martin Kruskal and Robert Miura published a seminal paper in Physical Review Letters which was to become a cornerstone in the theory of integrable systems. In 2006, the authors of this paper received the AMS Steele Prize. In this award the AMS pointed out that `In applications of mathematics, solitons and their descendants (kinks, anti-kinks, instantons, and breathers) have entered and changed such diverse fields as nonlinear optics, plasma physics, and ocean, atmospheric, and planetary sciences. Nonlinearity has undergone a revolution: from a nuisance to be eliminated, to a new tool to be exploited.' From this discovery the modern theory of integrability bloomed, leading scientists to a deep understanding of many nonlinear phenomena which is by no means reachable by perturbation methods or other previous tools from linear theories. Nonlinear phenomena appear everywhere in nature, their description and understanding is therefore of great interest both from the theoretical and applicative point of view. If a nonlinear phenomenon can be represented by an integrable system then we have at our disposal a variety of tools to achieve a better mathematical description of the phenomenon. This special issue is largely dedicated to investigations of nonlinear phenomena which are related to the concept of integrability, either involving integrable systems themselves or because they use techniques from the theory of integrability. The idea of this special issue originated during the 18th edition of the Nonlinear Evolution Equations and Dynamical Systems (NEEDS) workshop, held at Isola Rossa, Sardinia, Italy, 16-23 May 2009 (http://needs-conferences.net/2009/). The issue benefits from the occasion offered by the meeting, in particular by its mini-workshops programme, and contains invited review papers and contributed papers. It is worth pointing out that there was an open call for papers and all contributions were peer reviewed

  7. Remote sensing of natural phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag D. Regodić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There has always been a need to directly perceive and study the events whose extent is beyond people's possibilities. In order to get new data and to make observations and studying much more objective in comparison with past syntheses - a new method of examination called remote sensing has been adopted. The paper deals with the principles and elements of remote sensing, as well as with the basic aspects of using remote research in examining meteorological (weather parameters and the conditions of the atmosphere. The usage of satellite images is possible in all phases of the global and systematic research of different natural phenomena when airplane and satellite images of different characteristics are used and their analysis and interpretation is carried out by viewing and computer added procedures. Introduction Remote sensing of the Earth enables observing and studying global and local events that occur on it. Satellite images are nowadays used in geology, agriculture, forestry, geodesy, meteorology, spatial and urbanism planning, designing of infrastructure and other objects, protection from natural and technological catastrophes, etc. It it possible to use satellite images in all phases of global and systematic research of different natural phenomena. Basics of remote sensing Remote sensing is a method of the acquisition and interpretation of information about remote objects without making a physical contact with them. The term Daljinska detekcija is a literal translation of the English term Remote Sensing. In French it isTeledetection, in German - Fernerkundung, in Russian - дистанционие иследования. We also use terms such as: remote survailance, remote research, teledetection, remote methods, and distance research. The basic elements included in Remote Sensing are: object, electromagnetic energy, sensor, platform, image, analysis, interpretation and the information (data, fact. Usage of satellite remote research in

  8. Ca2+ influx and tyrosine kinases trigger Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT endocytosis. Cell physiology and expression of the CD11b/CD18 integrin major determinants of the entry route.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kepa B Uribe

    Full Text Available Humans infected with Bordetella pertussis, the whooping cough bacterium, show evidences of impaired host defenses. This pathogenic bacterium produces a unique adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT which enters human phagocytes and catalyzes the unregulated formation of cAMP, hampering important bactericidal functions of these immune cells that eventually cause cell death by apoptosis and/or necrosis. Additionally, ACT permeabilizes cells through pore formation in the target cell membrane. Recently, we demonstrated that ACT is internalised into macrophages together with other membrane components, such as the integrin CD11b/CD18 (CR3, its receptor in these immune cells, and GM1. The goal of this study was to determine whether ACT uptake is restricted to receptor-bearing macrophages or on the contrary may also take place into cells devoid of receptor and gain more insights on the signalling involved. Here, we show that ACT is rapidly eliminated from the cell membrane of either CR3-positive as negative cells, though through different entry routes, which depends in part, on the target cell physiology and characteristics. ACT-induced Ca(2+ influx and activation of non-receptor Tyr kinases into the target cell appear to be common master denominators in the different endocytic strategies activated by this toxin. Very importantly, we show that, upon incubation with ACT, target cells are capable of repairing the cell membrane, which suggests the mounting of an anti-toxin cell repair-response, very likely involving the toxin elimination from the cell surface.

  9. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow potential brain waves (contingent negativevariation, and eye blink rate or pupil functions, are used as indices for the measurement of the aroma effects

  10. Efficient Attosecond Phenomena in the Relativistic λ3 Regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle-in-cell simulations of relativistically strong laser pulses interacting with overdense plasma targets predict that coherent motion of electrons leads to the efficient generation of strong attosecond electromagnetic pulses and dense attosecond electron bunches. The optimal conditions for these attosecond phenomena are achieved in the λ3 regime, when few-cycle laser pulses are focused to a wavelength-limited spot, producing maximal intensity and maximal gradients with a given energy. The natural synchronism of these attosecond phenomena should enable a kind of relativistic attosecond optoelectronics

  11. Polyamines in plant physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galston, A. W.; Sawhney, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The diamine putrescine, the triamine spermidine, and the tetramine spermine are ubiquitous in plant cells, while other polyamines are of more limited occurrence. Their chemistry and pathways of biosynthesis and metabolism are well characterized. They occur in the free form as cations, but are often conjugated to small molecules like phenolic acids and also to various macromolecules. Their titer varies from approximately micromolar to more than millimolar, and depends greatly on environmental conditions, especially stress. In cereals, the activity of one of the major polyamine biosynthetic enzymes, arginine decarboxylase, is rapidly and dramatically increased by almost every studied external stress, leading to 50-fold or greater increases in putrescine titer within a few hours. The physiological significance of this increase is not yet clear, although most recent work suggests an adaptive, protective role. Polyamines produced through the action of ornithine decarboxylase, by contrast, seem essential for DNA replication and cell division. The application of exogenous polyamines produces effects on patterns of senescence and morphogenesis, suggesting but not proving a regulatory role for polyamines in these processes. The evidence for such a regulatory role is growing.

  12. Electromechanical phenomena in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Willatzen, M.

    2011-02-01

    Electromechanical phenomena in semiconductors are still poorly studied from a fundamental and an applied science perspective, even though significant strides have been made in the last decade or so. Indeed, most current electromechanical devices are based on ferroelectric oxides. Yet, the importance of the effect in certain semiconductors is being increasingly recognized. For instance, the magnitude of the electric field in an AlN/GaN nanostructure can reach 1-10 MV/cm. In fact, the basic functioning of an (0001) AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor is due to the two-dimensional electron gas formed at the material interface by the polarization fields. The goal of this review is to inform the reader of some of the recent developments in the field for nanostructures and to point out still open questions. Examples of recent work that involves the piezoelectric and pyroelectric effects in semiconductors include: the study of the optoelectronic properties of III-nitrides quantum wells and dots, the current controversy regarding the importance of the nonlinear piezoelectric effect, energy harvesting using ZnO nanowires as a piezoelectric nanogenerator, the use of piezoelectric materials in surface acoustic wave devices, and the appropriateness of various models for analyzing electromechanical effects. Piezoelectric materials such as GaN and ZnO are gaining more and more importance for energy-related applications; examples include high-brightness light-emitting diodes for white lighting, high-electron mobility transistors, and nanogenerators. Indeed, it remains to be demonstrated whether these materials could be the ideal multifunctional materials. The solutions to these and other related problems will not only lead to a better understanding of the basic physics of these materials, but will validate new characterization tools, and advance the development of new and better devices. We will restrict ourselves to nanostructures in the current article even though the

  13. Electrostatic phenomena in volcanic eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrostatic phenomena have long been associated with the explosive eruption of volcanoes. Lightning generated in volcanic plumes is a spectacular atmospheric electrical event that requires development of large potential gradients over distances of up to kilometres. This process begins as hydrated liquid rock (magma) ascends towards Earth's surface. Pressure reduction causes water supersaturation in the magma and the development of bubbles of supercritical water, where deeper than c. 1000 m, and water vapour at shallower depths that drives flow expansion. The generation of high strain rates in the expanding bubbly magma can cause it to fracture in a brittle manner, as deformation relaxation timescales are exceeded. The brittle fracture provides the initial charge separation mechanism, known as fractoemission. The resulting mixture of charged silicate particles and ions evolves over time, generating macro-scale potential gradients in the atmosphere and driving processes such as particle aggregation. For the silicate particles, aggregation driven by electrostatic effects is most significant for particles smaller than c. 100 μm. Aggregation acts to change the effective aerodynamic behaviour of silicate particles, thus altering the sedimentation rates of particles from volcanic plumes from the atmosphere. The presence of liquid phases also promotes aggregation processes and lightning.

  14. High Field Phenomena of Qubits

    CERN Document Server

    van Tol, J; Takahashi, S; McCamey, D R; Boehme, C; Zvanut, M E

    2009-01-01

    Electron and nuclear spins are very promising candidates to serve as quantum bits (qubits) for proposed quantum computers, as the spin degrees of freedom are relatively isolated from their surroundings, and can be coherently manipulated e.g. through pulsed EPR and NMR. For solid state spin systems, impurities in crystals based on carbon and silicon in various forms have been suggested as qubits, and very long relaxation rates have been observed in such systems. We have investigated a variety of these systems at high magnetic fields in our multi-frequency pulsed EPR/ENDOR spectrometer. A high magnetic field leads to large electron spin polarizations at helium temperatures giving rise to various phenomena that are of interest with respect to quantum computing. For example, it allows the initialization of the both the electron spin as well as hyperfine-coupled nuclear spins in a well defined state by combining millimeter and RF radiation; it can increase the T2 relaxation times by eliminating decoherence due to ...

