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Sample records for cell part ii

  1. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions: part II--an approach to intradermal proliferations and horizontally oriented lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Shachar; Al Habeeb, Ayman; Ghazarian, Danny

    2010-05-01

    Melanocytic lesions show great morphological diversity in their architecture and the cytomorphological appearance of their composite cells. Whereas functional melanocytes show a dendritic cytomorphology and territorial isolation, lesional nevomelanocytes and melanoma cells typically show epithelioid, spindled or mixed cytomorphologies, and a range of architectural arrangements. Spindling is common to melanocytic lesions, and may either be a characteristic feature or a divergent appearance. The presence of spindle cells may mask the melanocytic nature of a lesion, and is often disconcerting, either due to its infrequent appearance in a particular lesion or its interpretation as a dedifferentiated phenotype. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions follow the full spectrum of potential biological outcomes, and difficulty may be experienced judging the nature of a lesion due to a lack of consistently reliable features to predict biological behaviour. Over time, recognition of numerous histomorphological features that may portend a more aggressive lesion have been identified; however, the translation of these features into a diagnostic entity requires a gestalt approach. Although most spindle cell melanocytic lesions may reliably be resolved through this standard approach, problem areas do exist for the surgical pathologist or dermatopathologist. With this review (part II of II), we complete our discussion of spindle cell melanocytic lesions, in order to: (1) model a systematic approach to such lesions; and (2) provide familiarity with those melanocytic lesions which either typically or occasionally display a spindled cytomorphology.

  2. Workshop 96. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part II of the seminar proceedings contains contributions in various areas of science and technology, among them materials science in mechanical engineering, materials science in electrical, chemical and civil engineering, and electronics, measuring and communication engineering. In those areas, 6 contributions have been selected for INIS. (P.A.)

  3. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J; Long-Boyle, Janel

    2016-05-01

    Part I of this article included a pertinent review of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), the role of postgraft immunosuppression in alloHCT, and the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of the calcineurin inhibitors and methotrexate. In this article (Part II), we review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of mycophenolic acid (MPA), sirolimus, and the antithymocyte globulins (ATG). We then discuss target concentration intervention (TCI) of these postgraft immunosuppressants in alloHCT patients, with a focus on current evidence for TCI and on how TCI may improve clinical management in these patients. Currently, TCI using trough concentrations is conducted for sirolimus in alloHCT patients. Several studies demonstrate that MPA plasma exposure is associated with clinical outcomes, with an increasing number of alloHCT patients needing TCI of MPA. Compared with MPA, there are fewer pharmacokinetic/dynamic studies of rabbit ATG and horse ATG in alloHCT patients. Future pharmacokinetic/dynamic research of postgraft immunosuppressants should include '-omics'-based tools: pharmacogenomics may be used to gain an improved understanding of the covariates influencing pharmacokinetics as well as proteomics and metabolomics as novel methods to elucidate pharmacodynamic responses.

  4. Integration of Solar Cells on Top of CMOS Chips - Part II: CIGS Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Jiwu; Liu, Wei; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Sun, Yun; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the monolithic integration of deepsubmicrometer complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) microchips with copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells. Solar cells are manufactured directly on unpackaged CMOS chips. The microchips maintain comparable electronic performance,

  5. Stiffnites. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Pareschi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The dynamics of a stiffnite are here inferred. A stiffnite is a sheet-shaped, gravity-driven submarine sediment flow, with a fabric made up of marine ooze. To infer stiffnite dynamics, order of magnitude estimations are used. Field deposits and experiments on materials taken from the literature are also used. Stiffnites can be tens or hundreds of kilometers wide, and a few centimeters/ meters thick. They move on the sea slopes over hundreds of kilometers, reaching submarine velocities as high as 100 m/s. Hard grain friction favors grain fragmentation and formation of triboelectrically electrified particles and triboplasma (i.e., ions + electrons. Marine lipids favor isolation of electrical charges. At first, two basic assumptions are introduced, and checked a posteriori: (a in a flowing stiffnite, magnetic dipole moments develop, with the magnetization proportional to the shear rate. I have named those dipoles as Ambigua. (b Ambigua are ‘vertically frozen’ along stiffnite streamlines. From (a and (b, it follows that: (i Ambigua create a magnetic field (at peak, >1 T. (ii Lorentz forces sort stiffnite particles into two superimposed sheets. The lower sheet, L+, has a sandy granulometry and a net positive electrical charge density. The upper sheet, L–, has a silty muddy granulometry and a net negative electrical charge density; the grains of sheet L– become finer upwards. (iii Faraday forces push ferromagnetic grains towards the base of a stiffnite, so that a peak of magnetic susceptibility characterizes a stiffnite deposit. (iv Stiffnites harden considerably during their motion, due to magnetic confinement. Stiffnite deposits and inferred stiffnite characteristics are compatible with a stable flow behavior against bending, pinch, or other macro instabilities. In the present report, a consistent hypothesis about the nature of Ambigua is provided.

  6. Low-temperature charging of lithium-ion cells Part II: Model reduction and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmlinger, Jürgen; Tippmann, Simon; Buchholz, Michael; Dietmayer, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Lithium-ion cells, especially when used in electric vehicles at varying operation conditions, require a sophisticated battery management to ensure an optimal operation regarding operation limits, performance, and maximum lifetime. In some cases, the best trade-off between these conflictive goals can only be reached by considering internal, non-measurable cell characteristics. This article presents a data-driven model-reduction method for a strict electrochemical model. The model describes the charging process of a lithium-ion cell and possibly occurring degradation effects in a large temperature range and is presented in Part I of this contribution. The model-reduction process is explained in detail, and the gained model is compared to the original electrochemical model showing a very high approximation quality. This reduced model offers a very low computation complexity and is therefore suitable for the implementation in a battery management system (BMS). Based on this model, an advanced charging strategy is presented and evaluated for possible reductions in charging times especially at low temperatures.

  7. Pharmacology of the human cell voltage-dependent cation channel. Part II: inactivation and blocking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennekou, Poul; Barksmann, Trine L.; Kristensen, Berit I.;

    2004-01-01

    Human red cells; Nonselective voltage-dependent cation channel; NSVDC channel; Thiol group reagents......Human red cells; Nonselective voltage-dependent cation channel; NSVDC channel; Thiol group reagents...

  8. Investigating reliability on fuel cell model identification. Part II: An estimation method for stochastic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsikonis, L.; Diethelm, S.; Seiler, H.; Nakajo, A.; Van herle, J.; Favrat, D. [EPFL-LENI (Industrial Energy Systems Laboratory), ME A2, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    An alternative way to process data from polarization measurements for fuel cell model validation is proposed. The method is based on re- and subsampling of I-V data, with which repetitive estimations are obtained for the model parameters. This way statistics such as standard deviations and correlations between the parameters may be experimentally derived. Histograms may also be produced, approximating the probability distributions that they follow. Two experimental case studies are discussed. In the first case, observations are made on the behavior of the parameter values for two mathematical models. As the number of data points (measurement points) employed in the estimation of the parameters increases, parameters with high variances converge to specific values. On the contrary, parameters with small variances diverge linearly. The parameters' histograms do not usually follow normal distributions rather they show a connection between the number of peaks in the graphs and correlations of the parameters. The second case study is an application on a fast degraded SOFC button cell, where the values and the histograms of the parameters are compared before and after degradation. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-03-15

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part I of the work addressed the stack fixture, seal system and cell performance of a 3-cell short stack tested at 800oC for 6000h. Commercial NiO-YSZ anode-supported thin YSZ electrolyte cells with LSM cathodes were used for assessment and were tested in constant current mode with dilute (~50% H2) fuel versus air. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reactions, and volatility issues. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell degradation. After 6000h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO77 (Ba-Sr-Y-B-Si) showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time (40,000h) weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

  10. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: Sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-03-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reaction, and volatility issues of a 3-cell stack with LSM-based cells. After 6000 h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO7 showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

  11. Exploring Water Pollution. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1975-01-01

    This is part two of a three part article related to the science activity of exploring environmental problems. Part one dealt with background information for the classroom teacher. Presented here is a suggested lesson plan on water pollution. Objectives, important concepts and instructional procedures are suggested. (EB)

  12. Local Area Networks: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessy, Raymond E., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses five approaches used by industry/colleges to provide local area network (LAN) capabilities in the analytical laboratory: (1) mixed baseband bus network coupled to a star net; (2) broadband bus network; (3) ring network; (4) star network coupled to broadband net; and (5) simple multiprocessor center. Part I (September issue) focused on…

  13. Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nishant; Vassallo, Robert; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-07-01

    The diffuse cystic lung diseases have a broad differential diagnosis. A wide variety of pathophysiological processes spanning the spectrum from airway obstruction to lung remodeling can lead to multifocal cyst development in the lung. Although lymphangioleiomyomatosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis are perhaps more frequently seen in the clinic, disorders such as Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, follicular bronchiolitis, and light-chain deposition disease are increasingly being recognized. Obtaining an accurate diagnosis can be challenging, and management approaches are highly disease dependent. Unique imaging features, genetic tests, serum studies, and clinical features provide invaluable clues that help clinicians distinguish among the various etiologies, but biopsy is often required for definitive diagnosis. In part II of this review, we present an overview of the diffuse cystic lung diseases caused by lymphoproliferative disorders, genetic mutations, or aberrant lung development and provide an approach to aid in their diagnosis and management. PMID:25906201

  14. Revenue cycle management, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crew, Matt

    2007-01-01

    The proper management of your revenue cycle requires the application of "best practices" and the continual monitoring and measuring of the entire cycle. The correct technology will enable you to gain the insight and efficiencies needed in the ever-changing healthcare economy. The revenue cycle is a process that begins when you negotiate payor contracts, set fees, and schedule appointments and continues until claims are paid in full. Every single step in the cycle carries equal importance. Monitoring all phases and a commitment to continually communicating the results will allow you to achieve unparalleled success. In part I of this article, we explored the importance of contracting, scheduling, and case management as well as coding and clinical documentation. We will now take a closer look at the benefits charge capture, claim submission, payment posting, accounts receivable follow-up, and reporting can mean to your practice.

  15. Thermochemical data acquisition - Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was a joint effort of the four laboratories AEA Harwell, Winfrith, ECN Petten and the Free University of Brussels. Thermochemical data have been determined for a number of fission product and reactor material compounds. Critical assessments have also been made of the available thermochemical data on a number of systems. These data complement the results from similar studies conducted in 1990 (see EUR 14004 EN), and can be used in the appropriate computer codes for calculations of the speciation and transport properties of the fission products during a severe reactor accident. The work load was subdivided as follows: experimental studies of Harwell, Winfrith and Petten (Chapters 1 to 7) have focused on the vaporization of tellurium dioxide, caesium ruthenate, strontium and barium borate, indium hydroxide, caesium telluride, caesium phosphate, caesium hydroxide and caesium iodate and on the thermodynamic properties of the condensed phases Cdl2, Cs2Cdl4, Cs2Si4O9, Cs2ZrO3, SrB4O7, and Ba3B2O6. Critical evaluations have been made of a number of tellurides of importance in severe accident assessments, and analysis have been made of the Fe-Te, Ni-Te and Cr-Te systems. Tables of thermodynamic properties over the temperature range 298.15 to 3 000 K are given. The data are believed to predict the fission product species and their transport in case of severe reactor accidents with greater confidence. The Free University of Brussels (Chapter 8) carried out thermodynamic studies of the systems Cs-Te, In-Te and Cs-In-Te using the mass spectrometric Knudsen cell method. The gas phases formed between 800 and 1 300 K were investigated and the partial pressure and relative ionization cross-sections of the system components were determined

  16. Systems Analysis of Technologies for Energy Recovery from Waste. Part I. Gasification followed by Catalytic Combustion, PEM Fuel Cells and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Stationary Applications in Comparison with Incineration. Part - II. Catalytic combustion - Experimental part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assefa, Getachew; Frostell, Bjoern [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Industrial Ecology; Jaeraas, Sven; Kusar, Henrik [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Chemical Technology

    2005-02-01

    This project is entitled 'Systems Analysis: Energy Recovery from waste, catalytic combustion in comparison with fuel cells and incineration'. Some of the technologies that are currently developed by researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology include catalytic combustion and fuel cells as downstream units in a gasification system. The aim of this project is to assess the energy turnover as well as the potential environmental impacts of biomass/waste-to-energy technologies. In second part of this project economic analyses of the technologies in general and catalytic combustion and fuel cell technologies in particular will be carried out. Four technology scenarios are studied: (1) Gasification followed by Low temperature fuel cells (Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells) (2) Gasification followed by high temperature fuel cells (Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) (3) Gasification followed by catalytic combustion and (4) Incineration with energy recovery. The waste used as feedstock is an industrial waste containing parts of household waste, paper waste, wood residues and poly ethene. In the study compensatory district heating is produced by combustion of biofuel. The power used for running the processes in the scenarios will be supplied by the waste-to-energy technologies themselves while compensatory power is assumed to be produced from natural gas. The emissions from the system studied are classified and characterised using methodology from Life Cycle Assessment in to the following environmental impact categories: Global Warming Potential, Acidification Potential, Eutrophication Potential and finally Formation of Photochemical Oxidants. Looking at the result of the four technology chains in terms of the four impact categories with impact per GWh electricity produced as a unit of comparison and from the perspective of the rank each scenario has in all the four impact categories, SOFC appears to be the winner technology followed by PEM and CC as second

  17. Systems Analysis of Technologies for Energy Recovery from Waste. Part I. Gasification followed by Catalytic Combustion, PEM Fuel Cells and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Stationary Applications in Comparison with Incineration. Part - II. Catalytic combustion - Experimental part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project is entitled 'Systems Analysis: Energy Recovery from waste, catalytic combustion in comparison with fuel cells and incineration'. Some of the technologies that are currently developed by researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology include catalytic combustion and fuel cells as downstream units in a gasification system. The aim of this project is to assess the energy turnover as well as the potential environmental impacts of biomass/waste-to-energy technologies. In second part of this project economic analyses of the technologies in general and catalytic combustion and fuel cell technologies in particular will be carried out. Four technology scenarios are studied: (1) Gasification followed by Low temperature fuel cells (Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells) (2) Gasification followed by high temperature fuel cells (Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) (3) Gasification followed by catalytic combustion and (4) Incineration with energy recovery. The waste used as feedstock is an industrial waste containing parts of household waste, paper waste, wood residues and poly ethene. In the study compensatory district heating is produced by combustion of biofuel. The power used for running the processes in the scenarios will be supplied by the waste-to-energy technologies themselves while compensatory power is assumed to be produced from natural gas. The emissions from the system studied are classified and characterised using methodology from Life Cycle Assessment in to the following environmental impact categories: Global Warming Potential, Acidification Potential, Eutrophication Potential and finally Formation of Photochemical Oxidants. Looking at the result of the four technology chains in terms of the four impact categories with impact per GWh electricity produced as a unit of comparison and from the perspective of the rank each scenario has in all the four impact categories, SOFC appears to be the winner technology followed by PEM and CC as second and third

  18. In-situ diagnostic tools for hydrogen transfer leak characterization in PEM fuel cell stacks part II: Operational applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niroumand, Amir M.; Homayouni, Hooman; DeVaal, Jake; Golnaraghi, Farid; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a diagnostic tool for in-situ characterization of the rate and distribution of hydrogen transfer leaks in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell stacks. The method is based on reducing the air flow rate from a high to low value at a fixed current, while maintaining an anode overpressure. At high air flow rates, the reduction in air flow results in lower oxygen concentration in the cathode and therefore reduction in cell voltages. Once the air flow rate in each cell reaches a low value at which the cell oxygen-starves, the voltage of the corresponding cell drops to zero. However, oxygen starvation results from two processes: 1) the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction which produces current; and 2) the chemical reaction between oxygen and the crossed over hydrogen. In this work, a diagnostic technique has been developed that accounts for the effect of the electrochemical reaction on cell voltage to identify the hydrogen leak rate and number of leaky cells in a fuel cell stack. This technique is suitable for leak characterization during fuel cell operation, as it only requires stack air flow and voltage measurements, which are readily available in an operational fuel cell system.

  19. Is there an optimal topographical surface in nano-scale affecting protein adsorption and cell behaviors? Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Huajie, E-mail: wanghuajie972001@163.com; Sun Yuanyuan; Cao Ying, E-mail: caoying1130@sina.com; Wang Kui; Yang Lin [Henan Normal University, College of Chemistry and Environmental Science (China); Zhang Yidong; Zheng Zhi [Xuchang University, Institute of Surface Micro and Nano Materials (China)

    2012-05-15

    Although nano-structured surfaces exhibit superior biological activities to the smooth or micro-structured surfaces, whether there is an optimal topographical surface in nano-scale affecting protein adsorption and cell behaviors is still controversial. In this study, porous aluminum oxide membranes with different pore sizes ranging from 25 to 120 nm were prepared by the anodic oxidation technique. The surface morphology, topography and wettability were analyzed by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope and water contact angle measurement, respectively. The results indicated that the synergistic action of the nano-topography structure and hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties resulted in a highest protein adsorption on the aluminum oxide membrane with 80 nm pore size. Additionally, the morphological, metabolic and cell counting methods showed that cells had different sensitivity to porous aluminum oxide membranes with different surface features. Furthermore, this sensitivity was cell type dependent. The optimal pore size of aluminum oxide membranes for cell growth was 80 nm for PC12 cells and 50 nm for NIH 3T3 cells.

  20. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    guidelines. As for the first meeting the methodology of evidence-based medicine (EBM) was applied. The results of the discussion were compiled by the writing committee. All participants have agreed to this final update. RESULTS: The second part of the consensus paper includes the treatment of metastasised...... trials. Despite technical improvements, expert clinical skills will continue to be one of the major determinants for the prognosis of patients with germ cell cancer. In addition, the particular needs of testicular cancer survivors have been acknowledged Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  1. Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-01-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

  2. A distributed real-time model of degradation in a solid oxide fuel cell, part II: Analysis of fuel cell performance and potential failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccaria, V.; Tucker, D.; Traverso, A.

    2016-09-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells are characterized by very high efficiency, low emissions level, and large fuel flexibility. Unfortunately, their elevated costs and relatively short lifetimes reduce the economic feasibility of these technologies at the present time. Several mechanisms contribute to degrade fuel cell performance during time, and the study of these degradation modes and potential mitigation actions is critical to ensure the durability of the fuel cell and their long-term stability. In this work, localized degradation of a solid oxide fuel cell is modeled in real-time and its effects on various cell parameters are analyzed. Profile distributions of overpotential, temperature, heat generation, and temperature gradients in the stack are investigated during degradation. Several causes of failure could occur in the fuel cell if no proper control actions are applied. A local analysis of critical parameters conducted shows where the issues are and how they could be mitigated in order to extend the life of the cell.

  3. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Cardiac Cell Transplantation: Part II. In Vivo Imaging of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Swine with PET/CT and MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashurama, Natesh; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Ziv, Keren; Ito, Ken; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Willmann, Jürgen K; Chung, Jaehoon; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Swanson, Julia C; Merk, Denis R; Lyons, Jennifer K; Yerushalmi, David; Teramoto, Tomohiko; Kosuge, Hisanori; Dao, Catherine N; Ray, Pritha; Patel, Manishkumar; Chang, Ya-Fang; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Cohen, Jeff Eric; Goldstone, Andrew Brooks; Habte, Frezghi; Bhaumik, Srabani; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Robbins, Robert C; Dash, Rajesh; Yang, Phillip C; Brinton, Todd J; Yock, Paul G; McConnell, Michael V; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To quantitatively determine the limit of detection of marrow stromal cells (MSC) after cardiac cell therapy (CCT) in swine by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET) reporter gene imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with cell prelabeling. Materials and Methods Animal studies were approved by the institutional administrative panel on laboratory animal care. Seven swine received 23 intracardiac cell injections that contained control MSC and cell mixtures of MSC expressing a multimodality triple fusion (TF) reporter gene (MSC-TF) and bearing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) (MSC-TF-NP) or NP alone. Clinical MR imaging and PET reporter gene molecular imaging were performed after intravenous injection of the radiotracer fluorine 18-radiolabeled 9-[4-fluoro-3-(hydroxyl methyl) butyl] guanine ((18)F-FHBG). Linear regression analysis of both MR imaging and PET data and nonlinear regression analysis of PET data were performed, accounting for multiple injections per animal. Results MR imaging showed a positive correlation between MSC-TF-NP cell number and dephasing (dark) signal (R(2) = 0.72, P = .0001) and a lower detection limit of at least approximately 1.5 × 10(7) cells. PET reporter gene imaging demonstrated a significant positive correlation between MSC-TF and target-to-background ratio with the linear model (R(2) = 0.88, P = .0001, root mean square error = 0.523) and the nonlinear model (R(2) = 0.99, P = .0001, root mean square error = 0.273) and a lower detection limit of 2.5 × 10(8) cells. Conclusion The authors quantitatively determined the limit of detection of MSC after CCT in swine by using clinical PET reporter gene imaging and clinical MR imaging with cell prelabeling. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27332865

  4. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. De; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Paz-Ares, L.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the

  5. [Main issues of psychoneuroimmunology: Part II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausch, K

    2000-01-01

    In psychoneuroimmunology links between psyche and the body are examined in the context of neurotransmitter, hormone and immuno-transmitter interaction. This allows for construction of models which show empirically verifiable links between the nervous, endocrine and immune systems. The earlier concepts of stress by Cannon and Selye focused on the physical and mental strain influence on the action of the nervous and endocrine systems. Ursin, Olff and Schedlowski introduced the concept of stress extended by an immune system reaction, which is an integral part of the alarm phase. A change in the amount of NK cells and their stress-influenced activity is an important defense mechanism of the body. It constitutes a component of the preparation for defense against potential pathogen penetration.

  6. High efficiency chemical energy conversion system based on a methane catalytic decomposition reaction and two fuel cells. Part II. Exergy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qinghua; Tian, Ye; Li, Hongjiao; Jia, Lijun; Xia, Chun; Li, Yongdan [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Catalysis Science and Technology and State Key Laboratory for Chemical Engineering (Tianjin University), School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Thompson, Levi T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    A methane catalytic decomposition reactor-direct carbon fuel cell-internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (MCDR-DCFC-IRSOFC) energy system is highly efficient for converting the chemical energy of methane into electrical energy. A gas turbine cycle is also used to output more power from the thermal energy generated in the IRSOFC. In part I of this work, models of the fuel cells and the system are proposed and validated. In this part, exergy conservation analysis is carried out based on the developed electrochemical and thermodynamic models. The ratio of the exergy destruction of each unit is examined. The results show that the electrical exergy efficiency of 68.24% is achieved with the system. The possibility of further recovery of the waste heat is discussed and the combined power-heat exergy efficiency is over 80%. (author)

  7. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  8. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  9. Reclaiming Kindergarten: Part II--Questions about Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Dominic F.; Hughes, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Part II of "Reclaiming Kindergarten" continues the discussion related to responding to the crisis in today's kindergarten. In Part II, two policy questions are posed, the answers to which seek to respond to this continuing crisis. The questions center on issues related to engaging families in kindergarten and the need to consider a new early…

  10. Water Pollution: Part I, Municipal Wastewaters; Part II, Industrial Wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, K. E. M.

    This publication is an annotated bibliography of municipal and industrial wastewater literature. This publication consists of two parts plus appendices. Part one is entitled Municipal Wastewaters and includes publications in such areas as health effects of polluted waters, federal policy and legislation, biology and chemistry of polluted water,…

  11. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part II: Benchmark comparisons of PUMA core parameters with MCNP5 and improvements due to a simple cell heterogeneity correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO2 rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update of reactor physics calculation methods and models was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. This paper presents benchmark comparisons of core parameters of a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the PUMA reactor code with MCNP5. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, more symmetric than Atucha-II, and has some experimental data available. To validate the new models benchmark comparisons of k-effective, channel power and axial power distributions obtained with PUMA and MCNP5 have been performed. In addition, a simple cell heterogeneity correction recently introduced in PUMA is presented, which improves significantly the agreement of calculated channel powers with MCNP5. To complete the validation, the calculation of some of the critical configurations of the Atucha-I reactor measured during the experiments performed at first criticality is also presented. (authors)

  12. Pitfalls in diagnostic hematopathology – Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xianfeng F

    2010-01-01

    The overlapping features of malignant lymphomas create a diagnostic “grey zone” , and lead to the invention of “grey zone lymphomas”. There are several major grey zone lymphomas: 1) Lymphomas with overlapping features of Hodgkin lymphoma and large B-cell lymphoma; 2) Lymphomas with overlapping features of Burkitt lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma; 3) Lymphomas with overlapping features of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma and T-cell/histiocyte rich large B-cell lymphoma...

  13. Reproduce and die! Why aging? Part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, GA

    2005-01-01

    Whilst in part I of this diptych on aging the question why aging exists at all is discussed; this part deals with the question which mechanisms underly aging and, ultimately, dying. It appears that aging is not just an active process as such - although all kinds of internal (e.g., oxigen-free radica

  14. The Search for Another Earth - Part II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-01

    In the first part, we discussed the various methods for thedetection of planets outside the solar system known as theexoplanets. In this part, we will describe various kinds ofexoplanets. The habitable planets discovered so far and thepresent status of our search for a habitable planet similar tothe Earth will also be discussed.

  15. Hypertension in Women—Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Pemu, Priscilla Igho; Ofili, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    In Part I, we reviewed the pathophysiology of hypertension in women This section focuses on the treatment of hypertension in special circumstances and special populations: pregnancy, preeclampsia, and lactation; hypertension in black women; and hypertension in the elderly.

  16. Searching LEXIS and WESTLAW: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Carl

    1986-01-01

    This second of a three-part series compares search features (i.e., truncation symbols, boolean operators, proximity operators, phrase searching, save searches) of two databases providing legal information. Search tips concerning charges and effective searching and tables listing functions of commands and proximity operators for both databases are…

  17. Moroccan Arabic Intermediate Reader, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alami, Wali A.; Hodge, Carlton T., Ed.

    The first section of this companion volume to "Moroccan Arabic Intermediate Reader, Part I" (AL 002 041) presents the Arabic script version of the pre-drills in Lessons IA-IIB in that volume. The second and major section comprises 20 lessons consisting of pre-drills, texts, notes, and questions. All material in this volume appears in Arabic script…

  18. Two-dimensional modeling of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell with long flow channel. Part II. Physics-based electrochemical impedance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Cheng; Bessler, Wolfgang G.

    2015-03-01

    The state-of-the-art electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) calculations have not yet started from fully multi-dimensional modeling. For a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with long flow channel, the impedance plot shows a multi-arc characteristic and some impedance arcs could merge. By using a step excitation/Fourier transform algorithm, an EIS simulation is implemented for the first time based on the full 2D PEMFC model presented in the first part of this work. All the dominant transient behaviors are able to be captured. A novel methodology called 'configuration of system dynamics', which is suitable for any electrochemical system, is then developed to resolve the physical meaning of the impedance spectra. In addition to the high-frequency arc due to charge transfer, the Nyquist plots contain additional medium/low-frequency arcs due to mass transfer in the diffusion layers and along the channel, as well as a low-frequency arc resulting from water transport in the membrane. In some case, the impedance spectra appear partly inductive due to water transport, which demonstrates the complexity of the water management of PEMFCs and the necessity of physics-based calculations.

  19. Treatment of superficial mycoses: review - part II*

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes-Filho, Fred; Quaresma-Santos, Maria Victória Pinto; Amorim, Adriana Gutstein da Fonseca; Schechtman, Regina Casz; Azulay, David Rubem

    2013-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections of the hair, skin and nails are a major cause of morbidity in the world. Choosing the right treatment is not always simple because of the possibility of drug interactions and side effects. The first part of the article discusses the main treatments for superficial mycoses - keratophytoses, dermatophytosis, candidiasis, with a practical approach to the most commonly-used topical and systemic drugs , referring also to their dosage and duration of use. Promising new...

  20. Simulation in Wood Industry. Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Mihály Varga; Etele Csanády; Zalán Koppány Kovács; Zoltán Kocsis

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this simulation is to introduce and realize a part of material flow of an international furniture manufacturing company. This simulation was made with a special process-simulation software, called SIMUL8. With SIMUL8 we could simulate the whole process under real circumstances, and obtain the actual values of specific parameters relevant for the company. This opportunity helped the company to develop its strategy - to maximize the production efficiency and to find out the possibbl...

  1. Simulation in Wood Industry. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihály Varga

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this simulation is to introduce and realize a part of material flow of an international furniture manufacturing company. This simulation was made with a special process-simulation software, called SIMUL8. With SIMUL8 we could simulate the whole process under real circumstances, and obtain the actual values of specific parameters relevant for the company. This opportunity helped the company to develop its strategy - to maximize the production efficiency and to find out the possibble bottle-necks without making any investment, and to rearrange the workcenters effectively.

  2. New particle searches in ALEPH (part II)

    CERN Document Server

    Roussarie, A

    1991-01-01

    This report is the second part of the ALEPH search report . I t covers the search for super - symmetric particles (Higgs , chargino s an d neutralinos ) withi n th e framewor k o f th e Minima l Supersymmmetri c Standar d Mode l an d th e searc h fo r composi t charge d lepton s an d neutrinos . Lowe r limit s o f masse s o f suc h ne w particle s ar e given . Mos t o f the m ar e ver y clos e t o th e LE P I kenematica l limit .

  3. Anomalous transport from holography: Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Bu, Yanyan; Sharon, Amir

    2016-01-01

    This is a second study of chiral anomaly induced transport within a holographic model consisting of anomalous $U(1)_V\\times U(1)_A$ Maxwell theory in Schwarzschild-$AdS_5$ spacetime. In the first part, chiral magnetic/separation effects (CME/CSE) are considered in presence of a static spatially-inhomogeneous external magnetic field. Gradient corrections to CME/CSE are analytically evaluated up to third order in the derivative expansion. Some of the third order gradient corrections lead to an anomaly-induced negative $B^2$-correction to the diffusion constant. We also find non-linear modifications to the chiral magnetic wave (CMW). In the second part, we focus on the experimentally interesting case of the axial chemical potential being induced dynamically by a constant magnetic and time-dependent electric fields. Constitutive relations for the vector/axial currents are computed employing two different approximations: (a) derivative expansion (up to third order) but fully nonlinear in the external fields, and (...

  4. Complement system part II: role in immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas S. Merle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic system, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing a direct killing by C5b-9 membrane attack complex by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a and helps the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T- and B- lymphocytes. But it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Also examples will be discussed, where inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, C3 glomerulopathies (C3G and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Age related macular degeneration (AMD and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of diseases, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target.

  5. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  6. Biosimilars in Dermatology: Current Situation (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, L; Carretero, G; Daudén, E; Ferrándiz, C; Marrón, S E; Martorell, A; Pérez-Suárez, B; Rodriguez-Cerdeira, C; Ruiz-Villaverde, R; Sánchez-Carazo, J L; Velasco, M

    2015-09-01

    The first biosimilar version of a biologic agent used to treat psoriasis (infliximab) entered the Spanish market on February 16 of this year, and more biosimilars can be expected to follow in the coming months and years. Logically, this new situation will have economic repercussions and alter prescribing patterns among dermatologists. In this second part of the review, we will look at several somewhat contentious issues, such as the extrapolation of indications, interchangeability, and automatic substitution. We will also review the biosimilars with indications for psoriasis currently in the clinical development pipeline and assess their potential to offer comparable efficacy and safety to the reference product while contributing to the sustainability of the public health care system. PMID:26049964

  7. Submodeling Simulations in Fusion Welds: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    In part I, three-dimensional transient non-linear sub modeling heat transfer simulations were performed to study the thermal histories and thermal cycles that occur during the welding process at the macro, meso and micro scales. In the present work, the corresponding non-uniform temperature changes were imposed as load conditions on structural calculations to study the evolution of localized plastic strains and residual stresses at these sub-level scales. To reach the goal, a three-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic model (ABAQUS code) was developed. The sub-modeling technique proposed to be used in coupling phase-field (and/or digital microstructures) codes with finite element codes, was used to mesh a local part of the model with a refined mesh based on interpolation of the solution from an initial, relatively coarse, macro global model. The meso-sub-model is the global model for the subsequent micro sub-model. The strategy used to calculate temperatures, strains and residual stresses at the macro, meso and micro scale level, is very flexible to be used to any number of levels. The objective of this research was to initiate the development of microstructural models to identify fusion welding process parameters for preserving the single crystal nature of gas turbine blades during repair procedures. The multi-scale submodeling approach can be used to capture weld pool features at the macro-meso scale level, and micro residual stress and secondary dendrite arm spacing features at the micro scale level.

  8. Compressor Part II: Volute Flow Predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tai Lee

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical method that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is used to study an inefficient component of a shipboard air-conditioning HCFC-124 compressor system. This high-loss component of the centrifugal compressor was identified as the volute through a series of measurements given in Part I of the paper. The predictions were made using three grid topologies. The first grid closes the connection between the cutwater and the discharge diffuser. The other two grids connect the cutwater area with the discharge diffuser. Experiments were performed to simulate both the cutwater conditions used in the predictions. Surface pressures along the outer wall and near the inlet of the volute were surveyed for comparisons with the predictions. Good agreements between the predicted results and the measurements validate the calculations. Total pressure distributions and flow stream traces from the prediction results support the loss distribution through the volute. A modified volute configuration is examined numerically for further loss comparison.

  9. TEXTILE STRUCTURES FOR AERONAUTICS (PART II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOLER Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D textile structures with better delamination resistance and damage impact tolerance to be applied in composites for structural components is one of the main goals of the aeronautical industry. Textile Research Centre in Canet de Mar has been working since 2008 in this field. Our staff has been designing, developing and producing different textile structures using different production methods and machinery to improve three-dimensional textile structures as fiber reinforcement for composites. This paper describes different tests done in our textile labs from unidirectional structures to woven, knitted or braided 3 D textile structures. Advantages and disadvantages of each textile structure are summarized. The second part of this paper deals with our know-how in the manufacturing and assessing of three-dimensional textile structures during this last five years in the field of textile structures for composites but also in the development of structures for other applications. In the field of composites for aeronautic sector we have developed textile structures using the main methods of textile production, that is to say, weaving, warp knitting, weft knitting and braiding. Comparing the advantages and disadvantages it could be said that braided fabrics, with a structure in the three space axes are the most suitable for fittings and frames.

  10. A Physicist for All Seasons: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Frank

    2013-06-01

    The second part of this interview covers Frank Oppenheimer's move to the University of California at Berkeley and wartime work at the Westinghouse Research Laboratories in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, at the electromagnetic-separation plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and at Los Alamos, New Mexico (1941-1945); his postwar research at Berkeley (1945-1947); his appointment at the University of Minnesota in 1947 and firing two years later after being required to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee; his decade as a rancher in Colorado (1949-1959) and high-school science teacher toward the end of this period; his research at the University of Colorado in Boulder after 1959; his year as a Guggenheim Fellow at University College London in 1965; and his founding of the Exploratorium in San Francisco. California, in 1969. He also discusses his wartime relations with his older brother Robert and postwar events in Robert's life, including his Hearings before the Personnel Security Board of the Atomic Energy Commission in 1954.

  11. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Part I of Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…

  12. Solar cells. Danish strategy for research, development, demonstration and distribution. Part 2 - Background paper; Solceller. Dansk strategi for forskning, udvikling, demonstration og udbredelse. Del II - Baggrundsnotat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    The background paper to the strategy for Danish R and D within the solar cell field describes the background and references for solar cell technology and its development, both nationally and internationally. Especially, the potentials for use of solar cells in Denmark together with the primary Danish actors and strongholds are presented.

  13. Cz-Silicon Produced from Solar-Grade and Recycled Materials. Part II: Investigating Performances of Solar Cell Produced from Solar-Grade Cz-Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Øvrelid, Eivind Johannes; Di Sabtino, Marisa; Juel, Mari; Tranell, Gabriella

    2015-03-01

    This paper is the second of two, investigating the properties of P-type Cz-silicon materials and solar cells produced with recycled silicon and Elkem Solar Silicon (ESS) materials. While the focus on the first work was on the bulk properties and grown defects of the material, the current study focuses on the solar cell performances. In the processing of the solar cells, the phosphorous diffusion process was optimized to improve the bulk properties and thus to maximize the final solar cell characteristics. Results from the characterization of material defects suggest that the performances of the experimental ingots are limited by the activated grown-in defects, which should be strictly controlled during crystal growth and solar cell processing. The solar cells produced from the investigated ingots showed efficiency values up to 18.5 pct and fill factor values up to 79 pct, comparable to conventional silicon produced from poly silicon. Solar cells produced from mixed recycled and ESS material exhibit a better performance than 100 pct recycled material. Boron and oxygen concentration levels and net doping level showed a concurrent effect on light-induced degradation (LID). Appropriate compensation was finally demonstrated to be an efficient way to improve solar cells efficiency of Cz-silicon produced from recycled silicon, even though higher dopant concentration incurred relatively faster LID.

