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Sample records for cell pancreatic carcinoma

  1. Papillocystic Variant of Acinar Cell Pancreatic Carcinoma

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    Jasim Radhi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar cell pancreatic carcinoma is a rare solid malignant neoplasm. Recent review of the literature showed occasional cases with papillary or papillocystic growth patterns, ranging from 2 to 5 cm in diameter. We report a large 10 cm pancreatic tumor with papillocystic pathology features involving the pancreatic head. The growth pattern of these tumors could be mistaken for intraductal papillary mucinous tumors or other pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

  2. Recurrent Pancreatitis Due to a Cystic Pancreatic Tumor: A Rare Presentation of Acinar Cell Carcinoma

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    Raimondo M

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Acinar cell carcinoma is an uncommon malignancy of the pancreas. It has characteristic histomorphology, immunohistochemistry profile, and clinicopathological behavior. CASE REPORT: We report a rare case of recurrent pancreatitis secondary to acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas. We describe the endoscopic ultrasound characteristic, treatment and the surgical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Acinar cell carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors presenting with recurrent pancreatitis.

  3. Recurrent Pancreatitis Due to a Cystic Pancreatic Tumor: A Rare Presentation of Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Raimondo M; Krishna M; Nguyen J; Scolapio J; Aqel B

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: Acinar cell carcinoma is an uncommon malignancy of the pancreas. It has characteristic histomorphology, immunohistochemistry profile, and clinicopathological behavior. CASE REPORT: We report a rare case of recurrent pancreatitis secondary to acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas. We describe the endoscopic ultrasound characteristic, treatment and the surgical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Acinar cell carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors pre...

  4. KRAS Mutations in Canine and Feline Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, C; Wood, G A; Foster, R A; Stasi, S; Liu, J H W; Bartlett, J M S; Coomber, B L; Sabine, V S

    2016-07-01

    Companion animals may serve as valuable models for studying human cancers. Although KRAS is the most commonly mutated gene in human ductal pancreatic cancers (57%), with mutations frequently occurring at codons 12, 13 and 61, human pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) lack activating KRAS mutations. In the present study, 32 pancreatic ACC samples obtained from 14 dogs and 18 cats, including seven metastases, were analyzed for six common activating KRAS mutations located in codons 12 (n = 5) and 13 (n = 1) using Sequenom MassARRAY. No KRAS mutations were found, suggesting that, similar to human pancreatic ACC, KRAS mutations do not play a critical role in feline or canine pancreatic ACC. Due to the similarity of the clinical disease in dogs and cats to that of man, this study confirms that companion animals offer potential as a suitable model for investigating this rare subtype of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27290644

  5. Interaction of Stellate Cells with Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by its late detection, aggressive growth, intense infiltration into adjacent tissue, early metastasis, resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy and a strong “desmoplastic reaction”. The dense stroma surrounding carcinoma cells is composed of fibroblasts, activated stellate cells (myofibroblast-like cells), various inflammatory cells, proliferating vascular structures, collagens and fibronectin. In particular the cellular components of the stroma produce the tumor microenvironment, which plays a critical role in tumor growth, invasion, spreading, metastasis, angiogenesis, inhibition of anoikis, and chemoresistance. Fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and activated stellate cells produce the extracellular matrix components and are thought to interact actively with tumor cells, thereby promoting cancer progression. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the role of pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) in the desmoplastic response of pancreas cancer and the effects of PSC on tumor progression, metastasis and drug resistance. Finally we present some novel ideas for tumor therapy by interfering with the cancer cell-host interaction

  6. Isolated pancreatic metastases from a bronchogenic small cell carcinoma.

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    Walshe, T

    2012-01-31

    We describe the case of a 60 year old female smoker who presented with a three month history of weight loss (14 Kg), generalized abdominal discomfort and malaise. Chest radiography demonstrated a mass projected inferior to the hilum of the right lung. Computed Tomography of thorax confirmed a lobulated lesion in the right infrahilar region and subsequent staging abdominal CT demonstrated a low density lesion in the neck of the pancreas. Percutaneous Ultrasound guided pancreatic biopsy was performed, histology of which demonstrated pancreatic tissue containing a highly necrotic small cell undifferentiated carcinoma consistent with metastatic small cell carcinoma of the bronchus.

  7. Metastasis-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lungs

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    Hajime Tanaka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic metastases are relatively common in advanced lung cancers (both small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma, but metastasis-induced acute pancreatitis is very unusual. Case report A 51-year-old woman with small cell carcinoma of the lung developed acute pancreatitis as the initial manifestation. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed multiple pancreatic metastases which were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Conventional treatment did not improve her condition. However, aggressive chemotherapy resulted in a dramatic recovery from the acute pancreatitis and significant improvement in her general condition. Conclusion When cases of acute pancreatitis in patients with small cell lung carcinoma are encountered, we must consider the possibility of metastasis-induced acute pancreatitis and that, should pancreatic metastases be found in these patients, chemotherapy may provide substantial benefit.

  8. Metastasis-induced acute pancreatitis in a patient with small cell carcinoma of the lung.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, K. H.; Kim, C D; Lee, S. J.; Lee, G.; Jeen, Y T; Lee, H.S.; Chun, H J; Song, C. W.; Um, S. H.; Lee, S. W.; Choi, J. H.; Ryu, H. S.; Hyun, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in cancer patients can be secondary to the malignant process itself or a complication of antineoplastic agent administration. However, acute pancreatitis caused by metastatic carcinoma of the pancreas is an uncommon condition with a poor prognosis. We report a case of a 63-year-old man with small cell carcinoma of the lung, who developed acute pancreatitis lately. Thirteen months earlier, he developed small cell carcinoma of the lung and received 6 cycles of chemotherapy. A...

  9. Acute pancreatitis in association with small cell lung carcinoma: potential pitfall in diagnosis and management.

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, S. G.; Bundred, N; Eremin, O; Leonard, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Tumour metastases to the pancreas are a rare but recognized cause of acute pancreatitis, there is a 24-40% incidence of pancreatic involvement from small cell lung cancer in autopsy series but only a very few cases of tumour-induced acute pancreatitis have been described. Chemotherapy has been advocated as the primary therapy in patients with known oat cell carcinoma who develop acute pancreatitis. We describe 2 patients with acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis in association with disseminated sm...

  10. Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Pancreatic Metastasis: A Case Report

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    Abbas Alibakhshi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant tumors of pancreas are usually primary neoplasms and pancreatic metastases are rare findings. We are reporting a case of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the esophagus with pancreatic metastasis. A 59-year old woman was admitted with chief complaint of abdominal pain and mass. She was a known case of esophageal SCC since 4 years before when she had undergone transthoracic esophagectomy and cervical esophago-gastrostomy. In order to evaluate recent abdominal mass, CT scan was done which revealed septated cystic lesion in the body and the tail of the pancreas. Palliative resection of the tumor was performed and its histological study showed SCC compatible with her previously diagnosed esophageal cancer.

  11. A Case of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Pancreatic Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Choulki; Jang, Jae Young; Kim, Youn Hwa; Hwang, Eun Jung; Na, Ki Yong; Kim, Kyung-Yup; Park, Jae Hyun; Chang, Young Woon

    2013-01-01

    Solitary pancreatic metastasis of esophageal cancer is extremely rare. We report the case of a 58-year-old male admitted with esophageal cancer. Additional asymptomatic solitary hepatic and pancreatic masses were observed in the staging work-up for esophageal cancer. The hepatic mass was confirmed as a primary hepatocellular carcinoma with an ultrasound-guided needle biopsy. An esophagectomy with a distal pancreatectomy and radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma were performed. ...

  12. Characterization of novel carcinoma cell lines for the analysis of therapeutical strategies fighting pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zechner, Dietmar; Bürtin, Florian; Amme, Jonas; Lindner, Tobias; Radecke, Tobias; Hadlich, Stefan; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Background Preclinical evaluations of chemotherapies depend on clinically relevant animal models for pancreatic cancer. The injection of syngeneic murine adenocarcinoma cells is one efficient option to generate carcinomas in mice with an intact immune system. However, this option is constrained by the paucity of appropriate cell lines. Results The murine pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines 6606PDA and 7265PDA were compared to the 6606l cell line isolated from a liver metastasis from mice suf...

  13. Circulating endothelial cells and other angiogenesis factors in pancreatic carcinoma patients receiving gemcitabine chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a significant cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. As the level of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) is known to increase in response to various cancers, we investigated the predictive potential of CEC levels and the association of these levels with the expression of proangiogenic factors in pancreatic carcinoma patients. Pancreatic carcinoma patients receiving gemcitabine chemotherapy were prospectively assigned to this study. CEC levels were measured using the CellTracks system, and the plasma levels of several angiogenesis factors were measured using multiplex immunoassay. Associations between clinical outcomes and the levels of these factors were evaluated. Baseline CEC levels were markedly higher in pancreatic carcinoma patients (n = 37) than in healthy volunteers (n = 53). Moreover, these high CEC levels were associated with decreased overall survival (median, 297 days versus 143 days, P < 0.001) and progression-free survival (median, 150 days versus 64 days, P = 0.008), as well as with high vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin (IL)-8, and IL-10 expression in the pancreatic carcinoma patients. Several chemokines and proangiogenic factors correlate with the release of CECs, and the number of CECs detected may be a useful prognostic marker in pancreatic carcinoma patients undergoing gemcitabine chemotherapy. UMIN000002323

  14. Pancreatic panniculitis in a patient with pancreatic-type acinar cell carcinoma of the liver – case report and review of literature

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    Zundler, Sebastian; Erber, Ramona; Agaimy, Abbas; Hartmann, Arndt; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Strobel, Deike; Neurath, Markus F; Wildner, Dane

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare condition, which has only been described in relation with pancreatic diseases up to now. It is characterized by necrotizing subcutaneous inflammation and is thought to be triggered by adipocyte necrosis due to systemic release of pancreatic enzymes with consecutive infiltration of neutrophils. We present the first case of a patient with pancreatic panniculitis caused by pancreatic-type primary acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) of the liver and without un...

  15. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

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    Andoh Y

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Andoh,1,2 Naohiko Makino,2 Mitsunori Yamakawa11Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanBackground: It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs among dendritic cells (DCs fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines.Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated.Results: The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1 was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs

  16. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Presented as Acute Pancreatitis. Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Abdulzahra Hussain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Small cell carcinoma of the lung is an aggressive cancer with gloomy prognosis. Links to acute pancreatitis is extremely rare. Case report We are reporting a 53-year-old patient who was admitted because of acute pancreatitis. She had no history of gallstones, alcohol abuse, medications or any other predisposition for acute pancreatitis. Further investigations of blood, CT of chest abdomen and neck and ultrasound scan of abdomen, bone marrow and neck lymph node biopsies confirmed advanced small cell carcinoma of the lung with hypercalcemia, which was the only definite cause of acute pancreatitis. The patient made good recovery from pancreatitis after controlling the hypercalcemia. She was referred to respiratory team for further management of lung cancer. Conclusion Acute pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia of advanced small cell carcinoma of the lung is an extremely rare condition. Acute pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia should be thoroughly investigated to exclude serious pathology as in our case.

  17. Undifferentiated (Spindle Cell Pancreatic Carcinoma: A Case Report with Osteochondroid Differentiation

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    Xing Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Undifferentiated (spindle cell carcinomas of the pancreas are rare anaplastic variants of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma with a frequency of 2% of pancreatic exocrine tumors. Their clinicopathological features are limited and obtained by few previously case reports. We report a case of undifferentiated pancreatic carcinoma with a rare focal osteochondroid differentiation. Case report A sixty-six-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for abdominal pain and nonspecific nausea for almost 40 days. Imaging studies revealed a well-defined cystic–solid mass with heterogeneous density involving the tail of the pancreas. We performed an en bloc distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for radical excision, as well as regional lymphadenectomy. The resected specimen revealed a 4.0×5.0 cm exophytic clear-bordered neoplasm of the tail of the pancreas containing necrotic and calcified areas, without splenic invasion. The lymph node involvement was not detected (0/5 and the surgical margins were negative. Microscopy showed pleomorphism with giantcells, spindle-shaped cells with anaplasia, and osteochondroid differentiation. A diagnosis of undifferentiated (spindle cell carcinoma of the pancreas with focal osteochondroid differentiation was made. The patient declined chemotherapy and extended lymphadenectomy. She suffered from liver and lymph nodes metastasis 9 months after surgery, and she subsequently died 4 months later due to high tumor burden. Conclusions Undifferentiated pancreatic carcinoma with osteochondroid differentiation is rare but associated with extremely poor prognosis. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic mass lesions.

  18. Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking Igg4-Related Pseudotumor in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

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    Muhammad Ali Khan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Autoimmune pancreatitis is classified into two distinct clinical profiles. Care report Type 1 autoimmunepancreatitis (AIP is considered to be a manifestation of a novel clinicopathological entity called IgG4 related sclerosingdisease, diagnosed using the Mayo Clinic HISORt criteria. Extra-pancreatic manifestations can include involvement of bileducts, salivary gland, lung nodules, thyroiditis, tubulointerstitial nephritis, renal masses, and retroperitoneal fibrosis. Type2 autoimmune pancreatitis on the other hand is confirmed by histologically seen duct centric pancreatitis without elevationof IgG4 or involvement of other organs. In type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis, extrapancreatic manifestations like bile ductstrictures, tubulointerstitial nephritis, renal nodules, retroperitoneal fibrosis respond to steroid therapy. Conclusion Wepresent a case of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis in which the renal mass did not respond to steroid therapy and was later on found to be renal cell carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge this is only the third reported case of autoimmune pancreatitis in which the patient had renal cell carcinoma. Our case highlights the importance of close follow up of lesions that do not respond to steroid treatment which in this case proved to be renal cell cancer.

  19. Pancreatic metastasis of Merkel cell carcinoma and concomitant insulinoma: Case report and literature review

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    Hartschuh Wolfgang

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merkel cell carcinomas are rare neoplasm of neuroendocrine origin, usually observed in elderly people in areas with abundant sunlight, and predominantly located on the head and neck, extremities, and trunk. In many patients, a local recurrence after resection of the primary tumour and even distant metastases can be found. Case presentation We report an unusual occurrence of pancreatic metastases from a previously diagnosed Merkel cell carcinoma with the discovery of a concomitant insulinoma. An 82-year old lady suffered from recurrent attacks of hypoglycemia and presented with an abdominal mass, 2 years prior she had an excision done on her eyebrow that was reported as Merkel cell carcinoma. An extended distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy along with resection of the left flexure of the colon for her abdominal mass was carried out. Final histopathology of the mass was a poorly differentiated endocrine carcinoma in the pancreatic tail, in the peripancreatic tissue and in the surrounding soft tissue consistent with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma in addition to an insulinoma of the pancreatic body. Conclusion This is the first documented case of a metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma and a concomitant insulinoma, suggesting either a mere coincidence or an unknown neuroendocrine tumor syndrome.

  20. Pancreatic Metastasis and Obstructive Jaundice in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

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    Jeong, In Beom; Kim, Sun Moon; Lee, Tae Hee; Im, Euyi Hyeog; Huh, Kyu Chan; Kang, Young Woo; Choi, Young Woo

    2006-01-01

    Primary lung cancer frequently metastasizes to distant organs. The pancreas is a relatively infrequent site of metastasis. Furthermore, obstructive jaundice resulting from pancreatic metastasis is extremely rare. This paper examines the case of a 65-year-old woman with small cell lung cancer initially presenting with extrahepatic biliary obstruction. The patient underwent percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. The obstruction was relieved with a stent placement, then the woman was treate...

  1. Solitary Pancreatic Metastasis from Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report from India with a Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Pankaj Bhalla; Guruprasad Shetty; Chandralekha S Tampi; Prasad K Wagle

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic cancer to the pancreas accounts for less than 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, with renal cell carcinoma being the predominant type. We report the case of an elderly patient detected with a solitary lesion in the head of the pancreas, 6 years after a nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma. The patient underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy for the same. A review of literature showed isolated pancreatic metastasis to be rare, ranging from 0.5 to 3%. Patients are usually asymptomatic, u...

  2. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Presented as Acute Pancreatitis. Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulzahra Hussain; Shamsi El-Hasani; Ali Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Context Small cell carcinoma of the lung is an aggressive cancer with gloomy prognosis. Links to acute pancreatitis is extremely rare. Case report We are reporting a 53-year-old patient who was admitted because of acute pancreatitis. She had no history of gallstones, alcohol abuse, medications or any other predisposition for acute pancreatitis. Further investigations of blood, CT of chest abdomen and neck and ultrasound scan of abdomen, bone marrow and neck lymph node biopsies confirmed advan...

  3. Interdependence of Gemcitabine Treatment, Transporter Expression, and Resistance in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

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    Wolfgang Hagmann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Gemcitabine is widely used as first-line chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Our previous experimental chemotherapy studies have shown that treatment of human pancreatic carcinoma cells with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU alters the cellular transporter expression profile and that modulation of the expression of multidrug resistance protein 5 (MRP5; ABCC5 influences the chemoresistance of these tumor cells. Here, we studied the influence of acute and chronic gemcitabine treatment on the expression of relevant uptake and export transporters in pancreatic carcinoma cells by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, and immunoblot analyses. The specific role of MRP5 in cellular gemcitabine sensitivity was studied by cytotoxicity assays using MRP5-overexpressing and MRP5-silenced cells. Exposure to gemcitabine (12 nM for 3 days did not alter the messenger RNA (mRNA expression of MRP1, MRP3, MRP5, and equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1, whereas high dosages of the drug (20 µM for 1 hour elicited up-regulation of these transporters in most cell lines studied. In cells with acquired gemcitabine resistance (up to 160 nM gemcitabine, the mRNA or protein expression of the gemcitabine transporters MRP5 and ENT1 was upregulated in several cell lines. Combined treatment with 5-FU and gemcitabine caused a 5- to 40-fold increase in MRP5 and ENT1 expressions. Cytotoxicity assays using either MRP5-overexpressing (HEK and PANC-1 or MRP5-silenced (PANC1/shMRP5 cells indicated that MRP5 contributes to gemcitabine resistance. Thus, our novel data not only on drug-induced alterations of transporter expression relevant for gemcitabine uptake and export but also on the link between gemcitabine sensitivity and MRP5 expression may lead to improved strategies of future chemotherapy regimens using gemcitabine in pancreatic carcinoma patients.

  4. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Pancreatic Carcinoma

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    Maier, Harald J., E-mail: harald.maier@uni-ulm.de; Wirth, Thomas [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University of Ulm, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Beug, Hartmut [Institute of Molecular Pathology, 1030 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-12-09

    Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth-leading cause of cancer death and is characterized by early invasion and metastasis. The developmental program of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is of potential importance for this rapid tumor progression. During EMT, tumor cells lose their epithelial characteristics and gain properties of mesenchymal cells, such as enhanced motility and invasive features. This review will discuss recent findings pertinent to EMT in pancreatic carcinoma. Evidence for and molecular characteristics of EMT in pancreatic carcinoma will be outlined, as well as the connection of EMT to related topics, e.g., cancer stem cells and drug resistance.

  5. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth-leading cause of cancer death and is characterized by early invasion and metastasis. The developmental program of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is of potential importance for this rapid tumor progression. During EMT, tumor cells lose their epithelial characteristics and gain properties of mesenchymal cells, such as enhanced motility and invasive features. This review will discuss recent findings pertinent to EMT in pancreatic carcinoma. Evidence for and molecular characteristics of EMT in pancreatic carcinoma will be outlined, as well as the connection of EMT to related topics, e.g., cancer stem cells and drug resistance

  6. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Pancreatic Carcinoma

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    Thomas Wirth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth-leading cause of cancer death and is characterized by early invasion and metastasis. The developmental program of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is of potential importance for this rapid tumor progression. During EMT, tumor cells lose their epithelial characteristics and gain properties of mesenchymal cells, such as enhanced motility and invasive features. This review will discuss recent findings pertinent to EMT in pancreatic carcinoma. Evidence for and molecular characteristics of EMT in pancreatic carcinoma will be outlined, as well as the connection of EMT to related topics, e.g., cancer stem cells and drug resistance.

  7. The Place of Enucleation and Enucleo-Resection in the Treatment of Pancreatic Metastasis of Renal Cell Carcinoma

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    Thierry Yazbek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Renal cell carcinoma has shown less response to systemic therapies including chemotherapy, radiotherapy andimmunotherapy than other cancers. Metastasis of renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas occurs, even after long term radicalnephrectomy, surgical resection remains the only potentially curative intervention. We performed surgery for pancreatic metastatic renal cell carcinoma and analyzed the results. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 11 patients who had undergone pancreatic resection or metastasectomy at our hospital from January 1994 to January 2010. Patient’s demographics, clinical variables, types of pancreatic resections (standard or atypical resection, primary histopathology, surgical outcomes, survival and disease free interval were examined. We compared the standard pancreatic resection to atypical resection (enucleation or enucleo-resection. Results Eleven patients underwent 14 pancreatic resections or metastasectomy (3 pancreaticoduodenectomy, 4 distal pancreatectomy, 1 completion of pancreatectomy, 4 enucleations and two enucleo-resections for pancreatic renal cell carcinoma metastasis. The median age was 73 years, the median time period between nephrectomy and finding of pancreatic metastasis was 11.4 years. One patient showed synchronous pancreatic metastatic lesions on radiology. One patient died from a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm rupture 35 days after the surgery. Major complications occurred in 4 patients with standard resection (one hemoperitoneum, three pancreatic fistulas, and in one patient with atypical resection (duodenal fistula; six patients with standard resection presented postoperative diabetes mellitus. Median survival age was 6.5 years (range 1-9 years. Two patients died of metastatic disease 5 to 6years, while 7 patients are alive and well 1 to 9 years after surgery. Conclusions According to these results and regardless of the small number of cases, atypical resection of metastatic renal cell

  8. Coexistent ampullary squamous cell carcinoma with adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic duct

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    Gayatri S Pathak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of ampulla has seldom been reported. However, metastatic SCC to ampulla of Vater is well known. We report a case of primary SCC of ampulla of Vater coexistent with well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the distal pancreatic duct. A 50-year-old female presented with evidence of obstructive jaundice. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography revealed bulging papilla with ulcero-infiltrative growth at the ampulla of Vater. An initial endoscopic biopsy of the ampullary mass showed a well-differentiated SCC. The patient underwent Whipple′s operation. Thorough sampling of the dilated portion of the pancreatic duct showed presence of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the distal pancreatic duct. Immunohistochemical study with synaptophysin and chromogranin was done with negative result, ruling out neuroendocrine differentiation. Also, a detailed clinical, endoscopic and radiological examination was carried out, that excluded the presence of primary SCC elsewhere.

  9. Prolonged Survival in a Patient with a Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

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    Ploquin, Anne; Baldini, Capucine; Vuagnat, Perrine; Makhloufi, Samira; Desauw, Christophe; Hebbar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare entity. Herein we present the case of a 50-year-old male patient with an unlimited mass on the pancreatic corpus and tail with peripancreatic effusion and multiple metastases in the liver and spleen. A liver biopsy showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received 9 cycles of gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which had to be stopped because of a persistent grade 2 neuropathy. A CT scan showed complete response after 14 years. At the age of 61 years, a localized prostatic cancer was diagnosed, treated by prostatectomy. The patient carried a BRCA2 mutation. None of the precedent case reports describe a chemosensibility to the GEMOX regimen. In spite of the lack of study in these patients, chemotherapy with oxaliplatin seems to be the most effective. Long survival can be expected. PMID:26600777

  10. Spiclomazine induces apoptosis associated with the suppression of cell viability, migration and invasion in pancreatic carcinoma cells.

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    Wenjing Zhao

    Full Text Available The effective treatment for pancreatic carcinoma remains critically needed. Herein, this current study showed that spiclomazine treatment caused a reduction in viability in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines CFPAC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 in vitro. It was notable in this regard that, compared with pancreatic carcinoma cells, normal human embryonic kidney (HEK-293 and liver (HL-7702 cells were more resistant to the antigrowth effect of spiclomazine. Biochemically, spiclomazine treatment regulated the expression of protein levels in the apoptosis related pathways. Consistent with this effect, spiclomazine reduced the mitochondria membrane potential, elevated reactive oxygen species, and activated caspase-3/9. In addition, a key finding from this study was that spiclomazine suppressed migration and invasion of cancer cells through down-regulation of MMP-2/9. Collectively, the proposed studies did shed light on the antiproliferation effect of spiclomazine on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and further clarified the mechanisms that spiclomazine induced apoptosis associated with the suppression of migration and invasion.

  11. Intercalated duct cell is starting point in development of pancreatic ductal carcinoma?

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    Yamaguchi Toshikazu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although it is well known that the pancreatic ductal carcinoma may develop having a relationship to the mucous gland hyperplasia (MGH with atypia (PanIN-1B by PanIN system, the starting point of this atypical MGH is unclear. To know it, we examined the pancreas tissue using many methods described below. Methods 1. Twenty-seven surgically resected pancreas tissue specimens, including pancreatic ductal carcinomas (PDC, chronic pancreatitis and normal pancreas, were investigated using immunohistochemical stainings for MUC1, MUC6, 45M1, Ki67 and p53. 2. DNA extraction and analysis of K-ras mutation at codon 12 using microdissection method: The paraffin blocks with 16 regions including the intercalated duct cell (IC adjacant to the atypical MGH were prepared for DNA extraction. Mutation of K-ras codon 12 was analized and compared in enriched polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked minisequence assay (PCR-ELMA. Results 1. In the normal pancreas, although no positive cell was seen in 45M1, p53, Ki67, the cytoplasm of IC were always positive for MUC1 and sometimes positive for MUC6. In the pancreas with fibrosis or inflammation, MGH was positive for MUC6 and 45M1. And atypical MGH was positive for MUC1, MUC6 and 45M1. Some IC adjacent to the atypical MGH was positive for Ki67 as well as atypical MGH. The carcinoma cells in all cases of PDC were diffusely positive for MUC1, 45M1, p53 and Ki67, and focally positive for MUC6. 2. In K-ras mutation, we examined the regions including IC adjacent to the atypical MGH, because the immunohistochemical apomucin stainings of these regions resembled those of PDC as decribed above. And K-ras mutation was confirmed in 12 of 16 regions (75%. All mutations were a single mutation, in 6 regions GTT was detected, in 4 regions GAT was detected and in 2 region AGT was detected. Conclusion Some intercalated duct cell may be the starting point of the pancreatic ductal carcinoma, because the exhibitions of

  12. Chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic carcinoma

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    Pathy Sushmita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer patients present late in their course and surgical resection as a modality of treatment is of limited value. Majority develop loco-regional failure and distant metastasis, therefore, adjuvant therapy comprising of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are useful treatment options to achieve higher loco-regional control. Specialized irradiation techniques like intra-operative radiotherapy that help to increase the total tumor dose have been used, however, controvertible survival benefit was observed. Various studies have shown improved median and overall survival with chemoradiotherapy for advanced unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. The role of new agents such as topoisomerase I inhibitors also needs further clinical investigations.

  13. The effect of irradiation and chemotherapeutic agents on a new pancreatic carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In vitro studies using pancreatic cancer cells are based mostly on a few well-characterized cell lines, which have been established in culture for up to 20 years. The phenotype of these cell lines can change in long-term cultures and, due to extensive sub-cloning, they occasionally show phenotypic and genotypic instability, with eventual loss of the characteristics of the tumors from which they were originated. Therefore, we have established and characterized a new pancreatic cancer cell line from pleural effusion of a patient with advanced cancer of pancreas, designated p34, and evaluated its radio-chemo sensitivity. The cells were characterized using usual microscopy, FACS analysis, immunohistochemistry and cytogenetics. Cell survival following irradiation or drug treatment was measured by colorimetric XTT assay. Results. The p34 cells showed typical morphological characteristics of epithelial pancreatic tumor cells and expressed cytokeratin 7 and pancreatic antigen but were negative for vimentin. The line consisted of hyperdiploid cells with a modal number of 48 including trisomy of chromosomes 2, 5 and 7, monosomy of chromosome 20 and two marker chromosomes: 2p- and iso(8q). The same chromosomal changes were present in early and late passages (during >1 year of cultivation). Irradiation decreased significantly the p34 cell survival with the LD50 = 4,5 Gy. Gemcitabine, taxol and vinorelbine significantly inhibited cell proliferation in nM concentrations, whereas cis-platin was effective in μM concentrations. The p34 cell line may serve as a new model for studying various aspects of both biology and anticancer treatment in carcinoma of the pancreas

  14. Clinical Impact of Pancreatic Metastases from Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Paolo; Doucet, Ludovic; Giglione, Palma; Grünwald, Viktor; Melichar, Bohuslav; Galli, Luca; De Giorgi, Ugo; Sabbatini, Roberto; Ortega, Cinzia; Santoni, Matteo; Bamias, Aristotelis; Verzoni, Elena; Derosa, Lisa; Studentova, Hana; Pacifici, Monica; Coppa, Jorgelina; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; de Braud, Filippo; Porta, Camillo; Escudier, Bernard; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma are uncommon and their prognostic significance is not well defined. In this analysis we evaluated the outcome of patients with pancreatic metastases treated with either targeted therapies or local treatment to the pancreas. Patients with pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma treated between 1993 and 2014 were identified from 11 European centers. Clinical records were retrospectively reviewed. Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to evaluate progression-free survival and overall survival. Cox’s proportional hazard models were used for survival analysis. In total, 276 PM patients were evaluated, including 77 (28%) patients treated by either surgery or radiotherapy to the pancreas, and 256 (93%) who received systemic therapy. Median time from nephrectomy to diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 91 months (IQR 54–142). Disease control rate after first-line TTs was 84%, with a median progression-free survival of 12 months (95% CI 10–14). Median overall survival was 73 months (95% CI 61–86) with a 5-year OS of 58%. Median OS of patients treated with local treatment was 106 months (95% CI 78–204) with a 5-year overall survival of 75%. On multivariable analysis, nephrectomy (HR 5.31; 95%CI 2.36–11.92; p<0.0001), Memorial Sloan Kettering/International Metastatic RCC Database Consortium prognostic score (HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.94–2.23 for intermediate vs good vs risk; HR 2.76 95%, CI 1.43–5.35 for poor vs good risk p = 0.0099) and pancreatic local treatment (HR 0.48; 95%CI 0.30–0.78 p = 0.0029) were associated with overall survival. Difference in median OS between patients with PM and that reported in a matched-control group of mRCC patients with extrapancreatic metastases was statistically significant (p < .0001). Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma usually occur years after nephrectomy, are associated with an indolent behavior and a prolonged survival. Targeted therapies and

  15. Radiosensitization effect of recombinant adenoviral-mediated PUMA gene on pancreatic carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of PUMA gene mediated by recombinant adenovirus vector combined with radiation on the pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: The PANC-1 cells were infected with Ad- PUMA (MOI=10, 50 and 100, respectively) for 48 h. The expression of PUMA mRNA and protein was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. PANC-1 cells were divided into 4 groups: control group, transfection group, irradiation group and combined treatment group. The cell growth inhibition rate and apoptotic rate of PANC-1 cells were assessed by MTT assay and flow cytometry. Human pancreatic carcinomas were transplanted subcutaneously in nude mice, which were randomized into 4 groups: control group, transfection group, irradiation group and combined treatment group. Tumor growth rate and apoptotic index at different time points were recorded in 35 days. Results: The expression of PUMA mRNA and protein was increased with the increase of MOI of Ad-PUMA, which was does-dependant (MOI=10, mRNA=0.46± 0.02, protein=0.75± 0.09; MOI=50, mRNA=1.12±0.09, protein=1.01±0.18; MOI=100, mRNA=1.50±0.08, protein= 1.80±0.15; P3, (39.5±9.23)mm3, (33.6±10.3)mm3 and (52.0±11.43)mm3, respectively, P<0.05]. And the apoptotic index was increased in the same manner (AI=0.43±0.05, 0.29±0.10, 0.24±0.05 and 0.00±0.00, respectively, P<0.05). Conclusions: Recombinant adenoviral-mediated PUMA gene combined with irradiation could increase the cell-killing effect on pancreatic carcinoma. It is better than that of either one kind of therapy. (authors)

  16. Pancreatic metastasis in a case of small cell lung carcinoma: Diagnostic role of fine-needle aspiration cytology and immunocytochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip K Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung carcinoma represents a group of highly malignant tumors giving rise to early and widespread metastasis at the time of diagnosis. However, the pancreas is a relatively infrequent site of metastasis by this neoplasm, and there are only occasional reports on its fine needle aspiration (FNA cytology diagnosis. A 66-year-old man presented with extensive mediastinal lymphadenopathy and a mass in the pancreatic tail. Ultrasound-guided FNA smears from the pancreatic mass contained small, round tumor cells with extensive nuclear molding. The cytodiagnosis was metastatic small cell carcinoma. Immunocytochemical staining showed that a variable number of neoplastic cell were positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A, neurone-specific enolase and synaptophysin but negative for leukocyte common antigen. The trans-bronchial needle aspiration was non-diagnostic, but biopsy was suspicious of a small cell carcinoma. This case represents a rare metastatic lesion in the pancreas from small cell lung carcinoma, diagnosed by FNA cytology.

  17. Apoptosis of Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells Induced By All-Trans Retinoic Acid and Interferon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-hua Wang; Yuan-qin Yin; Ping Ma; Cheng-guang Sui; Fan-dong Meng; Jiang You-hong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the apoptosis of human pancreatic carcinoma PC3 cells induced by the combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) with interferon alpha (IFN-α). Methods: PC3 cells were treated with ATRA and IFN-α. The inhibitory rate of PC3 cell proliferation was detected using MTT method. Cellular apoptosis was determined with flow cytometry. The percentage of PC3 cell apoptosis was assayed using TUNEL methods. Results: ATRA and IFN-α could inhibit cellular proliferation and induces cellular apoptosis of PC3 cells. The inhibitory effect was stronger when the ATRA and IFN-α were combined as a therapy. Conclusion: ATRA inhibits the proliferation of PC3 cells and induce the apoptosis of PC3 cells. The combination of IFN-α with ATRA may enhance these effects on PC3 cells.

  18. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, J D; Morton, D. G.; Neoptolemos, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis is very important as the management and prognosis of these two diseases is different. In most patients with pancreatic disease, the diagnosis can be established but there is a subgroup of patients in whom it is difficult to differentiate between these conditions because the clinical presentation is often similar and currently available diagnostic tests may be unable to distinguish between an inflammatory or neoplast...

  19. Isoalantolactone Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma PANC-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Khan, Chuan Ding, Azhar Rasul, Fei Yi, Ting Li, Hongwen Gao, Rong Gao, Lili Zhong, Kun Zhang, Xuedong Fang, Tonghui Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoalantolactone, a sesquiterpene lactone compound possesses antifungal, antibacteria, antihelminthic and antiproliferative activities. In the present study, we found that isoalantolactone inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Further mechanistic studies revealed that induction of apoptosis is associated with increased generation of reactive oxygen species, cardiolipin oxidation, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c and cell cycle arrest at S phase. N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC, a specific ROS inhibitor restored cell viability and completely blocked isoalantolactone-mediated apoptosis in PANC-1 cells indicating that ROS are involved in isoalantolactone-mediated apoptosis. Western blot study showed that isoalantolactone increased the expression of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3 and decreased the expression of Bcl-2 in a dose-dependent manner. No change in expression of phosphorylated p38 MAPK and Bax was found when cells were treated with isoalantolactone in the presence of NAC, indicating that activation of these proteins is directly dependent on ROS generation. The present study provides evidence for the first time that isoalantolactone induces ROS-dependent apoptosis through intrinsic pathway. Furthermore, our in vivo toxicity study demonstrated that isoalantolactone did not induce any acute or chronic toxicity in liver and kidneys of CD1 mice at dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Therefore, isoalantolactone may be a safe chemotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of human pancreatic carcinoma.

  20. Coexistence of Pancreatic Carcinoma and Pancreatic Tuberculosis: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zhen-Jiang; Zhang, Hao; Xiang, Guang-Ming; Gong, Jun; Mai, Gang; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is extremely rare and mimics pancreatic carcinoma both clinically and radiologically. This paper discusses the occurrence of 2 heterogeneous masses located in the head and tail of the pancreas in an adult male. In this patient, laparotomy was performed because of the high suspicion of pancreatic carcinoma. Intraoperative fine needle aspiration biopsy revealed the coexistence of pancreatic carcinoma with pancreatic TB, and a combined resection of the distal pancrea...

  1. Prenyltransferase inhibitor radiosensitization of pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PaCa) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) radiosensitize tumor cell lines expressing activated H-Ras. K-Ras however remains active after FTI treatment due to prenylation by geranylgeranyltransferase. Up to 90% of pancreatic carcinomas (PaCa) are mutant in K-ras. We hypothesized that combined FTI and geranylgeranyltransferase inhibitor (GGTI) treatment could radiosensitize PaCa cells. Nine human PaCa lines (7 K-ras-mutant, 2 ras-wt) and transgenic mouse pancreatic ductal cells (PDC) expressing wt-ras or mutant K-ras were tested in clonogenic assays with combined FTI-A +/- GGTI-B (Merck and Co Inc.). Inhibition of PI3- kinase (with LY294002) or inhibition of MEK1/2 (with U0126) served to assess the significance of the PI3-kinase and MAPK to radiation survival in these cells. H- and K-Ras prenylation status and changes in phosphorylation of AKT and MAPK were monitored as were changes in cell cycle distribution. FTI+GGTI treatment achieved inhibition of K-Ras prenylation in all PaCa cell lines. This treatment radiosensitized the K-ras mutant cell lines AsPC-1, Capan-2, MiaPaCa-2 and PSN-1, PancM, but not Capan-1 or the ras-wt cell lines (BxPC-3, HS766T, PDC-wt). L-778,123, a dual action inhibitor, sensitized all K-ras mutant cells. Surprisingly, PancM, Panc-1, MiaPaCa-2 and PDC K-Ras cells were radiosensitized by FTI treatment alone. R11577, another FTI without GGTI activity, also sensitized Panc-1 and MiaPaCa-2 and additionally AsPC-1 cells. Radiosensitization was also achieved after treatment with LY294002 in all PaCa lines expressing mutant-K-ras and the ras-wt line BxPC-3 overexpressing Akt2. However these lines were not sensitized by U0126. FTI+GGTI sensitize K-ras mt PaCa cell lines to radiation. PI3-kinase signaling but not MAPK signaling appears to contribute to radiation survival in PaCa cells. Radiosensitization of certain PaCa cells by FTI alone indicates that alternate pathways or farnesylated targets other than K-Ras may also be involved in radiation survival

  2. PANCREATIC CARCINOMA: REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Kumari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the prognosis of pancreatic cancer is extremely poor, even when treated with radical surgery. The overall 5 year survival rate following surgical intervention is around 10%.With the increasing use of CT scans for other reasons not related to pancreas, a variety of neoplastic and non - neoplastic lesions are increasingly encountered in clinical practice. The distinction of these lesions has significant therapeutic and prognostic implications. Regarding ductal carcinoma, key distinguishing features from chronic pancreatitis and a discussion of the concept of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia ( PanIN are included. Precursors, mo lecular carcinogenesis, risk factors and different morphological patterns of tumors arising from exocrine pancreas are discussed. Research on early detection is ongoing. Screening of people with a family history of hereditary pancreatitis plays an importan t role in the early detection of ductal carcinoma of pancreas.