  15. Precursor films in wetting phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spontaneous spreading of non-volatile liquid droplets on solid substrates poses a classic problem in the context of wetting phenomena. It is well known that the spreading of a macroscopic droplet is in many cases accompanied by a thin film of macroscopic lateral extent, the so-called precursor film, which emanates from the three-phase contact line region and spreads ahead of the latter with a much higher speed. Such films have been usually associated with liquid-on-solid systems, but in the last decade similar films have been reported to occur in solid-on-solid systems. While the situations in which the thickness of such films is of mesoscopic size are fairly well understood, an intriguing and yet to be fully understood aspect is the spreading of microscopic, i.e. molecularly thin, films. Here we review the available experimental observations of such films in various liquid-on-solid and solid-on-solid systems, as well as the corresponding theoretical models and studies aimed at understanding their formation and spreading dynamics. Recent developments and perspectives for future research are discussed. (topical review)

  16. Precursor films in wetting phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M N; Oshanin, G; Dietrich, S; Cazabat, A-M

    2012-06-20

    The spontaneous spreading of non-volatile liquid droplets on solid substrates poses a classic problem in the context of wetting phenomena. It is well known that the spreading of a macroscopic droplet is in many cases accompanied by a thin film of macroscopic lateral extent, the so-called precursor film, which emanates from the three-phase contact line region and spreads ahead of the latter with a much higher speed. Such films have been usually associated with liquid-on-solid systems, but in the last decade similar films have been reported to occur in solid-on-solid systems. While the situations in which the thickness of such films is of mesoscopic size are fairly well understood, an intriguing and yet to be fully understood aspect is the spreading of microscopic, i.e. molecularly thin, films. Here we review the available experimental observations of such films in various liquid-on-solid and solid-on-solid systems, as well as the corresponding theoretical models and studies aimed at understanding their formation and spreading dynamics. Recent developments and perspectives for future research are discussed. PMID:22627067

  17. WESF natural phenomena hazards survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagenblast, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    A team of engineers conducted a systematic natural hazards phenomena (NPH) survey for the 225-B Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The survey is an assessment of the existing design documentation to serve as the structural design basis for WESF, and the Interim Safety Basis (ISB). The lateral force resisting systems for the 225-B building structures, and the anchorages for the WESF safety related systems were evaluated. The original seismic and other design analyses were technically reviewed. Engineering judgment assessments were made of the probability of NPH survival, including seismic, for the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems. The method for the survey is based on the experience of the investigating engineers,and documented earthquake experience (expected response) data.The survey uses knowledge on NPH performance and engineering experience to determine the WESF strengths for NPH resistance, and uncover possible weak links. The survey, in general, concludes that the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems are designed and constructed commensurate with the current Hanford Site design criteria.

  18. Neuronal Responses to Physiological Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition t...

  19. Chewing over physiology integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; Miranda, Manoel de Arcisio; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-03-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the different areas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it comes to cuts in expenses. With the aim of addressing this kind of problem, the graduate students of our department organized a physiology summer course offered to undergraduate students. The objective was to present the different physiological systems in an integrated fashion. The strategy pursued was to plan laboratory classes whose experimental results were the basis for the relevant theoretical discussions. The subject we developed to illustrate physiology integration was the study of factors influencing salivary secretion. PMID:15718383

  20. Directional Multivariate Extremes in Environmental Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Raúl; De Michele, Carlo; Laniado, Henry; Lillo, Rosa E.

    2016-01-01

    Several environmental phenomena can be described by different correlated variables that must be considered jointly in order to be more representative of the nature of these phenomena. For such events, identification of extremes is inappropriate if it is based on marginal analysis. Extremes have usually been linked to the notion of quantile, which is an important tool to analyze risk in the univariate setting. We propose to identify multivariate extremes and analyze environmental phenomena in ...

  1. Black hole critical phenomena without black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Steven L Liebling

    2000-10-01

    Studying the threshold of black hole formation via numerical evolution has led to the discovery of fascinating nonlinear phenomena. Power-law mass scaling, aspects of universality, and self-similarity have now been found for a large variety of models. However, questions remain. Here I briefly review critical phenomena, discuss some recent results, and describe a model which demonstrates similar phenomena without gravity.

  2. Observation of Celestial Phenomena in Ancient China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    Because of the need for calendar-making and portent astrology, the Chinese were diligent and meticulous observers of celestial phenomena. China has maintained the longest continuous historical records of celestial phenomena in the world. Extraordinary or abnormal celestial events were particularly noted because of their astrological significance. The historical records cover various types of celestial phenomena, which include solar and lunar eclipses, sunspots, "guest stars" (novae or supernovae as we understand today), comets and meteors, and all kinds of planetary phenomena. These records provide valuable historical data for astronomical studies today.

  3. The use of suspension models and comparison with true weightlessness. [Animal Model Workshop on Gravitational Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Ellis, S.

    1985-01-01

    A resume is presented of various papers concerning the effect of weightlessness on particular physiological and biochemical phenomena in animal model systems. Findings from weightlessness experiments on earth using suspension models are compared with results of experiments in orbit. The biological phenomena considered include muscle atrophy, changes in the endocrine system, reduction in bone formation, and changes in the cardiovascular system.

  4. Non-invasive tools for measuring metabolism and biophysical analyte transport: self-referencing physiological sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLamore, Eric S; Porterfield, D Marshall

    2011-11-01

    Biophysical phenomena related to cellular biochemistry and transport are spatially and temporally dynamic, and are directly involved in the regulation of physiology at the sub-cellular to tissue spatial scale. Real time monitoring of transmembrane transport provides information about the physiology and viability of cells, tissues, and organisms. Combining information learned from real time transport studies with genomics and proteomics allows us to better understand the functional and mechanistic aspects of cellular and sub-cellular systems. To accomplish this, ultrasensitive sensing technologies are required to probe this functional realm of biological systems with high temporal and spatial resolution. In addition to ongoing research aimed at developing new and enhanced sensors (e.g., increased sensitivity, enhanced analyte selectivity, reduced response time, and novel microfabrication approaches), work over the last few decades has advanced sensor utility through new sensing modalities that extend and enhance the data recorded by sensors. A microsensor technique based on phase sensitive detection of real time biophysical transport is reviewed here. The self-referencing technique converts non-invasive extracellular concentration sensors into dynamic flux sensors for measuring transport from the membrane to the tissue scale. In this tutorial review, we discuss the use of self-referencing micro/nanosensors for measuring physiological activity of living cells/tissues in agricultural, environmental, and biomedical applications comprehensible to any scientist/engineer. PMID:21761069

  5. Programmed death phenomena: from organelle to organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2002-04-01

    Programmed death phenomena appear to be inherent not only in living cells (apoptosis), but also in subcellular organelles (e.g., self-elimination of mitochondria, called mitoptosis), organs (organoptosis), and even whole organisms (phenoptosis). In all these cases, the "Samurai law of biology"--it is better to die than to be wrong--seems to be operative. The operation of this law helps complicated living systems avoid the risk of ruin when a system of lower hierarchic position makes a significant mistake. Thus, mitoptosis purifies a cell from damaged and hence unwanted mitochondria; apoptosis purifies a tissue from unwanted cells; and phenoptosis purifies a community from unwanted individuals. Defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) is probably one of the primary evolutionary functions of programmed death mechanisms. So far, it seems that ROS play a key role in the mito-, apo-, organo-, and phenoptoses, which is consistent with Harman's theory of aging. Here a concept is described that tries to unite Weismann's hypothesis of aging as an adaptive programmed death mechanism and the generally accepted alternative point of view that considers aging as an inevitable result of accumulation in an organism of occasional injuries. It is suggested that injury accumulation is monitored by a system(s) actuating a phenoptotic death program when the number of injuries reaches some critical level. The system(s) in question are organized in such a way that the lethal case appears to be a result of phenoptosis long before the occasional injuries make impossible the functioning of the organism. It is stressed that for humans these cruel regulations look like an atavism that, if overcome, might dramatically prolong the human life span. PMID:11976198

  6. Advances in physiological computing

    CERN Document Server

    Fairclough, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    This edited collection will provide an overview of the field of physiological computing, i.e. the use of physiological signals as input for computer control. It will cover a breadth of current research, from brain-computer interfaces to telemedicine.

  7. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  8. Reproduction, Physiology and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter focuses on the reproduction, physiology, and biochemistry of the root-knot nematodes. The extensive amount of information on the reproduction and cytogenetics of species of Meloidogyne contrasts with the limited information on physiology, biochemistry, and biochemical pathways. In commo...

  9. Nonlinear dynamical phenomena in liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the existence of the orientational order and anisotropy in liquid crystals, strong nonlinear phenomena and singular behaviors, such as solitary wave, transient periodic structure, chaos, fractal and viscous fingering, can be excited by a very small disturbance. These phenomena and behaviors are in connection with physics, biology and mathematics. 12 refs, 6 figs

  10. Fluctuation theory of critical phenomena in fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, G. A.

    2016-07-01

    It is assumed that critical phenomena are generated by density wave fluctuations carrying a certain kinetic energy. It is noted that all coupling equations for critical indices are obtained within the context of this hypothesis. Critical indices are evaluated for 15 liquids more accurately than when using the current theory of critical phenomena.

  11. Ketamine: effect of literacy on emergence phenomena.

    OpenAIRE

    Currie, M. A.; Currie, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    A prospective study of the relationship between literacy rate and emergence phenomena with ketamine anaesthesia was carried out among Pathans on Pakistan's Afghan frontier. Findings support both a strong link between the literacy of the patient and the occurrence of emergence phenomena, and the acceptability and value of ketamine in this type of population.

  12. Advances in transport phenomena 2011

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This new volume of the annual review “Advances in Transport Phenomena” series contains three in-depth review articles on the microfluidic fabrication of vesicles, the dielectrophoresis field-flow fractionation for continuous-flow separation of particles and cells in microfluidic devices, and the thermodynamic analysis and optimization of heat exchangers, respectively.

  13. PREFACE Integrability and nonlinear phenomena Integrability and nonlinear phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ullate, David; Lombardo, Sara; Mañas, Manuel; Mazzocco, Marta; Nijhoff, Frank; Sommacal, Matteo

    2010-10-01

    Back in 1967, Clifford Gardner, John Greene, Martin Kruskal and Robert Miura published a seminal paper in Physical Review Letters which was to become a cornerstone in the theory of integrable systems. In 2006, the authors of this paper received the AMS Steele Prize. In this award the AMS pointed out that `In applications of mathematics, solitons and their descendants (kinks, anti-kinks, instantons, and breathers) have entered and changed such diverse fields as nonlinear optics, plasma physics, and ocean, atmospheric, and planetary sciences. Nonlinearity has undergone a revolution: from a nuisance to be eliminated, to a new tool to be exploited.' From this discovery the modern theory of integrability bloomed, leading scientists to a deep understanding of many nonlinear phenomena which is by no means reachable by perturbation methods or other previous tools from linear theories. Nonlinear phenomena appear everywhere in nature, their description and understanding is therefore of great interest both from the theoretical and applicative point of view. If a nonlinear phenomenon can be represented by an integrable system then we have at our disposal a variety of tools to achieve a better mathematical description of the phenomenon. This special issue is largely dedicated to investigations of nonlinear phenomena which are related to the concept of integrability, either involving integrable systems themselves or because they use techniques from the theory of integrability. The idea of this special issue originated during the 18th edition of the Nonlinear Evolution Equations and Dynamical Systems (NEEDS) workshop, held at Isola Rossa, Sardinia, Italy, 16-23 May 2009 (http://needs-conferences.net/2009/). The issue benefits from the occasion offered by the meeting, in particular by its mini-workshops programme, and contains invited review papers and contributed papers. It is worth pointing out that there was an open call for papers and all contributions were peer reviewed

  14. Emergence of dynamical order synchronization phenomena in complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Manrubia, Susanna C; Zanette, Damián H

    2004-01-01

    Synchronization processes bring about dynamical order and lead tospontaneous development of structural organization in complex systemsof various origins, from chemical oscillators and biological cells tohuman societies and the brain. This book provides a review and adetailed theoretical analysis of synchronization phenomena in complexsystems with different architectures, composed of elements withperiodic or chaotic individual dynamics. Special attention is paid tostatistical concepts, such as nonequilibrium phase transitions, orderparameters and dynamical glasses.