  14. Visual Odometry: Part II - Matching, Robustness, and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fraundorfer, Friedrich; Scaramuzza, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Part II of the tutorial has summarized the remaining building blocks of the VO pipeline: specifically, how to detect and match salient and repeatable features across frames and robust estimation in the presence of outliers and bundle adjustment. In addition, error propagation, applications, and links to publicly available code are included. VO is a well understood and established part of robotics. VO has reached a maturity that has allowed us to successfully use it for certain classes of appl...

  15. Zeolite scaffolds for cultures of human breast cancer cells. Part II: Effect of pure and hybrid zeolite membranes on neoplastic and metastatic activity control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavolaro, Palmira; Martino, Guglielmo; Andò, Sebastiano; Tavolaro, Adalgisa

    2016-11-01

    This work is focused on the response of two invasive phenotypes of human breast cancer cells, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, grown on synthesized zeolite scaffolds in order to study the influence of those biomaterials in controlled conditions with and without anti-tumoral drug treatments. Our research was directed to the use of doxorubicin (DOX) and bergapten (5-MOP). The former is broadly considered the most active single agent available for the treatment of breast cancer, the second is a natural psoralen with an apoptotic effect. The results indicate that both drugs inhibit the cell viability of all cell lines grown on all zeolite scaffolds and that all Pure Zeolite Membranes are more responsive with respect to all Mixed Matrix Membranes. Moreover, the results after treatment with DOX at a concentration of 7.4μM for 24h, show that the expression of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) is greatly reduced in both cell lines, especially in those adherent on Pure Zeolite Scaffolds. PMID:27524044

  16. Mechanism of free sulfur influence on the eutectic cell count and transition from graphite to cementite eutectic in cast iron. Part II. Experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Fraś

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the mechanism of free sulfur influence on the transition from graphite to cementite eutectic in cast iron is experimentally verified. It has been shown that the main impact of free sulfur on the transition from graphite to cementite eutectic consist in reducing the growth rate of graphite eutectic cell.

  17. Part II: Functional delivery of a neurotherapeutic gene to neural stem cells using minicircle DNA and nanoparticles: Translational advantages for regenerative neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alinda R; Chari, Divya M

    2016-09-28

    Both neurotrophin-based therapy and neural stem cell (NSC)-based strategies have progressed to clinical trials for treatment of neurological diseases and injuries. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in particular can confer neuroprotective and neuro-regenerative effects in preclinical studies, complementing the cell replacement benefits of NSCs. Therefore, combining both approaches by genetically-engineering NSCs to express BDNF is an attractive approach to achieve combinatorial therapy for complex neural injuries. Current genetic engineering approaches almost exclusively employ viral vectors for gene delivery to NSCs though safety and scalability pose major concerns for clinical translation and applicability. Magnetofection, a non-viral gene transfer approach deploying magnetic nanoparticles and DNA with magnetic fields offers a safe alternative but significant improvements are required to enhance its clinical application for delivery of large sized therapeutic plasmids. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of using minicircles with magnetofection technology to safely engineer NSCs to overexpress BDNF. Primary mouse NSCs overexpressing BDNF generated increased daughter neuronal cell numbers post-differentiation, with accelerated maturation over a four-week period. Based on our findings we highlight the clinical potential of minicircle/magnetofection technology for therapeutic delivery of key neurotrophic agents.

  18. Fatigue-Related Gene Networks Identified in CD14+ Cells Isolated From HIV-Infected Patients—Part II: Statistical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Joachim G.; Dobra, Adrian; Morse, Caryn; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Raju, Raghavan; Danner, Robert L.; Munson, Peter J.; Logan, Carolea; Rangel, Zoila; Adelsberger, Joseph W.; McLaughlin, Mary; Adams, Larry D.; Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In limited samples of valuable biological tissues, univariate ranking methods of microarray analyses often fail to show significant differences among expression profiles. In order to allow for hypothesis generation, novel statistical modeling systems can be greatly beneficial. The authors applied new statistical approaches to solve the issue of limited experimental data to generate new hypotheses in CD14+ cells of patients with HIV-related fatigue (HRF) and healthy controls. Methodology We compared gene expression profiles of CD14+ cells of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-treated HIV patients with low versus high fatigue to healthy controls (n = 5 each). With novel Bayesian modeling procedures, the authors identified 32 genes predictive of low versus high fatigue and 33 genes predictive of healthy versus HIV infection. Sparse association and liquid association networks further elucidated the possible biological pathways in which these genes are involved. Relevance for nursing practice Genetic networks developed in a comprehensive Bayesian framework from small sample sizes allow nursing researchers to design future research approaches to address such issues as HRF. Implication for practice The findings from this pilot study may take us one step closer to the development of useful biomarker targets for fatigue status. Specific and reliable tests are needed to diagnosis, monitor and treat fatigue and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22084402

  19. The Nature of Reinforcement: Part I. (Volume I), Part II. (Volume II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Robert, Ed.

    Part One of this report describes the first half of a conference, designed to examine the nature of reinforcement, which was held at the University of Pittsburgh in June 1969. The topics discussed include: "Reward in Human Learning: Theoretical Issues and Strategic Choice Points"; "Are Reinforcement Concepts Able to Provide Reinforcement for…

  20. The optimal time for hematopoietic stem cell translantation for Hodgkin's lymphoma. International guidelines and real practic in Russia and former USSSR countries (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Zhukov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of previous antitumor therapy the efficacy and tolerability of high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cells transplantation (HCST in 369 patients with Hodgkin, s lymphoma in the clinics of Russia and CIS countries was analyzed. Longterm treatment results of patients who have received 1 or 2 therapy lines before deciding about HCST were comparable (5‑year overall survival (OS – 67 ± 3.8 % and 71 ± 5.0 %; freedom from treatment failure survival (FFTF – 52.6 ± 3.9 % and 61 ± 5.0 %, respectively. The worst results (p < 0.05 are in patients who have received > 2 lines of therapy prior HSCT (5‑year OS – 46 ± 9.7 %, FFTF – 38.4 ± 9.0 %. The negative impact of previous treatment on the efficiency of hematopoietic material collection and hematopoiesis reconstitution as well observed in patients who received > 2 lines of therapy. Therefore, if the delay of HSCT in patients who achieved remission on secondline therapy was caused by organizational problems, for optimum results is necessary to conduct HSCT not later than second relapse while maintaining tumor chemosensitivity (third disease remission. However, when remission is not achieved after second-line therapy, is necessary to change the treatment regimen and performing HSCT only at confirmation of tumor chemosensitivity, because regardless of prior therapy line number, this approach leads to better results than earlier performing HSCT without remission.

  1. The optimal time for hematopoietic stem cell translantation for Hodgkin's lymphoma. International guidelines and real practic in Russia and former USSSR countries (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Zhukov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of previous antitumor therapy the efficacy and tolerability of high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cells transplantation (HCST in 369 patients with Hodgkin, s lymphoma in the clinics of Russia and CIS countries was analyzed. Longterm treatment results of patients who have received 1 or 2 therapy lines before deciding about HCST were comparable (5‑year overall survival (OS – 67 ± 3.8 % and 71 ± 5.0 %; freedom from treatment failure survival (FFTF – 52.6 ± 3.9 % and 61 ± 5.0 %, respectively. The worst results (p < 0.05 are in patients who have received > 2 lines of therapy prior HSCT (5‑year OS – 46 ± 9.7 %, FFTF – 38.4 ± 9.0 %. The negative impact of previous treatment on the efficiency of hematopoietic material collection and hematopoiesis reconstitution as well observed in patients who received > 2 lines of therapy. Therefore, if the delay of HSCT in patients who achieved remission on secondline therapy was caused by organizational problems, for optimum results is necessary to conduct HSCT not later than second relapse while maintaining tumor chemosensitivity (third disease remission. However, when remission is not achieved after second-line therapy, is necessary to change the treatment regimen and performing HSCT only at confirmation of tumor chemosensitivity, because regardless of prior therapy line number, this approach leads to better results than earlier performing HSCT without remission.

  2. Pharmacokinetic interactions with calcium channel antagonists (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlanz, K D; Myre, S A; Bottorff, M B

    1991-12-01

    Since calcium channel antagonists are a diverse class of drugs frequently administered in combination with other agents, the potential for clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug interactions exists. These interactions occur most frequently via altered hepatic blood flow and impaired hepatic enzyme activity. Part I of the article, which appeared in the previous issue of the Journal, dealt with interactions between calcium antagonists and marker compounds, theophylline, midazolam, lithium, doxorubicin, oral hypoglycaemics and cardiac drugs. Part II examines interactions with cyclosporin, anaesthetics, carbamazepine and cardiovascular agents. PMID:1782739

  3. The Value of Imaging Part II: Value beyond Image Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Phuong-Anh T; Pastel, David A; Sadigh, Gelareh; Ballard, David; Sullivan, Joseph C; Bresnahan, Brian; Buch, Karen; Duszak, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Although image interpretation is an essential part of radiologists' value, there are other ways in which we contribute to patient care. Part II of the value of imaging series reviews current initiatives that demonstrate value beyond the image interpretation. Standardizing processes, reducing the radiation dose of our examinations, clarifying written reports, improving communications with patients and providers, and promoting appropriate imaging through decision support are all ways we can provide safer, more consistent, and higher quality care. As payers and policy makers push to drive value, research that demonstrates the value of these endeavors, or lack thereof, will become increasingly sought after and supported.

  4. The Value of Imaging Part II: Value beyond Image Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Phuong-Anh T; Pastel, David A; Sadigh, Gelareh; Ballard, David; Sullivan, Joseph C; Bresnahan, Brian; Buch, Karen; Duszak, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Although image interpretation is an essential part of radiologists' value, there are other ways in which we contribute to patient care. Part II of the value of imaging series reviews current initiatives that demonstrate value beyond the image interpretation. Standardizing processes, reducing the radiation dose of our examinations, clarifying written reports, improving communications with patients and providers, and promoting appropriate imaging through decision support are all ways we can provide safer, more consistent, and higher quality care. As payers and policy makers push to drive value, research that demonstrates the value of these endeavors, or lack thereof, will become increasingly sought after and supported. PMID:26683509

  5. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, Deepjyoti [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-13

    Limited placement of real-time monitoring devices in the distribution grid, recent trends notwithstanding, has prevented the easy implementation of demand-response and other smart grid applications. Part I of this paper discusses the problem of learning the operational structure of the grid from nodal voltage measurements. In this work (Part II), the learning of the operational radial structure is coupled with the problem of estimating nodal consumption statistics and inferring the line parameters in the grid. Based on a Linear-Coupled(LC) approximation of AC power flows equations, polynomial time algorithms are designed to identify the structure and estimate nodal load characteristics and/or line parameters in the grid using the available nodal voltage measurements. Then the structure learning algorithm is extended to cases with missing data, where available observations are limited to a fraction of the grid nodes. The efficacy of the presented algorithms are demonstrated through simulations on several distribution test cases.

  6. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its

  7. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1048 - Large Spark-ignition (SI) Composite Transient Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Large Spark-ignition (SI) Composite Transient Cycle II Appendix II to Part 1048 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY.... 1048, App. II Appendix II to Part 1048—Large Spark-ignition (SI) Composite Transient Cycle...

  8. Generalized Interference Alignment—Part II: Application to Wireless Secrecy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Liangzhong; Lau, Vincent K. N.; Win, Moe Z.

    2016-05-01

    In contrast to its wired counterpart, wireless communication is highly susceptible to eavesdropping due to the broadcast nature of the wireless propagation medium. Recent works have proposed the use of interference to reduce eavesdropping capabilities in wireless wiretap networks. However, the concurrent effect of interference on both eavesdropping receivers (ERs) and legitimate receivers (LRs) has not been thoroughly investigated, and carefully engineering the network interference is required to harness the full potential of interference for wireless secrecy. This two part paper addresses this issue by proposing a generalized interference alignment (GIA) technique, which jointly designs the transceivers at the legitimate partners to impede the ERs without interfering with LRs. In Part I, we have established a theoretical framework for the GIA technique. In Part II, we will first propose an efficient GIA algorithm that is applicable to large-scale networks and then evaluate the performance of this algorithm in stochastic wireless wiretap network via both analysis and simulation. These results reveal insights into when and how GIA contributes to wireless secrecy.

  9. Bedside ultrasonography-Applications in critical care: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Chacko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Point of care ultrasonography, performed by acute care physicians, has developed into an invaluable bedside tool providing important clinical information with a major impact on patient care. In Part II of this narrative review, we describe ultrasound guided central venous cannulation, which has become standard of care with internal jugular vein cannulation. Besides improving success rates, real-time guidance also significantly reduces the incidence of complications. We also discuss compression ultrasonography - a quick and effective bedside screening tool for deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremity. Abdominal ultrasound offers vital clues in the emergency setting; in the unstable trauma victim, a focused examination may provide immediate answers and has largely superseded diagnostic peritoneal lavage in diagnosing intraperitoneal bleed. From estimation of intracranial pressure to transcranial Doppler studies, ultrasound is becoming increasingly relevant to neurocritical care. Ultrasound may also help with airway management in several situations, including percutaneous tracheostomy. Clearly, bedside ultrasonography has become an indispensable part of intensive care practice - in the rapid assessment of critically ill-patients as well as in enhancing the safety of invasive procedures.

  10. Reforming Science Education: Part II. Utilizing Kieran Egan's Educational Metatheory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Roland M.

    2009-04-01

    This paper is the second of two parts and continues the conversation which had called for a shift in the conceptual focus of science education towards philosophy of education, with the requirement to develop a discipline-specific “philosophy” of science education. In Part I, conflicting conceptions of science literacy were identified with disparate “visions” tied to competing research programs as well as school-based curricular paradigms. The impasse in the goals of science education and thereto, the contending views of science literacy, were themselves associated with three underlying fundamental aims of education (knowledge-itself; personal development; socialization) which, it was argued, usually undercut the potential of each other. During periods of “crisis-talk” and throughout science educational history these three aims have repeatedly attempted to assert themselves. The inability of science education research to affect long-term change in classrooms was correlated not only to the failure to reach a consensus on the aims (due to competing programs and to the educational ideologies of their social groups), but especially to the failure of developing true educational theories (largely neglected since Hirst). Such theories, especially metatheories, could serve to reinforce science education’s growing sense of academic autonomy and independence from socio-economic demands. In Part II, I offer as a suggestion Egan’s cultural-linguistic theory as a metatheory to help resolve the impasse. I hope to make reformers familiar with his important ideas in general, and more specifically, to show how they can complement HPS rationales and reinforce the work of those researchers who have emphasized the value of narrative in learning science.

  11. Discovery of Quantum structure and A Theory of Everything Part I and Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meggie

    2012-10-01

    (Part I) During my research I discovered logical errors in the logic of science and in mathematics. These errors caused scientists missed out important information when interpreting data. This led me to revisit the method of science and the existing results and able to find new information, which lead to the discovery of photon's structure. A ``particle collision illumination'' experiment then provided direct evidence supported the structure. Analysis of the properties of the structure suggested an organized but not-continuous multi-dimension (n-D) space within. Therefore I formed a hypothesis of a not-continuous n-D space structure. In search for evidence, I turned into crystal technology, and found direct evidence supported the hypotesis, then further particle collision found more evidence support this finding. (Part II) Analysis of single electron buildup revealed star and galaxy formation is from a single particle following a predictable pattern. This pattern is also common in matter formation. Analysis of the quantum structure suggested the formation of a larger structure through the space expansion within the structure. Further experiment results support the finding and result revealed the expansion is through space folding. Result also suggested a violation of energy conservation law that energy is created during the formation of matter, and matter itself is moving from a lower energy state to a higher energy state. When putting all information together, I arrived to a theory of everything which gives explanations to all existing phenomenon in the universe including black hole, dark energy, star formation, consciousness.

  12. Alveolar Type II cell transplantation restores pulmonary surfactant protein levels in lung fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; Gay-Jordi, Gemma; Xaubet, Antoni; Peinado, Victor; Serrano-Mollar, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background Alveolar Type II cell transplantation has been proposed as a cell therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Its long-term benefits include repair of lung fibrosis, but its success partly depends on the restoration of lung homeostasis. Our aim was to evaluate surfactant protein restoration after alveolar Type II cell transplantation in an experimental model of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Methods Lung fibrosis was induced by intratracheal instillation o...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1068 - Emission-Related Parameters and Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission-Related Parameters and Specifications II Appendix II to Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS GENERAL COMPLIANCE PROVISIONS FOR ENGINE PROGRAMS Pt. 1068, App. II Appendix...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  15. Approach To The First Unprovoked Seizure- PART II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad GHOFRANI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Ghofrani M. Approach To The First Unprovoked Seizure- PART II. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Autumn; 7(4:1-5.Abstract The approach to a child who has experienced a first unprovoked generalized tonic-clonic seizure is challenging and at the same time controversial.How to establish the diagnosis, ways and means of investigation and whether treatment is appropriate, are different aspects of this subject. In this writing the above mentioned matters are discussed. References31.Berg AT, Testa FM., Levy SR, Shinnar S. Neuroimaging in children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. A community based study. Pediatrics 2000;106:527-532.32.Shinnar S, Odell C. Treating childhood seizure; when and for how long. In: Shinnar S, Amir N, Branski D (Eds. Childhood seizure. S Karger Basel. 1995. P.100-110.33.Shinnar S, Berg AT, Moshe Sl, et al. Risk of Seizure recurrence following a first unprovoked seizure in childhood; A prospective study. Pediatrics 1990;85:1076-2085.34.Shinnar S, Berg At, Moshe SL, et al. The risk of seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked febrile seizure in childhood: An extended follow up. Pediatrics 1996:98:216-225.35.Hauser WA, Rich SS, Annegers JF, Anderson VE. Seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure: An extended follow up. Neurology 1990;40:1163-1170.36.Stroink H, Brouwer O F, Arts WF, Greets AT, Peter AC, Van Donselaar CA. The First unprovoked, untreated seizure in childhood: A hospital based study of the accuracy of diagnosis, rate of recurrence, and long term outcome after recurrence. Dutch study of epilepsy in childhood. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1998;64:595-600. 37.Shinnar S, Berg AT, O’Dell C. Newstein D, et al. Predictors of multiple seizure in a cohort of children prospectively followed from the time of their first unprovoked seizure, Ann Neurol 2000; 48:140-147.38.Martinovie Z, Jovic N. Seizure recurrence after a first generalized tonic-clonic seizure in children

  16. Estimating Welfare Effects Consistent with Forward-Looking Behavior. Part I: Lessons from a Simulation Exercise. Part II: Empirical Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael P.; Wolpin, Kenneth I.

    2002-01-01

    Part I uses simulations of a model of welfare participation and women's fertility decisions, showing that increases in per-child payments have substantial impact on fertility. Part II uses estimations of decision rules of forward-looking women regarding welfare participation, fertility, marriage, work, and schooling. (SK)

  17. Conscious Intelligent Systems - Part II - Mind, Thought, Language and Understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Gayathree, U.

    2006-01-01

    This is the second part of a paper on Conscious Intelligent Systems. We use the understanding gained in the first part (Conscious Intelligent Systems Part 1: IXI (arxiv id cs.AI/0612056)) to look at understanding. We see how the presence of mind affects understanding and intelligent systems; we see that the presence of mind necessitates language. The rise of language in turn has important effects on understanding. We discuss the humanoid question and how the question of self-consciousness (an...

  18. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  19. Pharmacogenomics: from cell to clinic (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siest, Gérard; Medeiros, Rui; Melichar, Bohuslav; Stathopoulou, Maria; Van Schaik, Ron H N; Cacabelos, Ramon; Abt, Peter Meier; Monteiro, Carolino; Gurwitz, David; Queiroz, Jao; Mota-Filipe, Helder; Ndiaye, Ndieye Coumba; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    The second international European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT) conference was organized in Lisbon, Portugal, and attracted 250 participants from 37 different countries. The participants could listen to 50 oral presentations, participate in five lunch symposia and were able to view 83 posters and an exhibition. The first part of this Conference Scene will focus on the pharmacogenomics and biomarkers used in medical oncology, and in particular solid tumors. In addition, this article covers the two keynote conference introductory lectures by Ann K Daly and Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg. The second part of this article will discuss the clinical implementation of pharmacogenomic tests; the role of transports and pharmacogenomics; how stem cells and other new tools are helping the development of pharmacogenomics and drug discovery; and an update on the clinical translation of pharmacogenomics to personalized medicine. Part two of this Conference Scene will be featured in the next issue of Pharmacogenomics.

  20. Mesenchymal tumours of the mediastinum—part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. den Bakker (Michael); A. Marx (Alexander); K. Mukai (Kiyoshi); P. Ströbel (Philipp)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThis is the second part of a two-part review on soft tissue tumours which may be encountered in the mediastinum. This review is based on the 2013 WHO classification of soft tissue tumours and the 2015 WHO classification of tumours of the lung, pleura, thymus and heart and provides an upd

  1. Philosophy of climate science part II: modelling climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Frigg, Roman; Thompson, Erica; Werndl, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of three parts of an introduction to the philosophy of climate science. In this second part about modelling climate change, the topics of climate modelling, confirmation of climate models, the limits of climate projections, uncertainty and finally model ensembles will be discussed.

  2. Designing SoTL Studies--Part II: Practicality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter suggests solutions to common practical problems in designing SoTL studies. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of different types of designs are discussed. [Part I available at EJ1029363.

  3. Internal Auditing in Federal, State, and Local Governments (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Susan; Wilson, Guy

    1981-01-01

    This second part of an annotated bibliography of reports, books, and journal articles concerned with internal auditing in government contexts reviews the available literature for an understanding of the types of internal audit, methods and practices, and other facets. (FM)

  4. Guidelines for acute ischemic stroke treatment: part II: stroke treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Ouriques Martins

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The second part of these Guidelines covers the topics of antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke, reperfusion therapy, and classification of Stroke Centers. Information on the classes and levels of evidence used in this guideline is provided in Part I. A translated version of the Guidelines is available from the Brazilian Stroke Society website (www.sbdcv.com.br.

  5. Bi-capacities -- Part II: the Choquet integral

    OpenAIRE

    GRABISCH, Michel; Labreuche, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    International audience Bi-capacities arise as a natural generalization of capacities (or fuzzy measures) in a context of decision making where underlying scales are bipolar. They are able to capture a wide variety of decision behaviours, encompassing models such as Cumulative Prospect Theory (CPT). The aim of this paper in two parts is to present the machinery behind bi-capacities, and thus remains on a rather theoretical level, although some parts are firmly rooted in decision theory, not...

  6. Delivery systems for biopharmaceuticals. Part II: Liposomes, Micelles, Microemulsions and Dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana C; Lopes, Carla M; Lobo, José M S; Amaral, Maria H

    2015-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are a generation of drugs that include peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and cell products. According to their particular molecular characteristics (e.g. high molecular size, susceptibility to enzymatic activity), these products present some limitations for administration and usually parenteral routes are the only option. To avoid these limitations, different colloidal carriers (e.g. liposomes, micelles, microemulsions and dendrimers) have been proposed to improve biopharmaceuticals delivery. Liposomes are promising drug delivery systems, despite some limitations have been reported (e.g. in vivo failure, poor long-term stability and low transfection efficiency), and only a limited number of formulations have reached the market. Micelles and microemulsions require more studies to exclude some of the observed drawbacks and guarantee their potential for use in clinic. According to their peculiar structures, dendrimers have been showing good results for nucleic acids delivery and a great development of these systems during next years is expected. This is the Part II of two review articles, which provides the state of the art of biopharmaceuticals delivery systems. Part II deals with liposomes, micelles, microemulsions and dendrimers. PMID:26278524

  7. Delivery systems for biopharmaceuticals. Part II: Liposomes, Micelles, Microemulsions and Dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana C; Lopes, Carla M; Lobo, José M S; Amaral, Maria H

    2015-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are a generation of drugs that include peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and cell products. According to their particular molecular characteristics (e.g. high molecular size, susceptibility to enzymatic activity), these products present some limitations for administration and usually parenteral routes are the only option. To avoid these limitations, different colloidal carriers (e.g. liposomes, micelles, microemulsions and dendrimers) have been proposed to improve biopharmaceuticals delivery. Liposomes are promising drug delivery systems, despite some limitations have been reported (e.g. in vivo failure, poor long-term stability and low transfection efficiency), and only a limited number of formulations have reached the market. Micelles and microemulsions require more studies to exclude some of the observed drawbacks and guarantee their potential for use in clinic. According to their peculiar structures, dendrimers have been showing good results for nucleic acids delivery and a great development of these systems during next years is expected. This is the Part II of two review articles, which provides the state of the art of biopharmaceuticals delivery systems. Part II deals with liposomes, micelles, microemulsions and dendrimers.

  8. EL español andino. II parte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Arboleda Toro

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available En el número 13 de esta revista (nov. del 2000 se publicó una primera parte del estudio sobre el español andino. Presentamos ahora una segunda parte que comprende aspectos histórico-geográficos de Nariño y Putumayo andinos, región de Colombia donde se habla esa variedad, y una descripción general de su realidad lingüística. Esperamos que sean objeto de otra publicación la descripción de los rasgos dialectales del español andino, parte nuclear del trabajo, y la presentación de la metodología y el corpus. En esto nos encontramos trabajando. Incluimos no obstante un inventario de rasgos más amplio que el presentado en la primera parte. Pero por ahora se trata de eso, de un inventario ilustrativo, no del análisis en el que estamos empeñados, en el marco del contacto de lenguas, el cambio lingüístico y la relación entre la norma y las posibilidades del sistema. Para contextualizar esta segunda parte, incluimos, a manera de introducción, un resumen de la primera.

  9. Being prepared: bioterrorism and mass prophylaxis: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weant, Kyle A; Bailey, Abby M; Fleishaker, Elise L; Justice, Stephanie B

    2014-01-01

    Although several biological agents have been recognized as presenting a significant threat to public health if used in a bioterrorist attack, those that are of greatest importance are known as the Category A agents: Bacillus anthracis (anthrax); variola major (smallpox); Yersinia pestis (plague); Francisella tularensis (tularemia); ribonucleic acid viruses (hemorrhagic fevers); and Clostridium botulinum (botulism toxin). In the previous issue, Part I of this review focused on the clinical presentation and treatment of anthrax, plague, and tularemia. In this second part of this 2-part review of these agents, the focus is on the clinical presentation and treatment of smallpox, viral hemorrhagic fevers, and botulism toxin. The utilization of mass prophylaxis to limit the morbidity and mortality associated with all these agents is also discussed along with the role emergency care personnel play in its implementation.

  10. Optimization Model for Refinery Hydrogen Networks Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique E. Tarifa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this work, a model of optimization was presented that minimizes the consumption of the hydrogen of a refinery. In this second part, the model will be augmented to take into account the length of the pipelines, the addition of purification units and the installation of new compressors, all features of industrial real networks. The model developed was implemented in the LINGO software environment. For data input and results output, an Excel spreadsheet was developed that interfaces with LINGO. The model is currently being used in YPFLuján de Cuyo refinery (Mendoza, Argentina

  11. Biomedical research ethics: an Islamic view part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Raafat Y

    2007-12-01

    In part I of this article I discussed why Islam rejects secularization and this is not because the ethical principles embedded in Islam's teachings are archaic and out of touch with current realities. In addition, I pointed out the agreement between general broad principles of research ethics and Islamic teachings concerning life; which showed clearly that Islam has addressed the regulation of ethics in research more than 14 centuries ago. In this part, I will address two controversial issues concerning women's rights and age of consent for children as possible research subjects in a Muslim community.

  12. Karst geomorphology: From hydrological functioning to palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jo; Gutierrez, Francisco; Audra, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    In January 2015, the first part of the special issue on karst, entitled "Karst geomorphology: From hydrological functioning to palaeoenvironmental reconstructions" was published (Geomorphology, Vol. 229). This second part of the special issue comprises seven research papers covering a broad geographical canvas including Japan, Slovenia, France, Spain, Croatia, and Poland-Ukraine. Both issues mainly emanate from the contributions presented in the Karst session of the 8th International Conference of Geomorphology (International Association of Geomorphologists), held in Paris in August 2013, enriched with some invited papers.

  13. Endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II disrupts alveolar epithelial type II to type I cell transdifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distal alveolar morphogenesis is marked by differentiation of alveolar type (AT-II to AT-I cells that give rise to the primary site of gas exchange, the alveolar/vascular interface. Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide (EMAP II, an endogenous protein with anti-angiogenic properties, profoundly disrupts distal lung neovascularization and alveolar formation during lung morphogenesis, and is robustly expressed in the dysplastic alveolar regions of infants with Bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Determination as to whether EMAP II has a direct or indirect affect on ATII→ATI trans-differentiation has not been explored. Method In a controlled nonvascular environment, an in vitro model of ATII→ATI cell trans-differentiation was utilized to demonstrate the contribution that one vascular mediator has on distal epithelial cell differentiation. Results Here, we show that EMAP II significantly blocked ATII→ATI cell transdifferentiation by increasing cellular apoptosis and inhibiting expression of ATI markers. Moreover, EMAP II-treated ATII cells displayed myofibroblast characteristics, including elevated cellular proliferation, increased actin cytoskeleton stress fibers and Rho-GTPase activity, and increased nuclear:cytoplasmic volume. However, EMAP II-treated cells did not express the myofibroblast markers desmin or αSMA. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that EMAP II interferes with ATII → ATI transdifferentiation resulting in a proliferating non-myofibroblast cell. These data identify the transdifferentiating alveolar cell as a possible target for EMAP II's induction of alveolar dysplasia.

  14. Kids in Mental Institutions. Part II. Program 131.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    The second of a two-part radio program on children in mental institutions presents transcripts of interviews with psychiatrists and emotionally disturbed adolescents. Subjects addressed include use of drugs, behavior modification, music, and theatre therapy in institutions. The transcript concludes with a narrated tour of Sheppard-Pratt, an…

  15. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  16. Topics in Finance: Part II--Financial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Judy

    2010-01-01

    The second article in a series designed to supplement the introductory financial management course, this essay addresses financial statement analysis, including its impact on stock valuation, disclosure, and managerial behavior. [For "Topics in Finance Part I--Introduction and Stockholder Wealth Maximization," see EJ1060345.

  17. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 150 - Explanation of Figure 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Explanation of Figure 1 II Appendix II to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES... future expansion are groups 23 through 29 and those past 43. Reactive Groups contain products which...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix II to Part 805 - Employees Required To Submit Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employees Required To Submit Statements II Appendix II to Part 805 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL...—Employees Required To Submit Statements Statements of employment and financial interests are required of...

  19. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell......-like) as well as T cells producing both cytokines (THO-like) responded to class II mAb. The costimulatory effect was not restricted to IL-2-driven T cell growth, since TCR/CD3-induced T cell activation was also enhanced by HLA-DR mAb. Moreover, class II costimulation potentiated CD28-mAb-induced T cell...

  20. Design of multiphysics actuators using topology optimization - Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole

    2001-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-paper description of the topology optimization method applied to the design of multiphysics actuators and electrothermomechanical systems in particular. The first paper is focussed on one-material structures, the second on two-material structures. The extensions...... of the topology optimization method in this part include design descriptions for two-material structures, constitutive modelling of elements with mixtures of two materials, formulation of optimization problems with multiple constraints and multiple materials and a mesh-independency scheme for two......-material structures. The application in mind is the design of thermally and electro thermally driven micro actuators for use in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). MEMS are microscopic mechanical systems coupled with electrical circuits. MEMS are fabricated using techniques known from the semi-conductor industry...

  1. Achieving hemostasis in dermatology-Part II: Topical hemostatic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie B Glick

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding is a common occurrence during any dermatologic surgery that disrupts blood vessels. The complications of excess bleeding can include delayed wound healing, hematoma formation, infection, dehiscence, and necrosis. In part one of this review, we discussed the pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative management of patients undergoing dermatologic surgery. In Part two, we discuss traditional and new topical hemostatic agents used to achieve hemostasis in dermatological procedures and surgery. We will evaluate the caustic and non-caustic hemostatic agents as well as hemostatic dressings. The mechanisms of action, side effect profile, and advantages and disadvantages of the topical hemostatic agents are provided. Sources for this article were found searching the English literature in PubMed for the time period 1940 to March 2012. A thorough bibliography search was also performed and key references examined.

  2. DOBD Algorithm for Training Neural Network:Part II. Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建昱; 何小荣

    2002-01-01

    In the first part of the article, a new algorithm for pruning network?Dynamic Optimal Brain Damage(DOBD) is introduced. In this part, two cases and an industrial application are worked out to test the new algorithm. It is verified that the algorithm can obtain good generalization through deleting weight parameters with low sensitivities dynamically and get better result than the Marquardt algorithm or the cross-validation method. Although the initial construction of network may be different, the finial number of free weights pruned by the DOBD algorithm is similar and the number is just close to the optimal number of free weights. The algorithm is also helpful to design the optimal structure of network.

  3. Common ECG Lead Placement Errors. Part II: Precordial Misplacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison V. Rosen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electrocardiography is a very useful diagnostic tool. However, errors in placement of ECG leads can create artifacts, mimic pathologies, and hinder proper ECG interpretation. This is the second of a two-part series discussing how to recognize and avoid these errors. Methods: 12-lead ECGs were recorded in a single male healthy subject in his mid 20s. Various precordial lead misplacements were compared to ECG recordings from correct lead placement. Results: Precordial misplacements caused classical changes in ECG patterns. Techniques of differentiating these ECG patterns from true pathological findings were described. Conclusion: As in Part I of this series, recognition and interpretation of common ECG placement errors is critical in providing optimal patient care.

  4. Operation of industrial electrical substations. Part II: practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Jimenez, Juan J; Zerquera Izquierdo, Mariano D; Beltran Leon, Jose S; Garcia Martinez, Juan M; Alvarez Urena, Maria V; Meza Diaz, Guillermo [Universidad de Guadalajara (Mexico)]. E-mails: cheosj@yahoo.com; mdzi@hotmail.com; beltran5601@yahoo.com.mx; jmargarmtz@yahoo.com; victory_alvarez@telmexmail.com; depmec@cucei.udg.mx

    2013-03-15

    The practical application of the methodology explained in Part 1 in a Cuban industry is the principal objective of this paper. The calculus of the economical operation of the principal transformers of the industrial plant is shown of the one very easy form, as well as the determination of the equations of the losses when the transformers operate under a given load diagram. It is calculated the state load which will be passed to the operation in parallel. [Spanish] El objetivo principal de este trabajo es la aplicacion practica de la metodologia, en una industria cubana, que se explico en la Parte 1. El calculo de la operacion economica de los principales transformadores de la planta industrial se muestra de una forma muy facil, asi como la determinacion de las ecuaciones de las perdidas cuando los transformadores operan bajo un diagrama de carga dado. Se calcula la carga de estado que se pasa a la operacion en paralelo.

  5. Global thermohaline circulation. Part II: Sensitivity with interactive atmospheric transports

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.; Stone, P.; Marotzke, J.

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid coupled ocean-atmosphere model is used to investigate the stability of the thermohaline circulation (THC) to an increase in the surface freshwater forcing in the presence of interactive meridional transports in the atmosphere. The ocean component is the idealized global general circulation model used in Part I. The atmospheric model assumes fixed latitudinal structure of the heat and moisture transports, and the amplitudes are calculated separately for each hemisphere from the large-...

  6. Escapes in Hamiltonian systems with multiple exit channels: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the escape dynamics in open Hamiltonian systems with multiple channels of escape continuing the work initiated in Part I. A thorough numerical investigation is conducted distinguishing between trapped (ordered and chaotic) and escaping orbits. The determination of the location of the basins of escape towards the different escape channels and their correlations with the corresponding escape periods of the orbits is undoubtedly an issue of paramount importance. We consider four diffe...

  7. ABOUT ABRASION RESISTANCE OF FABRICS WITH STRATEGIC DESTINATION PART II

    OpenAIRE

    Adina Bucevschi; Alexandru Popa; Monica Pustianu; Erzsebet Airinei; Ionel Barbu

    2011-01-01

    This paper is part of a research agreement between "Aurel Vlaicu" University and The National Research - Development Institute for Textile and Leather, Bucharest, about the relationship of interdependence between the yarns' characteristics and fabric's characteristics for the installation of ventilation and heating pipesof the military helicopter[5]. Fabrics for strategic areas must have certain characteristics such resistance at high temperatures, breaking and tearing strength, shock resista...

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: part II

    OpenAIRE

    Biglands John D; Radjenovic Aleksandra; Ridgway John P

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This is the second of two reviews that is intended to cover the essential aspects of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) physics in a way that is understandable and relevant to clinicians using CMR in their daily practice. Starting with the basic pulse sequences and contrast mechanisms described in part I, it briefly discusses further approaches to accelerate image acquisition. It then continues by showing in detail how the contrast behaviour of black blood fast spin echo and bri...