  3. Sensitivity of cultured pancreatic carcinoma cells to Acinetobacter glutaminase-asparaginase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M C; Arimura, G K; Holcenberg, J S; Yunis, A A

    1982-09-01

    Cultured human pancreatic carcinoma cells (MIA PaCa-2) have been shown previously to be very sensitive to E. coli L-asparaginase (EC II). The present studies have demonstrated that another enzyme, Acinetobacter glutaminase-asparaginase (AGA) is much more effective in inhibiting cell growth. At the concentration of 0.0025 U/ml of AGA activity the enzyme totally inhibited cell growth, whereas the EC II with the same concentration did not show any effect. The inhibition of cell growth correlated well with inhibition of protein and glycoprotein synthesis. The addition of L-glutamine at the concentration of 1 mM completely reversed the inhibition of protein synthesis. Similarly, the addition of L-glutamine at the concentration of 3 mM daily on 3 successive days after adding AGA resulted in significant reversal of growth inhibition. The results of this study indicate that the action of AGA on MIA PaCa-2 is, to a great extent, exerted through its L-glutaminase activity. PMID:7173949

  4. Multiple pancreatic metastases from clear cell renal carcinoma: diagnosis with chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging before surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a case in which multiple pancreatic tumours were diagnosed as metastatic clear cell renal carcinomas with chemical shift MRI (CSI) before surgery. Radiologists may be unable to recognize the loss of intensity on CSI macroscopically. We believe that it is useful to make subtraction images and calculate signal intensity on CSI, even if the lesions are multiple metastatic tumours Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  5. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Feick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available : In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  6. Evaluating the effect of radiosensitizer early by uptake of 18F-FDG human pancreatic carcinoma cell Patu 8988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to evaluate the effect of radiotherapy and joint action with CMNa and 2-DG early by uptake of 18F-FDG in human pancreatic carcinoma cell Patu 8988. Methods: The human pancreatic carcinoma cell Patu 8988 were exposed to a single fraction of X-ray radiation either with glycodidazolum natrium (CMNa) or 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) or irradiation-only. The uptake of 18F-FDG was calculated 24 and 48 h after irradiation. Results: The differences of 18F-FDG uptake between groups of various dose had no significance 24 h after irradiation (P>0.05). 18F-FDG uptake in the 2-DG groups and CMNa groups were lower than that in the irradiation-only groups (P<0.05 or <0.01). The differences of 18F-FDG uptake in 2-DG groups, CMNa groups and irradiation-only groups had significance 24 and 48 h after irradiation (P<0.05). 18F-FDG uptake decreased with the increasing dose of X-ray. Uptake was positively correlated with the A value 24 and 48 h after irradiation (r=0.759, r=0.814, P<0.01). Conclusion: The uptake of 18F-FDG with human pancreatic carcinoma cell Patu 8988 decreased 24 h after irradiation with 2-DG or CMNa. Response to radiotherapy could be predicted early by 18F-FDG PET scans. (authors)

  7. CONSTRUCTION OF ACTIVE RECOMBINANT CASPASE-3 EUKARYOTIC EXPRESSION PLA SMID AND EFFECT OF r-CASPASE-3 ON APOPTOSIS OF PANCREATIC CARCINOMA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To construct active recombinant cas pa ses-3 gene(r-caspases-3)eukaryotic expression plasmid and observe the apoptos is inducing activity of r-caspase-3 in pancreatic carcinoma cells. Methods pcDNA3.1(+)/r-caspase-3 was constructed and pan creatic carcinoma cells(PC-Ⅱ)were transfected with the pcDNA3.1(+)/r-caspases -3 by liposomes(LipofectAMINE).The expression of r-Caspase-3 mRNA in pancreat ic carcinoma cells was detected by reverse transcription process of the polymera se chain reaction(RT-PCR), and the signs of apoptosis were examined in pancreat ic carcinoma cells by the methods of the DNA electrophoresis and flow cytometry analysis(FACS).Results The sequence inserted in pBlueSKM/r-Caspase-3 p lasmid was coincident with that of the r-caspases-3. The evaluation result of pcDNA3.1(+)/r-caspases-3 through enzyme cutting was correct. A 894bp strap was observed by RT-PCR after pancreatic carcinoma cells being transfected with the pcDNA3.1(+)/r-caspases-3 by liposomes. No strap was found in control groups. A characteristic DNA ladder was observed in pancreatic carcinoma cells DNA elect r ophoresis, and transparent hypodiploid karyotype peak was found by FACS. Conclusion The plasmid of pcDNA3.1(+)/r-Caspase-3 was c onstructed successfully, the expression of r-Caspase-3 mRMA in pancreatic carc inoma cells was confirmed by RT-PCR, and pcDNA3.1(+)/r-Caspase-3 can induce a poptosis in pancreatic carcinoma cells.

  8. Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 promotes cell invasion and angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaochun; Han, Ye; Xue, Xiaofeng; Li, Wei; Guo, Xiaobo; Li, Pu; Wang, Yunliang; Li, Dechun; Zhou, Jin; Zhi, Qiaoming

    2016-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7), also known as vascular endothelial stain, was firstly identified as a modulator of smooth muscle cell migration. Though the expression of EGFL7 was reported to be up-regulated during tumorigenesis, the clinical and biological functions of EGFL7 in pancreatic carcinoma (PC) were still not fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the serum EGFL7 level in PC tissues was statistically higher than that in normal subjects (p0.05), whereas inhibition of EGFL7 expression could decrease PaCa-2 cell invasion (p<0.05). More interestingly, by tubular formation, Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and ELISA assays, our results revealed that silencing EGFL7 expression represented a strong inhibiting effect on tubular formation of micro-vessels through down-regulating the protein levels of VEGF and Ang-2 (p<0.05). Our results raised the possibility of using EGFL7as a potential prognostic biomarker and therapy target of PC, and down-regulation of EGFL7 might be considered to be a potentially important molecular treatment strategy for patients with PC. PMID:26796281

  9. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31+ vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models

  10. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Jin [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); New Drug Development Center, Osong Medical Innovation Foundation, Cheongwon, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Suhwan [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa [BK21-plus, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok, E-mail: sskoh@dau.ac.kr [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  11. The clinical assessment of intraductal ultrasonography in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the clinical value of intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis with conventional imaging methods. Methods: IDUS was carried out in eighteen patients with pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

  12. Requirement of Nuclear Factor κB for Smac Mimetic–Mediated Sensitization of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells for Gemcitabine-Induced Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dominic Stadel; Silvia Cristofanon; Behnaz Ahangarian Abhari; Kurt Deshayes; Kerry Zobel; Domagoj Vucic; Klaus-Michael Debatin; Simone Fulda

    2011-01-01

    Defects in apoptosis contribute to treatment resistance and poor outcome of pancreatic cancer, calling for novel therapeutic strategies. Here, we provide the first evidence that nuclear factor (NF) κB is required for Smac mimetic– mediated sensitization of pancreatic carcinoma cells for gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. The Smac mimetic BV6 cooperates with gemcitabine to reduce cell viability and to induce apoptosis. In addition, BV6 significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of several anticancer ...

  13. Requirement of Nuclear Factor κB for Smac Mimetic-Mediated Sensitization of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells for Gemcitabine-Induced Apoptosis12

    OpenAIRE

    Stadel, Dominic; Cristofanon, Silvia; Abhari, Behnaz Ahangarian; Deshayes, Kurt; Zobel, Kerry; Vucic, Domagoj; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Fulda, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Defects in apoptosis contribute to treatment resistance and poor outcome of pancreatic cancer, calling for novel therapeutic strategies. Here, we provide the first evidence that nuclear factor (NF) κB is required for Smac mimetic-mediated sensitization of pancreatic carcinoma cells for gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. The Smac mimetic BV6 cooperates with gemcitabine to reduce cell viability and to induce apoptosis. In addition, BV6 significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of several anticancer d...

  14. Epidermal growth factor and its receptors in human pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in oncogenesis and progression of malignant tumors is a subject of vast interest. In this study, radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay of EGF were established. EGF contents in malignant and benign pancreatic tumors, in normal pancreas tissue, and in culture media of a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line were determined. EGF receptor binding studies were performed. It was shown that EGF contents in pancreatic carcinomas were significantly higher than those in normal pancreas or benign pancreatic tumors. EGF was also detected in the culture medium of a pancreatic carcinoma cell line. The binding of 125I-EGF to the pancreatic carcinoma cells was time and temperature dependent, reversible, competitive, and specific. Scatchard analysis showed that the dissociation constant of EGF receptor was 2.1 X 10(-9) M, number of binding sites was 1.3 X 10(5) cell. These results indicate that there is an over-expression of EGF/EGF receptors in pancreatic carcinomas, and that an autocrine regulatory mechanism may exist in the growth-promoting effect of EGF on tumor cells

  15. Targeting of XIAP combined with systemic mesenchymal stem cell-mediated delivery of sTRAIL ligand inhibits metastatic growth of pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Andrea; Albarenque, Stella Maris; Deedigan, Laura; Yu, Rui; Reidy, Mairead; Fulda, Simone; Zwacka, Ralf Michael

    2010-11-01

    Disseminating tumors are one of the gravest medical problems. Here, we combine the tumor-specific apoptosis-inducing activity of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) with the ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to infiltrate both tumor and lymphatic tissues to target primary tumors as well as disseminated cancer cells in a human pancreatic cancer mouse model. Furthermore, we targeted X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) by RNA interference (RNAi) inside the cancer cells to make use of the apoptosis sensitization as well the antimetastatic effect that is afforded by XIAP silencing. We generated MSCs, termed MSC.sTRAIL, that express and secrete a trimeric form of soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL). MSC.sTRAIL triggered limited apoptosis in human pancreatic carcinoma cells that were resistant to soluble recombinant TRAIL, which is most likely due to the enhanced effect of the direct, cell-mediated delivery of trimeric TRAIL. MSC.sTRAIL-mediated cell death was markedly increased by concomitant knockdown of XIAP by RNAi in the cancer cells. These findings were confirmed in xenograft models, in which tumors from the parental pancreatic carcinoma cells showed only growth retardation on treatment with MSC.sTRAIL, whereas tumors with silenced XIAP that were treated with MSC.sTRAIL went into remission. Moreover, animals with XIAP-negative xenografts treated with MSC.sTRAIL were almost free of lung metastasis, whereas animals treated with control MSCs showed substantial metastatic growth in the lungs. In summary, this is the first demonstration that a combined approach using systemic MSC-mediated delivery of sTRAIL together with XIAP inhibition suppresses metastatic growth of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:20882532

  16. Effect of deleted pancreatic cancer locus 4 gene transfection on biological behaviors of human colorectal carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Sheng Xiao; Ji-Fang Wen; Jing-He Li; Zhong-Liang Hu; Hui Zheng; Chun-Yah Fu

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the effect of deleted pancreatic cancer locus 4 (DPC4) gene transfection on biological behaviors of human colorectal carcinoma cells and the role of DPC4 gene in colorectal carcinogenesis.METHODS: PcDNA3.1-DPC4 plasmid was re-constructed by gene-recombination technology. SW620 cells, a human colorectal carcinoma cell line, were transfected with PcDNA3.1-DPC4 plasmid using lipofectamine transfecting technique. Transfected cells were selected with G418.Expression of Smad4 protein was detected in cells transfected with DPC4 gene by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Biological characterristics of transfected cells were evaluated by population-doubling time and cloning efficiency. Alterations of percentage of S phage cells (S%) and apoptosis rate were determined by flowcytometry.RESULTS: PcDNA3.1-DPC4 plasmid was constructed successfully. SW620 cells transfected with PcDNA3.1-DPC4plasmid (DPC4+-SW620 cells) showed a strong intracellular expression of Smad4 protein, and the positive signal was localized in cytoplasm and nuclei, mainly in cytoplasm,where the expressions of Smad4 protein in SW620 cells transfected with PcDNA3.1 plasmid (PcDNA3.1-SW620 cells)and non-transfected SW620 cells (SW620 cells) were weaker than those in DPC4+-SW620 cells. The populationdoubling time in DPC4+-SW620 cells (116 h) was significantly longer than that in SW620 cells (31 h) and PcDNA3.1-Sw620 cells (29 h) (P<0.01). The cloning efficiencies of DPC4+-SW620 cells (12%) were markedly lower than those of SW620 cells (69%) and PcDNA3.1-Sw620 cells (67%) (P<0.01). Compared with SW620 cells and PcDNA3.1-Sw620 cells, the G0-G1% of DPC4+-SW620cells was obviously higher and the S% was markedly lower (P<0.05). Apoptosis rate of DPC4+-SW620 cells was significantly higher than that of SW620 cells and PcDNA3.1-SW620 cells.CONCLUSION: PcDNA3.1-DPC4 plasmid can be successfully re-constructed and stably transfected into human SW620 cells, thereby the cells can steadily

  17. CT of the superior mesenteric artery root in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous reports suggested that pancreatitis does not produce CT changes in the region of the root of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) while pancreatic carcinoma does. The authors have reviewed 103 CT studies from patients with proved pancreatitis (n = 61) or pancreatic carcinoma (n = 42). Masked CT studies (obscuring all regions except the root of the SMA) were evaluated for infiltration of the fat around the SMA, adjacent lymph nodes, focal mass abutting the SMA, and mass circumferentially encasing the SMA. Streaky infiltration around the SMA was seen in patient with pancreatitis (58%) and pancreatic carcinoma (52%). Lymph nodes were seen in both pancreatitis (28%) and carcinoma (17%). Focal mass abutting the SMA was seen in pancreatitis (7%) and carcinoma (26%). Encasement of the SMA was seen only in carcinoma (17%). Both pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma can produce CT findings in the region of the root of the SMA. Encasement of the SMA was the only finding specific to patients with pancreatic carcinoma

  18. Coagulation function in patients with pancreatic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hang-yan; XIU Dian-rong; LI Zhi-fei; WANG Gang

    2009-01-01

    Background The coagulation function in patients with pancreatic carcinoma is abnormal and the reason is not very clear. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the coagulation function in patients with pancreatic carcinoma.Methods From June 2004 to December 2007, 132 patients received diagnosis and treatment in our hospital. The coagulative parameters including the prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrinogen levels were collected and studied retrospectively.Results The average fibrinogen levels in patients with pancreatic carcinoma, (476.21±142.05) mg/dl, were significantly higher than in patients with cholangiolithiasis, (403.28±126.41) mg/dl (P 0.05).Conclusions The level of fibrinogen in patients with pancreatic carcinoma was elevated. The elevated fibrinogen level may be associated with invasiveness and lymphatic metastasis. Using vitamin K in perioperation management did not reduce intraoperative blood loss.

  19. Genetic alterations in pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Roland M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer of the exocrine pancreas represents the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the Western population with an average survival after diagnosis of 3 to 6 months and a five-year survival rate under 5%. Our understanding of the molecular carcinogenesis has improved in the last few years due to the development of novel molecular biological techniques. Pancreatic cancer is a multi-stage process resulting from the accumulation of genetic changes in the somatic DNA of normal cells. In this article we describe major genetic alterations of pancreatic cancer, mutations in the proto-oncogene K-RAS and the tumor suppressors INK4A, TP53 and DPC4/SMAD4. The accumulation of these genetic changes leads to a profound disturbance in cell cycle regulation and continuous growth. The knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms will offer new therapeutic and diagnostic options and hopefully improve the outcome of this aggressive disease.

  20. Taxotere resistance in SUIT Taxotere resistance in pancreatic carcinoma cell line SUIT 2 and its sublines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Liu; Edgar Staren; Takeshi Iwamura; Hubert Appert; John Howard

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the specific mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance to taxotere (TXT) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC). METHODS: MTT assay was used to detect the sensitivity of PAC cell line SUIT-2 and its sublines (S-007, S-013, S-020,S-028 and TXT selected SUIT-2 cell line, S2/TXT) to TXT.Mdr1 (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP), lung resistance protein (LRP) and β-tubulin isotype gene expressions were detected by RT-PCR. The functionality of P-gp and MRP was tested using their specific blocker verapamil ( Ver ) and indomethacin ( IMC ),respectively. The transporter activity of P-gp was also confirmed by Rhodamine 123 accumulation assay. RESULTS: S-020 and S2/TXT were found to be significantly resistant to TXT(19 and 9.5-fold to their parental cell line SUIT-2, respectively ). RT-PCR demonstrated strong expression of Mdr1 in these two cell lines, but weaker expression or no expression in other cells lines. MRP and LRP expressions were found in most of these cell lines. The TXT-resistance in S2-020 and S2/TXT could be reversed almost completely by Ver, but not by IMC. Flow cytometry showed that Ver increased the accumulation of Rhodamine-123 in these two cell lines. Compared with S-020 and SUIT-2,the levels of β-tubulin isotype II, III expreesions in S-2/TXTwere increased remarkably. CONCLUSION: The both intrinsic and acquired TXT-related drugresistance in these PAC cell lines is mainly mediated by P-gp, but had no relationship to MRP and LRP expressions.The increases of β-tubulin isotype II, III might be collateral changes that occur when the SUIT-2 cells are treated with TXT.

  1. Requirement of Nuclear Factor κB for Smac Mimetic–Mediated Sensitization of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells for Gemcitabine-Induced Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Stadel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Defects in apoptosis contribute to treatment resistance and poor outcome of pancreatic cancer, calling for novel therapeutic strategies. Here, we provide the first evidence that nuclear factor (NF κB is required for Smac mimetic– mediated sensitization of pancreatic carcinoma cells for gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. The Smac mimetic BV6 cooperates with gemcitabine to reduce cell viability and to induce apoptosis. In addition, BV6 significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of several anticancer drugs against pancreatic carcinoma cells, including doxorubicin, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil. Molecular studies reveal that BV6 stimulates NF-κB activation, which is further increased in the presence of gemcitabine. Importantly, inhibition of NF-κB by overexpression of the dominant-negative IκBα superrepressor significantly decreases BV6- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis, demonstrating that NF-κB exerts a proapoptotic function in this model of apoptosis. In support of this notion, inhibition of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα by the TNFα blocking antibody Enbrel reduces BV6- and gemcitabine-induced activation of caspase 8 and 3, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptosis. By demonstrating that BV6 and gemcitabine trigger a NF-κB–dependent, TNFα-mediated loop to activate apoptosis signaling pathways and caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death, our findings have important implications for the development of Smac mimetic–based combination protocols in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Effect of 188Re-IGF-1 analogue in proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction in pancreatic carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of 188Re-IGF-1 analogue (IGF-1A) in proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction in human pancreatic carcinoma cell line Patu8988. Methods: IGF-1A was labeled with 188Re. Patu8988 cells were divided into an un-treated control group, IGF-1A group (1, 5, 10, 20 μg), 188ReO4-group (0.37, 1.85, 3.70, 7.40 MBq) and 188Re-IGF-1A group (0.37, 0.74, 1.85 MBq). The cell proliferation inhibition effects by the 188Re-IGF-1A and 188ReO4--were detected every day by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test from 1 d to 7 d after administration, while the IGF-1 A group was tested every day from 1 d to 6 d after treatment. Inhibition rates were calculated. At 3 d after treatment with 188ReO4-and 188Re-IGF-1A (1.85, 3.70, 7.40 MBq), cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. For biodistribution studies of 188Re-IGF-1A, 36 nude mice bearing Patu8988 cell xenografts were divided into 6 groups. At different time points (15 min, 1 h, 4 h, 1 d, 3 d and 5 d), 36 mice (n=6 per time point) were sacrificed and organs of interest were removed, weighted and measured for radioactivity by a gamma counter. The absorbed doses of organs were calculated as % ID/g. One-way analysis of variance was used. Results: After 4 d, inhibition rate of Patu8988 cell proliferation in the 188Re-IGF-1A group (1.85 MBq) was (90.75 ±5.20)%,higher than that in 188ReO4-group or IGF-1A group ((49.50±2.39)%, (23.00±4.21)%; F=554.724, P<0.01). At 3 d after treatment with different doses of 188Re-IGF-1A (1.85, 3.70, 7.40 MBq), floating cell ratios were (16.56 ± 0.95)%, (33.39 ±5.93)% and (43.76 ± 1.38)%, respectively. Apoptosis ratios in the floating cells treated by 188Re-IGF-1A (1.85, 3.70, 7.40 MBq) were (12.70±2.27)%, (17.80±1.51)% and (23.23 ±1.22)%, respectively. Distribution in tumors was (39.30 ± 17.98), (10.59 ± 9.39), (5.32 ± 1.53) and (5.30 ±2.28)% ID/g at the 15 min, 1 d, 3 d, and 5 d time points after intratumoral

  3. Pancreatic involvement in small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few data are available concerning incidence, clinical picture, and prognosis for pancreatic metastases of small cell lung carcinoma. In this paper we review the related literature available in English language. Although pancreatic metastases are generally asymptomatic, they can rarely produce clinical symptoms or functional abnormalities. The widespread use of multi-detector computerised tomography (CT) in contemporary medical practice has led to an increased detection of pancreatic metastases in oncology patients. Tissue diagnosis is imperative because radiological techniques alone are incapable of differentiating them from primary pancreatic tumours. Pancreatic metastases occur in the relative end stage of small cell lung cancer. The main complications of these lesions, although rare, are acute pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice. Early chemotherapy can provide a survival benefit even in patients with mild acute pancreatitis or extrahepatic biliary obstruction

  4. Pancreatic ascariasis with periampullary carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Arulprakash, S; Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Dutta, Amit Kumar; Joseph, A; Chandy, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Ascarias lumbricoides infestation is endemic in tropical countries. Most infections are asymptomatic, but it can produce a wide spectrum of manifestations including hepatobiliary and pancreatic complications. There are reports of association of biliary ascariasis with bilary malignancies in the past, but same is not known for pancreatic ascariasis. We report a case of association of periampullary malignancy with pancreatic ascariasis.

  5. Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking Igg4-Related Pseudotumor in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Ali Khan; Sehrish Kamal; Mohammed Andaleeb Chowdhury; Usman Ahmad; Ali Nawras

    2014-01-01

    Context Autoimmune pancreatitis is classified into two distinct clinical profiles. Care report Type 1 autoimmunepancreatitis (AIP) is considered to be a manifestation of a novel clinicopathological entity called IgG4 related sclerosingdisease, diagnosed using the Mayo Clinic HISORt criteria. Extra-pancreatic manifestations can include involvement of bileducts, salivary gland, lung nodules, thyroiditis, tubulointerstitial nephritis, renal masses, and retroperitoneal fibrosis. Type2 autoimmune ...

  6. Lymphatic drainage and CTV in pancreatic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganti, Alessio G; Cellini, Numa; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Macchia, Gabriella; Smaniotto, Daniela; Luzi, Stefano; Balducci, Mario; Deodato, Francesco; Valentini, Vincenzo; Trodella, Lucio

    2003-01-01

    CTV definition in exclusive or adjuvant radiation therapy of pancreatic carcinoma is essentially based on the opinion of "expert" authors and on the knowledge of lymphatic pathways. The subject has been widely debated. Radiotherapy treatments of the entire upper abdomen (liver and pancreatic region), pancreas and lymph node stations, to volumes focused on macroscopic tumor only, have been proposed. Carcinoma of exocrine pancreas is characterized by the frequent, early appearance of metastasis via the lymphatic route. Most commonly involved lymph node stations include those of the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric, peripancreatic, lumboaortic lymph nodes, those of the hepatic portal (the latter in particular for pancreatic head tumors) and of the hilum of spleen (the latter in particular for pancreatic tail tumors). The possible multicentricity of pancreatic carcinoma, most likely due to intraductal spread, should lead to the inclusion in the CTV of the entire pancreatic parenchyma. This should be considered also for the frequent perineural intra- or extrapancreatic spread of pancreatic carcinoma present also in small tumors (T1). In extrapancreatic spread the retropancreatic adipose tissue should be included in the CTV at least at the GTV level. At the present state of knowledge, in the absence of pattern of failure analysis and of comparison of different treatment approaches, in terms of the definition of volumes of interest, CTV definitions which include lymphatic drainage stations, most part of pancreatic parenchyma and retropancreatic adipose tissue seem justified especially in treatments for cure. In palliation, the CTV may be limited to the GTV and the adipose tissue behind it. PMID:15018319

  7. Groove pancreatic carcinomas: radiological and pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabata, Toshifumi; Terayama, Noboru; Sanada, Junichiro; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Matsui, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Kanazawa University, School of Medicine, 13-1 Takara-machi, Kanazawa City 920-8641 (Japan); Kadoya, Masumi [Department of Radiology, Kanazawa University, School of Medicine, 13-1 Takara-machi, Kanazawa City 920-8641 (Japan); Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Shinshu University, Shinshu 390-8621 (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the characteristics of pancreatic head carcinomas mainly invading the groove between the duodenum and the pancreatic head. Nine patients with pathologically proven pancreatic head carcinomas underwent thin-slice dynamic CT, MR imaging, duodenal endoscopy, and angiography (seven patients). Plate-like masses within the groove region were seen in all cases, which showed hypointensity on T1-weighted images and slight hyperintensity on T2-weighted MR images. The masses appeared hypovascular in the early phase and delayed enhancement in the late phase of dynamic CT and MR imaging. On MR cholangiopancreatography, stenosis of intrapancreatic common bile duct was seen in all patients, whereas stenosis of the main pancreatic duct was seen in only three cases. Endoscopy revealed luminal narrowing of the duodenum in all patients, and duodenal mucosal biopsy demonstrated adenocarcinoma in seven patients. Abdominal arteriography showed serrated encasement of peripancreatic arteries in seven patients who received angiographic examinations. The CT and MR imaging findings of groove pancreatic carcinomas resemble those of groove pancreatitis. Differential diagnosis may be achieved by the pathological diagnosis of a biopsy specimen of the duodenal mucosa and arterial encasement on arteriography. (orig.)

  8. Differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas vs. groove pancreatitis: Usefulness of the portal venous phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigami, Kousei, E-mail: Ishigamikousei@aol.co [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Nishie, Akihiro; Kakihara, Daisuke [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Fujita, Nobuhiro [Anatomic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Asayama, Yoshiki; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Irie, Hiroyuki [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Nakamura, Masafumi; Takahata, Shunichi [Surgery and Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ito, Tetsuhide [Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose: To clarify if the portal venous phase is helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. Materials and methods: MDCT and MRI of groove pancreatic carcinomas (n = 7) and groove pancreatitis (n = 15) were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists independently. The signal intensity on T2-weighted images was subjectively assessed. The presence or absence of common bile duct (CBD) and main pancreatic duct (MPD) strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions was evaluated. Additionally, the appearance of groove pancreatic carcinoma and that of groove pancreatitis in the portal venous phase on dynamic MDCT and MRI were compared. Results: There were no significant differences in the signal intensity on T2-weighted images and in the presence or absence of CBD and MPD strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions between groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. However, patchy focal enhancement in the portal venous phase was more commonly observed in groove pancreatitis than groove pancreatic carcinoma (Reviewers 1 and 2: 14/15 [93.3%] vs. 1/7 [14.3%], P < 0.0001). In addition, peripheral enhancement was only seen in groove pancreatic carcinomas (Reviewer 1: 4/7 [57.1%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.005, and Reviewer 2: 3/7 [42.9%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.05). Conclusion: The portal venous phase may be helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis.

  9. Differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas vs. groove pancreatitis: Usefulness of the portal venous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To clarify if the portal venous phase is helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. Materials and methods: MDCT and MRI of groove pancreatic carcinomas (n = 7) and groove pancreatitis (n = 15) were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists independently. The signal intensity on T2-weighted images was subjectively assessed. The presence or absence of common bile duct (CBD) and main pancreatic duct (MPD) strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions was evaluated. Additionally, the appearance of groove pancreatic carcinoma and that of groove pancreatitis in the portal venous phase on dynamic MDCT and MRI were compared. Results: There were no significant differences in the signal intensity on T2-weighted images and in the presence or absence of CBD and MPD strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions between groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. However, patchy focal enhancement in the portal venous phase was more commonly observed in groove pancreatitis than groove pancreatic carcinoma (Reviewers 1 and 2: 14/15 [93.3%] vs. 1/7 [14.3%], P < 0.0001). In addition, peripheral enhancement was only seen in groove pancreatic carcinomas (Reviewer 1: 4/7 [57.1%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.005, and Reviewer 2: 3/7 [42.9%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.05). Conclusion: The portal venous phase may be helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis.

  10. Optical characterization of lesions and identification of surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma by using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has become a powerful instrument for imaging unstained tissue samples in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPEF imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) stain can be used to characterize lesions and identify surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The specimens of a pancreatic metastasis from RCC, as well as a primary RCC from a patient, were examined by TPEF microscopy and compared with their corresponding H-E stained histopathological results. The results showed that high-resolution TPEF imaging of unstained histological sections of pancreatic metastasis from RCC can reveal that the typical morphology of the tissue and cells in cancer tissues is different from the normal pancreas. It also clearly presented histopathological features of the collagenous capsule, which is an important boundary symbol to identify normal and cancerous tissue and to instruct surgical operation. It indicated the feasibility of using TPEF microscopy to make an optical diagnosis of lesions and identify the surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from RCC. (paper)

  11. Optical characterization of lesions and identification of surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma by using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Hong, Zhipeng; Chen, Hong; Chen, Youting; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Shi, Zheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has become a powerful instrument for imaging unstained tissue samples in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPEF imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) stain can be used to characterize lesions and identify surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The specimens of a pancreatic metastasis from RCC, as well as a primary RCC from a patient, were examined by TPEF microscopy and compared with their corresponding H-E stained histopathological results. The results showed that high-resolution TPEF imaging of unstained histological sections of pancreatic metastasis from RCC can reveal that the typical morphology of the tissue and cells in cancer tissues is different from the normal pancreas. It also clearly presented histopathological features of the collagenous capsule, which is an important boundary symbol to identify normal and cancerous tissue and to instruct surgical operation. It indicated the feasibility of using TPEF microscopy to make an optical diagnosis of lesions and identify the surgical margins in pancreatic metastasis from RCC.

  12. Pancreatic involvement in small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gonlugur, Ugur; Mirici, Arzu; Karaayvaz, Muammer

    2014-01-01

    Background Few data are available concerning incidence, clinical picture, and prognosis for pancreatic metastases of small cell lung carcinoma. In this paper we review the related literature available in English language. Conclusions Although pancreatic metastases are generally asymptomatic, they can rarely produce clinical symptoms or functional abnormalities. The widespread use of multi-detector computerised tomography (CT) in contemporary medical practice has led to an increased detection ...

  13. Antroquinonol, a natural ubiquinone derivative, induces a cross talk between apoptosis, autophagy and senescence in human pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chia-Chun; Chiang, Po-Cheng; Lu, Pin-Hsuan; Kuo, Mao-Tien; Wen, Wu-Che; Chen, Peini; Guh, Jih-Hwa

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm of the pancreas. A mutation and constitutive activation of K-ras occurs in more than 90% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. A successful approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancers is urgent. Antroquinonol, a ubiquinone derivative isolated from a camphor tree mushroom, Antrodia camphorata, induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation in pancreatic cancer PANC-1 and AsPC-1 cells. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content by propidium iodide staining showed that antroquinonol induced G1 arrest of the cell cycle and a subsequent apoptosis. Antroquinonol inhibited Akt phosphorylation at Ser(473), the phosphorylation site critical for Akt kinase activity, and blocked the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) phosphorylation at Ser(2448), a site dependent on mTOR activity. Several signals responsible for mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP1 signaling cascades have also been examined to validate the pathway. Moreover, antroquinonol induced the down-regulation of several cell cycle regulators and mitochondrial antiapoptotic proteins. In contrast, the expressions of K-ras and its phosphorylation were significantly increased. The coimmunoprecipitation assay showed that the association of K-ras and Bcl-xL was dramatically augmented, which was indicative of apoptotic cell death. Antroquinonol also induced the cross talk between apoptosis, autophagic cell death and accelerated senescence, which was, at least partly, explained by the up-regulation of p21(Waf1/Cip1) and K-ras. In summary, the data suggest that antroquinonol induces anticancer activity in human pancreatic cancers through an inhibitory effect on PI3-kinase/Akt/mTOR pathways that in turn down-regulates cell cycle regulators. The translational inhibition causes G1 arrest of the cell cycle and an ultimate mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, autophagic cell death and accelerated senescence also explain antroquinonol-mediated anticancer effect. PMID:21840189

  14. MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy increases the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer cell immunotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zibing; Liu, Yuqing; Zhang, Yong; Shang, Yiman; Gao, Quanli

    2016-01-26

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells is a promising cancer treatment, but its efficacy is restricted by various factors, including the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). In this study, we determine whether chemotherapeutic drugs that reduce MDSC levels enhance the efficacy of CIK cell therapy in the treatment of solid tumors. Fifty-three patients were included in this study; 17 were diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC), 10 with advanced pancreatic cancer (PC), and 26 with metastatic melanoma (MM). These patients were divided into two groups: CIK cell therapy alone and CIK cell therapy combined with chemotherapy. Combining CIK cell therapy and chemotherapy increased 1-year survival rates and median survival times in MRCC and PC patients, but not in MM patients. The disease control rate did not differ between treatment groups for MRCC or MM patients, but was higher in PC patients receiving combined treatment than CIK cell treatment alone. These data suggest that addition of MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy to CIK cell therapy improves survival in MRCC and PC patients. PMID:26716894

  15. Prognostic Factors in Patients with Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HANYue; SUICheng-guang1; RUANZhi-ping

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the major prognostic factors in patients with pancreatic carcinoma.Methods : 113 cases of a particular disease were retrospectively analysed and 9 factors for prognosis were studied by muitivaritate analysis with Cox proportional hazards survival model. Survival rate was calculated by Kaplan-Meier estimation. Results:In this group,survival time was 0.1 to 82 months,and the median survival time was 3 months.Overall survival rates at month 6,12,18,36 were 35.6%, 20.3%, 15.9% and 6.2%, respectively.Multivariate analyses revealed significant prognostic factors as follows:jaundice, metastasis, therapy method and synthetic therapy. Conchusion: The prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma is determined by various factors. Jaundice and metastasis are independent predictors of poor survival.Radical operation and synthetic therapy will improve the prognosis.

  16. Membrane Drug Transporters and Chemoresistance in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer ranks among the tumors most resistant to chemotherapy. Such chemoresistance of tumors can be mediated by various cellular mechanisms including dysregulated apoptosis or ineffective drug concentration at the intracellular target sites. In this review, we highlight recent advances in experimental chemotherapy underlining the role of cellular transporters in drug resistance. Such contribution to the chemoresistant phenotype of tumor cells or tissues can be conferred both by uptake and export transporters, as demonstrated by in vivo and in vitro data. Our studies used human pancreatic carcinoma cells, cells stably transfected with human transporter cDNAs, or cells in which a specific transporter was knocked down by RNA interference. We have previously shown that 5-fluorouracil treatment affects the expression profile of relevant cellular transporters including multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and that MRP5 (ABCC5) influences chemoresistance of these tumor cells. Similarly, cell treatment with the nucleoside drug gemcitabine or a combination of chemotherapeutic drugs can variably influence the expression pattern and relative amount of uptake and export transporters in pancreatic carcinoma cells or select for pre-existing subpopulations. In addition, cytotoxicity studies with MRP5-overexpressing or MRP5-silenced cells demonstrate a contribution of MRP5 also to gemcitabine resistance. These data may lead to improved strategies of future chemotherapy regimens using gemcitabine and/or 5-fluorouracil

  17. The comparative study of tumor angiogenesis and CT enhancement in pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to study the correlation of pancreatic phase Computed tomography (CT) enhancement, intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) and pathologic grades in pancreatic carcinoma and to evaluate the relationship between CT enhancement degree and the malignancy degree of pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: 34 patients with pancreatic carcinoma underwent CT scanning before resection. The enhancement degrees and forms of tumor were observed in pancreatic phase. The operational sample was stained with HE and CD34 marked by immunohistochemistry. MVD and histopathological grades of pancreatic carcinoma were examined. CT enhancement of the tumor, MVD counting in hot spot areas of neoplastic parenchymal cells and pathological grades of pancreatic carcinoma were comparatively analyzed. Result: Highly differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma was identified in 16 patients, moderately differentiated tumor in seven and poorly differentiated tumor in 11. Isodensity CT enhancement was demonstrated in 13 cases, slight low density enhancement in nine, slight low density enhancement along with small cyst lesion in nine and slight low density enhancement along with large cyst lesion in three. The counting of MVD with CD34 marked by immunohistochemistry in hot spot areas of neoplastic parenchyma cells were small in ten cases, medium in 16 and large in eight. The pathological grades correlated with CT enhancement of tumor (r=0.7857, P<0.001). The pathological grade correlated with MVD counting of tumor (r=0.3613, P<0.05). The CT enhancement of tumor correlated with MVD (r=0.6768, P<0.001). Conclusion: There was obvious and significant correlation between CT enhancement, pathological grades and MVD numbers in the hot spot areas of tumor. The extent of CT enhancement was inversely proportional to the malignancy degree of pancreatic carcinoma, and inversely proportional to MVD numbers in the hot spot areas of neoplastic parenchyma. The MVD in the hot spot areas of

  18. Comparision of the Cytotoxic Effects of Birch Bark Extract, Betulin and Betulinic Acid Towards Human Gastric Carcinoma and Pancreatic Carcinoma Drug-sensitive and Drug-Resistant Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Lage

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Betulin and betulinic acid are naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenes showing cytotoxicity towards a number of cancer cell lines. These compounds can be found in the bark of the many plants. In this report we have compared the cytotoxic activity of crude birch bark extract and purified betulin and betulinic acid towards human gastric carcinoma (EPG85-257 and human pancreatic carcinoma (EPP85-181 drug-sensitive and drug-resistant (daunorubicin and mitoxantrone cell lines. Our results show significant differences in sensitivity between cell lines depending on the compound used, and suggest that both betulin and betulinic acid can be considered as a promising leads in the treatment of cancer.