  15. A statistical approach to strange diffusion phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of particle (and heat) transport in fusion plasmas has revealed the existence of what might be called 'unusual' transport phenomena. Such phenomena are: unexpected scaling of the confinement time with system size, power degradation (i.e. sub-linear scaling of energy content with power input), profile stiffness (also known as profile consistency), rapid transient transport phenomena such as cold and heat pulses (travelling much faster than the diffusive timescale would allow), non-local behaviour and central profile peaking during off-axis heating, associated with unexplained inward pinches. The standard modelling framework, essentially equal to Fick's Law plus extensions, has great difficulty in providing an all-encompassing and satisfactory explanation of all these phenomena. This difficulty has motivated us to reconsider the basics of the modelling of diffusive phenomena. Diffusion is based on the well-known random walk. The random walk is captured in all its generality in the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) formalism. The CTRW formalism is directly related to the well-known Generalized Master Equation, which describes the behaviour of tracer particle diffusion on a very fundamental level, and from which the phenomenological Fick's Law can be derived under some specific assumptions. We show that these assumptions are not necessarily satisfied under fusion plasma conditions, in which case other equations (such as the Fokker-Planck diffusion law or the Master Equation itself) provide a better description of the phenomena. This fact may explain part of the observed 'strange' phenomena (namely, the inward pinch). To show how the remaining phenomena mentioned above may perhaps find an explanation in the proposed alternative modelling framework, we have designed a toy model that incorporates a critical gradient mechanism, switching between rapid (super-diffusive) and normal diffusive transport as a function of the local gradient. It is then demonstrated

  16. Fourteenth International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nelson, Keith A; Silvestri, Sandro; Ultrafast Phenomena XIV

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XIV presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including ultrafast laser and measurement technology as well as studies of ultrafast phenomena. Pico-, femto-, and atosecond processes relevant in physics, chemistry, biology and engineering are presented. Ultrafast technology is now having a profound impact within a wide range of applications, among them imaging, material diagnostics, and transformation and high-speed optoelectronics. This book summarizes results presented at the 14th Ultrafast Phenomena Conference and reviews the state of the art in this important and rapidly advancing field.

  17. Sixteenth International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Corkum, Paul; Nelson, Keith A; Riedle, Eberhard; Schoenlein, Robert W; Ultrafast Phenomena XVI

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XVI presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including both ultrafast optical technology and the study of ultrafast phenomena. It covers picosecond, femtosecond and attosecond processes relevant to applications in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Ultrafast technology has a profound impact in a wide range of applications, amongst them biomedical imaging, chemical dynamics, frequency standards, material processing, and ultrahigh speed communications. This book summarizes the results presented at the 16th International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena and provides an up-to-date view of this important and rapidly advancing field.

  18. Computational transport phenomena for engineering analyses

    CERN Document Server

    Farmer, Richard C; Cheng, Gary C; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2009-01-01

    Computational Transport PhenomenaOverviewTransport PhenomenaAnalyzing Transport PhenomenaA Computational Tool: The CTP CodeVerification, Validation, and GeneralizationSummaryNomenclatureReferencesThe Equations of ChangeIntroductionDerivation of The Continuity EquationDerivation of The Species Continuity EquationDerivation of The Equation Of MotionDerivation of The General Energy EquationNon-Newtonian FluidsGeneral Property BalanceAnalytical and Approximate Solutions for the Equations of ChangeSummaryNomenclatureReferencesPhysical PropertiesOverviewReal-Fluid ThermodynamicsChemical Equilibrium

  19. Transient phenomena in electrical power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Venikov, V A; Higinbotham, W

    1964-01-01

    Electronics and Instrumentation, Volume 24: Transient Phenomena in Electrical Power Systems presents the methods for calculating the stability and the transient behavior of systems with forced excitation control. This book provides information pertinent to the analysis of transient phenomena in electro-mechanical systems.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the principal requirements in an excitation system. This text then explains the electromagnetic and electro-mechanical phenomena, taking into account the mutual action between the components of the system. Ot

  20. Fifteenth International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Corkum, Paul; Miller, R. J. Dwayne; Weiner, Andrew M; Ultrafast Phenomena XV

    2007-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XV presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including both ultrafast optical technology and the study of ultrafast phenomena. It covers picosecond, femtosecond, and attosecond processes relevant to applications in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Ultrafast technology has a profound impact in a wide range of applications, among them biomedical imaging, chemical dynamics, frequency standards, materials processing, and ultrahigh-speed communications. This book summarizes the results presented at the 15th International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena and provides an up-to-date view of this important and rapidly advancing field.

  1. MORPHOLOGICAL AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL STUDIES OF HORIZONTAL CELLS IN THE BLACK BASS RETINA(Issue Commemorating the Directorship of Prof. Yoko HASHIMOTO, at the Department of Physiology)

    OpenAIRE

    UMINO, Osamu; MAEHARA, Michiyo; HASHIMOTO, Yoko; 海野, 修; 前原, 通代; 橋本, 葉子

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the correlation between the morphological characteristics and spectral responses of horizontal cells in black bass retina. Three layers of horizontal cell bodies and one layer of fine processes of horizontal cell axons were recognized in the horizontal cell layer. The most distally layered H1 cells were smaller than the H2 cells which form the second layer. Both H1 and H2 cells showed a monophasic spectral response with a maximum peak for red light. In ...

  2. The Physiologically Difficult Airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrod M. Mosier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation.

  3. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  4. PHYSIOLOGY OF BLOOD COAGULATION (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ţuţuianu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Coagulation cascade was untill recently the only model used to explain the physiological and pathological reactions during clot formation. Dr. Maureane Hoffman and her team suggested a cell-based model for coagulation, which takes place (according to this model in three phases: initiation, amplification and propagation. This theory does not deny the coagulation cascade. It only says that the leading role in the whole process is held by the cells and that the „intrinsic” and the „extinsic” pathways operate in parallel on different cell surfaces. Using this model, a better understanding of the reactions in vivo during coagulation is achieved, together with answers related to clinical-based questions like „why haemophiliacs bleed?”.

  5. Renal Physiology of Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Katharine L.; Lafayette, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy involves remarkable orchestration of physiologic changes. The kidneys are central players in the evolving hormonal milieu of pregnancy, responding and contributing to the changes in the environment for the pregnant woman and fetus. The functional impact of pregnancy on kidney physiology is widespread, involving practically all aspects of kidney function. The glomerular filtration rate increases 50% with subsequent decrease in serum creatinine, urea, and uric acid values. The thresho...

  6. Upper gastrointestinal physiology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldum, Helge L; Kleveland, Per M; Fossmark, Reidar

    2015-06-01

    Nordic research on physiology and pathophysiology of the upper gastrointestinal tract has flourished during the last 50 years. Swedish surgeons and physiologists were in the frontline of research on the regulation of gastric acid secretion. This research finally led to the development of omeprazole, the first proton pump inhibitor. When Swedish physiologists developed methods allowing the assessment of acid secretion in isolated oxyntic glands and isolated parietal cells, the understanding of mechanisms by which gastric acid secretion is regulated took a great step forward. Similarly, in Trondheim, Norway, the acid producing isolated rat stomach model combined with a sensitive and specific method for determination of histamine made it possible to evaluate this regulation qualitatively as well as quantitatively. In Lund, Sweden, the identification of the enterochromaffin-like cell as the cell taking part in the regulation of acid secretion by producing and releasing histamine was of fundamental importance both physiologically and clinically. Jorpes and Mutt established a center at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm for the purification of gastrointestinal hormones in the 1960s, and Danes followed up this work by excelling in the field of determination and assessment of biological role of gastrointestinal hormones. A Finnish group was for a long period in the forefront of research on gastritis, and the authors' own studies on the classification of gastric cancer and the role of gastrin in the development of gastric neoplasia are of importance. It can, accordingly, be concluded that Nordic researchers have been central in the research on area of the upper gastrointestinal physiology and diseases. PMID:25857514

  7. Conditioning and breakdown phenomena in accelerator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Important breakdown mechanisms in accelerator tubes are reviewed, and discharge phenomena in NEC tubes are deduced from the surface appearance of the electrodes and insulators of a used tube. Microphotos of these surfaces are shown

  8. Perspective: Emergent magnetic phenomena at interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yuri [Department of Applied Physics and Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of emergent magnetic phenomena is of fundamental and technological interest. This perspective highlights recent promising examples of emergent ferromagnetism at complex oxide interfaces in the context of spin based electronics.

  9. Canister storage building natural phenomena design loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents natural phenomena hazard (NPH) loads for use in the design and construction of the Canister Storage Building (CSB), which will be located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site

  10. CISM Course on Rolling Contact Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kalker, Joost

    2000-01-01

    Preface.- Rolling Contact Phenomena - Linear Elasticity.- Finite Element Methods for Rolling Contact.- Plastic Deformation in Rolling Contact.- Non-Steady State Rolling Contact and Corrugations.- Modelling of Tyre Force and Moment Generation.- Rolling Noise.- Lubrication

  11. Perspective: Emergent magnetic phenomena at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of emergent magnetic phenomena is of fundamental and technological interest. This perspective highlights recent promising examples of emergent ferromagnetism at complex oxide interfaces in the context of spin based electronics

  12. Didactic demonstrations of superfluidity and superconductivity phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to demonstrate to students phenomena of superfluidity and superconductivity a special helium cryostat has been constructed. The demonstrated effects, construction of the cryostat and the method of demonstration are described. (author)

  13. Sorption phenomena of PCBs in environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between the properties of PCBs and the behavior of soil and sediment is reviewed. The sorption phenomena of PCBs in the environment are described with different models. The research progress on the sorption mechanisms is also discussed.

  14. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos eKagias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. Physiological stress can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, which result from an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level.

  15. Experimental techniques for the investigation of coupled phenomena in geomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes different experimental setups and techniques used to investigate coupled stress, fluid (water and air and temperature effects on geomaterials. Two temperature controlled cells are described: a a constant volume cell in which thermal pulses can be performed under controlled hydraulic conditions to induce pore pressure build-up during quasi-undrained heating and later dissipation; and b an axisymmetric triaxial cell with controlled suction and temperature to perform drained heating and cooling paths under partially saturated states. The paper also presents an experimental setup to perform controlled flow-rate gas injection experiments on argillaceous rocks using a high-pressure triaxial cell. This cell is used to study gas migration phenomena and the conditions under which gas breakthrough processes occur. Selected test results are presented, which show the capabilities of the different experimental setups described to capture main behavioural features.