  9. Neutron detection with imaging plates Part II. Detector characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Thoms, M

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the physical processes described in Neutron detection with imaging plates - part I: image storage and readout [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 424 (1999) 26-33] detector characteristics, such as quantum efficiency, detective quantum efficiency, sensitivity to neutron- and gamma-radiation, readout time and dynamic range are predicted. It is estimated that quantum efficiencies and detective quantum efficiencies close to 100% can be reached making these kind of detectors interesting for a wide range of applications.

  10. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, P S; Brabrand, K; Cantisani, V; Correas, J M; Cui, X W; D'Onofrio, M; Essig, M; Freeman, S; Gilja, O H; Gritzmann, N; Havre, R F; Ignee, A; Jenssen, C; Kabaalioğlu, A; Lorentzen, T; Mohaupt, M; Nicolau, C; Nolsøe, C P; Nürnberg, D; Radzina, M; Saftoiu, A; Serra, C; Spârchez, Z; Sporea, I; Dietrich, C F

    2015-12-01

    This is the second part of the series on interventional ultrasound guidelines of the Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB). It deals with the diagnostic interventional procedure. General points are discussed which are pertinent to all patients, followed by organ-specific imaging that will allow the correct pathway and planning for the interventional procedure. This will allow for the appropriate imaging workup for each individual interventional procedure (Long version). PMID:26669871

  11. Common ECG Lead Placement Errors. Part II: Precordial Misplacements

    OpenAIRE

    Allison V. Rosen; Sahil Koppikar; Catherine Shaw; Adrian Baranchuk

    2014-01-01

    Background: Electrocardiography is a very useful diagnostic tool. However, errors in placement of ECG leads can create artifacts, mimic pathologies, and hinder proper ECG interpretation. This is the second of a two-part series discussing how to recognize and avoid these errors. Methods: 12-lead ECGs were recorded in a single male healthy subject in his mid 20s. Various precordial lead misplacements were compared to ECG recordings from correct lead placement. Results: Precordial mispla...

  12. Variance analysis. Part II, The use of computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, S A

    1991-09-01

    This is the second in a two-part series on variance analysis. In the first article (JONA, July/August 1991), the author discussed flexible budgeting, including the calculation of price, quantity, volume, and acuity variances. In this second article, the author focuses on the use of computers by nurse managers to aid in the process of calculating, understanding, and justifying variances. PMID:1919788

  13. Prevention of Dealloying in Manganese Aluminium Bronze Propeller: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Napachat Tareelap; Kaysinee Sriraksasin; Nakorn Srisukhumbowornchai; Swieng Thuanboon; Choochat Nitipanyawong

    2014-01-01

    Due to the failure of manganese aluminium bronze (MAB) propeller caused by dealloying corrosion as described in Part I [1], this work aims to study the prevention of dealloying corrosion using aluminium and zinc sacrificial anodes. The results indicated that both of the sacrificial anodes could prevent the propeller from dealloying. Moreover, the dealloying in seawater was less than that found in brackish water. It was possible that hydroxide ions, from cathodic reaction, reacted with calcium...

  14. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoudi, Mehrdad [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  15. Two-World Background of Special Relativity. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekugbe A. O. J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-world background of the Special Theory of Relativity started in part one of this article is continued in this second part. Four-dimensional inversion is shown to be a special Lorentz transformation that transforms the positive spacetime coordinates of a frame of reference in the positive universe into the negative spacetime coordinates of the symmetry-partner frame of reference in the negative universe in the two-world picture, contrary to the conclusion that four-dimensional inversion is impossible as actual trans- formation of the coordinates of a frame of reference in the existing one-world picture. By starting with the negative spacetime dimensions in the negative universe derived in part one, the signs of mass and other physical parameters and physical constants in the negative universe are derived by application of the symmetry of laws between the pos- itive and negative universes. The invariance of natural laws in the negative universe is demonstrated. The derived negative sign of mass in the negative universe is a conclu- sion of over a century-old effort towards the development of the concept of negative mass in physics.

  16. A tutorial survey of topics in wireless networking: Part II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anurag Kumar; D Manjunath

    2007-12-01

    This is the second part of the survey of recent and emerging topics in wireless networking. We provide an overview of the area of wireless networking as that of dealing with problems of resource allocation so that the various connections that utilise the network achieve their desired performance objectives. In Part I we provided a taxonomy of wireless networks as they have been deployed. We then provided a quick survey of the main issues in the wireless 'physical' layer. We then discussed some resource allocation formulations in CDMA (code division multiple access) cellular networks and OFDMA (orthogonal frequency division multiple access) networks. In this part we begin with a discussion of random access wireless networks. We first provide an overview of the evolution of random access networks from Aloha to the currently popular 802·11 (Wi-Fi) networks. We then analyse the performance of the 802·11 random access protocol. We briefly discuss the problem of optimal association of nodes to Wi-Fi access points. Next, we consider topics in ad hoc multihop wireless networks. We first discuss topology and cross layer control. For the latter, we describe the important maximum weight link scheduling algorithm. The connectivity and capacity of randomly deployed networks are then analysed. Finally, we provide an overview of the technical issues in the emerging area of wireless sensor networks.

  17. Alveolar epithelial type II cells induce T cell tolerance to specific antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Bernice; Hansen, Søren; Evans, Kathy;

    2008-01-01

    The lungs face the immunologic challenge of rapidly eliminating inhaled pathogens while maintaining tolerance to innocuous Ags. A break in this immune homeostasis may result in pulmonary inflammatory diseases, such as allergies or asthma. The observation that alveolar epithelial type II cells (Type...... II) constitutively express the class II MHC led us to hypothesize that Type II cells play a role in the adaptive immune response. Because Type II cells do not express detectable levels of the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, we propose that Type II cells suppress activation of naive T cells...

  18. The Symmetric Group Defies Strong Fourier Sampling: Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Cristopher; Moore, Cristopher; Russell, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Part I of this paper showed that the hidden subgroup problem over the symmetric group--including the special case relevant to Graph Isomorphism--cannot be efficiently solved by strong Fourier sampling, even if one may perform an arbitrary POVM on the coset state. In this paper, we extend these results to entangled measurements. Specifically, we show that the hidden subgroup problem on the symmetric group cannot be solved by any POVM applied to pairs of cosets states. In particular, these hidden subgroups cannot be determined by any polynomial number of one- or two-register experiments on coset states.

  19. The museum maze in oral pathology demystifed: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Ganavi, Bs

    2013-09-01

    Museum technology is perpetually changing due to current requirements and added inventions for our comfort and furbished display of specimens. Hence numerous methods of specimen preservation have been put on trial by diverse people in the medical feld as are the inventions. But only few have caught people's interest and are popularized today. This part provides unique insights into specialized custom-made techniques, evolution of recent advances like plastination and virtual museum that have popularized as visual delights. Plastination gives handy, perennial life-like acrylic specimens, whereas virtual museum takes museum feld to the electronic era making use of computers and virtual environment.

  20. The museum maze in oral pathology demystifed: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Ganavi, Bs

    2013-01-01

    Museum technology is perpetually changing due to current requirements and added inventions for our comfort and furbished display of specimens. Hence numerous methods of specimen preservation have been put on trial by diverse people in the medical feld as are the inventions. But only few have caught people's interest and are popularized today. This part provides unique insights into specialized custom-made techniques, evolution of recent advances like plastination and virtual museum that have popularized as visual delights. Plastination gives handy, perennial life-like acrylic specimens, whereas virtual museum takes museum feld to the electronic era making use of computers and virtual environment. PMID:24685810

  1. Designing carbon markets, Part II: Carbon markets in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyses the design of carbon markets in space (i.e., geographically). It is part of a twin set of papers that, starting from first principles, ask what an optimal global carbon market would look like by around 2030. Our focus is on firm-level cap-and-trade systems, although much of what we say would also apply to government-level trading and carbon offset schemes. We examine the 'first principles' of spatial design to maximise flexibility and to minimise costs, including key design issues in linking national and regional carbon markets together to create a global carbon market.

  2. Tourette's syndrome, Part II: Contemporary approaches to assessment and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, L; Ort, S I; Hardin, M T

    1993-08-01

    Clinical assessment of a child with Tourette's syndrome (TS) includes a careful review of motor and phonic tics. In addition, commonly associated problems of such as obsessive-compulsive symptoms, or symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (inattention, impulsiveness, and overactivity) should also be evaluated. Treatment almost always includes education of the child, family, and school personnel concerning the natural history and behavioral boundaries of the disorder. Other treatment interventions depend to a great extent on the primary source of impairment. This article, the second of two parts, presents three illustrative cases and reviews current treatment interventions for children and adolescents with TS.

  3. Prevention of Dealloying in Manganese Aluminium Bronze Propeller: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napachat Tareelap

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the failure of manganese aluminium bronze (MAB propeller caused by dealloying corrosion as described in Part I [1], this work aims to study the prevention of dealloying corrosion using aluminium and zinc sacrificial anodes. The results indicated that both of the sacrificial anodes could prevent the propeller from dealloying. Moreover, the dealloying in seawater was less than that found in brackish water. It was possible that hydroxide ions, from cathodic reaction, reacted with calcium in seawater to form calcium carbonate film protecting the propeller from corrosion.

  4. Positivity-preserving cell-centered Lagrangian schemes for multi-material compressible flows: From first-order to high-orders. Part II: The two-dimensional case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, François; Shu, Chi-Wang; Maire, Pierre-Henri

    2016-05-01

    This paper is the second part of a series of two. It follows [44], in which the positivity-preservation property of methods solving one-dimensional Lagrangian gas dynamics equations, from first-order to high-orders of accuracy, was addressed. This article aims at extending this analysis to the two-dimensional case. This study is performed on a general first-order cell-centered finite volume formulation based on polygonal meshes defined either by straight line edges, conical edges, or any high-order curvilinear edges. Such formulation covers the numerical methods introduced in [6,32,5,41,43]. This positivity study is then extended to high-orders of accuracy. Through this new procedure, scheme robustness is highly improved and hence new problems can be tackled. Numerical results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of these methods. It is important to point out that even if this paper is concerned with purely Lagrangian schemes, the theory developed is of fundamental importance for any methods relying on a purely Lagrangian step, as ALE methods or non-direct Euler schemes.

  5. The year's new drugs & biologics 2014 - Part II: trends & challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul, A I; Serebrov, M; Cruces, E; Tracy, M; Dulsat, C

    2015-02-01

    2014 was a year of continued high activity in the pharma and biotech industry, as evidenced in part I of this annual two-part review article published last month in this journal (1). As of December 23, 2014, a total of 55 new chemical and biological entities had reached their first markets worldwide, together with another 29 important new line extensions. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by December 23. Furthermore, during the now-traditional year-end sprint, several regulatory agencies issued last-minute approvals for other compounds that missed the deadline for inclusion in that article, bringing the total of new approvals for the year to a somewhat higher number. In addition to the successful development, registration and launch of new drugs and biologics, there are various other trends and tendencies that serve as indicators of the overall health and status of the industry. These include the pursuit of novel programs designed by regulators to stimulate the development of drugs for diseases that are currently under-treated; the regular and pragmatic culling by companies of their R&D pipelines; and the decision to unify pipelines, portfolios and sales forces through mergers and acquisitions. PMID:25756068

  6. Two-World Background of Special Relativity. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekugbe A. O. J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-world background of the Special Theory of Relativity started in part one of this article is continued in this secondpart. Four-dimensional inversion is shown to be a special Lorentz transformation that transforms the positive spacetime coordinates of a frame of reference in the positive universe into the negative spacetime coordinates of the symmetry-partner frame of reference in the negative universe in the two-world picture, contrary to the conclusion that four-dimensional inversion is impossible as actual transformation of the coordinates of a frame of reference in the existing one-world picture. By starting with the negative spacetime dimensions in the negative universe derived in part one, the signs of mass and other physical parameters and physical constants in the negative universe are derived by application of the symmetry of laws between the positive and negative universes. The invariance of natural laws in the negative universe is demonstrated. The derived negative sign of mass in the negative universe is a conclusion of over a century-old effort towards the development of the concept of negative mass in physics.

  7. Morphological changes of V-79 cells after equinatoxin II treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, U; Jezernik, K

    1992-02-01

    Morphological observations on the V-79-379 A cells after treatment with equinatoxin II (EqT II), isolated from the sea anemone Actina equina L., and fetal calf serum (FCS) treated toxin were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that the cells incubated with FCS treated EqT II were almost ultrastructurally unaltered. When the cells were treated with low concentrations of EqT II alone cell ultrastructure was altered with the evidence of numerous blebs and decreased microvilli number on the cell surface and appearance of numerous vesicles in the Golgi regions. High concentrations of EqT II caused disintegration of plasmalemma and intracellular membranes as well as degradation of cytosol. PMID:1348018

  8. Ultrasensitivity part II: multisite phosphorylation, stoichiometric inhibitors, and positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, James E; Ha, Sang Hoon

    2014-11-01

    In this series of reviews, we are examining ultrasensitive responses, the switch-like input-output relationships that contribute to signal processing in a wide variety of signaling contexts. In the first part of this series, we explored one mechanism for generating ultrasensitivity, zero-order ultrasensitivity, where the saturation of two converting enzymes allows the output to switch from low to high over a tight range of input levels. In this second installment, we focus on three conceptually distinct mechanisms for ultrasensitivity: multisite phosphorylation, stoichiometric inhibitors, and positive feedback. We also examine several related mechanisms and concepts, including cooperativity, reciprocal regulation, coherent feed-forward regulation, and substrate competition, and provide several examples of signaling processes where these mechanisms are known or are suspected to be applicable. PMID:25440716

  9. Responsive Persistence Part II. Practices of Postmodern Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Olga; Dienhart, Anna; Turner, Jean

    2013-10-01

    This article, a companion to Part I of this series of articles, discusses how therapists informed by social constructionist and postmodern ideas enact persistence in their work with families. Transcripts and video-recordings of therapy interaction facilitated by selected major champions for three postmodern (collaborative) therapies: Michael White (narrative therapy), Harlene Anderson (collaborative language systems approach), and Bill O'Hanlon (solution-oriented therapy) were examined for persistence practices. The article offers a range of possible ways in which postmodern therapists may enact their influence in facilitating generative and helpful conversations with families and remain responsive to clients' preferences and understandings. Implications for family therapy practice, training, and supervision are discussed. PMID:25800424

  10. Planar LTCC transformers for high voltage flyback converters: Part II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schofield, Daryl (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD); Schare, Joshua M., Ph.D.; Slama, George (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD); Abel, David (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD)

    2009-02-01

    This paper is a continuation of the work presented in SAND2007-2591 'Planar LTCC Transformers for High Voltage Flyback Converters'. The designs in that SAND report were all based on a ferrite tape/dielectric paste system originally developed by NASCENTechnoloy, Inc, who collaborated in the design and manufacturing of the planar LTCC flyback converters. The output/volume requirements were targeted to DoD application for hard target/mini fuzing at around 1500 V for reasonable primary peak currents. High voltages could be obtained but with considerable higher current. Work had begun on higher voltage systems and is where this report begins. Limits in material properties and processing capabilities show that the state-of-the-art has limited our practical output voltage from such a small part volume. In other words, the technology is currently limited within the allowable funding and interest.

  11. Gas dynamics of a supersonic radial jet. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosarev, V. F.; Klinkov, S. V.; Zaikovskii, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents the radial distributions of the pressure measured with a Pitot tube for the case of a radial jet with/without swirling of the input flow in the pre-chamber; the length of the supersonic part of the jet, dependency of the jet thickness as a function of the distance from the nozzle outlet, and approximating analytical formula for the jet thickness that generalizes the experimental data. Experimental data demonstrated that at the deposition distances lower than 4-6 gauges from the nozzle outlet, the solid particle velocity and temperature are almost uniform over the jet cross section. This means that the target surface can be allocated here without loss in coating quality and deposition coefficient. The maximal recommended distance where the deposition is still possible is the length of l s0 ~ 16 gauges.

  12. Fundamental Limits of Wideband Localization - Part II: Cooperative Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yuan; Win, Moe Z

    2010-01-01

    The availability of positional information is of great importance in many commercial, governmental, and military applications. Localization is commonly accomplished through the use of radio communication between mobile devices (agents) and fixed infrastructure (anchors). However, precise determination of agent positions is a challenging task, especially in harsh environments due to radio blockage or limited anchor deployment. In these situations, cooperation among agents can significantly improve localization accuracy and reduce localization outage probabilities. A general framework of analyzing the fundamental limits of wideband localization has been developed in Part I of the paper. Here, we build on this framework and establish the fundamental limits of wideband cooperative location-aware networks. Our analysis is based on the waveforms received at the nodes, in conjunction with Fisher information inequality. We provide a geometrical interpretation of equivalent Fisher information for cooperative networks....

  13. Cosmology In Terms Of The Deceleration Parameter. Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Bolotin, Yu L; Lemets, O A; Yerokhin, D A; Zazunov, L G

    2015-01-01

    In the early seventies, Alan Sandage defined cosmology as the search for two numbers: Hubble parameter ${{H}_{0}}$ and deceleration parameter ${{q}_{0}}$. The first of the two basic cosmological parameters (the Hubble parameter) describes the linear part of the time dependence of the scale factor. Treating the Universe as a dynamical system it is natural to assume that it is non-linear: indeed, linearity is nothing more than approximation, while non-linearity represents the generic case. It is evident that future models of the Universe must take into account different aspects of its evolution. As soon as the scale factor is the only dynamical variable, the quantities which determine its time dependence must be essentially present in all aspects of the Universe' evolution. Basic characteristics of the cosmological evolution, both static and dynamical, can be expressed in terms of the parameters ${{H}_{0}}$ and ${{q}_{0}}$. The very parameters (and higher time derivatives of the scale factor) enable us to const...

  14. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted. PMID:27679727

  15. Stochastic dynamics of Arctic sea ice Part II: Multiplicative noise

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Woosok

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the numerical solutions of a stochastic Arctic sea ice model with multiplicative noise over a wide range of external heat-fluxes, $\\Delta F_0$, which correspond to greenhouse gas forcing. When the noise is multiplicative, the noise-magnitude depends on the state-variable, and this will influence the statistical moments in a manner that differs from the additive case, which we analyzed in Part I of this study. The state variable describing the deterministic backbone of our model is the energy, $E(t)$, contained in the ice or the ocean and for a thorough comparison and contrast we choose the simplest form of multiplicative noise $\\sigma E(t) \\xi(t)$, where $\\sigma$ is the noise amplitude and $\\xi(t)$ is the noise process. The case of constant additive noise (CA) we write as $\\sigma\\overline{E_S}\\xi(t)$, in which $\\overline{E_S}$ is the seasonally averaged value of the periodic deterministic steady-state solution $E_S(t)$, or the deterministic seasonal cycle. We then treat the case of seasonally-varyi...

  16. Oral health in Brazil - Part II: Dental Specialty Centers (CEOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Pedrazzi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of health promotion, self-care and community participation emerged during the 1970s and, since then, their application has grown rapidly in the developed world, showing evidence of effectiveness. In spite of this, a major part of the population in the developing countries still has no access to specialized dental care such as endodontic treatment, dental care for patients with special needs, minor oral surgery, periodontal treatment and oral diagnosis. This review focuses on a program of the Brazilian Federal Government named CEOs (Dental Specialty Centers, which is an attempt to solve the dental care deficit of a population that is suffering from oral diseases and whose oral health care needs have not been addressed by the regular programs offered by the SUS (Unified National Health System. Literature published from 2000 to the present day, using electronic searches by Medline, Scielo, Google and hand-searching was considered. The descriptors used were Brazil, Oral health, Health policy, Health programs, and Dental Specialty Centers. There are currently 640 CEOs in Brazil, distributed in 545 municipal districts, carrying out dental procedures with major complexity. Based on this data, it was possible to conclude that public actions on oral health must involve both preventive and curative procedures aiming to minimize the oral health distortions still prevailing in developing countries like Brazil.

  17. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted.

  18. Polymers Based on Renewable Raw Materials – Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović, S.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A short review of biopolymers based on starch (starch derivatives, thermoplastic starch, lignin and hemicelluloses, chitin (chitosan and products obtained by degradation of starch and other polysaccharides and sugars (poly(lactic acid, poly(hydroxyalkanoates, as well as some of their basic properties and application area, are given in this part. The problem of environmental and economic feasibility of biopolymers based on renewable raw materials and their competitiveness with polymers based on fossil raw materials is discussed. Also pointed out are the problems that appear due to the increasing use of agricultural land for the production of raw materials for the chemical industry and energy, instead for the production of food for humans and animals. The optimistic assessments of experts considering the development perspectives of biopolymers based on renewable raw materials in the next ten years have also been pointed out.At the end of the paper, the success of a team of researchers gathered around the experts from the company Bayer is indicated. They were the first in the world to develop a catalyst by which they managed to effectively activate CO - and incorporate it into polyols, used for the synthesis of polyurethanes in semi-industrial scale. By applying this process, for the first time a pollutant will be used as a basic raw material for the synthesis of organic compounds, which will have significant consequences on the development of the chemical industry, and therefore the production of polymers.

  19. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted. PMID:27679727

  20. Medicine at the crossroads. Part II. Summary of completed project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Medicine at the crossroads (a.k.a. The Future of Medicine) is an 8-part series of one-hour documentaries which examines the scientific and social forces that have shaped the practice of medicine around the world. The series was developed and produced over a five-year period and in eleven countries. Among the major issues examined in the series are the education of medical practitioners and the communication of medical issues. The series also considers the dilemmas of modern medicine, including the treatment of the elderly and the dying, the myth of the quick fix in the face of chronic and incurable diseases such as HIV, and the far-reaching implications of genetic treatments. Finally, the series examines the global progress made in medical research and application, as well as the questions remaining to be answered. These include not only scientific treatment, but accessibility and other critical topics affecting the overall success of medical advances. Medicine at the crossroads is a co-production of Thirteen/WNET and BBC-TV in association with Television Espafiola SA (RTVE) and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Stefan Moore of Thirteen/WNET and Martin Freeth of BBC-TV are series producers. George Page is executive in charge of medicine at the crossroads. A list of scholarly advisors and a program synopses is attached.

  1. Overactive bladder – 18 years – Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G.; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell’Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, José Antonio; Castaño, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; López, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics – pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy – started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning – as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder – 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder. PMID:27176185

  2. Global Thermohaline Circulation. Part II: Sensitivity with Interactive Atmospheric Transports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Stone, Peter H.; Marotzke, Jochem

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid coupled ocean-atmosphere model is used to investigate the stability of the thermohaline circulation (THC) to an increase in the surface freshwater forcing in the presence of interactive meridional transports in the atmosphere. The ocean component is the idealized global general circulation model used in Part I. The atmospheric model assumes fixed latitudinal structure of the heat and moisture transports, and the amplitudes are calculated separately for each hemisphere from the large-scale sea surface temperature (SST) and SST gradient, using parameterizations based on baroclinic stability theory. The ocean-atmosphere heat and freshwater exchanges are calculated as residuals of the steady-state atmospheric budgets.Owing to the ocean component's weak heat transport, the model has too strong a meridional SST gradient when driven with observed atmospheric meridional transports. When the latter are made interactive, the conveyor belt circulation collapses. A flux adjustment is introduced in which the efficiency of the atmospheric transports is lowered to match the too low efficiency of the ocean component.The feedbacks between the THC and both the atmospheric heat and moisture transports are positive, whether atmospheric transports are interactive in the Northern Hemisphere, the Southern Hemisphere, or both. However, the feedbacks operate differently in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, because the Pacific THC dominates in the Southern Hemisphere, and deep water formation in the two hemispheres is negatively correlated. The feedbacks in the two hemispheres do not necessarily reinforce each other because they have opposite effects on low-latitude temperatures. The model is qualitatively similar in stability to one with conventional `additive' flux adjustment, but quantitatively more stable.

  3. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Joshua A.; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  4. Cell Stress Induces Upregulation of Osteopontin via the ERK Pathway in Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aki Kato; Takafumi Okura; Chizuru Hamada; Seigo Miyoshi; Hitoshi Katayama; Jitsuo Higaki; Ryoji Ito

    2014-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multifunctional protein that plays important roles in cell growth, differentiation, migration and tissue fibrosis. In human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and murine bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis, OPN is upregulated in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II). However, the mechanism of OPN induction in AEC II is not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate the molecular mechanism of OPN induction in AEC II and elucidate the functions of OPN in AEC II and lung ...

  5. Prediction of periventricular leukomalacia. Part II: Selection of hemodynamic features using computational intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Samanta; G.L. Bird; M. Kuijpers; R.A. Zimmerman; G.P. Jarvik; G. Wernovsky; R.R. Clancy; D.J. Licht; J.W. Gaynor; C. Nataraj

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of Part II is to analyze the dataset of extracted hemodynamic features (Case 3 of Part I) through computational intelligence (CI) techniques for identification of potential prognostic factors for periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) occurrence in neonates with congenital heart

  6. 48 CFR 1436.270-3 - Part II-Contract clauses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Part II-Contract clauses... Construction 1436.270-3 Part II—Contract clauses. For Section I, Contract clause, include any clauses required by law or by the FAR (including subpart 36.5), the DIAR (including subpart 1436.5), and...

  7. Charting the Course for a Nursing Online Journal Club: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonan, Marilyn; Bukoye, Bola; Clapp, Alison; Shermont, Herminia; O'Sullivan Oliveira, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    In a pediatric inpatient setting, an interdisciplinary team designed and implemented an online journal club to discuss current nursing trends and research, as well as to foster evidence-based practice. This article is Part II of a two-part series in which the implementation process is described. PMID:26790492

  8. Eponyms related to genetic disorders associated with gingival enlargement; part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Mohammed Al-Aboud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are genetic disorders associated with gingival enlargement. In our part I, we reviewed the eponyms linked to Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis (HGF [1]. Historical Article How to cite this article: Al Aboud A, Al-Aboud NM, Barnawi H, Al Hakami A. Eponyms related to genetic disorders associated with gingival enlargement: Part II. Our Dermatol Online. 2015;6(1:114-117. Submission: 27.05.2013; Acceptance: 21.09.2014 DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20151.32 In this part II of this review, we are going to shed some light on eponyms linked to groups of genetic disorders which may feature gingival enlargement.

  9. Eponyms related to genetic disorders associated with gingival enlargement; part II

    OpenAIRE

    Nora Mohammed Al-Aboud; Hanan Barnawi; Ahlam Al Hakami

    2015-01-01

    There are genetic disorders associated with gingival enlargement. In our part I, we reviewed the eponyms linked to Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis (HGF) [1]. Historical Article How to cite this article: Al Aboud A, Al-Aboud NM, Barnawi H, Al Hakami A. Eponyms related to genetic disorders associated with gingival enlargement: Part II. Our Dermatol Online. 2015;6(1):114-117. Submission: 27.05.2013; Acceptance: 21.09.2014 DOI: 10.7241/ourd.20151.32 In this part II of thi...

  10. Addressing future challenges for cancer services: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jane; Radford, Gina

    2016-02-01

    Jane Maher & Gina Radford speak to Gemma Westcott, Commissioning Editor Jane Maher has been Macmillan's Chief Medical Officer since 1999 and now shares the role as Joint Chief Medical Officer with general practitioner Rosie Loftus, reflecting the growing need for specialists and generalists to work more effectively together. She has been an National Health Service (NHS) improvement clinical leader for over 10 years and is a Consultant Clinical Oncologist at Mount Vernon Cancer Centre and Hillingdon Hospital where she has worked for more than 20 years, during which she helped develop nonsurgical oncology services in five district general hospitals. She is a senior Clinical Lecturer at University College London and Visiting Professor in Cancer and Supportive Care at the Centre for Complexity Management at the University of Hertfordshire. Jane chaired the Maher Committee for the Department of Health in 1995, led the UK National Audit of Late Effects Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) in 2000 and, most recently, chaired the National Cancer Survivorship Initiative Consequences of Treatment work stream. She co-founded one of the first Cancer Support and Information services in the UK, winning the Nye Bevan award in 1992 and there are now more than 60 units based on this model. She is a member of the Older People and Cancer Clinical Advisory Group. She has written more than 100 published articles and is a UK representative for cancer survivorship in Europe and advises on cancer survivorship programs in Denmark and Canada. Gina Radford is Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, a post she took up in January 2015. Prior to that, she has held a number of roles in public health, at local and regional level. Most recently she was Centre Director for Anglia and Essex for Public Health England, and as a part of that role helped lead nationally on the public health response to Ebola. She was until very recently Chair of one of the NICE public health

  11. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglands, John D; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Ridgway, John P

    2012-09-20

    This is the second of two reviews that is intended to cover the essential aspects of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) physics in a way that is understandable and relevant to clinicians using CMR in their daily practice. Starting with the basic pulse sequences and contrast mechanisms described in part I, it briefly discusses further approaches to accelerate image acquisition. It then continues by showing in detail how the contrast behaviour of black blood fast spin echo and bright blood cine gradient echo techniques can be modified by adding rf preparation pulses to derive a number of more specialised pulse sequences. The simplest examples described include T2-weighted oedema imaging, fat suppression and myocardial tagging cine pulse sequences. Two further important derivatives of the gradient echo pulse sequence, obtained by adding preparation pulses, are used in combination with the administration of a gadolinium-based contrast agent for myocardial perfusion imaging and the assessment of myocardial tissue viability using a late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) technique. These two imaging techniques are discussed in more detail, outlining the basic principles of each pulse sequence, the practical steps required to achieve the best results in a clinical setting and, in the case of perfusion, explaining some of the factors that influence current approaches to perfusion image analysis. The key principles of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) are also explained in detail, especially focusing on timing of the acquisition following contrast agent bolus administration, and current approaches to achieving time resolved MRA. Alternative MRA techniques that do not require the use of an endogenous contrast agent are summarised, and the specialised pulse sequence used to image the coronary arteries, using respiratory navigator gating, is described in detail. The article concludes by explaining the principle behind phase contrast imaging techniques

  12. Master plan Modoc National Wildlife Refuge [ Part I and Part II

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Master Plan, consisting of three parts, is designed to accomplish sound and orderly development of Modoc Refuge and provides for a continuing program of...

  13. Characterization of cloned cells from an immortalized fetal pulmonary type II cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, R.F.; Waide, J.J.; Lechner, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    A cultured cell line that maintained expression of pulmonary type II cell markers of differentiation would be advantageous to generate a large number of homogenous cells in which to study the biochemical functions of type II cells. Type II epithelial cells are the source of pulmonary surfactant and a cell of origin for pulmonary adenomas. Last year our laboratory reported the induction of expression of two phenotypic markers of pulmonary type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and surfactant lipid synthesis) in cultured fetal rat lung epithelial (FRLE) cells, a spontaneously immortalized cell line of fetal rat lung type II cell origin. Subsequently, the induction of the ability to synthesize surfactant lipid became difficult to repeat. We hypothesized that the cell line was heterogenuous and some cells were more like type II cells than others. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis and to obtain a cultured cell line with type II cell phenotypic markers by cloning several FRLE cells and characterizing them for phenotypic markers of type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and presence of surfactant lipids). Thirty cloned cell lines were analyzed for induced alkaline phosphatase activity (on x-axis) and for percent of phospholipids that were disaturated (i.e., surfactant).

  14. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part II: Thermal modeling and analysis of experimental observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Justin S G; Solanki, Prem K; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    This study aims at developing thermal analysis tools and explaining experimental observations made by means of polarized-light cryomacroscopy (Part I). Thermal modeling is based on finite elements analysis (FEA), where two model parameters are extracted from thermal measurements: (i) the overall heat transfer coefficient between the cuvette and the cooling chamber, and (ii) the effective thermal conductivity within the cryoprotective agent (CPA) at the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range. The effective thermal conductivity takes into account enhanced heat transfer due to convection currents within the CPA, creating the so-called Bénard cells. Comparison of experimental results with simulation data indicates that the uncertainty in simulations due to the propagation of uncertainty in measured physical properties exceeds the uncertainty in experimental measurements, which validates the modeling approach. It is shown in this study that while a cavity may form in the upper-center portion of the vitrified CPA, it has very little effect on estimating the temperature distribution within the domain. This cavity is driven by thermal contraction of the CPA, with the upper-center of the domain transitioning to glass last. Finally, it is demonstrated in this study that additional stresses may develop within the glass transition temperature range due to nonlinear behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient. This effect is reported here for the first time in the context of cryobiology, using the capabilities of polarized-light cryomacroscopy.

  15. Interactions between DNA and gemini surfactant: impact on gene therapy: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Taksim; Kamel, Amany O; Wettig, Shawn D

    2016-02-01

    Nonviral gene delivery, provides distinct treatment modalities for the inherited and acquired diseases, relies upon the encapsulation of a gene of interest, which is then ideally delivered to the target cells. Variations in the chemical structure of gemini surfactants and subsequent physicochemical characteristics of the gemini-based lipoplexes and their impact on efficient gene transfection were assessed in part I, which was published in first March 2016 issue of Nanomedicine (1103). In order to design an efficient vector using gemini surfactants, the interaction of the surfactant with DNA and other components of the delivery system must be characterized, and more critically, well understood. Such studies will help to understand how nonviral transfection complexes, in general, overcome various cellular barriers. The Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer studies, atomic force microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, isothermal titration calorimetry, small-angle x-ray scattering, are extensively used to evaluate the interaction behavior of gemini surfactants with DNA and other vector components. Part II of this review focuses on the use of these unique techniques to understand their interaction with DNA. PMID:26784450

  16. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  17. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part II. Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography (SXRT) has been applied to the study of defects within three-dimensional printed titanium parts. These parts were made using the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V) as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The samples represent a selection of complex shapes with a variety of internal morphologies. Inspection via SXRT has revealed a number of defects which may not otherwise have been seen. The location and nature of such defects combined with detailed knowledge of the process conditions can contribute to understanding the interplay between design and manufacturing strategy. This fundamental understanding may subsequently be incorporated into process modelling, prediction of properties and the development of robust methodologies for the production of defect-free parts. PMID:27359151

  18. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. II Appendix II to Part 266—Tier I Feed Rate.../hr) Rural (g/hr) Complex Terrain (g/hr) 4 8.2E+01 4.2E+01 1.9E+01 6 9.1E+01 4.8E+01 2.8E+01 8...

  19. Immunobiology of natural killer cells. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volume include: In vivo activities of NK cells against primary and metastatic tumors in experimental animals; involvement of NK cells in human malignant disease; impaired NK cell profile in leukemia patients; in vivo modulation of NK activity in cancer patients; implications of aberrant NK cell activity in nonmalignant, chronic diseases; NK cell role in regulation of the growth and functions of hemopoietic and lymphoid cells; NK cells active against viral, bacterial, protozoan, and fungal infections; cytokine secretion and noncytotoxic functions of human large granular lymphocytes; augmentation of NK activity; regulation of NK cell activity by suppressor cells; NK cell cloning technology and characteristics of NK cell clones; comparison of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and NK activity, and index.

  20. Activation of Type II Cells into Regenerative Stem Cell Antigen-1+ Cells during Alveolar Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Varsha Suresh; Zhang, Wei; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B.

    2015-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium is composed of two cell types: type I cells comprise 95% of the gas exchange surface area, whereas type II cells secrete surfactant, while retaining the ability to convert into type I cells to induce alveolar repair. Using lineage-tracing analyses in the mouse model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced lung injury, we identified a population of stem cell antigen (Sca)-1–expressing type II cells with progenitor cell properties that mediate alveolar repair. These cells were shown to be distinct from previously reported Sca-1–expressing bronchioalveolar stem cells. Microarray and Wnt reporter studies showed that surfactant protein (Sp)-C+Sca-1+ cells expressed Wnt signaling pathway genes, and inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling prevented the regenerative function of Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells in vitro. Thus, P. aeruginosa–mediated lung injury induces the generation of a Sca-1+ subset of type II cells. The progenitor phenotype of the Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells that mediates alveolar epithelial repair might involve Wnt signaling. PMID:25474582

  1. Uptake of palmitic acid by rabbit alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alveolar type II cells require a source of palmitic acid for synthesis of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a major constituent of pulmonary surfactant. Previous studies indicated that maximal rates of DPPC synthesis are achieved only if exogenous palmitate is available to the type II cell. Little is known of the mechanisms by which fatty acids enter type II cells. To determine if uptake is mediated by a membrane carrier system, as described in other cell types, we examined the kinetics of palmitate uptake. Using freshly isolated rabbit type II cells, we demonstrated that radiolabeled palmitate uptake was maximal and linear for 45 s; after 1 min the apparent rate of uptake declined. The initial uptake phase was taken as a measure of cellular fatty acid influx because intracellular radiolabeled palmitate remained 80% nonesterified at this time but was 55% esterified by 2 min. Cellular influx of palmitate showed saturation kinetics with increasing concentration of nonalbumin bound palmitate. Michaelis constant was 52.6 nM, and maximum velocity was 152 pmol.10(6) cells-1.min-1. The hypothesis that saturable cellular influx of palmitate is likely linked to the previously identified membrane fatty acid binding protein (MFABP) was supported by Western-blot analysis of rat lung tissue with an antibody to MFABP that demonstrated the presence of this carrier protein in lung tissue. These data suggest that palmitate uptake by type II cells is saturable and may be mediated by a membrane-associated carrier as described in other cell types

  2. Glutathione synthesis and homeostasis in isolated type II alveolar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After isolation of Type II cells from neonatal rat lung, the glutathione (GSH) levels in these cells were greatly depressed. The total glutathione content could be increased 5-fold within 12-24 h by incubating the cells in media containing sulfur amino acids. Similarly, the activity of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase was low immediately after isolation, but was increased 2-fold during the first 24 h culture. Addition of either GSH or GSSG to the culture media increased the GSH content of Type II cells 2-2.5-fold. Buthionine sulfoximine and NaF prevented this replenishment of GSH during 24 h culture. When the rates of de novo synthesis of GSH and GSSG from 35S-cysteine were measured, the amounts of newly formed GSH decreased to 80% in the presence of GSH or GSSG. This suggests that exogenous GSH/GSSG can be taken up by the Type II cells to replenish the intracellular pool of GSH. Methionine was not as effective as cysteine in the synthesis of GSH. These results suggest that GSH levels in the isolated Type II cell can be maintained by de novo synthesis or uptake of exogenous GSH. Most of the GSH synthesized from cysteine, however, was excreted into the media of the cultured cells indicative of a potential role for the type II cell in export of the non-protein thiol

  3. Understanding Medicines: Conceptual Analysis of Nurses' Needs for Knowledge and Understanding of Pharmacology (Part I). Understanding Medicines: Extending Pharmacology Education for Dependent and Independent Prescribing (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathard, Helen L.