  19. Diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma by ERCP(analysis of 119 cases).

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    The ERCP findings of 119 patients with pancreatic carcinoma were analysed in detail. Based on ERCP findings,the authors suggested a new clasification for pancreatic carcinoma including 6 types: (1)main pancreatic duct obstruction; (2)main panreatic duct steno

  20. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Luiz De Souza

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We previously published our and Johns Hopkins data titled: "Platinum-based therapy in adenosquamous pancreatic cancer: experience at two institutions” [1]. We will here like to submit a related case report as a letter to the editor to JOP in reference to the above paper. Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas has various reported incidence rates, ranging from 0.5% to as high as 5% of pancreatic ductal carcinomas [2, 3]. Of the 1300 cases of pancreatic cancers observed at autopsy in a survey in Japan in 1992, 0.7% were squamous cell carcinoma [4]. A Mayo clinic review of very rare exocrine tumors showed an even rarer incidence of squamous cell carcinoma when compared to acinar and small cell carcinoma of the pancreas [5]. This discrepancy in the reported incidence rates related to the fact that some of the cases represent adenosquamous carcinoma rather than pure squamous cell carcinoma of pancreas. In an analysis of 25 patients, mean age at diagnosis of pancreatic squamous cell carcinoma was 62 years (range: 33–80 years and there was no gender difference [6]. There is no study about the molecular profile of squamous carcinoma of the pancreas. There are no retrospective or prospective studies about the best therapy for these tumors

  1. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Li; Qiang Li

    2008-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor which is defined as a carcinoma that exhibits pancreatic enzyme production by neoplastic cells. This review includes re-cent developments in our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of ACC, imaging and pathological diagnosis and ap-proaches to treatment with reference to the literature.

  2. INHIBITION OF ACTIVATED K-RAS GENE BY SIRNA EXPRESSION CASSETTES IN HUMAN PANCREATIC CARCINOMA CELL LINE MIAPACA-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; WANG Chun-you; DONG Ji-hua; CHEN Xiong; ZHANG Min; ZHAO Gang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To construct the small interfering RNA(siRNA) expression cassettes (SECs) targeting activated K-ras gene sequence and investigate the effects of SECs on K-ras gene in human pancreatic cancer cell line MIAPaCa-2. Methods: Three different sites of SECs were constructed by PCR. The K1/siRNA, K2/siRNA and K3/siRNA were located at the site 194, 491 and 327, respectively. They were transfected into MiaPaCa-2 cells by liposome to inhibit the expression of activated K-ras. In the interfering groups of site 194,491, we observed the cytopathic effect of confluent MiaPaCa-2 cells after they were incubated for 48 hours, and detected the apoptosis in cells by FACS, then we tested the alternation of K-ras gene in confluent MiaPaCa-2 cells by RT-PCR,immunofluorescence and western blot, respectively. Results: Introductions of the K1/siRNA and K2/siRNA against K-ras into MiaPaCa-2 cells led to cytopathic effect, slower proliferation and increased apoptosis, while the appearances of control MiaPaCa-2 cells remained well. The number of apoptotic cells increased compared with control cells. RT-PCR,immunofluorescence and western blot showed the effects of inhibited expression of activated K-ras gene by RNA interference in the K1/siRNA and K2/siRNA groups. We also found that the introduction of K3/siRNA had no effect on MiaPaCa-2 cells. Conclusion: K1/siRNA and K2/siRNA can inhibit the expression of activated K-ras and decrease the growth of MiaPaCa-2 cells, while K3/siRNA has no such effect, demonstrating that the suppression of tumor growth by siRNA is sequence-specific. We conclude that K-ras is involved in maintenance of tumor growth of human pancreatic cancer, and SECs against K-ras expression may be a powerful tool to be used therapeutically against human pancreatic cancer.

  3. Vascularisation Pattern of Chronic Pancreatitis Compared with Pancreatic Carcinoma: Results from Contrast-Enhanced Endoscopic Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hocke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Discriminating between focal chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer is always a challenge in clinical medicine. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound using Doppler techniques can uniquely reveal different vascularisation patterns in pancreatic tissue alterated by chronic inflammatory processes and even allows a discrimination from pancreatic cancer. This paper will describe the basics of contrast-enhanced high mechanical index endoscopic ultrasound (CEHMI EUS and contrast enhanced low mechanical index endoscopic ultrasound (CELMI EUS and explain the pathophysiological differences of the vascularisation of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Furthermore it will discuss how to use these techniques in daily clinical practice.

  4. Antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of quercetin on human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines EPP85-181P and EPP85-181RDB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Dumanska

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols are present in several edible plants and for many years induce high interest mainly due to their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory influence. At present, numerous studies are conducted on antineoplastic effects of the compounds. One of most effective biopolyphenols involves the flavonol quercetin. Our studies aimed at evaluation of antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of quercetin alone and in combinations with daunorubicin on cells of human pancreatic carcinoma lines. The experiments were conducted on two cell lines, sensitive to daunorubicin EPP85-181P line, and its resistant variant EPP85-181RDB. Effect of studied substances on cell proliferation was detected using sulphorhodamine B (SRB protein staining method. Apoptotic damage was estimated using comet and TUNEL techniques. Our data demonstrated that quercetin exerted cytotoxic action on cells of the both neoplastic cell lines in concentration-dependent manner. In the case of EPP85-181RDB cell line, quercetin seemed to sensitize resistant cells to daunorubicin. In parallel, the effect of both substances on the sensitive cell line was synergistic. Results of the studies confirmed that quercetin may probably break resistance of neoplastic cells to chemotherapy. On the other side, studied flavonol augmented action of cytostatic drug in case of sensitive tumour cells what suggest, that it might allow to decrease dosage of cytostatic drugs and reduce negative side effects of the treatment.

  5. In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation of HDAC inhibitor Apicidin in pancreatic carcinoma cells subsequent time and dose dependent treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauden, Monika; Tassidis, Helena; Ansari, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Apicidin is a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) that selectively binds to histone deacetylases (HDACs) class I and interferes with the deacetylation process, which results in modification of acetylation level of cellular proteins. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential time and dose dependent cytotoxicity of the test compound, Apicidin, in pancreatic cancer cells Capan-1 and Panc-1 as well as estimate maximal tolerable dose (MTD) of the test agent and determine EC50 using four complementary colorimetric cytotoxicity or viability assays. The cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Apicidin (0-5000nM) for 2, 4 and 6h (short term exposure) or 24, 48 and 72h (long term exposure) before conducting cytotoxic analyses with lactate dehydrogenase assay or viability analyses with sulforhodamine B (SRB), methyl tetrazolium (MTT) and crystal violet (CV) assays. In order to investigate whether Apicidin irreversibly affects the cells already during the short term exposure, the medium containing Apicidin was removed and replaced with fresh culturing medium after 6h of treatment. The cells were then incubated for additional 24, 48 or 72h before carrying out the analysis. The results obtained from cytotoxicity and viability assays indicated, that Apicidin was well tolerated by both cell lines at concentrations below 100nM at any given time point and at all applied concentrations during the short term (6h or less) treatment. Continuous prolonged term exposures (48h or greater) of the cells to Apicidin with concentration exceeding 100nM resulted in significantly increasing cytotoxicity and sustained significant loss of cell viability. Moreover, long term exposure of pancreatic cancer cells Capan-1 and Panc-1 to Apicidin concentrations exceeding 100nM showed an initial anti-proliferative effect before cytotoxicity onset. In summary, MTD was exposure time dependent and estimated to 100nM for long term treatment and to at least 5000nM for treatment

  6. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epithelioma, is the most common form of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma usually occurs on sun-damaged skin, especially ... other health issues. Infiltrating or morpheaform basal cell carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive ...

  7. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without Erlotinib Hydrochloride Followed By the Same Chemotherapy Regimen With or Without Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine or Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Has Been Removed By Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-29

    Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary-Mucinous Neoplasm; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer

  8. Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jyotsna Vijaykumar Wader; Sujata S Kumbhar; Huddedar AD; Wasim GM Khatib

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common neoplasm of the kidney comprised of different histological variants. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) is a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) mainly diagnosed in the sixth decade of life. It is important to identify this entity because it has significantly better prognosis than the clear cell (conventional) and papillary renal cell carcinomas. The chromophobe renal cell carcinoma should be differentiated from oncocytoma and clear cell ca...

  9. Solid and cystic pancreatic papillary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 22 years-old female patient who began feeling some pain in the upper hemi abdomen that became intensive after food consumption and the feeling of having eaten too much. The serum amylase levels were within the normal limits. The imaging studies both echography and computerized axial tomography disclosed a well-defined and vascularized tumor mass in the tail of pancreas. She was operated on to completely remove the lesion. The anatomopathological study confirmed the diagnosis of solid and cystic pancreatic papillary carcinoma. Later on, the patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The evolutional imaging tests did not show either local relapses or distant metastasis. The patient responded well to treatment and her health status is good nowadays

  10. Quercetin as a Potential Modulator of P-Glycoprotein Expression and Function in Cells of Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Line Resistant to Daunorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Dziegiel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available P-glycoprotein (P-gp is one of the ABC transporters responsible for the resistance of several tumours to successful chemotherapy. Numerous agents are capable of interfering with the P-gp-mediated export of drugs but unfortunately most of them produce serious side effects. Some plant polyphenols, including the flavonol quercetin (Q, manifest anti-neoplastic activity mainly due to their influence on cell cycle control and apoptosis. Reports are also available which show that Q may intensify action of cytostatic drugs and suppress the multidrug resistance (MDR phenomenon. The study aimed at determination if Q sensitizes cells resistant to daunorubicin (DB through its effect on P-gp expression and action. The experiments were conducted on two cell lines of human pancreatic carcinoma, resistant to DB EPP85-181RDB and sensitive EPP85-181P as a comparison. Cells of both lines were exposed to selected concentrations of Q and DB, and then membranous expression of P-gp and its transport function were examined. The influence on expression of gene for P-gp (ABCB1 was also investigated. Results of the studies confirmed that Q affects expression and function of P-gp in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover it decreased expression of ABCB1. Thus, Q may be considered as a potential modulator of P-gp.

  11. A Case of Pancreatic Undifferentiated Carcinoma Mimicking Proximal-Type Epithelioid Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nobuyuki Ohike; Reika Suzuki; Tomohide Isobe; Tomoko Norose; Akira Shiokawa; Toshiaki Kunimura; Kenichi Kohashi; Yoshinao Oda

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of pancreatic undifferentiated/anaplastic carcinoma pathologically mimicking proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma. The patient was a 35-year-old female who complained of epigastralgia and back pain and presented with tarry stools and weight loss. A growing, hemorrhagic pancreatic mass more than 6 cm in diameter and multiple liver masses were revealed on abdomen images. A liver biopsy showed malignant cells and chemotherapy using TS-1 was performed, however, the patient ac...

  12. Inhibition of SIRT1 combined with gemcitabine therapy for pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong DJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dao-Jun Gong,1 Jia-Min Zhang,1 Min Yu,1 Bo Zhuang,1 Qing-Qu Guo21Department of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Jinhua Hospital of Zhejiang University, Jinhua, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University College of Medicine, Hangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Pancreatic carcinoma possesses one of the highest lethality rates, highest drug-resistance, and highest incidence rates. The objective of this research was to enhance the efficacy and drug-resistance for pancreatic carcinoma by using inhibition of SIRT1 combined with gemcitabine therapy methods.Methods: Three pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1 cells, BxPC-3 cells, and SW1990 cells received treatment with physiological saline, inhibition of SIRT1, gemcitabine, and combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine in vitro; then BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenogeneic mice also received treatment with physiological saline, inhibition of SIRT1, gemcitabine, and combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine in vivo.Results: The cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP-1 effect of drug in pancreatic carcinoma cells was significantly different (P < 0.05 and the efficacy in descending order was the combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine, inhibition of SIRT1, and gemcitabine. The BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenogeneic mice model received treatment with physiological saline, inhibition of SIRT1, gemcitabine, and combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine in vivo and the results showed that the tumor volumes decreased and the survival rate within 45 days increased according to the order of the given drugs and the difference was significant (P < 0.05.Conclusion: Combination therapy with inhibition of SIRT1 and gemcitabine could improve efficacy and survival time in a BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenogeneic mice model, compared with single inhibition of SIRT1, or single

  13. CT diagnosis of pancreatitis and carcinoma of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article reports on 78 CT scans of surgically diseases of the pancreas, 30 cases of chronic pancreatitis, 12 cases of haemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis, and 36 cases of carcinoma of the pancreas. 12 of these cases were operable, whereas 234 were inoperable. The operable carcinomas were so small that proper diagnosis was effected in 50% only, whereas the inoperable carcinomas eluded CT identification in 17% of the cases only. The most important signs of an operable carcinoma of the pancreas are a well-defined enlargement and inhomogeneity of the parenchyma with reduced contrast, especially on bolus injection, as well as dilatation of the bile duct system. The most essential criteria for inoperability are absence of boundaries, especially towards the dorsal side, with infiltration of the retroperitoneal fatty tissue, and lack of delineation of the large vessels. According to the present state of the art, CT does not supply definite criteria for differentiating between an operable carcinoma of the pancreas and chronic fibrotic pancreatitis. Overstepping of the marginal contours is a reliably distinctive feature between carcinoma and pancreatitis, but it also points to the inoperable nature of the disease. Haemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis is characterized by definite CT criteria, so that diagnosis is easy. Computerised tomography is a valuable diagnostic tool in diseases of the pancreas and can supply conclusive pointers towards the operability of a tumor. (orig.)

  14. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Request Permissions Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/2016 What is Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome? Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is ...

  15. Planoepitheliale cell carcinoma arising from ampullopancreatic unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: We report a case of planoepitheliale cell carcinoma located in the ampulla of Vater. We report the surgical results and pathological findings of a patient with an ampullary planoepitheliale cell carcinoma. From what we know it is the first case with successful surgical treatment. Case Report: A 58-year-old woman who presented with jaundice and preoperative endoscopic and radiological procedures could not show whether the tumour was carcinoma planoepitheliale. The clinical presentation, biochemical, radiographic and endoscopic investigation pronounced advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Results: We performed pancreaticoduodenectomy with curative intention. Histological examination revealed: planoepitheliale cell carcinoma of the ampullo-pancreatic unit. Conclusions: In conclusion, preoperative endoscopic and radiological evaluations can all prove insufficient to distinguish between benign and malignant tumour. Thus, for malignant tumours surgeons may be forced to perform extensive surgery. (authors)

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survival in patients with unresectable pancreatic carcinoma is poor. Studies by Mayo Clinic and the Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group (GITSG) have established combined modality treatment with chemotherapy and radiation as the standard of care. Use of gemcitabine-based chemotherapy alone has also been shown to provide a benefit, but 5‑year overall survival still remains less than 5%. Conventional radiotherapy is traditionally delivered over a six week period and high toxicity is seen with the concomitant use of chemotherapy. In contrast, SBRT can be delivered in 3–5 days and, when used as a component of combined modality therapy with gemcitabine, disruption to the timely delivery of chemotherapy is minimal. Early single-institution reports of SBRT for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma demonstrate excellent local control with acceptable toxicity. Use of SBRT in unresectable pancreatic carcinoma warrants further investigation in order to improve the survival of patients with historically poor outcomes

  17. The retropancreatic fusion fascia acts as a barrier against infiltration by pancreatic carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    KITAGAWA, HIROHISA; Tajima, Hidehiro; NAKAGAWARA, HISATOSHI; Hayashi, Hironori; MAKINO, ISAMU; Takamura, Hiroyuki; NINOMIYA, ITASU; Fushida, Sachio; KAYAHARA, MASATO; Ohta, Tetsuo; IKEDA, HIROKO

    2013-01-01

    Although pancreatic carcinoma frequently extends posteriorly beyond the pancreatic parenchyma, retroperitoneal organs such as the inferior vena cava (IVC) and the adrenal gland are rarely involved. The fusion fascia lies between the pancreas and these retroperitoneal organs. This study investigated the role of the fusion fascia in the prevention of infiltration of retroperitoneal structures by pancreatic carcinoma. This study was conducted on 140 patients who underwent pancreatic carcinoma re...

  18. Clinicopathologic features and outcomes following surgery for pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Tsann-Long

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC is a rare pancreatic malignancy subtype. We investigated the clinicopathological features and outcome of pancreatic ASC patients after surgery. Methods The medical records of 12 patients with pancreatic ASC undergoing surgical treatment (1993 to 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Survival data of patients with stage IIB pancreatic adenocarcinoma and ASC undergoing surgical resection were compared. Results Symptoms included abdominal pain (91.7%, body weight loss (83.3%, anorexia (41.7% and jaundice (25.0%. Tumors were located at pancreatic head in 5 (41.7% patients, tail in 5 (41.7%, and body in 4 (33.3%. Median tumor size was 6.3 cm. Surgical resection was performed on 7 patients, bypass surgery on 3, and exploratory laparotomy with biopsy on 2. No surgical mortality was identified. Seven (58.3% and 11 (91.7% patients died within 6 and 12 months of operation, respectively. Median survival of 12 patients was 4.41 months. Seven patients receiving surgical resection had median survival of 6.51 months. Patients with stage IIB pancreatic ASC had shorter median survival compared to those with adenocarcinoma. Conclusion Aggressive surgical management does not appear effective in treating pancreatic ASC patients. Strategies involving non-surgical treatment such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy or target agents should be tested.

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas with liver metastasis: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qiang-pu; OU Kun; GUAN Qing-hai; ZHANG Fan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is an unusual cancer of ductal cell origin. In a review of 6668 cases of exocrine pancreatic cancer from various registries reported from 1950 through 1985, the incidence of squamous carcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma was 0.005% and 0.01%, respectively.1 We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas with liver metastasis.

  20. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include: Fasting glucose level Gastrin level Glucose tolerance test Secretin stimulation test for pancreas Blood glucagon ... PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatic Cancer Browse the ...

  1. Role of pancreatic stellate cells in chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    McCarroll, Joshua A.; Naim, Stephanie; Sharbeen, George; Russia, Nelson; Lee, Julia; Kavallaris, Maria; Goldstein, David; Phillips, Phoebe A.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumor volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment following activation of PSCs, tumor progression, and chemoresistanc...

  2. Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-14

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Paraganglioma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  3. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells by the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) system

    OpenAIRE

    STOELTZING, OLIVER; Liu, Wenbiao; Fan, Fan; Wagner, Christine; Stengel, Kathrin; Somcio, Ray J.; Reinmuth, Niels; Parikh, Alexander A; Hicklin, Daniel J.; Ellis, Lee M.

    2007-01-01

    Both the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are frequently overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that IGF-IR is directly involved in induction of COX-2 and sought to investigate signaling pathways mediating this effect. Pancreatic cancer cells (L3.6pl) were stably transfected with a dominant-negative receptor (IGF-IR DN) construct or empty vector (pcDNA). Cells were stimulated with IGF-I to determine activated signaling intermediates and ...

  4. Basal cell carcinoma of the skin with areas of squamous cell carcinoma: a basosquamous cell carcinoma?

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, J.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of basosquamous cell carcinoma is controversial. A review of cases of basal cell carcinoma showed 23 cases that had conspicuous areas of squamous cell carcinoma. This was distinguished from squamous differentiation and keratotic basal cell carcinoma by a comparative study of 40 cases of compact lobular and 40 cases of keratotic basal cell carcinoma. Areas of intermediate tumour differentiation between basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma were found. Basal cell carcinomas with ...

  5. CT features of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eelkema, E.A.; Stephens, D.H.; Ward, E.M.; Sheedy, P.F. II

    1984-11-01

    To determine the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas, the CT scans of 27 patients with that disease were reviewed. The pancreatic tumor was identified as a mass in 26 patients (96%) Of the 25 tumors evaluated with contrast enhancement, 20 became partially diffusely hyperdense relative to nearby normal pancreatic tissue. Hepatic metastases were identified in 15 patients (56%), regional lymphadenopathy in 10 (37%), atrophy of the gland proximal to the tumor in six (22%), dilatation of the biliary ducts in five (19%), and dilatation of the pancreatic duct in four (15%). The CT appearances of the nonfunctioning islet cell tumors were compared with those of 100 ordinary (ductal) pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Although the two types of tumors were sometimes indistinguishable, features found to be more characteristic of islet cell carcinoma included a pancreatic mass of unusually large size, calcification within the tumor, and contrast enhancement of either the primary tumor or hepatic metastases. Involvement of the celiac axis or proximal superior mesenteric artery was limited to ductal carcinoma.

  6. High Volume Washing of the Abdomen in Increasing Survival After Surgery in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-03

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Ampulla of Vater Adenocarcinoma; Cholangiocarcinoma; Duodenal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm, Pancreatobiliary-Type; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma

  7. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer

  8. Evaluation of inoperable pancreatic carcinoma based on tumor metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many pancreatic cancers are detected only after they are far advanced, and thus show a poor prognosis. We evaluated the survival of patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma, and strategy treatment. Subjects were 72 persons with advanced inoperable pancreatic carcinoma selected from among 144 examined at our department from May 1992 to March 2001. Patient factors (age, gender, and nutrition), tumor factors (hepatic metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, and distant metastasis), and treatment (radiotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and hepatic arterial infusion therapy (HAI)) were studied and survival evaluated statistically. Overall mean survival was 175 days and the 1-year survival ratio was 13.5%. With multivariate analysis, prognostic factors were hepatic metastasis and radiotherapy. We therefore re-evaluated 56 patients treated with radiotherapy. In the group with no hepatic metastasis whose mean survival was 247 days, the prognostic factor was systemic chemotherapy. In the group with hepatic metastasis, mean survival was 140 days and the prognostic factor was the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) on admission. HAI was also a significant factor, which prolonged survival time with univariate analysis. Radiotherapy will be conducted for all inoperable pancreatic carcinomas. For the group with no hepatic metastasis, systemic chemotherapy is effective and for the group with hepatic metastasis. HAI will be selected. (author)

  9. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D; Tuveson, David; Miller, George

    2015-11-16

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis. PMID:26481685

  10. β-Cell regeneration through the transdifferentiation of pancreatic cells: Pancreatic progenitor cells in the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo-Sup; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic progenitor cell research has been in the spotlight, as these cells have the potential to replace pancreatic β-cells for the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetic patients with the absence or reduction of pancreatic β-cells. During the past few decades, the successful treatment of diabetes through transplantation of the whole pancreas or isolated islets has nearly been achieved. However, novel sources of pancreatic islets or insulin-producing cells are required to provide sufficient amounts of donor tissues. To overcome this limitation, the use of pancreatic progenitor cells is gaining more attention. In particular, pancreatic exocrine cells, such as duct epithelial cells and acinar cells, are attractive candidates for β-cell regeneration because of their differentiation potential and pancreatic lineage characteristics. It has been assumed that β-cell neogenesis from pancreatic progenitor cells could occur in pancreatic ducts in the postnatal stage. Several studies have shown that insulin-producing cells can arise in the duct tissue of the adult pancreas. Acinar cells also might have the potential to differentiate into insulin-producing cells. The present review summarizes recent progress in research on the transdifferentiation of pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells, especially duct and acinar cells. PMID:27330712

  11. Vitamin D Receptor Signaling and Pancreatic Cancer Cell EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiwei; Guo, Junli; Xie, Keping; Zheng, Shaojiang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of human malignancies. Even in patients who undergo resection, long-term survival rates remain extremely low. A major contributor to the aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a physiologic process of morphological and genetic changes in carcinoma cells from an epithelial phenotype to a mesenchymal phenotype, which is the basis of the high metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer cells. EMT is triggered by various tumor microenvironmental factors, including cytokines, growth factors, and chemotherapeutic agents. This review highlights the growing evidence of the effect of EMT on pancreatic cancer progression, focusing on the interaction of EMT with other pathways central to cancer progression, especially vitamin D receptor signaling. Studies of the signaling pathways that lead to the inactivation of EMT programs during these disease processes are providing new insights into the plasticity of cellular phenotypes and possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:25506892

  12. Chloroquine targets pancreatic cancer stem cells via inhibition of CXCR4 and hedgehog signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balic, Anamaria; Sørensen, Morten Dræby; Trabulo, Sara Maria;

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the deadliest carcinomas and is characterized by highly tumorigenic and metastatic cancer stem cells (CSC). CSCs evade available therapies, which preferentially target highly proliferative and more differentiated progenies, leaving behind CSCs as a...... putative source for disease relapse. Thus, to identify potentially more effective treatment regimens, we screened established and new compounds for their ability to eliminate CSCs in primary pancreatic cancer (stem) cells in vitro and corresponding patient-derived pancreatic cancer tissue xenografts in...

  13. Detection of the pancreas-specific gene in the peripheral blood of patients with pancreatic carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroki, T; Tomioka, T.; TAJIMA, Y; Inoue, K.; Ikematsu, Y; Ichinose, K.; Furui, J; Kanematsu, T

    1999-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with pancreatic carcinoma remains very poor. To improve the therapeutic results, the early detection of this cancer is needed. The present study was performed to detect the pancreas-specific gene, chymotrypsinogen, in the peripheral blood from patients with pancreatic carcinoma by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in order to evaluate the clinical significance of this gene. Ten patients with pancreatic carcinoma, two with acute pancreatit...

  14. Clinical evaluation of a new serum tumour marker CA 242 in pancreatic carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Pasanen, P. A.; Eskelinen, M.; Partanen, K.; Pikkarainen, P; Penttilä, I.; Alhava, E

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the new monoclonal tumour marker CA 242 in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and to compare it with the established markers CA 50 and CEA. Serum concentrations were determined in 113 patients with jaundice, in 20 patients with laboratory values suggesting cholestasis, and in 60 patients with a suspicion to have chronic pancreatitis. Twenty-four of these 193 patients had pancreatic carcinoma and two patients had carcinoma of papilla of Vater. The sensi...

  15. Pancreatic Metastasis from Renal Carcinoma Managed by Whipple Resection. A Case Report and Literature Review of Metastatic Pattern, Surgical Management and Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Norman Oneil Machado; Pradeep Chopra

    2009-01-01

    Context Metastatic cancer to the pancreas is rare and accounts for less than 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, metastasis from renal cell carcinoma being predominant. While symptomatic patients present with obstructive jaundice, abdominal pain, or GI bleeding, the diagnosis is often made in asymptomatic patients during follow-up for renal cell carcinoma. Hence, a high index of clinical suspicion is required in a patient who presents with a pancreatic tumor following a nephrectomy for renal c...

  16. Utility of fusion CT-PET in the diagnosis of small pancreatic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian Kim-Poh Goh; Yu-Meng Tan; Yaw-Fui Alexander Chung

    2005-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma has a poor prognosis and early detection is essential for potentially curative resection. Despite the wide array of diagnostic tools, preoperative detection of small pancreatic carcinomas remains difficult. We report a case of small pancreatic carcinoma of the head of pancreas with indeterminate findings on US, ERCP, MRI and EUS which was successfully diagnosed via fusion CT-PET. This case illustrates the utility of CT-PET in the diagnosis of patients with small pancreatic carcinoma with equivocal findings on conventional diagnostic modalities.

  17. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  18. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor signaling significantly attenuates growth of murine pancreatic carcinoma grafts in syngeneic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with a very poor prognosis. To evaluate the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) type 2 receptor (AT2) expression in the host's body on the growth of pancreatic carcinoma, we have investigated the growth of mouse pancreatic ductal carcinoma grafts in syngeneic wild type and AT2 receptor-deficient (AT2-KO) mice. The role of AT2 receptor-signaling in stromal cells on the growth of murine pancreatic carcinoma cells (PAN02) was studied using various in vitro and in vivo assays. In vivo cell proliferation, apoptosis, and vasculature in tumors were monitored by Ki-67 immunostaining, TUNEL assay, and von Willebrand factor immunostaining, respectively. In the co-culture study, cell proliferation was measured by MTT cell viability assay. All the data were analyzed using t-test and data were treated as significant when p < 0.05. Our results show that the growth of subcutaneously transplanted syngeneic xenografts of PAN02 cells, mouse pancreatic ductal carcinoma cells derived from the C57/BL6 strain, was significantly faster in AT2-KO mice compared to control wild type mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue revealed significantly more Ki-67 positive cells in xenografts grown in AT2-KO mice than in wild type mice. The index of apoptosis is slightly higher in wild type mice than in AT2-KO mice as evaluated by TUNEL assay. Tumor vasculature number was significantly higher in AT2-KO mice than in wild type mice. In vitro co-culture studies revealed that the growth of PAN02 cells was significantly decreased when grown with AT2 receptor gene transfected wild type and AT2-KO mouse-derived fibroblasts. Faster tumor growth in AT2-KO mice may be associated with higher VEGF production in stromal cells. These results suggest that Ang II regulates the growth of pancreatic carcinoma cells through modulating functions of host stromal cells; Moreover, Ang II AT2 receptor signaling is a negative regulator in the

  19. Renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renal cell carcinoma is a type of kidney cancer that starts in the lining of very small tubes (tubules) in the kidney. ... cancer; Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney

  20. Pancreatic Carcinoma Recurrence in the Remnant Pancreas after a Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Dalla Valle

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Context :We report a rare case of a repeated pancreatic resection in the remnant distal pancreas 18 months after a Whipple R0 procedure. Case report: In September 2003, a 63-yearold man underwent a Whipple procedure with an extended lymphadenectomy, portal vein resection and direct reconstruction for pancreatic cancer. In September 2004, the tumor marker level increased and MR revealed a tumor in the remnant pancreas. There were no findings of invasion into the surrounding tissue or distant metastasis. After three months of systemic chemotherapy and a radiological reevaluation (PET and CT in March 2005, we removed the remnant pancreas. Histopathologically, the tumor was classified as a ductal adenocarcinoma like the tumor which had been removed during the first operation, with infiltration of peripancreatic adipose tissue and a segmentary tract of the transverse mesocolon, without lymph node metastasis. Conclusions :There are very few reports of pancreatic carcinoma recurrence in the remnant pancreas after a pancreaticoduodenectomy in the literature. In most of these cases, it is difficult to assess whether the remnant pancreatic cancer is a recurrence or a second primary cancer. In our patient, the first hypothesis seems to be more realistic due to the brief recurrence-free survival period. Otherwise the high rate of multicentricity in pancreatic cancer may also explain the development of a secondary cancer in the remnant pancreas, even though the interval was relatively brief.

  1. Molecular regulation of pancreatic stellate cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Jaster Robert

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Until now, no specific therapies are available to inhibit pancreatic fibrosis, a constant pathological feature of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. One major reason is the incomplete knowledge of the molecular principles underlying fibrogenesis in the pancreas. In the past few years, evidence has been accumulated that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the predominant source of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the diseased organ. PSCs are vitamin A-storing...

  2. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Karl-Walter Jauch; Hendrik Seeliger; Hanno Niess; Qi Bao; Andrea Renner; Yue Zhao; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC t...

  3. Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kafil Akhtar; Ahmad Shamshad; Zaheer Sufian; Mansoor Tariq

    2011-01-01

    Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (SRCC) is an aggressive tumor variant thought to arise predominantly from differentiation of clear cell carcinoma. A few reports of SRCC asso-ciated with non-clear cell tumors led to the presumption that SRCC may arise from any renal cell carcinoma, although direct evidence of this is lacking. We report a case of a 70-year-old male patient, who presented with acute left upper quadrant abdominal pain and was diagnosed to have SRCC after pathological examination...

  4. Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Human and Experimental Pancreatic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Haber, Paul S; Keogh, Gregory W.; Apte, Minoti V.; Moran, Corey S.; Stewart, Nancy L.; Crawford, Darrell H.G.; Pirola, Romano C.; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Ramm, Grant A; Wilson, Jeremy S.

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms of pancreatic fibrosis are poorly understood. In the liver, stellate cells play an important role in fibrogenesis. Similar cells have recently been isolated from the pancreas and are termed pancreatic stellate cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether pancreatic stellate cell activation occurs during experimental and human pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis was induced in rats (n = 24) by infusion of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) into the pancreatic duc...

  5. Effects of integrin-targeted photodynamic therapy on pancreatic carcinoma cell%整合素靶向光动力学疗法对胰腺癌细胞的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪倩雯; 杨姗莹; 瞿春莹; 周敏; 赵鹏程; 张建成; 徐雷鸣

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨整合素靶向光动力学疗法(PDT)对人胰腺癌的体外抗癌作用.方法 将胰腺癌SW1990细胞分成4组,以不加量子点、无光辐照培养的细胞作为空白对照,另设单纯光辐照组、光敏剂组、PDT组.合成量子点-精氨酸甘氨酸-天冬氨酸(RGD)整合素探针,利用激光共聚焦显微镜验证其靶向性,将其作为光敏剂进行PDT.用荧光显微镜观察各组处理后48 h胰腺癌细胞的形态学变化.MTT法、流式细胞术(FCM)法检测细胞增殖、凋亡和周期的变化.RT PCR法检测各处理组细胞髓样细胞白血病-1(Mcl-1)、蛋白激酶B(Akt)、肿瘤坏死因子相关凋亡诱导配体(TRA IL)表达.荧光探针检测各组活性氧表达.组间比较采用单因素方差分析,分析PDT组的治疗效果.结果 量子点-RGD探针能有效靶向标记胰腺癌细胞.MTT法PDT组24、48、72 h时的胰腺癌细胞增殖相对抑制率均高于空白对照组,差异有统计学意义(F=73.00、85.10、126.58,P均<0.01).FCM法结果示48 h时PDT组细胞凋亡率(17.860%±1.230%)高于其他各组(F=130.617,P<0.01);细胞G0/G1期(69.14%±2.63%)和S期(24.41%±2.67%)出现阻滞(P均<0.05).PDT组增殖、凋亡相关基因Mcl-1、Akt的mRNA表达低于其他各组,而凋亡诱导配体TRAIL mRNA表达高于其他各组(F=567.456、446.817,145.238,P均<0.05).PDT组活性氧水平高于其他各组(F=3262.559,P<0.01).结论 量子点-RGD整合素靶向探针介导的PDT能明显抑制胰腺癌细胞增殖,促进细胞凋亡.%Objective To investigate the anti carcinoma role of integrin targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) on pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro.Methods Pancreatic carcinoma cells SW1990 were divided into four groups:cells without quantum dots (QDs) and light-treated as blank control group,pure light-treated group,photosensitizer group and PDT group.The targeting of QDs-arginine,glycine,aspartic acid (RGD) and integrin probe was confirmed by laser

  6. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    OpenAIRE

    Nilton Nasser; Nilton Nasser Filho; Bruno Trauczynski Neto; Lissandra Melati da Silva

    2012-01-01

    The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no s...

  7. Remnant Pancreatectomy for Recurrent or Metachronous Pancreatic Carcinoma Detected by FDG-PET: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Koizumi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Although surgical resection is the only curative therapeutic option for recurrent or metachronous pancreatic carcinomas, most such cancers are beyond surgical curability. We herein report on two rare cases of remnant pancreatectomy used to treat recurrent or metachronous pancreatic carcinomas. Case reports Case#1 A 65-year-old male developed weight loss and diabetes mellitus 83 months after a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy followed by two years of adjuvant chemotherapy (5- fluorouracil plus leucovorin plus mitomycin C for a pancreatic carcinoma in the head of the pancreas (stage IA. An abdominal CT scan revealed a 3 cm tumor in the remnant pancreas which appeared as a ‘hot’ nodule on FDG-PET. A remnant distal pancreatectomy was performed and a pancreatic carcinoma similar in profile to the primary lesion (stage IIB was confirmed pathologically. Case#2 A 67-year-old male showed increased CA 19-9 levels 25 months after a distal pancreatectomy for a pancreatic carcinoma in the body of the pancreas (stage IA. An abdominal CT scan revealed a cystic lesion in the cut end of the pancreas which appeared as a ‘hot’ nodule on FDG-PET. A remnant proximal pancreatectomy with duodenectomy was performed and a metachronous pancreatic carcinoma (stage III was confirmed pathologically. Conclusion Remnant pancreatectomy can be considered a treatment option for recurrent or metachronous pancreatic carcinomas. FDG-PET can play a key role in detecting remnant pancreatic carcinomas.

  8. A Rare Case of Calf Muscle Metastasis from a Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) are uncommon pancreatic neoplasms, accounting for 1-2% of all pancreatic tumors. However, they have a better prognosis and long-term survival compared to exocrine pancreatic cancer. PNETs can be divided into functional or non-functional based upon whether or not they excrete active substances relevant to specific clinical syndromes. Skeletal muscle metastasis is also a rare condition and differentiation between a primary soft tissue sarcoma and metastatic carcinoma is difficult without biopsy. Thus, skeletal muscle metastases from pancreatic neoplasms are exceedingly rare, with only a few cases reported in the literature. We present a 34-year-old man with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma that was initially thought to be a primary soft tissue tumor. Pathology and immunohistochemistry demonstrated the tumor to be a metastasis from a pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. A brief review of the literature on this subject is also presented

  9. Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Year Award Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award Diversity Mentorship Program Eugene Van ... 300 PUVA treatments. What causes Merkel cell carcinoma? Scientists are still studying what causes this skin cancer. ...

  10. Giant basal cell carcinoma Carcinoma basocelular gigante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nasser

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer but the giant vegetating basal cell carcinoma reaches less than 0.5 % of all basal cell carcinoma types. The Giant BCC, defined as a lesion with more than 5 cm at its largest diameter, is a rare form of BCC and commonly occurs on the trunk. This patient, male, 42 years old presents a Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma which reaches 180 cm2 on the right shoulder and was negligent in looking for treatment. Surgical treatment was performed and no signs of dissemination or local recurrence have been detected after follow up of five years.O carcinoma basocelular é o tipo mais comum de câncer de pele, mas o carcinoma basocelular gigante vegetante não atinge 0,5% de todos os tipos de carcinomas basocelulares. O Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante, definido como lesão maior que 5 cm no maior diâmetro, é uma forma rara de carcinoma basocelular e comumente ocorre no tronco. Este paciente apresenta um Carcinoma Basocelular Gigante com 180cm² no ombro direito e foi negligente em procurar tratamento. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico e nenhum sinal de disseminação ou recorrência local foi detectada após 5 anos.

  11. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shin [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Hamada, Hirofumi [Laboratory of Oncology, Department of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji (Japan); Kobune, Masayoshi [Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Satoh, Kennichi [Division of Cancer Stem Cell, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori (Japan); Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  12. Alteration of chaperonin60 and pancreatic enzyme in pancreatic acinar cell under pathological condition

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yong-Yu; Bendayan, Moise

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the changes of chaperonin60 (Cpn60) and pancreatic enzymes in pancreatic acinar cells, and to explore their roles in the development of experimental diabetes and acute pancreatitis (AP).

  13. Pancreatic and peri-pancreatic lesions mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in multidetector computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Hua-dan; LIU Wei; XIAO Yu; SUN Hao; WANG Xuan; LEI Jing; JIN Zheng-yu

    2011-01-01

    Objective This pictorial review aimed to summarize the most possible differential diagnosis of pancreatic islet cell tumor (PICT).Data sources Data used in this review were mainly from Medline and Pubmed in English. And all clinical images in this review were from Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.Study selection Cases of pancreatic cystadenoma, solid pseudo-papillary tumor of the pancreas, pancreatic metastasis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, para-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, Castleman disease, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, splenic artery aneurysm and accessory spleen were selected in this pictorial review for differential diagnosis of PICT.Results Careful analysis of imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations may allow a more specific diagnosis. It is also important that the radiologist is familiar with the anatomic variants and disease entities which mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in order to avoid an improper treatment protocol.Conclusions Many congenital anatomic variants or other pancreatic and peri-pancreatic diseases may mimic MDCT appearance of pancreatic islet cell tumor. Radiological, clinical and pathological characteristics should be considered for the final diagnosis.