  16. The resonance phenomena and state of health

    OpenAIRE

    Sikura A.Y.

    2010-01-01

    The question of dependence of the state of health is examined from the resonance phenomena in the liquid environments of organism, roles herein physical loadings. It is rotined that resonance waves can compensate structural violations on a tissue, system levels. The oppressive operating is the same compensated on the organism of man. The physical loading in a complex with other external resonance phenomena causes substantial resonance vibrations in all systems of organism. It is necessary to ...

  17. Evidence on Dropout Phenomena at Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malene Rode; Sommersel, Hanna Bjørnøy; Larsen, Michael Søgaard

    This publication is an excerpt from the full technical report ‘Dropout Phenomena at Universities: What is Dropout? Why does Dropout Occur? What Can be Done by the Universities to Prevent or Reduce it? A systematic review’, which was completed in April 2013. The purpose of this excerpt is to present...... the knowledge we have on dropout phenomena at European universities in a short, precise and comprehensible form to allow readers to orient themselves on the subject in a more readable manner....

  18. Noise Induced Phenomena in Population Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Valenti, D.; Giuffrida, A; Denaro, G.; Pizzolato, N; Curcio, L; Spagnolo, B.; Mazzola, S.; Basilone, G.; Bonanno, A.

    2015-01-01

    Noise through its interaction with the nonlinearity of the living systems can give rise to counter-intuitive phenomena. In this paper we shortly review the noise induced effects in different ecosystems. The transient dynamics of these ecosystems are analyzed through generalized Lotka-Volterra equations in the presence of multiplicative noise, which models the interaction between the species and the environment. We find noise induced phenomena such as quasi-deterministic oscillations, stochast...

  19. The Casimir effect and critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present review we focus our attention on the theory and experimental confirmations of the Casimir effect in critical phenomena. Since the effect is related to the boundary conditions imposed on a system undergoing a phase transition and its consequences, the theory of critical phenomena in finite-size systems is an indispensable part of the theoretical description. Experiments with liquid films near a critical point are of particular experimental relevance to the studied phenomenon

  20. Local phenomena associated with natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this lecture is to impart to the participants an adequate knowledge of various phenomena encountered in the natural circulation systems of a nuclear reactor. All the components of the primary system of a nuclear reactor are described and phenomena occurring in each of them are explained. A comprehensive coverage of related thermohydraulic relationships is provided which will enable the participants to carryout the process design of a natural circulation system. (author)

  1. High Energy Phenomena in Clusters of Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Colafrancesco, S.

    1998-01-01

    Several phenomena in high energy astrophysics have been recently related to clusters of galaxies and to cosmic ray interactions occurring inside these structures. In many of these phenomena the observable effects depend on the energy density of cosmic rays confined in the Intra Cluster (IC) medium, which is a poorly known quantity. We propose here that useful indications about this quantity can be obtained from present and future observations of galaxy clusters in the radio and hard X-ray fre...

  2. Second DOE natural phenomena hazards mitigation conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference has been organized into ten presentation sessions which include an overview of the DOE Natural Phenomena Guidelines, Seismic Analysis, Seismic Design, Modifying Existing Facilities, DOE Orders, Codes, and Standards (2 sessions), Seismic Hazard (2 sessions), and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (2 sessions). Two poster sessions were also included in the program to provide a different forum for communication of ideas. Over the past fourteen years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Nuclear Systems Safety Program, has been working with the US Department of Energy, Office of Safety Appraisals and their predecessors in the area of natural phenomena hazards. During this time we have developed seismic, extreme wind/tornado, and flood hazard models for DOE sites in the United States. Guidelines for designing and evaluating DOE facilities for natural phenomena have been developed and are in interim use throughout the DOE community. A series of state-of-the practice manuals have also been developed to aid the designers. All of this material is listed in the Natural Phenomena Hazards Bibliography included in these proceedings. This conference provides a mechanism to disseminate current information on natural phenomena hazards and their mitigation. It provides an opportunity to bring together members of the DOE community to discuss current projects, to share information, and to hear practicing members of the structural engineering community discuss their experiences from past natural phenomena, future trends, and any changes to building codes. Each paper or poster presented is included in these proceedings. We have also included material related to the luncheon and dinner talks

  3. The XIIIth International Physiological Congress in Boston in 1929: American physiology comes of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jack A

    2016-03-01

    In the 19th century, the concept of experimental physiology originated in France with Claude Bernard, evolved in Germany stimulated by the teaching of Carl Ludwig, and later spread to Britain and then to the United States. The goal was to develop a physicochemical understanding of physiological phenomena. The first International Physiological Congress occurred in 1889 in Switzerland with an emphasis on experimental demonstrations. The XIIIth Congress, the first to be held outside of Europe, took place in Boston, MA, in 1929. It was a watershed meeting and indicated that American physiology had come of age. Meticulously organized, it was the largest congress to date, with over 1,200 participants from more than 40 countries. Getting to the congress was a cultural adventure, especially for the 400 scientists and their families from over 20 European countries, who sailed for 10 days on the S.S. Minnekahda. Many of the great physiologists of the world were in attendance, including 22 scientists who were either or would become Nobel Laureates. There were hundreds of platform presentations and many experimental demonstrations. The meeting was not without controversy as a conflict, still not completely settled, arose over the discovery of ATP. After the meeting, hundreds of participants made a memorable trip to the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, MA, which culminated in a "good old fashioned Cape Cod Clambake." Although not as spectacular as the 1929 congress, the physiological congresses have continued with goals similar to those established more than a century ago. PMID:26847252

  4. Cell assemblies at multiple time scales with arbitrary lag distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Eleonora; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Hebb's idea of a cell assembly as the fundamental unit of neural information processing has dominated neuroscience like no other theoretical concept within the past 60 years. A range of different physiological phenomena, from precisely synchronized spiking to broadly simultaneous rate increases, has been subsumed under this term. Yet progress in this area is hampered by the lack of statistical tools that would enable to extract assemblies with arbitrary constellations of time lags, and at mul...

  5. Human physiology in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernikos, J.

    1996-01-01

    The universality of gravity (1 g) in our daily lives makes it difficult to appreciate its importance in morphology and physiology. Bone and muscle support systems were created, cellular pumps developed, neurons organised and receptors and transducers of gravitational force to biologically relevant signals evolved under 1g gravity. Spaceflight provides the only microgravity environment where systematic experimentation can expand our basic understanding of gravitational physiology and perhaps provide new insights into normal physiology and disease processes. These include the surprising extent of our body's dependence on perceptual information, and understanding the effect and importance of forces generated within the body's weightbearing structures such as muscle and bones. Beyond this exciting prospect is the importance of this work towards opening the solar system for human exploration. Although both appear promising, we are only just beginning to taste what lies ahead.

  6. Exploratory research on bioactive natural products with a focus on biological phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Uemura, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of new basic compounds holds the key for advancing material sciences. We have focused on the identification and characterization of natural key compounds that control biologically and physiologically intriguing phenomena. The discovery of new bioactive molecules, facilitated by a deeper understanding of nature, should advance our knowledge of biological processes and lead to new strategies to treat disease. The structure and function of natural compounds are sometimes unexpected...

  7. Fractal physiology and the fractional calculus: a perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BruceJWest

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a restricted overview of Fractal Physiology focusing on the complexity of the human body and the characterization of that complexity through fractal measures and their dynamics, with fractal dynamics being described by the fractional calculus. We review the allometric aggregation approach to the processing of physiologic time series as a way of determining the fractal character of the underlying phenomena. This straight forward method establishes the scaling behavior of complex physiologic networks and some dynamic models capable of generating such scaling are reviewed. These models include simple and fractional random walks, which describe how the scaling of correlation functions and probability densities are related to time series data. Subsequently, it is suggested that a proper methodology for describing the dynamics of fractal time series may well be the fractional calculus, either through the fractional Langevin equation or the fractional diffusion equation. Fractional operators acting on fractal functions yield fractal functions, allowing us to construct a fractional Langevin equation to describe the evolution of a fractal statistical process. Control of physiologic complexity is one of the goals of medicine. Allometric control incorporates long-time memory, inverse power-law (IPL correlations, and long-range interactions in complex phenomena as manifest by IPL distributions. We hypothesize that allometric control, rather than homeostatic control, maintains the fractal character of erratic physiologic time series to enhance the robustness of physiological networks. Moreover, allometric control can be described using the fractional calculus to capture the dynamics of complex physiologic networks. This hypothesis is supported by a number of physiologic time series data.

  8. Investigating the students' understanding of surface phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Kastro Mohamad

    1999-11-01

    This study investigated students' understanding of surface phenomena. The main purpose for conducting this research endeavor was to understand how students think about a complex topic about which they have little direct or formal instruction. The motivation for focusing on surface phenomena stemmed from an interest in integrating research and education. Despite the importance of surfaces and interfaces in research laboratories, in technological applications, and in everyday experiences, no previous systematic effort was done on pedagogy related to surface phenomena. The design of this research project was qualitative, exploratory, based on a Piagetian semi-structured clinical piloted interview, focused on obtaining a longitudinal view of the intended sample. The sampling was purposeful and the sample consisted of forty-four undergraduate students at Kansas State University. The student participants were enrolled in physics classes that spanned a wide academic spectrum. The data were analyzed qualitatively. The main themes that emerged from the analysis were: (a) students used analogies when confronted with novel situations, (b) students mixed descriptions and explanations, (c) students used the same explanation for several phenomena, (d) students manifested difficulties transferring the meaning of vocabulary across discipline boundaries, (e) in addition to the introductory chemistry classes, students used everyday experiences and job-related experiences as sources of knowledge, and (f) students' inquisitiveness and eagerness to investigate and discuss novel phenomena seemed to peak about the time students were enrolled in second year physics classes.