    2001-01-01

    Part I reviews what nurses need to know about the administration and prescription of medicines. Part II addresses drug classifications, actions and effects, and interactions. Also discussed are the challenges pharmacological issues pose for nursing education. (SK)

  4. On second order effects in a glavanic cell : Part II. A unified treatment of the theoretical principles of the second order techniques for the study of electrode processes and for electrochemical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluyters-Rehbach, M.; Struys, J.; Sluyters, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    A general formalism is developed for the theory of the second order contribution to the non-linear behaviour of an electrochemical cell. The derivations result into a set of linear relationships for both the faradaic process and the double-layer charging process, which can be combined to deduce the

  5. Microbiofuel cell powered by glucose/O-2 based on electrodeposition of enzyme, conducting polymer and redox mediators. Part II : Influence of the electropolymerized monomer on the output power density and stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammam, Malika; Fransaer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of nature of the electropolymerized monomer on the resulting power output and stability of a glucose/O-2 powered biofuel cells (BFCs). The bioanode was prepared from a mixture of glucose oxidase-polymeric monomer-ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate-pyrroloqui

  6. Workshop II: Nanotechnology and Advanced Cell Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Workshop focused on few emerging concepts(beyond tandem cells): 1. Engineering incident sun spectrum and transparency losses a) Nano emitters (dot concentrator); b) Surface plasmonics; c) Up converters; d) Down converter. 2. Intermediate band solar cells a) Efficiency projections (detail energy balance projections); b) Inserting 0,1 and 2D semiconductor structures in solar cells 3. Polymer and hybrid cells a) Nanotubes/dot polymers; b) Exciton dissociation.

  7. Alveolar epithelial type II cell: defender of the alveolus revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Fehrenbach Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Abstract In 1977, Mason and Williams developed the concept of the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cell as a defender of the alveolus. It is well known that AE2 cells synthesise, secrete, and recycle all components of the surfactant that regulates alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. AE2 cells influence extracellular surfactant transformation by regulating, for example, pH and [Ca2+] of the hypophase. AE2 cells play various roles in alveolar fluid balance, coagulation/fibrinolysis, a...

  8. Starting a hospital-based home health agency: Part II--Key success factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, P

    1993-09-01

    In Part II of a three-part series, the financial, technological and legislative issues of a hospital-based home health-agency are discussed. Beginning a home healthcare service requires intensive research to answer key environmental and operational questions--need, competition, financial projections, initial start-up costs and the impact of delayed depreciation. Assessments involving technology, staffing, legislative and regulatory issues can help project service volume, productivity and cost-control.

  9. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

  10. Student Performance on the NBME Part II Subtest and Subject Examination in Obstetrics-Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metheny, William P.; Holzman, Gerald B.

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of the scores of 342 third-year medical students on the National Board of Medical Examiners subject examination and the Part II subtest on obstetrics-gynecology found significantly better performance on the former, suggesting a need to interpret the scores differently. (Author/MSE)

  11. Synthesis and cytotoxic effect on RD cell line of Pd(II and Cu(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahasin Alias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of Cr(III, Cd(II, Ni(II, Pd(II and Cu(II with new ligand sodium [5-(p-nitro phenyl-/4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-dithiocarbamato hydrazide] (TRZ.DTC have been prepared and characterized in solid state by using flame atomic absorption, elemental analysis C.H.N.S, FT-IR, UV–vis spectrophotometry, thermal analysis TGA, conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The ratio of M:L and logK was determined by molar ratio method. From the spectral studies, an octahedral monomer structure was proposed for all complexes except copper(II which has a dimeric structure. Cadmium(II has tetrahedral geometry. Structural geometries of these compounds were also suggested in gas phase by using hyper chem-8 program. The heat of formation, binding energy, and dipole moment were calculated by PM3 and ZINDO/1 methods. ZINDO/1 was used to evaluate the vibration spectra of the (TRZ.DTC ligand and starting material as authentic compound. Cytotoxic effect of Pd, Cu and ligand was evaluated against Rhabdomyosarcoma cell line by using four different concentrations (500, 250, 125 & 62.5 μg/ml in three exposure times 24, 48 and 72 h and compared this effect with control positive Cis-Pt. The efficiency of these new compounds on RD cell line may be attributed to blocking the protein synthesis of the cells.

  12. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1979. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 2 of 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume II, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-O; Part 2 contains Appendices P-FF. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  13. Cytotoxic Effects of Newly Synthesized Palladium(II Complexes of Diethyldithiocarbamate on Gastrointestinal Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Hadizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a part of a drug development program to discover novel therapeutic and more effective palladium (Pd based anticancer drugs, a series of water-soluble Pd complexes have been synthesized by interaction between [Pd (phen(H2O2(NO32] and alkylenebisdithiocarbamate(al-bis-dtc disodium salts. This study was undertaken to examine the possible cytotoxic effect of three novel complexes (0.125–64 µg/mL on human gastric carcinoma (AGS, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (Kyse-30, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cell lines. The cytotoxicity was examined using cell proliferation and acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB assay. In order to examine the effects of new Pd(II complexes on cell cycle status, we performed cell cycle analysis. The complexes were found to have completely lethal effects on the cell lines, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values obtained for the cell lines were much lower in comparison with cisplatin. We demonstrated that the three new Pd(II complexes are able to induce G2/M phase arrest in AGS and HepG2; in addition, the Pd(II complexes caused an S phase arrest in Kyse-30 cell line. Our results indicate that newly synthesized Pd(II complexes may provide a novel class of chemopreventive compounds for anticancer therapy.

  14. Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Part of the Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Joe R.; Altork, Linh Nguyen

    2010-01-01

    With the decreasing availability of oil and the perpetual dependence on foreign-controlled resources, many people around the world are beginning to insist on alternative fuel sources. Hydrogen fuel cell technology is one answer to this demand. Although modern fuel cell technology has existed for over a century, the technology is only now becoming…

  15. Hodgkins disease - Part II: Management of advanced - stage disease, relapsed disease and long-term complications of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part II of the refresher course on Hodgkin's disease (HD) will: 1. Update chemotherapy principles and new regimens for HD. 2. Discuss the role and practice of radiation therapy in the management of stage III-IV disease. 3. Review the treatment of relapsed Hodgkin's disease after radiotherapy alone and the salvage approach to failures of primary chemotherapy and combined modality therapy. 4. Examine the role of radiation therapy in high-dose salvage programs with stem cell rescue. 5. Review the long-term complications of all modalities with an emphasis on secondary breast cancer and coronary heart disease

  16. Hodgkin's disease - Part II: Management of advanced-stage disease, relapsed disease and long-term complications of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part II of the refresher course on Hodgkin's disease (HD) will: 1. Update chemotherapy principles and new regimens for HD. 2. Discuss the role and practice of radiation therapy in the management of stage III-IV disease. 3. Review the treatment of relapsed Hodgkin's disease after radiotherapy alone and the salvage approach to failures of primary chemotherapy and combined modality therapy. 4. Examine the role of radiation therapy in high-dose salvage programs with stem cell rescue. 5. Review the long-term complications of all modalities with an emphasis on secondary breast cancer and coronary heart disease

  17. Repopulation of denuded tracheal grafts with alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repopulation of denuded heterotopic tracheal grafts with populations of specific epithelial cell types is one approach to study the differentiation potential of various cell types. This technique has been adopted to delineate the differentiation pathways of alveolar type II cells isolated from rat lungs. Under the conditions of this experiment, the reestablished epithelial lining was alveolar-like, however, ultrastructural analysis of the cells showed them to be like Clara cells. These preliminary results suggest that the secretary cells of the lung parenchyma and terminal airways may share a common ancestry. (author)

  18. COPING STRATEGIES ADOPTED BY UNIVERSITY STUDENTS - PART II: ROLE CONFLICT AND AGE

    OpenAIRE

    NATOVOVÁ, Ludmila; CHÝLOVÁ, Hana

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the particularities of various stress coping strategies (measured by standardized stress coping strategies questionnaire SVF 78) used by undergraduate university students (N=177). The first part was focused on gender differences. Part II compares groups differing in age and level of family-school-work conflict, drawing on the division according to the type of study: Part-time (N=102) and Full-time (N=75) students as well as on the age distinction (age24: N=82). The finding...

  19. Angiotensin II facilitates breast cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Rodrigues-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis is a leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Efforts are being made to further characterize the rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis, i.e. extravasation of circulating tumor cells and colonization of secondary organs. In this study, we investigated whether angiotensin II, a major vasoactive peptide both produced locally and released in the bloodstream, may trigger activating signals that contribute to cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. We used an experimental in vivo model of cancer metastasis in which bioluminescent breast tumor cells (D3H2LN were injected intra-cardiacally into nude mice in order to recapitulate the late and essential steps of metastatic dissemination. Real-time intravital imaging studies revealed that angiotensin II accelerates the formation of metastatic foci at secondary sites. Pre-treatment of cancer cells with the peptide increases the number of mice with metastases, as well as the number and size of metastases per mouse. In vitro, angiotensin II contributes to each sequential step of cancer metastasis by promoting cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells, trans-endothelial migration and tumor cell migration across extracellular matrix. At the molecular level, a total of 102 genes differentially expressed following angiotensin II pre-treatment were identified by comparative DNA microarray. Angiotensin II regulates two groups of connected genes related to its precursor angiotensinogen. Among those, up-regulated MMP2/MMP9 and ICAM1 stand at the crossroad of a network of genes involved in cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Our data suggest that targeting angiotensin II production or action may represent a valuable therapeutic option to prevent metastatic progression of invasive breast tumors.

  20. Lysosomes from rabbit type II cells catabolize surfactant lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, E D; Ikegami, M; Pinkerton, K E; Peake, J L; Jobe, A H

    2000-01-01

    The role of a lysosome fraction from rabbit type II cells in surfactant dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) catabolism was investigated in vivo using radiolabeled DPPC and dihexadecylphosphatidylcholine (1, 2-dihexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; DEPC), a phospholipase A(1)- and A(2)-resistant analog of DPPC. Freshly isolated type II cells were gently disrupted by shearing, and lysosomes were isolated with Percoll density gradients (density range 1.0591-1.1457 g/ml). The lysosome fractions were relatively free of contaminating organelles as determined by electron microscopy and organelle marker enzymes. After intratracheal injection of rabbits with [(3)H]DPPC and [(14)C]DEPC associated with a trace amount of natural rabbit surfactant, the degradation-resistant DEPC accumulated 16-fold compared with DPPC in lysosome fractions at 15 h. Lysosomes can be isolated from freshly isolated type II cells, and lysosomes from type II cells are the primary catabolic organelle for alveolar surfactant DPPC following reuptake by type II cells in vivo. PMID:10645892

  1. Enhanced casein kinase II activity in human tumour cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowald, K; Fischer, H; Issinger, O G

    1984-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) activity is enhanced as much as 2-3 fold in established and 4-5-fold in transformed human cell lines when compared to that of fibroblasts and primary human tumour cell cultures where CKII activity never exceeded a basic level. The high activity of CKII in transformed cells...... and in established cell lines was reduced to about the same basic level after treatment with heparin, a highly specific inhibitor of CKII activity. The activity of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase was virtually the same in fibroblasts and various human tumour cell lines investigated....

  2. Intracellular Angiotensin II and cell growth of vascular smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Henning, RH; de Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, A

    2001-01-01

    1 We recently demonstrated that intracellular application of Angiotensin II (Angiotensin IIintr) induces rat aorta contraction independent of plasma membrane Angiotensin II receptors. In this study we investigated the effects of Angiotensin IIintr on cell growth in A7r5 smooth muscle cells. 2 DNA-sy

  3. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent.

  4. Rail and multimodal freight: a problem-oriented survey (part II-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin MARINOV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper includes the Part II-2 of the series of problem-oriented surveys on rail and multimodal freight transportation services, which aim is to reveal the current situation in this sector and raises looming questions for discussion. The particular objective of Part II-2 is to discuss recently published works and documents dedicated to Multi-actor chain management and control, Mode choice and pricing strategies, Intermodal transportation policy and planning as well as Miscellaneous. It should be noted that this paper is a problem oriented survey and does not explicitly focus on the available scientific instrumental that has been applied in dealing with rail and multimodal freight. However, throughout the description methods and concepts are addressed, where it is of interest.

  5. An International Round-Robin Study, Part II: Thermal Diffusivity, Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Bottner, Harold [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Konig, Jan [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Chen, Lidong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Bai, Shengqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tritt, Terry M. [Clemson University; Mayolett, Alex [Corning, Inc; Senawiratne, Jayantha [Corning, Inc; Smith, Charlene [Corning, Inc; Harris, Fred [ZT-Plus; Gilbert, Partricia [Marlow Industries, Inc; Sharp, J [Marlow Industries, Inc; Lo, Jason [CANMET - Materials Technology Laboratory, Natural Resources of Canada; Keinke, Holger [University of Waterloo, Canada; Kiss, Laszlo I. [University of Quebec at Chicoutimi

    2013-01-01

    For bulk thermoelectrics, figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In recent years, the most significant improvements in ZT were mainly due to successful reduction of thermal conductivity. However, thermal conductivity cannot be measured directly at high temperatures. The combined measurements of thermal diffusivity and specific heat and density are required. It has been shown that thermal conductivity is the property with the greatest uncertainty and has a direct influence on the accuracy of the figure of merit. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) has conducted two international round-robins since 2009. This paper is Part II of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk bismuth telluride. The main focuses in Part II are on thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity.

  6. Mechanism of angiotensin II-induced arachidonic acid metabolite release in aortic smooth muscle cells: involvement of phospholipase D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, J; Kozawa, O; Suzuki, A; Watanabe-Tomita, Y; Oiso, Y; Uematsu, T

    1997-02-01

    In a previous study, we have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) activates phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D due to Ang II-induced Ca2+ influx from extracellular space in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells. In the present study, we have investigated the role of phospholipase D in Ang II-induced arachidonic acid (AA) metabolite release and prostacyclin synthesis in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Ang II significantly stimulated AA metabolite release in a concentration-dependent manner in the range between 1 nmol/I and 0.1 mumol/I. D.L.-Propranolol hydrochloride (propranolol), an inhibitor of phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced release of AA metabolites. The Ang II-induced AA metabolite release was reduced by chelating extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA. Genistein, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases, significantly suppressed the Ang II-induced AA metabolite release. 1,6-Bis-(cyclohexyloximinocarbonylamino)-hexane (RHC-80267), a potent and selective inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipase, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced AA metabolite release. Both propranolol and RHC-80267 inhibited the Ang II-induced synthesis of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin. The synthesis was suppressed by genistein. These results strongly suggest that the AA metabolite release induced by Ang II is mediated, at least in part, through phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by phospholipase D activation in aortic smooth muscle cells.

  7. Bloqueio do nervo supraescapular: procedimento importante na prática clínica. Parte II Suprascapular nerve block: important procedure in clinical practice. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Rassi Fernandes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available O bloqueio do nervo supraescapular é um método de tratamento reprodutível, confiável e extremamente efetivo no controle da dor no ombro. Esse método tem sido amplamente utilizado por profissionais na prática clínica, como reumatologistas, ortopedistas, neurologistas e especialistas em dor, na terapêutica de enfermidades crônicas, como lesão irreparável do manguito rotador, artrite reumatoide, sequelas de AVC e capsulite adesiva, o que justifica a presente revisão (Parte II. O objetivo deste estudo foi descrever as técnicas do procedimento e suas complicações descritas na literatura, já que a primeira parte reportou as indicações clínicas, drogas e volumes utilizados em aplicação única ou múltipla. Apresentamse, detalhadamente, os acessos para a realização do procedimento tanto direto como indireto, anterior e posterior, lateral e medial, e superior e inferior. Diversas são as opções para se realizar o bloqueio do nervo supraescapular. Apesar de raras, as complicações podem ocorrer. Quando bem indicado, este método deve ser considerado.The suprascapular nerve block is a reproducible, reliable, and extremely effective treatment method in shoulder pain control. This method has been widely used by professionals in clinical practice such as rheumatologists, orthopedists, neurologists, and pain specialists in the treatment of chronic diseases such as irreparable rotator cuff injury, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke sequelae, and adhesive capsulitis, which justifies the present review (Part II. The objective of this study was to describe the techniques and complications of the procedure described in the literature, as the first part reported the clinical indications, drugs, and volumes used in single or multiple procedures. We present in details the accesses used in the procedure: direct and indirect, anterior and posterior, lateral and medial, upper and lower. There are several options to perform suprascapular nerve block

  8. Origin of the angiotensin II secreted by cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    1994-03-01

    Circulating angiotensin II is unique in that it is formed in the blood by the interaction of circulating proteins. There are in addition many local renin-angiotensin systems in tissues in which angiotensin II is apparently secreted by various types of cells. This brief review considers the possible pathways for synthesis of locally produced angiotensin II in the brain, the anterior pituitary, the testes, the ovaries, the adrenal cortex, the kidneys, the heart, blood vessel walls, and brown and white fat. Synthesis by cells in culture is also reviewed. The possibility that certain cells contain a complete intracellular renin-angiotensin system is not ruled out, but there are problems with this hypothesis. Proteases other than renin may be involved, and there may be different pathways in different tissues. However, it appears that at least in some tissues, angiotensinogen is produced in one population of cells and transported in a paracrine fashion to other renin-containing cells, where it serves as the substrate for production of angiotensin II.

  9. A Historical Timeline of Doping in the Olympics (Part II 1970-1988)

    OpenAIRE

    Kremenik, Michael; Onodera, Sho; Nagao, Mitsushiro; Yuzuki, Osamu; Yonetani, Shozo

    2007-01-01

    This article is part II of A Historical Timeline of Doping in the Olympics. The timeline is divided into three sections for analysis: Section 1 timelines the science of doping with special emphasis on the East German doping program. Section 2 timelines drug testing. Section 3 timelines positive drug tests and the sanctioning of athletes. The science of doping highlights the development of scientific awareness of the effectiveness of performance enhancing drugs when used by highly trained Olym...

  10. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Summary Report - Part II of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - includes reports on development of fast reactors in France from 1977 to 1978; review of the activities related to fast reactors in Germany; status of fast breeder reactors development in Belgium and Netherlands; status of activities related to fast reactors in USSR, Japan USA, UK and Italy

  11. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  12. Pseudoelasticity and thermoelasticity of nickel-titanium alloys: a clinically oriented review. Part II: Deactivation forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, M; Nicolay, O F; Cangialosi, T J

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to organize a systematic reference to help orthodontists evaluate commonly used orthodontic nickel-titanium alloys. Part I of the article reviewed the data available in the literature regarding the temperature transitional ranges of the alloys. The thermomechanical behavior of these compounds is, in fact, strictly dependent upon the correlation between the temperature transitional range and the oral temperature range. Part II focuses on the mechanical characteristics of the alloys, such as the magnitude of the forces delivered and correlations with the temperature transitional range and oral temperature.

  13. A pure population of lung alveolar epithelial type II cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dachun; Haviland, David L.; Burns, Alan R.; Zsigmond, Eva; Wetsel, Rick A.

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells are small, cuboidal cells that constitute ≈60% of the pulmonary alveolar epithelium. These cells are crucial for repair of the injured alveolus by differentiating into alveolar epithelial type I cells. ATII cells derived from human ES (hES) cells are a promising source of cells that could be used therapeutically to treat distal lung diseases. We have developed a reliable transfection and culture procedure, which facilitates, via genetic selection, the ...

  14. Error Performance of Multidimensional Lattice Constellations-Part II: Evaluation over Fading Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Pappi, Koralia N; Chronis, Theodore N; Karagiannidis, George K

    2012-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-part series of papers, where the error performance of multidimensional lattice constellations with signal space diversity (SSD) is investigated. In Part I, following a novel combinatorial geometrical approach which is based on parallelotope geometry, we have presented an exact analytical expression and two closed-form bounds for the symbol error probability (SEP) in Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN). In the present Part II, we extend the analysis and present a novel analytical expression for the Frame Error Probability (FEP) of multidimensional lattice constellations over Nakagami-m fading channels. As the FEP of infinite lattices is lower bounded by the Sphere Lower Bound (SLB), we propose the Sphere Upper Bound (SUB) for block fading channels. Furthermore, two novel bounds for the FEP of multidimensional lattice constellations over block fading channels, named Multiple Sphere Lower Bound (MSLB) and Multiple Sphere Upper Bound (MSUB), are presented. The expressions for the...

  15. Toward a molecular understanding of adaptive immunity:A chronology, Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall A Smith

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available By 1980 it was obvious that to more fully understand adaptive immunity, one needed to somehow reduce the tremendous complexity of antigen recognition by T cell populations. Thus, there were two developments that resulted in a paradigm shift in immunology, one being the generation of monoclonal antibodies, and the other the development of monoclonal functional antigen-specific T cell lines. For the first time, the cellular reagents became available to ask new questions as to how individual cells comprising the complex cell populations recognize and respond to changes in their molecular environments. The first successful generation of monoclonal T cells depended upon the understanding that antigen renders cells responsive to the antigen non-specific T cell growth factor that came to be termed interleukin-2 (IL-2, which could then be used in propagating large numbers of the progeny of single cells, which in turn could then be used for molecular analyses. Monoclonal functional human T cells were used to immunize mice to generate clone-specific (clonotypic monoclonal antibodies, which then permitted the first biochemical characterizations of the antigen recognition elements of the T cell antigen receptor complex. Moreover, the use of monoclonal cytolytic and helper/inducer human T cell clones essentially proved that the T cell-specific molecules T4 and T8 functioned as accessory molecules in antigen recognition by defining MHC class II or class I restriction respectively. As well, the expression of the T3 molecules, found to be common to all T cells, were shown further to be obligatory for functional antigen-specific T cell signaling. The monoclonal IL-2-dependent T cells were also instrumental in the isolation and purification of the IL-2 molecule to homogeneity, the first interleukin molecule to be identified and characterized. These advances then led to the generation of pure radiolabeled IL-2 molecules that were used to identify the first

  16. Nitric oxide and redox regulation in the liver: part II. Redox biology in pathologic hepatocytes and implications for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesen, Diana L; Kuo, Paul C

    2011-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are created in normal hepatocytes and are critical for normal physiologic processes, including oxidative respiration, growth, regeneration, apoptosis, and microsomal defense. When the levels of oxidation products exceed the capacity of normal antioxidant systems, oxidative stress occurs. This type of stress, in the form of ROS and RNS, can be damaging to all liver cells, including hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, stellate cells, and endothelial cells, through induction of inflammation, ischemia, fibrosis, necrosis, apoptosis, or through malignant transformation by damaging lipids, proteins, and/or DNA. In Part I of this review, we will discuss basic redox biology in the liver, including a review of ROS, RNS, and antioxidants, with a focus on nitric oxide as a common source of RNS. We will then review the evidence for oxidative stress as a mechanism of liver injury in hepatitis (alcoholic, viral, nonalcoholic). In Part II of this review, we will review oxidative stress in common pathophysiologic conditions, including ischemia/reperfusion injury, fibrosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, iron overload, Wilson's disease, sepsis, and acetaminophen overdose. Finally, biomarkers, proteomic, and antioxidant therapies will be discussed as areas for future therapeutic interventions.

  17. Towards Optimal Diagnosis of Type II Germ Cell Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Stoop (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the work described in this thesis is to improve the understanding of the pathobiology of testicular cancer (type II Germ Cell Tumors) to create possibilities for optimalization of diagnosis for this type of malignancy in routine pathology laboratories. The different studies pr

  18. Part I: In-situ fluorometric quantification of microalgal neutral lipids. Part II: Thermal degradation behavior of investment casting polymer patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongfang

    Research described in this dissertation covers two topics. Part-I is focused on in-situ determination of neutral lipid content of microalgae using a lipophilic fluorescent dye. The traditional Nile red stain-based method for detecting microalgal intracellular lipids is limited due to varying composition and thickness of rigid cell walls. In this study, the addition of dilute acid and heating of solution, were found to greatly enhance staining efficiency of Nile red for microalgal species evaluated. Oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion stabilized by a non-ionic surfactant was employed as a pseudo-standard that mimics lipid-bearing microalgal cells suspended in water. The average neutral lipid contents determined were very close to the results obtained by traditional gravimetric method and solid phase extraction. Part II of the dissertation explores thermo-physico-chemical properties of polymeric pattern materials, including expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam, polyurethane foam, and epoxy stereolithography (SLA) patterns, that are used in investment casting. Density, elastic modulus, expansion coefficient, thermal degradation behavior, etc. were experimentally investigated for their effects on metal casting quality. The reduction in toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) generated during thermal decomposition of polyurethane pattern was achieved by increasing either oxidant level or residence time in heated zone. Thermal degradation kinetics of the pattern materials were examined with a thermogravimetric analysis and activation energies were determined by Kissinger and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa methods.

  19. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinga, K.R. (ed.)

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  20. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1979. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1 of 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-O; Part 2 contains Appendices P-FF. Separate abstracts have been prepared of each Appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  1. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  2. A hybrid phenomenological model for ferroelectroelastic ceramics. Part II: Morphotropic PZT ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, S.; Neumeister, P.; Balke, H.

    2016-10-01

    In this part II of a two part series, the rate-independent hybrid phenomenological constitutive model introduced in part I is modified to account for the material behavior of morphotropic lead zirconate titanate ceramics (PZT ceramics). The modifications are based on a discussion of the available literature results regarding the micro-structure of these materials. In particular, a monoclinic phase and a highly simplified representation of the hierarchical structure of micro-domains and nano-domains observed experimentally are incorporated into the model. It is shown that experimental data for the commercially available morphotropic PZT material PIC151 (PI Ceramic GmbH, Lederhose, Germany) can be reproduced and predicted based on the modified hybrid model.

  3. A legacy of struggle: the OSHA ergonomics standard and beyond, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, Linda; Mojtahedi, Zahra; Sheikh, Hina; Lemus, Jackie

    2014-11-01

    The OSHA ergonomics standard issued in 2000 was repealed within four months through a Congressional resolution that limits future ergonomics rulemaking. This section continues the conversation initiated in Part I, documenting a legacy of struggle for an ergonomics standard through the voices of eight labor, academic, and government key informants. Part I summarized important components of the standard; described the convergence of labor activism, research, and government action that laid the foundation for a standard; and highlighted the debates that characterized the rulemaking process. Part II explores the anti-regulatory political landscape of the 1990s, as well as the key opponents, power dynamics, and legal maneuvers that led to repeal of the standard. This section also describes the impact of the ergonomics struggle beyond the standard itself and ends with a discussion of creative state-level policy initiatives and coalition approaches to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) in today's sociopolitical context.

  4. Cooperation in Carrier Sense Based Wireless Ad Hoc Networks - Part II: Proactive Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Munari, Andrea; Zorzi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This work is the second of a two-part series of papers on the effectiveness of cooperative techniques in non-centralized carrier sense-based ad hoc wireless networks. While Part I extensively discussed reactive cooperation, characterized by relayed transmissions triggered by failure events at the intended receiver, Part II investigates in depth proactive solutions, in which the source of a packet exploits channel state information to preemptively coordinate with relays in order to achieve the optimal overall rate to the destination. In particular, this work shows by means of both analysis and simulation that the performance of reactive cooperation is reduced by the intrinsic nature of the considered medium access policy, which biases the distribution of the available relays, locating them in unfavorable positions for rate optimization. Moreover, the highly dynamic nature of interference that characterizes non-infrastructured ad hoc networks is proved to hamper the efficacy and the reliability of preemptively ...

  5. Identification and characterization of a lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase in alveolar type II cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xueni; Hyatt, Brian A.; Mucenski, Michael L; Mason, Robert J; Shannon, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex of lipids and proteins produced and secreted by alveolar type II cells that provides the low surface tension at the air–liquid interface. The phospholipid most responsible for providing the low surface tension in the lung is dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is synthesized in large part by phosphatidylcholine (PC) remodeling, and a lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) acyltransferase is thought to play a critical role in its synthesis...

  6. Alveolar epithelial type II cell: defender of the alveolus revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehrenbach Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1977, Mason and Williams developed the concept of the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2 cell as a defender of the alveolus. It is well known that AE2 cells synthesise, secrete, and recycle all components of the surfactant that regulates alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. AE2 cells influence extracellular surfactant transformation by regulating, for example, pH and [Ca2+] of the hypophase. AE2 cells play various roles in alveolar fluid balance, coagulation/fibrinolysis, and host defence. AE2 cells proliferate, differentiate into AE1 cells, and remove apoptotic AE2 cells by phagocytosis, thus contributing to epithelial repair. AE2 cells may act as immunoregulatory cells. AE2 cells interact with resident and mobile cells, either directly by membrane contact or indirectly via cytokines/growth factors and their receptors, thus representing an integrative unit within the alveolus. Although most data support the concept, the controversy about the character of hyperplastic AE2 cells, reported to synthesise profibrotic factors, proscribes drawing a definite conclusion today.

  7. [Therapeutic use of stem cells. II. Adult stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Georges

    2004-09-30

    Many degenerative diseases are not curable by means of classical medicine. The long term objective of cell therapy is to treat the patients with their own stem cells that could be either purified from the diseased organ or from "reservoirs" of stem cells such as that constituted by the bone marrow. The existence of stem cells in the organs or reservoirs is now established in vitro and in some cases, in animal models. Numbers of technical problems linked to the scarcity of these cells still delay the clinical use of purified stem cells. However, clinical protocols using heterogeneous cell populations have already started to treat a growing number of diseases. In some case, autologous cells can be used, as it is the case for bone marrow transplantation in blood diseases. Mesenchymal cells, also purified from the bone marrow are currently used in orthopaedic diseases. Because these cells reveal a broad differentiation potential, active research programs explore their possible use for treatment of other diseases. Bone marrow also contains vascular stem cells that could be active in reappearing defective vessels responsible for ischaemic diseases. Indeed, clinical trials in which bone marrow cells are injected in the cardiac muscle of patients with myocardial infarction or in the leg muscle (gastrocnemius) of patients with hind limb ischaemia have already started. Artificial skin prepared from skin biopsies is used for the reconstitution of the derma of severely burned patients. Clinical trials have also started, using allogenic cells. The patients must be treated by immunosuppressive drugs. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson have been successfully treated by intra-cerebral injection of foetal neurones. Pancreatic islets implanted in the liver have shown to re-establish a normal glycaemia in diabetic patients. However, all these clinical trials use differentiated cells or at least progenitors which display differentiation potential and lifetime much more

  8. Zn(II, Mn(II and Sr(II Behavior in a Natural Carbonate Reservoir System. Part II: Impact of Geological CO2 Storage Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auffray B.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Some key points still prevent the full development of geological carbon sequestration in underground formations, especially concerning the assessment of the integrity of such storage. Indeed, the consequences of gas injection on chemistry and petrophysical properties are still much discussed in the scientific community, and are still not well known at either laboratory or field scale. In this article, the results of an experimental study about the mobilization of Trace Elements (TE during CO2 injection in a reservoir are presented. The experimental conditions range from typical storage formation conditions (90 bar, supercritical CO2 to shallower conditions (60 and 30 bar, CO2 as gas phase, and consider the dissolution of the two carbonates, coupled with the sorption of an initial concentration of 10−5 M of Zn(II, and the consequent release in solution of Mn(II and Sr(II. The investigation goes beyond the sole behavior of TE in the storage conditions: it presents the specific behavior of each element with respect to the pressure and the natural carbonate considered, showing that different equilibrium concentrations are to be expected if a fluid with a given concentration of TE leaks to an upper formation. Even though sorption is evidenced, it does not balance the amount of TE released by the dissolution process. The increase in porosity is clearly evidenced as a linear function of the CO2 pressure imposed for the St-Emilion carbonate. For the Lavoux carbonate, this trend is not confirmed by the 90 bar experiment. A preferential dissolution of the bigger family of pores from the preexisting porosity is observed in one of the samples (Lavoux carbonate while the second one (St-Emilion carbonate presents a newly-formed family of pores. Both reacted samples evidence that the pore network evolves toward a tubular network type.

  9. The Bacillus cereus spoIIS programmed cell death system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eMelnicakova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death in bacteria is generally associated with two¬ component toxin antitoxin systems. The SpoIIS toxin-antitoxin system, consisting of a membrane bound SpoIISA toxin and a small, cytosolic antitoxin SpoIISB, was originally identified in Bacillus subtilis. In this work we describe the Bacillus cereus SpoIIS system which is a three-component system, harbouring an additional gene spoIISC. Its protein product serves as an antitoxin, and similarly as SpoIISB, is able to bind SpoIISA and abolish its toxic effect. Our results indicate that SpoIISC seems to be present not only in B. cereus but also in other Bacilli containing a SpoIIS toxin antitoxin system. In addition, we show that B. cereus SpoIISA can form higher oligomers and we discuss the possible role of this multimerization for the protein’s toxic function.

  10. An Easy-to-Assemble Three-Part Galvanic Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Per-Odd; Skaugrud, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The galvanic cell presented in this article is made of only three parts, is easy to assemble, and can light a red light emitting diode (LED). The three cell components consist of a piece of paper with copper sulfate, a piece of paper with sodium sulfate, and a piece of magnesium ribbon. Within less than 1 h, students have time to discuss the…

  11. TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase II Single Cell Deployment/Demonstration Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phifer, M.A.

    1999-04-15

    This Phase II final report documents the Phase II testing conducted from June 18, 1998 through November 13, 1998, and it focuses on the application of the siphon technology as a sub-component of the overall GeoSiphon Cell technology. [Q-TPL-T-00004

  12. Social class, political power, and the state: their implications in medicine--parts I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, V

    1976-01-01

    This three part article presents an anlysis of the distribution of power and of the nature of the state in Western industrialized societies and details their implications in medicine. Part I presents a critique of contemporary theories of the Western system of power; discusses the countervailing pluralist and power elite theories, as well as those of bureaucratic and professional control; and concludes with an examination of the Marxist theories of economic determinism, structural determinism, and corporate statism. Part II presents a Marxist theory of the role, nature, and characteristics of state intervention. Part III (which will appear in the next issue of this journal) focuses on the mode of that intervention and the reasons for its growth, with an added analysis of the attributes of state intervention in the health sector, and of the dialectical relationship between its growth and the current fiscal crisis of the state. In all three parts, the focus is on Western European countries and on North America, with many examples and categories from the area of medicine. PMID:1022803

  13. Ageing behaviour of electrochemical double layer capacitors. Part II. Lifetime simulation model for dynamic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlen, Oliver; Kowal, Julia; Dirk Uwe Sauer [Institute for Power Electronics and Electrical Drives ISEA, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany)

    2007-11-08

    Based on the results of the experimental study in Part I, a holistic simulation model that combines electrical and thermal simulation of electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC) modules with an ageing model is presented. This simulation model allows analysing self-accelerating degradation effects caused by elevated voltages and temperatures. Furthermore, the divergence of cell performance in a stack of cells can be investigated which makes the model a valuable tool for cell and stack design as well as for testing operating strategies and cooling systems. (author)

  14. Part I: Sound color in the music of Gyorgy Kurtag, Part II: "Leopard's Path," thirteen visions for chamber ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iachimciuc, Igor

    The dissertation is in two parts, a theoretical study and a musical composition. In Part I the music of Gyorgy Kurtag is analyzed from the point of view of sound color. A brief description of what is understood by the term sound color, and various ways of achieving specific coloristic effects, are presented in the Introduction. An examination of Kurtag's approaches to the domain of sound color occupies the chapters that follow. The musical examples that are analyzed are selected from Kurtag's different compositional periods, showing a certain consistency in sound color techniques, the most important of which are already present in the String Quartet, Op. 1. The compositions selected for analysis are written for different ensembles, but regardless of the instrumentation, certain principles of the formation and organization of sound color remain the same. Rather than relying on extended instrumental techniques, Kurtag creates a large variety of sound colors using traditional means such as pitch material, register, density, rhythm, timbral combinations, dynamics, texture, spatial displacement of the instruments, and the overall musical context. Each sound color unit in Kurtag's music is a separate entity, conceived as a complete microcosm. Sound color units can either be juxtaposed as contrasting elements, forming sound color variations, or superimposed, often resulting in a Klangfarbenmelodie effect. Some of the same gestural figures (objets trouves) appear in different compositions, but with significant coloristic modifications. Thus, the principle of sound color variations is not only a strong organizational tool, but also a characteristic stylistic feature of the music of Gyorgy Kurtag. Part II, Leopard's Path (2010), for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, cimbalom, and piano, is an original composition inspired by the painting of Jesse Allen, a San Francisco based artist. The composition is conceived as a cycle of thirteen short movements. Ten of these movements are

  15. Biology and Mechanics of Blood Flows Part II: Mechanics and Medical Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Biology and Mechanics of Blood Flows presents the basic knowledge and state-of-the-art techniques necessary to carry out investigations of the cardiovascular system using modeling and simulation. Part II of this two-volume sequence, Mechanics and Medical Aspects, refers to the extraction of input data at the macroscopic scale for modeling the cardiovascular system, and complements Part I, which focuses on nanoscopic and microscopic components and processes. This volume contains chapters on anatomy, physiology, continuum mechanics, as well as pathological changes in the vasculature walls including the heart and their treatments. Methods of numerical simulations are given and illustrated in particular by application to wall diseases. This authoritative book will appeal to any biologist, chemist, physicist, or applied mathematician interested in the functioning of the cardiovascular system.