  14. Suppression of pancreatic carcinoma growth by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ involves angiogenesis inhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Wei Dong; Xing-Peng Wang; Kai Wu

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the possible actions and mechanisms of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a ligand-activated transcription factor, in pancreatic carcinogenesis,especially in angiogenesis.METHODS: Expressions of PPARγ and retinoid acid receptor (RXRα) were examined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with immunocytochemical staining. Pancreatic carcinoma cells, PANC-1,were treated either with 9-cis-RA, a ligand of RXRα,or with 15-deoxy-Δ12,14 prostaglandin J2(15d-PGJ2), a ligand of PPARγ, or both. Antiproliferative effect was evaluated by cell viability using methyltetrazolium (MTT) assay. A pancreatic carcinoma xenograft tumor model of nude mice was established by inoculating PANC-1 cells subcutaneously. Rosiglitazone, a specific ligand of PPARγ, was administered via water drinking in experimental group of nude mice. After 75 d, all mice were sacrificed. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in tumor tissue was examined with immunohistochemical staining. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA in PANC-1 cells, which were treated with 15d-PGJ2 or 9-cis-RA at variousconcentrations or different duration, was detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Effects of Rosiglitazone on changes of microvascular density (MVD) and VEGF expression were investigated in xenograft tumor tissue. Neovasculature was detected with immunohistochemistry staining labeled with anti-Ⅳ collagen antibody, and indicated by MVD.RESULTS: RT-PCR and immunocytochemical staining showed that PPARγ and RXRα were expressed in PANC-1 cells at both transcription level and translation level. MTT assay demonstrated that 15d-PGJ2, 9-cis-RA and their combination inhibited the growth of PANC-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. 9-cis-RA had a combined inhibiting action with 15d-PGJ2 on the growth of pancreatic carcinoma. In vivo studies revealed that Rosiglitazone significantly suppressed the growth of pancreatic carcinoma

  15. Mitomycin-Induced Interstitial Pneumonitis in a Patient with BRCA2 Associated Metastatic Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, Interstitial lung diseases are diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, and represent a heterogeneous group of disorders including lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis, interstitial lung diseases of unknown etiology, including sarcoidosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and pulmonary fibrosis associated with connective tissue diseases [1]. Most of the interstitial disorders have a restrictive pattern with reductions in total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume [2]. The lung has significant susceptibility to injury from a variety of chemotherapeutic agents (Table 1. The clinician must be familiar with classic chemotherapeutic agents with well-described pulmonary toxicities and must also be vigilant about a host of new agents that may exert adverse effects on lung function [3]. BRCA2 mutations have been known to be associated with higher incidence of breast, ovarian and pancreatic adenocarcinoma [4, 5, 6]. Although present in only a minority of pancreatic cancers, mutations in the BRCA2 gene could provide a rational target for treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. Van der Heijden et al. have demonstrated that pancreatic cancer cells having defects in Fanconi anemia and BRCA2 pathway are remarkably sensitive to mitomycin-C both in culture and mice [7, 8]. Isacoff et al. reported good results with mitomycin-C plus fluorouracil regimen in first-line therapy of locally advanced pancreatic cancer, with two out of 50 patients achieving complete remission [9]. Another study using the same regimen in patients with metastatic pancreatic carcinoma also showed some activity including one complete remission [10].

  16. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. ► Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. ► Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. ► Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. ► This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called “cancer stem cells”, within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the “stemness” of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  17. Resveratrol induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jia-hua; CHENG Hai-yan; YU Ze-qian; HE Dao-wei; PAN Zheng; YANG De-tong

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers with a very low survival rate of 5 years.Conventional cancer treatments including surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or combinations of these show little effect on this disease. Several proteins have been proved critical to the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer.The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol on apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.Methods Several pancreatic cancer cell lines were screened by resveratrol, and its toxicity was tested by normal pancreatic cells. Western blotting was then performed to analyze the molecular mechanism of resveratrol induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cell lines.Results In the screened pancreatic cancer cell lines, capan-2 and colo357 showed high sensitivity to resveratrol induced apoptosis. Resveratrol exhibited insignificant toxicity to normal pancreatic cells. In resveratrol sensitive cells,capan-2 and colo357, the activation of caspase-3 was detected and showed significant caspase-3 activation upon resveratrol treatment; p53 and p21 were also detected up-regulated upon resveratrol treatment.Conclusion Resveratrol provides a promising anti-tumor stratagy to fight against pancreatic cancer.

  18. Expression of survivin, a novel inhibitor of apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory protein, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sarela, A I; Verbeke, C S; Ramsdale, J; Davies, C. L.; Markham, A F; Guillou, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    Survivin is unique for its expression in human malignancies but not in normal adult cells. It has been implicated in sensitisation to chemotherapy and as a prognostic marker in several common cancers. Immunohistochemistry for Survivin, P53 and BCL-2 expression as well as cell proliferative index (Ki-67) and apoptosis index (TUNEL) was conducted on 52 pancreatic and 12 ampullary adenocarcinomas. Survivin was detected in the cytoplasm of carcinoma cells in 46 (88%) of pancreatic tumours. P53 an...

  19. Carbon-Ion Irradiation Suppresses Migration and Invasiveness of Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells MIAPaCa-2 via Rac1 and RhoA Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the inhibition of cancer cell migration and invasion by carbon (C)-ion irradiation. Methods and Materials: Human pancreatic cancer cells MIAPaCa-2, AsPC-1, and BxPC-3 were treated by x-ray (4 Gy) or C-ion (0.5, 1, 2, or 4 Gy) irradiation, and their migration and invasion were assessed 2 days later. The levels of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound Rac1 and RhoA were determined by the active GTPase pull-down assay with or without a proteasome inhibitor, and the binding of E3 ubiquitin ligase to GTP-bound Rac1 was examined by immunoprecipitation. Results: Carbon-ion irradiation reduced the levels of GTP-bound Rac1 and RhoA, 2 major regulators of cell motility, in MIAPaCa-2 cells and GTP-bound Rac1 in AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. Proteasome inhibition reversed the effect, indicating that C-ion irradiation induced Rac1 and RhoA degradation via the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway. E3 Ub ligase X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), which directly targets Rac1, was selectively induced in C-ion–irradiated MIAPaCa-2 cells and coprecipitated with GTP-bound Rac1 in C-ion–irradiated cells, which was associated with Rac1 ubiquitination. Cell migration and invasion reduced by C-ion radiation were restored by short interfering RNA–mediated XIAP knockdown, indicating that XIAP is involved in C-ion–induced inhibition of cell motility. Conclusion: In contrast to x-ray irradiation, C-ion treatment inhibited the activity of Rac1 and RhoA in MIAPaCa-2 cells and Rac1 in AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells via Ub-mediated proteasomal degradation, thereby blocking the motility of these pancreatic cancer cells

  20. Carbon-Ion Irradiation Suppresses Migration and Invasiveness of Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells MIAPaCa-2 via Rac1 and RhoA Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Mayumi; Imadome, Kaori; Shoji, Yoshimi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Isozaki, Tetsurou; Endo, Satoshi; Yamada, Shigeru [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Imai, Takashi, E-mail: imait@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the inhibition of cancer cell migration and invasion by carbon (C)-ion irradiation. Methods and Materials: Human pancreatic cancer cells MIAPaCa-2, AsPC-1, and BxPC-3 were treated by x-ray (4 Gy) or C-ion (0.5, 1, 2, or 4 Gy) irradiation, and their migration and invasion were assessed 2 days later. The levels of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound Rac1 and RhoA were determined by the active GTPase pull-down assay with or without a proteasome inhibitor, and the binding of E3 ubiquitin ligase to GTP-bound Rac1 was examined by immunoprecipitation. Results: Carbon-ion irradiation reduced the levels of GTP-bound Rac1 and RhoA, 2 major regulators of cell motility, in MIAPaCa-2 cells and GTP-bound Rac1 in AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. Proteasome inhibition reversed the effect, indicating that C-ion irradiation induced Rac1 and RhoA degradation via the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway. E3 Ub ligase X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), which directly targets Rac1, was selectively induced in C-ion–irradiated MIAPaCa-2 cells and coprecipitated with GTP-bound Rac1 in C-ion–irradiated cells, which was associated with Rac1 ubiquitination. Cell migration and invasion reduced by C-ion radiation were restored by short interfering RNA–mediated XIAP knockdown, indicating that XIAP is involved in C-ion–induced inhibition of cell motility. Conclusion: In contrast to x-ray irradiation, C-ion treatment inhibited the activity of Rac1 and RhoA in MIAPaCa-2 cells and Rac1 in AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells via Ub-mediated proteasomal degradation, thereby blocking the motility of these pancreatic cancer cells.

  1. Middle segment-preserving pancreatectomy for recurrent metastasis of renal cell carcinoma after pancreatoduodenectomy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshi, Aiyama; Mitsuhiro, Inagaki; Hiromitsu, Akabane; Naoyuki, Yanagida; Taiichiro, Shibaki; Hiroki, Shomura; Takeaki, Kudo; Tatsuya, Shonaka; Futoshi, Oikawa; Hiroharu, Sakurai; Shiro, Nakano

    2014-01-01

    Many cases of surgical resection of metastatic pancreatic tumors originating from renal cell carcinoma have been reported; however, cases of reresection of recurrent pancreatic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in the remnant pancreas are rare. We performed a second resection for recurrent pancreatic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma six years after pancreatoduodenectomy with pancreaticogastrostomy reconstruction. By performing middle segment-preserving pancreatectomy, we were able to successfully spare the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function compared to that observed after total pancreatectomy, with no signs of recurrence for two years after the surgery. PMID:25061531

  2. Middle Segment-Preserving Pancreatectomy for Recurrent Metastasis of Renal Cell Carcinoma after Pancreatoduodenectomy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshi, Aiyama; Mitsuhiro, Inagaki; Hiromitsu, Akabane; Naoyuki, Yanagida; Taiichiro, Shibaki; Hiroki, Shomura; Takeaki, Kudo; Tatsuya, Shonaka; Futoshi, Oikawa; Hiroharu, Sakurai; Shiro, Nakano

    2014-01-01

    Many cases of surgical resection of metastatic pancreatic tumors originating from renal cell carcinoma have been reported; however, cases of reresection of recurrent pancreatic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma in the remnant pancreas are rare. We performed a second resection for recurrent pancreatic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma six years after pancreatoduodenectomy with pancreaticogastrostomy reconstruction. By performing middle segment-preserving pancreatectomy, we were able to successfully spare the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function compared to that observed after total pancreatectomy, with no signs of recurrence for two years after the surgery. PMID:25061531

  3. Radiodiagnostics for carcinoma of the pancreas and chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to establish which methods in radiodiagnosis are the most effective in demonstrating the presence of a pancreatic carcinoma or chronic pancreatitis. A second purpose is to evaluate which methods can be used to plan treatment of the patient. The different methods of radiodiagnosis that have been used and are being used to demonstrate disease of the pancreas are described, and their possible applications are reviewed. From this review a scheme is devised for the radiodiagnostic investigation of pancreatic disease. The results of each method of investigation are evaluated for those patients who were investigated in the University Hospital Groningen and compared with those published in the literature. On the basis of the results a final scheme for the diagnostic process is outlined. Ultrasonography and endoscopic pancreaticocholangiography are the prime methods of radiological investigation. Arteriography is an essential method in the assessment of the curative operability. It is established that computerized tomography is of little value after a good ultrasonogram, both for the primary diagnosis and the assessment of the possibility for operative treatment. (Auth.)

  4. A comparative proteomic study of plasma in feline pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify diagnostic biomarkers: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Meachem, Melissa D.; Snead, Elisabeth R.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Jackson, Marion L.; Dickinson, Ryan; Larson, Victoria; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    While pancreatitis is now recognized as a common ailment in cats, the diagnosis remains challenging due to discordant results and suboptimal sensitivity of ultrasound and specific feline pancreatic lipase (Spec fPL) assay. Pancreatitis also shares similar clinical features with pancreatic carcinoma, a rare but aggressive disease with a grave prognosis. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the plasma proteomes of normal healthy cats (n = 6), cats with pancreatitis (n = 6), and cats...

  5. Comparison of semi-automated image analysis and manual methods for tissue quantification in pancreatic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, A.J. [Regional Medical Physics Department, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: a.j.sims@newcastle.ac.uk; Murray, A. [Regional Medical Physics Department, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Bennett, M.K. [Department of Histopathology, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2002-04-21

    Objective measurements of tissue area during histological examination of carcinoma can yield valuable prognostic information. However, such measurements are not made routinely because the current manual approach is time consuming and subject to large statistical sampling error. In this paper, a semi-automated image analysis method for measuring tissue area in histological samples is applied to the measurement of stromal tissue, cell cytoplasm and lumen in samples of pancreatic carcinoma and compared with the standard manual point counting method. Histological samples from 26 cases of pancreatic carcinoma were stained using the sirius red, light-green method. Images from each sample were captured using two magnifications. Image segmentation based on colour cluster analysis was used to subdivide each image into representative colours which were classified manually into one of three tissue components. Area measurements made using this technique were compared to corresponding manual measurements and used to establish the comparative accuracy of the semi-automated image analysis technique, with a quality assurance study to measure the repeatability of the new technique. For both magnifications and for each tissue component, the quality assurance study showed that the semi-automated image analysis algorithm had better repeatability than its manual equivalent. No significant bias was detected between the measurement techniques for any of the comparisons made using the 26 cases of pancreatic carcinoma. The ratio of manual to semi-automatic repeatability errors varied from 2.0 to 3.6. Point counting would need to be increased to be between 400 and 1400 points to achieve the same repeatability as for the semi-automated technique. The results demonstrate that semi-automated image analysis is suitable for measuring tissue fractions in histological samples prepared with coloured stains and is a practical alternative to manual point counting. (author)

  6. Comparison of semi-automated image analysis and manual methods for tissue quantification in pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective measurements of tissue area during histological examination of carcinoma can yield valuable prognostic information. However, such measurements are not made routinely because the current manual approach is time consuming and subject to large statistical sampling error. In this paper, a semi-automated image analysis method for measuring tissue area in histological samples is applied to the measurement of stromal tissue, cell cytoplasm and lumen in samples of pancreatic carcinoma and compared with the standard manual point counting method. Histological samples from 26 cases of pancreatic carcinoma were stained using the sirius red, light-green method. Images from each sample were captured using two magnifications. Image segmentation based on colour cluster analysis was used to subdivide each image into representative colours which were classified manually into one of three tissue components. Area measurements made using this technique were compared to corresponding manual measurements and used to establish the comparative accuracy of the semi-automated image analysis technique, with a quality assurance study to measure the repeatability of the new technique. For both magnifications and for each tissue component, the quality assurance study showed that the semi-automated image analysis algorithm had better repeatability than its manual equivalent. No significant bias was detected between the measurement techniques for any of the comparisons made using the 26 cases of pancreatic carcinoma. The ratio of manual to semi-automatic repeatability errors varied from 2.0 to 3.6. Point counting would need to be increased to be between 400 and 1400 points to achieve the same repeatability as for the semi-automated technique. The results demonstrate that semi-automated image analysis is suitable for measuring tissue fractions in histological samples prepared with coloured stains and is a practical alternative to manual point counting. (author)

  7. Spectral CT evaluation of interstitial brachytherapy in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts: preliminary animal experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shudong [Jiangsu University, Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Renmin Hospital, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Shanghai Jiao tong University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai (China); Huang, Wei; Song, Qi; Lin, Xiaozhu; Wang, Zhongmin; Chen, Kemin [Shanghai Jiao tong University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai (China); Chen, Yerong [Jiangsu University, Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Renmin Hospital, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China)

    2014-09-15

    We sought to evaluate the capability of spectral CT to detect the therapeutic response to {sup 125}I interstitial brachytherapy in a pancreatic carcinoma xenograft nude mouse model. Twenty mice bearing SWl990 human pancreatic cancer cell xenografts were randomly separated into two groups: experimental (n = 10; 1.0 mCi) and control (n = 10; 0 mCi). After a two-week treatment, spectral CT was performed. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and iodine concentration (IC) in the lesions were measured and normalized to the muscle tissue, and nIC CD31 immunohistochemistry was used to measure microvessel density (MVD). The relationships between the nIC and MVD of the tumours were analysed. The nIC of the experimental group was significantly lower than that of the control group during the multiphase examination. A significant difference in the MVD was observed between the two groups (P <0.001). The nIC values of the three-phase scans have a certain positive correlation with MVD (r = 0.57, p < 0.0001; r = 0.48, p = 0.002; r = 0.63, p = 0.0017 in the 10, 25, and 60 s phase, respectively). Spectral CT can be a useful non-invasive imaging modality in evaluating the therapeutic effect of {sup 125}I interstitial brachytherapy to a pancreatic carcinoma. (orig.)

  8. Metformin induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role and mechanism of mefformin in inducing apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS: The human pancreatic cancer cell lines ASPC-1, BxPc-3, PANC-1 and SW1990 were exposed to mefformin. The inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation via apoptosis induction and S phase arrest in pancreatic cancer cell lines of mefformin was tested.RESULTS: In each pancreatic cancer cell line tested, metformin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner in MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assays). Flow cytometric analysis showed that metformin reduced the number of cells in G1 and increased the percentage of cells in S phase as well as the apoptotic fraction. Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (EUSA) showed that metformin induced apaptosis in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. In Western blot studies, metformin induced oly-ADP-ribose polymerase(PARP) cleavage (an indicator of aspase activation) in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. The general caspase inhibitor (VAD-fmk) completely abolished metformin-induced PARP cleavage and apoptosis in ASPC-1 BxPc-3 and PANC-1, the caspase-8 specific inhibitor (IETD-fmk) and the caspase-9 specific inhibitor (LEHD-fmk) only partially abrogated metformin-induced apoptosis and PARP cleavage in BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells. We also observed that metformin treatment ramatically reduced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinase (P-MAPK) in both a time- and dose-dependent manner in all cell lines tested.CONCLUSION: Metformin significantly inhibits cell proliferation and apoptosis in all pancreatic cell lines. And the metformin-induced apoptosis is associated with PARP leavage, activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Hence, both caspase-8 and -9-initiated apoptotic signaling pathways contribute to metforrnin-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cell lines.

  9. PNMA1 promotes cell growth in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Heng; He, Ping; Ma, Ming-Ze; Wang, Yang; Li, Rong-Kun; Fang, Fang; Fu, Ying; Tian, Guang-Ang; Qin, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic Ma1 (PNMA1) is a member of an expanding family of 'brain/testis' proteins involved in an autoimmune disorder defined as paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS). Although it is widely studied in PNS, little is known about the underlying clinical significance and biological function of PNMA1 in tumors. Here, we find that elevated PNMA1 expression is more commonly observed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell lines, compared with normal pancreatic cell and tissues from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patient. Besides, higher PNMA1 expression is closely correlated with large tumor size. Suppression of endogenous PNMA1 expression decreases cell viability and promotes cell apoptosis. Subsequent studies reveal that the PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK pathway and members of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family may be involved in the pro-survival and anti-apoptotic effect of PNMA1 on PDAC. Taken together, this study provides evidence that PNMA1 is involved in tumor growth of pancreatic carcinoma and PNMA1-related pathways might represent a new treatment strategy. PMID:25120759

  10. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. → Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. → PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. → This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated β-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered by treatment with anti

  11. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... cell carcinoma public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  12. Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... cell carcinoma public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  13. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 in pancreatic ductal carcinoma is associated with tumor metastasis formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kemona

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study was to assess the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 in pancreatic ductal carcinoma and to examine its correlation with chosen clinico-anatomical parameters. The study group consisted of 36 patients with pancreatic ductal carcinoma. Tumors were stained using immunohistochemical method (NCL -MMP-9, Novocastra. No correlation was found between tumor MMP-9 expression and age, gender or grade of histological malignancy. However, statistical analysis revealed a relationship between tumor MMP-9 expression and histological type (adenocarcinoma mucinosum of pancreatic carcinoma. The expression was strongly correlated with lymph node involvement and occurrence of distant metastases (p<0.00001. The results indicate a correlation between the expression of MMP-9 in pancreatic ductal carcinoma and worse prognosis (shown by lymph node involvement and distant metastases.

  14. 慢病毒介导Vimentin基因沉默抑制胰腺癌细胞侵袭和粘附的机制%Lentivirus-mediated Vimentin Gene Silencing Inhibits Invasion and Adhesion of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李旭; 江建新; 王敏; 朱峰; 田锐; 申铭; 秦仁义

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of vimentin down-regulation by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) on invasion and adhesion of human pancreatic carcinoma cells. Methods Vimentin expression in human pancreatic carcinoma Panc-1 cells was silenced by Lv-VIM-GFP-shRNA infection. The expression of vimentin in the cells was detected by qRT -PCR ,Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Transwell and Scratch-wound assays were used to measure the invasive and migratory capability of cells. The adhesion ability of infected Panc-1 cells was evaluated by cell adhesion assay. The expression of tumor adhesion-related factors was detected by qRT -PCR and Western blot. The expression of F-actin and focal adhesion kinase(FAK ) was detected by immunofluorescence staining. Results Vimentin was constitutively expressed in Panc-1 cells. Vimentin expression was silenced by Lv-VIM-GFP-shRNA infection (P0. 05 ) ,but the expression of F-actin was decreased and immunofluorescence staining showed FAK rearrangement in Lv-VIM-GFP-shRNA group. Conclusion Suppression of vimentin expression may inhibit the invasion and adhesion of pancreatic cancer cells invitro by reducing the adhesion of tumor cells to the extracellular matrix and their migration via depolymer -ization of F-actin cytoskeleton and rearrangement of FAK.%目的 应用慢病毒介导的shRNA基因沉默技术,有效沉默人胰腺癌细胞株Panc-1中Vimentin表达,并探讨下调Vimentin后对Panc-1细胞侵袭运动及粘附能力的影响及其机制.方法 Lv-VIM-GFP-shRNA慢病毒转染人胰腺癌细胞株Panc-1,Real-time PCR、Western blot和免疫荧光法检测慢病毒转染后Vimentin的沉默效率;Transwell小室体外运动侵袭实验及划痕实验比较细胞运动侵袭能力变化,细胞粘附实验检测细胞粘附能力的变化;Real-time PCR 和Western blot检测肿瘤侵袭和粘附相关因子的表达,免疫荧光法观察转染前后细胞骨架蛋白F-actin和

  15. Cell apoptosis and proliferation inhibition of pancreatic cancer induced by sub-threshold focused ultrasound (FUS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of sub-threshold focused ultrasound (FUS) sonication on the pancreatic cancer cell. Materials and methods: The human pancreatic carcinoma cell line PaTu 8988t suspension and pancreatic carcinoma xenograft in nude mice were sonicated by FUS using sub-threshold doses. The temperature at the focus was controlled at below 60 °C. The cell apoptosis in vitro was tested by flow cytometer at 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after FUS sonication. Colony formation was used to evaluate the cell growth inhibition of FUS in vitro. The tumor volume of the xenograft was measured before and after FUS sonication. Then the slides of the tumor were under hematoxylin–eosin (H and E) staining and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) to evaluate the effect of FUS on pancreatic carcinoma xenograft in vivo. Results: The maximum cell suspension temperature of the FUS sonication group was 55.8 ± 2.17 °C. The cell apoptosis rate peaked at 24 h after FUS sonication, the differences between the FUS sonication group and control group were statistically significant (P 3 and 1085.23 ± 217.13 mm3 (P < 0.05). H and E staining and TUNEL assay showed both necrotic and apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Sub-threshold FUS sonication could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells.

  16. bcl-2-specific siRNAs restore Gemcitabine sensitivity in human pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Kinya; Ocker, Matthias; Neureiter, Daniel; Dietze, Otto; Zopf, Steffen; Hahn, Eckhart G; Herold, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Gemcitabine has been shown to ameliorate disease related symptoms and to prolong overall survival in pancreatic cancer.Yet, resistance to Gemcitabine is commonly observed in this tumour entity and has been linked to increased expression of anti-apoptotic bcl-2. We therefore investigated if and to what extend silencing of bcl-2 by specific siRNAs (siBCL2) might enhance Gemcitabine effects in human pancreatic carcinoma cells. siBCL2 was transfected into the pancreatic cancer cell line ...

  17. The CT signs of peripancreatic vascular invasion in pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze various characteristics of multislice spiral CT (MSCT) signs of peripancreatic arterial and venous invasion in pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: In 68 patients with pancreatic carcinoma diagnosed by MSCT, 33 patients were confirmed by surgeco-pathology (12 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy, 21 patients were found that the tumors were unresectable during surgical exploration). The peripancreatic major vessels, including superior mesenteric artery (SMA), celiac artery (CA), hepatic artery (HA), superior mesenteric vein (SMV), and portal vein (PV), were examined carefully by surgeons during the operation. Results: In surgical exploration, 103 of 165 vessels were found uninvolved, and the other 62 vessels were found invaded by the tumors. Except 5 false-negative vessels, the characteristics of invaded peripancreatic major vessels presented in preoperative MSCT were as follows: all of the invaded peripancreatic major arteries were involved by tumors above one-half circumference of the vessel or embedded in tumors. Parts of the invaded peripancreatic major veins, such as 4/17 SMV and 2/13 PV, were involved by tumors below one-half circumference of the vessels, but venous wall irregularity or vascular stenosis or vascular contour alteration appeared at the same time. The invaded peripancreatic major veins, such as 11/17 SMV and 12/13 PV, more often behaved vascular stenosis or obliteration than the invaded peripancreatic arteries including 3/8 CA, 4/7 HA, 4/12 SMA. Irregularity owing to infiltration by tumors appeared more often in the invaded peripancreatic major venous wall (11/17 SMV and 7/13 PV) than in the arterial wall (3/8 CA, 2/7 HA, and 6/12 SMA). Conclusion: The CT signs of peripancreatic arterial and venous invasion have different characteristics. (authors)

  18. The prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawanishi, Masahiro; Munaka, Masaki (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology); Okamoto, Sukeyoshi; Kajiyama, Goro

    1992-03-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma in 28 Hiroshima A-bomb survivors was compared with that in background- and tumor size-matched non-exposed patients living in Hiroshima. A-bomb survivors consisted of 13 exposed within 2,000 m from the hypocenter, 12 who had entered the city within 3 days after A-bombing, and 3 not clarified in detail. Survival time was significantly prolonged when tumor resection or surgical internal fistula for obstructive jaundice was performed. The significant therapeutic factor was thus adjusted by using the Cox model to clarify the difference in cumulative survival rates between the exposed and non-exposed groups of pancreatic cancer patients. Median survival was 120 days in the exposed group and 186 days in the non-exposed group. The corresponding figures for 75% and 25% cumulative survival rates were 175 days and 75 days in the exposed group and 238 days and 120 days in the non-exposed group. Prognosis was worse in the exposed group than the non-exposed group. (N.K.).

  19. Effects of Compounded Human Ghrelin in a Mouse Model of Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Nanashima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is a peptide that is secreted from the stomach and plays a role in appetite, weight gain, and skeletal muscle composition. Thus, compounded human ghrelin is a candidate drug for improving nutritional status after pancreatic surgery. However, in patients with pancreatic carcinomas, adverse influences on the occult tumor growth of ghrelin-induced secretion are a concern. The present study describes the effects of the administration of compounded human ghrelin on weight gain and pancreatic cancer cell growth in a mouse model. Changes in body weight and tumor growth in a subcutaneously transplanted pancreatic carcinoma cell line in vivo (5-week-old BALB/c-nu/nu mice were examined with or without the administration of compounded human ghrelin. Compounded human ghrelin was administered at 44 days after post-transplantation” Changes in weight were not significantly different between the control and compounded human ghrelin groups 8 days after compounded human ghrelin administration, and no association between weight and concentration of compounded human ghrelin was identified. Tumor growth after the administration of compounded human ghrelin was significantly lower than that of the control group, with the magnitude of the decrease being associated with increasing compounded human ghrelin concentration (p<0.05. At 6 and 8 days after compounded human ghrelin administration, increases in tumor weights of the control groups (0.5±0.3 g and 0.9±0.2 g, respectively were significantly greater than those observed for groups receiving 3, 15, and 30 nmol per kg of compounded human ghrelin (0.1 and 0.2, 0.2 and 0.3, and 0.2 and 0.3, respectively. There were no adverse effects of compounded human ghrelin administration. Plasma leptin levels were significantly lower in cancer cells compared with the control vehicle (p<0.05, which was decreased in mice receiving 30nmol per kg of compounded human ghrelin in comparison with those receiving vehicle (p<0

  20. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (ppancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  1. Proteomic analysis of differential proteins in pancreatic carcinomas: Effects of MBD1 knock-down by stable RNA interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methyl-CpG binding domain protein 1 (MBD1), a suppressor of gene transcription, may be involved in inactivation of tumor suppressor genes during tumorigenesis. Over-expression of MBD1 has been reported in human pancreatic carcinomas. In this study, we established a MBD1-knock-down pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3) using stable RNA interference, to compare the proteomic changes between control and MBD1-knock-down cells using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. We identified five proteins that were up-regulated and nine proteins that were down-regulated. Most of the identified proteins are involved in tumorigenesis, some are prognostic biomarkers for human malignant tumors. Our data suggest that these differential proteins may be associated with the function of MBD1, and provide some insight into the functional mechanism of MBD1 in the development of pancreatic cancer

  2. Fentanyl inhibits cell viability in human pancreatic cancer cell line and tumor growth in pancreatic cancer cell-transplanted mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Jianxia; Wang, Liangrong; Chen, Lei; Yang, Tao; Jin, Lida; Lin, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a kind of devastating disease with a high mortality rate. Fentanyl has been widely applied to anesthesia and analgesia in pancreatic cancer therapy, and is also demonstrated to inhibit the growth of some kinds of cancer cells in existed studies. To investigate the functions of fentanyl in pancreatic cancer, we conducted a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments using human pancreatic cancer cells SW1990 and fentanyl treatment. The cells were transplanted to BALB/c nude...

  3. Value of diffusion-weighted imaging in distinguishing pancreatic carcinoma from mass-forming chronic pancreatitis: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Xiangke; Sushant Kumar Das; Anup Bhetuwal; Xiao Yingquan; Sun Feng; Zeng Lichuan; Wang Wenxuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Several previous studies have shown that diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can provide additional information for focal pancreatic lesions by demonstrating more restricted diffusion in solid malignant tumors than in chronic pancreatitis,which can be indicated by a decreased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC).However,these studies have a modest sample size and convey inconclusive results.The aim of this study was to determine,in a meta-analysis,the diagnostic performance of quantitative diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in distinguishing pancreatic carcinoma from mass-forming chronic pancreatitis.Methods We determined the sensitivities and specificities across studies.A summary receiver operator characteristic (sROC) curve was constructed to calculate the area under the curve (AUC).Results The pooled sensitivity of DWI was 0.86 (95% CI:0.80-0.91) and the pooled specificity was 0.82 (95% CI:0.72-0.89).The AUC of the sROC was 0.91 (95% CI:0.88-0.93).Conclusions DWI may be a potentially technically feasible tool for differentiating pancreatic carcinoma from massforming chronic pancreatitis.However,large-scale randomized control trials are necessary to assess its clinical value.

  4. Papillary renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1976 and 1987, 395 patients with kidney tumors were studied with radiological techniques and sonography. In 37 cases (9.4%) histopathology diagnosed pure papillary renal cell carcinoma. Analyzing the radiographic patterns of these neoplasms, the authors observed constantly diminished vascularity (100%) frequent calcifications (35.1%) and necrotic areas (51.3%). Such X-ray features are not specific: nevertheless, their coexistence is strongly suggestive of papillary renal cell cancer. No consistent US pattern was found; however, necrotic areas were easily demonstrated in most cases. It must be stressed how patients with papillary carcinoma experienced a longer post-operative survival; it has not yet been established whether such favorable behavior is due to low biological aggressiveness or to earlier diagnosis

  5. Pancreatic panniculitis: a cutaneous manifestation of acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Laureano, A; Mestre, T; Ricardo, L; Rodrigues, AM; Cardoso, J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thi...

  6. Fatal Pancreatic Panniculitis Associated with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Woo Sun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Woo; Paik, Chang Nyol; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thi...

  7. Ipsilateral synchronous renal cell carcinoma and transitional cell carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. W.; Kim, M. J.; Song, J H; Kim, J H; Kim, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of renal cell carcinoma(RCC) and transitional cell carcinoma(TCC) in the same kidney is unusual. We report a 53-year-old man with ipsilateral synchronous renal adenocarcinoma and renal pelvic transitional cell carcinoma with severe hypercalcemia and a huge staghorn calculus in the opposite kidney. The patient was admitted to the hospital because of left flank pain and intermittent fever which he had had for 2 months. Computerized tomography revealed a huge stone in...

  8. Penis squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor Hernández Piñero; José Luis Rodríguez López; María de Lourdes Menéndez Villa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become a first order health problem worldwide, despite the great diagnostic and therapeutic programs achieved during the last years. This is a clinical case of an 81- year-old patient with personal and social history of promiscuous and unprotected sexual behavior that shows a vegetative lesion in his gland and numerous inguinal adenopathies. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the penis, which is a relatively rare pathology which is generally diagn...

  9. Clear Cell Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Wang; Tracey Harbert; Jennifer Olivella; Daniel Olson; Sarma, Deba P; Stephanie Ortman

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Clear cell basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is an uncommon and unusual variant of BCC, which is characterized by a variable component of clear cells. The pathogenesis of this histological variant and its clinical significance has not been clarified. Differentiation of this uncommon variant of BCC from other clear cell tumors is important for the treatment. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male presented with a 0.9 cm dome-shaped lesion on his upper chest. A shave biopsy revealed a der...

  10. An evaluation of spiral CT scan in diagnosis of unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the spiral CT findings and diagnostic criteria of unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: The spiral CT findings of 17 cases of pancreatic carcinoma, confirmed by surgery and histo-pathologic examinations, were retrospectively studied. Factors like peripancreatic vasculars and fat tissue, metastases or adjacent involvement, and the protocol of the scan were carefully evaluated. Results: The CT manifestations of unresectable pancreatic carcinoma included: peripancreatic vascular involvement, metastasis found liver and peritoneum, adjacent organ involvement, distant metastatic lymphadenopathy and invasion of peripancreatic fat plane accompanied with other signs of unresectable lesion revealed in the same evaluation. Conclusion: Spiral CT scan accurately evaluates the range, degree of tumor, metastatic lesions and especially the peripancreatic vascular involvement. Spiral CT scan is a valuable in determining the resectability of pancreatic cancer

  11. New insights into pancreatic cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chinthalapally V Rao; Altaf Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has been one of the deadliest of allcancers, with almost uniform lethality despite aggressivetreatment. Recently, there have been important advancesin the molecular, pathological and biological understandingof pancreatic cancer. Even after the emergence of recentnew targeted agents and the use of multiple therapeuticcombinations, no treatment option is viable in patients withadvanced cancer. Developing novel strategies to targetprogression of PC is of intense interest. A small populationof pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been foundto be resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy.CSCs are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation,progression and metastasis. The CSC research has recentlyachieved much progress in a variety of solid tumors,including pancreatic cancer to some extent. This leads tofocus on understanding the role of pancreatic CSCs. Thefocus on CSCs may offer new targets for prevention andtreatment of this deadly cancer. We review the most salientdevelopments in important areas of pancreatic CSCs. Here,we provide a review of current updates and new insightson the role of CSCs in pancreatic tumor progression withspecial emphasis on DclK1 and Lgr5, signaling pathwaysaltered by CSCs, and the role of CSCs in prevention andtreatment of PC.

  12. The expressions and significance of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in human pancreatic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Bo; Ma Qingyong; Li Ming

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in pancreatic carcinoma and their relationship with tumor invasion, local metastasis and prognosis of the carcinoma. Methods The expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were examined in 32 patients with pancreatic carcinomas by S-P immunohistochemical technique and the correlation with pathological tumor parameters were analyzed. Survival analysis was made by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The positive rates of MMP-2, TIMP-2 in 32 patients with pancreatic carcinoma were 56.25% and 75.00%, which were significantly higher than those of the controls(P<0.05). Expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were independent of sex, age, histological grading and type, but well correlated with the lymph node metastasis and TNM clinical staging(Ⅰ and Ⅲ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ). There was a significant association between MMP-2, TIMP-2 and prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma. Conclusion MMP-2 and TIMP-2 might be useful markers for biological aggressiveness of this malignancy and might contribute to the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma, which can be used to evaluate the prognosis of patients.

  13. Focused ultrasound induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qian; JIANG Li-xin; HU Bing

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence and mortality rate of pancreatic cancer have increased dramatically in China over recent decades.Focused ultrasound (FU) has been somewhat successful in treating pancreatic cancer.The purpose of this study was to investigate apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells induced by FU.Methods Suspension of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line PaTu 8988t was radiated by FU,using five doses with different radiation parameters and patterns,including one blank control.Temperature increase of the cell suspension was monitored.Cell apoptosis and death after FU radiation was observed using fluorescence microscopy and was tested by flow cytometer at 3,6,12,24,and 48 hours after ultrasound radiation.Results The maximum cell suspension temperatures following five radiation doses were 28°C,(42.20±2.17)°C,(50.80±0.84)°C,(55.80±2.17)°C,and (65.20±3.11)°C; differences between the doses were statistically significant (P <0.05).The apoptosis rate peaked at 24 hours after radiation,at (0.56±0.15)%,(1.28±0.16)%,(1.84±0.29)%,(5.74±1.15)%,and (2.00±0.84)% for the five doses; differences between the doses were statistically significant (P <0.05).Between doses 1-4,cell apoptosis rates increased as the Tmax increased.In dose 5,as the Tmax was above 60°C,the apoptosis rate decreased.Conclusion Sub-threshold thermal exposures of FU radiation with a continuous radiation pattern could result in higher oercentage of apoptosed cells.