  9. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  10. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  11. Fractal physiology and the fractional calculus: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Bruce J

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a restricted overview of Fractal Physiology focusing on the complexity of the human body and the characterization of that complexity through fractal measures and their dynamics, with fractal dynamics being described by the fractional calculus. Not only are anatomical structures (Grizzi and Chiriva-Internati, 2005), such as the convoluted surface of the brain, the lining of the bowel, neural networks and placenta, fractal, but the output of dynamical physiologic networks are fractal as well (Bassingthwaighte et al., 1994). The time series for the inter-beat intervals of the heart, inter-breath intervals and inter-stride intervals have all been shown to be fractal and/or multifractal statistical phenomena. Consequently, the fractal dimension turns out to be a significantly better indicator of organismic functions in health and disease than the traditional average measures, such as heart rate, breathing rate, and stride rate. The observation that human physiology is primarily fractal was first made in the 1980s, based on the analysis of a limited number of datasets. We review some of these phenomena herein by applying an allometric aggregation approach to the processing of physiologic time series. This straight forward method establishes the scaling behavior of complex physiologic networks and some dynamic models capable of generating such scaling are reviewed. These models include simple and fractional random walks, which describe how the scaling of correlation functions and probability densities are related to time series data. Subsequently, it is suggested that a proper methodology for describing the dynamics of fractal time series may well be the fractional calculus, either through the fractional Langevin equation or the fractional diffusion equation. A fractional operator (derivative or integral) acting on a fractal function, yields another fractal function, allowing us to construct a fractional Langevin equation to describe the evolution of a

  12. Moving toward a more physiological model: application of mucin to refine the in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the intestine, the epithelial cells are covered with a mucin layer produced by goblet cells. This mucin layer provides many important functions and can influence the uptake of iron. The objective of this study was to determine if a combination of commercially available mucin and an 8 um micropor...

  13. Stability and Restoration phenomena in Competitive Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Uechi, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    A conservation law and stability, recovering phenomena and characteristic patterns of a nonlinear dynamical system have been studied and applied to biological and ecological systems. In our previous study, we proposed a system of symmetric 2n-dimensional conserved nonlinear differential equations with external perturbations. In this paper, competitive systems described by 2-dimensional nonlinear dynamical (ND) model with external perturbations are applied to population cycles and recovering phenomena of systems from microbes to mammals. The famous 10-year cycle of population density of Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare is numerically analyzed. We find that a nonlinear dynamical system with a conservation law is stable and generates a characteristic rhythm (cycle) of population density, which we call the {\\it standard rhythm} of a nonlinear dynamical system. The stability and restoration phenomena are strongly related to a conservation law and balance of a system. The {\\it standard rhythm} of population density ...

  14. Quantum phenomena in magnetic nano clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Raghu; Indranil Rudra; Diptiman Sen; S Ramasesha

    2001-10-01

    One of the fascinating fields of study in magnetism in recent years has been the study of quantum phenomena in nanosystems. While semiconductor structures have provided paradigms of nanosystems from the stand point of electronic phenomena, the synthesis of high nuclearity transition metal complexes have provided examples of nano magnets. The range and diversity of the properties exhibited by these systems rivals its electronic counterparts. Qualitative understanding of these phenomena requires only a knowledge of basic physics, but quantitative study throws up many challenges that are similar to those encountered in the study of correlated electronic systems. In this article, a brief overview of the current trends in this area are highlighted and some of the efforts of our group in developing a quantitative understanding of this field are outlined.

  15. Active Cyber Defense Dynamics Exhibiting Rich Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Ren; Xu, Shouhuai

    2016-01-01

    The Internet is a man-made complex system under constant attacks (e.g., Advanced Persistent Threats and malwares). It is therefore important to understand the phenomena that can be induced by the interaction between cyber attacks and cyber defenses. In this paper, we explore the rich phenomena that can be exhibited when the defender employs active defense to combat cyber attacks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that shows that {\\em active cyber defense dynamics} (or more generally, {\\em cybersecurity dynamics}) can exhibit the bifurcation and chaos phenomena. This has profound implications for cyber security measurement and prediction: (i) it is infeasible (or even impossible) to accurately measure and predict cyber security under certain circumstances; (ii) the defender must manipulate the dynamics to avoid such {\\em unmanageable situations} in real-life defense operations.

  16. Multi-phenomena couplings in argillites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (author) The objective of this research thesis is to be a contribution to electro-kinetic phenomena at the continuum scale (about the nanometer) in a complex porous structure. After a general overview of equations and problems raised by electro-kinetic phenomena (geological barriers for radioactive wastes, local electrokinetic equations, porous media, parallel computing and numerical simulation), the author addresses the electro-osmosis in porous solids for high zeta potentials (electrokinetic equations and their resolution) and generalizes his approach to universal electro-osmosis formulae for porous media. He reports the study of ionic transports in porous media for high zeta potentials (electrokinetic equations and numerical simulation) and of the influence of the Stern layer on electrokinetic phenomena

  17. Physiology of Breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation summaries physiology of lactation and the impact of a variety of clinical practices on lactation from delivery through weaning. Factors that inhibit lactogenesis stage II are explained, including retained placenta, excess blood loss during delivery, and hypoplastic brea...

  18. Renal physiology of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Katharine L; Lafayette, Richard A

    2013-05-01

    Pregnancy involves remarkable orchestration of physiologic changes. The kidneys are central players in the evolving hormonal milieu of pregnancy, responding and contributing to the changes in the environment for the pregnant woman and fetus. The functional impact of pregnancy on kidney physiology is widespread, involving practically all aspects of kidney function. The glomerular filtration rate increases 50% with subsequent decrease in serum creatinine, urea, and uric acid values. The threshold for thirst and antidiuretic hormone secretion are depressed, resulting in lower osmolality and serum sodium levels. Blood pressure drops approximately 10 mmHg by the second trimester despite a gain in intravascular volume of 30% to 50%. The drop in systemic vascular resistance is multifactorial, attributed in part to insensitivity to vasoactive hormones, and leads to activation of the renin-aldosterone-angiostensin system. A rise in serum aldosterone results in a net gain of approximately 1000 mg of sodium. A parallel rise in progesterone protects the pregnant woman from hypokalemia. The kidneys increase in length and volume, and physiologic hydronephrosis occurs in up to 80% of women. This review will provide an understanding of these important changes in kidney physiology during pregnancy, which is fundamental in caring for the pregnant patient. PMID:23928384

  19. The Face of Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul White

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the relationship between the physiology of the emotions and the display of character in Victorian Britain. Charles Bell and others had begun to link certain physiological functions, such as respiration, with the expression of feelings such as fear, regarding the heart and other internal organs as instruments by which the emotions were made visible. But a purely functional account of the emotions, which emerged through the development of reflex physiology during the second half of the century, would dramatically alter the nature of feelings and the means of observing them. At the same time, instinctual or acquired sympathy, which had long underpinned the accurate reading of expressions, became a problem to be surmounted by new 'objectively'. Graphic recording instruments measuring a variety of physiological functions and used with increasing frequency in clinical diagnostics became of fundamental importance for tracing the movement of feelings during the period prior to the development of cinematography. They remained, in the form of devices such as the polygraph, a crucial and controversial means of measuring affective states, beneath the potentially deceptive surface of the body.

  20. Datation methods by natural nuclear phenomena. Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The whole current methods of datation by natural nuclear phenomena, applied to terrestrial phenomena, are described in this book. Examples included in each chapter give a view of problems that these methods allow to solve in geology, geophysics, geochemistry and also although to a less extent, in archeology and cimatology. The chapters on cosmogenic isotopes drop a hint of their importance for knowledge of solar system and of our galaxy, this domain leading on studies of meteorites and lunar samples. In the first chapter, the reader can compare the fields and advantages of the techniques presented. (830 refs)

  1. Third DOE natural phenomena hazards mitigation conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference on Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation has been organized into 15 presentation, panel, and poster sessions. The sessions included an overview of activities at DOE Headquarters; natural phenomena hazards tasks underway for DOE; two sessions on codes, standards, orders, criteria, and guidelines; two sessions on seismic hazards; equipment qualification; wind; PRA and margin assessments; modifications, retrofit, and restart; underground structures with a panel discussion; seismic analysis; seismic evaluation and design; and a poster session. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  2. The resonance phenomena and state of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikura A.Y.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The question of dependence of the state of health is examined from the resonance phenomena in the liquid environments of organism, roles herein physical loadings. It is rotined that resonance waves can compensate structural violations on a tissue, system levels. The oppressive operating is the same compensated on the organism of man. The physical loading in a complex with other external resonance phenomena causes substantial resonance vibrations in all systems of organism. It is necessary to take into account it on employments on physical education and to use all necessary rehabilitation facilities.

  3. Current-driven phenomena in nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Seideman, Tamar

    2010-01-01

    Consisting of ten chapters written by some of the world's leaders in the field, this book combines experimental, theoretical and numerical studies of current-driven phenomena in the nanoscale. The topics covered range from single-molecule, site-specific nanochemistry induced by a scanning tunneling microscope, through inelastic tunneling spectroscopy and current-induced heating, to current-triggered molecular machines. The various chapters focus on experimental and numerical method development, the description of specific systems, and new ideas and novel phenomena.

  4. Modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharia, T.; Vitek, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Goldak, J.A. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); DebRoy, T.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rappaz, M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in the mathematical modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds are summarized. State-of-the-art mathematical models, advances in computational techniques, emerging high-performance computers, and experimental validation techniques have provided significant insight into the fundamental factors that control the development of the weldment. The current status and scientific issues in the areas of heat and fluid flow in welds, heat source metal interaction, solidification microstructure, and phase transformations are assessed. Future research areas of major importance for understanding the fundamental phenomena in weld behavior are identified.

  5. Vector (two-dimensional) magnetic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, some interesting phenomena were described from the viewpoint of two-dimensional magnetic property, which is reworded with the vector magnetic property. It shows imperfection of conventional magnetic property and some interested phenomena were discovered, too. We found magnetic materials had the strong nonlinearity both magnitude and spatial phase due to the relationship between the magnetic field strength H-vector and the magnetic flux density B-vector. Therefore, magnetic properties should be defined as the vector relationship. Furthermore, the new Barukhausen signal was observed under rotating flux. (Author)

  6. 19th International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Cundiff, Steven; Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto; DiMauro, Louis

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including both ultrafast optical technology and the study of ultrafast phenomena. It covers picosecond, femtosecond, and attosecond processes relevant to applications in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Ultrafast technology has a profound impact in a wide range of applications, amongst them biomedical imaging, chemical dynamics, frequency standards, material processing, and ultrahigh-speed communications. This book summarizes the results presented at the 19th International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena and provides an up-to-date view of this important and rapidly advancing field.

  7. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included

  8. Dissipative phenomena in condensed matter some applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dattagupta, Sushanta

    2004-01-01

    From the field of nonequilibrium statistical physics, this graduate- and research-level volume treats the modeling and characterization of dissipative phenomena. A variety of examples from diverse disciplines like condensed matter physics, materials science, metallurgy, chemical physics etc. are discussed. Dattagupta employs the broad framework of stochastic processes and master equation techniques to obtain models for a wide range of experimentally relevant phenomena such as classical and quantum Brownian motion, spin dynamics, kinetics of phase ordering, relaxation in glasses, dissipative tunneling. It provides a pedagogical exposition of current research material and will be useful to experimentalists, computational physicists and theorists.

  9. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included.