  16. A US perspective on fast reactor fuel fabrication technology and experience. Part II: Ceramic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is Part II of a review focusing on the United States experience with oxide, carbide, and nitride fast reactor fuel fabrication. Over 60 years of research in fuel fabrication by government, national laboratories, industry, and academia has culminated in a foundation of research and resulted in significant improvements to the technologies employed to fabricate these fuel types. This part of the review documents the current state of fuel fabrication technologies in the United States for each of these fuel types, some of the challenges faced by previous researchers, and how these were overcome. Knowledge gained from reviewing previous investigations will aid both researchers and policy makers in forming future decisions relating to nuclear fuel fabrication technologies.

  17. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part II - size estimations for selected markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Robert

    2014-04-01

    In a series of two contributions, decisive business-related aspects of the current process status to transfer research results on diffractive optical elements (DOEs) into commercial solutions are discussed. In part I, the focus was on the patent landscape. Here, in part II, market estimations concerning DOEs for selected applications are presented, comprising classical spectroscopic gratings, security features on banknotes, DOEs for high-end applications, e.g., for the semiconductor manufacturing market and diffractive intra-ocular lenses. The derived market sizes are referred to the optical elements, itself, rather than to the enabled instruments. The estimated market volumes are mainly addressed to scientifically and technologically oriented optical engineers to serve as a rough classification of the commercial dimensions of DOEs in the different market segments and do not claim to be exhaustive.

  18. Analysis of cornea curvature using radial basis functions - Part II: Fitting to data-set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, G W; Płociniczak, Ł; Schiesser, W E

    2016-10-01

    In part I we discussed the solution of corneal curvature using a 2D meshless method based on radial basis functions (RBFs). In Part II we use these methods to fit a full nonlinear thin membrane model to a measured data-set in order to generate a topological mathematical description of the cornea. In addition, we show how these results can lead to estimations for corneal radius of curvature and certain physical properties of the cornea; namely, tension and elasticity coefficient. Again all calculations and graphics generation were performed using the R language programming environment. The model describes corneal topology extremely well, and the estimated properties fall well within the expected range of values. The method is straight forward to implement and offers scope for further analysis using more detailed 3D models that include corneal thickness. PMID:27570056

  19. Time Synchronization Attack in Smart Grid-Part II: Cross Layer Detection Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhenghao; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Li, Husheng

    2012-01-01

    A novel time synchronization attack (TSA) on wide area monitoring systems in smart grid has been identified in the first part of this paper. A cross layer detection mechanism is proposed to combat TSA in part II of this paper. In the physical layer, we propose a GPS carrier signal noise ratio (C/No) based spoofing detection technique. In addition, a patch-monopole hybrid antenna is applied to receive GPS signal. By computing the standard deviation of the C/No difference from two GPS receivers, a priori probability of spoofing detection is fed to the upper layer, where power system state is estimated and controlled. A trustworthiness based evaluation method is applied to identify the PMU being under TSA. Both the physical layer and upper layer algorithms are integrated to detect the TSA, thus forming a cross layer mechanism. Experiment is carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed TSA detection algorithm.

  20. A thermoelectric power generating heat exchanger: Part II – Numerical modeling and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Bjørk, Rasmus; Lindeburg, N.;

    2016-01-01

    In Part I of this study, the performance of an experimental integrated thermoelectric generator (TEG)-heat exchanger was presented. In the current study, Part II, the obtained experimental results are compared with those predicted by a finite element (FE) model. In the simulation of the integrated...... of the interface surfaces as well as the air gap thermal resistance at the interface. The combined CMY and parallel plate gap model is then further developed to simulate the thermal contact resistance for the case of an interface material. The numerical results show good agreement with the experimental data...... with an average deviation of 17% for the case without interface material and 12% in the case of including additional material at the interfaces. The model is then employed to evaluate the power production of the integrated system using different interface materials, including graphite, aluminum (Al), tin (Sn...

  1. Towards Optimal Diagnosis of Type II Germ Cell Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Stoop, Hans

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the work described in this thesis is to improve the understanding of the pathobiology of testicular cancer (type II Germ Cell Tumors) to create possibilities for optimalization of diagnosis for this type of malignancy in routine pathology laboratories. The different studies presented here show valuable additional information on the microscopic diagnostics in daily practice. This enables proper and complete diagnosis of this relative rare variant of cancer ensuring the b...

  2. Guidelines for the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (including bronchopulmonary and thymic neoplasms). Part II-specific NE tumour types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberg, Kjell; Astrup, Lone Bording; Eriksson, Barbro;

    2004-01-01

    Part II of the guidelines contains a description of epidemiology, histopathology, clinical presentation, diagnostic procedure, treatment, and survival for each type of neuroendocrine tumour. We are not only including gastroenteropancreatic tumours but also bronchopulmonary and thymic neuroendocri...

  3. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss Part II: Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Therapeutic Options].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    The great majority of hearing disorders generates from pathologies in the inner ear, mainly the outer hair cells, as mentioned in the first part of this review. Very often, however, hearing loss appears suddenly and even without external causes like noise exposure. This sudden hearing loss is mostly unilateral, recovers very often spontaneously and should be treated, if persisting. Only in this acute stage there are therapeutic options available. If the inner ear hearing loss is chronic there is no curative therapy, an effective management of the hearing disorder is only possible through rehabilitation. This is due to the fact, that hair cells of all mammals, incl. humans, have no regenerative capacity and neither pharmaceutic agents nor other means can induce regeneration and recovery of hair cells. Even a gen-therapy is not available yet. In the second part of this review the main focus lies in sudden hearing loss and general therapeutic options for inner ear hearing loss. PMID:27392187

  4. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss Part II: Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Therapeutic Options].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    The great majority of hearing disorders generates from pathologies in the inner ear, mainly the outer hair cells, as mentioned in the first part of this review. Very often, however, hearing loss appears suddenly and even without external causes like noise exposure. This sudden hearing loss is mostly unilateral, recovers very often spontaneously and should be treated, if persisting. Only in this acute stage there are therapeutic options available. If the inner ear hearing loss is chronic there is no curative therapy, an effective management of the hearing disorder is only possible through rehabilitation. This is due to the fact, that hair cells of all mammals, incl. humans, have no regenerative capacity and neither pharmaceutic agents nor other means can induce regeneration and recovery of hair cells. Even a gen-therapy is not available yet. In the second part of this review the main focus lies in sudden hearing loss and general therapeutic options for inner ear hearing loss.

  5. Isolation and partial characterisation of a mammalian cell mutant hypersensitive to topoisomerase II inhibitors and X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have isolated, following one-step mutagenesis, a Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant hypersensitive to the intercalating agent, adriamycin. This agent exerts at least part of its cytotoxic action via inhibition of the nuclear enzyme, topoisomerase II. The mutant, designated ADR-3, showed hypersensitivity to all classes of topoisomerase II inhibitors, inlcuding actinomycin D, amsacrine (m-AMSA), etoposide (VP16) and mitoxantrone. ADR-3 cells also showed cross-sensitivity to ionizing radiation, but not no UV light. Topoisomerase II activity was elevated to a small but significant degree in ADR-3 cells, and this was reflected in a 1.5-fold higher level of topoisomerase II protein in ADR-3 than in CHO-K1 cells, as judged by Western blotting. ADR-3 cells were hypersensitive to cumene hydroperoxide but cross-resistant to hydrogen peroxide, suggesting possible abnormality in the detoxification of peroxides by glutathione peroxidase or catalase. Glutathione peroxidase activity against hydroperoxide was elevated to a small but significant extent in mutant cells. Catalase levels were not significantly different in ADR-3 and CHO-K1 cells. ADR-3 cells were recessive in hybrids with parental CHO-K1 cells with respect to sensitivity to topoisomerase II inhibitors and X-rays, and represent a different genetic complementation group from the previously reported adriamycin-sensitive mutant, ADR-1. (author). 34 refs.; 5 figs.; 3 tabs

  6. Mineral resources of parts of the Departments of Antioquia and Caldas, Zone II, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R.B.; Feininger, Tomas; Barrero, L.; Dario, Rico H.; ,; Alvarez, A.

    1970-01-01

    The mineral resources of an area of 40,000 sq km, principally in the Department of Antioquia, but including small parts of the Departments of Caldas, C6rdoba, Risaralda, and Tolima, were investigated during the period 1964-68. The area is designated Zone II by the Colombian Inventario Minero Nacional(lMN). The geology of approximately 45 percent of this area, or 18,000 sq km, has been mapped by IMN. Zone II has been a gold producer for centuries, and still produces 75 percent of Colombia's gold. Silver is recovered as a byproduct. Ferruginous laterites have been investigated as potential sources of iron ore but are not commercially exploitable. Nickeliferous laterite on serpentinite near Ure in the extreme northwest corner of the Zone is potentially exploitable, although less promising than similar laterites at Cerro Matoso, north of the Zone boundary. Known deposits of mercury, chromium, manganese, and copper are small and have limited economic potentia1. Cement raw materials are important among nonmetallic resources, and four companies are engaged in the manufacture of portland cement. The eastern half of Zone II contains large carbonate rock reserves, but poor accessibility is a handicap to greater development at present. Dolomite near Amalfi is quarried for the glass-making and other industries. Clay saprolite is abundant and widely used in making brick and tiles in backyard kilns. Kaolin of good quality near La Union is used by the ceramic industry. Subbituminous coal beds of Tertiary are an important resource in the western part of the zone and have good potential for greater development. Aggregate materials for construction are varied and abundant. Deposits of sodic feldspar, talc, decorative stone, and silica are exploited on a small scale. Chrysotils asbestos deposits north of Campamento are being developed to supply fiber for Colombia's thriving asbestos-cement industry, which is presently dependent upon imported fiber. Wollastonite and andalusite are

  7. Signal transduction by HLA class II antigens expressed on activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L;

    1991-01-01

    Human T cells express HLA class II antigens upon activation. Although activated, class II+ T cells can present alloantigens under certain circumstances, the functional role of class II antigens on activated T cells remains largely unknown. Here, we report that cross-linking of HLA-DR molecules ex...

  8. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. Seismic risk analysis for General Electric Plutonium Facility, Pleasanton, California. Final report, part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-27

    This report is the second of a two part study addressing the seismic risk or hazard of the special nuclear materials (SNM) facility of the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center at Pleasanton, California. The Part I companion to this report, dated July 31, 1978, presented the seismic hazard at the site that resulted from exposure to earthquakes on the Calaveras, Hayward, San Andreas and, additionally, from smaller unassociated earthquakes that could not be attributed to these specific faults. However, while this study was in progress, certain additional geologic information became available that could be interpreted in terms of the existance of a nearby fault. Although substantial geologic investigations were subsequently deployed, the existance of this postulated fault, called the Verona Fault, remained very controversial. The purpose of the Part II study was to assume the existance of such a capable fault and, under this assumption, to examine the loads that the fault could impose on the SNM facility. This report first reviews the geologic setting with a focus on specifying sufficient geologic parameters to characterize the postulated fault. The report next presents the methodology used to calculate the vibratory ground motion hazard. Because of the complexity of the fault geometry, a slightly different methodology is used here compared to the Part I report. This section ends with the results of the calculation applied to the SNM facility. Finally, the report presents the methodology and results of the rupture hazard calculation.

  1. Relation between the diffusion curve and the roughness of a tilting diffuser: part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollo, M. A.; Perez Quintian, F.; Landau, Monica R.; Hogert, Elsa N.; Gaggioli, Nestor G.

    1996-02-01

    We have studied the diffusion curve evolution in variable translucent rough surfaces. In order to carry on these studies, we used cells having an internal diffuser face. Inside these cells, we place a liquid of controllable refraction index. In this way, we are able to obtain a great range of roughness values without changing the correlation length. In this paper we extend the results obtained in another work presented in the II Iberoamerican Optical Meeting. We verify the existence of a similar phenomenon and its relation with the surface roughness. Moreover, we must note that this work has been done with coherent, but we think that we deal with a predominantly geometric phenomenon, not quite in agreement with most of the authors that are studying this subject.

  2. Human alveolar epithelial type II cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Pu; Wu, Songling; Li, Jianchun; Fu, Wei; He, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Slutsky, Arthur S; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Yimin

    2015-02-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells are a key structure and defender in the lung but also are the targets in many lung diseases, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, ventilator-induced lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis. We sought to establish an optimized method for high yielding and long maintenance of characteristics of primary human AEII cells to facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms of lung diseases at the cellular and molecular levels. Adult human peripheral normal lung tissues of oncologic patients undergoing lung resection were collected. The AEII cells were isolated and identified by the expression of pro-surfactant protein (SP)C, epithelial sodium channel (αENaC) and cytokeratin (CK)-8, the lamellar bodies specific for AEII cells, and confirmed by the histology using electron microscopy. The phenotype of AEII cells was characterized by the expression of surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D), CK-8, KL-6, αENaC, and aquaporin (AQP)-3, which was maintained over 20 days. The biological activity of the primary human AEII cells producing SP-C, cytokines, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was vigorous in response to stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α. We have modified previous methods and optimized a method for isolation of high purity and long maintenance of the human AEII cell phenotype in primary culture. This method provides an important tool for studies aiming at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of lung diseases exclusively in AEII cells. PMID:25677546

  3. Effect of arginase II on L-arginine depletion and cell growth in murine cell lines of renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson John R

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L-arginine is the common substrate for the two isoforms of arginase. Arginase I, highly expressed in the liver and arginase II mainly expressed in the kidney. Arginase I-producing myeloid derived suppressor cells have been shown to inhibit T-cell function by the depletion of L-arginine. On the other hand, arginase II has been detected in patients with cancer and is thought to metabolize L-arginine to L-ornithine needed to sustain rapid tumor growth; however its role in L-arginine depletion is unclear. Thus, in tumor biology, L-arginine metabolism may play a dual role in tumor growth and in the induction of T cell dysfunction. Therefore, we studied in murine renal cell carcinoma (RCC cell lines, the effect of arginase II on tumor cell proliferation and L-arginine depletion. The effect of arginase inhibitors on cell proliferation was also tested. Methods Three murine renal cell carcinoma (mRCC cell lines were tested for the presence of arginase. nor-NOHA, an arginase inhibitor was used to substantiate the effect of arginase on cell growth and L-arginine depletion. Amino acid levels were tested by HPLC. Results Our results show that mRCC cell lines express only arginase II and were able to deplete L-arginine from the medium. Cell growth was independent of the amount of arginase activity expressed by the cells. nor-NOHA significantly (P = 0.01 reduced arginase II activity and suppressed cell growth in cells exhibiting high arginase activity. The depletion of L-arginine by mRCC induced the decrease expression of CD3ζ a key element for T-cell function. Conclusion The results of this study show for the first time that arginase II produced by RCC cell lines depletes L-arginine resulting in decreased expression of CD3ζ. These results indicate that RCC cell lines expressing arginase II can modulate the L-arginine metabolic pathway to regulate both cell growth and T-cell function. Blocking arginase may lead to a decrease in RCC cell

  4. Noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part II: spectrum of imaging findings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Ronan P

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has evolved into an effective imaging technique for the evaluation of coronary artery disease in selected patients. Two distinct advantages over other noninvasive cardiac imaging methods include its ability to directly evaluate the coronary arteries and to provide a unique opportunity to evaluate for alternative diagnoses by assessing the extracardiac structures, such as the lungs and mediastinum, particularly in patients presenting with the chief symptom of acute chest pain. Some centers reconstruct a small field of view (FOV) cropped around the heart but a full FOV (from skin to skin in the area irradiated) is obtainable in the raw data of every scan so that clinically relevant noncardiac findings are identifiable. Debate in the scientific community has centered on the necessity for this large FOV. A review of noncardiac structures provides the opportunity to make alternative diagnoses that may account for the patient\\'s presentation or to detect important but clinically silent problems such as lung cancer. Critics argue that the yield of biopsy-proven cancers is low and that the follow-up of incidental noncardiac findings is expensive, resulting in increased radiation exposure and possibly unnecessary further testing. In this 2-part review we outline the issues surrounding the concept of the noncardiac read, looking for noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part I focused on the pros and cons for and against the practice of identifying noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part II illustrates the imaging spectrum of cardiac CT appearances of benign and malignant noncardiac pathology.

  5. Constructions of Optical Queues With a Limited Number of Recirculations--Part II: Optimal Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xuan-Chao

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in all-optical packet-switched networks is the lack of optical buffers, and one feasible technology for the constructions of optical buffers is to use optical crossbar Switches and fiber Delay Lines (SDL). In this two-part paper, we consider SDL constructions of optical queues with a limited number of recirculations through the optical switches and the fiber delay lines. Such a problem arises from practical feasibility considerations. In Part I, we have proposed a class of greedy constructions for certain types of optical queues, including linear compressors, linear decompressors, and 2-to-1 FIFO multiplexers, and have shown that every optimal construction among our previous constructions of these types of optical queues under the constraint of a limited number of recirculations must be a greedy construction. In Part II, the present paper, we further show that there are at most two optimal constructions and give a simple algorithm to obtain the optimal construction(s). The main idea i...

  6. Societal Planning: Identifying a New Role for the Transport Planner-Part II: Planning Guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khisty, C. Jotin; Leleur, Steen

    1997-01-01

    . The guidelines serve to frame the right considerations and questions when dealing with planning problems of a certain complexity. They can then facilitate the structuring and interpretation of empirical study. Emphasis is paid to describe the planning process as one of self-organizing dynamics vis......The paper seeks to formulate planning guidelines based on Habermas's theory of communicative action. Specifically, this has led to the formulation of a set of four planning validity claims concerned to four types of planning guidelines concerning adequacy, dependency, suitability and adaptability......-a-vis the planning validity claims. Among other things the contingency of this process is outlined. It is concluded (part I & II) that transport planners can conveniently utilize the guidelines in their professional practice, tailored to their particular settings....

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow. Part II: Abnormalities of the ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Tuite, Michael; Sanford, Matthew [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Part II of this comprehensive review on magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow discusses the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating patients with abnormalities of the ligaments, tendons, and nerves of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can yield high-quality multiplanar images which are useful in evaluating the soft tissue structures of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect tears of the ulnar collateral ligament and lateral collateral ligament of the elbow with high sensitivity and specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging can determine the extent of tendon pathology in patients with medial epicondylitis and lateral epicondylitis. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect tears of the biceps tendon and triceps tendon and can distinguishing between partial and complete tendon rupture. Magnetic resonance imaging is also helpful in evaluating patients with nerve disorders at the elbow. (orig.)

  8. CERN scientists take part in the Tevatron Run II performance review committee

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Tevatron Run II is under way at Fermilab, exploring the high-energy frontier with upgraded detectors that will address some of the biggest questions in particle physics.Until CERN's LHC switches on, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider is the world's only source of top quarks. It is the only place where we can search for supersymmetry, for the Higgs boson, and for signatures of additional dimensions of space-time. The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently convened a high-level international review committee to examine Fermilab experts' first-phase plans for the accelerator complex. Pictured here with a dipole magnet in CERN's LHC magnet test facility are the four CERN scientists who took part in the DOE's Tevatron review. Left to right: Francesco Ruggiero, Massimo Placidi, Flemming Pedersen, and Karlheinz Schindl. Further information: CERN Courier 43 (1)

  9. Repository Planning, Design, and Engineering: Part II-Equipment and Costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Phillip M; Gunter, Elaine W

    2016-08-01

    Part II of this article discusses and provides guidance on the equipment and systems necessary to operate a repository. The various types of storage equipment and monitoring and support systems are presented in detail. While the material focuses on the large repository, the requirements for a small-scale startup are also presented. Cost estimates and a cost model for establishing a repository are presented. The cost model presents an expected range of acquisition costs for the large capital items in developing a repository. A range of 5,000-7,000 ft(2) constructed has been assumed, with 50 frozen storage units, to reflect a successful operation with growth potential. No design or engineering costs, permit or regulatory costs, or smaller items such as the computers, software, furniture, phones, and barcode readers required for operations have been included. PMID:26886768

  10. Implementing AORN recommended practices for a safe environment of care, part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Lynne

    2014-09-01

    Construction in and around a working perioperative suite is a challenge beyond merely managing traffic patterns and maintaining the sterile field. The AORN "Recommended practices for a safe environment of care, part II" provides guidance on building design; movement of patients, personnel, supplies, and equipment; environmental controls; safety and security; and control of noise and distractions. Whether the OR suite evolves through construction, reconstruction, or remodeling, a multidisciplinary team of construction experts and health care professionals should create a functional plan and communicate at every stage of the project to maintain a safe environment and achieve a well-designed outcome. Emergency preparedness, a facility-wide security plan, and minimization of noise and distractions in the OR also help enhance the safety of the perioperative environment.

  11. Psychoeducational Interventions with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Part II. Effects of Information and Skills Training on Health-Related Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Ivan L.; Bradlyn, Andrew S.; Kato, Pamela M.

    2003-01-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a model that was used as a framework for reviewing studies of psychoeducational interventions intended to influence illness- and treatment-related behaviors and attitudes in pediatric cancer patients. In Part II, we distinguish between interventions that attempt to influence patients' behaviors just by…

  12. Modeling of optical spectra of the light-harvesting CP29 antenna complex of photosystem II--part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ximao; Kell, Adam; Pieper, Jörg; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2013-06-01

    Until recently, it was believed that the CP29 protein from higher plant photosystem II (PSII) contains 8 chlorophylls (Chl's) per complex (Ahn et al. Science 2008, 320, 794-797; Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1999, 96, 10056-10061) in contrast to the 13 Chl's revealed by the recent X-ray structure (Pan et al. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 2011, 18, 309-315). This disagreement presents a constraint on the interpretation of the underlying electronic structure of this complex. To shed more light on the interpretation of various experimental optical spectra discussed in the accompanying paper (part I, DOI 10.1021/jp4004328 ), we report here calculated low-temperature (5 K) absorption, fluorescence, hole-burned (HB), and 300 K circular dichroism (CD) spectra for CP29 complexes with a different number of pigments. We focus on excitonic structure and the nature of the low-energy state using modeling based on the X-ray structure of CP29 and Redfield theory. We show that the lowest energy state is mostly contributed to by a612, a611, and a615 Chl's. We suggest that in the previously studied CP29 complexes from spinach (Pieper et al. Photochem. Photobiol.2000, 71, 574-589) two Chl's could have been lost during the preparation/purification procedure, but it is unlikely that the spinach CP29 protein contains only eight Chl's, as suggested by the sequence homology-based study (Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.1999, 96, 10056-10061). The likely Chl's missing in wild-type (WT) CP29 complexes studied previously (Pieper et al. Photochem. Photobiol. 2000, 71, 574-589) include a615 and b607. This is why the nonresonant HB spectra shown in that reference were ~1 nm blue-shifted with the low-energy state mostly localized on about one Chl a (i.e., a612) molecule. Pigment composition of CP29 is discussed in the context of light-harvesting and excitation energy transfer.

  13. Effect of mutagen combined action on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of UV radiation and UV radiation combined with alkylnitrosourea derivatives (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) was observed on survival of cells of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In particular, single parts were evaluated of the overall lethal effect - dying of cells before division and dying of cells after division. It was found that the combined action of low doses of UV radiation and alkylnitrosoureas result in a pronounced protective effect which manifests itself by a higher frequency of surviving cells than was that effected by the action of alkylnitrosoureas alone. As a result of combined action with higher doses of UV radiation this effect is lost, and the resultant values will come close to the theoretically anticipated values. This gradual transition from a protective to an additive effect mainly manifests itself by changes in the proportion of cells dying before division. (author)

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  13. File list: Pol.Lar.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Utr.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Pup.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Dig.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Utr.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.PSC.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Utr.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Epd.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Adl.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Pup.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Spl.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Bld.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Lar.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Spl.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Oth.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Bon.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Oth.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Neu.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Kid.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Myo.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Kid.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Prs.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.PSC.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Prs.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Adp.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Bon.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Pan.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Neu.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Oth.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Neu.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Prs.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Myo.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  17. File list: Pol.Adl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  18. File list: Pol.Myo.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. File list: Pol.Liv.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. Expression of endogenous and transfected apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin II genes in an estrogen responsive chicken liver cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, R; MacDonald, C C; Burch, J B; Lazier, C B; Williams, D L

    1990-02-01

    A recently described chicken liver cell line, LMH, was characterized to evaluate responsiveness to estrogen. Expression of the endogenous apolipoprotein (apo) II gene was induced by 17 beta-estradiol when LMH cells were cultured with chicken serum. The response was low and yielded apoll mRNA at only 0.3% of the level seen in estrogenized rooster liver. Higher levels of apoll mRNA were achieved when LMH cells were transiently transfected with an expression plasmid for estrogen receptor. A transfected apoll gene was strongly expressed only when cotransfected with receptor. Expression of the endogenous vitellogenin (VTG) II gene was not detected. However, when cotransfected with a receptor expression plasmid, VTG II reporter plasmids were expressed in LMH cells in response to 17 beta-estradiol. These results suggest that estrogen responsiveness of LMH cells is limited by the availability of functional receptor. Low levels of estrogen receptor mRNA were detected in LMH cells, and receptor binding sites and mRNA were greatly increased following transient transfection with a receptor expression plasmid. Using this transient transfection protocol, several VTG II reporter plasmids were compared in LMH cells and chick embryo fibroblasts. A plasmid containing VTG II estrogen response elements linked to a heterologous promoter was regulated by estrogen in both cell types. In contrast, reporter plasmids containing the VTG II promoter were regulated by estrogen in LMH cells but were not expressed at all in chick embryo fibroblasts. These results suggest that regulation of the VTG II gene involves cell type-specific elements in addition to estrogen response elements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2330000

  8. Effect of inhaled 239PuO2 on alveolar Type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphological changes of rat alveolar type II (AT-II) cells were studied at 8 and 10 months following inhalation of 239PuO2 to elucidate the biological role of AT-II cells in the induction of lung tumours. TEM micrographs of random sections of lung were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using an automatic image analyser. Eighteen morphometric parameters were obtained according to stereological principles. The results showed that, following the inhalation of 239PuO2, AT-II cells became less differentiated and the metabolism of the pulmonary surfactant in AT-II cells was disturbed. (author)

  9. Effect of inhaled 239PuO2 on alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphological changes of rat alveolar type II (AT-II) cells were studied at 8 and 10 months following inhalation of 239PuO2 to elucidate the biological role of At-II cells in the induction of lung tumours. TEM micrographs of random sections of lung were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using an automatic image analyser. Eighteen morphometric parameters were obtained according to stereo logical principles. The results showed that, following the inhalation of 239PuO2, AT-II cells became less differentiated and the metabolism of the pulmonary surfactant in AT-II cells was disturbed

  10. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Eight Annual Meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Eighth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Past Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 15 to 18 April 1975. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMPBR’s and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  11. Hospital reimbursement incentives: is there a more effective option?--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    As discussed in Part I of this article, hospital executives in Canada, Germany, and the United States manage their facilities' resources to maximize the incentives inherent in their respective reimbursement system and thereby increase their bottom line. It was also discussed that an additional supply of available hospitals, physicians, and other services will generate increased utilization. Part II discusses how the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 will eventually fail since it neither controls prices nor utilization (e.g., imaging, procedures, ambulatory surgery, discretionary spending). This article concludes with the discussion of the German multipayer approach with universal access and global budgets that might well be a model for U.S. healthcare in the future. Although the German healthcare system has a number of shortfalls, its paradigm could offer the most appropriate compromise when selecting the economic incentives to reduce the percentage of the U.S. gross domestic product expenditure for healthcare from 17.4% to roughly 12.0%. PMID:23547503

  12. Investigational drug tracking: phases I-III and NDA submissions--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, K L

    1994-10-01

    The author catalogs over 800 investigational drugs/biologicals currently in Phase I, II or III clinical trials or drugs/biologicals submitted to the FDA as new drug applications. Part I of this article appeared in the September issue of Hospital Pharmacy. The list assists in predicting when new drugs will be marketed. The entries include generic/chemical name, investigational drug number, synonyms, trade names, manufacturers, clinical trial status, predicted approval year, indications or drug class, whether the drug has been developed through biotechnology, and references. Entries were gleaned from medical journals, stock market analysis publications, and the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association's Medicines in Development Series. The list is alphabetized by the generic/chemical name or investigational drug number and cross-indexed by the trade name and synonyms. The list reflects those drugs which were not FDA approved as of April 15, 1994. Part I concludes with the remaining alphabetical listing by generic/chemical name or investigational drug number. PMID:10137850

  13. Tobacco control and gender in south-east Asia. Part II: Singapore and Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Martha; Barraclough, Simon

    2003-12-01

    In the World Health Organization's Western Pacific Region, being born male is the single greatest risk marker for tobacco use. While the literature demonstrates that risks associated with tobacco use may vary according to sex, gender refers to the socially determined roles and responsibilities of men and women, who initiate, continue and quit using tobacco for complex and often different reasons. Cigarette advertising frequently appeals to gender roles. Yet tobacco control policy tends to be gender-blind. Using a broad, gender-sensitivity framework, this contradiction is explored in four Western Pacific countries. Part I of the study presented the rationale, methodology and design of the study, discussed issues surrounding gender and tobacco, and analysed developments in Malaysia and the Philippines (see the previous issue of this journal). Part II deals with Singapore and Vietnam. In all four countries gender was salient for the initiation and maintenance of smoking. Yet, with a few exceptions, gender was largely unrecognized in control policy. Suggestions for overcoming this weakness in order to enhance tobacco control are made. PMID:14695368

  14. Interview-based Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part II: Data Collection, Analysis and Results Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L; Meisel, Zachary F; Choo, Esther K; Garro, Aris C; Sasson, Comilla; Morrow Guthrie, Kate

    2015-09-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. In Part I of this two-article series, we provided an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field (observation, individual interviews, and focus groups). Here in Part II of this series, we outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research.

  15. CFD analysis of the ITER first wall 06 panel. Part II: Thermal-hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanino, R.; Bonifetto, R. [Dipartimento Energia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy); Cau, F.; Portone, A. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Savoldi Richard, L., E-mail: laura.savoldi@polito.it [Dipartimento Energia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the FW06 panel of the ITER shielding blanket is presented in two companion papers. In this Part II we concentrate on the thermal-hydraulics of the water coolant, driven by the nuclear volumetric and plasma surface heat loads discussed in Part I. Both the detailed steady state analysis of a single cooling channel and the coarse transient analysis of the whole panel are considered. The compatibility of the hot spots with the maximum recommended temperatures for the different materials is confirmed. The heat transfer coefficient between coolant and walls is obtained post-processing the results of the simulation and compared with the results of available correlations, which may be used for simpler analyses: in the fully developed flow regions of the cooling pipes, it turns out to be well approximated by the Sieder–Tate correlation. The operation margin with respect to the critical heat flux is also computed and turns out to be sufficiently large compared with the design limit.

  16. Anti-Hypertensive Herbs and their Mechanisms of Action: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akhtar eAnwar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicine has a history extending back to thousands of years, and during the intervening time, man has identified the healing properties of a very broad range of plants. Globally, the use of herbal therapies to treat and manage cardiovascular disease (CVD is on the rise. This is the second part of our comprehensive review where we discuss the mechanisms of plants and herbs used for the treatment and management of high blood pressure. Similar to the first part, PubMed and ScienceDirect databases were utilized, and the following keywords and phrases were used as inclusion criteria: hypertension, high blood pressure, herbal medicine, complementary and alternative medicine, endothelial cells, nitric oxide, vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC proliferation, hydrogen sulfide, nuclear factor kappa-B, oxidative stress and epigenetics/epigenomics. Each of the aforementioned keywords was co-joined with plant or herb in question, and where possible with its constituent molecule(s. This part deals in particular with plants that are used, albeit less frequently, for the treatment and management of hypertension. We then discuss the interplay between herbs/prescription drugs and herbs/epigenetics in the context of this disease. The review then concludes with a recommendation for more rigorous, well-developed clinical trials to concretely determine the beneficial impact of herbs and plants on hypertension and a disease-free living.

  17. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part II: Analysis by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, D Kimberley; Castorena, Joe L; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a decedent's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray (SEM/EDX) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In part I of this 2-part series, GSR results performed by SEM/EDX in undisputed cases of suicidal handgun wounds were studied. In part II, the same population was studied, deceased persons with undisputed suicidal handgun wounds, but GSR testing was performed using ICP-AES. A total of 102 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and the results of the GSR testing. This study found that 50% of cases where the deceased was known to have fired a handgun immediately prior to death had positive GSR results by ICP/AES, which did not differ from the results of GSR testing by SEM/EDX. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon were positive for GSR by either method, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether someone has discharged a firearm and is not useful as a determining factor of whether or not a wound is self-inflicted or non-self-inflicted. While a positive GSR result may be of use, a negative result is not helpful in the medical examiner setting as a negative result indicates that either a person fired a weapon prior to death or a person did not fire a weapon prior to death. PMID:17721164

  18. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  19. Rare or remarkable microfungi from Oaxaca (south Mexico)--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ale-Agha, N; Jensen, M; Brassmann, M; Kautz, S; Eilmus, S; Ballhorn, D J

    2008-01-01

    Microfungi were collected in southern Mexico in the vicinity of Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca in 2007. In 2006, samples were gathered from Acacia myrmecophytes [(Remarkable microfungi from Oaxaca of Acacia species) Part I]. In the present investigation [Part II], we collected microfungi from different parts of a variety of wild and cultivated higher plants belonging to the families Anacardiaceae, Caricaceae, Fabaceae, Moraceae, and Nyctaginacae. The microfungi found here live as parasites or saprophytes. Interestingly, the species Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. and Magn.) Briosi and Cavara has repeatedly been used to cause fungal infections of Phaseolus lunatus leaves in laboratory experiments. We could now find the same fungus as parasite on the same host plants under field conditions showing that results obtained in the laboratory are also relevant in nature. Most of the fungal species collected belong to the classes Ascomycotina, Basidiomycotina and Deuteromycotina. Until now, some of the microfungi identified in this study have been rarely observed before or have been reported for the first time in Mexico, for example: Pestalotia acaciae Thüm. on Acacia collinsii Safford; Corynespora cassiicola (Berk. and M.A. Curtis) C.T. Wei on Carica papaya L.; Botryosphaeria ribis Grossenb. and Duggar and Cercosporella leucaenae (Raghu Ram and Mallaiah) U. Braun (new for Mexico) and Camptomeris leucaenae (F. Stevens and Dalbey) Syd. (new for Mexico) on Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit.; Oidium clitoriae Narayanas. and K. Ramakr. and Phakopsora cf. pachyrhizi Sydow and Sydow (new for Mexico) on Clitoria ternatea L.; Botryosphaeria obtusa (Schw.) Shoemaker on Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC.; Cylindrocladium scoparium Morg. on Ficus benjamina L.; Acremonium sp. on Bougainvillea sp. All specimens are located in the herbarium ESS. Mycotheca Parva collection G.B. Feige and N. Ale-Agha.