  14. 苯乙酸抑制胰腺癌BXPC-3细胞增殖及RNA编辑酶表达的研究%Effects of phenylacetate on proliferation and RNA editing deaminase expression of human pancreatic carcinoma BXPC-3 cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜涛; 王岩; 任辉; 张广; 刘安安; 田宇

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the differentiation-inducing effect of phenylacetate on pancreatic carcinoma cells and underlying mechanism of RNA editing deaminase in cell proliferation and differentiation. Methods The effect of phenylacetate on cell proliferation and cell cycle were investigated in cultured pancreatic carcinoma BXPC-3 cell lines by methylthiazoletetrazolium( MTT) assay, and flow cytometry. The effect of phenylacetate on the expression of RNA editing deaminase (ADAR2 mRNA) in BXPC-3 cells and fresh pancreatic carcinoma specimen was evaluated by RT-PCR. Results ADAR1 mRNA expression was positive in human pancreatic carcinoma tissues and BXPC-3 cell lines. After application of 1.0 and 2.0 mmol/L phenylacetate for 24 h and 72 h, BXPC-3 cell growth inhibition rate increased, G0/G1 phase cells decreased, S phase cells increased, ADAR2 mRNA expression decreased ( P < 0.01 ). Conclusion ADAR2 mRNA played a vital role of regulation in the process of pancreatic carcinoma cells growth and differentiation. Phenylacetate could regulate the proliferation and differentiation of pancreatic carcinoma cells through the regulation of ADAR2 mRNA expression.%目的 探讨苯乙酸对胰腺癌诱导分化作用及RNA编辑在胰腺癌细胞增殖分化过程中的作用机理.方法 采用MTT比色法和流式细胞术检测苯乙酸对胰腺癌BXPC-3细胞系增殖抑制作用及对BXPC-3细胞周期的影响.RT-PCR方法检测RNA编辑酶ADAR mRNA在胰腺癌细胞系和胰腺癌组织中的表达以及应用苯乙酸后ADAR mRNA表达的变化.结果 人胰腺癌组织及胰腺癌BXPC-3细胞中均可检测到编辑酶ADAR2.应用1.0及2.0mmol/L苯乙酸后24h及72 h,BXPC-3细胞增殖抑制率增加,G0/G1期比例下降,S期比例显著升高.ADAR2 mRNA表达降低,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 ADAR2可能在胰腺细胞增殖分化过程中发挥作用,且苯乙酸可能通过调控ADAR2 mRNA的表达来发挥诱导分化作用.

  15. Alterations in integrin expression modulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors mediating the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through the extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. METHODS: In this study, sub-populations of the human pancreatic cancer cell line, MiaPaCa-2 were established which displayed differences in invasion, adhesion, anoikis, anchorage-independent growth and integrin expression. RESULTS: Clone #3 displayed higher invasion with less adhesion, while Clone #8 was less invasive with increased adhesion to ECM proteins compared to MiaPaCa-2. Clone #8 was more sensitive to anoikis than Clone #3 and MiaPaCa-2, and displayed low colony-forming efficiency in an anchorage-independent growth assay. Integrins beta 1, alpha 5 and alpha 6 were over-expressed in Clone #8. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), integrin beta1 knockdown in Clone #8 cells increased invasion through matrigel and fibronectin, increased motility, decreased adhesion and anoikis. Integrin alpha 5 and alpha 6 knockdown also resulted in increased motility, invasion through matrigel and decreased adhesion. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that altered expression of integrins interacting with different extracellular matrixes may play a significant role in suppressing the aggressive invasive phenotype. Analysis of these clonal populations of MiaPaCa-2 provides a model for investigations into the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma.

  16. Molecular regulation of pancreatic stellate cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaster Robert

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Until now, no specific therapies are available to inhibit pancreatic fibrosis, a constant pathological feature of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. One major reason is the incomplete knowledge of the molecular principles underlying fibrogenesis in the pancreas. In the past few years, evidence has been accumulated that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs are the predominant source of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in the diseased organ. PSCs are vitamin A-storing, fibroblast-like cells with close morphological and biochemical similarities to hepatic stellate cells (also known as Ito-cells. In response to profibrogenic mediators such as various cytokines, PSCs undergo an activation process that involves proliferation, exhibition of a myofibroblastic phenotype and enhanced production of ECM proteins. The intracellular mediators of activation signals, and their antagonists, are only partially known so far. Recent data suggest an important role of enzymes of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family in PSC activation. On the other hand, ligands of the nuclear receptor PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ stimulate maintenance of a quiescent PSC phenotype. In the future, targeting regulators of the PSC activation process might become a promising approach for the treatment of pancreatic fibrosis.

  17. Penis squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Hernández Piñero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has become a first order health problem worldwide, despite the great diagnostic and therapeutic programs achieved during the last years. This is a clinical case of an 81- year-old patient with personal and social history of promiscuous and unprotected sexual behavior that shows a vegetative lesion in his gland and numerous inguinal adenopathies. Biopsy confirms the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma infiltrating the penis, which is a relatively rare pathology which is generally diagnosed belatedly. Partial amputation of the penis was considered to be performed, but there was no consent on behalf of his family. The patient’s general condition was getting worse until he died.

  18. Effects of oridonin on cytoskeletal protein F-actin in human pancreatic carcinoma cells%冬凌草甲素对胰腺癌细胞骨架蛋白F-actin的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军楼; 沈洪; 徐力; 杨继兵; 于希忠; 孙志岭

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose:Traditional Chinese medicine with notable effect and little adverse reaction is increasingly concerned about the medical profession because of its great potential and advantage in treating pancreatic carcinoma. In this experiment, we studied the effects of oridonin on apoptosis and cytoskeletal protein F-actin in human pancreatic carcinoma SW1990 cells. Methods:SW1990 cells in culture medium were treated with different concentrations of oridonin. The inhibitory rate of the cells was measured by MTT assay. Morphology of cell apoptosis was observed by DAPI stain and cell apoptotic rate was detected by lfow cytometry (FCM). The morphological changes of F-actin were observed by laser confocal microscopy. Results:The growth of human pancreatic carcinoma SW1990 cells was signiifcantly inhibited by oridonin. Apoptosis morphological changes including condensation of chromatin and nuclear fragmentation were observed clearly by DAPI stain. The early apoptotic rate of SW1990 cells treated with 25, 50μmol/L oridonin was signiifcantly higher than that of the control group (3.78±0.46, 9.51±0.63 vs 0.73±0.06, P<0.05), and the late apoptotic rate and cell necrosis rate were also signiifcantly higher than that of the control group (14.40±1.78, 20.53±2.54 vs 4.16±0.31, P<0.05). F-actin was showed from polymerization to depolymerization after oridonin treatment. Conclusion:Oridonin can obviously inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis of SW1990 cells. The mechanisms may involve the depolymerization of F-actin after treatment with oridonin.%背景与目的:中医药治疗肿瘤不良反应低且疗效显著,在防治胰腺癌方面有较大的潜力与优势,日益受到国内、外医学界的关注。本研究观察中草药冬凌草的有效成分冬凌草甲素对人胰腺癌SW1990凋亡及细胞骨架蛋白F-actin的影响。方法:以不同浓度的冬凌草甲素作用于体外培养的SW1990细胞,采用MTT法检测细胞生长

  19. Effects of oridonin on cytoskeletal protein F-actin in human pancreatic carcinoma cells%冬凌草甲素对胰腺癌细胞骨架蛋白F-actin的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军楼; 沈洪; 徐力; 杨继兵; 于希忠; 孙志岭

    2015-01-01

    背景与目的:中医药治疗肿瘤不良反应低且疗效显著,在防治胰腺癌方面有较大的潜力与优势,日益受到国内、外医学界的关注。本研究观察中草药冬凌草的有效成分冬凌草甲素对人胰腺癌SW1990凋亡及细胞骨架蛋白F-actin的影响。方法:以不同浓度的冬凌草甲素作用于体外培养的SW1990细胞,采用MTT法检测细胞生长抑制率,DAPI染色法染色后荧光显微镜观察细胞核凋亡、流式细胞仪检测细胞凋亡率,激光共聚焦显微镜观察F-actin形态学变化。结果:冬凌草甲素对人胰腺癌SW1990细胞具有明显的增殖抑制作用,荧光显微镜见到典型的凋亡形态学改变。流式细胞仪检测结果显示,25、50μmol/L冬凌草甲素给药组早期凋亡的百分率显著高于对照组(3.78±0.46,9.51±0.63 vs 0.73±0.06,P<0.05),晚期凋亡和坏死细胞的百分率也显著高于未给药组(14.40±1.78,20.53±2.54 vs 4.16±0.31,P<0.05)。细胞骨架蛋白F-actin呈现解聚状态。结论:冬凌草甲素可抑制胰腺癌SW1990细胞增殖,促进肿瘤细胞凋亡,其作用机制可能是药物引起了细胞骨架蛋白F-actin解聚。%Background and purpose:Traditional Chinese medicine with notable effect and little adverse reaction is increasingly concerned about the medical profession because of its great potential and advantage in treating pancreatic carcinoma. In this experiment, we studied the effects of oridonin on apoptosis and cytoskeletal protein F-actin in human pancreatic carcinoma SW1990 cells. Methods:SW1990 cells in culture medium were treated with different concentrations of oridonin. The inhibitory rate of the cells was measured by MTT assay. Morphology of cell apoptosis was observed by DAPI stain and cell apoptotic rate was detected by lfow cytometry (FCM). The morphological changes of F-actin were observed by laser confocal microscopy. Results:The growth of human pancreatic

  20. Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas -A Case Report and Review of the Literature-

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hui-Young; Lee, Dong-Gyu; Chun, Kwangjin; Lee, Seungkoo; SONG, SEO-YOUNG

    2009-01-01

    Most of the malignant neoplasms of the pancreas demonstrate features that are consistent with adenocarcinoma. According to the WHO classification, primary clear cell carcinoma of the pancreas is rare and it is classified as a "miscellaneous" carcinoma. In addition, there is not an adequate systematic overview that can demonstrate its true existence as a definable entity. We report here on an unusual case of primary pancreatic clear cell carcinoma, which is the first such reported case in Kore...

  1. Multisystem Langerhans' cell histiocytosis with pancreatic involvement.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, R C; Attra, A; Quinn, C M; Krausz, T; Chu, A C

    1993-01-01

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, a rare disorder of unknown cause affecting both children and adults, can affect many different organs and present to a wide range of medical specialties. An infant with fatal multisystem Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in whom the pancreas and the intestine were extensively affected is reported. The direct pancreatic involvement by this disease has not previously been described.

  2. Inhibition of SIRT1 combined with gemcitabine therapy for pancreatic carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gong DJ; Zhang JM; Yu M; Zhuang B; Guo QQ

    2013-01-01

    Dao-Jun Gong,1 Jia-Min Zhang,1 Min Yu,1 Bo Zhuang,1 Qing-Qu Guo21Department of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Jinhua Hospital of Zhejiang University, Jinhua, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University College of Medicine, Hangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Pancreatic carcinoma possesses one of the highest lethality rates, highest drug-resistance, and highest incidence rates. The objective of this resear...

  3. The pancreatic beta cell surface proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Stützer, I.; Esterházy, D.; Stoffel, M.

    2012-01-01

    The pancreatic beta cell is responsible for maintaining normoglycaemia by secreting an appropriate amount of insulin according to blood glucose levels. The accurate sensing of the beta cell extracellular environment is therefore crucial to this endocrine function and is transmitted via its cell surface proteome. Various surface proteins that mediate or affect beta cell endocrine function have been identified, including growth factor and cytokine receptors, transporters, ion channels and prote...

  4. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ayesha Salahuddin; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 relate...

  5. Value of three-dimensional reconstructions in pancreatic carcinoma using multidetector CT: Initial results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miriam Klauβ; Max Sch(o)binger; Ivo Wolf; Jens Werner; Hans-Peter Meinzer; Hans-Ulrich Kauczor; Lars Grenacher

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the use of three-dimensional imaging of pancreatic carcinoma using multidetector computed tomography (CT) in a prospective study. METHODS: Ten patients with suspected pancreatic tumors were examined prospectively using multidetector CT (Somatom Sensation 16, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The images were evaluated for the presence of a pancreatic carcinoma and invasion of the peripancreatic vessels and surrounding organs. Using the isotropic CT data sets, a three-dimensional image was created with automatic vascular analysis and semiautomatic segmentation of the organs and pancreatic tumor by a radiologist. The CT examinations and the three-dimensional images were presented to the surgeon directly before and during the patient's operation using the Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit-based software "ReLiver". Immediately after surgery, the value of the two images was judged by the surgeon. The operation and the histological results served as the gold standard. RESULTS: Nine patients had a pancreatic carcinoma (all pT3), and one patient had a serous cystadenoma. One tumor infiltrated the superior mesenteric vein. The infiltration was correctly evaluated. All carcinomas were resectable. In comparison to the CT image with axial and coronal reconstructions, the three-dimensional image was judged by the surgeons as better for operation planning and consistently described as useful. CONCLUSION: A 3D-image of the pancreas represents an invaluable aid to the surgeon. However, the 3D-software must be further developed in order to be integrated into daily clinical routine.

  6. Vascularisation Pattern of Chronic Pancreatitis Compared with Pancreatic Carcinoma: Results from Contrast-Enhanced Endoscopic Ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hocke; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2012-01-01

    Discriminating between focal chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer is always a challenge in clinical medicine. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound using Doppler techniques can uniquely reveal different vascularisation patterns in pancreatic tissue alterated by chronic inflammatory processes and even allows a discrimination from pancreatic cancer. This paper will describe the basics of contrast-enhanced high mechanical index endoscopic ultrasound (CEHMI EUS) and contrast enhanced low ...

  7. Relationship between telomerase activity and its subunit expression and inhibitory effect of antisense hTR on pancreatic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Hua Zhou; Hong-Mei Zhang; Quan Chen; Dong-Dong Han; Fei Pei; Li-Shan Zhang; De-Tong Yang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To directly investigate the relationship between telomerase activity and its subunit expression and the inhibitory effect of antisense hTR on pancreatic carcinogenesis.METHODS: We examined the telomerase activity and its subunit expression by cell culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR-silver staining, PCR-ELISA, DNA sequencing, MTT and flow cytometry methods.RESULTS: PCR-silver staining and PCR-ELISA methods had the same specificity and sensitivity as the TRAP method.Telomerase activity was detected in the extract of the 10th,20th and 30th passages of P3 cells,while it was absent in fibroblasts. Furthermore, after the 30th generation, the proliferation period of fibroblast cells was significantly prolonged. Telomerase activity and hTERTmRNA were detected in two pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, but were found to be negative in human fibroblast cells. Telomerase activity and hTERTmRNA were tested in pancreatic carcinoma specimens of 24 cases. The telomerase activity was positive in 21 of the 24 cases (87.5 %), and the hTERTmRNA in 20 cases (83.3 %). In adjacent normal tissues positive rates were both 12.5 %. There was a significant difference between the two groups. This indicated a significant correlation between the expression level of telomerase activity and histologic differentiation,metastasis and advanced clinical stage of pancreatic carcinoma. Our findings showed that the expressions of hTR and TP1mRNA were not correlated with the activity of telomerase but the expression of hTERTmRNA was. After treatment with PS-ODNs, telomerase activity in P3 cells weakened and the inhibiting effect became stronger with an increase in PS-ODNs concentration. There was a significant difference between different PS-ODN groups (P<0.05). Inhibition of telomerase activity occurred most significant with PS-ODN1.The results of the FCM test of pancreatic cancer P3 cells showed an increase in the apoptotic rate with increasing PS-ODN1 and PS-ODN2concentrations

  8. NBL1 and anillin (ANLN genes over-expression in pancreatic carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Lange

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the gene expression profile of pancreatic cancer to derive novel molecular markers of this malignancy. The snap-frozen or RNA-later preserved samples of 18 pancreatic adenocarcinomas, 5 chronic pancreatitis cases and 6 specimens of grossly normal pancreas were used for microarray analysis by HG-U133 Plus 2.0 oligonucleotide Affymetrix arrays. Validation was carried out by real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR in the set of 66 samples: 31 of pancreatic cancer, 14 of chronic pancreatitis and 21 of macroscopically unchanged pancreas. By Principal Component Analysis of the microarray data we found a very consistent expression pattern of normal samples and a less homogenous one in chronic pancreatitis. By supervised comparison (corrected p-value 0.001 we observed 11094 probesets differentiating between cancer and normal samples, while only seventy six probesets were significant for difference between cancer and chronic pancreatitis. The only gene occurring within the best 10 genes in both comparisons was S100 calcium binding protein P (S100P, already indicated for its utility as pancreatic cancer marker by earlier microarray-based studies. For validation we selected two genes which appeared as valuable candidates for molecular markers of pancreatic cancer: neuroblastoma, suppression of tumorigenicity 1 (NBL1 and anillin (ANLN. By Q-PCR, we confirmed statistically significant differences in these genes with a 9.5 fold-change difference between NBL1 expression in cancer/normal comparison and a relatively modest difference between cancer and pancreatitis. For ANLN even more distinct differences were observed (cancer/normal 19.8-fold, cancer/pancreatitis 4.0-fold. NBL1 and anillin are promising markers for pancreatic carcinoma molecular diagnostics.

  9. Pancreatic stellate cells as a morphological basis for the development of pancreatic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirenko O.Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Last decade in Ukraine and many countries there is a clear tendency to increase the number of cases of pancreatic diseases. For more than century study of the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis it has been proposed many hypotheses. Some of them were eventually dismissed, partially confirmed by other clinical and experimental research. Significant progress in understanding the process of fibrosis in the pancreas is associated with the identification, isolation and description of pancreatic stellate cells. They present in periacinar space and have long cytoplasmic processes covered the basis of acinus. This cells can be changed from stable fat-storing to miofibroblastic phenotype. Pancreatic stellate cells perform a wide range of functions, they have the ability to contraction, proliferation, they can synthesize extracellular matrix components and influence on the surrounding cellular environment. These cells can be regarded as a morphological basis for the development of pancreatic fibrosis. Currently, for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis, the main therapy is directed on depression of secretory activity of pancreas and inactivation biogenic amines in blood. Treatment of chronic pancreatitis should aim to influence the key mechanisms of pancreatic stellate cells activation and proliferation. Understanding the biology of this cells can open potential therapeutic targets for treatment and prevention of chronic pancreatitis and other diseases accompanied by pancreatic fibrosis.

  10. Generation of pancreatic islet cells from human embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Efficiently obtaining functional pancreatic islet cells derived from human embryonic stem(hES) cells not only provides great potential to solve the shortage of islets sources for type I diabetes cell therapy,but also benefits the study of the development of the human pancreas and diabetes pathology.In 2001,hES cells were reported to have the capacity to generate insulin-producing cells by spontaneous differentiation in vitro.Since then,many strategies(such as overexpression of key transcription factors,delivery of key proteins for pancreatic development,co-transplantation of differentiated hES cells along with fetal pancreas,stepwise differentiation by mimicking in vivo pancreatic development) have been employed in order to induce the differentiation of pancreatic islet cells from hES cells.Moreover,patient-specific induced pluripotent stem(iPS) cells can be generated by reprogramming somatic cells.iPS cells have characteristics similar to those of ES cells and offer a new cell source for type I diabetes cell therapy that reduces the risk of immunologic rejection.In this review,we summarize the recent progress made in the differentiation of hES and iPS cells into functional pancreatic islet cells and discuss the challenges for their future study.

  11. Membrane proteomic analysis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaojun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors due to its high potential of local invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study was to characterize the membrane proteomes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells of primary and metastatic origins, and to identify potential target proteins related to metastasis of pancreatic cancer. Methods Membrane/membrane-associated proteins were isolated from AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells and identified with a proteomic approach based on SDS-PAGE, in-gel tryptic digestion and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. X! Tandem was used for database searching against the SwissProt human protein database. Results We identified 221 & 208 proteins from AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, respectively, most of which are membrane or membrane-associated proteins. A hundred and nine proteins were found in both cell lines while the others were present in either AsPC-1 or BxPC-3 cells. Differentially expressed proteins between two cell lines include modulators of cell adhesion, cell motility or tumor invasion as well as metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, or nucleotide/lipid metabolism. Conclusion Membrane proteomes of AsPC-1 (metastatic and BxPC-3 (primary cells are remarkably different. The differentially expressed membrane proteins may serve as potential targets for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.

  12. Obstructive jaundice in small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar Pour, Ali; Masir, Noraidah; Isa, Mohd Rose

    2015-08-01

    Small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) commonly metastasizes to distant organs. However, metastasis to the pancreas is not a common event. Moreover, obstructive jaundice as a first clinical presentation of SCLC is extremely unusual. This case reports a 51-year-old male with SCLC, manifesting with obstructive jaundice as the initial clinical presentation. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatograghy (ERCP) and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed a mass at the head of the pancreas. The patient underwent pancreatoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure). Histopathology revealed a chromogranin- A-positive poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. No imaging study of the lung was performed before surgery. A few months later, a follow-up CT revealed unilateral lung nodules with ipsilateral hilar nodes. A lung biopsy was done and histopathology reported a TTF- 1-positive, chromogranin A-positive, small cell carcinoma of the lung. On review, the pancreatic tumour was also TTF-1-positive. He was then treated with combination chemotherapy (cisplatin, etoposide). These findings highlight that presentation of a mass at the head of pancreas could be a manifestation of a metastatic tumour from elsewhere such as the lung, and thorough investigations should be performed before metastases can be ruled out. PMID:26277673

  13. Effect of chymotrypsin C and related proteins on pancreatic cancer cell migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haibo Wang; Wei Sha; Zhixue Liu; Cheng-Wu Chi

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a malignant cancer with a bigh mortality rate. The amount of chymotrypsin C in pancreatic cancer cells is only 20% of that found in normal cells.Chymotrypsin C has been reported to be involved in cancer cell apoptosis, but its effect on pancreatic cancer cell migration is unclear. We performed cell migration scratch assays and Transwell experiments, and found that cell migration ability was downregulated in pancreatic cancer Aspc-1 cells that overexpressed chymotrypsin C, whereas the cell migration ability was upregulated in Aspc-1 cells in which chymotrypsin C was suppressed. Two-dimensional fluorescence differential in gel electrophoresis/mass spectrometry method was used to identify the proteins that were differentially expressed in Aspc-1 cells that were transfected with plasmids to induce either overexpression or suppressed expression of chymotrypsin C. Among 26 identified differential proteins, cytokeratin 18 was most obviously correlated with chymotrypsin C expression. Cytokeratin 18 is expressed in developmental tissues in early stages of cancer,and is highly expressed in most carcinomas. We speculated that chymotrypsin C might regulate pancreatic cancer cell migration in relation to cytokeratin 18 expression.

  14. Assessment of vascular invasion in pancreatic carcinoma by MDCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Hassanen

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Assessment of vascular invasion is crucial in the evaluation of resectability for pancreatic cancer. MDCT is an accurate diagnostic tool for peripancreatic vascular invasion in cancer pancreas.

  15. Diagnostic value of tissue polypeptide specific antigen in serum for patients with pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS) in serum, with the carbohydrate antigens (CA) 19-9, CA50, CA125 and CA242 in pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: Serum TPS was measured with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CA19-9 and CA125 were measured with chemiluminescent immunoassay. CAS0 and CA242 were measured with immunoradiometric assay in 33 patients with pancreatitis, 34 patients with pathologically proven pancreatic carcinoma, and 35 patients with non-pancreatic malignancies. Statistic analysis was carried out with SPSS 9.0 software. Results: Patients with pancreatic carcinoma had relatively higher levels of TPS [(386.5 ± 315. 1) U/L] and CA19-9 [(10 820.9 ± 389.7) kU/L] when compared with patients with pancreatitis [(86. 2 ± 28.1) U/L and (61.5 ± 24.7) kU/L, respectively; F = 936. 42, P < 0. 001 ; F = 2217. 09, P < 0. 001], with a sensitivity and a specificity of 70.6% (48/68) and 57.4% (39/68), respectively, for TPS, and 82.4% (28/34) and 77.9% (53/68), respectively, for CA19-9. Diagnostic performance was further improved when TPS was assayed in combination with CA19-9, CA50, CA125 and CA242. Conclusion: Serum TPS has an incremental value in complementing CA19-9 in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. (authors)

  16. Pylorus-Preserving Versus Pylorus-Resecting Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Periampullary and Pancreatic Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chong; Wu, He-Shui; Chen, Xing-Lin; Wang, Chun-You; Gou, Shan-Miao; Xiao, Jun; He, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Qi-Jun; Li, Yong-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the long-term survival, mortality, morbidity and the operation-related events in patients with periampullary and pancreatic carcinoma undergoing pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) and pylorus-resecting pancreaticoduodenectomy (PRPD). Method A systematic search of literature databases (Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science) was performed to identify studies. Outcome measures comparing PPPD versus PRPD for periampullary and pancreatic carcinoma were long-term survival, mortality, morbidity (overall morbidity, delayed gastric emptying [DGE], pancreatic fistula, wound infection, postoperative bleeding, biliary leakage, ascites and gastroenterostomy leakage) and operation related events (hospital stays, operating time, intraoperative blood loss and red blood cell transfusions). Results Eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including 622 patients were identified and included in the analysis. Among these patients, it revealed no difference in long-term survival between the PPPD and PRPD groups (HR = 0.23, p = 0.11). There was a lower rate of DGE (RR = 2.35, p = 0.04, 95% CI, 1.06–5.21) with PRPD. Mortality, overall morbidity, pancreatic fistula, wound infection, postoperative bleeding, biliary leakage, ascites and gastroenterostomy leakage were not significantly different between the groups. PPPDs were performed more quickly than PRPDs (WMD = 53.25 minutes, p = 0.01, 95% CI, 12.53–93.97); and there was less estimated intraoperative blood loss (WMD = 365.21 ml, p = 0.006, 95% CI, 102.71–627.71) and fewer red blood cell transfusions (WMD = 0.29 U, p = 0.003, 95% CI, 0.10–0.48) in patients undergoing PPPD. The hospital stays showed no significant difference. Conclusions PPPD had advantages over PRPD in operating time, intraoperative blood loss and red blood cell transfusions, but had a significantly higher rate of DGE for periampullary and

  17. Pylorus-preserving versus pylorus-resecting pancreaticoduodenectomy for periampullary and pancreatic carcinoma: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the long-term survival, mortality, morbidity and the operation-related events in patients with periampullary and pancreatic carcinoma undergoing pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD and pylorus-resecting pancreaticoduodenectomy (PRPD. METHOD: A systematic search of literature databases (Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science was performed to identify studies. Outcome measures comparing PPPD versus PRPD for periampullary and pancreatic carcinoma were long-term survival, mortality, morbidity (overall morbidity, delayed gastric emptying [DGE], pancreatic fistula, wound infection, postoperative bleeding, biliary leakage, ascites and gastroenterostomy leakage and operation related events (hospital stays, operating time, intraoperative blood loss and red blood cell transfusions. RESULTS: Eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs including 622 patients were identified and included in the analysis. Among these patients, it revealed no difference in long-term survival between the PPPD and PRPD groups (HR = 0.23, p = 0.11. There was a lower rate of DGE (RR = 2.35, p = 0.04, 95% CI, 1.06-5.21 with PRPD. Mortality, overall morbidity, pancreatic fistula, wound infection, postoperative bleeding, biliary leakage, ascites and gastroenterostomy leakage were not significantly different between the groups. PPPDs were performed more quickly than PRPDs (WMD = 53.25 minutes, p = 0.01, 95% CI, 12.53-93.97; and there was less estimated intraoperative blood loss (WMD = 365.21 ml, p = 0.006, 95% CI, 102.71-627.71 and fewer red blood cell transfusions (WMD = 0.29 U, p = 0.003, 95% CI, 0.10-0.48 in patients undergoing PPPD. The hospital stays showed no significant difference. CONCLUSIONS: PPPD had advantages over PRPD in operating time, intraoperative blood loss and red blood cell transfusions, but had a significantly higher rate of DGE for periampullary

  18. Inhibition of Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia Progression to Carcinoma by Nitric Oxide-Releasing Aspirin in p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthalapally V. Rao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide-releasing aspirin (NO-aspirin represents a novel class of promising chemopreventive agents. Unlike conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NO-aspirin seems to be free of adverse effects while retaining the beneficial activities of its parent compound. The effect of NO-aspirin on pancreatic carcinogenesis was investigated by assessing the development of precursor pancreatic lesions and adenocarcinomas in KrasG12D/+ transgenic mice that recapitulate human pancreatic cancer progression. Six-week-old male p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ transgenic mice (20 per group were fed diets containing 0, 1000, or 2000 ppm NO-aspirin. The development of pancreatic tumors was monitored by positron emission tomography imaging. All mice were killed at the age of 41 weeks and assessed for pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC and for molecular changes in the tumors. Our results reveal that NO-aspirin at 1000 and 2000 ppm significantly suppressed pancreatic tumor weights, PDAC incidence, and carcinoma in situ (PanIN-3 lesions. The degree of inhibition of PanIN-3 and carcinoma was more pronounced with NO-aspirin at 1000 ppm (58.8% and 48%, respectively than with 2000 ppm (47% and 20%, respectively. NO-aspirin at 1000 ppm significantly inhibited the spread of carcinoma in the pancreas (∼97%; P < .0001. Decreased expression of cyclooxygenase (COX; with ∼42% inhibition of total COX activity, inducible nitric oxide synthase, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, Bcl-2, cyclin D1, and β-catenin was observed, with induction of p21, p38, and p53 in the pancreas of NO-aspirin-treated mice. These results suggest that low-dose NO-aspirin possesses inhibitory activity against pancreatic carcinogenesis by modulating multiple molecular targets.

  19. Chromic-P32 phosphate treatment of implanted pancreatic carcinoma: Mechanism involved

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Liu; Guo-Sheng Feng; Hong Gao; Guan-Sheng Tong; Yu Wang; Wen Gao; Ying Huang; Cheng Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of chromic-P32 phosphate (32p colloids) interstitial administration in Pc-3 implanted pancreatic carcinoma, and investigate its anticancer mechanism.METHODS: Ninety-eight tumor bearing nude mice werekilled at different time points after the injection of 32Pcolloids to the tumor core with observed radioactivity. The light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immuno-histochemistry and flow cytometry were used to study the rates of tumor cell necrosis, proliferating cell nuclear antigen index, the micro vessel density (MVD). The changes of the biological response to the lymphatic transported 32p colloids in the inguinal lymph node (ILN) were dynamically observed, and the percentage of tumor cell apoptosis, and Apo2.7, caspase-3, Bcl-2, Baxrelated gene expression were observed too.RESULTS: The half-life of effective medication is 13 dafter injection of 32P colloids to the tumor stroma, in 1-6groups, the tumor cell necrosis rates were 20%, 45%,65%, 70%, 95% and 4%, respectively (F= 4.14-105.36, P<0.01). MVD were 38.5±4.0, 28.0±2.9, 17.0±2.9, 8.8±1.5,5.7±2.3 and 65.0±5.2 (t= 11.9-26.1, P<0.01), respectively.Under TEM fairly differentiated Pc-3 cells were found. Thirty days after medication, tumors were shrunk and dried with scabs detached, and those in control group increased in size prominently with plenty of hypodermic blood vessels. In all animals the ILN were enlarged but in medicated animals they appeared later and smaller than those in control group. The extent of irradiative injury in ILN was positively correlated to the dosage of medication. Typical tumor cell apoptosis could be found under TEM inanimals with intra-tumoral injection of low dosed 32P colloids. The peak of apoptosis occurred in 2.96 MBq group and 24 h after irradiation. In the course of irradiationinduced apoptosis, the value of Bcl-2/Bax was down regulated; Apo2.7 and caspase-3 protein expression were prominently increased dose dependently

  20. Beyond pancreatic carcinoma: The close relationship between survivin levels and prognosis in systemic malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    I read with great interest the recent article by Liu and Wang in a recent issue of your esteemed journal. The article is highly thought provoking. Interestingly, the past few years have seen a number of studies that have established a close relationship between survivin expression and tumor prognosis in systemic malignancies besides pancreatic carcinomas. For instance, a poor prognosis is seen in patients with bladder carcinomas which exhibit survivin over expression. A higher recurrence rate...

  1. Genes and Proteins Differentially Expressed during In Vitro Malignant Transformation of Bovine Pancreatic Duct Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jesnowski

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic carcinoma has an extremely bad prognosis due to lack of early diagnostic markers and lack of effective therapeutic strategies. Recently, we have established an in vitro model recapitulating the first steps in the carcinogenesis of the pancreas. SV40 large T antigen-immortalized bovine pancreatic duct cells formed intrapancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors on k-rasmut transfection after orthotopic injection in the nude mouse pancreas. Here we identified genes and proteins differentially expressed in the course of malignant transformation using reciprocal suppression subtractive hybridization and 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, respectively. We identified 34 differentially expressed genes, expressed sequence tags, and 15 unique proteins. Differential expression was verified for some of the genes or proteins in samples from pancreatic carcinoma. Among these genes and proteins, the majority had already been described either to be influenced by a mutated ras or to be differentially expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, thus proving the feasibility of our model. Other genes and proteins (e.g., BBC1, GLTSCR2, and rhoGDlα, up to now, have not been implicated in pancreatic tumor development. Thus, we were able to establish an in vitro model of pancreatic carcinogenesis, which enabled us to identify genes and proteins differentially expressed during the early steps of malignant transformation.

  2. Experimental study of 32P-CP-PLLA microparticle on human pancreatic carcinoma in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the therapeutic and toxic effects of 32P-chromic phosphate-poly (L-lactic) acid (32P-CP-PLLA) microparticle intratumoral administration into BALB/c nude mice bearing BxPc-3 human pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: Twenty four nude mice bearing tumors were injected with 0, 9.3, 18.5 and 37.0 M Bq 32P-CP-PLLA microparticle, respectively. The relative tumor growth rates were observed every day, and white blood cells, platelets and body weight were measured. At 14 d after administration, the tumors were removed, histological examination and immunohistochemical analysis were performed. Results: The relative tumor growth rates of each treatment group was lower than 40%. Histological examination showed the degenerative necrosis at the site nearby the microparticle. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the Microvessel density (MVD) and the expression of Bcl-2 in treated group were lower than those in control group.In contrast, the expression of bax in treated group were higher than those in control group. The ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein significantly decreased in the treatment group,which were 3.83 ± 0.43, 0.47 ± 0.13, 1.10 ± 0.32, 2.19 ± 0.57 for 0, 9.3, 18.5 and 37.0 MBq 32P-CP-PLLA microparticle, respectively (t=2.36-2.77, P<0.05). MVD were 31.2 ± 2.3, 23.8 ± 1.5, 14.8 ±0.8, 11.0 ± 1.2, respectively. Dose dependence was observed in both HE and IHC staining after 14 d treatment (t=2.30-2.57, P<0.05). Conclusions: Intratumoral injection of 32P-CP-PLLA microparticle might be a safe, easy and effective radionuclide interventional therapy for pancreatic carcinoma. (authors)

  3. Novel Hedgehog pathway targets against Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jean Y.; So, Po-Lin; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2006-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a key role in directing growth and patterning during embryonic development and is required in vertebrates for the normal development of many structures, including the neural tube, axial skeleton, skin, and hair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in adult tissue is associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), medulloblastoma, and a subset of pancreatic, gastro-intestinal, and other cancers. This review will provide an overvi...

  4. Pancreatic stellate cells promote proliferation and invasiveness of human pancreatic cancer cells via galectin-3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Biao Jiang; Ming Xu; Xing-Peng Wang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and galectin-3 (GAL-3) in the proliferation and infiltration of pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990.METHODS: Human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 and PSCs were cultured in vitro. Supernatant fluid of cultured PSCs and SW1990 cells was collected. Expression of GAL-3 in SW1990 cells and PSCs was detected by ELISA, RT-PCR and Western blotting. Proliferation of cultured PSCs and SW1990 cells was measured by 3-(4, 5-methylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry. Infiltration of SW1990 cells was detected by a cell infiltration kit.RESULTS: SW1990 cells expressed GAL-3 and this was up-regulated by the supernatant fluid of cultured PSCs. PSCs did not express GAL-3. SW1990 cells stimulated proliferation of PSCs via GAL-3. GAL-3 antibody inhibited SW1990 cell proliferation, while the supernatant fluid of PSCs stimulated proliferation of SW1990 cells through interaction with GAL-3 protein. The supernatant fluid of PSCs enhanced the invasiveness of SW1990 cells through interaction with GAL-3.CONCLUSION: GAL-3 and PSCs were involved in the proliferation and infiltration process of pancreatic cancer cells.

  5. Orthotopic Injection of Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Nicole M; Rhim, Andrew D; Stanger, Ben Z

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive disease with a 5-yr survival rate of only 5%. The location of the pancreas in the abdomen, where it is obscured by other organs, makes it a difficult tissue to study and manipulate. This protocol describes in detail how to orthotopically inject cancer cells into the pancreas in mice. This technique is particularly useful when the cells must be manipulated in ways that cannot be modeled genetically. PMID:26729902

  6. Renal cell carcinoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present five cases of renal cell carcinoma in children, describing its aspects on excretory urography, ultra-sonography and computerized tomography. The clinical, pathological and radiological features are compared with those of the literature. (author)

  7. Pancreatic hormone secretion in chronic pancreatitis without residual beta-cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B;

    1988-01-01

    Hormonal responses (glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide and somatostatin) to iv glucagon, iv arginine, and ingestion of a mixed meal were investigated in 6 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis without beta-cell function, in 8 Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetics...... without beta-cell function, and 8 healthy subjects. No significant differences were found between the two diabetic groups regarding glucagon responses to arginine and meal ingestion. In the patients with diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis compared with Type I diabetics and normal controls...... no residual beta-cell function. These findings suggest that pancreatic glucagon deficiency is not absolute in insulin-dependent diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis. A high level of somatostatin may contribute to a lower blood glucose level in patients with chronic pancreatitis....

  8. Defect in assimilation following combined radiation and chemotherapy in patients with locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative contributions of high-dose irradiation and/or chemotherapy to the nutritional problems of patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma were evaluated by study of pancreatic exocrine function and jejunal function and morphologic findings in ten patients before and after treatment. Nutrient assimilation studies included determination of serum carotene levels, D-xylose absorption and fat absorption. Crosby capsule biopsy specimen of jejunal mucosa were evaluated with light microscopy. Fat assimilation was the only parameter of nutritional function to significantly worsen after therapy. Low serum carotene levels present in the patients before therapy remained low but did not significantly change after treatment. D-xylose absorption and the morphologic structure of the jejunal mucosa were normal before and after treatment. These findings support the previous observations that the nutritional problems of the patient with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma are due to pancreatic insufficiency and that high dose irradiation and chemotherapy can exacerbate the pancreatic insufficiency but do not produce jejunal dysfunction. Therefore, it is suggested that pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy may improve the nutritional status of these patients

  9. Identification and Validation of Src and Phospho-Src Family Proteins in Circulating Mononuclear Cells as Novel Biomarkers for Pancreatic Cancer1

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoi, Kenji; Hawke, David; Oborn, Carol J.; Jang, Jin-Young; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Fan, Dominic; Kim, Seung Wook; Kim, Sun-Jin; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2011-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop novel markers of pancreatic cancer to facilitate early diagnosis. Pancreatic carcinoma is characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) that originate from circulating mononuclear cells (MNCs). We hypothesized that differential analysis of protein expression and phosphorylation in circulating MNCs from healthy nude mice and nude mice bearing orthotopic human pancreatic cancer would identify a ...