  10. Anatomy and Physiology. Revised Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Danene; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains 14 units of instruction for a course in anatomy and physiology for surgical technology students. The units cover the following topics: (1) organization of the body; (2) cells, tissues, and membranes; (3) integumentary system; (4) skeletal system; (5) muscular system; (6) nervous system; (7) special sense organs; (8)…

  11. Physiology of inactivation of microbial cells by near-ultraviolet light: mode of action and application for the enrichment of mutants of Escherichia coli and saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mode of action of near-ultraviolet (NUV) light was studied in Escherichia coli. NUV light (maximum emission at 365 nm) caused the photodestruction of ribonucleoside diphosphate (RDP) reductase activity in vivo. Evidence was presented for a model suggesting that the loss of RDP-reductase resulted in a metabolic state analogous to that produced during starvation for thymine. Some important properties of cells irradiated by NUV light, cell death, loss of the ability to support the replication of DNA phages and a delay in the onset of cell division in sublethally irradiated cells, were accounted for in terms of photoinactivation of RDP-reductase. Conditions were described under which NUV light was an effective counterselective agent for the enrichment of mutants of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  12. Physiological ecology meets climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinovic, Francisco; Pörtner, Hans-Otto

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we pointed out that understanding the physiology of differential climate change effects on organisms is one of the many urgent challenges faced in ecology and evolutionary biology. We explore how physiological ecology can contribute to a holistic view of climate change impacts on organisms and ecosystems and their evolutionary responses. We suggest that theoretical and experimental efforts not only need to improve our understanding of thermal limits to organisms, but also to consider multiple stressors both on land and in the oceans. As an example, we discuss recent efforts to understand the effects of various global change drivers on aquatic ectotherms in the field that led to the development of the concept of oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) as a framework integrating various drivers and linking organisational levels from ecosystem to organism, tissue, cell, and molecules. We suggest seven core objectives of a comprehensive research program comprising the interplay among physiological, ecological, and evolutionary approaches for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms. While studies of individual aspects are already underway in many laboratories worldwide, integration of these findings into conceptual frameworks is needed not only within one organism group such as animals but also across organism domains such as Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. Indeed, development of unifying concepts is relevant for interpreting existing and future findings in a coherent way and for projecting the future ecological and evolutionary effects of climate change on functional biodiversity. We also suggest that OCLTT may in the end and from an evolutionary point of view, be able to explain the limited thermal tolerance of metazoans when compared to other organisms. PMID:25798220

  13. Role of insulin hormone in modulation of inflammatory phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Di Petta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence demonstrates the involvement of hormones in thedevelopment of inflammatory response. Inflammation evokes markedstructural alterations of microvasculature, besides migration ofleukocytes from microcirculation to the site of lesion. These alterations are caused primarily by release or activation of endogenous mediators, in which hormones play an integral role in this regulatory system. Binding sites for many hormones may be characterized by vascular structures and hematogenous cells involved with the inflammatory response. Quantitative alterations of inflammatory events involving the decrease in microvascular response to inflammatory mediators, deficiency in the leukocyte-endothelium interaction, reduction of cell concentration in the inflammatory exudate, and failure of the phagocyte function of mononuclear cells were observed in insulindeficient states. Therefore, inflammation is not merely a local response, but rather a process controlled by hormones in which insulin plays an essential role in modulation of these phenomena, and assures tissue repair and remodeling within the limits of normality.

  14. Geophysical phenomena classification by artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, M. P.; Bruckner, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Space science information systems involve accessing vast data bases. There is a need for an automatic process by which properties of the whole data set can be assimilated and presented to the user. Where data are in the form of spectrograms, phenomena can be detected by pattern recognition techniques. Presented are the first results obtained by applying unsupervised Artificial Neural Networks (ANN's) to the classification of magnetospheric wave spectra. The networks used here were a simple unsupervised Hamming network run on a PC and a more sophisticated CALM network run on a Sparc workstation. The ANN's were compared in their geophysical data recognition performance. CALM networks offer such qualities as fast learning, superiority in generalizing, the ability to continuously adapt to changes in the pattern set, and the possibility to modularize the network to allow the inter-relation between phenomena and data sets. This work is the first step toward an information system interface being developed at Sussex, the Whole Information System Expert (WISE). Phenomena in the data are automatically identified and provided to the user in the form of a data occurrence morphology, the Whole Information System Data Occurrence Morphology (WISDOM), along with relationships to other parameters and phenomena.

  15. DOE natural phenomena hazards mitigation conference: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference includes sessions which present an overview of DOE programs, available codes, standards and criteria, examples of designs and upgrades from the DOE complex, lessons learned from past natural phenomena, ground motion, seismic evaluation of equipment, and applications of probabilistic risk assessment techniques to DOE facilities. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers

  16. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an instanta

  17. Hyper-random Phenomena: Definition and Description

    OpenAIRE

    Gorban, Igor

    2008-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the theory which describes physical phenomena in non-constant statistical conditions. The theory is a new direction in probability theory and mathematical statistics that gives new possibilities for presentation of physical world by hyper-random models. These models take into consideration the changing of object’s properties, as well as uncertainty of statistical conditions.

  18. MIXING PHENOMENA IN INDUSTRIAL FUME AFTERBURNER SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report reviews the physical-mixing phenomena involved in the reactions that occur in afterburners or fume incinerators. It considers mixing in after-burners from three points of view. It first covers typical designs of afterburner components that are involved in the mixing ph...

  19. Simple classical approach to spin resonance phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, R A

    1977-01-01

    A simple classical method of describing spin resonance in terms of the average power absorbed by a spin system is discussed. The method has several advantages over more conventional treatments, and a number of important spin resonance phenomena, not normally considered at the introductory level...

  20. Emergent Phenomena, Morphomatics and Theory of Complexity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bíla, J.; Krist, Pavel

    Brno: VUT Press, 2011, s. 528-533. ISBN 978-80-214-4302-0. ISSN 1803-3814. [17th International Conference on Soft Computing. Brno (CZ), 15.06.2011-17.06.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : emergent phenomena * sign model * semantic space * macrostructure * microstructure * matroids Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory

  1. Hyperchaotic phenomena in dynamic decision making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Mosekilde, Erik; Sterman, John David

    1992-01-01

    article is to show how the decision making behavior of real people in simulated corporate environments can lead to chaotic, hyperchaotic and higher-order hyperchaotic phenomena. Characteristics features of these complicated forms of behavior are analyzed with particular emphasis on an interesting form of...

  2. Observation of DNB phenomena by neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the design of LWRs, the forecast of critical heat flux (CHF) is important. The existing CHF correlation equations include the arbitrary constants based on experimental data, therefore, their range of application is limited. For advancing the research and development of high conversion LWRs or passive safety reactors, the development of more general CHF forecasting technique has been demanded. In order to elucidate the mechanism of CHF occurrence and construct the general forecasting model based on physical phenomena, the detailed observation of flow phenomena near a heat generation surface is indispensable. The experiment of observing boiling two-phase flow and CHF phenomena by applying neutron radiography technique was carried out. The utilization of neutron radiography in the field of heat-transferring flow is explained. The experimental setup and the experimental method, the experimental conditions, and the results of the observations of boiling two-phase flow and CHF are reported. By applying real time neutron radiography technique, the observation of the flow mode of boiling two-phase flow and CHF phenomena has become feasible. The measurement of void fraction distribution near a heating surface at the time of DNB occurrence and the study on the state of mechanism shift between low quality DNB and high quality dry-out are carried out hereafter. (K.I.)

  3. Resonance Phenomena in the Macroscopic Quantum Tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present a theoretical approach to describe the quantum behaviour of a macroscopic system interacting with an external field at frequencies close to resonant condition. Moreover we apply our results to simulate resonant phenomena in rf SQUIDs, whose parameters lie in the range typically used in the experiments

  4. CP violating phenomena and theoretical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An introduction to CP violating phenomena is given and the standard model and its most popular low energy extensions in this context are reviewed. The discussion comprises the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model, left-right symmetry, the standard model with more than one Higgs doublet and gauged horizontal symmetries. (Author)

  5. Comparing potato tuberization and sprouting: opposite phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreugdenhil, D.

    2004-01-01

    The regulation of tuber formation and tuber sprouting are compared. As a starting point it is hypothesized that these two phenomena are opposite to each other. This idea is tested from three points of view: hormonal regulation, gene expression, and carbohydrate metabolism. It is concluded that there

  6. Possible new wave phenomena in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Szwed, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    We propose to search for new wave phenomena in the brain by using interference effects in analogy to the well-known double slit (Young) experiment. This method is able to extend the range of oscillation frequencies to much higher values than currently accessible. It is argued that such experiments may test the hypothesis of the wave nature of information coding.

  7. Solar Phenomena Associated with "EIT Waves"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesecker, D. A.; Myers, D. C.; Thompson, B. J.; Hammer, D. M.; Vourlidas, A.

    2002-01-01

    In an effort to understand what an 'EIT wave' is and what its causes are, we have looked for correlations between the initiation of EIT waves and the occurrence of other solar phenomena. An EIT wave is a coronal disturbance, typically appearing as a diffuse brightening propagating across the Sun. A catalog of EIT waves, covering the period from 1997 March through 1998 June, was used in this study. For each EIT wave, the catalog gives the heliographic location and a rating for each wave, where the rating is determined by the reliability of the observations. Since EIT waves are transient, coronal phenomena, we have looked for correlations with other transient, coronal phenomena: X-ray flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and metric type II radio bursts. An unambiguous correlation between EIT waves and CMEs has been found. The correlation of EIT waves with flares is significantly weaker, and EIT waves frequently are not accompanied by radio bursts. To search for trends in the data, proxies for each of these transient phenomena are examined. We also use the accumulated data to show the robustness of the catalog and to reveal biases that must be accounted for in this study.

  8. Wave Phenomena in an Acoustic Resonant Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design and operation of a high Q acoustical resonant chamber which can be used to demonstrate wave phenomena such as three-dimensional normal modes, Q values, densities of states, changes in the speed of sound, Fourier decomposition, damped harmonic oscillations, sound-absorbing properties, and perturbation and scattering problems.…

  9. Transport phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontani, Hiroshi [Nagoya Univ., Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-03-01

    Comprehensive overview. Written by an expert of this topic. Provides the reader with current developments in the field. In conventional metals, various transport coefficients are scaled according to the quasiparticle relaxation time, {tau}, which implies that the relaxation time approximation (RTA) holds well. However, such a simple scaling does not hold in many strongly correlated electron systems, reflecting their unique electronic states. The most famous example would be cuprate high-Tc superconductors (HTSCs), where almost all the transport coefficients exhibit a significant deviation from the RTA results. To better understand the origin of this discrepancy, we develop a method for calculating various transport coefficients beyond the RTA by employing field theoretical techniques. Near the magnetic quantum critical point, the current vertex correction (CVC), which describes the electron-electron scattering beyond the relaxation time approximation, gives rise to various anomalous transport phenomena. We explain anomalous transport phenomena in cuprate HTSCs and other metals near their magnetic or orbital quantum critical point using a uniform approach. We also discuss spin related transport phenomena in strongly correlated systems. In many d- and f-electron systems, the spin current induced by the spin Hall effect is considerably greater because of the orbital degrees of freedom. This fact attracts much attention due to its potential application in spintronics. We discuss various novel charge, spin and heat transport phenomena in strongly correlated metals.