  20. Rare or remarkable microfungi from Oaxaca (south Mexico)--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ale-Agha, N; Jensen, M; Brassmann, M; Kautz, S; Eilmus, S; Ballhorn, D J

    2008-01-01

    Microfungi were collected in southern Mexico in the vicinity of Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca in 2007. In 2006, samples were gathered from Acacia myrmecophytes [(Remarkable microfungi from Oaxaca of Acacia species) Part I]. In the present investigation [Part II], we collected microfungi from different parts of a variety of wild and cultivated higher plants belonging to the families Anacardiaceae, Caricaceae, Fabaceae, Moraceae, and Nyctaginacae. The microfungi found here live as parasites or saprophytes. Interestingly, the species Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. and Magn.) Briosi and Cavara has repeatedly been used to cause fungal infections of Phaseolus lunatus leaves in laboratory experiments. We could now find the same fungus as parasite on the same host plants under field conditions showing that results obtained in the laboratory are also relevant in nature. Most of the fungal species collected belong to the classes Ascomycotina, Basidiomycotina and Deuteromycotina. Until now, some of the microfungi identified in this study have been rarely observed before or have been reported for the first time in Mexico, for example: Pestalotia acaciae Thüm. on Acacia collinsii Safford; Corynespora cassiicola (Berk. and M.A. Curtis) C.T. Wei on Carica papaya L.; Botryosphaeria ribis Grossenb. and Duggar and Cercosporella leucaenae (Raghu Ram and Mallaiah) U. Braun (new for Mexico) and Camptomeris leucaenae (F. Stevens and Dalbey) Syd. (new for Mexico) on Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit.; Oidium clitoriae Narayanas. and K. Ramakr. and Phakopsora cf. pachyrhizi Sydow and Sydow (new for Mexico) on Clitoria ternatea L.; Botryosphaeria obtusa (Schw.) Shoemaker on Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC.; Cylindrocladium scoparium Morg. on Ficus benjamina L.; Acremonium sp. on Bougainvillea sp. All specimens are located in the herbarium ESS. Mycotheca Parva collection G.B. Feige and N. Ale-Agha. PMID:19226752

  1. Resource Allocation for Downlink Cellular OFDMA Systems: Part II - Asymptotic Analysis and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ksairi, Nassar; ciblat, Phiippe; Hachem, Walid

    2008-01-01

    In a companion paper (see Resource Allocation for Downlink Cellular OFDMA systems: Part I - Optimal Allocation), we characterized the optimal resource allocation in terms of power control and sub-carrier assignment, for a downlink OFDMA system impaired by multicell interference. In our model, the network is assumed to be one dimensional (linear) for the sake of analysis. We also assume that a certain part of the available bandwidth is likely to be reused by different base stations and that the other part of the bandwidth is shared in an orthogonal way between the different base stations. The optimal resource allocation characterized in Part I is obtained by minimizing the total power spent by the network under the constraint that all users rate requirements in nats/s/Hz are satisfied. It is worth noting that when optimal resource allocation is used, any user receives data either in the reused bandwidth or in the protected bandwidth, but not in both (except for at most one pivot user in each cell). In the pres...

  2. Ubiquitination by March-I prevents MHC class II recycling and promotes MHC class II turnover in antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung-Jin; Walseng, Even; Ishido, Satoshi; Roche, Paul A

    2015-08-18

    MHC class II (MHC-II)-dependent antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is carefully controlled to achieve specificity of immune responses; the regulated assembly and degradation of antigenic peptide-MHC-II complexes (pMHC-II) is one aspect of such control. In this study, we have examined the role of ubiquitination in regulating pMHC-II biosynthesis, endocytosis, recycling, and turnover in APCs. By using APCs obtained from MHC-II ubiquitination mutant mice, we find that whereas ubiquitination does not affect pMHC-II formation in dendritic cells (DCs), it does promote the subsequent degradation of newly synthesized pMHC-II. Acute activation of DCs or B cells terminates expression of the MHC-II E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I and prevents pMHC-II ubiquitination. Most importantly, this change results in very efficient pMHC-II recycling from the surface of DCs and B cells, thereby preventing targeting of internalized pMHC-II to lysosomes for degradation. Biochemical and functional assays confirmed that pMHC-II turnover is suppressed in MHC-II ubiquitin mutant DCs or by acute activation of wild-type DCs. These studies demonstrate that acute APC activation blocks the ubiquitin-dependent turnover of pMHC-II by promoting efficient pMHC-II recycling and preventing lysosomal targeting of internalized pMHC-II, thereby enhancing pMHC-II stability for efficient antigen presentation to CD4 T cells.

  3. Sludge in the pulp and paper industry in Sweden, part II[Combustion of]; Slam fraan skogsindustrin, fas II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyllenhammar, Marianne; Herstad Svaerd, Solvie; Kjoerk, Anders; Larsson, Sara; Wennberg, Olle [S.E.P. Scandinavian Energy Project AB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Aamand, Lars-Erik [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Eskilsson, David [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2003-11-01

    During part II of this research program combustible sludge from the pulp and paper industry has been studied in detail. 560,000 tonnes of sludge per year (calculated as dry sludge) are produced in Sweden. The energy potential in the produced sludge is about 2 TWh/year. Today 1 TWh/year is produced in the pulp and paper mill's own boilers. This means that additional energy can be utilized from this material. An objective of this program has been to decide whether or not there are sludge types which are favourable respectively difficult to combust. By mixing different sludge types, or other waste products, emissions and/or problems during combustion can be minimized. These possibilities have been studied thoroughly in this program. A lot of sludge samples have been studied in laboratory scale at SP and in full-scale at Chalmers 12 MW CFB boiler. As a complement to the practical tests S.E.P. has done research regarding different aspects of sludge as a fuel; for example handling of sludge and regional drying. The results of 40 sintering tests at SP showed that the sintering temperature during combustion of sludge in a fluidised bed, with silica sand as bed material, varied between <850 deg C and >1100 deg C. The evaluation showed that the alkali content in the ash had the largest influence on the sintering temperature. Other factors were less important. During the tests at Chalmers eleven different sludge samples have been combusted together with wood pellets. Initially there were problems with the feeding to the boiler for some of the sludge samples. When the fuel feeding problems were solved the combustion took place without any problems. When sludge is co-combusted together with a 'clean' base fuel such as wood pellets the sulphur-, nitrogen- and chloride contents in the sludge have a large impact on the emissions. The normal way to reduce sulphur dioxide but also hydrogen chloride is to add lime in different positions into and after the boiler. In

  4. Biocompatibility evaluation in vitro. Part II: Functional expression of human and animal osteoblasts on the biomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    DNA synthesis and collagen formations on the implant material by cell culture in vitro are the most important phenotypical expression to estimate the biocompatibility. In this part, DNA synthesis and collagen formation on implant materials were quantitatively and qualitatively estimated by radioactive isotope H+-thymidine to incorporate into DNA chains, H+-proline to incorporate into type I collagen proteins followed by scin-tillation counting and antibody-antigen immunocytochemistry staining, respectively. Research results demonstrate that hydroxyapatite (HA) stimulates DNA synthesis and collagen formation on the material whereas this stimulation is restricted by adding spinel to the materials. There are statistical differences between the influences of material components on both DNA synthesis and collagen formation. It is supposed that porous materials can supply more platforms for cell anchoring, and more DNA and collagen are synthesised on the porous materials. Immersion in culture medium results in new HA crystal formation on the porous HA materials.

  5. Jak2-Independent Activation of Stat3 by Intracellular Angiotensin II in Human Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ang II is shown to mediate the stimulatory effect of high glucose on TGF-b1 and extracellular matrix proteins in glomerular mesangial cells. Also inhibition of Ang II formation in cell media (extracellular and lysates (intracellular blocks high-glucose effects on TGF-b1 and matrix more effectively compared to inhibition of extracellular Ang II alone. To investigate whether intracellular Ang II can stimulate TGF-b1 and matrix independent of extracellular Ang II, cultured human mesangial cells were transfected with Ang II to increase intracellular Ang II levels and its effects on TGF-b1 and matrix proteins were determined. Prior to transfection, cells were treated with candesartan to block extracellular Ang II-induced responses via cell membrane AT1 receptors. Transfection of cells with Ang II resulted in increased levels of intracellular Ang II which was accompanied by increased production of TGF-b1, collagen IV, fibronectin, and cell proliferation as well. On further examination, intracellular Ang II was found to activate Stat3 transcription factor including increased Stat3 protein expression, tyrosine 705 phosphorylation, and DNA-binding activity. Treatment with AG-490, an inhibitor of Jak2, did not block intracellular Ang II-induced Stat3 phosphorylation at tyrosine 705 residue indicating a Jak2-independent mechanism used by intracellular Ang II for Stat3 phosphorylation. In contrast, extracellular Ang II-induced tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of Stat3 was inhibited by AG-490 confirming the presence of a Jak2-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that intracellular Ang II increases TGF-b1 and matrix in human mesangial cells and also activates Stat3 transcription factor without involvement of the extracellular Ang II signaling pathway.

  6. Expression of secreted recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkari, H; Sekkat, D; Straczek, J; Hess, K; Belleville-Nabet, F; Nabet, P

    1994-07-29

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-KI) cells were cotransfected with a plasmid pcDNAI containing the human preproinsulin-like growth factor II cDNA linked downstream to the human cytomegalovirus promoter and with a plasmid containing the neomycin resistance gene (pMAM-neo). CHO neo+ were selected by growth in medium supplemented with G418 geneticin. After amplification, the neomycin-resistant clones were screened for IGF-II production. IGF-II produced was identified by dot blot and quantified by ELISA. The clones C24, C40 and C94 secreted IGF-II at about 350-400 ng per 10(6) cells per day. DNA analysis of C24 and C40 CHO cells by PCR demonstrated the presence of the IGF-II construct in the transfected cells, presumably integrated into the chromosomal DNA. IGF-II produced by CHO cells and purified by RP-HPLC was a mitogen for MCF-7 stimulating mitosis 2-fold. PMID:7765161

  7. Manufacturing processes of cellular metals. Part II. Solid route, metals deposition, other processes; Procesos de fabricacion de metales celulares. Parte II: Via solida, deposicion de metales otros procesos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Cruz, L. J.; Coleto, J.

    2009-07-01

    At the first part of this paper review a description about cellular metal processes by liquid route, was made. In this second part, solid processes and metals deposition are described. In similar way, the different kind of processes in each case are reviewed; making a short description about the main parameters involved and the advantages and drawbacks in each of them. (Author) 147 refs.

  8. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Part II; Analisis neutronico y termohidraulico del reactor C.E.N.E. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, R.

    1976-07-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics thermohydraulics and shielding of the 10 HWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs.

  9. Critical Illness in Pregnancy: Part II: Common Medical Conditions Complicating Pregnancy and Puerperium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K; Karnad, Dilip R; Bandi, Venkata; Hall, Nicole; Belfort, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The first of this two-part series on critical illness in pregnancy dealt with obstetric disorders. In Part II, medical conditions that commonly affect pregnant women or worsen during pregnancy are discussed. ARDS occurs more frequently in pregnancy. Strategies commonly used in nonpregnant patients, including permissive hypercapnia, limits for plateau pressure, and prone positioning, may not be acceptable, especially in late pregnancy. Genital tract infections unique to pregnancy include chorioamnionitis, group A streptococcal infection causing toxic shock syndrome, and polymicrobial infection with streptococci, staphylococci, and Clostridium perfringens causing necrotizing vulvitis or fasciitis. Pregnancy predisposes to VTE; D-dimer levels have low specificity in pregnancy. A ventilation-perfusion scan is preferred over CT pulmonary angiography in some situations to reduce radiation to the mother's breasts. Low-molecular-weight or unfractionated heparins form the mainstay of treatment; vitamin K antagonists, oral factor Xa inhibitors, and direct thrombin inhibitors are not recommended in pregnancy. The physiologic hyperdynamic circulation in pregnancy worsens many cardiovascular disorders. It increases risk of pulmonary edema or arrhythmias in mitral stenosis, heart failure in pulmonary hypertension or aortic stenosis, aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome, or valve thrombosis in mechanical heart valves. Common neurologic problems in pregnancy include seizures, altered mental status, visual symptoms, and strokes. Other common conditions discussed are aspiration of gastric contents, OSA, thyroid disorders, diabetic ketoacidosis, and cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy. Studies confined to pregnant women are available for only a few of these conditions. We have, therefore, reviewed pregnancy-specific adjustments in the management of these disorders. PMID:26020727

  10. The Danieli Inventory of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma, Part II: Reparative Adaptational Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, Yael; Norris, Fran H; Lindert, Jutta; Paisner, Vera; Kronenberg, Sefi; Engdahl, Brian; Richter, Julia

    2015-05-01

    The impacts of the Holocaust on children of survivors have been widely investigated. However, consensus is limited, and no validated measures have been tailored with or to them. We aimed to develop and validate a scale that measures these specific impacts (Part II of the Danieli Inventory of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma). We studied 484 adult children of survivors who participated in a cross-sectional web-based survey in English or Hebrew; of these, 191 participated in a clinical interview. Exploratory factor analyses of 58 items to reduce and refine the measure yielded a 36-item scale, Reparative Adaptational Impacts, that had excellent internal consistency (α = .91) and congruence between English and Hebrew versions (φ ≥ .95). Associations between impacts and SCID-based diagnoses of major depressive episode, posttraumatic stress disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder were moderate to strong (ds = 0.48-0.89). Strong associations also emerged between severity of offspring's reparative adaptational impacts and intensity of their parents' posttrauma adaptational styles (Multiple R = .72), with intensity of victim style, especially the mother's, having the strongest effect (β = .31-.33). Having both research and clinical relevance for assessing Holocaust survivors' offspring, future studies might investigate the scale's generalizability to other populations affected by mass trauma. PMID:25985110

  11. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure . Part II; Severe Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a finite element analysis and the testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part II of the paper considers the final test to failure of the test article in the presence of an intentionally inflicted severe discrete source damage under the wing up-bending loading condition. Finite element analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during the test and demonstrate that the hybrid wing body test article was able to redistribute and support the required design loads in a severely damaged condition.

  12. Plectasin, a Fungal Defensin, Targets the Bacterial Cell Wall Precursor Lipid II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Tanja; Kruse, Thomas; Wimmer, Reinhard;

    2010-01-01

    that plectasin, a fungal defensin, acts by directly binding the bacterial cell-wall precursor Lipid II. A wide range of genetic and biochemical approaches identify cell-wall biosynthesis as the pathway targeted by plectasin. In vitro assays for cell-wall synthesis identified Lipid II as the specific cellular...

  13. Up-regulation of hexokinaseII in myeloma cells: targeting myeloma cells with 3-bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Ayako; Miki, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Shingen; Harada, Takeshi; Oda, Asuka; Amou, Hiroe; Fujii, Shiro; Kagawa, Kumiko; Takeuchi, Kyoko; Ozaki, Shuji; Matsumoto, Toshio; Abe, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    Hexokinase II (HKII), a key enzyme of glycolysis, is widely over-expressed in cancer cells. However, HKII levels and its roles in ATP production and ATP-dependent cellular process have not been well studied in hematopoietic malignant cells including multiple myeloma (MM) cells.We demonstrate herein that HKII is constitutively over-expressed in MM cells. 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA), an inhibitor of HKII, promptly and substantially suppresses ATP production and induces cell death in MM cells. Interestingly, cocultures with osteoclasts (OCs) but not bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt along with an increase in HKII levels and lactate production in MM cells. The enhancement of HKII levels and lactate production in MM cells by OCs were mostly abrogated by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, suggesting activation of glycolysis in MM cells by OCs via the PI3K-Akt-HKII pathway. Although BMSCs and OCs stimulate MM cell growth and survival, 3BrPA induces cell death in MM cells even in cocultures with OCs as well as BMSCs. Furthermore, 3BrPA was able to diminish ATP-dependent ABC transporter activity to restore drug retention in MM cells in the presence of OCs. These results may underpin possible clinical application of 3BrPA in patients with MM. PMID:22298254

  14. A pure population of lung alveolar epithelial type II cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dachun; Haviland, David L; Burns, Alan R; Zsigmond, Eva; Wetsel, Rick A

    2007-03-13

    Alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells are small, cuboidal cells that constitute approximately 60% of the pulmonary alveolar epithelium. These cells are crucial for repair of the injured alveolus by differentiating into alveolar epithelial type I cells. ATII cells derived from human ES (hES) cells are a promising source of cells that could be used therapeutically to treat distal lung diseases. We have developed a reliable transfection and culture procedure, which facilitates, via genetic selection, the differentiation of hES cells into an essentially pure (>99%) population of ATII cells (hES-ATII). Purity, as well as biological features and morphological characteristics of normal ATII cells, was demonstrated for the hES-ATII cells, including lamellar body formation, expression of surfactant proteins A, B, and C, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance receptor, as well as the synthesis and secretion of complement proteins C3 and C5. Collectively, these data document the successful generation of a pure population of ATII cells derived from hES cells, providing a practical source of ATII cells to explore in disease models their potential in the regeneration and repair of the injured alveolus and in the therapeutic treatment of genetic diseases affecting the lung. PMID:17360544

  15. Coordinator(a) de Servicios Clinicos. Parte I (Unidad I-IV). Parte II (Unidad V-VI). Guia. Documento de Trabajo (Clinical Services Coordinator. Part I. Units I-IV. Part II. Units V-VI. Guide. Working Document).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey. Area for Vocational and Technical Education.

    This guide is intended for instructing secondary students in the occupation of clinical services coordinator in a hospital. The first part contains four units on the following subjects: the occupation of clinical services coordinator; interpersonal relationships; ethical/legal aspects; and communications (telephone, intercom, and others). For each…

  16. MHC class II polymorphisms, autoreactive T-cells and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue eTsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes, also known as human leukocyte antigen genes (HLA in humans, are the prevailing contributors of genetic susceptibility to autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 Diabetes (T1D, Multiple Sclerosis (MS, and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA, among others (Todd and Wicker, 2001;MacKay et al., 2002;Hafler et al., 2007. Although the pathways through which MHC molecules afford autoimmune risk or resistance remain to be fully mapped out, it is generally accepted that they do so by shaping the central and peripheral T cell repertoires of the host towards autoimmune proclivity or resistance, respectively. Disease-predisposing MHC alleles would both spare autoreactive thymocytes from central tolerance and bias their development towards a pathogenic phenotype. Protective MHC alleles, on the other hand, would promote central deletion of autoreactive thymocytes and skew their development towards non-pathogenic phenotypes. This interpretation of the data is at odds with two other observations: that in MHC-heterozygous individuals, resistance is dominant over susceptibility; and that it is difficult to understand how deletion of one or a few clonal autoreactive T cell types would suffice to curb autoimmune responses driven by hundreds if not thousands of autoreactive T cell specificities. This review provides an update on current advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying MHC class II-associated autoimmune disease susceptibility and/or resistance and attempts to reconcile these seemingly opposing concepts.

  17. Towards multi-resolution global climate modeling with ECHAM6-FESOM. Part II: climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackow, T.; Goessling, H. F.; Jung, T.; Sidorenko, D.; Semmler, T.; Barbi, D.; Handorf, D.

    2016-06-01

    This study forms part II of two papers describing ECHAM6-FESOM, a newly established global climate model with a unique multi-resolution sea ice-ocean component. While part I deals with the model description and the mean climate state, here we examine the internal climate variability of the model under constant present-day (1990) conditions. We (1) assess the internal variations in the model in terms of objective variability performance indices, (2) analyze variations in global mean surface temperature and put them in context to variations in the observed record, with particular emphasis on the recent warming slowdown, (3) analyze and validate the most common atmospheric and oceanic variability patterns, (4) diagnose the potential predictability of various climate indices, and (5) put the multi-resolution approach to the test by comparing two setups that differ only in oceanic resolution in the equatorial belt, where one ocean mesh keeps the coarse ~1° resolution applied in the adjacent open-ocean regions and the other mesh is gradually refined to ~0.25°. Objective variability performance indices show that, in the considered setups, ECHAM6-FESOM performs overall favourably compared to five well-established climate models. Internal variations of the global mean surface temperature in the model are consistent with observed fluctuations and suggest that the recent warming slowdown can be explained as a once-in-one-hundred-years event caused by internal climate variability; periods of strong cooling in the model (`hiatus' analogs) are mainly associated with ENSO-related variability and to a lesser degree also to PDO shifts, with the AMO playing a minor role. Common atmospheric and oceanic variability patterns are simulated largely consistent with their real counterparts. Typical deficits also found in other models at similar resolutions remain, in particular too weak non-seasonal variability of SSTs over large parts of the ocean and episodic periods of almost absent

  18. CHAPA, BEEF COW/CALF HEALTH AND PRODUCTIVITY AUDIT, PART II: BEEF COW/CALF REPRODUCTIVE AND NUTRITIONAL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    OpenAIRE

    Dargatz, David

    1994-01-01

    As part of the National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS ), USDA:APHIS:Veterinary Services conducted a national study of beef production, the Beef Cow/Calf Health and Productivity Audit (CHAPA). This study was designed to provide both participants and the industry with information on cow/calf health, productivity, and management practices. Data for Part II: Nutritional & Reproductive Management Practices, were collected by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) from beef pr...

  19. Developing guidelines for economic evaluation of environmental impacts in EIAs. Part II: Case studies and dose-response literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This Part II of the report contains full versions of the case studies for air, water and land (Chapters 2-4), which were only summarised in Part I. In addition, during the work the research team has collected a large amount of literature and information on dose response relationships for air and water pollution relevant to China. This information is included as Chapters 5 and 6.

  20. Fault Detection in Gear Drives with Non-Stationary Rotational Speed - Part II: the Time-Quefrency Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, G.; Ivanov, Yu. Ye.

    2003-03-01

    This paper deals with the recognition of faults in toothing during non-stationary start up and run down of gear drives. In the first part, this task was solved by means of the time-frequency analysis. A planetary gear was used as a case study. Part II contains a new approach using the time-quefrency analysis. The same example was successfully subjected in this procedure.

  1. Low carbon products to design innovative leather processes. Part II: determination of the optimal physical modification of tara

    OpenAIRE

    Ollé Otero, Lluís; Casas, Concepció; Diaz, Jorge; Sorolla, Sílvia; Bacardit Dalmases, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This study considers the fruit of the tara bush as a sustainable source for tanning agents and proposes alternatives to chromium and other mineral salts and vegetable extracts. Specifically, physical modifications have been developed in part II of the study to obtain a modified tara with a higher percentage of tannins and with a better level of penetration (see Low carbon products to design innovative leather processes. Part I: determination of the optimal chemical modification of...

  2. A microencapsulation process of liquid mercury by sulfur polymer stabilization/solidification technology. Part II: Durability of materials

    OpenAIRE

    López-Delgado, A.; Guerrero, A; López, F. A.; Pérez, C.; Alguacil, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    Under the European LIFE Program a microencapsulation process was developed for liquid mercury using Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) technology, obtaining a stable concrete-like sulfur matrix that allows the immobilization of mercury for long-term storage. The process description and characterization of the materials obtained were detailed in Part I. The present document, Part II, reports the results of different tests carried out to determine the durability of Hg-S concrete...

  3. Developing guidelines for economic evaluation of environmental impacts in EIAs. Part II: Case studies and dose-response literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Part II of the report contains full versions of the case studies for air, water and land (Chapters 2-4), which were only summarised in Part I. In addition, during the work the research team has collected a large amount of literature and information on dose response relationships for air and water pollution relevant to China. This information is included as Chapters 5 and 6

  4. A common effect of angiotensin II and relaxin 2 on the PNT1A normal prostate epithelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domińska, Kamila; Ochędalski, Tomasz; Kowalska, Karolina; Matysiak-Burzyńska, Zuzanna E; Płuciennik, Elżbieta; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka W

    2016-09-01

    The prostate gland is a part of the male reproductive tract which produces both angiotensin II (Ang II) and relaxin 2 (RLN2). The present study analyzes the effect of both these peptide hormones at concentration 10(-8)M on viability, proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion of normal prostate epithelial cells (PNT1A). Improved survival in two- and three-dimensional cell cultures was noted as well as visual changes in colony size and structure in Geltrex™. Stimulatory influence on cell viability of each peptide applied single was lower than in combination. Enhanced survival of PNT1A cells appears to be associated with increased BCL2/BAX messenger RNA (mRNA) expression ratio. Modulation of cell spreading and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion dynamics were also altered as an influence of tested hormone application. However, long-term Ang II and RLN2 effects may lead to an increase of normal prostate cell migration and invasion abilities. Moreover, gelatin zymography revealed that both gelatinases A and B were augmented by Ang II treatment, whereas RLN2 significantly stimulated only MMP-9 secretion. These results support the hypothesis that deregulation of locally secreted peptide hormones such as Ang II and RLN2 may take part in the development of certain cancers, including prostate cancer. Moreover, the observed ability of relaxin 2 to act as a regulator of mRNA expression levels not only LGR7 but also classic angiotensin receptors suggested that renin-angiotensin system and relaxin family peptide system are functionally linked. PMID:27119161

  5. "Why not stoichiometry" versus "Stoichiometry--why not?" Part II: GATES in context with redox systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna Maria; Asuero, Agustin G; Toporek, Marcin; Michałowski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Redox equilibria and titration play an important role in chemical analysis, and the formulation of an accurate mathematical description is a challenge. This article is devoted to static and (mainly) dynamic redox systems; the dynamic systems are represented by redox titrations. An overview addresses earlier approaches to static redox systems (redox diagram plots, including Pourbaix diagrams) and to titration redox systems, thereby covering a gap in the literature. After this short review, the generalized approach to electrolytic systems (GATES) is introduced, with generalized electron balance (GEB) as its inherent part within GATES/GEB. Computer simulation, performed according to GATES/GEB, enables following the changes in potential and pH of the solution, together with chemical speciation at each step of a titration, thus providing better insight into this procedure. The undeniable advantages of GATES/GEB over earlier approaches are indicated. Formulation of GEB according to two approaches (I and II) is presented on the respective examples. A general criterion distinguishing between non-redox and redox systems is presented. It is indicated that the formulation of GEB according to Approach II does not need the knowledge of oxidation degrees of particular elements; knowledge of the composition, expressed by chemical formula of the species and its charge, is sufficient for this purpose. Approach I to GEB, known also as the "short" version of GEB, is applicable if oxidation degrees for all elements of the system are known beforehand. The roles of oxidants and reductants are not ascribed to particular components forming a system and to the species thus formed. This is the complete opposite of earlier approaches to redox titrations, based on the stoichiometric redox reaction, formulated for this purpose. GEB, perceived as a law of matter conservation, is fully compatible with other (charge and concentration) balances related to the system in question. The applicability

  6. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun, E-mail: majuntongrensh1@126.com; Zhuang, Wen-Fang, E-mail: wenfangzhuangmd@163.com

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent. - Highlights: • SKI-II inhibits proliferation and survival of primary and transformed AML cells. • SKI-II induces apoptotic death of AML cells, but is safe to normal PBMCs. • SKI-II is more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors in inhibiting AML cells. • SKI-II inhibits SphK1 activity, while increasing ceramide production in AML cells. • SKI-II dose-dependently inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  7. Stimulation of DNA synthesis in cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie, C.C.; McCormick-Shannon, K.; Robinson, P.C.; Mason, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Restoration of the alveolar epithelium after injury is thought to be dependent on the proliferation of alveolar type II cells. To understand the factors that may be involved in promoting type II cell proliferation in vivo, we determined the effect of potential mitogens and culture substrata on DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. Type II cells cultured in basal medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) exhibited essentially no DNA synthesis. Factors that stimulated /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation included cholera toxin, epidermal growth factor, and rat serum. The greatest degree of stimulation was achieved by plating type II cells on an extracellular matrix prepared from bovine corneal endothelial cells and then by culturing the pneumocytes in medium containing rat serum, cholera toxin, insulin, and epidermal growth factor. Under conditions of stimulation of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation there was an increased DNA content per culture dish but no increase in cell number. The ability of various culture conditions to promote DNA synthesis in type II cells was verified by autoradiography. Type II cells were identified by the presence of cytoplasmic inclusions, which were visualized by tannic acid staining before autoradiography. These results demonstrate the importance of soluble factors and culture substratum in stimulating DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture.

  8. Myosin-II dependent cell contractility contributes to spontaneous nodule formation of mesothelioma cells

    CERN Document Server

    Tárnoki-Zách, Julia; Méhes, Elod; Paku, Sándor; Neufeld, Zoltán; Hegedus, Balázs; Döme, Balázs; Czirok, Andras

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that characteristic nodules emerge in cultures of several malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cell lines. Instead of excessive local cell proliferation, the nodules arise by Myosin II-driven cell contractility. The aggregation process can be prevented or reversed by suitable pharmacological inhibitors of acto-myosin contractility. A cell-resolved elasto-plastic model of the multicellular patterning process indicates that the morphology and size of the nodules as well as the speed of their formation is determined by the mechanical tension cells exert on their neighbors, and the stability of cell-substrate adhesion complexes. A linear stability analysis of a homogenous, self-tensioned Maxwell fluid indicates the unconditional presence of a patterning instability.

  9. Conference scene: pharmacogenomics: from cell to clinic (part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siest, Gérard; Medeiros, Rui; Melichar, Bohuslav; Stathopoulou, Maria; Van Schaik, Ron Hn; Cacabelos, Ramon; Abt, Peter Meier; Monteiro, Carolino; Gurwitz, David; Queiroz, Jao; Mota-Filipe, Helder; Ndiaye, Ndeye Coumba; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    Second International ESPT Meeting Lisbon, Portugal, 26-28 September 2013 The second European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT) conference was organized in Lisbon, Portugal, and attracted 250 participants from 37 different countries. The participants could listen to 50 oral presentations, participate in five lunch symposia and were able to view 83 posters and an exhibition. Part 1 of this Conference Scene was presented in the previous issue of Pharmacogenomics. This second part will focus on: clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics tests; transporters and pharmacogenomics; stem cells and other new tools for pharmacogenomics and drug discovery; from system pharmacogenomics to personalized medicine; and, finally, we will discuss the Posters and Awards that were presented at the conference.

  10. Pavlovian Conditioning of Rat Mucosal Mast Cells to Secrete Rat Mast Cell Protease II

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacQueen, Glenda; Marshall, Jean; Perdue, Mary; Siegel, Shepard; Bienenstock, John

    1989-01-01

    Antigen (egg albumin) injections, which stimulate mucosal mast cells to secrete mediators, were paired with an audiovisual cue. After reexposure to the audiovisual cue, a mediator (rat mast cell protease II) was measured with a sensitive and specific assay. Animals reexposed to only the audiovisual cue released a quantity of protease not significantly different from animals reexposed to both the cue and the antigen; these groups released significantly more protease than animals that had received the cue and antigen in a noncontingent manner. The results support a role for the central nervous system as a functional effector of mast cell function in the allergic state.

  11. [The history of antitobacco actions in the last 500 years. Part. II. Medical actions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Tobacco was brought to Europe by Christopher Columbus, who discovered it in Cuba in October, 1492. Spread of tobacco consumption was initiated by the French diplomat Jean Nicot de Villemain, who in 1560 recommended it in the form of powdered tobacco leaves to the French Queen Catherine de Medice to combat her migraine headaches, and introduced the term Nicotiana tobaccum. Tobacco consumption greatly rose after the I World War, and after the II World War it became very common, especially among man. In the first half of the 20th century the sale of tobacco products rose by 61%, and cigarettes dominated the market of tobacco products. At the beginning of the 20th century cigarettes constituted only 2% of the total sale of tobacco products, while in the middle of the 20th century--more than 80%. Although the first epidemiological papers indicating that "smoking is connected with the shortening of life span" were published in the first half of the 20th century, not until 1950 did Hill and Doll in Great Britain, and Wynder and Graham in USA in 1951 show a statistically significant correlation between cigarettes smoking and lung cancer occurrence. Many controversies according the use of tobacco accompanied it from the beginning of its presence in Europe. The conflicting opinions according to its influence to health coexisted in the 16th to 19th centuries. In this period, especially in the 19th century dominated moral and religious arguments against tobacco. In the 20th century however, and particularly in its second part, development in medical research was enhanced by civil voluntary actions against advertisement and passive smoking. This lead to the significant limitation of tobacco expansion in Europe, USA and Canada in the end of the 20th century.

  12. Industry Wage Surveys: Banking and Life Insurance, December 1976. Part I--Banking. Part II--Life Insurance. Bulletin 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Carl

    This report presents the results of a survey conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics to determine wages and related benefits in (1) the banking industry and (2) for employees in home offices and regional head offices of life insurance carriers. Part 1 discusses banking industry characteristics and presents data for tellers and selected…

  13. The Design of Research Laboratories. Part I: A General Assessment. Part II: Air Conditioning and Conditioned Rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legget, R. F.; Hutcheon, N. B.

    Design factors in the planning of research laboratories are described which include--(1) location, (2) future expansion, (3) internal flexibility, (4) provision of services, (5) laboratory furnishing, (6) internal traffic, (7) space requirements, and (8) building costs. A second part discusses air-conditioning and conditioned rooms--(1)…

  14. Interobserver reliability and diagnostic performance of Chiari II malformation measures in MR imaging-part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, Niels; van der Vliet, Ton; Rotteveel, Jan J.; Feuth, Ton; Roeleveld, Nel; Mullaart, Reinier A.

    2012-01-01

    Brain MR imaging is essential in the assessment of Chiari II malformation in clinical and research settings concerning spina bifida. However, the interpretation of MR images of the malformation is not always straightforward. Morphometric analyses of the extent of Chiari II malformation may improve t

  15. Interobserver reliability and diagnostic performance of Chiari II malformation measures in MR imaging--part 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, N.; Vliet, T. van der; Rotteveel, J.J.; Feuth, T.; Roeleveld, N.; Mullaart, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Brain MR imaging is essential in the assessment of Chiari II malformation in clinical and research settings concerning spina bifida. However, the interpretation of MR images of the malformation is not always straightforward. Morphometric analyses of the extent of Chiari II malformation may

  16. Primer on medical genomics part II: Background principles and methods in molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefferi, Ayalew; Wieben, Eric D; Dewald, Gordon W; Whiteman, David A H; Bernard, Matthew E; Spelsberg, Thomas C

    2002-08-01

    The nucleus of every human cell contains the full complement of the human genome, which consists of approximately 30,000 to 70,000 named and unnamed genes and many intergenic DNA sequences. The double-helical DNA molecule in a human cell, associated with special proteins, is highly compacted into 22 pairs of autosomal chromosomes and an additional pair of sex chromosomes. The entire cellular DNA consists of approximately 3 billion base pairs, of which only 1% is thought to encode a functional protein or a polypeptide. Genetic information is expressed and regulated through a complex system of DNA transcription, RNA processing, RNA translation, and posttranslational and cotranslational modification of proteins. Advances in molecular biology techniques have allowed accurate and rapid characterization of DNA sequences as well as identification and quantification of cellular RNA and protein. Global analytic methods and human genetic mapping are expected to accelerate the process of identification and localization of disease genes. In this second part of an educational series in medical genomics, selected principles and methods in molecular biology are recapped, with the intent to prepare the reader for forthcoming articles with a more direct focus on aspects of the subject matter.

  17. Superantigen and HLA-DR ligation induce phospholipase-C gamma 1 activation in class II+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanner, S B; Odum, Niels; Grosmaire, L;

    1992-01-01

    activated by HLA-DR ligation through antibody cross-linking or by direct enterotoxin superantigen binding. Both types of stimuli induced tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) and an increase in intracellular calcium concentration; however......, superantigen-induced signaling was stronger than class II ligation alone. Antibody-mediated ligation of HLA-DR with CD3 resulted in augmented PLC gamma 1 activation and increased calcium mobilization, consistent with a mechanism of superantigen activity through a combination of class II and CD3/Ti signals...... to the PLC gamma 1 signal transduction pathway, and that coligation of HLA-DR with CD3 augments T cell signaling comparable to that induced by enterotoxin superantigen. Thus, we suggest that superantigen-induced early signaling responses in activated T cells may be due in part to class II transmembrane...

  18. Neuro-Oftalmologia: sistema sensorial -- Parte II Revisão 1997 -- 1999 Neuro-Ophthalmology: sensorial system - Part II. Review 1997 - 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Lana-Peixoto

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Esta é a segunda parte de uma revisão da literatura do sistema visual sensorial. O autor seleciona artigos publicados na literatura entre os anos de 1997 e 1999 relacionados a neurorretinites, neuropatia óptica compressiva, tumores do nervo óptico, pseudotumor cerebral, neuropatias ópticas hereditárias, hipoplasia do nervo óptico, drusas do disco óptico, neuropatia óptica tóxica, neuropatia óptica traumática, outras neuropatias ópticas e doenças retinianas, doenças do quiasma óptico e do trato óptico, assim como alterações geniculares e retrogeniculares, incluindo os distúrbios visuais corticais. Os artigos são apresentados e comentados quanto às suas conclusões, alcance e relações com o conhecimento previamente estabelecido.This is the second part of a review of papers on the visual afferent system published from 1997 to 1999. In this part the author presents the most important contributions made to areas such as neuroretinitis, optic nerve tumors, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hereditary optic neuropathies, optic disc drusen, optic nerve hypoplasia, traumatic and toxic optic neuropathy as well as geniculate and retrogeniculate visual disorders. Selected papers are considered in relation to their results and previously established concepts.