  10. New perspectives for radiosensitization in pancreatic carcinoma: A review of mechanisms involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis; Mecanismes de carcinogenese des cancers du pancreas: quelles pistes pour la radiosensibilisation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, F. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital Tenon, Assistance publique-Hopitaux de Paris, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Universite Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Centre de recherche, institut Curie, campus universitaire, 91898 Orsay cedex (France); Inserm U612, campus universitaire, 91898 Orsay cedex (France); Fernet, M.; Favaudon, V. [Centre de recherche, institut Curie, campus universitaire, 91898 Orsay cedex (France); Inserm U612, campus universitaire, 91898 Orsay cedex (France); Monnier, L.; Touboul, E. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital Tenon, Assistance publique-Hopitaux de Paris, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Universite Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-08-15

    Pancreatic carcinoma is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The 5-year overall survival is less than 5 %. This very poor prognosis can be explained both by late diagnosis and by treatment resistance, including resistance to radiation therapy. A better understanding of the pancreatic tumorigenesis and knowledge of the most frequent mutations in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (KRAS, p16, TP53, Smad4) open new perspectives for the development of more effective treatments. This review presents the major genetic and molecular alterations in pancreatic cancer that could be targeted to improve radiosensitization. (authors)

  11. Contextual regulation of pancreatic cancer stem cell phenotype and radioresistance by pancreatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is promoted by desmoplasia induced by pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). Contributory to this progression is epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), which shares many characteristics with the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis. We investigated the role of these processes on the radioresponse and tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells. Materials and methods: We used an in vitro sphere model and in vivo xenograft model to examine the role of PSC in EMT and CSC processes. Results: We demonstrated that PSC enhanced the CSC phenotype and radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, the expression of several EMT and CSC markers supported enhanced processes in our models and that translated into remarkable in vivo tumorigenicity. Multi-dose TGFβ neutralizing antibody inhibited the EMT and CSC processes, sensitized cells to radiation and reduced in vivo tumorigenicity. A proteomic screen identified multiple novel factors that were regulated by PSC in pancreatic cells. Conclusion: These results are critical in highlighting the role of PSC in tumor progression and radioresistance by manipulating the EMT and CSC processes. TGFβ and the novel factors identified are important targets for better therapeutic outcome in response to PSC mediated mechanisms

  12. Pulmonary Metastasis of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Sang-Hee; Shim, Woo-Haing; SHIN, DONG-HOON; Kim, Yun-Seong; Sung, Hyun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Although basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, it rarely metastasizes. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma may, therefore, initially elude diagnosis and management. We describe the case of a patient with a metastatic basal cell carcinoma present in the lungs. The differential diagnosis of suspected metastatic lesions should include metastases from a cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, in addition to those from more commonly metastasizing carcinomas, especially in patients with a histor...

  13. Pancreatic Metastasis from Colon Carcinoma Treated with Radiotherapy with Palliative Benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, We read with great interest an interesting report of a pancreatic metastasis from colon carcinoma nine years after a hemicolectomy managed by distal pancreatectomy and review of the literature regarding the role and outcome of pancreatic resection for colorectal metastasis by Norman Oneil Machado et al. published in the 2010 July issue of JOP. J Pancreas (Online [1]. We agree with the authors that pancreatic metastasis from colorectal malignancy is rare and accounts for less than 2% of all pancreatic metastases [2]. We would like to add another case of colonic metastasis to the pancreas seen at our institution and discuss radiation therapy as another modality to treat such patients

  14. Generation of pancreatic islet cells from human embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG DongHui; JIANG Wei; SHI Yan; DENG HongKui

    2009-01-01

    Efficiently obtaining functional pancreaUc islet cells derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells not only provides great potential to solve the shortage of islets sources for type I diabetes cell therapy,but also benefits the study of the development of the human pancreas and diabetes pathology. In 2001,hES cells were reported to have the capacity to generate insulin-producing cells by spontaneous differentiation in vitro. Since then, many strategies (such as overexpression of key transcription factors,delivery of key proteins for pancreatic development, co-transplantation of differentiated hES cells along with fetal pancreas, stepwise differentiation by mimicking in vivo pancreatic development) have been employed in order to induce the differentiation of pancreatic islet cells from hES cells. Moreover, patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be generated by reprogramming somatic cells.iPS cells have characteristics similar to those of ES cells and offer a new cell source for type I diabetes cell therapy that reduces the risk of immunologic rejection. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made in the differentiation of hES and iPS cells into functional pancreatic islet cells and discuss the challenges for their future study.

  15. Using Multidetector Row Computed Tomography to Diagnose and Stage Pancreatic Carcinoma: the Problems and the Possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotondo A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of computed tomography (CT in the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms and accurate tumor staging has significantly been improved by the use of thin-section multi-detector row CT techniques. Greater table speed, improved tube cooling, high resolution imaging and the possibility of isotropic voxels have led to optimal multiplanar reconstruction in any arbitrary plane and particularly along the pancreatic duct and peripancreatic vessels, significantly improving the detection of small pancreatic tumors and surgical resectability where imaging modalities have so far yielded disappointing results. Nonetheless, while multi-detector row CT has greatly enhanced the imaging capabilities of CT, early diagnosis is practically impossible to achieve, since the tumor remains asymptomatic until the surrounding structures are involved. Furthermore, even when treated with radical surgery, the incidence of recurrence is high and the prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma still remains extremely poor and has not changed over the past years. In this article, the recent technical developments of multi-detector row CT in diagnosing pancreatic neoplasms and staging are considered, with special emphasis on multi-detector row CT angiography techniques and curved planar reformations. Some remaining challenging problems such as the pre-operative identification and characterization of small hepatic lesions and detection of omental and peritoneal metastasis, the diagnosis of small isoattenuating pancreatic adenocarcinomas and promising strategies to differentiate between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and chronic inflammatory changes are also presented.

  16. Effect of Taurine on Acinar Cell Apoptosis and Pancreatic Fibrosis in Dibutyltin Dichloride-induced Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawa,Kiminari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between pancreatic fibrosis and apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells has not been fully elucidated. We reported that taurine had an anti-fibrotic effect in a dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC-chronic pancreatitis model. However, the effect of taurine on apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells is still unclear. Therefore, we examined apoptosis in DBTC-chronic pancreatitis and in the AR42J pancreatic acinar cell line with/without taurine. Pancreatic fibrosis was induced by a single administration of DBTC. Rats were fed a taurine-containing diet or a normal diet and were sacrificed at day 5. The AR42J pancreatic acinar cell line was incubated with/without DBTC with taurine chloramines. Apoptosis was determined by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. The expression of Bad and Bcl-2 proteins in the AR42J cells lysates was detected by Western blot analysis. The apoptotic index of pancreatic acinar cells in DBTC-administered rats was significantly increased. Taurine treatment inhibited pancreatic fibrosis and apoptosis of acinar cells induced by DBTC. The number of TUNEL-positive cells in the AR42J pancreatic acinar cell lines was significantly increased by the addition of DBTC. Incubation with taurine chloramines ameliorated these changes. In conclusion, taurine inhibits apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells and pancreatitis in experimental chronic pancreatitis.

  17. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound, computer tomography and ERPC in chronic pancreatitis and carcinoma of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmelin, E.; Weiss, H.D.; Fuchs, H.D.; Reiser, M.

    1981-02-01

    A comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound, computer tomography and ERPC in chronic or recurrent pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma has shown that ERPC is the most precise of the three methods. This was particularly important in the demonstration of the small, still operable, carcinomas of the pancreas. Sonography is most useful for serial observations of pancreatic pseudocyste due to chronic recurrent pancreatitis. In this situation, ERPC should only be used if sonography and computer tomography cannot localise the lesion. Where the computer tomogram has shown evidence of enlargement of the pancreas, sonography may show an area devoid of echoes within the enlarged organ, suggesting the presence of a carcinoma. Computer tomography is superior to ultrasonography in delineating the extent of extensive pancreatic disease and in showing the anatomical structures surrounding the pancreas.

  18. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  19. Green Tea Epigallocatechin Gallate Exhibits Anticancer Effect in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells via the Inhibition of Both Focal Adhesion Kinase and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang Anh Vu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The exact molecular mechanism by which epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG suppresses human pancreatic cancer cell proliferation is unclear. We show here that EGCG-treated pancreatic cancer cells AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 decrease cell adhesion ability on micro-pattern dots, accompanied by dephosphorylations of both focal adhesion kinase (FAK and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R whereas retained the activations of mitogen-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin. The growth of AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells can be significantly suppressed by EGCG treatment alone in a dose-dependent manner. At a dose of 100 μM which completely abolishes activations of FAK and IGF-1R, EGCG suppresses more than 50% of cell proliferation without evidence of apoptosis analyzed by PARP cleavage. Finally, the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 enhances growth-suppressive effect of EGCG. Our data suggests that blocking FAK and IGF-1R by EGCG could prove valuable for targeted therapy, which can be used in combination with other therapies, for pancreatic cancer.

  20. Pancreatic Stem Cells Remain Unresolved

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is caused by absolute (type 1) or relative (type 2) deficiency of insulin-secreting islet β cells. An ideal treatment of diabetes would, therefore, be to replace the lost or deficient β cells, by transplantation of donated islets or differentiated endocrine cells or by regeneration of endogenous islet cells. Due to their ability of unlimited proliferation and differentiation into all functional lineages in our body, including β cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripo...

  1. Blockade of sonic hedgehog signal pathway enhances antiproliferative effect of EGFR inhibitor in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-guo HU; Tao LIU; Jiong-xin XIONG; Chun-you WANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the expression of sonic hedgehog (SHH) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal molecules in pancreatic cancer cells, and to assess the inhibitory effects through the blockade of the SHH and EGFR signaling path- ways by cyclopamine and Iressa, respectively. Methods: The expression of SHH and EGFR in pancreatic cancer cell lines (PANC-1, SUIT-2, and ASPC-1) was de-tected by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. After treatment with different con-centrations of cyclopamine, alone or in combination with Iressa, the antiproliferative effect on pancreatic cancer cells was analyzed by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assays. A flow cytometry analysis was used to detect the cellular cycle distribu-tion and apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. Results: All of the 3 pancreatic cancer cell lines expressed SHH, Smoothened (SMO), and EGFR. Cyclopamine could downregulate the expression of EGFR in all cell lines. Cyclopamine or Iressa could induce a growth inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover,the combined use of 2.5 μmol/L cyclopamine and 1 μmol/L Iressa induced an enhanced inhibitory effect and a greater apoptosis rate than any agent alone. The percentage of the cell population of the G0/G1 and sub-G1 phases was significantly increased along with the increasing dose of cyclopamine and/or Iressa. Conclusion: The blockade of the sonic hedgehog signal pathway enhances the antiproliferative effect of the EGFR inhibitor through the downregulation of its expression in pancreatic cancer cells. The simultaneous blockade of SHH and EGFR signaling represents possible targets of new treatment strategies for pan-creatic carcinoma.

  2. Simultaneous Development of Renal Cell Carcinoma and Multifocal Urothelial Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Keng Chuang; Heng-Chang Chuang; Kwai-Fong Ng

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of multifocal urothelial carcinoma (UC) and ipsilateral renalcell carcinoma (RCC) is rare. We report a 67-year-old woman with multifocal, infiltratingurothelial carcinoma and unilateral renal cell carcinoma. She was referred to our departmentbecause of painless gross hematuria. Cystoscopy, computed tomography and retrogradepyelography studies revealed bladder, bilateral renal and ureter UC. She was treated withtransurethral resection of the bladder tumor followed by bi...

  3. Simultaneous Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bighan Khademi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The association of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx with thyroid papillary carcinoma is an unusual finding. From 2004 to 2011, approximately 250 patients underwent laryngectomies due to squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx at the Otolaryngology Department of Khalili Hospital, affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. In three patients, synchronous occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma and thyroid papillary carcinoma was found. Histopathologic study of the lymph nodes revealed metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma in one case. We report three cases of thyroid papillary carcinoma incidentally found on histological examinations of resected thyroid lobes, as a procedure required for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In comparison, laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma needs more aggressive treatment than well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The prevalence of thyroid papillary carcinoma, as an incidental finding in our study was 0.01%. Therefore, preoperative evaluation of the thyroid gland by ultrasonography and fine needle aspiration biopsy of suspicious lesions is recommended in patients who are candidates for open laryngectomy.

  4. Percutaneous ethanol ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: Periprocedural onset alcohol toxicity and pancreatitis following conventional percutaneous ethanol ablation treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, Kirsteen Rennie; O’Dwyer, Helena; Scudamore, Charles

    2009-01-01

    A novel case of acute pancreatitis in a patient treated with percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma is described. The most commonly reported adverse effects of PEI are hepatic or peritoneal hemorrhage, hepatic insufficiency or infarction. There are no previous reports of fatal acute pancreatitis as a result of conventional PEI.

  5. Pancreatic endoproteases and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor immunoreactivity in human Paneth cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Bohe, M; Borgström, A; Lindström, C; Ohlsson, K.

    1986-01-01

    Normal and metaplastic gastrointestinal mucosa obtained at surgical resection were studied by light microscopy, using the unlabelled antibody enzyme method for immunohistochemical staining of lysozyme, pancreatic endoproteases, and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI). Paneth cells in the mucosa of normal small intestine, gastric mucosa with intestinal metaplasia, and colonic metaplastic mucosa were found to contain anionic trypsin, cationic trypsin, lysozyme, and PSTI immunoreactivi...

  6. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divvya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differentiation is practically very rare.

  7. BASAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH ECCRINE DIFFERENTIATION: A RARE ENTITY

    OpenAIRE

    Divvya; Rehana; Viswanathan; Krishnaswamy; Anvar Ali

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma preferentially occurs in the face where the surgical excision with adequate margin is curative. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma is also reported rarely in other sites especially associated with basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The histological variants are Nodular basal cell carcinoma, Keratotic basal cell carcinoma, Adenoid basal cell carcinoma, Basal cell carcinoma with sebaceous differentiation. Of these variants, Basal cell carcinoma with eccrine differen...

  8. Castleman disease mimicked pancreatic carcinoma: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Hua

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Castleman disease (CD is an uncommon benign lymphoproliferative disorder, which usually presents as solitary or multiple masses in the mediastinum. Peripancreatic CD was rarely reported. Herein, we report two cases of unicentric peripancreatic CD from our center. A 43-year-old man and a 58-year-old woman were detected to have a pancreatic mass in the routine medical examinations. Both of them were asymptomatic. The computed tomography and ultrasonographic examination revealed a mild enhancing solitary mass at the pancreatic head/neck. No definite preoperative diagnosis was established and Whipple operations were originally planned. The intraoperative frozen section diagnosis of both patients revealed lymphoproliferation. Then the local excisions of mass were performed. Histological examination revealed features of CD of hyaline-vascular type. No recurrence was found during the follow-up period. CD should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Local excision is a suitable surgical choice.

  9. Erlotinib and Cetuximab With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Kidney, Colorectal, Head and Neck, Pancreatic, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-10

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  10. Alteration of pancreatic cancer cell functions by tumor-stromal cell interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Shin eHamada; Atsushi eMasamune; Tooru eShimosegawa

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a characteristic tissue structure called desmoplasia, which consists of dense fibrotic stroma surrounding cancer cells. Interactions between pancreatic cancer cells and stromal cells promote invasive growth of cancer cells and establish a specific microenvironment such as hypoxia which further aggravates the malignant behavior of cancer cells. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play pivotal role in the development of fibrosis within the pancreatic cancer tissue, and also...

  11. Alteration of pancreatic cancer cell functions by tumor-stromal cell interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a characteristic tissue structure called desmoplasia, which consists of dense fibrotic stroma surrounding cancer cells. Interactions between pancreatic cancer cells and stromal cells promote invasive growth of cancer cells and establish a specific microenvironment such as hypoxia which further aggravates the malignant behavior of cancer cells. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in the development of fibrosis within the pancreatic cancer tissue, and al...

  12. Pancreatic Resections for Advanced M1-Pancreatic Carcinoma: The Value of Synchronous Metastasectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Seelig

    2010-01-01

    Materials and Methods. From January 1, 2004 to December, 2007 a total of 20 patients with pancreatic malignancies were retrospectively evaluated who underwent pancreatic surgery with synchronous resection of hepatic, adjacent organ, or peritoneal metastases for proven UICC stage IV periampullary cancer of the pancreas. Perioperative as well as clinicopathological parameters were evaluated. Results. There were 20 patients (9 men, 11 women; mean age 58 years identified. The primary tumor was located in the pancreatic head (n=9, 45%, in pancreatic tail (n=9, 45%, and in the papilla Vateri (n=2, 10%. Metastases were located in the liver (n=14, 70%, peritoneum (n=5, 25%, and omentum majus (n=2, 10%. Lymphnode metastases were present in 16 patients (80%. All patients received resection of their tumors together with metastasectomy. Pylorus preserving duodenopancreatectomy was performed in 8 patients, distal pancreatectomy in 8, duodenopancreatectomy in 2, and total pancreatectomy in 2. Morbidity was 45% and there was no perioperative mortality. Median postoperative survival was 10.7 months (2.6–37.7 months which was not significantly different from a matched-pair group of patients who underwent pancreatic resection for UICC adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (median survival 15.6 months; P=.1. Conclusion. Pancreatic resection for M1 periampullary cancer of the pancreas can be performed safely in well-selected patients. However, indication for surgery has to be made on an individual basis.

  13. Basal cell carcinoma of penis: case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, M Z; Polacarz, S V; Partington, P E

    1988-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the penis is rare. A patient who presented with a penile and scrotal ulcer due to basal cell carcinoma is reported. Wide local excision and split skin grafting were performed to excise the lesion completely.

  14. Differentiation of focal-type autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreatic carcinoma: assessment by multiphase contrast-enhanced CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuhashi, Naohiro; Suzuki, Kojiro; Sakurai, Yusuke; Naganawa, Shinji [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeda, Mitsuru [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Kawai, Yuichi [Japanese Red Cross Nagoya Daiichi Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the utility of multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) findings alone and in combination for differentiating focal-type autoimmune pancreatitis (f-AIP) from pancreatic carcinoma (PC). The study group comprised 22 f-AIP lesions and 61 PC lesions. Two radiologists independently evaluated CT findings. Frequencies of findings were compared between f-AIP and PC. Statistical, univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Homogeneous enhancement during the portal phase (AIP, 59 % vs. PC, 3 %; P < 0.001), dotted enhancement during the pancreatic phase (50 % vs. 7 %; P < 0.001), duct-penetrating sign (46 % vs. 2 %; P < 0.001), enhanced duct sign (36 % vs. 2 %; P < 0.001) and capsule-like rim (46 % vs. 3 %; P < 0.001) were more frequently observed in AIP. Ring-like enhancement during the delayed phase (5 % vs. 46 %; P < 0.001) and peripancreatic strands with a length of at least 10 mm (5 % vs. 39 %; P = 0.001) were more frequently observed in PC. AIP was identified with 82 % sensitivity and 98 % specificity using four of these seven findings. Multivariate analysis revealed significant differences in dotted enhancement (P = 0.004), duct-penetrating sign (P < 0.001) and capsule-like rim (P = 0.007). The combination of CT findings may allow improvements in differentiating f-AIP from PC. (orig.)

  15. Apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells induced by Triptolide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Xiong Zhou; Xiao-Ling Ding; Jie-Fei Huang; Hong Zhang; Sheng-Bao Wu; Jian-Ping Cheng; Qun Wei

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer ceils induced by Triptolide (TL),and the relationship between this apoptosis and expression of caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.METHODS:Human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was cultured in DIEM media for this study.MTT assay was used to determine the cell growth inhibitory rate in vitro.Flow cytometry and TUNEL assay were used to detect the apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells before and after TL treatment.RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of apoptosis-associated gene caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.RESULTS:TL inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner.TL induced human pancreatic cancer cells to undergo apoptosis with typically apoptotic characteristics.TUNEL assay showed that after the treatment of human pancreatic cancer cells with 40 ng/mL TL for 12 h and 24 h,the apoptotic rates of human pancreatic cancer cells increased significantly.RT-PCR demonstrated that caspase-3 and bax were significantly up-regulated in SW1990 cells treated with TL while bcl-2 mRNA was not.CONCLUSION:TL is able to induce the apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.This apoptosis may be mediated by up-regulating the expression of apoptosisassociated caspase-3 and bax gene.

  16. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  17. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur S; Thami G; Kanwar A

    2003-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  18. Percutaneous irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma using the dorsal approach: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Hester J; Melenhorst, Marleen C A M; Vogel, Jantien A; van Tilborg, Aukje A J M; Nielsen, Karin; Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R

    2015-06-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively. PMID:25288173

  19. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively

  20. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffer, Hester J., E-mail: hj.scheffer@vumc.nl; Melenhorst, Marleen C. A. M., E-mail: m.melenhorst@vumc.nl [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Vogel, Jantien A., E-mail: j.a.vogel@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Tilborg, Aukje A. J. M. van, E-mail: a.vantilborg@vumc.nl [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Nielsen, Karin, E-mail: k.nielsen@vumc.nl; Kazemier, Geert, E-mail: g.kazemier@vumc.nl [VU University Medical Center, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Meijerink, Martijn R., E-mail: mr.meijerink@vumc.nl [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively.

  1. Islet Cells Serve as Cells of Origin of Pancreatic Gastrin-Positive Endocrine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnavion, Rémy; Teinturier, Romain; Jaafar, Rami;

    2015-01-01

    The cells of origin of pancreatic gastrinomas remain an enigma, since no gastrin-expressing cells are found in the normal adult pancreas. It was proposed that the cellular origin of pancreatic gastrinomas may come from either the pancreatic cells themselves or gastrin-expressing cells which have...

  2. Ultrasonic interventional analgesia in pancreatic carcinoma with chemical destruction of celiac ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Wang; Fu-Zhou Tian; Zhong-Hong Cai; Xu Li; Tao Cheng; Li Shi; Qi Cheng

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect the therapeutic effects of chemical destruction of celiac ganglion in patients with pancreatic carcinoma with intractable pain.METHODS: Ninety-seven cases with advanced pancreatic carcinoma received chemical destruction of celiac ganglion-5 mL pure alcohol injection around celiac artery under ultrasonic guidance. The changes of visual analogue scale (VAS), serum substance P (Sub P),β-endopeptide (β-EP) and T-lymphocyte subtypes level were compared between pre- and post-therapy.RESULTS: Successful rate of puncture was 98.7%, with one failure. No serious complications such as traumatic pancreatitis, pancreatic fistula, abdominal cavity hemorrhage or peritoneal infection occurred. VAS, serum Sub P and β-EP level significantly changed after treatment (8.0 ± 2.3 vs 4.6 ± 2.1, 254.1 ± 96.7 vs 182.4 ± 77.6,3.2 ± 0.8 vs 8.8 ± 2.1, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P < 0.01)with complete relief rate 54.2%, partial relief rate 21.9%, ineffective rate 12.5% and recurrent rate 10.7%.The T-lymphocyte subtypes level remarkably increased when compared with that of pre-therapy (46.7 ± 3.7 vs 62.5 ± 5.5, P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that chemical destruction of celiac ganglion under ultrasonic guidance is highly safe, and can evidently relieve cancer pain and improve the cellular immunity in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  3. High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy in combination with gemcitabine for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv W

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wei Lv, Tao Yan, Guojin Wang, Wei Zhao, Tao Zhang, Dinghua Zhou Hepatobiliary Surgery Department, Second Artillery General Hospital, Xicheng District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effect and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy combined with gemcitabine in treating unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: The 45 patients suffering from pancreatic carcinoma were randomized into two groups. The patients in the experimental group (n=23 received HIFU in combination with gemcitabine and those in the control group (n=22 received gemcitabine alone. The effect and clinical benefit rates in the two groups were compared. The median survival time and 6-month and 12-month survival rates were calculated by Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test. Results: The median survival time and 6-month survival rate were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group (8.91 months vs 5.53 months, 73.9% vs 40.9%, respectively P<0.05, but 12-month survival rate was not statistically different between the two groups (13.0% vs 4.5%, P>0.05. The clinical benefit rates in the experimental group and the control group were 69.6% and 36.3%, respectively (P<0.05. The pain remission rate in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group (65.2% vs 31.8%, P<0.05. Conclusion: HIFU in combination with gemcitabine is better than gemcitabine alone. This combinatorial therapy may become a better and effective treatment for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Keywords: pancreatic carcinoma treatment, high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy, gemcitabine

  4. Carcinoma developing in ectopic pancreatic tissue in the stomach: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Papaziogas, Basilios; Koutelidakis, Ioannis; Tsiaousis, Panagiotis; Panagiotopoulou, Konstantina; Paraskevas, George; Argiriadou, Helena; Atmatzidis, Stefanos; Atmatzidis, Konstantinos

    2008-01-01

    The development of pancreatic tissue outside the confines of the main gland, without anatomic or vascular connections between them, is a congenital abnormality referred to as heterotopic pancreas. A heterotopic pancreas in the gastrointestinal tract is usually discovered incidentally and the risk of its malignant transformation is extremely low. In this study, we describe the first case of endoepithelial carcinoma arising in a gastric heterotopic pancreas of a 56-year old woman in Greece. She...

  5. Phytotherapy of chronic abdominal pain following pancreatic carcinoma surgery: a single case observation

    OpenAIRE

    Wiebelitz KR; Beer AM

    2012-01-01

    Karl Rüdiger Wiebelitz, André-Michael BeerDepartment of True Naturopathy, Blankenstein Hospital, Hattingen, GermanyAbstract: A patient with pancreatic carcinoma diagnosed in 2005 suffered from chronic abdominal pain 6 years later that did not respond to conventional pain treatment according to guidelines. Furthermore, several complementary medical approaches remained ineffective. In the long run, only an Iberis amara drug combination relieved pain sufficiently. The drug is...

  6. Spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hassan, S J

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin predominantly affecting elderly Caucasians. It has a high rate of local recurrence and regional lymph node metastases. It is associated with a poor prognosis. Complete spontaneous regression of Merkel cell carcinoma has been reported but is a poorly understood phenomenon. Here we present a case of complete spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma demonstrating a markedly different pattern of events from those previously published.

  7. Cryotherapy in basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra A; Balachandran C; Shenoi S; Sabitha L; Pai Satish; Ravikumar B; Roy Alfred

    1999-01-01

    Cryotherapy has proved to be an effective tool in the management of various dermatoses. We report 6 patients with histopathologically proven basal cell carcinoma of variable sizes treated with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy by the open spray technique. Lesions tended to heal with depigmentation and scar formation. However depigmented areas often repigmented over a period of time.

  8. The current status and evaluation of comprehensive therapy of pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of pancreatic carcinoma is increasing obviously in recent years with a serious threat to the people's life, and yet there is not a single treatment for obtaining satisfactory prognosis. At present, the radical resection is the primary method for resectable pancreatic carcinoma, together with radiotherapy can improve the surgical resection rate and reduce the dissemination of tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy can alleviate the pain and increase the survival rate, but the role of postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy is still in controversial. There is a lot of advantages for regional chemotherapy theoretically, but lack of evidence in practice. Physical therapy and biological therapy in the treatment of pancreatic carcinoma have been recognized extensively. It is possible to change fundamentally the current status of treatment and to improve the long-term survival rates with the quality of life until establishing a comprehensive treatment system mainly depended on surgical resection with combination of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, physical and biological treatment. The interventional therapy has been significantly developed as an important palliative treatment during recent years. (authors)

  9. Pancreatic Satellite Cells Derived Galectin-1 Increase the Progression and Less Survival of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Wang, Sen; Ye, Nianyuan; Li, Ping; Gao, Sujun; Miao, Yi; Wang, Daorong; Jiang, Kuirong

    2014-01-01

    Background Galectin-1, a member of carbohydrate-binding proteins with a polyvalent function on tumor progression, was found strongly expressed in pancreatic satellite cells (PSCs), which partner in crime with cancer cells and promote the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We evaluated the effects of PSCs derived Galectin-1 on the progression of PDAC, as well as the tumor establishment and development in mouse xenografts. Methods The relationship between immunohistochemistry staining intensity of Galectin-1 and clinicopathologic variables were assessed in 66 PDAC tissues, 18 chronic pancreatitis tissues and 10 normal controls. The roles of PSCs isolated from PDAC and normal pancreas on the proliferative activity, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and the invasion of CFPAC-1 in the co-cultured system, as well as on the tumor establishment and development in mouse xenografts by mixed implanting with CFPAC-1 subcutaneously were evaluated. Results Galectin-1 expression was gradually increased from normal pancreas (negative), chronic pancreatitis (weak) to PDAC (strong), in which Galectin-1 expression was also increased from well, moderately to poorly differentiated PDAC. Galectin-1 staining intensity of pancreatic cancer tissue was associated with increase in tumor size, lymph node metastasis, perineural invasion and differentiation and UICC stage, and served as the independent prognostic indicator of poor survival of pancreatic cancer. In vitro and in vivo experiments indicated that TGF-β1 upregulated Galectin-1 expression in PSCs, which could further promotes the proliferative activity, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, as well as the tumor establishment and growth. Conclusion Galectin-1 expression in stromal cells of pancreatic cancer suggests that this protein plays a role in the promotion of cancer cells invasion and metastasis and provides a therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24595374

  10. Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer by cytology and telomerase activity in exfoliated cells obtained by pancreatic duct brushing during endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Xiong Zhou; Jie-Fei Huang; Hong Zhang; Jian-Ping Chen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Telomerase activity is reported to be speciifc and frequent in human pancreatic cancer. We conducted this study to assess the usefulness of monitoring telomerase activity in exfoliated cells obtained by pancreatic duct brushing during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. METHODS:Exfoliated cells obtained by pancreatic duct brushing during ERCP from 21 patients (18 with pancreatic cancer, 3 with chronic pancreatitis) were examined. Telomerase activity was detected by polymerase chain reaction and telomeric repeat ampliifcation protocol assay (PCR-TRAP-ELISA). RESULTS:D450 values of telomerase activity were 0.446± 0.2700 in pancreatic cancer and 0.041±0.0111 in chronic pancreatitis. 77.8% (14/18) of patients with pancreatic cancer had cells with telomerase activity. None of the samples from patients with chronic pancreatitis showed telomerase activity, when the cutoff value of telomerase activity was set at 2.0. Cytological examination showed cancer cells in 66.7%(12/18) of the patients. CONCLUSIONS:Telomerase activity may be an early malignant event in pancreatic cancer development. Cytology and telomerase activity in cells obtained by pancreatic duct brushing may complement each other for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

  11. MRI analysis of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze MRI manifestation and enhancement of renal cell carcinoma, and to improve the diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. Methods: 48 cases of renal cell carcinoma proven by surgery and pathology were reviewed. MRI scans including T1WI, T2WI, TRUFI and contrast enhancement were carried out in all cases and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed in 15. Results: Of the 48 cases, there were clear cell carcinoma in 41, chromophobe cell carcinoma in 4 and papillary cell carcinoma in 3. The tumors were homogeneously T1 iso- or hypointense in 33 and heterogeneous in 15; homogeneously T2 hyperintense in 14, isointense in 6 and heterogeneous in 28 patients. Pseudocapsule was found in 10 cases. Contrast enhancement was homogeneous in 6, heterogeneous in 34, irregularly peripheral within the wall in 5, and homogeneously circular in 3. Conclusion: MRI can accurately diagnose renal cell carcinoma and help to determine the cell subsets. (authors)

  12. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio L. Heldwein

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the current treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, focusing on medical treatment options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The most important recent publications have been selected after a literature search employing PubMed using the search terms: advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma, anti-angiogenesis drugs and systemic therapy; also significant meeting abstracts were consulted. RESULTS: Progress in understanding the molecular basis of renal cell carcinoma, especially related to genetics and angiogenesis, has been achieved mainly through of the study of von Hippel-Lindau disease. A great variety of active agents have been developed and tested in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC patients. New specific molecular therapies in metastatic disease are discussed. Sunitinib, Sorafenib and Bevacizumab increase the progression-free survival when compared to therapy with cytokines. Temsirolimus increases overall survival in high-risk patients. Growth factors and regulatory enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrase IX may be targets for future therapies. CONCLUSIONS: A broader knowledge of clear cell carcinoma molecular biology has permitted the beginning of a new era in mRCC therapy. Benefits of these novel agents in terms of progression-free and overall survival have been observed in patients with mRCC, and, in many cases, have become the standard of care. Sunitinib is now considered the new reference first-line treatment for mRCC. Despite all the progress in recent years, complete responses are still very rare. Currently, many important issues regarding the use of these agents in the management of metastatic renal cancer still need to be properly addressed.

  13. Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jia-wei; YUAN Lin; Hu Hong-hui

    2005-01-01

    @@ Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma is a special type of tumor which is usually found in the lungs. However, it is very rare in extra pulmonary tissues, especially in epididymis. One case of small cell undifferentiated carcinoma in the right epididymis, with partial differentiation to adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma is reported as follows.

  14. Stellate Cell Activation in Tropical Calcific Pancreatitis Compared to Alcoholic Pancreatitis, Adenocarcinoma of Pancreas and Normal Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johny Cyriac

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available ContextPancreatic stellate cell (PSC is known to be the source of fibrosis in pancreatic pathology of various etiologies. However, there is no published data on activation of PSCs in tropical calcific pancreatitis. ObjectivesThe present study was undertaken to estimate the proportion of activated stellate cells, in a semi-quantitative manner, in normal pancreas and pancreatic fibrosis due to, tropical calcific pancreatitis, alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PatientsSurgically resected specimen from patients with tropical calcific pancreatitis (n=22, alcoholic chronic pancreatitis(n=16, adenocarcinoma of pancreas (n=20 and normal pancreas (n=20 were included. Main outcome measuresExpression of CD34, and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Morphometry was performed by a pointcounting procedure and CD34 positive areas were excluded from α-SMA positive areas for estimating activated PSCs. StatisticsThe one-way ANOVA and the Tukey multiple comparison test were used to compare the proportion ofactivated stellate cells among the four categories. ResultsIn all the disease conditions studied, namely, tropical calcific pancreatitis (16.7±14.5%, mean±SD, alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (13.6±12.4% and pancreatic adenocarcinoma (22.8±14.4%, there was highly significant (P<0.001 increased percentage of activated PSCs compared to normal pancreas (-0.9±6.4%. Proportion of activated PSCs in tropical calcific pancreatitis was similar to that in cases of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Such activation is documented for the first time in tropical calcific pancreatitis while it is known for the other causes. ConclusionsThe present study suggests that a final common pathway of PSC activation leads to fibrogenesis in tropical calcific pancreatitis just as in other pancreatic pathologies.

  15. The many faces of basal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most easily cured carcinoma, but because of the many forms it can take, and because it grows so slowly, it can be misdiagnosed or neglected. The author discusses its more common forms and etiologic considerations.

  16. Effects of a non thermal plasma treatment alone or in combination with gemcitabine in a MIA PaCa2-luc orthotopic pancreatic carcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Martel, Eric; Robert, Eric; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Trichet, Valérie; Richard, Serge; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel; Le Pape, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are the gastrointestinal cancer with the worst prognosis in humans and with a survival rate of 5% at 5 years. Nowadays, no chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in terms of survival for this cancer. Previous study focused on the development of a new therapy by non thermal plasma showed significant effects on tumor growth for colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma. To allow targeted treatment, a fibered plasma (Plasma Gun) was developed and its evaluation was performed on an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma using a MIA PaCa2-luc bioluminescent cell line. The aim of this study was to characterize this pancreatic carcinoma model and to determine the effects of Plasma Gun alone or in combination with gemcitabine. During a 36 days period, quantitative BLI could be used to follow the tumor progression and we demonstrated that plasma gun induced an inhibition of MIA PaCa2-luc cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo and that this effect could be improved by association with gemcitabine possibly thanks to its radiosensitizing properties. PMID:23300736

  17. Effects of a non thermal plasma treatment alone or in combination with gemcitabine in a MIA PaCa2-luc orthotopic pancreatic carcinoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Brullé

    Full Text Available Pancreatic tumors are the gastrointestinal cancer with the worst prognosis in humans and with a survival rate of 5% at 5 years. Nowadays, no chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in terms of survival for this cancer. Previous study focused on the development of a new therapy by non thermal plasma showed significant effects on tumor growth for colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma. To allow targeted treatment, a fibered plasma (Plasma Gun was developed and its evaluation was performed on an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma using a MIA PaCa2-luc bioluminescent cell line. The aim of this study was to characterize this pancreatic carcinoma model and to determine the effects of Plasma Gun alone or in combination with gemcitabine. During a 36 days period, quantitative BLI could be used to follow the tumor progression and we demonstrated that plasma gun induced an inhibition of MIA PaCa2-luc cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo and that this effect could be improved by association with gemcitabine possibly thanks to its radiosensitizing properties.

  18. Acinic Cell Carcinoma of the Salivary Gland with Metastatic Spread to the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Geiger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic disease to the pancreas is rare among solid tumors and has not been well described for salivary cancers. We report a patient who developed an isolated metastatic lesion in the pancreas from acinic cell carcinoma of the salivary gland, presenting as acute pancreatitis.

  19. Pancreatic carcinoma development: new etiological and pathogenetic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirio Fiorino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC is a very aggressive cancer with a poor prognosis. To date, the causes and pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the development of this malignancy remain largely unknown. Therefore, additional studies are required to improve our knowledge of the events that occur during the process of pancreatic carcinogenesis. The purpose of this article is to describe the most recent evidence, concerning the possible risk factors and mechanisms that may contribute to determine the development of PAC, as well as models, such as the tensegrity model, that may explain this complex process. Available studies suggest that approximately 15-20% of human malignancies are somehow associated with chronic infection. Some epidemiological research has shown that some infectious agents represent risk factors for PAC. In particular, several reports showed that the infection caused by some micro-organisms, including helicobacter pylori and some bacterial species of oral microbiota, as well as by viral agents, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and hepatitis B (HBV and C (HCV viruses, is associated with an increased probability of developing PAC. For the first time, observational studies and meta-analyses have suggested that HBV and HCV, two hepatotropic viruses with oncogenic properties, may be also risk factors for PAC. However, the small number of available reports, nearly all performed in Asian populations, limits their validity to these ethnic groups. Therefore, additional studies focusing on populations of different geographical areas and enrolling larger series of patients are required to confirm this association. Furthermore, an accurate description and a better understanding of the events and of the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the process of pancreatic carcinogenesis, as proposed by the tensegrity model, might be a useful approach to effectively deal with this pathology.