  10. Ordering phenomena in ABA triblock copolymer gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynders, K.; Mischenko, N.; Kleppinger, R.; Reynaers, H.; Koch, M.H.J.; Mortensen, K.

    1997-01-01

    Temperature and concentration dependencies of the degree of order in ABA triblock copolymer gels are discussed. Two factors can influence the ordering phenomena: the conformation of the midblocks (links of the network) and the polydispersity of the endblock domains (nodes of the network). The...

  11. Possible new wave phenomena in the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Szwed, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    We propose to search for new wave phenomena in the brain by using interference effects in analogy to the well known double slit (Young) experiment. This method is able to extend the range of oscillation frequencies to much higher values than presently accessible. It is argued that such experiments may test the hypothesis of wave nature of information coding.

  12. Possible New Wave Phenomena in the Brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose to search for new wave phenomena in the brain by using interference effects in analogy to the well-known double slit (Young) experiment. This method is able to extend the range of oscillation frequencies to much higher values than currently accessible. It is argued that such experiments may test the hypothesis of the wave nature of information coding. (author)

  13. Transient phenomena in the Vivitron (Part 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of transient phenomena in the Vivitron on the occasion of a breakdown is a first importance for appreciating the good or bad running of the Vivitron and for judging the reasons of eventual damages and for giving remedies. This report presents the studies made on this subject until june 1992

  14. Chapter IX: Stress phenomena in landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter consist of next sub-chapters: (1) Sources of stress phenomena and their reflection in landscape; (2) Impact of stress phenomena on natural resources and human hea; (3) Impact of stress phenomena on landscape. The different types of human activities and natural phenomena affect the environment. They are referred to by the general term of stress phenomena. There are the stress phenomena of natural character (the radon risk, landslides, avalanches, etc.) and anthropogenic phenomena determined or directly provoked by man (air and water pollution, emissions, etc.). They cause different environmental problems: they threaten the ecological and cultural priorities, but above all they threaten human health. National legislation and international conventions concerning the air protection lay down the regular inventory of emission of pollutants to atmosphere. Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute (SHMU) is responsible for such inventory. It is carried out in co-operation with several specialised institutions under the methodological guidance of the SHMU. The Register of Emissions and Pollution Sources (REZZO) was in operation at SHMU since 1985. It contains the data on emissions of the basic pollutants from stationary sources. This system was replaced by the National Emission Inventory System (NEIS) harmonised with the internationally accepted methodology (CORINAIR, EMEP, IPCC/FCCC). Sources of pollutants emitted to atmosphere are above all energetic and industrial productions, transport, fuel mining and transport, waste disposal and agriculture. Emissions in Slovakia reached their highest level by the end of the 1980's. Their consistent decrease is recorded since the 1990's. The cause of such developments is the overall recession connected with the decline of industrial production and consequently lower demand of the amount of produced energy. Simultaneously, the effects of legal instruments (Act No. 309/1991 of Coll. on protection of air against pollutants (The

  15. Neuronal responses to physiological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, due to an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level. PMID:23112806

  16. Selected geodynamic phenomena; 1 : 500 000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On this map the selected geodynamic phenomena on the territory of the Slovak Republic are shown. Geodynamic phenomena cause the changes of structure of rock environment, soils, relief, and hydrogeological situation, as well as the overall change of environmental quality. They threaten, limit, and even actually or potentially hinder the land use. Many of them may be provoked or activated by human activities. Depending on the type their activity, intensity or developmental stages are evaluated. Selected phenomena or territories threatened by these phenomena are represented on the maps. Landslides (slope deformations) including numerous slope failures caused by gravitational movements, such as block deformations, landslides, debris flows, and other were evaluated. They are classified according to their appurtenance to the main geological forms of the Western Carpathians; gully erosion - the territory with the density of gullies higher than 1 km.km-2; wind erosion (agricultural soils threatened by wind erosion), expected loss of agricultural soils expressed by unit of area in determinate time taking into consideration the soil texture, climatic factors (occurrence, direction and strength of winds, precipitations, air temperature and humidity), relief (inclination and orientation in terms of air currents); collapsing of sediments (collapsibility), territory with occurrence of soils prone to collapsing, above all the loess and loess-like earth and other earth with the collapsibility index (Imp > 1 %), it is the case of sudden reduction of the earth volume caused by increased humidity or loading; karstic phenomena (karstification of rocks), territories with partial or total development of exo- and endo-karst with allogenous to autogenous development; seismicity of territory (the territory threatened by earthquake) expressed by isoseists 5 grad - 6 grad EMS-98; snow avalanches (territory threatened by snow avalanches); potential of their occurrence exists in the high

  17. Studies on the effect of cell cycle arrest on central metabolism in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, using physiological and systems biology approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joomi

    Diatoms (Bacillarophyceae) are photosynthetic unicellular microalgae that have risen to ecological prominence in the modern oceans over the past 30 million years. They are excellent candidates for biodiesel feedstocks. Global climate change has led to an interest in algal triacylglycerols (TAGs) as feedstocks for sustainable biodiesel, and diatoms are attractive candidates for TAG production as one of the most productive and environmentally flexible algae in the contemporary oceans. For Chapter 2, a genome-scale metabolic model was constructed to calculate intracellular fluxes of a diatom under different growth conditions. The model identified enzymes that may be relevant to increasing lipid synthesis, explored how transporters affect flux outputs, and explored unusual features of diatoms, including the Entner-Douderoff and phosphoketolase pathways, and glycolytic enzymes in their mitochondria. Chapter 3 discusses how cell cycle arrest via cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibition, can increase accumulation of TAGs, and shift metabolism away from protein synthesis. For Chapter 4, transcriptome analysis of cells under cell cycle arrest was performed to show that the pattern of gene expression was fundamentally different from nitrogen stress. Most of the genes related to fatty acid and TAG synthesis were up-regulated. The gene expression pattern for light harvesting complexes was similar to cells stressed by high light, suggesting that arrested cells have smaller sinks for photosynthetically generated electrons.

  18. PREFACE: Transport phenomena in proton conducting media Transport phenomena in proton conducting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikerling, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Proton transport phenomena are of paramount importance for acid-base chemistry, energy transduction in biological organisms, corrosion processes, and energy conversion in electrochemical systems such as polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The relevance for such a plethora of materials and systems, and the ever-lasting fascination with the highly concerted nature of underlying processes drive research across disciplines in chemistry, biology, physics and chemical engineering. A proton never travels alone. Proton motion is strongly correlated with its environment, usually comprised of an electrolyte and a solid or soft host material. For the transport in nature's most benign proton solvent and shuttle, water that is, insights from ab initio simulations, matured over the last 15 years, have furnished molecular details of the structural diffusion mechanism of protons. Excess proton movement in water consists of sequences of Eigen-Zundel-Eigen transitions, triggered by hydrogen bond breaking and making in the surrounding water network. Nowadays, there is little debate about the validity of this mechanism in water, which bears a stunning resemblance to the basic mechanistic picture put forward by de Grotthuss in 1806. While strong coupling of an excess proton with degrees of freedom of solvent and host materials facilitates proton motion, this coupling also creates negative synergies. In general, proton mobility in biomaterials and electrochemical proton conducting media is highly sensitive to the abundance and structure of the proton solvent. In polymer electrolyte membranes, in which protons are bound to move in nano-sized water-channels, evaporation of water or local membrane dehydration due to electro-osmotic coupling are well-known phenomena that could dramatically diminish proton conductivity. Contributions in this special issue address various vital aspects of the concerted nature of proton motion and they elucidate important structural and dynamic effects of solvent

  19. PHYSIOLOGIC PATTERNS OF SLEEP ON EEG, MASKING OF EPILEPTIFORM ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Glukhova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiologic patterns of sleep on EEG can sometimes be similar to epileptiform activity and even to the EEG pattern of epileptic seizures, but they have no connection to epilepsy and their incorrect interpretation may lead to overdiagnosis of epilepsy. These sleep patterns include vertex transients, K-complexes, hypnagogic hypersynchrony, 14 and 6 Hz positive bursts, wicket-potentials, etc. The main distinctive features of acute physiological phenomena of sleep unlike epileptiform activity are stereotyped, monomorphic morphology of waves, which frequently has rhythmic, arcuate pattern, often with change of lateralization, mainly dominated in the first stages of sleep (N1-N2, with their reduction in the deeper stages and transition to delta sleep (N3. The correct interpretation of physiological sharp-wave phenomena of sleep on EEG requires considerable training and experience of the physician. Our review includes a variety of physiological sleep patterns, which can mimic epileptiform activity on EEG, their criteria of diagnostic with demonstration of own illustrations of EEG.

  20. A Pilot Study of Ceramic Powder Far-Infrared Ray Irradiation (cFIR) on Physiology: Observation of Cell Cultures and Amphibian Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ting-Kai; Lee, Chi-Ming; Tsai, Shih-Yin; Chen, Yi-Chien; Chao, Jo-Shui

    2011-08-31

    The purpose of this research was to assess the potential for far-infrared ray irradiation from ceramic powder to improve exercise performance at room temperature. We designed experiments with murine myoblast cells (C2C12) to study the effect of cFIR irradiation on cell viability and lactate dehydrogenase release under H2O2-mediated oxidative stress and evaluated intracellular levels of nitric oxide and calmodulin. We also used electro-stimulation of amphibian skeletal muscle. Our results show that cFIR strengthened C2C12 under oxidative stress and delayed onset of fatigue induced by muscle contractions. We discuss possible mechanisms including anti-oxidation and prevention of acid build-up in muscle tissue based, and expect to see more applications of cFIR in the future. PMID:22129823

  1. Oxide interfaces: pathways to novel phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Yu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Novel phenomena and functionalities at artificial heterointerfaces have been attracting extensive scientific attention in both materials science and fundamental condensed matter physics. The interplay between degrees of freedom at interfaces of complex oxides could lead to exotic and unexpected states of matter. In this article, using the model system of BiFeO3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3, we review recent progress on our understanding of the novel states formed at this heterointerface. Furthermore, we discuss how emergent interfacial phenomena can be employed to influence the bulk properties of these materials. We summarize by highlighting several possible and promising directions for future study.