  19. Re-expression of IGF-II is important for beta cell regeneration in adult mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luxian Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The key factors which support re-expansion of beta cell numbers after injury are largely unknown. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II plays a critical role in supporting cell division and differentiation during ontogeny but its role in the adult is not known. In this study we investigated the effect of IGF-II on beta cell regeneration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed an in vivo model of 'switchable' c-Myc-induced beta cell ablation, pIns-c-MycER(TAM, in which 90% of beta cells are lost following 11 days of c-Myc (Myc activation in vivo. Importantly, such ablation is normally followed by beta cell regeneration once Myc is deactivated, enabling functional studies of beta cell regeneration in vivo. IGF-II was shown to be re-expressed in the adult pancreas of pIns-c-MycER(TAM/IGF-II(+/+ (MIG mice, following beta cell injury. As expected in the presence of IGF-II beta cell mass and numbers recover rapidly after ablation. In contrast, in pIns-c-MycER(TAM/IGF-II(+/- (MIGKO mice, which express no IGF-II, recovery of beta cell mass and numbers were delayed and impaired. Despite failure of beta cell number increase, MIGKO mice recovered from hyperglycaemia, although this was delayed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that beta cell regeneration in adult mice depends on re-expression of IGF-II, and supports the utility of using such ablation-recovery models for identifying other potential factors critical for underpinning successful beta cell regeneration in vivo. The potential therapeutic benefits of manipulating the IGF-II signaling systems merit further exploration.

  20. Multiple junction II-VI compound photoelectrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russak, Michael A.

    1986-12-01

    The application of concepts used in producing tandem solid state photovoltaic devices to photoelectrochemical cells has resulted in improved spectral response and photovoltaic output. As in solid state devices, the key to achieving good photovoltaic performance is optimization of the semiconductor properties in each part of the tandem arrangement. This has been done for the thin film CdS/CdSe/sulfide-polysulfide system with an improvement of over 15 percent in conversion efficiency being obtained. Preliminary results showing significant current enhancement by the addition of a CdSe backwall electrode to the CdTe/selenide-polyselenide system are also reported.

  1. Evaluation and Treatment of Acne Patients – Part II: Topical, Systemic and Surgical Treatments, Acne Treatment in Pregnancy, Treatment Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    A. Figueiredo; Massa, A; Picoto, A; Soares, AP; Lopes, C; Resende, C; Rebelo, C; Brandão, FM; Marques-Pinto, G; Schonenberger de Oliveira, H; Selores, M.; Gonçalo, M; Bello, RT

    2011-01-01

    O Portuguese Acne Advisory Board (PAAB), grupo de dermatologistas portugueses que, à semelhança de grupos congéneres internacionais, tem dedicado particular atenção à definição de linhas de orientação para o tratamento da acne, pretende que o presente documento constitua uma ferramenta útil na abordagem dos doentes com esta patologia. Elaborou-se um dossier, para educação médica contínua, subdividido em 2 partes: Parte I – etiopatogenia e clínica; Parte II – abordagem terapêutica. Nesta P...

  2. The new production theory for health care through clinical reengineering: a study of clinical guidelines--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, J R

    1995-01-01

    In Part I of this two-part article, in the December 1994 issue of the journal, the author discussed the manufacturing theories of Peter Drucker in terms of their applicability for the health care field. He concluded that Drucker's four principles and practices of manufacturing--statistical quality control, manufacturing accounting, modular organization, and systems approach--do have application to the health care system. Clinical guidelines, a variation on the Drucker theory, are a specific example of the manufacturing process in health. The performance to date of some guidelines and their implications for the health care reform debate are discussed in Part II of the article. PMID:10139603

  3. Control of uncertain systems by feedback linearization with neural networks augmentation. Part II. Controller validation by numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TOADER

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper was conceived in two parts. Part I, previously published in this journal, highlighted the main steps of adaptive output feedback control for non-affine uncertain systems, having a known relative degree. The main paradigm of this approach was the feedback linearization (dynamic inversion with neural network augmentation. Meanwhile, based on new contributions of the authors, a new paradigm, that of robust servomechanism problem solution, has been added to the controller architecture. The current Part II of the paper presents the validation of the controller hereby obtained by using the longitudinal channel of a hovering VTOL-type aircraft as mathematical model.

  4. Effect of angiotensin II on proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mesodermal progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Treatment with angiotensin II enhanced LIF-induced DNA synthesis of mouse iPS cells. ► Angiotensin II may enhance the DNA synthesis via induction of superoxide. ► Treatment with angiotensin II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. ► Angiotensin II enhanced differentiation into mesodermal progenitor cells. ► Angiotensin II may enhance the differentiation via activation of p38 MAPK. -- Abstract: Previous studies suggest that angiotensin receptor stimulation may enhance not only proliferation but also differentiation of undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, in the present study, we determined the involvement of the angiotensin receptor in the proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Stimulation with angiotensin II (Ang II) significantly increased DNA synthesis in mouse iPS cells cultured in a medium with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Pretreatment of the cells with either candesartan (a selective Ang II type 1 receptor [AT1R] antagonist) or Tempol (a cell-permeable superoxide scavenger) significantly inhibited Ang II-induced DNA synthesis. Treatment with Ang II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Pretreatment with candesartan significantly inhibited Ang II- induced JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. In contrast, induction of mouse iPS cell differentiation into Flk-1-positive mesodermal progenitor cells was performed in type IV collagen (Col IV)- coated dishes in a differentiation medium without LIF. When Col IV-exposed iPS cells were treated with Ang II for 5 days, the expression of Flk-1 was significantly increased compared with that in the cells treated with the vehicle alone. Pretreatment of the cells with both candesartan and SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) significantly inhibited the Ang II- induced increase in Flk-1 expression. Treatment with Ang II enhanced the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in Col IV- exposed iPS cells. These results suggest that the stimulation of

  5. REDUCED TOPOISOMERASE-II ACTIVITY IN MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT HUMAN NONSMALL CELL LUNG-CANCER CELL-LINES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EIJDEMS, EWHM; DEHAAS, M; TIMMERMAN, AJ; VANDERSCHANS, GP; KAMST, E; DENOOIJ, J; RICOTTI, GCBA; BORST, P; BAAS, F

    1995-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) cell lines often have a compound phenotype, combining reduced drug accumulation with a decrease in topoisomerase II. We have analysed alterations in topoisomerase II in MDR derivatives of the human lung cancer cell line SW-1573. Selection with doxorubicin frequently resulte

  6. Angiotensin II Inhibits Insulin Binding to Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jin Oh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInsulin-mediated glucose uptake in insulin target tissues is correlated with interstitial insulin concentration, rather than plasma insulin concentration. Therefore, insulin delivery to the interstitium of target tissues is very important, and the endothelium may also play an important role in the development of insulin resistance.MethodsAfter treating bovine aortic endothelial cells with angiotensin II (ATII, we observed the changes in insulin binding capacity and the amounts of insulin receptor (IR on the cell membranes and in the cytosol.ResultsAfter treatment of 10-7M ATII, insulin binding was decreased progressively, up to 60% at 60 minutes (P<0.05. ATII receptor blocker (eprosartan dose dependently improved the insulin binding capacity which was reduced by ATII (P<0.05. At 200 µM, eprosartan fully restored insulin binding capacity, althogh it resulted in only a 20% to 30% restoration at the therapeutic concentration. ATII did not affect the total amount of IR, but it did reduce the amount of IR on the plasma membrane and increased that in the cytosol.ConclusionATII decreased the insulin binding capacity of the tested cells. ATII did not affect the total amount of IR but did decrease the amount of IR on the plasma membrane. Our data indicate that ATII decreases insulin binding by translocating IR from the plasma membrane to the cytosol. The binding of insulin to IR is important for insulin-induced vasodilation and transendothelial insulin transport. Therefore, ATII may cause insulin resistance through this endothelium-based mechanism.

  7. Detection of PIVKA II produced by human hepatoma cells in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, H; Ono, M; Sekiya, C; Ohta, H; Ohhira, M; Ohhira, M; Yoshida, Y; Ikeda, N; Namiki, M

    1991-03-01

    A novel experimental nude mouse model, which is useful for investigation of the mechanisms of PIVKA II synthesis, was established by inoculation with PIVKA II-producing human hepatoma cells (huH-1). We have found markedly elevated levels of PIVKA II in the plasma of nude mice transplanted with huH-1 cells and increased PIVKA II content in huH-1 tumor tissues. Whereas we have not found detectable level of PIVKA II neither in the plasma nor in tumor tissues of nude mice transplanted different human hepatoma cells (HLF) which is not producing PIVKA II. Histology of the tumor tissues produced by huH-1 cells revealed a thick trabecular pattern with blood spaces.

  8. Neuro-Oftalmologia: sistema sensorial -- Parte II Revisão 1997 -- 1999 Neuro-Ophthalmology: sensorial system - Part II. Review 1997 - 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Aurélio Lana-Peixoto

    2002-01-01

    Esta é a segunda parte de uma revisão da literatura do sistema visual sensorial. O autor seleciona artigos publicados na literatura entre os anos de 1997 e 1999 relacionados a neurorretinites, neuropatia óptica compressiva, tumores do nervo óptico, pseudotumor cerebral, neuropatias ópticas hereditárias, hipoplasia do nervo óptico, drusas do disco óptico, neuropatia óptica tóxica, neuropatia óptica traumática, outras neuropatias ópticas e doenças retinianas, doenças do quiasma óptico e do trat...

  9. Jamming dynamics of stretch-induced surfactant release by alveolar type II cells

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, Arnab; Arold, Stephen P.; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Suki, Béla

    2011-01-01

    Secretion of pulmonary surfactant by alveolar epithelial type II cells is vital for the reduction of interfacial surface tension, thus preventing lung collapse. To study secretion dynamics, rat alveolar epithelial type II cells were cultured on elastic membranes and cyclically stretched. The amounts of phosphatidylcholine, the primary lipid component of surfactant, inside and outside the cells, were measured using radiolabeled choline. During and immediately after stretch, cells secreted less...

  10. Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

  11. Reactive polymers: part I - Novel polystyrene-anchored copper (II), nickel (II), cobalt (II), iron (III), zinc (II), cadmium (II), molybdenum (VI) and uranium (VI) complexes of the chelating resin containing thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new chelating resin containing thiosemicarbazone has been synthesized by the reaction of aldehydopolystyrene and thiosemicarbazide. The polystyrene bound thiosemicarbazone reacts with salicylaldehyde leading to the formation of a new Schiff base chelating resin which reacts with sodium monochloroacetate and gives the polymer bound S-acetatothiosemicarbazone. The new chelating resin forms complexes of the types PS-LCuX·S, PS-LNiX·3S, PS-LHNi(acac)2, PS-LCoX·3S, PS-LFeX2·2S, PS-LZnX·S, PS-LCdX·S, PS-LMoO2(acac) and PS-LUO2X·S (where PS-LH = polymeranchored ligand; S = DMF or CH3OH; X=Cl or CH3COO- and acacH = acetylacetone). The chelating resins and complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR and electronic spectra and magnetic measurements. The Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Fe(III) complexes are paramagnetic while the Zn(II), Cd(II), Mo(VI) and U(VI) complexes are diamagnetic. The IR data indicate the thioenolization of the ligand in the complexes (except in PS-LHNi(acac)2 where it behaves as a neutral bidentate ligand). (author). 24 refs., 2 tabs

  12. Evaluación neurofuncional del tallo cerebral Parte II: Reflejo mandibular = Neurofunctional evaluation of brain stem. II. Mandibular reflex

    OpenAIRE

    Leon Sarmiento, Fidias E.; Pabón Porras, María Angélica; Granadillo Deluqu, Elías David

    2011-01-01

    El reflejo mandibular o maseterino posee conexiones nerviosas únicas, diferentes de las exhi­bidas por otros reflejos monosinápticos humanos, y permite evaluar, de forma fácil y eficien­te, el tallo cerebral por medio de la estimulación mecánica, eléctrica o magnética. Diversos estudios han demostrado la participación en este reflejo de las interneuronas del tallo cerebral y su modulación por estructuras supraespinales, que hacen parte fundamental de su integra­ción motora. El reflejo mandibu...

  13. Active suppression of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II genes is acquired very early in B-cell ontogeny and is maintained up to the B-cell blast stage. Terminal differentiation in plasma cells is, however, accompanied by a loss of class II gene expression. In B cells this gene system is under the control of several loci encoding transacting factors with activator function, one of which, the aIr-1 gene product, operates across species barriers. In this report human class II gene expression is shown to be extinguished in somatic cell hybrids between the human class II-positive B-cell line Raji and the mouse class-II negative plasmacytoma cell line P3-U1. Since all murine chromosomes are retained in these hybrids and no preferential segregation of a specific human chromosome is observed, the results are compatible with the presence of suppressor factors of mouse origin, operating across species barriers and inhibiting class II gene expression. Suppression seems to act at the level of transcription or accumulation of class II-specific mRNA, since no human, and very few murine, class II transcripts are detectable in the hybrids

  14. Peak-summer East Asian rainfall predictability and prediction part II: extratropical East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, So-Young; Wang, Bin; Xing, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The part II of the present study focuses on northern East Asia (NEA: 26°N-50°N, 100°-140°E), exploring the source and limit of the predictability of the peak summer (July-August) rainfall. Prediction of NEA peak summer rainfall is extremely challenging because of the exposure of the NEA to midlatitude influence. By examining four coupled climate models' multi-model ensemble (MME) hindcast during 1979-2010, we found that the domain-averaged MME temporal correlation coefficient (TCC) skill is only 0.13. It is unclear whether the dynamical models' poor skills are due to limited predictability of the peak-summer NEA rainfall. In the present study we attempted to address this issue by applying predictable mode analysis method using 35-year observations (1979-2013). Four empirical orthogonal modes of variability and associated major potential sources of variability are identified: (a) an equatorial western Pacific (EWP)-NEA teleconnection driven by EWP sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, (b) a western Pacific subtropical high and Indo-Pacific dipole SST feedback mode, (c) a central Pacific-El Nino-Southern Oscillation mode, and (d) a Eurasian wave train pattern. Physically meaningful predictors for each principal component (PC) were selected based on analysis of the lead-lag correlations with the persistent and tendency fields of SST and sea-level pressure from March to June. A suite of physical-empirical (P-E) models is established to predict the four leading PCs. The peak summer rainfall anomaly pattern is then objectively predicted by using the predicted PCs and the corresponding observed spatial patterns. A 35-year cross-validated hindcast over the NEA yields a domain-averaged TCC skill of 0.36, which is significantly higher than the MME dynamical hindcast (0.13). The estimated maximum potential attainable TCC skill averaged over the entire domain is around 0.61, suggesting that the current dynamical prediction models may have large rooms to improve

  15. Isolation of alveolar epithelial type II progenitor cells from adult human lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Fujino, Naoya; Kubo, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Takaya; Ota, Chiharu; Hegab, Ahmed E.; He, Mei; Suzuki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Takashi; Kato, Hidemasa; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2010-01-01

    Resident stem/progenitor cells in the lung are important for tissue homeostasis and repair. However, a progenitor population for alveolar type II (ATII) cells in adult human lungs has not been identified. The aim of this study is to isolate progenitor cells from adult human lungs with the ability to differentiate into ATII cells. We isolated colony-forming cells that had the capability for self-renewal and the potential to generate ATII cells in vitro. These undifferentiated progenitor cells ...

  16. Secretion of mucus proteinase inhibitor and elafin by Clara cell and type II pneumocyte cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallenave, J M; Silva, A; Marsden, M E; Ryle, A P

    1993-02-01

    The regulation of proteinases secreted by neutrophils is very important for the prevention of tissue injury. We recently described the isolation of elafin from bronchial secretions, a new elastase-specific inhibitor that is also found in the skin of patients with psoriasis. In this study, we investigated the secretion of elafin and mucus proteinase inhibitor (MPI), another inhibitor showing sequence similarity with elafin, in two lung carcinoma cell lines, NCI-H322 and A549, which have features of Clara cells and type II alveolar cells, respectively. The results presented show that the two inhibitors are produced when the cells are cultured either in serum-free or in serum-containing media. MPI was detected immunologically as a unique molecule of M(r) 14 kD, in accordance with previous studies. Conversely, one or two elafin-immunoreactive species were detected depending on the cell line: a 12- to 14-kD species was observed in the A549 cell line, regardless of the culture conditions, whereas in the NCI-H322 cell line we detected a 6-kD species in serum-containing (10% fetal calf serum) conditions and a 12- to 14-kD species in serum-free conditions. The 12- to 14-kD molecule probably represents an active precursor of elafin. Whether the cleavage of the 12- to 14-kD precursor giving rise to the elafin molecule is of any physiologic significance is not known. In showing for the first time that MPI and elafin (and its precursor) are secreted by the A549 cell line, this report implicates the type II alveolar cell in the defense of the peripheral lung against the neutrophil elastase secreted during inflammation. PMID:8427705

  17. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 2: Application to EBR-II Primary Sodium System and Related Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Sherman; Collin J. Knight

    2006-03-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decontamination and decomissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidifed carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, USA. This report is Part 2 of a two-part report. This second report provides a supplement to the first report and describes the application of the humdidified carbon dioxide technique ("carbonation") to the EBR-II primary tank, primary cover gas systems, and the intermediate heat exchanger. Future treatment plans are also provided.

  18. Epithelial cell shape is regulated by Lulu proteins via myosin-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Tanoue, Takuji

    2010-02-15

    Cell-shape change in epithelial structures is fundamental to animal morphogenesis. Recent studies identified myosin-II as the major generator of driving forces for cell-shape changes during morphogenesis. Lulu (Epb41l5) is a major regulator of morphogenesis, although the downstream molecular and cellular mechanisms remain obscure in mammals. In Drosophila and zebrafish, Lulu proteins were reported to negatively regulate Crumbs, an apical domain regulator, thus regulating morphogenesis. In this study, we show that mammalian Lulu activates myosin-II, thus regulating epithelial cell shape. In our experiments, Lulu expression in epithelial cells resulted in apical constriction and lateral elongation in the cells, accompanied by upregulation of myosin-II. The inhibition of myosin-II activity almost completely blocked this Lulu-driven cell-shape change. We further found that Rock participates in the myosin-II activation. Additionally, RNAi-mediated depletion of Lulu in epithelial cells resulted in disorganization of myosin-II and a concomitant loss of proper lateral domain organization in the cells. From these results, we propose that Lulu regulates epithelial cell shape by controlling myosin-II activity. PMID:20103536

  19. Bauxitas refratárias: composição química, fases e propriedades - parte II Refractory bauxites: chemical composition, phases and properties - part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pascoal

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A bauxita apresenta uma ampla faixa de aplicações industriais, de acordo com sua composição química e mineralógica. No setor de refratários, esta matéria-prima tem adquirido grande importância, uma vez que pode substituir parcial ou totalmente agregados de alumina eletrofundida em formados e monolíticos, devido a sua alta refratariedade e custo inferior. Entre os maiores produtores mundiais encontram-se a China, a Guiana e o Brasil. Embora seja um dos maiores produtores mundiais de bauxita refratária, no Brasil pouco se conhece de suas características químicas e mineralógicas, bem como suas propriedades em serviço a altas temperaturas. Esta seqüência de artigos apresenta uma revisão sobre as aplicações, fases cristalinas, características e propriedades a alta temperatura de bauxitas refratárias chinesas e sul-americanas. Nesta segunda parte serão consideradas suas propriedades mecânicas a alta temperatura e um problema freqüente na utilização de bauxitas refratárias, a expansão térmica secundária.Bauxite shows a wide range of applications, according to its chemical and mineralogical composition. In the refractory industry, this raw material has partially or totally substituted fused alumina in bricks and castables, due to its high refractoriness and low cost. The major producers of refractory grade bauxite are, in this order, China, Guyana and Brazil. Although Brazil is one of the major suppliers of this raw material, very few studies have been carried out to understand its chemical, mineralogical and high-temperature properties. These papers present a review regarding the applications of South American and Chinese refractory grade bauxites, including the microchemistry of their crystalline phases and their hot properties. This second part will focus mechanical properties at high temperatures, and a common problem in refractory bauxites, the secondary thermal expansion.

  20. Zircônia tetragonal policristalina. Parte II: Microestrutura e resistividade elétrica Tetragonal zirconia polycrystals. Part II: Microstructure and electrical resistivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Tadokoro

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Nesta segunda parte são mostrados os resultados obtidos em cerâmicas densas de ZrO2: 3% mol Y2O3 (Y-TZP e 12% mol CeO2 (Ce-TZP, analisadas por espectroscopia Raman, microscopia eletrônica de varredura, e por espectroscopia de impedância. Os resultados mostram que, para ambos tipos de amostras, é possível obter cerâmicas densas (> 95% da densidade teórica para temperaturas de sinterização inferiores a 0,45 T F (T F = temperatura de fusão. A taxa de crescimento de grãos é dependente do cátion estabilizante, sendo maior para a Ce-TZP do que para a Y-TZP. Os espectros Raman de cerâmicas sinterizadas mostram as bandas típicas associadas aos modos ativos da fase cristalográfica tetragonal. Os resultados de espectroscopia de impedância são similares aos obtidos por outros pesquisadores tanto para cerâmicas convencionais quanto nanofásicas no caso da Y-TZP. Para a Ce-TZP foi observada uma redução na condutividade extrínseca em conseqüência da maior pureza do precursor cristalizado.Results on dense ZrO2: 3 mol% Y2O3 (Y-TZP and 12 mol% CeO2 (Ce-TZP ceramics are shown in this second part. Sintered specimens were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and impedance spectroscopy. The main results show that both types of solid solutions may attain a high densification (> 95% of the theoretical density for sintering temperatures lower than 0.45 T F (T F = melting temperature. The rate of grain growth is governed by the stabilizing cation and is faster for Ce-TZP than for Y-TZP. Raman spectra exhibit the six characteristic bands of the tetragonal phase for both specimens. Impedance spectroscopy results for Y-TZP do not differ from those obtained for nanophase ceramics. A reduction in the extrinsic conductivity due to the high purity of the crystallized precursor was observed for Ce-TZP specimens.

  1. Nitro-Arachidonic Acid Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Cell Line of Kidney Proximal Tubular Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Sánchez-Calvo

    Full Text Available Nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA is a cell signaling nitroalkene that exerts anti-inflammatory activities during macrophage activation. While angiotensin II (ANG II produces an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells, little is known regarding the potential protective effects of NO2-AA in ANG II-mediated kidney injury. As such, this study examines the impact of NO2-AA on ANG II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in an immortalized renal proximal tubule cell line (HK-2 cells. Treatment of HK-2 cells with ANG II increases the production of superoxide (O2●-, nitric oxide (●NO, inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2 expression, peroxynitrite (ONOO- and mitochondrial dysfunction. Using high-resolution respirometry, it was observed that the presence of NO2-AA prevented ANG II-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Attempting to address mechanism, we treated isolated rat kidney mitochondria with ONOO-, a key mediator of ANG II-induced mitochondrial damage, in the presence or absence of NO2-AA. Whereas the activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH and ATP synthase (ATPase were diminished upon exposure to ONOO-, they were restored by pre-incubating the mitochondria with NO2-AA. Moreover, NO2-AA prevents oxidation and nitration of mitochondrial proteins. Combined, these data demonstrate that ANG II-mediated oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction is abrogated by NO2-AA, identifying this compound as a promising pharmacological tool to prevent ANG II-induced renal disease.

  2. Characterization of sugar cane bagasse: part II: fluid dynamic characteristics; Caracterizacion del bagazo de la cana de azucar: parte II: caracteristicas fluidodinamicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Guillermo A. Roca [Universidad de Oriente (CEEFE/UO), Santiago de Cuba (Cuba). Centro de Estudios de Eficiencia Energetica], Emails: roca@ceefe.uo.edu.cu, grocabayamon@hotmail.com; Sanchez, Caio Glauco [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica], Email: caio@fem.unicamp.br; Gomez, Edgardo Olivares [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (NIPE/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico], Emails: gomez@bioware.com.br, egomez@energiabr.org.br; Cortez, Luis Augusto Barbosa [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (NIPE/FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola. Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico], Email: cortez@reitoria.unicamp.br

    2006-07-01

    This paper is the second part of a general study about physic-geometrical and fluid-dynamics characteristic of the sugarcane bagasse particles. These properties has relevant importance on the dimensions and operation of the equipment for transport and treatment of solid particles. Was used the transport column method for the determination of the drag velocity and later on the drag coefficient of the sugarcane bagasse particles was calculated. Both, the installation and experimental technique used for materials of these characteristics are simple and innovations tools, but rigorous conceptually, thus the results obtained are reliable. Were used several sugarcane bagasse fractions of particles of known mean diameter. The properties determined were expressed as a function of Reynolds and Archimedes a dimensional criteria. The best considered model from statistical analysis (model from equation 8) was statistically validated for determined ranges of Reynolds and Archimedes. These empirical equations can be used to determine these properties in the range and conditions specified and also for modeling some processes where these fractions are employed. (author)

  3. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  4. THE FOOTWEAR DESIGNING SESSION USING CRISPIN DYNAMICS ENGINEER. PART II: Creating the parts, Estimating the material consumption, Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOVAN-DRAGOMIR Alina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The diversification and customization of products are important characteristic of the modern economy and especially of the fashion industry. Because of this, the lifetime of the footwear product is very short and result the necessity to cut the design and production time. By classic methodology, designing footwear is a very complex and laborious activity. That is because classic methodology requires many graphic executions using manual means, which consume a lot of the producer’s time. With CRISPIN Dynamics, one can visualize a range of designs on-screen; work out the costs of a new style and even cut out sample shoe components. Reliance on manual skills is largely eliminated, so the staff can work creatively, but with increased accuracy and productivity. One can even send designs to a distant office or manufacturing centre in a matter of minutes. This paper presents the basic function of CRISPIN Dynamics CAD Suite Engineer for footwear design. The process of new product development has six stapes: digitized form of the medium copy, last flatting, model drawing, creation and management of individual parts, estimation of material consumption, multiplying the designed footwear product’s pattern. This product has been developed for shoemakers who wish to ensure that their business remains competitive by increasing the efficiency, speed and accuracy of pattern development and grading.

  5. From a set of parts to an indivisible whole. Part II: Operations in an open comparative mode

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Leonid

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a new method, HGV2C, for pattern analysis. The HGV2C method involves the construction of a computer ego (CE) based on an individual object that can be either a part of the system under analysis or a newly created object based on a certain hypothesis. The CE provides a capability to analyze data from a specific standpoint, e.g. from a viewpoint of a certain object. The CE is constructed from two identical copies of a query object, and its functioning mechanism involves: a hypothesis-parameter (HP) and infothyristor (IT). HP is a parameter that is introduced into an existing set of parameters. The HP value for one of the clones of a query object is set to equal 1, whereas for another clone it is greater than 1. The IT is based on the previously described algorithm of iterative averaging and performs three functions: 1) computation of a similarity matrix for the group of three objects including two clones of a query object and a target object; 2) division of the group into two alternative su...

  6. Binding of transcobalamin II by human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Y; Lönnerdal, B

    2001-01-01

    The presence of nutrient binders in milk may have an important role during milk production and may influence the nutrient's bioavailability to the infant. Human milk and plasma contain at least two types of vitamin B12 binders: transcobalamin II (TCII) and haptocorrin (Hc). Vitamin B12 in milk is exclusively bound to Hc (Hc-B12). In plasma, the major vitamin B12 binding protein that is responsible for delivering absorbed vitamin B12 to most tissues and cells is TCII (TCII-B12). Currently, little is known about the route of secretion of vitamin B12 into human milk. It is possible that a receptor-mediated pathway is involved, since maternal vitamin B12 supplementation increases the amount of the vitamin secreted into human milk if the mother's vitamin B12 consumption is low, but remains unchanged if her intake is adequate. In this study, we investigated the process by which the mammary gland acquires vitamin B12 from maternal circulation, whether as a free vitamin or as a Hc-B12 or TCII-B12 complex. TCII was purified from plasma incubated with [57Co]vit B12 (B12*), while Hc was purified from whey incubated with B12*. Both proteins were separated by fast protein liquid chromatography using gel filtration and anion-exchange columns. Purity of the separated proteins was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Binding studies were carried out on a monolayer of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) at 4 degrees C using free B12* and TCII-B12* and Hc-B12* complexes. Minimal binding of free B12* and Hc-B12* to HMEC was observed; however, HMEC exhibited a high affinity for the TCII-B12* complex. This study suggests that a specific cell surface receptor for the TCII-B12 complex exists in the mammary gland. It is possible that once vitamin B12 is in the mammary gland it is transferred to Hc (which may be synthesized by the mammary gland) and then secreted into milk as a Hc-B12 complex. PMID:11787717

  7. Evaluación neurofuncional del tallo cerebral Parte II: Reflejo mandibular = Neurofunctional evaluation of brain stem. II. Mandibular reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Sarmiento, Fidias E.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El reflejo mandibular o maseterino posee conexiones nerviosas únicas, diferentes de las exhi­bidas por otros reflejos monosinápticos humanos, y permite evaluar, de forma fácil y eficien­te, el tallo cerebral por medio de la estimulación mecánica, eléctrica o magnética. Diversos estudios han demostrado la participación en este reflejo de las interneuronas del tallo cerebral y su modulación por estructuras supraespinales, que hacen parte fundamental de su integra­ción motora. El reflejo mandibular es útil para evaluar la afectación trigémino-trigeminal en polineuropatías como la diabetes, neuromiopatías como la esclerosis múltiple y en pacientes con trastornos del movimiento, con o sin disfunción oromandibular. La evaluación neuro­funcional de este reflejo craneofacial ayuda a identificar la integración sensorimotora del tallo cerebral y las posibles alteraciones de estas vías reflejas, debidas a anormalidades del sistema nervioso central o del periférico. Su apropiada ejecución e interpretación, clínica y neurológica, permite aplicar de manera más personalizada diversos protocolos de neurorre­habilitación, con el fin de ayudar a mejorar la calidad de vida de los individuos con afectación de estas vías neurales.

  8. Carbon black nanoparticles induce type II epithelial cells to release chemotaxins for alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaldson Ken

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are a key cell in dealing with particles deposited in the lungs and in determining the subsequent response to that particle exposure. Nanoparticles are considered a potential threat to the lungs and the mechanism of pulmonary response to nanoparticles is currently under intense scrutiny. The type II alveolar epithelial cell has previously been shown to release chemoattractants which can recruit alveolar macrophages to sites of particle deposition. The aim of this study was to assess the responses of a type II epithelial cell line (L-2 to both fine and nanoparticle exposure in terms of secretion of chemotactic substances capable of inducing macrophage migration. Results Exposure of type II cells to carbon black nanoparticles resulted in significant release of macrophage chemoattractant compared to the negative control and to other dusts tested (fine carbon black and TiO2 and nanoparticle TiO2 as measured by macrophage migration towards type II cell conditioned medium. SDS-PAGE analysis of the conditioned medium from particle treated type II cells revealed that a higher number of protein bands were present in the conditioned medium obtained from type II cells treated with nanoparticle carbon black compared to other dusts tested. Size-fractionation of the chemotaxin-rich supernatant determined that the chemoattractants released from the epithelial cells were between 5 and 30 kDa in size. Conclusion The highly toxic nature and reactive surface chemistry of the carbon black nanoparticles has very likely induced the type II cell line to release pro-inflammatory mediators that can potentially induce migration of macrophages. This could aid in the rapid recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of particle deposition and the subsequent removal of the particles by phagocytic cells such as macrophages and neutrophils. Future studies in this area could focus on the exact identity of the substance(s released by the

  9. Programming an interim report on the SETL project. Part I: generalities. Part II: the SETL language and examples of its use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, J T

    1975-06-01

    A summary of work during the past several years on SETL, a new programming language drawing its dictions and basic concepts from the mathematical theory of sets, is presented. The work was started with the idea that a programming language modeled after an appropriate version of the formal language of mathematics might allow a programming style with some of the succinctness of mathematics, and that this might ultimately enable one to express and experiment with more complex algorithms than are now within reach. Part I discusses the general approach followed in the work. Part II focuses directly on the details of the SETL language as it is now defined. It describes the facilities of SETL, includes short libraries of miscellaneous and of code optimization algorithms illustrating the use of SETL, and gives a detailed description of the manner in which the set-theoretic primitives provided by SETL are currently implemented. (RWR)

  10. DOE program guide for universities and other research groups. Part I. DOE Research and Development Programs; Part II. DOE Procurement and Assistance Policies/Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    This guide addresses the DOE responsibility for fostering advanced research and development of all energy resources, both current and potential. It is intended to provide, in a single publication, all the fundamental information needed by an institution to develop a potential working relationship with DOE. Part I describes DOE research and development programs and facilities, and identifies areas of additional research needs and potential areas for new research opportunities. It also summarizes budget data and identifies the DOE program information contacts for each program. Part II provides researchers and research administrators with an introduction to the DOE administrative policies and procedures for submission and evaluation of proposals and the administration of resulting grants, cooperative agreements, and research contracts. (RWR)

  11. On understanding the very different science premises meaningful to CAM versus orthodox medicine: Part II--applications of Part I fundamentals to five different space-time examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, William A

    2010-04-01

    In Part I of this pair of articles, the fundamental experimental observations and theoretical perspectives were provided for one to understand the key differences between our normal, uncoupled state of physical reality and the human consciousness-induced coupled state of physical reality. Here in Part II, the thermodynamics of complementary and alternative medicine, which deals with the partially coupled state of physical reality, is explored via the use of five different foci of relevance to today's science and medicine: (1) homeopathy; (2) the placebo effect; (3) long-range, room temperature, macroscopic size-scale, information entanglement; (4) an explanation for dark matter/energy plus human levitation possibility; and (5) electrodermal diagnostic devices. The purpose of this pair of articles is to clearly differentiate the use and limitations of uncoupled state physics in both nature and today's orthodox medicine from coupled state physics in tomorrow's complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:20423220

  12. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulphur mines 2-4-5 certification tests and analysis. Part I: 1981 testing. Part II: 1982 testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Well leak tests and a cavern pressure were conducted in June through December 1981, and are described in Part I. The tests did not indicate conclusively that there was no leakage from the cavern, but the data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely. The test results indicated that retesting and well workover were desirable prior to making a decision on the cavern use. Well leak tests were conducted in March through May 1982, and are described in Part II. The tests indicated that there was no significant leakage from wells 2 and 4 but that the leakage from wells 2A and 5 exceeded the DOE criterion. Because of the proximity of cavern 2-4-5 to the edge of the salt, this cavern should be considered for only one fill/withdrawal cycle prior to extensive reevaluation. 57 figures, 17 tables.

  13. Essential features of Chiari II malformation in MR imaging : an interobserver reliability study-part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, Niels; van der Vliet, Ton; Rotteveel, Jan J.; Feuth, Ton; Roeleveld, Nel; Mullaart, Reinier A.