  20. The Expression of the Thrombin Receptors PAR-3 and PAR-4 is Downregulated in Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Rudroff

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with pancreatic cancer frequently suffer from thrombosis as a consequence of excess thrombin generation. In addition to its role in the plasmatic coagulation cascade, thrombin induces numerous cellular effects by activating a unique group of G-protein-coupled receptors on the cell membrane, the proteinase-activated receptors (PARs. At present, PAR-1, PAR-3 and PAR-4 are known to be activated by thrombin. We previously demonstrated a putative role for PAR-1 in pancreatic cancer progression, but little is known about the physiological and pathophysiological roles of PAR-3 and PAR-4. In the present study, we examined the expression patterns of PAR-3 and PAR-4 in pancreatic tissue and pancreatic cancer cells. Methods: Tissue samples from three patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and six human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines were examined. Gene expression was analysed by RT-PCR and quantified by HPLC. Protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Data analysis was performed using ANOVA in SPSS. Results and Conclusion: In contrast to PAR-1, both PAR-3 and PAR-4 were expressed in healthy pancreases but downregulated in pancreatic cancer. The contrasting expression patterns of PAR-3 and PAR-4 compared with PAR-1 indicate that the mechanism that regulates the cellular effects of thrombin on tumor progression remains to be fully elucidated.

  1. Immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, R M

    1999-06-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma continue to present a therapeutic challenge. Current therapeutic approaches involve surgery and various types of immunotherapy. The rationale for this latter form of therapy include the observations of spontaneous tumor regression, the presence of a T-cell-mediated immune response, and the tumor responses observed in patients receiving cytokine therapy. Analysis of prognostic factors in these patients demonstrates that clinical responses occur most frequently in individuals with good performance status. The cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2, aldesleukin [Proleukin], interferon-alfa (Intron A, Roferon-A), or the combination produce responses in 15% to 20% of patients. Randomized trials suggest that administration of interferon-alfa may result in a modest improvement in median survival. Investigation of the molecular genetics of renal cell carcinoma and the presence of T-lymphocyte immune dysregulation have suggested new therapeutic strategies. Further preclinical and clinical studies investigating inhibitors of angiogenesis or pharmacologic methods to reverse immune dysregulation are ongoing. Therapeutic results in patients with renal cell carcinoma remain limited, and investigational approaches are warranted. PMID:10378218

  2. Dynamic telecytopathology of on site rapid cytology diagnoses for pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhieng David

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of pancreatic lesions can be accurately performed by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA with onsite cytopathologists to assess specimen adequacy and to determine a preliminary diagnosis. Considerable time is needed to perform on-site assessments. This takes away work time of cytopathologists and prohibits them from serving remote locations. It is therefore logical to ask if real-time telecytopathology could be used to assess specimen adequacy and if telecytopathology diagnosis has the same level of agreement to the final diagnosis as that of onsite evaluation. In this study, we compare agreement between cytodiagnoses rendered using telecytopathology with onsite and final interpretations. Method 40 Diff-Quik-stained EUS-FNA were re-evaluated retrospectively (patient ages 31–62, 19:21 male:female, 15 non-malignant lesions, 25 malignant lesions as classified by final diagnosis. Each previously assessed by a cytopathologist and finally reviewed by the same or different cytopathologist. Blinded to the final diagnosis, a resident pathologist re-screened all slides for each case, selected a slide and marked the diagnostic cells most representative of the lesion. Blinded to the diagnosis, one cytopathologist assessed the marked cells through a real time remotely operated telecytopathology system (MedMicroscopy. Diagnosis and time spent were recorded. Kappa statistic was used to compare agreements between telecytopathology vs. original onsite vs. final diagnoses. Results Time spent for prescreening ranged from 1 to 5 minutes (mean 2.6 +/- 1.3 minutes and time spent for telecytopathology diagnosis ranged from 2–20 minutes (mean 7.5 +/- 4.5 minutes. Kappa statistics, K, was as follows: telecytopathology versus onsite diagnosis K, 95% CI = 0.65, 0.41–0.88, for telecytopathology versus final K, 95% CI = 0.61, 0.37–0.85 and for onsite diagnosis versus final K, 95% CI = 0.79, 0.61–0.98. There is

  3. Multiple MR Imaging Techniques in the Diagnosis and Assessment of Resectability in Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONGYu; KONGXiangquan; XUHaibo; LIUDingxi; YANGFan; XIONGYin; YUQun; FENGZhenjun

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of multiple MR imaging techniques in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and the assessment of resectbility of the lesion. Methods: MR imaging was performed in 18 pa-tients with surgically and/or pathologically proven pancreatic carcinoma. GRE T1WI, TSE T2WI, GRE T1WI with fat suppression, delayed enhancement GRE T1WI, MRCP and 3D DCE MRA were used in MR scanning. Tumor involvement of the celiac trunk and its main branches, superior mesenteric artery,the portal, splenic and superior mesenteric veins were prospectively graded on a 0-4 scale based on cir-cumferential contiguity of tumor to vessel. Results: On GRE T1WI and TSE T2WI all the lesions showed slightly hypointense and hyperintense, respectively; On GRE T1WI with fat suppression, all the tumors obviously appeared hypointense; On delayed enhancement GRE T1WI, the lesions displayed irregularly circular enhancement in 14 patients and well-distributed enhancement in 4 patients. MRCP showed exten-sive bile and main pancreatic duct dilatation with typical "double-duct" sign in 8 patients. On 3D DCE MRA, we thought it was unresectable with more than half circumferential involvement of tumor to vessel,so that the portal, splenic and superior mesenteric veins were involved with 56% (10/18), 39% (7/18)and 67% (12/18), respectively. The celiac trunk and its main branches and superior mesenteric arteries were involved with 22% (4/18) and 17% (3/18), respectively. The pancreatic lesions in 2 cases could be completely resected in the evaluation of MR imaging, which was fitted to the findings of operation by pan-creatoduodenectomy. The pancreatic lesions in other 2 cases were partly, resected because there was tumor extension to superior mesenteric vein and/or artery. The tumors in the remaining 14 patients were too large and involved peripancreatic vessels or there were stomach or liver metastases, so these patients were only treated by choledochojejunostomy and gastrojejunstomy. Conclusion

  4. Diagnosis and staging of pancreatic carcinoma: MRI versus multislice-CT - A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate multislice-CT versus MRI in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic carcinoma in a prospective multi-reader analysis. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma underwent both multislice-CT (4-Row, 'hydro-technique') and state-of-the-art MRI (two 1.5 T units). In correlation with histopathologic findings or in case of a non-lesion diagnosis by follow-up (6-month interval), we evaluated MRI versus CT in a multi-reader analysis (2 reader pairs) for: 1. diagnostic quality; 2. examination time; 3. accuracy of potential respectability; 4. kappa analysis of observer variations; and 5. overall diagnostic reliability. Results: A total of 28 lesions (n=22 malignant, n=6 benign) were present in the cohort group versus 22 patients without a focal lesion (n=10 pancreatitis, n=12 no tumor). For lesion detection, CT had a sensitivity of 100/89% (reader pair 1/2) and specificity of 77%, and MRI had a sensitivity of 75/89% and specificity of 77/73%. For the subgroup of adenocarcinomas of the pancreas (n=17), we found a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 61% for CT versus a sensitivity of 82/94% and a specificity of 67/61% for MRI. The accuracy for determining the resectability was 91/82% for CT and 90/82% for MRI. The kappa analysis showed a good correlation for CT (0.71) and a moderate correlation of both groups for MRI (0.49). Conclusion: CT and MRI showed comparable results in the detection of pancreatic carcinomas as well as in the determination of resectability. Chronic pancreatitis as a 'tumor-like-lesion' was the major factor of a missed diagnosis. The results of multi-reader analysis for both reading groups were almost identical with a moderate to good kappa correlation. There is no reason to prefer MRI (more expensive) over CT for patients with the presumptive diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. (orig.)

  5. The concept and controversy of retroperitoneal nerve dissection in pancreatic head carcinoma (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Hongwei; Wang, Taihong; Lau, Wan Yee; Wang, Xin; Sun, Jingfeng; Yuan, Zhenhua; Zhang, Yewei

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic head cancer is a common but the most lethal cancer of the human digestive system. It is invasive, resulting in early infiltration of adjacent structures and lymph node and distant metastases. Its biological characteristics of neurotropic growth lead to early neural invasion (NI) which is an independent prognostic factor of survival for pancreatic cancer. Radical surgical resection remains the only form of curative treatment. The extent of surgical resection and whether extended resection results in better long-term survival have been controversial. Studies have reported that peripancreatic plexus invasion is a frequent cause of pancreatic cancer recurrence and death. The relationship between cancer microenvironment and nerve cells, and whether the peripancreatic nerve plexus nearby needs to be resected require further studies. The present review aims to discuss the role of peripancreatic nerve and its implications in pancreatic head cancer resection. PMID:26458369

  6. c-Met in pancreatic cancer stem cells: Therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Aizpea Zubia-Olascoaga; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the deadliest solid cancer and currently the fourth most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths.Emerging evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play a crucial role in the development and progression of this disease.The identification of CSC markers could lead to the development of new therapeutic targets.In this study,the authors explore the functional role of c-Met in pancreatic CSCs,by analyzing self-renewal with sphere assays and tumorigenicity capacity in NOD SCID mice.They concluded that c-Met is a novel marker for identifying pancreatic CSCs and c-Methigh in a higher tumorigenic cancer cell population.Inhibition of c-Met with XL184 blocks self-renewal capacity in pancreatic CSCs.In pancreatic tumors established in NOD SCID mice,c-Met inhibition slowed tumor growth and reduced the population of CSCs,along with preventing the development of metastases.

  7. Designing of promiscuous inhibitors against pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singla, Deepak; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the most devastating disease with worst prognosis. There is a pressing need to accelerate the drug discovery process to identify new effective drug candidates against pancreatic cancer. We have developed QSAR models for predicting promiscuous inhibitors using the pharmacological data. Our models achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86, when evaluated on 10-fold cross-validation. Our models have also successfully validated the drug-to-oncogene relationship and further we used these models to screen FDA approved drugs and tested them in vitro. We have integrated these models in a webserver named as DiPCell, which will be useful for screening and designing novel promiscuous drug molecules. We have also identified the most and least effective drugs for pancreatic cancer cell lines. On the other side, we have identified resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines, which need investigative scanner on them to put light on resistant mechanism in pancreatic cancer.

  8. Pancreatic ampullary carcinoma with neck metastases: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Aksoy, Murat; Sumer, Aziz; Sari, Serkan; Mete, Ozgur; Salmaslioglu, Artur; Erbil, Yesim

    2009-01-01

    Background An 18-year-old Turkish woman was referred with a 6-week history of rapidly enlarging cervical mass at the left side. Case report She was diagnosed of ampullary carcinoma for which pancreatoduodenectomy was performed 14 months ago. In our patient with a history of malignancy, a rapidly enlarging neck mass was considered a metastasis to the neck. Tumor resection was performed. Histopathological examination revealed the metastasis of the precedent ampullary adenocarcinoma. Conclusion ...

  9. Gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma arising from heterotopic pancreatic tissue

    OpenAIRE

    R Chetty; Weinreb, I

    2004-01-01

    An 85 year old man presented with symptoms of dyspepsia and increase in stool frequency of two months duration. Upper endoscopy revealed an ulcer and the biopsy was interpreted as carcinoma with endocrine features. A formal distal gastrectomy was planned, but intraoperatively, because of the patient’s condition, a wedge resection was performed. Histology revealed a neuroendocrine tumour (grade 1), located mainly in the submucosa, which had caused mucosal attenuation and ulceration. Associated...

  10. Antioxidant Protection by American Ginseng in Pancreatic ß-Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Elaine; Wang, Yong; Mehendale, Sangeeta; Sun, Shi; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Xie, Jing-Tian; Aung, Han H.; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2008-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in diabetic conditions may cause oxidative stress in pancreatic ß-cells, leading to their dysfunction and insulin resistance within peripheral tissues. Previous studies suggest that American ginseng berry extract may have hypoglycemic effects, as well as offer antioxidant protection. We examined effects of American ginseng berry extract and ginsenoside Re in a pancreatic ß-cell line, MIN-6, to determine if these two properties are related. Cells were exposed to oxidative stress ...

  11. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  12. Differential roles of inflammatory cells in pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerle, Julia; Dummer, Annegret; Sendler, Mathias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; van den Brandt, Cindy; Teller, Steffen; Aghdassi, Ali; Nitsche, Claudia; Lerch, Markus M

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis per 100,000 of population ranges from 5 to 80. Patients suffering from hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis die in 10-24% of cases. 80% of all cases of acute pancreatitis are etiologically linked to gallstone disease immoderate alcohol consumption. As of today no specific causal treatment for acute pancreatitis exists. Elevated C-reactive protein levels above 130,mg/L can also predict a severe course of acute pancreatitis. The essential medical treatment for acute pancreatitis is the correction of hypovolemia. Prophylactic antibiotics should be restricted to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, infected necrosis or other infectious complications. However, as premature intracellular protease activation is known to be the primary event in acute pancreatitis. Severe acute pancreatitis is characterized by an early inflammatory immune response syndrome (SIRS) and a subsequent compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) contributing to severity as much as protease activation does. CARS suppresses the immune system and facilitates nosocomial infections including infected pancreatic necrosis, one of the most feared complications of the disease. A number of attempts have been made to suppress the early systemic inflammatory response but even if these mechanisms have been found to be beneficial in animal models they failed in daily clinical practice. PMID:22320916

  13. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H;

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  14. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma: a report of 106 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F[FDG PET) as a tool for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma while taking into account serum glucose level. A group of 106 patients with unclear pancreatic masses were recruited for the study. PET was performed following intravenous administration of an average of 190 MBq [18F[FDG. Focally increased glucose utilisation was used as the criterion of malignancy. In addition, the ''standardised uptake value'' (SUV) was determined 45 min after injection. Carcinoma of the pancreas was demonstrated histologically in 74 cases, and chronic pancreatitis in 32 cases. Employing visual evaluation, 63 of the 74 (85%) pancreatic carcinomas were identified by PET. In 27 of the 32 cases (84%) of chronic pancreatitis it was possible to exclude malignancy. False-negative results (n=11) were obtained mostly in patients with raised serum glucose levels (10 out of 11), and false-positives (n=5) in patients with inflammatory processes of the pancreas. Thus PET showed an overall sensitivity of 85%, a specificity of 84%, a negative predictive value of 71%, and a positive predictive value of 93%. In a subgroup of patients with normal serum glucose levels (n=72), the results were 98%, 84%, 96% and 93%, respectively. Quantitative assessment yielded a mean SUV of 6.4±3.6 for pancreatic carcinoma as against a value of 3.6±1.7 for chronic pancreatitis (P<0.001), without increasing the diagnostic accuracy. This shows PET to be of value in assessing unclear pancreatic masses. The diagnostic accuracy of PET examinations is very dependent on serum glucose levels. (orig.). With 2 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma: a report of 106 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimny, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen University of Technology (Germany); Bares, R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen University of Technology (Germany); Fass, J. [Department of Surgery, Aachen University of Technology (Germany); Adam, G. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen University of Technology (Germany); Cremerius, U. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen University of Technology (Germany); Dohmen, B. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen University of Technology (Germany); Klever, P. [Department of Surgery, Aachen University of Technology (Germany); Sabri, O. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen University of Technology (Germany); Schumpelick, V. [Department of Surgery, Aachen University of Technology (Germany); Buell, U. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen University of Technology (Germany)

    1997-06-10

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) as a tool for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma while taking into account serum glucose level. A group of 106 patients with unclear pancreatic masses were recruited for the study. PET was performed following intravenous administration of an average of 190 MBq [{sup 18}F]FDG. Focally increased glucose utilisation was used as the criterion of malignancy. In addition, the ``standardised uptake value`` (SUV) was determined 45 min after injection. Carcinoma of the pancreas was demonstrated histologically in 74 cases, and chronic pancreatitis in 32 cases. Employing visual evaluation, 63 of the 74 (85%) pancreatic carcinomas were identified by PET. In 27 of the 32 cases (84%) of chronic pancreatitis it was possible to exclude malignancy. False-negative results (n=11) were obtained mostly in patients with raised serum glucose levels (10 out of 11), and false-positives (n=5) in patients with inflammatory processes of the pancreas. Thus PET showed an overall sensitivity of 85%, a specificity of 84%, a negative predictive value of 71%, and a positive predictive value of 93%. In a subgroup of patients with normal serum glucose levels (n=72), the results were 98%, 84%, 96% and 93%, respectively. Quantitative assessment yielded a mean SUV of 6.4{+-}3.6 for pancreatic carcinoma as against a value of 3.6{+-}1.7 for chronic pancreatitis (P<0.001), without increasing the diagnostic accuracy. This shows PET to be of value in assessing unclear pancreatic masses. The diagnostic accuracy of PET examinations is very dependent on serum glucose levels. (orig.). With 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. FH535 inhibited metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu MY

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meng-Yao Wu,1,* Rong-Rui Liang,1,* Kai Chen,1 Meng Shen,1 Ya-Li Tian,1,2 Dao-Ming Li,1 Wei-Ming Duan,1 Qi Gui,1 Fei-Ran Gong,3 Lian Lian,1,2 Wei Li,1,6 Min Tao1,4–61Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 2Department of Oncology, Suzhou Xiangcheng People’s Hospital, 3Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 4Jiangsu Institute of Clinical Immunology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, 5Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Soochow University, Suzhou, 6PREMED Key Laboratory for Precision Medicine, Soochow University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: FH535 is a small-molecule inhibitor of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which a substantial body of evidence has proven is activated in various cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. We investigated the inhibitory effect of FH535 on the metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells. Western blotting and luciferase reporter gene assay indicated that FH535 markedly inhibited Wnt/β-catenin pathway viability in pancreatic cancer cells. In vitro wound healing, invasion, and adhesion assays revealed that FH535 significantly inhibited pancreatic cancer cell metastasis. We also observed the inhibitory effect of FH535 on pancreatic cancer cell growth via the tetrazolium and plate clone formation assays. Microarray analyses suggested that changes in the expression of multiple genes could be involved in the anti-cancer effect of FH535 on pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate for the first time that FH535 inhibits pancreatic cancer cell metastasis and growth, providing new insight into therapy of pancreatic cancer.Keywords: pancreatic cancer, FH535, β-catenin, metastasis, growth

  17. Solitary pancreatic lymph node metastasis from carcinoma of the breast: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scambia Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report the first case of isolated pancreatic lymph node recurrence in a locally advanced breast cancer patient. Case A 41-year old woman underwent radical mastectomy according to Madden and removal of axillary lymph nodes for multicentric infiltrating ductal carcinoma pathologically staged as pT2N2M0. After six years from primary diagnosis, and four years from the diagnosis of lung recurrence, she developed an isolated metastatic lesion to pancreatic lymph node. After surgical excision of metastasis, hormone therapy with Exemestane was begun. At 16 months of follow-up, the patient appears free of disease. Conclusion Because metastatization to visceral organ carries a very unfavorable prognosis, we think that the clinical significance of the elevation of CA 15.3 serum levels in the early detection of recurrence and in monitoring metastatic disease during follow-up, should be not underestimated.

  18. Secondary pancreatic involvement by a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Wasif Saif; Sapna Khubchandani; Marek Walczak

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. More than 50% of patients have some site of extra-nodal involvement at diagnosis,including the gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow.However, a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis is rare. A 57-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and matted lymph nodes in her axilla. She was admitted with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed diffusely enlarged pancreas due to infiltrative neoplasm and peripancreatic lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the axillary mass revealed a large B-cell lymphoma.The patient was classified as stage Ⅳ, based on the Ann Arbor Classification, and as having a high-risk lymphoma,based on the International Prognostic Index. She was started on chemotherapy with CHOP (cyclophosphamide,doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone). Within a week after chemotherapy, the patient's abdominal pain resolved. Follow-up CT scan of the abdomen revealed a marked decrease in the size of the pancreas and peripancreatic lymphadenopathy. A literature search revealed only seven cases of primary involvement of the pancreas in B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis. However, only one case of secondary pancreatic involvement by B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis has been published. Our case appears to be the second report of such a manifestation.Both cases responded well to chemotherapy.

  19. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ge [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Wan, Rong [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Hu, Yanling [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Ni, Jianbo [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Yin, Guojian; Xing, Miao [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Shen, Jie [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Tang, Maochun [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Congying [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Zhao, Yan [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Wang, Xingpeng, E-mail: wangxingpeng@hotmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); and others

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway.

  20. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway

  1. Scalp squamous cell carcinoma in xeroderma pigmentosum

    OpenAIRE

    Awan, Basim A; Hanadi Alzanbagi; Osama A Samargandi; Hossam Ammar

    2014-01-01

    Context: Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder that appears in early childhood. Squamous cell carcinoma is not uncommon in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and mostly involving the face, head, neck, and scalp. However, squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp may exhibit an aggressive course. Case Report: Here, we present a huge squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp in a three-years-old child with xeroderma pigmentosum. In addition, we illustrate the challenges of a child...

  2. Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma and Tonsil Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Dario Marcotullio; Giannicola Iannella; Gian Franco Macri; Caterina Marinelli; Melissa Zelli; Giuseppe Magliulo

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor in adults. Clear cell carcinoma represents 85% of all histological subtypes. In February 2012 a 72-year-old woman came to our department due to the appearance of massive hemoptysis and pharyngodinia. Previously, this patient was diagnosed with a renal cell carcinoma treated with left nephrectomy. We observed an exophytic, grayish, and ulcerated mass in the left tonsillar lodge and decided to subject the patient to an immediate tonsillectomy....

  3. Clear cell carcinoma of the lung.

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, C; Carlile, A

    1985-01-01

    Six tumours of the lung initially classified as clear cell carcinoma, were studied. Examination of further material by light and electron microscopy showed adenocarcinomatous differentiation in three cases and squamous differentiation in two. One case showed the features of a large cell anaplastic carcinoma. The clear appearance of the cytoplasm in paraffin sections was due to accumulations of glycogen that were partially removed during processing. It is concluded that clear cell carcinoma is...

  4. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Çiçek, Tufan; Coşkunoğlu, Esra Zeynep; Duran, Berkan; Çiftci, Egemen

    2015-01-01

    Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder a...

  5. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Tufan Cicek; Esra Zeynep Coskunoglu; Berkan Duran; Egemen Ciftci

    2015-01-01

    Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder ...

  6. Synchronous Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Multiple Digits

    OpenAIRE

    Abner, Sabra; Redstone, Jeremiah; Chowdhry, Saeed; Kasdan, Morton L.; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2011-01-01

    Cancers of the perionychium are relatively rare occurrences and are often related to chronic inflammation associated with trauma, infection, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or other carcinogens. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common tumor reported of the nail bed. Synchronous squamous cell carcinomas of the perionychium have been rarely reported. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman with synchronous squamous cell carcinomas involving both hands and multiple digits. Treatment modal...

  7. Merkel Cell Carcinoma Concurrent with Bowen's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyun Chul; Kang, Ho Song; Park, Kyoung Tae; Oh, Young Ha; Yu, Hee Joon; Kim, Joung Soo

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive cutaneous malignancy of the elderly and immunocompromised patients. It is occasionally found coexisting with other diseases, such as squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, miscellaneous adnexal tumors, and rarely Bowen disease. A 75-year-old woman presented with a 6-month history of an irregularly shaped erythematous patch on the left mandibular angle. Three months later, a 1.5×1.0 cm sized painless and rapidly growi...

  8. Case of hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa, Sadaf; Jadidi, Nima; Faraj, Sheila F.; Rodriquez, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of renal malignancy and it originates from the renal tubular epithelium. Due to the diversity in the histopathological and molecular characteristics, it is typically subclassified into five different categories. Papillary renal cell carcinoma is one subclassification and it includes two variants: sporadic and hereditary. Although the hereditary form comprises a smaller number of cases of papillary renal cell carcinoma, an understanding of the molec...

  9. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD; Waseem-Asim Ghulam El-Charnoubi, MD; Julie Gehl, MD, PhD; Christen Krag, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstruct...

  10. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration using Helical Computerized Tomography for TN Staging and Vascular Injury in Operable Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Celso Ardengh

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Context EUS-FNA is increasingly being used in operable pancreatic carcinoma cases identified by CT. Objectives Determine the safety, accuracy and clinical utility of EUS-FNA for T, N and TN staging and vascular injury assessment in proven ductal pancreatic carcinoma. Patients Fifty-two consecutive patients (29 women and 23 men with histologically ductal pancreatic carcinoma, with an excellent possibility of mass resection assessed by helical computerized tomography, were studied. Mean age was 62.4 years (range: 27-82 years. Tumor locations were in the head (43 cases, body (5 cases and tail (4 cases of the pancreas. Mean tumor size from EUS was 3.7 cm (range: 0.8-6.2 cm. Methods We reviewed medical records and abdominal ultrasound, CT, EUS-FNA and the results were compared to surgical and histological findings. Results Ultrasound identified pancreatic abnormalities in 38 out of 52 patients (73.1%: pancreatic mass (25 cases, pancreatic head enlargement (8 cases, dilation of main pancreatic duct (3 cases, pancreatic cyst (1 case and pancreatic calcification (1 case. CT showed a pancreatic mass (30 cases, pancreatic enlargement (17 cases, pancreatic cystic lesion (2 cases and pancreatic calcification (1 case in 50 out of 52 patients (96.2%. EUS-FNA found a clear pancreatic tumor image in all patients (100%. The accuracy of EUS for evaluating portal blood vessels, superior mesenteric artery, T alone, N alone and combined TN staging was 86.5%, 94.2%, 84.7%, 67.3% and 55.8%, respectively. In addition to cytological material from 50 patients, microfragments from 43 patients were sent for histological analysis. Two patients (3.8% showed minor complications: self-limited bleeding and acute pancreatitis. Conclusions EUS-FNA is safe, and can help gastroenterologists and surgeons make surgical decisions regarding pancreatic carcinoma patients.

  11. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Yegutkin, G.G.; Novak, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our...... dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting...

  12. Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Sharad; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma presenting with dysphagia is rare. We report a case who presented with dysphagia as the only manifestations of renal malignancy. Biopsy from the pyriform fossa nodules revealed a clear cell neoplasm. Immuno-histochemical analysis of tissue confirmed metastasis of renal cell carcinoma.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Feeder Cells for Pancreatic Islet Transplants

    OpenAIRE

    Sordi, Valeria; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic islet transplantation serves as a source of insulin-secreting beta-cells for the maintenance of normal glucose levels and treatment of diabetes. However, limited availability of islets, high rates of islet graft failure, and the need for life-long non-specific immunosuppressive therapy are major obstacles to the widespread application of this therapeutic approach. To overcome these problems, pancreatic islet transplantation was recently suggested as a potential target of the "thera...

  14. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne - case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda P

    2016-06-01

    Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment-resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis. PMID:27398205

  15. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma caused by carcinoma misdiagnosed as acne – case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Aydin, Dogu; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Jakobsen, Linda P.

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Basal cell carcinoma can be misdiagnosed as acne; thus, carcinoma should be considered in treatment‐resistant acne. Although rare, neglected basal cell carcinoma increases the risk of metastasis.

  16. Type I collagen inhibits differentiation and promotes a stem cell-like phenotype in human colorectal carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkland, S. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Human colorectal cancer is caused by mutations and is thought to be maintained by a population of cancer stem cells. Further phenotypic changes occurring at the invasive edge suggest that colon cancer cells are also regulated by their microenvironment. Type I collagen, a promoter of the malignant phenotype in pancreatic carcinoma cells, is highly expressed at the invasive front of human colorectal cancer. Methods: This study investigates the role of type I collagen in specifying t...

  17. Renal cell carcinoma: Evolving and emerging subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumley, Suzanne M; Divatia, Mukul; Truong, Luan; Shen, Steven; Ayala, Alberto G; Ro, Jae Y

    2013-12-16

    Our knowledge of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is rapidly expanding. For those who diagnose and treat RCC, it is important to understand the new developments. In recent years, many new renal tumors have been described and defined, and our understanding of the biology and clinical correlates of these tumors is changing. Evolving concepts in Xp11 translocation carcinoma, mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma, multilocular cystic clear cell RCC, and carcinoma associated with neuroblastoma are addressed within this review. Tubulocystic carcinoma, thyroid-like follicular carcinoma of kidney, acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, and clear cell papillary RCC are also described. Finally, candidate entities, including RCC with t(6;11) translocation, hybrid oncocytoma/chromophobe RCC, hereditary leiomyomatosis and RCC syndrome, and renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor are reviewed. Knowledge of these new entities is important for diagnosis, treatment and subsequent prognosis. This review provides a targeted summary of new developments in RCC. PMID:24364021

  18. Radioimmunotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma using 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody Nd2 in xenografted nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the biodistribution, radiolocalization, and radioimmunotherapeutic potential of 131I-labeled Nd2 in athymic nude mice bearing human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts. 131I-Nd2 was accumulated at high levels in the tumor, in contrast to blood, liver, spleen, and other normal organs. The tumor was clearly delineated in scintigraphs. The volumes of tumors of mice injected with 7.4 MBq of 131I-Nd2 were 80% less than those of tumors before injection of radiolabeled Nd2. Fibrous or vacuolar degeneration was seen in histological sections of tumors of 7-week-treated mice. The growth of tumors in mice treated with misonidazole, a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, and then injected twice with 3.7 MBq of 131I-Nd2 was suppressed over 7 weeks. Neither leucocytopenia nor thrombocytopenia was severe after injection of radiolabeled Nd2. Thus 131I-labeled Nd2 may have clinical application in the radioimmunotherapy of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  19. Pancreatic Metastasis of High-Grade Papillary Serous Ovarian Carcinoma Mimicking Primary Pancreas Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Gunay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reports of epithelial ovarian carcinomas metastatic to the pancreas are very rare. We herein present a metastasis of high grade papillary serous ovarian cancer to mid portion of pancreas. Case. A 42-year-old patient was admitted with a non-specified malignant cystic lesion in midportion of pancreas. She had a history of surgical treatment for papillary serous ovarian adenocarcinoma. A cystic lesion was revealed by an abdominal computerized tomography (CT performed in her follow up . It was considered as primary mid portion of pancreatic cancer and a distal pancreatectomy was performed. The final pathology showed high-grade papillary serous adenocarcinoma morphologically similar to the previously diagnosed ovarian cancer. Discussion. Metastatic pancreatic cancers should be considered in patients who present with a solitary pancreatic mass and had a previous non-pancreatic malignancy. Differential diagnosis of primary pancreatic neoplasm from metastatic malignancy may be very difficult. A biopsy for tissue confirmation is required to differentiate primary and secondary pancreatic tumors. Although, the value of surgical resection is poorly documented, resection may be considered in selected patients. Conclusion. Pancreatic metastasis of ovarian papillary serous adenocarcinoma has to be kept in mind when a patient with pancreatic mass has a history of ovarian malignancy.

  20. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, S.Q.; Cao, J. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Q.Y.; Li, Y.Y. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Yan, Y.Q. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Yu, F.X. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China)

    2013-09-27

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  1. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis

  2. The Expression of p53 and Cox-2 in Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Actinic Keratosis Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Ülker KARAGECE YALÇIN; Selda SEÇKİN

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate p53 and COX-2 expressions in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, and to determine a possible relationship.Material and Method: 50 basal cell carcinoma, 45 squamous cell carcinoma and 45 actinic keratosis cases were evaluated. The type of tumor in basal cell carcinoma and tumor differentiation in squamous cell carcinoma were noted and the paraffin block that best represented the tumor was chosen. Immunostainin...

  3. Bone marrow-derived pancreatic stellate cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparmann, Gisela; Kruse, Marie-Luise; Hofmeister-Mielke, Nicole; Koczan, Dirk; Jaster, Robert; Liebe, Stefan; Wolff, Daniel; Emmrich, Jörg

    2010-03-01

    Origin and fate of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) before, during and after pancreatic injury are a matter of debate. The crucial role of PSCs in the pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis is generally accepted. However, the turnover of the cells remains obscure. The present study addressed the issue of a potential bone marrow (BM) origin of PSCs. We used a model of stable hematopoietic chimerism by grafting enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP)-expressing BM cells after irradiation of acceptor rats. Chimerism was detected by FACS analysis of eGFP-positive cells in the peripheral blood. Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) was used to induce acute pancreatic inflammation with subsequent recovery over 4 weeks. Investigations have been focused on isolated cells to detect the resting PSC population. The incidence of eGFP-positive PSC obtained from the pancreas of chimeric rats was approximately 7% in healthy pancreatic tissue and increased significantly to a mean of 18% in the restored pancreas 4 weeks after DBTC-induced acute inflammation. Our results suggest that BM-derived progenitor cells represent a source of renewable stellate cells in the pancreas. Increased numbers of resting PSCs after regeneration point toward enhanced recruitment of BM-derived cells to the pancreas and/or re-acquisition of a quiescent state after inflammation-induced activation. PMID:20101265

  4. Current Aspects on Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Markopoulos, Anastasios K

    2012-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common malignant epithelial neoplasm affecting the oral cavity. This article overviews the essential points of oral squamous cell carcinoma, highlighting its risk and genomic factors, the potential malignant disorders and the therapeutic approaches. It also emphasizes the importance of the early diagnosis.

  5. Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, Helen; Walsh, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), also known as kidney cancer, renal adenocarcinoma or hypernephroma, and metastatic renal cell carcinoma is a global burden. This article aims to provide a brief overview of RCC. It outlines epidemiology and presentation; invesitgation and staging; treatments and prognosis. The article also includes a focus on currently available drug treatments, and serves as an introduction to the topic.

  6. Renal cell carcinoma presenting with malignant ascites

    OpenAIRE

    Jennison, Erica; Wathuge, Gayathri W; Gorard, David A

    2015-01-01

    Lesson It is rare for renal cell carcinoma to involve the peritoneum and cause malignant ascites. Furthermore, it is uncommon for malignant ascites to be a presenting feature of this cancer. An unusual case of renal cell carcinoma presenting with malignant ascites is reported, and its response to sunitinib described.

  7. Renal Cell Carcinoma in Transplanted Kidney

    OpenAIRE

    M. Naroienejad; Salouti, R

    2005-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs are prescribed routinely to kidney transplant recipients to prevent rejection. These medications are associated wi th an increased risk of secondary malignancies,including renal cell carcinoma in the transplanted kidney itself. We present a case of renal cell carcinoma in a transplanted kidney.

  8. Basal Cell Carcinoma in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Flohil (Sophie)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThere are many different cutaneous malignancies, but malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represent approximately 98% of all skin cancers.In literature, these three skin cancers are often divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC

  9. Ex vivo Expansion of Human Adult Pancreatic Cells with Properties of Distributed Stem Cells by Suppression of Asymmetric Cell Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Paré, JF; Sherley, JL

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation therapy for type I diabetes (T1D) might be improved if pancreatic stem cells were readily available for investigation. Unlike macroscopic islets, pancreatic tissue stem cells could more easily access the retroperitoneal pancreatic environment and thereby might achieve more effective pancreatic regeneration. Unfortunately, whether the adult pancreas actually contains renewing stem cells continues as a controversial issue in diabetes research. We evaluated a new method developed...

  10. Melatonin inhibits the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Lv; Pei-Lin Cui; Shi-Wei Yao; You-Qing Xu; Zhao-Xu Yang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of melatonin on cellular proliferation and endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1).Methods:PANC-1 cells were cultured for this study.The secreted VEGF concentration in the culture medium was determined using ELISA method,VEGF production in the tumor cells was detected by immunocytochemistry,and VEGF mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR.Results:Higher melatonin concentrations significantly inhibited cellular proliferation,with 1 mmol/L concentration exhibiting the highest inhibitory effect (P<0.01).VEGF concentrations in the cell culture supernatants and intra-cellules were all significantly reduced after melatonin (1 mmol/L) incubation (P<0.05).VEGF mRNA expression decreased markedly in a time-dependent manner during the observation period (P<0.05).Conclusions:High melatonin concentrations markedly inhibited the proliferation of pancreatic carcinoma cells.The endogenous VEGF expression was also suppressed by melatonin incubation.

  11. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic plasticity in vitro

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maithili P Dalvi; Malati R Umrani; Mugdha V Joglekar; Anandwardhan A Hardikar

    2009-10-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is a phenomenon that describes the occurrence of 2 or more distinct phenotypes under diverse conditions. This article discusses the work carried out over the past few years in understanding the potential of human pancreatic islet-derived progenitors for cell replacement therapy in diabetes. The phenotypic plasticity exhibited by pancreatic progenitors during reversible epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and possible role of microRNAs in regulation of this process is also presented herein.

  12. THE CHANGES OF PANCREATIC ACINAR CELL FUNCTION IN ACUTE NECROTIZING PANCREATITIS OF RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余枭; 韩天权; 汤耀卿; 雷若庆; 夏宗勤

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the changes of pancreatic acinar cell functions in the rats with acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). Methods Seventy SD rats were randomized into two groups: experimental group (n=35) and control group (n=35). To prepare the experimental model, the retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct was used for inducing ANP. Radioactive tracing by L- 3H-phenylalanine and autoradiography were performed for scoring the differences of changes of amino acid uptake, enzyme-protein synthesis and output from acinar cells in rats between both groups. Results No changes were observed in amino acid uptake and enzyme-protein synthesis in rats with dotted and haemorrhagic necrotizing foci as compared with control group. However, accumulated zymogen granules in the interstitial of acinar cells were seen in the experimental group. Conclusion It indicates that in experimental ANP rats, the functions of acinar cells in both amino acid uptake and protein synthesis were essentially normal, but the pathway of enzyme output was affected into ectopic secretion through the bottom or lateral cellular membrane of pancreatic acinar cell.

  13. Molecular Biologic Approach to the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Carcinoma Using Specimens Obtained by EUS-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyohito Kato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the utility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA, a rapid, safe, cost-effective, and accurate diagnostic modality for evaluating pancreatic tumors. EUS-FNA is currently used for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic tumors. The sensitivity of EUS-FNA for pancreatic malignancy ranges from 75% to 94%, and its specificity approaches 100% in most studies. However, EUS-FNA has some limitations in the diagnosis of well-differentiated or early-stage cancers. Recent evidence suggests that molecular biological analysis using specimens obtained by EUS-FNA improves diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, especially in borderline cytological cases. It was also reported that additional information regarding patient response to chemotherapy, surgical resectability, time to metastasis, and overall survival was acquired from the genetic analysis of specimens obtained by EUS-FNA. Other studies have revealed that the analysis of KRAS, MUC, p53, p16, S100P, SMAD4, and microRNAs is helpful in making the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. In this paper, we describe the present state of genetic diagnostic techniques for use with EUS-FNA samples in pancreatic diseases. We also discuss the role of molecular biological analyses for the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma.