  2. Diffractive phenomena in high energy processes

    CERN Document Server

    Frankfurt, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    We review the evolution of the studies of diffractive processes in the strong interaction over the last 60 years. First, we briefly outline the early developments of the theory based on analyticity and unitarity of the S-matrix, including the derivation and exploration of the Regge trajectories and related moving cuts. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Pomeron trajectory introduced for description of total, elastic and diffractive cross sections at high energies and to the emergence of the dynamics of multi-Pomeron interactions.The role of large longitudinal distances and color coherent phenomena for the understanding of inelastic diffraction in hadron-hadron scattering and deep inelastic scattering is emphasized. The connection of these phenomena to the cancellation of the contribution of the Glauber approximation in hadron-nucleus collisions and to the understanding of the Gribov-Glauber approximation is explained. The presence of different scales in perturbative QCD due to masses of heavy qua...

  3. Exotic Phenomena Searches at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Santanastasio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    This review presents a selection of the final results of searches for various exotic physics phenomena in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and 8~TeV delivered by the LHC and collected with the ATLAS and CMS detectors in 2011 (5 $fb^{-1}$) and in the first part of 2012 (4 $fb^{-1}$). Searches for large extra dimensions, gravitons, microscopic black holes, long-lived particles, dark matter, and leptoquarks are presented in this report. No sign of new physics beyond the standard model has been observed so far. In the majority of the cases these searches set the most stringent limits to date on the aforementioned new physics phenomena.

  4. Transport phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Kontani, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In conventional metals, various transport coefficients are scaled according to the quasiparticle relaxation time, \\tau, which implies that the relaxation time approximation (RTA) holds well. However, such a simple scaling does not hold in many strongly correlated electron systems, reflecting their unique electronic states. The most famous example would be cuprate high-Tc superconductors (HTSCs), where almost all the transport coefficients exhibit a significant deviation from the RTA results. To better understand the origin of this discrepancy, we develop a method for calculating various transport coefficients beyond the RTA by employing field theoretical techniques. Near the magnetic quantum critical point, the current vertex correction (CVC), which describes the electron-electron scattering beyond the relaxation time approximation, gives rise to various anomalous transport phenomena. We explain anomalous transport phenomena in cuprate HTSCs and other metals near their magnetic or orbital quantum critical poi...

  5. Probabilistic Dynamic Logic of Phenomena and Cognition

    CERN Document Server

    Vityaev, Evgenii; Perlovsky, Leonid; Smerdov, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop further the main concepts of Phenomena Dynamic Logic (P-DL) and Cognitive Dynamic Logic (C-DL), presented in the previous paper. The specific character of these logics is in matching vagueness or fuzziness of similarity measures to the uncertainty of models. These logics are based on the following fundamental notions: generality relation, uncertainty relation, simplicity relation, similarity maximization problem with empirical content and enhancement (learning) operator. We develop these notions in terms of logic and probability and developed a Probabilistic Dynamic Logic of Phenomena and Cognition (P-DL-PC) that relates to the scope of probabilistic models of brain. In our research the effectiveness of suggested formalization is demonstrated by approximation of the expert model of breast cancer diagnostic decisions. The P-DL-PC logic was previously successfully applied to solving many practical tasks and also for modelling of some cognitive processes.

  6. Basic transport phenomena in materials engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Iguchi, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the basic theory and experimental techniques of transport phenomena in materials processing operations. Such fundamental knowledge is highly useful for researchers and engineers in the field to improve the efficiency of conventional processes or develop novel technology. Divided into four parts, the book comprises 11 chapters describing the principles of momentum transfer, heat transfer, and mass transfer in single phase and multiphase systems. Each chapter includes examples with solutions and exercises to facilitate students’ learning. Diagnostic problems are also provided at the end of each part to assess students’ comprehension of the material.  The book is aimed primarily at students in materials science and engineering. However, it can also serve as a useful reference text in chemical engineering as well as an introductory transport phenomena text in mechanical engineering. In addition, researchers and engineers engaged in materials processing operations will find the material use...

  7. Coherent topological phenomena in protein folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    A theory is presented for coherent topological phenomena in protein dynamics with implications for protein folding and stability. We discuss the relationship to the writhing number used in knot diagrams of DNA. The winding state defines a long-range order along the backbone of a protein with long......-range excitations, `wring' modes, that play an important role in protein denaturation and stability. Energy can be pumped into these excitations, either thermally or by an external force.......A theory is presented for coherent topological phenomena in protein dynamics with implications for protein folding and stability. We discuss the relationship to the writhing number used in knot diagrams of DNA. The winding state defines a long-range order along the backbone of a protein with long...

  8. Optimizing Laboratory Experiments for Dynamic Astrophysical Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D; Remington, B

    2005-09-13

    To make a laboratory experiment an efficient tool for the studying the dynamical astrophysical phenomena, it is desirable to perform them in such a way as to observe the scaling invariance with respect to the astrophysical system under study. Several examples are presented of such scalings in the area of magnetohydrodynamic phenomena, where a number of scaled experiments have been performed. A difficult issue of the effect of fine-scale dissipative structures on the global scale dissipation-free flow is discussed. The second part of the paper is concerned with much less developed area of the scalings relevant to the interaction of an ultra-intense laser pulse with a pre-formed plasma. The use of the symmetry arguments in such experiments is also considered.

  9. Tunable caustic phenomena in electron wavefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavabi, Amir Hossein, E-mail: a.tavabi@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Migunov, Vadim; Dwyer, Christian; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Pozzi, Giulio [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Novel caustic phenomena, which contain fold, butterfly and elliptic umbilic catastrophes, are observed in defocused images of two approximately collinear oppositely biased metallic tips in a transmission electron microscope. The observed patterns depend sensitively on defocus, on the applied voltage between the tips and on their separation and lateral offset. Their main features are interpreted on the basis of a projected electrostatic potential model for the electron-optical phase shift. - Highlights: • Electron-optical caustics are observed in defocused images of biased metallic tips. • The caustics depend on defocus, on the bias between the tips and on their separation. • The setup offers the flexibility to study a wide variety of caustic phenomena.

  10. An update: improvements in imaging perfluorocarbon-mounted plant leaves with implications for studies of plant pathology, physiology, development and cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Littlejohn, George R.; Mansfield, Jessica C.; Christmas, Jacqueline T.; Witterick, Eleanor; Fricker, Mark D; Grant, Murray R.; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Everson, Richard M.; Moger, Julian; Love, John

    2014-01-01

    Plant leaves are optically complex, which makes them difficult to image by light microscopy. Careful sample preparation is therefore required to enable researchers to maximize the information gained from advances in fluorescent protein labeling, cell dyes and innovations in microscope technologies and techniques. We have previously shown that mounting leaves in the non-toxic, non-fluorescent perfluorocarbon (PFC), perfluorodecalin (PFD) enhances the optical properties of the leaf with minimal...

  11. The Impact of Alpha-Syntrophin Deletion on the Changes in Tissue Structure and Extracellular Diffusion Associated with Cell Swelling under Physiological and Pathological Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dmytrenko, Lesia; Cicanič, Michal; Anděrová, Miroslava; Voříšek, Ivan; Ottersen, O. P.; Syková, Eva; Vargová, Lýdia

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 7 (2013), e68044. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/09/1597; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/2378; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : extracellular space * diffusion parameters * cell swelling Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  12. Transplantation of Adipose Tissue and Adipose-Derived Stem Cells as a Tool to Study Metabolic Physiology and for Treatment of Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Thien T.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Humans and other mammals have three main fat depots - visceral white fat, subcutaneous white fat, and brown fat - each possessing unique cell-autonomous properties. In contrast to visceral fat which can induce detrimental metabolic effects, subcutaneous white fat and brown fat have potential beneficial metabolic effects, including improved glucose homeostasis and increased energy consumption, which might be transferred by transplantation of these fat tissues. In addition, fat contains adipose...

  13. Conservation physiology of marine fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian; Peck, Myron A.; Antognarelli, Fabio;

    2012-01-01

    At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology to...

  14. Particle precipitation : effects on selected ionospheric phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Lunde, June

    2009-01-01

    The motivation behind this thesis has been to study particle precipitation from the Sun into the Earth’s upper atmosphere and its effects on selected ionospheric phenomena. Particles from the solar wind can enter the Earth's magnetosphere through magnetic merging, either at the sub-solar point, or at higher latitudes, depending on the configuration of the interplanetary magnetic field. This interaction can be studied from the ground at Svalbard, due to its fortuitous location beneath the magn...

  15. Emergent Phenomena at Complex Oxide Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Pu

    2011-01-01

    Novel phenomena and functionalities at epitaxial complex oxide heterostructures have been attracting huge scientific attention because of the intriguing fundamental physics as well as potential for technological applications that they embody. Essentially, charge and spin reconstruction at the interface can lead to exotic properties, which are completely different from those inherent to the individual materials, for example, a conductive interface between two insulating materials and interfac...

  16. Numerical Modeling and Investigation of Boiling Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Kunkelmann, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The subject of the present thesis is the numerical modeling and investigation of boiling phenomena. The heat transfer during boiling is highly efficient and therefore used for many applications in power generation, process engineering and cooling of high performance electronics. The precise knowledge of particular boiling processes, their relevant parameters and limitations is of utmost importance for an optimized application. Therefore, the fundamentals of boiling heat transfer have been...

  17. Mirage phenomena in superconducting quantum corrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the local density of states and the order parameter structure inside an elliptic quantum corral on surfaces of isotropic and anisotropic superconductors. The Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations are solved in the presence of non-magnetic and magnetic impurities. We observe and discuss a variety of mirage and anti-mirage phenomena, which specifically reflect the nature of the superconducting pairing state. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Mirage phenomena in superconducting quantum corrals

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Markus; Kampf, Arno P.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the local density of states and the order parameter structure inside an elliptic quantum corral on surfaces of isotropic and anisotropic superconductors. The Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations are solved in the presence of non-magnetic and magnetic impurities. We observe and discuss a variety of mirage and anti-mirage phenomena, which specifically reflect the nature of the superconducting pairing state.

  19. CONTAGION PHENOMENA: OCCURENCE AND TRANSMISSION MECHANISMS

    OpenAIRE

    MARGINEAN Silvia; ORASTEAN Ramona

    2012-01-01

    Contagion phenomena are a real challenge for economists and economic theory, and in the same time they induce important policy issues at national and international level. Despite significant progress has been made in recent years, there is still no consensus on their definition. This paper aims to contribute to the contagion literature on two levels: (1) a synthesis of theoretical and empirical contributions to contagion - definition, contagion channels, classes of contagion and transmission ...

  20. Colossal magnetoresistance oxides: phenomena and questions

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnan, TV

    1998-01-01

    Some unusual electronic properties of doped manganites are described. The low temperature resistivity of the metallic ferromagnet has a large $T^2$ term. The residual resistivity can be much larger than the Mott maximum, and depends exponentially on spontaneous magnetization. There is much evidence for strong spatial and temporal fluctuation effects. The available theories are discussed in the light of these phenomena, and it is suggested that a novel localizing mechanism is at work, leading ...