    2012-01-01

    Brain MR imaging is essential in the assessment of Chiari II malformation in clinical and research settings concerning spina bifida. However, the interpretation of morphological features of the malformation on MR images may not always be straightforward. In an attempt to select those features that u

  14. Essential features of Chiari II malformation in MR imaging: an interobserver reliability study--part 1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, N.; Vliet, T. van der; Rotteveel, J.J.; Feuth, T.; Roeleveld, N.; Mullaart, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Brain MR imaging is essential in the assessment of Chiari II malformation in clinical and research settings concerning spina bifida. However, the interpretation of morphological features of the malformation on MR images may not always be straightforward. In an attempt to select those featur

  15. Human Rehabilitation Techniques. Disability Analyses: Chronic Disease Disabilities. Volume II, Part C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, C.; And Others

    Volume II, Section C of a six-volume final report (which covers the findings of a research project on policy and technology related to rehabilitation of disabled individuals) presents a review of literature on six types of chronic disease disabilities--rheumatoid arthritis, coronary heart disease, emphysema, carcinoma of the colon/rectum, kidney…

  16. Human Rehabilitation Techniques. Disability Analyses: Behavioral Disabilities. Volume II, Part B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, C.; And Others

    Volume II, Section B of a six-volume final report (which covers the findings of a research project on policy and technology related to rehabilitation of disabled individuals) presents a review of literature on three types of behavior disabilities--epilepsy, mental retardation, and schizophrenia. Individual chapters on each disability cover the…

  17. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma - Part II: Management of primary extranodal lymphomas, generalized disease and salvage treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To review the approach to the diagnosis, classification, assessment, treatment and continuing management of patients with primary extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and the management of generalized disease with the emphasis on the current role of salvage treatment with high dose chemotherapy and stem cell/bone marrow support strategies. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma may involve any part of the body. Many lymphomas, such as MALT, angiocentric T-cell, etc., commonly present in extranodal sites. Lymphomas presenting in the GI tract, and head and neck, are most common with the single most common site being the stomach. Gastric lymphoma is associated with Helicobacter pylorii and is most common in areas endemic for Helicobacter pylorii infection. Recent advances in the understanding of the etiology of gastric MALT, thyroid, and intestinal lymphomas present new opportunities for the application of novel therapeutic approaches e.g. antibiotic therapy for Helicobacter pylori and early stage IPSID. Lymphomas presenting in the orbit, thyroid, breast, bone, extradural and skin are of interest because of the importance of expert RT in securing local control. Primary brain lymphomas present a particular challenge to the radiation oncologist. Although localized, primary brain lymphomas are extremely difficult to control. Rare sites of extranodal lymphoma include testis, female genital tract, and lung. Extranodal lymphomas are often localized and cure with RT or CMT is possible. They represent a assorted group of diseases with diverse presentations, prognosis, sensitivity to RT and expected outcome. They are of particular importance to radiation oncologists as they require special attention to patterns of spread and treatment planning. The principles of management of primary extranodal lymphoma, however, follow those applicable to localized nodal presentations. Although primary extranodal lymphomas are highly curable, a proportion of patients will fail with disseminated

  18. Review of ultrasound image guidance in external beam radiotherapy part II: intra-fraction motion management and novel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Tuathan; Bamber, Jeffrey; Fontanarosa, Davide; van der Meer, Skadi; Verhaegen, Frank; Harris, Emma

    2016-04-01

    Imaging has become an essential tool in modern radiotherapy (RT), being used to plan dose delivery prior to treatment and verify target position before and during treatment. Ultrasound (US) imaging is cost-effective in providing excellent contrast at high resolution for depicting soft tissue targets apart from those shielded by the lungs or cranium. As a result, it is increasingly used in RT setup verification for the measurement of inter-fraction motion, the subject of Part I of this review (Fontanarosa et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 R77-114). The combination of rapid imaging and zero ionising radiation dose makes US highly suitable for estimating intra-fraction motion. The current paper (Part II of the review) covers this topic. The basic technology for US motion estimation, and its current clinical application to the prostate, is described here, along with recent developments in robust motion-estimation algorithms, and three dimensional (3D) imaging. Together, these are likely to drive an increase in the number of future clinical studies and the range of cancer sites in which US motion management is applied. Also reviewed are selections of existing and proposed novel applications of US imaging to RT. These are driven by exciting developments in structural, functional and molecular US imaging and analytical techniques such as backscatter tissue analysis, elastography, photoacoustography, contrast-specific imaging, dynamic contrast analysis, microvascular and super-resolution imaging, and targeted microbubbles. Such techniques show promise for predicting and measuring the outcome of RT, quantifying normal tissue toxicity, improving tumour definition and defining a biological target volume that describes radiation sensitive regions of the tumour. US offers easy, low cost and efficient integration of these techniques into the RT workflow. US contrast technology also has potential to be used actively to assist RT by manipulating the tumour cell environment and by

  19. Review of ultrasound image guidance in external beam radiotherapy part II: intra-fraction motion management and novel applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Tuathan; Bamber, Jeffrey; Fontanarosa, Davide; van der Meer, Skadi; Verhaegen, Frank; Harris, Emma

    2016-04-21

    Imaging has become an essential tool in modern radiotherapy (RT), being used to plan dose delivery prior to treatment and verify target position before and during treatment. Ultrasound (US) imaging is cost-effective in providing excellent contrast at high resolution for depicting soft tissue targets apart from those shielded by the lungs or cranium. As a result, it is increasingly used in RT setup verification for the measurement of inter-fraction motion, the subject of Part I of this review (Fontanarosa et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 R77-114). The combination of rapid imaging and zero ionising radiation dose makes US highly suitable for estimating intra-fraction motion. The current paper (Part II of the review) covers this topic. The basic technology for US motion estimation, and its current clinical application to the prostate, is described here, along with recent developments in robust motion-estimation algorithms, and three dimensional (3D) imaging. Together, these are likely to drive an increase in the number of future clinical studies and the range of cancer sites in which US motion management is applied. Also reviewed are selections of existing and proposed novel applications of US imaging to RT. These are driven by exciting developments in structural, functional and molecular US imaging and analytical techniques such as backscatter tissue analysis, elastography, photoacoustography, contrast-specific imaging, dynamic contrast analysis, microvascular and super-resolution imaging, and targeted microbubbles. Such techniques show promise for predicting and measuring the outcome of RT, quantifying normal tissue toxicity, improving tumour definition and defining a biological target volume that describes radiation sensitive regions of the tumour. US offers easy, low cost and efficient integration of these techniques into the RT workflow. US contrast technology also has potential to be used actively to assist RT by manipulating the tumour cell environment and by

  20. Cell proliferation and migration are modulated by Cdk-1-phosphorylated endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A Schwarz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide (EMAP II is a secreted protein with well-established anti-angiogenic activities. Intracellular EMAP II expression is increased during fetal development at epithelial/mesenchymal boundaries and in pathophysiologic fibroproliferative cells of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, emphysema, and scar fibroblast tissue following myocardial ischemia. Precise function and regulation of intracellular EMAP II, however, has not been explored to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that high intracellular EMAP II suppresses cellular proliferation by slowing progression through the G2M cell cycle transition in epithelium and fibroblast. Furthermore, EMAP II binds to and is phosphorylated by Cdk1, and exhibits nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning, with only nuclear EMAP II being phosphorylated. We observed that extracellular secreted EMAP II induces endothelial cell apoptosis, where as excess intracellular EMAP II facilitates epithelial and fibroblast cells migration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that EMAP II has specific intracellular effects, and that this intracellular function appears to antagonize its extracellular anti-angiogenic effects during fetal development and pulmonary disease progression.

  1. The cytotoxicology of momordicins I and II on Spodoptera litura cultured cell line SL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Wang, Guo-Cai; Zhang, Mao-Xin; Ling, Bing

    2015-07-01

    Momordicin I and II are secondary metabolites from bitter melon (Momordica charantia L.) that are toxic to the Spodoptera litura ovary cell line (SL-1 cell). Both momordicin I and II significantly inhibited SL-1 cells proliferation. IC50 values after 24 h were 8.35 and 82.31 µg/mL, 6.11 and 77.49 µg/mL for 36 h, 4.93 and 49.42 µg/mL for 48 h for cells treated by momordicin I and II, respectively. IC50 values of the azadirachtin A control were 149.63, 54.54 and 23.66 µg/mL at 24, 36 and 48 h respectively, indicating that the cytotoxicity of momordicin I was significantly higher than that of momordicin II and azadirachtin A. Using inverted phase contrast microscopy we found that after 24 h exposure to momordicin I and II, cell shapes changed to circular, swelling increased, adherence ability declined and the cellular membrane bubbled. After 48 h exposure to momordicin I, most cells were suspended and dead; vacuole deformation and cytoplasm leakage indicated that momordicin I was more toxic to the cytoskeleton than momordicin II. Cells treated with momordicin I and II inhibited glucose absorption by 23.04 and 13.38% after 48 h and 47.60 and 20.92% after 60 h. Flow cytometry analysis suggested that SL-1 cells treated with momordicin I and II dramatically accumulated during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, and total cell protein content increased by 56.93 and 35.81% respectively after 48 h treatment. Following treatment with momordicin I and II the karyotheca dissolved, the chromatin condensed abnormally and the nucleoli were damaged, migrated, or disappeared. The PI fluorescent value by FCM showed that the relative fluorescent intensity of SL-1 cells induced by momordicin I and II increased to 521.45 and 370.17, higher than 135.04 induced by control group treatment for 48 h. This indicated significant damage to the cytomembrane. Overall, the results demonstrate that suppression of cytoskeletal function, interference of mitotic figures

  2. Nanoscaled carborane ruthenium(II-arene complex inducing lung cancer cells apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Hong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The new ruthenium(II-arene complex, which bearing a carborane unit, ruthenium and ferrocenyl functional groups, has a novel versatile synthetic chemistry and unique properties of the respective material at the nanoscale level. The ruthenium(II-arene complex shows significant cytotoxicity to cancer cells and tumor-inhibiting properties. However, ruthenium(II-arene complex of mechanism of anticancer activity are scarcely explored. Therefore, it is necessary to explore ruthenium(II-arene complex mechanism of anticancer activity for application in this area. Results In this study, the ruthenium(II-arene complex could significantly induce apoptosis in human lung cancer HCC827 cell line. At the concentration range of 5 μM-100 μM, ruthenium(II-arene complex had obvious cell cytotoxicity effect on HCC827 cells with IC50 values ranging 19.6 ± 5.3 μM. Additionally, our observations demonstrate that the ruthenium(II-arene complex can readily induce apoptosis in HCC827 cells, as evidenced by Annexin-V-FITC, nuclear fragmentation as well as DNA fragmentation. Treatment of HCC827 cells with the ruthenium(II-arene complex resulted in dose-dependent cell apoptosis as indicated by high cleaved Caspase-8,9 ratio. Besides ruthenium(II-arene complex caused a rapid induction of cleaved Caspase-3 activity and stimulated proteolytic cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion In this study, the ruthenium(II-arene complex could significantly induce apoptosis in human lung cancer HCC827 cell line. Treatment of HCC827 cells with the ruthenium(II-arene complex resulted in dose-dependent cell apoptosis as indicated by high cleaved Caspase-8,9 ratio. Besides ruthenium(II-arene complex caused a rapid induction of cleaved Caspase-3 activity and stimulated proteolytic cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that ruthenium(II-arene complex could be a candidate for further

  3. Secretory activity and cell cycle alteration of alveolar type II cells in the early and late phase after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Type II cells and the surfactant system have been proposed to play a central role in pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis. We analyzed the secretory function and proliferation parameters of alveolar type II cells in the early (until 24 h) and late phase (1-5 weeks) after irradiation (RT) in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: Type II cells were isolated from rats according to the method of Dobbs. Stimulation of secretion was induced with terbutaline, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for a 2-h period. Determination of secretion was performed using 3H-labeled phosphatidylcholine. For the early-phase analysis, freshly isolated and adherent type II cells were irradiated in vitro with 9-21 Gy (stepwise increase of 3 Gy). Secretion stimulation was initiated 1, 6, 24, and 48 h after RT. For late-phase analysis, type II cells were isolated 1-5 weeks after 18 Gy whole lung or sham RT. Each experiment was repeated at least fivefold. Flow cytometry was used to determine cell cycle distribution and proliferating cell nuclear antigen index. Results: During the early-phase (in vitro) analysis, we found a normal stimulation of surfactant secretion in irradiated, as well as unirradiated, cells. No change in basal secretion and no dose effect were seen. During the late phase, 1-5 weeks after whole lung RT, we observed enhanced secretory activity for all secretagogues and a small increase in basal secretion in Weeks 3 and 4 (pneumonitis phase) compared with controls. The total number of isolated type II cells, as well as the rate of viable cells, decreased after the second post-RT week. Cell cycle alterations suggesting an irreversible G2/M block occurred in the second post-RT week and did not resolve during the observation period. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen index of type II cells from irradiated rats did not differ from that of controls. Conclusion: In contrast to literature data, we observed no direct effect

  4. Membrane potential and ion transport in lung epithelial type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alveolar type II pneumocyte is critically important to the function and maintenance of pulmonary epithelium. To investigate the nature of the response of type II cells to membrane injury, and describe a possible mechanism by which these cells regulate surfactant secretion, the membrane potential of isolated rabbit type II cells was characterized. This evaluation was accomplished by measurements of the accumulation of the membrane potential probes: [3H]triphenylmethylphosphonium ([3H]TPMP+), rubidium 86, and the fluorescent dye DiOC5. A compartmental analysis of probe uptake into mitochondrial, cytoplasmic, and non-membrane potential dependent stores was made through the use of selective membrane depolarizations with carbonycyanide M-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). These techniques and population analysis with flow cytometry, permitted the accurate evaluation of type II cell membrane potential under control conditions and under conditions which stimulated cell activity. Further analysis of ion transport by cells exposed to radiation or adrenergic stimulation revealed a common increase in Na+/K+ ATPase activity, and an increase in sodium influx across the plasma membrane. This sodium influx was found to be a critical step in the initiation of surfactant secretion. It is concluded that radiation exposure as well as other pulmonary toxicants can directly affect the membrane potential and ionic regulation of type II cells. Ion transport, particularly of sodium, plays an important role in the regulation of type II cell function

  5. File list: Pol.CeL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CeL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cell line...70,SRX749072,SRX749071,SRX749073,SRX017852,SRX529168 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.CeL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.CeL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CeL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cell line...70,SRX749072,SRX749071,SRX749073,SRX017852,SRX529168 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.CeL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  7. Empirically Supported Interventions and School Psychology: Rationale and Methodological Issues--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Stoiber, Karen Callan

    2000-01-01

    This paper, part two of a two-part article, presents conceptual and practice issues on the use of empirically supported interventions in school and community settings. Discusses the essential practice issues, given the dual goal of advancing research in empirically supported interventions and of producing a knowledge base that has direct meaning…

  8. Hyposplenism: a comprehensive review. Part II: clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, Basem M; Thawani, Nitika; Sae-Tia, Sutthichai; Corazza, Gino R

    2007-04-01

    In the first part of this review, we described the physiological basis of splenic function and hypofunction. We also described the wide spectrum of diseases that can result in functional hyposplenism. In the second part of this review, we will be discussing the clinical picture, including complications, diagnostic methods, and management of hyposplenism.

  9. Empirical Psycho-Aesthetics and Her Sisters: Substantive and Methodological Issues--Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecni, Vladimir J.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical psycho-aesthetics is approached in this two-part article from two directions. Part I, which appeared in the Winter 2012 issue of "JAE," addressed definitional and organizational issues, including the field's origins, its relation to "sister" disciplines (experimental philosophy, cognitive neuroscience of art, and neuroaesthetics), and…

  10. Light detection and ranging measurements of wake dynamics. Part II: two-dimensional scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, Juan-José; Bingöl, Ferhat; Larsen, Gunner Chr.;

    2011-01-01

    expands the results of one-dimensional measurements already presented in the first part of this paper. Consequently, it is now possible to separate the deterministic and turbulent parts of the wake wind field, thus enabling capturing the wake in the meandering frame of reference. The results correspond...

  11. Nanoscaled carborane ruthenium(II)-arene complex inducing lung cancer cells apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Hong; Ye Hongde; Wu Chunhui; Zhang Gen; Wang Xuemei

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The new ruthenium(II)-arene complex, which bearing a carborane unit, ruthenium and ferrocenyl functional groups, has a novel versatile synthetic chemistry and unique properties of the respective material at the nanoscale level. The ruthenium(II)-arene complex shows significant cytotoxicity to cancer cells and tumor-inhibiting properties. However, ruthenium(II)-arene complex of mechanism of anticancer activity are scarcely explored. Therefore, it is necessary to explore rut...

  12. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the analysis of neutronics thermohydraulics and shielding of the 10 HWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs

  13. T cells induce extended class II MHC compartments in dendritic cells in a Toll-like receptor-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Marianne; Bertho, Nicolas; Cerny, Jan; Op den Brouw, Marjolein; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Ploegh, Hidde

    2003-10-15

    Interaction of Ag-loaded dendritic cells with Ag-specific CD4 T cells induces the formation of long tubular class II MHC-positive compartments that polarize toward the T cell. We show involvement of a Toll-like receptor-mediated signal in this unusual form of intracellular class II MHC trafficking. First, wild-type dendritic cells loaded with LPS-free Ag failed to show formation of class II-positive tubules upon Ag-specific T cell engagement, but did so upon supplementation of the Ag with low concentrations of LPS. Second, Ag-loaded myeloid differentiation factor 88 -deficient dendritic cells failed to form these tubules upon interaction with T cells, regardless of the presence of LPS. Finally, inclusion of a cell-permeable peptide that blocks TNFR-associated factor 6 function, downstream of myeloid differentiation factor 88, blocked T cell-dependent tubulation. A Toll-like receptor-dependent signal is thus required to allow Ag-loaded dendritic cells to respond to T cell contact by formation of extended endosomal compartments. This activation does not result in massive translocation of class II MHC molecules to the cell surface.

  14. Choque cardiogénico: Historia, fisiopatología e implicaciones terapeúticas. Parte II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Zeledón S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El choque cardiogénico es la principal causa de muerte entre los pacientes que presentan un síndrome coronario agudo. Después de la revisión histórica y de los conceptos fisiológicos y fisiopatológicos de esta condición clínica expuesta en la primera parte, se revisa su abordaje terapéutico, principalmente la revascularización de emergencia con angioplastía o cirugía.Cardiogenic shock: History, pathophysiology and therapeutical implications. Part II. Cardiogenic shock is the first cause of death among patients with acute coronary syndromes. After a previous discussion of the history and the physiologic and pathophysiologic aspects of this clinical condition in part 1, we review the therapeutic management which predominantly involves urgent angioplasty with stenting or coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

  15. Urotensin II induces interleukin 8 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yi Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urotensin II (U-II, an 11-amino acid peptide, exerts a wide range of actions in cardiovascular systems. Interleukin-8 (IL-8 is secreted by endothelial cells, thereby enhancing endothelial cell survival, proliferation, and angiogenesis. However, the interrelationship between U-II and IL-8 as well as the detailed intracellular mechanism of U-II in vascular endothelial cells remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of U-II on IL-8 expression and to explore its intracellular mechanism in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells were used. Expression of IL-8 was determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and luciferase reporter assay. Western blot analyses and experiments with specific inhibitors were performed to reveal the downstream signaling pathways as concerned. U-II increased the mRNA/protein levels of IL-8 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The U-II effects were significantly inhibited by its receptor antagonist [Orn(5]-URP. Western blot analyses and experiments with specific inhibitors indicated the involvement of phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in U-II-induced IL-8 expression. Luciferase reporter assay further revealed that U-II induces the transcriptional activity of IL-8. The site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the mutation of AP-1 and NF-kB binding sites reduced U-II-increased IL-8 promoter activities. Proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced by U-II could be inhibited significantly by IL-8 RNA interference. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results show that U-II induces IL-8 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways and IL-8 is involved in the U-II

  16. Interface fatigue crack propagation in sandwich X-joints – Part II: Finite element modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the second and final part of this study is to simulate fatigue crack growth in the tested Sandwich Tear Test specimens, described in Part I, using the finite element method. To accelerate the simulation, a cycle jump method is utilized and implemented in the finite element routine...... in Part I are used as input to the fatigue crack growth simulation routine. A fair accuracy with 99% saving in computation time is achieved in the simulation of the Sandwich Tear Test specimens with H100 core. However, for the Sandwich Tear Test specimens with H45 core a large deviation between...

  17. Pentostatin in T-cell malignancies - a phase II trial of the EORTC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, AD; Suciu, S; Stryckmans, P; De Cataldo, F; Willemze, R; Thaler, J; Peetermans, M; Dohner, H; Solbu, G; Dardenne, M; Zittoun, R

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Within this phase II EORTC trial, we have investigated the safety and efficacy of pentostatin in lymphoid malignancies. We have previously reported the results in T- and B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) and hairy cell leukemia. This report focuses

  18. Intratracheal transplantation of alveolar type II cells reverses bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano-Mollar, Anna; Nácher, María; Gay-Jordi, Gemma; Closa, Daniel; Xaubet, Antoni; Bulbena, Oriol

    2007-01-01

    [Rationale]: Transplantation of stem cells has been proposed as a strategy for repair of lung fibrosis. Nevertheless, many studies have yielded controversial results that currently limit the potential use of these cells as an efficient treatment. Alveolar type II cells are the progenitor cells of the pulmonary epithelium and usually proliferate after epithelial cell injury. During lung fibrosis, however, the altered regeneration process leads to uncontrolled fibroblast proliferation. [Objecti...

  19. Adiponectin ameliorates the apoptotic effects of paraquat on alveolar type II cells via improvements in mitochondrial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    HE, YARONG; ZOU, LIQUN; ZHOU, YAXIONG; HU, HAI; YAO, RONG; JIANG, YAOWEN; LAU, WAYNE BOND; YUAN, TUN; HUANG, WEN; ZENG, ZHI; CAO, YU

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that excessive reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-induced apoptosis is an important feature of the injury to the lung epithelium in paraquat (PQ) poisoning. However the precise mechanisms of PQ-induced dysfunction of the mitochondria, where ROS/RNS are predominantly produced, remain to be fully elucidated. Whether globular adiponectin (gAd), a potent molecule protective to mitochondria, regulates the mitochondrial function of alveolar type II cells to reduce PQ-induced ROS/RNS production remains to be investigated. The current study aimed to investigate the precise mechanisms of PQ poisoning in the mitochondria of alveolar type II cells, and to elucidate the role of gAd in protecting against PQ-induced lung epithelium injury. Therefore, lung epithelial injury was induced by PQ co-culture of alveolar type II A549 cells for 24 h. gAd was administrated to and removed from the injured cells in after 24 h. PQ was observed to reduce cell viability and increase apoptosis by ~1.5 fold in A549 cells. The oxidative/nitrative stress, resulting from ROS/RNS and disordered mitochondrial function were evidenced by increased O2−., NO production and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) content in PQ-poisoned A549 cells. gAd treatment significantly reversed the PQ-induced cell injury and mitochondrial dysfunction in A549 cells. The protective effects of gAd were partly abrogated by an adenosine 5′-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor, compound C. The results suggest that reduced ΔΨ and ATP content may result in PQ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction of the lung epithelium, which constitutes a novel mechanism for gAd exerting pulmonary protection against PQ poisoning via AMPK activation. PMID:27220901

  20. The flipped classroom for professional development: part II. making podcasts and videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charlene M; McDonald, Katie

    2013-11-01

    As described in Part I, podcasts and videos are educational technologies used to flip the classroom. This column describes the technology options for creating podcasts and videos and offers tips on developing podcasts and videos.

  1. Fulfilling the Promise of a Sequenced Human Genome – Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Eric [National Human Genome Research Institute

    2009-05-27

    Eric Green, scientific director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), gives the opening keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM on May 27, 2009. Part 2 of 2

  2. Establishment and evaluation of a stable cattle type II alveolar epithelial cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Su

    Full Text Available Macrophages and dendritic cells are recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. Recent research has confirmed that alveolar epithelial cells (AECs also play important roles against mycobacterium infections. Thus, establishing a stable cattle AEC line for future endogenous immune research on bacterial invasion is necessary. In the present study, we first purified and immortalized type II AECs (AEC II cells by transfecting them with a plasmid containing the human telomerase reverse trancriptase gene. We then tested whether or not the immortalized cells retained the basic physiological properties of primary AECs by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Finally, we tested the secretion capacity of immortalized AEC II cells upon stimulation by bacterial invasion. The cattle type II alveolar epithelial cell line (HTERT-AEC II that we established retained lung epithelial cell characteristics: the cells were positive for surfactants A and B, and they secreted tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in response to bacterial invasion. Thus, the cell line we established is a potential tool for research on the relationship between AECs and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  3. Input-Output Parametric Models for Nonlinear Systems. Part ii Stochastic Nonlinear Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Leontaritis, I.J.; Billings, S A

    1984-01-01

    In the first part of this paper (Leontaritis and Billings 1984)recursive input-output models for deterministic nonlinear multivariable discrete-time systems were derived and sufficient conditions for their existence were defined. In this second part, the nonlinear model is compared with other system representations, several examples are introduced and the results are extended to create prediction error input-output models for multivariable nonlinear stochastic systems.

  4. The Lower Silurian Osmundsberg K-bentonite. Part II: Mineralogy, geochemistry, chemostratigraphy and tectonomagmatic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, W.D.; Bergstrom, Stig M.; Kolata, Dennis R.; Sun, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Lower Silurian Osmundsberg K-bentonite is a widespread ash bed that occurs throughout Baltoscandia and parts of northern Europe. This paper describes its characteristics at its type locality in the Province of Dalarna, Sweden. It contains mineralogical and chemical characteristics that permit its regional correlation in sections elsewhere in Sweden as well as Norway, Estonia, Denmark and Great Britain. The Baltica as part of the subduction complex associated with the closure of Iapetus.

  5. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen, Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q Ping

    2008-08-15

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC(50) value of 13.8 microM, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC(50) 5.3 microM). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells. PMID:18501397

  6. Myosin II controls cellular branching morphogenesis and migration in three dimensions by minimizing cell-surface curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Hunter; Fischer, Robert S; Myers, Kenneth A; Desai, Ravi A; Gao, Lin; Chen, Christopher S; Adelstein, Robert S; Waterman, Clare M; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-02-01

    In many cases, cell function is intimately linked to cell shape control. We used endothelial cell branching morphogenesis as a model to understand the role of myosin II in shape control of invasive cells migrating in 3D collagen gels. We applied principles of differential geometry and mathematical morphology to 3D image sets to parameterize cell branch structure and local cell-surface curvature. We find that Rho/ROCK-stimulated myosin II contractility minimizes cell-scale branching by recognizing and minimizing local cell-surface curvature. Using microfabrication to constrain cell shape identifies a positive feedback mechanism in which low curvature stabilizes myosin II cortical association, where it acts to maintain minimal curvature. The feedback between regulation of myosin II by curvature and control of curvature by myosin II drives cycles of localized cortical myosin II assembly and disassembly. These cycles in turn mediate alternating phases of directionally biased branch initiation and retraction to guide 3D cell migration.

  7. Use of modulated excitation signals in ultrasound. Part II: Design and performance for medical imaging applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Thanassis; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-01-01

    For pt.I, see ibid., vol.52, no.2, p.177-91 (2005). In the first paper, the superiority of linear FM signals was shown in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and robustness to tissue attenuation. This second paper in the series of three papers on the application of coded excitation signals in medical....... The method is evaluated first for resolution performance and axial sidelobes through simulations with the program Field II. A coded excitation ultrasound imaging system based on a commercial scanner and a 4 MHz probe driven by coded sequences is presented and used for the clinical evaluation of the coded...

  8. Project Monitor: Part II. Conservation in small business: an exploratory study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, P Y

    1979-08-01

    Project Monitor examined the energy conservation attitude and behavior of small samples of small business owners/operators in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, focusing on manufacturing concerns and retailers. Section I reports the findings on the energy conserving behavior of 92 smaller manufacturers and Section II identifies the factors which affect decision making concerning energy consuming activities by the owners/operators of 94 small retail establishments. In each, the impact of Project Pacesetter and of the coal strike and the general energy situation is considered. (MCW)

  9. Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives: Part II. Science, research, development, higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modelski, Józef; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2010-09-01

    Electronics is under development in this country in an organized and institutional way since the beginning of 30-ties of the previous century. It grew up from electrical engineering of weak currents and its first name used popularly was communications. It was time when television was born and the radio was maturing. Electronics is a branch of research and technology which deals with generation and processing of electrical and electromagnetic signals. A subject of telecommunications is signal transmission for a distance. Electronics and telecommunications (ET) includes or is combined with other branches like: microelectronics, radioelectronics, optoelectronics, photonics, acoustoelectronics, magnetronics, bioelectronics, energoelectronics, material engineering, semiconductor physics, automation and robotics, mechatronics and microsystems, informatics, teleinformatics, software engineering and other. Devices and functional systems of ET such as computers, data warehouses, cell phones, TV sets, Internet, GPS are build of electronic components and circuits. ET is a branch which belongs to hi-tech area, where the products gather a large load of knowledge of value overcoming frequently the price of work and material. ET has recently turned to an active participant of the processes of generation, storing, processing, transportation, distribution and usage of knowledge in the society. ET started to create artificial intelligence, co-creates intellectual property, searches for knowledge in big data sets, aids medicine, extends virtual/augmented reality, builds Internet of persons and things, strengthens security, protects natural environment, facilitates our life, aids our decisions, activates individuals, equalizes chances, provides convenient personal communications and access to data, starts building a penetrating ubiquitous infrastructure, ceases to be only a branch of technology, grows into the social space, touches culture, sociology, psychology and art. Such an

  10. Pharmacological activation of myosin II paralogs to correct cell mechanics defects

    OpenAIRE

    Surcel, Alexandra; Ng, Win Pin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ren, Yixin; Avery, Lindsay B.; Krenc, Agata K.; Meyers, David J.; Rock, Ronald S.; Anders, Robert A.; Freel Meyers, Caren L.; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the integral role of cell mechanics, efforts to target mechanics for drug development have lagged. Here, we present an approach to identifying small molecules capable of modulating mechanics. We characterize 4-hydroxyacetophenone (4-HAP), isolated as a breakdown product of a hit from our pilot screen of over 22,000 compounds. We show that 4-HAP specifically alters the localization of the mechanoenzyme myosin II, increasing the stiffness of cells. The effect of 4-HAP on myosin II, whos...

  11. A New Humanized HLA Transgenic Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis Expressing Class II on Mouse CD4 T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mangalam, Ashutosh; Rodriguez, Moses; David, Chella

    2007-01-01

    Among all the genetic factors associated with MS susceptibility, strongest association has been seen with expression of certain MHC class II molecules, although analysis of their exact function remains complicated. In general expression of class II is restricted to professional antigen presenting cells, however human but not mice CD4+ T cells express class II on their surface. Functional studies of classII+CD4+ T cells have been hampered due to lack of proper animal model. Here we describe de...

  12. Identification and characterization of glycosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of the side chains of the cell wall pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Malcolm [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-08-31

    Our goal was to gain insight into the genes and proteins involved in the biosynthesis of rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II), a borate cross-linked and structurally conserved pectic polysaccharide present in the primary cell walls of all vascular plants. The research conducted during the funding period established that (i) Avascular plants have the ability to synthesize UDP-apiose but lack the glycosyltransferase machinery required to synthesize RG-II or other apiose-containing cell wall glycans. (ii) RG-II structure is highly conserved in the Lemnaceae (duckweeds and relatives). However, the structures of other wall pectins and hemicellulose have changed substantial during the diversification of the Lemnaceae. This supports the notion that a precise structure of RG-II must be maintained to allow borate cross-linking to occur in a controlled manner. (iii) Enzymes involved in the conversion of UDP-GlcA to UDP-Api, UDP-Xyl, and UDP-Ara may have an important role in controlling the composition of duckweed cell walls. (iv) RG-II exists as the borate ester cross-linked dimer in the cell walls of soybean root hairs and roots. Thus, RG-II is present in the walls of plants cells that grow by tip or by expansive growth. (v) A reduction in RG-II cross-linking in the maize tls1 mutant, which lacks a borate channel protein, suggests that the growth defects observed in the mutant are, at least in part, due to defects in the cell wall.

  13. Vitamin E alters alveolar type II cell phospholipid synthesis in oxygen and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newborn rats were injected with vitamin E or placebo daily until 6 days after birth. The effect of vitamin E pretreatment on in vitro surfactant phospholipid synthesis was examined in isolated type II cells exposed to oxygen or air form 24 h in vitro. Type II cells were also isolated from untreated 6-day-old rats and cultured for 24 h in oxygen or air with control medium or vitamin E supplemented medium. These cells were used to examine the effect of vitamin E exposure in vitro on type II cell phospholipid synthesis and ultrastructure. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis was reduced in cells cultured in oxygen as compared with air. This decrease was not prevented by in vivo pretreatment or in vitro supplementation with vitamin E. Vitamin E pretreatment increased the ratio of disaturated PC to total PC and increased phosphatidylglycerol synthesis. The volume density of lamellar bodies in type II cells was increased in cells maintained in oxygen. Vitamin E did not affect the volume density of lamellar bodies. We conclude that in vitro hyperoxia inhibits alveolar type II cell phosphatidylcholine synthesis without decreasing lamellar body volume density and that supplemental vitamin E does not prevent hyperoxia-induced decrease in phosphatidylcholine synthesis

  14. Global optimization of truss topology with discrete bar areas-Part II: Implementation and numerical results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achtziger, Wolfgang; Stolpe, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    we use the theory developed in Part I to design a convergent nonlinear branch-and-bound method tailored to solve large-scale instances of the original discrete problem. The problem formulation and the needed theoretical results from Part I are repeated such that this paper is self-contained. We focus...... on the implementation details but also establish finite convergence of the branch-and-bound method. The algorithm is based on solving a sequence of continuous non-convex relaxations which can be formulated as quadratic programs according to the theory in Part I. The quadratic programs to be treated...... within the branch-and-bound search all have the same feasible set and differ from each other only in the objective function. This is one reason for making the resulting branch-and-bound method very efficient. The paper closes with several large-scale numerical examples. These examples are, to the...

  15. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  16. An improved methodology for erosion hazard mapping, Part II: Application to Lesotho

    OpenAIRE

    Chakela, Q.; Stocking, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    This is the second part of a paper on an improved technique for erosion hazard mapping. In this part, the authors apply the new methodology to Lesotho, where erosion has been the most important factor in the decline in crop yields since the 1930s. The authors assess each factor in erosion and produce a composite map in order to measure the degree, distribution, and principal causative factors of erosion hazard. This map will serve as a guide to resource planning and as a promotion for strateg...

  17. FROM ZERO-DIMENSIONAL TO 2-DIMENSIONAL CARBON NANOMATERIALS - part II: GRAPHENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin IANCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available As was presented in the first part of this review paper, lately, many theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out to develop one of the most interesting aspects of the science and nanotechnology which is called carbon-related nanomaterials. In this review paper are presented some of the most exciting and important developments in the synthesis, properties, and applications of low-dimensional carbon nanomaterials. In this part of the paper are presented the synthesis techniques used to produce the two-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (including graphene, and also the most important properties and potential applications of graphene.

  18. The decision to extract: part II. Analysis of clinicians' stated reasons for extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Boyd, R L; Maxwell, R

    1996-04-01

    In a recently reported study, the pretreatment records of each subject in a randomized clinical trial of 148 patients with Class I and Class II malocclusions presenting for orthodontic treatment were evaluated independently by five experienced clinicians (drawn from a panel of 14). The clinicians displayed a higher incidence of agreement with each other than had been expected with respect to the decision as to whether extraction was indicated in each specific case. To improve our understanding of how clinicians made their decisions on whether to extract or not, the records of a subset of 72 subjects randomly selected from the full sample of 148, have now been examined in greater detail. In 21 of these cases, all five clinicians decided to treat without extraction. Among the remaining 51 cases, there were 202 decisions to extract (31 unanimous decision cases and 20 split decision cases). The clinicians cited a total of 469 reasons to support these decisions. Crowding was cited as the first reason in 49% of decisions to extract, followed by incisor protrusion (14%), need for profile correction (8%), Class II severity (5%), and achievement of a stable result (5%). When all the reasons for extraction in each clinician's decision were considered as a group, crowding was cited in 73% of decisions, incisor protrusion in 35%, need for profile correction in 27%, Class II severity in 15% and posttreatment stability in 9%. Tooth size anomalies, midline deviations, reduced growth potential, severity of overjet, maintenance of existing profile, desire to close the bite, periodontal problems, and anticipation of poor cooperation accounted collectively for 12% of the first reasons and were mentioned in 54% of the decisions, implying that these considerations play a consequential, if secondary, role in the decision-making process. All other reasons taken together were mentioned in fewer than 20% of cases. In this sample at least, clinicians focused heavily on appearance

  19. SKI-II reverses the chemoresistance of SGC7901/DDP gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Zhu, Zuan; Cai, Hongxing; Liu, Qinghua; Zhou, Honglian; Zhu, Zhengqiu

    2014-07-01

    Cisplatin is frequently used in treating gastric cancers; however, acquired resistance to the drug often reduces the efficacy of therapy. The present study analyzed the efficacy of the combination of 4-[4-(4-chloro-phenyl)-thiazol-2-ylamino]-phenol (SKI-II) and cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II); DDP] on the gastric cancer SGC7901/DDP cell line. The results revealed that SKI-II and DDP had a clear synergistic effect. Glutathione (GSH) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) levels decreased significantly subsequent to the cells being treated with the combination of DDP and SKI-II compared with the cells that were treated with DDP or SKI-II alone. Phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) expression levels also decreased following treatment with SKI-II. The results suggested that SKI-II is able to reverse the drug resistance in human gastric carcinoma cells and enhance the antitumor effect of DDP through the ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) proliferation pathway.

  20. Two isoforms of trimming glucosidase II exist in mammalian tissues and cell lines but not in yeast and insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziak, M; Meier, M; Etter, K S; Roth, J

    2001-01-12

    We previously cloned glucosidase II and provided in vivo evidence for its involvement in protein folding quality control. DNA-sequencing of different clones demonstrated the existence of two isoforms of glucosidase II which differed by 66 nucleotides due to alternative splicing. The existence of two enzyme isoforms in various organs of pig and rat as well as human, bovine, rat, and mouse cell lines could be demonstrated by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Furthermore, the two isoforms of glucosidase II could be detected in embryonic and postnatal rat kidney and liver. In yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in insects, Drosophila S2 cells, only one isoforms of the enzyme was detectable. The ubiquitous occurrence of the two glucosidase II isoforms in mammalian tissues and cell lines might be indicative of a special function of each isoform.