  14. Analysis of gene expression profile of pancreatic carcinoma using CDNA microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhiJun Tan; Xian-Gui Hu; Gui-Song Cao; Yan Tang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To identify new diagnostic markers and drug targets,the gene expression profiles of pancreatic cancer were compared with that of adjacent normal tissues utilizing cDNA microarray analysis.METHODS: cDNA probes were prepared by labeling mRNA from samples of six pancreatic carcinoma tissues with Cy5dUTP and mRNA from adjacent normal tissues with Cy3dUTP respectively through reverse transcription. The mixed probes of each sample were then hybridized with 12 800cDNA arrays (12 648 unique human cDNA sequences), and the fluorescent signals were scanned by ScanArray 3 000scanner (General Scanning, Inc.). The values of CyS-dUTP and Cy3-dUTP on each spot were analyzed and calculated by ImaGene 3.0 software (BioDiscovery, Inc.). Differentially expressed genes were screened according to the criterion that the absolute value of natural logarithm of the ratio of Cy5-dUTP to Cy3-dUTP was greater-than 0.69.RESETS: Among 6 samples investigated, 301 genes, which accounted for 2.38% of genes on the microarry slides,exhibited differentially expression at least in 5. There were 166 over-expressed genes including 136 having been registered in Genebank, and 135 under-expressed genes including 79 in Genebank in cancerous tissues.CONCLUSION: Microarray analysis may provide invaluable information on disease pathology, progression, resistance to treatment, and response to cellular microenvironments of pancreatic carcinoma and ultimately may lead to improving early diagnosis and discovering innovative therapeutic approaches for cancer.

  15. Whipple's operation for carcinoma of the pancreatic head and the ampullary region. Short-and long-term results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M B; Banner, Jytte; Rokkjaer, M; Jacobsen, N O

    1998-01-01

    In this retrospective review short- and long-term perspectives have been evaluated for 108 patients who, during 1982 through 1992, had Whipple's operation performed for carcinoma of the pancreatic head (PC, n=63) or the ampullary region (AC, n=45). In 24 patients the operation was not radical (21...

  16. Effect of antidepressants on body weight, ethology and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Lin; Shang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yu-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of mirtazapine and fluoxetine, representatives of the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant respectively, on body weight, ingestive behavior, locomotor activity and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice.

  17. Clear Cell Carcinoma and Clear Cell Odontogenic Carcinoma: a Comparative Clinicopathologic and Immunohistochemical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bilodeau, Elizabeth A.; Hoschar, Aaron P.; Barnes, E. Leon; Hunt, Jennifer L.; Seethala, Raja R.

    2011-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma or hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma (CCC) and clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC) are rare, low-grade and typically indolent malignancies that can be diagnostically challenging. In this study the clinicopathologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical features of 17 CCCs and 12 CCOCs are examined. The differential diagnosis of clear cell malignancies in the head and neck is discussed. The relationship of CCCs and CCOCs to other clear cell tumors on the basis of their i...

  18. Successful palliative approach with high-intensity focused ultrasound in a patient with metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungaro, Antonio; Orsi, Franco; Casadio, Chiara; Galdy, Salvatore; Spada, Francesca; Cella, Chiara Alessandra; Tonno, Clementina Di; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Murgioni, Sabina; Frezza, Anna Maria; Fazio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man with a metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (APC). After an early tumour progression on first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine, even though it was badly tolerated, he was treated with a combination of systemic modified FOLFIRI and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on the pancreatic mass. A tumour showing partial response with a clinical benefit was obtained. HIFU was preferred to radiotherapy because of its shorter course and minimal side effects, in order to improve the patient’s clinical conditions. The patient is currently on chemotherapy, asymptomatic with a good performance status. In referral centres, with specific expertise, HIFU could be safely and successfully combined with systemic chemotherapy for treatment of metastatic pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27170835

  19. Successful palliative approach with high-intensity focused ultrasound in a patient with metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungaro, Antonio; Orsi, Franco; Casadio, Chiara; Galdy, Salvatore; Spada, Francesca; Cella, Chiara Alessandra; Tonno, Clementina Di; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Murgioni, Sabina; Frezza, Anna Maria; Fazio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old man with a metastatic anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (APC). After an early tumour progression on first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine, even though it was badly tolerated, he was treated with a combination of systemic modified FOLFIRI and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on the pancreatic mass. A tumour showing partial response with a clinical benefit was obtained. HIFU was preferred to radiotherapy because of its shorter course and minimal side effects, in order to improve the patient's clinical conditions. The patient is currently on chemotherapy, asymptomatic with a good performance status. In referral centres, with specific expertise, HIFU could be safely and successfully combined with systemic chemotherapy for treatment of metastatic pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27170835

  20. CHROMOPHOBE RENAL CELL CARCINOMA MASQUERADING AS OBSTRUCTIVE JAUNDICE AND GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromophobe (Chr RCC is a distinctive entity of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC arising from cortical portion of collecting duct of kidneys with an incidence of 3 - 5% (1. Localized Cromophobe RCC suggests a better prognosis than other type of RCC but there is a poorer outcome with sarcomatoid features or metastatic disease (1 . Renal cell carcinoma is one of the few tumors known to metastasize to the pancreas (2 . Metastatic pancreatic cancer is rare, accounting for approximately 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, and most cases arise from renal cell carcinoma (3. Of patients with pancreatic metastases, 12% present with synchronous extra pancreatic metastasis, and they have a poor prognosis . Chromophobe RCC presenting as obstructive jaundice and gastric outlet obstruction has been cited infrequently in literature (3 . The purpose of this paper is two: first, a rare case ChRCC with atypical presentation with obstructive jaundice, gastric outlet obstruction and pancreatic metastasis. Second, multidisciplinary treatment involving General surgeon, Medical Gastroenterologist, Surgical Gastroenterologist, Urologist, Interventional Radiologist and a Medical oncologist. CASE PRESENTATION: A 43 years old female presenting with features of obstructive jaundice and gastric outlet obstruction in surgical outpatient. A multidisciplinary management approach found Metastatic ChRCC the cause for gastrointestinal manifestation . CONCLUSIONS: ChRCC can be local invasion or metastatic. There are multiple sites where metastases can occur. There are many specific investigations to confirm RCC and concomitant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO, obstructive jaundice and pancreatic secondaries. This patient was diagnosed early after presentation of acute symptoms, decompression of biliary system done early by PTBD, Radical nephrectomy done with Portahepatis node which was causing obstructive jaundice and gastric outlet obstruction. Frozen section biopsy from

  1. Advances in radionuclide molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, β-cell mass (BCM) is lost.Various treatments are developed to restore or reconstruct BCM. The development of non-invasive methods to quantify BCM in vivo offers the potential for early detection of β-cell dysfunction prior to the clinical onset of diabetes. PET imaging with radioligands that directly target the pancreatic β-cells appears promising. The ability to determine the BCM has been investigated in several targets and their corresponding radiotracers, including radiolabeled receptor ligands, antibodies, metabolites and reporter genes. Therefore, we summarize the recent progress in radionuclide molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells. (authors)

  2. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010355 Oxymatrine enhances the expression of collagen I and α-SMA in rat chronic pancreatitis. WANG Yuliang(王昱良),et al. Dept Gastroenterol ,Huanghe Hosp,Sanmenxia 472000. World Chin J Digestol 2010;18(13):1331-36. Objective To investigate the treatment effects of oxymatrine (OM) against chronic pancreatitis in rats and to explore the potential

  3. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) channels, and corresponding transcripts were expressed in duct cells. Direct stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling and ethanol application had negligible effects on ATP release. The released ATP was sequentially dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting adenylate kinase (AK1) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) enzymes (NME1, 2), which contribute to metabolism and regeneration of extracellular ATP and other nucleotides (ADP, uridine diphosphate (UDP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP)). In conclusion, we illustrate a complex regulation of extracellular purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide

  4. Synchronous Renal Cell Carcinoma and Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Dafashy, Tamer J.; Cameron K. Ghaffary; Keyes, Kyle T.; Joseph Sonstein

    2016-01-01

    While renal cell carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed neoplasm of the kidney, its simultaneous diagnosis with a gastrointestinal malignancy is a rare, but well reported phenomenon. This discussion focuses on three independent cases in which each patient was diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma and a unique synchronous gastrointestinal malignancy. Case 1 explores the diagnosis and surgical intervention of a 66-year-old male patient synchronously diagnosed with clear cell renal cell carcinom...

  5. Clear Cell Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Potential Mimic of Conventional Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma on Core Biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Heath Liddell; Anton Mare; Sean Heywood; Genevieve Bennett; Hin Fan Chan

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCP-RCC) is a recently described, relatively uncommon variant of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with a reported incidence of 4.1%. Thought to only arise in those with end stage renal disease, CCP-RCC is increasingly identified in those without renal impairment. CCP-RCCs have unique morphologic, genetic, and immunohistochemical features distinguishing them from both conventional clear cell renal cell carcinomas and papillary renal cell carcinomas. Immunoh...

  6. Tumor Budding Cells, Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition-type Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EvaKaramitopoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is one of the most lethal cancers with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Moreover, PDAC escapes early detection and resists treatment. Multiple combinations of genetic alterations are known to occur in PDAC including mutational activation of KRAS, inactivation of p16/CDKN2A and SMAD4 (DPC4 and dysregulation of PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling. Through their interaction with WNT pathway, the downstream molecules of these pathways have been implicated in the promotion of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that cancer stem cells (CSCs, small populations of which have been identified in PDAC, and EMT-type cells play critical roles in drug resistance, invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancer. EMT may be histologically represented by the presence of tumor budding which is described as the occurrence of single tumor cells or small clusters (<5 of dedifferentiated cells at the invasive front of gastrointestinal (including colorectal, oesophageal, gastric and ampullary carcinomas and is linked to poor prognosis. Tumor budding has recently been shown to occur frequently in PDAC and to be associated with adverse clinicopathological features and decreased disease-free and overall survival. The aim of this review is to present a short overview on the morphological and molecular aspects that underline the relationship between tumor budding cells, CSCs and EMT-type cells in PDAC.

  7. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  8. Advances and challenges in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into pancreatic β cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Essam M Abdelalim; Mohamed M Emara

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are able to differentiate intoseveral cell types, including pancreatic β cells. Differentiationof pancreatic β cells depends on certain transcriptionfactors, which function in a coordinated way duringpancreas development. The existing protocols for in vitrodifferentiation produce pancreatic β cells, which are nothighly responsive to glucose stimulation except after theirtransplantation into immune-compromised mice and allowingseveral weeks for further differentiation to ensurethe maturation of these cells in vivo . Thus, although thesubstantial improvement that has been made for the differentiationof induced PSCs and embryonic stem cellstoward pancreatic β cells, several challenges still hinderingtheir full generation. Here, we summarize recent advancesin the differentiation of PSCs into pancreatic β cells anddiscuss the challenges facing their differentiation as wellas the different applications of these potential PSC-derivedβ cells.

  9. Assessment of pancreatic islet cell function and survival

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Function and survival of pancreatic islet insulin-producing beta-cells (β-cells) and glucagonproducing alpha-cells (α-cells) were studied, and methods for this purpose were developed or refined. Dynamic control of glucose metabolism is essential for β-cell stimulus-secretion coupling. ATP is an important metabolic parameter and therefore we set up a technique to monitor dynamic changes of ATP in insulin-producing cells using luciferase bioluminescence at the level of single...

  10. Recent progress on normal and malignant pancreatic stem/progenitor cell research: therapeutic implications for the treatment of type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus and aggressive pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    MIMEAULT, M.; Batra, S K

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress on pancreatic stem/progenitor cell research has revealed that the putative multipotent pancreatic stem/progenitor cells and/or more committed beta cell precursors may persist in the pancreatic gland in adult life. The presence of immature pancreatic cells with stem cell-like properties offers the possibility of stimulating their in vivo expansion and differentiation or to use their ex vivo expanded progenies for beta cell replacement-based therapies for type 1 or 2 diabetes me...

  11. Expression of basic fibroblast growth factor and its receptor in human pancreatic carcinomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta, T.(Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047, Japan); Yamamoto, M.; Numata, M; Iseki, S.; Tsukioka, Y.; Miyashita, T; Kayahara, M.; Nagakawa, T.; Miyazaki, I.; Nishikawa, K.; Yoshitake, Y

    1995-01-01

    We examined the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and FGF receptor by immunohistochemistry in 32 human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. Mild to marked basic FGF immunoreactivity was noted in 19 (59.4%) of the 32 tumours examined, and 30 (93.3%) of the tumours exhibited a cytoplasmic staining pattern against FGF receptor. The tumours were divided into two groups according to the proportion of positively stained tumour cells: a low expression group (positive cells < 25%) and ...

  12. The role of mesenchymal stem cells and serotonin in the development of experimental pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazebnic, L B; Lychkova, A E; Knyazev, O V

    2013-08-01

    Pancreatitis was modeled before and after preliminary transplantation of stem cells and serotonin. It was demonstrated that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells and activation of serotoninergic system prevent the development of pancreatitis. PMID:24143388

  13. Inflammatory role of the acinar cells during acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isabel; De; Dios

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells are secretory cells whose main function is to synthesize, store and f inally release digestive enzymes into the duodenum. However, in response to noxious stimuli, acinar cells behave like real inflammatory cells because of their ability to activate signalling transduction pathways involved in the expression of inflammatory mediators. Mediated by the kinase cascade, activation of Nuclear factor-κB, Activating factor-1 and Signal transducers and activators of transcription transcription factors has been demonstrated in acinar cells, resulting in overexpression of inflammatory genes. In turn, kinase activity is down-regulated by protein phosphatases and the f inal balance between kinase and phosphatase activity will determine the capability of the acinar cells to produce inflammatory factors. The kinase/ phosphatase pair is a redox-sensitive system in which kinase activation overwhelms phosphatase activity under oxidant conditions. Thus, the oxidative stress developed within acinar cells at early stages of acute pancreatitis triggers the activation of signalling pathways involved in the up-regulation of cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. In this way, acinar cells trigger the release of the f irst inflammatory signals which can mediate the activation and recruitment of circulating inflammatorycells into the injured pancreas. Accordingly, the role of acinar cells as promoters of the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis may be considered. This concept leads to amplifying the focus from leukocyte to acinar cells themselves, to explain the local inflammation in early pancreatitis.

  14. Human pancreatic cancer-associated stellate cells remain activated after in vivo chemoradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Carla Cabrera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is characterized by an extensive fibrotic reaction or desmoplasia and complex involvement of the surrounding tumor microenvironment. Pancreatic stellate cells are a key mediator of the pancreatic matrix and they promote progression and invasion of pancreatic cancer by increasing cell proliferation and offering protection against therapeutic interventions. Our study utilizes human tumor-derived pancreatic stellate cells (HTPSCs isolated from fine needle aspirates of pancreatic cancer tissue from patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma before and after treatment with full dose gemcitabine plus concurrent hypo-fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery. We show that HTPSCs survive in vivo chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment and display a more activated phenotype post therapy. These data support the idea that stellate cells play an essential role in supporting and promoting pancreatic cancer and further research is needed to develop novel treatments targeting the pancreatic tumor microenvironment.

  15. ROLE OF PANCREATIC STELLATE CELLS AND GALECTIN-3 ON PROLIFERATION AND INFILTRATION OF HUMAN PANCREATIC CANCER CELL LINE SW1990

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hai-biao; XU Ming; WANG Xing-peng

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and galectin-3 (GAL-3)on the proliferation and infiltration of pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. Methods Human pancreatic cancercell line SW1990 and PSCs were cultured in vitro. Supernatant of cultured PSCs and SW1990 cells was collected.Expressions of GAL-3 in SW1990 cells and PSCs were detected by ELISA, RT-PCR and Western blot. Theproliferation of those cultured PSCs and SW1990 cells were measured by MTT assay and flowcytometry. Infiltrationof SW1990 cells was detected by cell infiltration kit. Results SW1990 cells expressed GAL-3 and the expressionwas up-regulated by the supernatant fluid of cultured PSCs. PSCs did not express GAL-3. SW1990 cells couldstimulate the proliferation of PSCs via GAL-3. GAL-3 antibody could inhibit SW1990 cells proliferation andinfiltration, which indicated that supernatant of PSCs might stimulate the proliferation of SW1990 cells through theinteraction with GAL-3 protein. The supernatant fluid of PSCs could enhance the invasiveness of SW1990 cellsthrough the interaction with GAL-3. Conclusion GAL-3 and PSCs was involved in the proliferation andinfiltration process of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Breast metastasis from clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Botticelli, A.; De Francesco, G. P.; D. Di Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In Western countries, breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, whereas metastases to the breast from extramammary malignancies are extremely rare. We present the case of a 60-year-old woman, who underwent surgery in 2007 for clear cell renal cell carcinoma and who 4 years later presented with a breast metastasis from clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  17. Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Ampulla of Vater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Bolanaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Squamous carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater is a very rare tumor with only three cases been reported so far. Case report Here, we report the case of a 68-year-old man who presented with painless obstructive jaundice, general fatigue, loss of appetite and weight loss. Laboratory tests revealed hypochromic anemia. Total and direct bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, liver enzymes, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA were all elevated. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a distended gallbladder, dilatation of the intra- and extra-hepatic bile ducts and enlargement of the pancreatic head. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a bulging papilla with infiltrative growth at the ampulla of Vater but endoscopic biopsies were inconclusive. The patient was treated with classical Whipple’s pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histopathological examination showed a moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Multiple serial sectioning of the tumor specimen failed to detect an adenomatous component. Regional lymph nodes and resection margins were free of tumor and the disease was classified as stage IIA (T3N0M0 according to the TNM system. Adjuvant treatment was not given. Despite curative resection, multiple liver metastases developed after four months and the patient succumbed to progressive hepatic failure 5 months after the operation. Conclusion Primary pure squamous cell carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater is a very rare histological type of carcinoma. Clinical characteristics and optimal treatment are obscure. Primary surgical treatment with curative intent should be performed although this type of carcinoma associates with dismal prognosis.

  18. Effect of recombinant adenovirus vector mediated human interleukin-24 gene transfection on pancreatic carcinoma growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xin-ting; ZHU Qing-yun; LI De-chun; YANG Ji-cheng; ZHANG Zi-xiang; ZHU Xing-guo; ZHAO Hua

    2008-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a highly malignant tumor affecting an ever increasing number of patients with a mean 5-year survival rate below 4%. Therefore, gene therapy for cancer has become a potential novel therapeutic modality. In this study we sought to determine the inhibitory effects of adenovirus-mediated human interleukin-24 (AdhlL-24) on pancreatic cancer.Methods Human interleukin-24 gene was cloned into replication-defective adenovirus specific for patu8988 tumor cells by virus recombination technology. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis were used to determine the expression of human interleukin-24 mRNA in patu8988 cells in vitro. Induction of apoptosis by overexpression of human interleukin-24 in patu8988 cells was determined by flow cytometry. In vivo efficacy of adenoviral delivery of human interleukin-24 was assessed in nude mice (n=10 for each group) bearing patu8988 pancreatic cancer cell lines by determining inhibition of tumor growth, endothelial growth factor and CD34 expression, and intratumoral microvessel density (MVD).Results The recombinant adenovirus vector AdVGFP/IL-24 was constructed with a packaged recombinant retrovirus titer of 1.0x1010 pfu/ml and successfully expressed of both mRNA and protein in patu8988 cells. The AdVGFP/IL-24 induced apoptosis of patu8988 tumor cells in vitro and significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo (P <0.05). The intratumoral MVD decreased significantly in the treated tumors (P <0.05).Conclusion The recombinant adenovirus AdGFP/IL-24 can effectively express biologically active human interleukin-24, which results in inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth.

  19. Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma: A rare entity

    OpenAIRE

    P Venkat Baghirath; J Vijay Kumar; B Hari Vinay

    2011-01-01

    Hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma (HCCC) is an uncommon malignant salivary gland tumor accounting for about 1% of all intra-oral salivary gland tumors. Microscopic diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma may be challenging because of the spectrum of features which frequently overlaps with the other salivary gland tumors that contain clear cells, and thus it may be a diagnosis of exclusion. Here we, report a case of HCCC in a 36 years old female with detailed histological, histochemical and immunohis...

  20. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare; only several studies have been reported in the English literature. A 62-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of hematuria and dysuria. Bladder endoscopy revealed a large polypoid tumor at the bladder base. Transurethral bladder tumorectomy (TUR-BT) was performed. Many TUR-BT specimens were obtained. Histologically, the bladder tumor was pure small cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positi...

  1. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Accompanying Gorlin Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yeliz Bilir; Erkan Gokce; Banu Ozturk; Faik Alev Deresoy; Ruken Yuksekkaya; Emel Yaman

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity...

  2. Cathepsin B Activity Initiates Apoptosis via Digestive Protease Activation in Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Experimental Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendler, Matthias; Maertin, Sandrina; John, Daniel; Persike, Maria; Weiss, F Ulrich; Krüger, Burkhard; Wartmann, Thomas; Wagh, Preshit; Halangk, Walter; Schaschke, Norbert; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatitis is associated with premature activation of digestive proteases in the pancreas. The lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin B (CTSB) is a known activator of trypsinogen, and its deletion reduces disease severity in experimental pancreatitis. Here we studied the activation mechanism and subcellular compartment in which CTSB regulates protease activation and cellular injury. Cholecystokinin (CCK) increased the activity of CTSB, cathepsin L, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and caspase 3 in vivo and in vitro and induced redistribution of CTSB to a secretory vesicle-enriched fraction. Neither CTSB protein nor activity redistributed to the cytosol, where the CTSB inhibitors cystatin-B/C were abundantly present. Deletion of CTSB reduced and deletion of cathepsin L increased intracellular trypsin activation. CTSB deletion also abolished CCK-induced caspase 3 activation, apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein degradation, but these depended on trypsinogen activation via CTSB. Raising the vesicular pH, but not trypsin inhibition, reduced CTSB activity. Trypsin inhibition did not affect apoptosis in hepatocytes. Deletion of CTSB affected apoptotic but not necrotic acinar cell death. In summary, CTSB in pancreatitis undergoes activation in a secretory, vesicular, and acidic compartment where it activates trypsinogen. Its deletion or inhibition regulates acinar cell apoptosis but not necrosis in two models of pancreatitis. Caspase 3-mediated apoptosis depends on intravesicular trypsinogen activation induced by CTSB, not CTSB activity directly, and this mechanism is pancreas-specific. PMID:27226576

  3. Pancreatic cancer stimulates pancreatic stellate cell proliferation and TIMP-1 production through the MAP kinase pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by an intense desmoplastic reaction that surrounds the tumor. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are thought to be responsible for production of this extracellular matrix. When activated, PSCs have a myofibroblast phenotype and produce not only components of the extracellular matrix including collagen, fibronectin, and laminin, but also matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Since PSCs are found in the stroma surrounding human pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we postulate that pancreatic cancer could impact PSC proliferation and TIMP-1 production. Rat PSCs were isolated and cultured. Isolated PSCs were exposed to PANC-1 conditioned medium (CM) and proliferation, activation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway, and TIMP-1 gene induction were determined. Exposure to PANC-1 CM increased PSC DNA synthesis, cell number, and TIMP-1 mRNA (real-time PCR) as well as activating the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Inhibition of ERK 1/2 phosphorylation (U0126) prevented the increases in growth and TIMP-1 expression. PANC-1 CM stimulates PSC proliferation and TIMP-1 through the MAP kinase (ERK 1/2) pathway

  4. Ca2+ signaling in pancreatic acinar cells: physiology and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.H. Petersen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic acinar cell is a classical model for studies of secretion and signal transduction mechanisms. Because of the extensive endoplasmic reticulum and the large granular compartment, it has been possible - by direct measurements - to obtain considerable insights into intracellular Ca2+ handling under both normal and pathological conditions. Recent studies have also revealed important characteristics of stimulus-secretion coupling mechanisms in isolated human pancreatic acinar cells. The acinar cells are potentially dangerous because of the high intra-granular concentration of proteases, which become inappropriately activated in the human disease acute pancreatitis. This disease is due to toxic Ca2+ signals generated by excessive liberation of Ca2+ from both the endoplasmic reticulum and the secretory granules.

  5. File list: ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: His.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 TFs and others Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells SRX174585,SRX174586 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. ACANTHOLYTIC SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF PREPUCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An uncircumcised 65 year male, with history of phimosis presented with retention of urine and ulceration and bleeding in the prepuce. Circumcision was done under local anesthesia which revealed an ulcero-proliferative growth involving the prepuce and glans. The prepucial skin was sent for histopathological examination. The diagnosis was histopathologically confirmed as Acantholytic Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma is a highly malignant, unusual variant of squamous cell carcinoma invading deeper anatomic structures and is associated with a higher incidence of regional metastasis and mortality.

  18. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Cicek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumors. Small Cell Carcinoma of the bladder has an aggressive behaviour and is usually metastatic at diagnosis. Due to its infrequent occurence, the literature on this entity is limited; which unsurprisingly leads to an uncertanity in defining an ideal therapeutic approach. This report, overviews the literature while describing a 70- year- old female patient who is diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the bladder arising in an unusual localization. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 604-608

  19. Neglected giant scalp Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; El-Charnoubi, Waseem-Asim Ghulam; Gehl, Julie;

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local...... control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence...

  20. Neglected Giant Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kristine Larsen, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Rarely, basal cell carcinoma grows to a giant size, invading the underlying deep tissue and complicating the treatment and reconstruction modalities. A giant basal cell carcinoma on the scalp is in some cases treated with a combination of surgery and radiation therapy, resulting in local control, a satisfactory long-term cosmetic and functional result. We present a case with a neglected basal cell scalp carcinoma, treated with wide excision and postoperative radiotherapy, reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi flap. The cosmetic result is acceptable and there is no sign of recurrence 1 year postoperatively.

  1. Pancreatic differentiation from pluripotent stem cells: Tweaking the system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew M Holland; Andrew G Elefanty; Edouard G Stanley

    2009-01-01

    @@ Autoimmune destruction of insulin producing pancreatic β cells results in type 1 diabetes, a condition for which there is presently no cure. Clinical trials indicate that, in some instances, control of blood glucose can be restored by transplantation of cadaveric derived islets [1], raising hopes that such cell-based therapies may eventually form part of a curative treatment.

  2. Decoy receptor 3 suppresses FasL-induced apoptosis via ERK1/2 activation in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Xin; Song, Shiduo; Zhang, Lifeng; Zhu, Dongming [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Wang, Zhenxin [Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Chen, Xiaochen [Department of Pathology, The Obstetrics & Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zhou, Jian, E-mail: zhoujian20150602@126.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2015-08-07

    Resistance to Fas Ligand (FasL) mediated apoptosis plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is reported to interact with FasL and is overexpressed in some malignant tumors. We sought to investigate the role of DcR3 in resistance to FasL in pancreatic cancer. We compared expression of apoptosis related genes between FasL-resistant SW1990 and FasL-sensitive Patu8988 pancreatic cell lines by microarray analysis. We explored the impact of siRNA knockdown of, or exogenous supplementation with, DcR3 on FasL-induced cell growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines and expression of proteins involved in apoptotic signaling. We assessed the level of DcR3 protein and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in tumor and non-tumor tissue samples of 66 patients with pancreatic carcinoma. RNAi knockdown of DcR3 expression in SW1990 cells reduced resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis, and supplementation of Patu8988 with rDcR3 had the opposite effect. RNAi knockdown of DcR3 in SW1990 cells elevated expression of caspase 3, 8 and 9, and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation (P < 0.05), but did not alter phosphorylated-Akt expression. 47 tumor tissue specimens, but only 15 matched non-tumor specimens stained for DcR3 (χ{sup 2} = 31.1447, P < 0.001). The proliferation index of DcR3 positive specimens (14.26  ±  2.67%) was significantly higher than that of DcR3 negative specimens (43.58  ±  7.88%, P < 0.01). DcR3 expression positively correlated with p-ERK1/2 expression in pancreatic cancer tissues (r = 0.607, P < 0.001). DcR3 enhances ERK1/2 phosphorylation and opposes FasL signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. - Highlights: • We investigated the role of DcR3 in FasL resistance in pancreatic cancer. • Knockdown of DcR3 in SW1990 cells reduced resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis. • DcR3 knockdown also elevated caspase expression, and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. • Tumor and non-tumor tissues were collected from 66 pancreatic carcinoma patients

  3. Decoy receptor 3 suppresses FasL-induced apoptosis via ERK1/2 activation in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistance to Fas Ligand (FasL) mediated apoptosis plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is reported to interact with FasL and is overexpressed in some malignant tumors. We sought to investigate the role of DcR3 in resistance to FasL in pancreatic cancer. We compared expression of apoptosis related genes between FasL-resistant SW1990 and FasL-sensitive Patu8988 pancreatic cell lines by microarray analysis. We explored the impact of siRNA knockdown of, or exogenous supplementation with, DcR3 on FasL-induced cell growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines and expression of proteins involved in apoptotic signaling. We assessed the level of DcR3 protein and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in tumor and non-tumor tissue samples of 66 patients with pancreatic carcinoma. RNAi knockdown of DcR3 expression in SW1990 cells reduced resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis, and supplementation of Patu8988 with rDcR3 had the opposite effect. RNAi knockdown of DcR3 in SW1990 cells elevated expression of caspase 3, 8 and 9, and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation (P < 0.05), but did not alter phosphorylated-Akt expression. 47 tumor tissue specimens, but only 15 matched non-tumor specimens stained for DcR3 (χ2 = 31.1447, P < 0.001). The proliferation index of DcR3 positive specimens (14.26  ±  2.67%) was significantly higher than that of DcR3 negative specimens (43.58  ±  7.88%, P < 0.01). DcR3 expression positively correlated with p-ERK1/2 expression in pancreatic cancer tissues (r = 0.607, P < 0.001). DcR3 enhances ERK1/2 phosphorylation and opposes FasL signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. - Highlights: • We investigated the role of DcR3 in FasL resistance in pancreatic cancer. • Knockdown of DcR3 in SW1990 cells reduced resistance to FasL-induced apoptosis. • DcR3 knockdown also elevated caspase expression, and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. • Tumor and non-tumor tissues were collected from 66 pancreatic carcinoma patients.

  4. Cis-hydroxyproline-induced inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth is mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Mueller; Joerg Emmrich; Robert Jaster; Dagmar Braun; Stefan Liebe; Gisela Sparmann

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the biological effects of cishydroxyproline (CHP) on the rat pancreatic carcinoma cell line DSL6A, and to examine the underlying molecular mechanisms.METHODS: The effect of CHP on DSL6A cell proliferation was assessed by using BrdU incorporation. The expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was characterized by Western blotting and immunofluorescence.Induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was investigated by using RT-PCR and Western blotting for the glucose-related protein-78 (GRP78) and growth arrest and DNA inducible gene (GADD153). Cell viability was determined through measuring the metabolic activity based on the reduction potential of DSL6A cells. Apoptosis was analyzed by detection of caspase-3 activation and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) as well as DNA laddering.RESULTS: In addition to inhibition of proliferation,incubation with CHP induced proteolytic cleavage of FAK and a delocalisation of the enzyme from focal adhesions,followed by a loss of cell adherence. Simultaneously,we could show an increased expression of GRP78 and GADD153, indicating a CHP-mediated activation of the ER stress cascade in the DSL6A cell line. Prolonged incubation of DSL6A cells with CHP finally resulted in apoptotic cell death. Beside L-proline, the inhibition of intracellular proteolysis by addition of a broad spectrum protease inhibitor could abolish the effects of CHP on cellular functions and the molecular processes. In contrast, impeding the activity of apoptosis-executing caspases had no influence on CHP-mediated cell damage.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that the initiation of ER stress machinery by CHP leads to an activation of intracellular proteolytic processes, including caspaseindependent FAK degradation, resulting in damaging pancreatic carcinoma cells.

  5. Pazopanib-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Hata, Hiroo; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Imafuku, Keisuke; Kitamura, Shinya; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and c-Kit approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and soft tissue sarcoma. Nonselective kinase inhibitors, such as sunitinib and sorafenib, are known to be associated with acute pancreatitis. There are few case reports of severe acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment. We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis caused by pazopan...

  6. Basal cell carcinoma in oculo-cutaneous albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Kumar; Ashish Chauhan; Subhash Kashyap

    2016-01-01

    The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin tumour especially affecting the white individuals worldwide. The exact incidence of basal cell carcinoma is not known from India but non melanoma skin cancers comprises about 1-2% of cutaneous tumour in India. The most common skin tumour is squamous cell carcinoma in albinism and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma is less. Hereby, we report a peculiar case of basal cell carcinoma in albinism to highlights the importance of early recognition ...

  7. Dynamic Proteomic Analysis of Pancreatic Mesenchyme Reveals Novel Factors That Enhance Human Embryonic Stem Cell to Pancreatic Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger A. Russ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current approaches in human embryonic stem cell (hESC to pancreatic beta cell differentiation have largely been based on knowledge gained from developmental studies of the epithelial pancreas, while the potential roles of other supporting tissue compartments have not been fully explored. One such tissue is the pancreatic mesenchyme that supports epithelial organogenesis throughout embryogenesis. We hypothesized that detailed characterization of the pancreatic mesenchyme might result in the identification of novel factors not used in current differentiation protocols. Supplementing existing hESC differentiation conditions with such factors might create a more comprehensive simulation of normal development in cell culture. To validate our hypothesis, we took advantage of a novel transgenic mouse model to isolate the pancreatic mesenchyme at distinct embryonic and postnatal stages for subsequent proteomic analysis. Refined sample preparation and analysis conditions across four embryonic and prenatal time points resulted in the identification of 21,498 peptides with high-confidence mapping to 1,502 proteins. Expression analysis of pancreata confirmed the presence of three potentially important factors in cell differentiation: Galectin-1 (LGALS1, Neuroplastin (NPTN, and the Laminin α-2 subunit (LAMA2. Two of the three factors (LGALS1 and LAMA2 increased expression of pancreatic progenitor transcript levels in a published hESC to beta cell differentiation protocol. In addition, LAMA2 partially blocks cell culture induced beta cell dedifferentiation. Summarily, we provide evidence that proteomic analysis of supporting tissues such as the pancreatic mesenchyme allows for the identification of potentially important factors guiding hESC to pancreas differentiation.

  8. Dynamic Proteomic Analysis of Pancreatic Mesenchyme Reveals Novel Factors That Enhance Human Embryonic Stem Cell to Pancreatic Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Holger A; Landsman, Limor; Moss, Christopher L; Higdon, Roger; Greer, Renee L; Kaihara, Kelly; Salamon, Randy; Kolker, Eugene; Hebrok, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) to pancreatic beta cell differentiation have largely been based on knowledge gained from developmental studies of the epithelial pancreas, while the potential roles of other supporting tissue compartments have not been fully explored. One such tissue is the pancreatic mesenchyme that supports epithelial organogenesis throughout embryogenesis. We hypothesized that detailed characterization of the pancreatic mesenchyme might result in the identification of novel factors not used in current differentiation protocols. Supplementing existing hESC differentiation conditions with such factors might create a more comprehensive simulation of normal development in cell culture. To validate our hypothesis, we took advantage of a novel transgenic mouse model to isolate the pancreatic mesenchyme at distinct embryonic and postnatal stages for subsequent proteomic analysis. Refined sample preparation and analysis conditions across four embryonic and prenatal time points resulted in the identification of 21,498 peptides with high-confidence mapping to 1,502 proteins. Expression analysis of pancreata confirmed the presence of three potentially important factors in cell differentiation: Galectin-1 (LGALS1), Neuroplastin (NPTN), and the Laminin α-2 subunit (LAMA2). Two of the three factors (LGALS1 and LAMA2) increased expression of pancreatic progenitor transcript levels in a published hESC to beta cell differentiation protocol. In addition, LAMA2 partially blocks cell culture induced beta cell dedifferentiation. Summarily, we provide evidence that proteomic analysis of supporting tissues such as the pancreatic mesenchyme allows for the identification of potentially important factors guiding hESC to pancreas differentiation. PMID:26681951

  9. The reprogrammed pancreatic progenitor-like intermediate state of hepatic cells is more susceptible to pancreatic beta cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiwei; Wang, Hai; Sun, Yu; Li, Shi-Wu; Donelan, William; Chang, Lung-Ji; Jin, Shouguang; Terada, Naohiro; Cheng, Henrique; Reeves, Westley H; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-08-15

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapy. However, their low efficiency of lineage-specific differentiation and tumorigenesis severely hinder clinical translation. We hypothesized that reprogramming of somatic cells into lineage-specific progenitor cells might allow for large-scale expansion, avoiding the tumorigenesis inherent with iPSCs and simultaneously facilitating lineage-specific differentiation. Here we aimed at reprogramming rat hepatic WB cells, using four Yamanaka factors, into pancreatic progenitor cells (PPCs) or intermediate (IM) cells that have characteristics of PPCs. IM clones were selected based on their specific morphology and alkaline phosphatase activity and stably passaged under defined culture conditions. IM cells did not have iPSC properties, could be stably expanded in large quantity, and expressed all 14 genes that are used to define the PPC developmental stage. Directed differentiation of IM and WB cells by Pdx1-Ngn3-MafA (PNM) into pancreatic beta-like cells revealed that the IM cells are more susceptible to directed beta cell differentiation because of their open chromatin configuration, as demonstrated by expression of key pancreatic beta cell genes, secretion of insulin in response to glucose stimulation, and easy access to exogenous PNM proteins at the rat insulin 1 and Pdx1 promoters. This notion that IM cells are superior to their parental cells is further supported by the epigenetic demonstration of accessibility of Pdx1 and insulin 1 promoters. In conclusion, we have developed a strategy to derive and expand PPC cells from hepatic WB cells using conventional cell reprogramming. This proof-of-principal study may offer a novel, safe and effective way to generate autologous pancreatic beta cells for cell therapy of diabetes. PMID:23750005

  10. Surgical Treatment as a Principle for Patients with High-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Österlund, Pia;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to evaluate the role of surgery for patients with high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (hgPNEC) in a large Nordic multicenter cohort study. Prior studies evaluating the role of surgery for patients with hgPNEC are limited, and the benefit of the surgery is...... factors potentially influencing survival. RESULTS: The study registered 119 patients. The median survival period from the time of metastasis was 23 months for patients undergoing initial resection of localized nonmetastatic disease and chemotherapy at the time of recurrence (n = 14), 29 months for...... patients undergoing resection of the primary tumor and resection/radiofrequency ablation of synchronous metastatic liver disease (n = 12), and 13 months for patients with synchronous metastatic disease given systemic chemotherapy alone (n = 78). The 3-year survival rate after surgery of the primary tumor...

  11. High-Dose Lanreotide in the Treatment of Poorly Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Van Fraeyenhove

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs, including poorly differentiated carcinomas (NECs, are rarely encountered. The majority of these tumors do not secrete excess hormones, but functioning NETs produce large amounts of vasoactive peptides and may cause carcinoid syndrome. Synthetic somatostatin analogs (SSAs have been widely used in NETs for control of hormonal syndromes. Here, we present a case of poorly differentiated, grade 3 pancreatic NEC associated with carcinoid syndrome, for which adequate symptom control was achieved for 2 years and 4 months using the long-acting SSA lanreotide Autogel®. In February 2009, a 55-year-old woman presented with episodes of flushing, diarrhea and epigastric pain. Imaging techniques revealed the presence of a metabolically active mass expressing somatostatin receptors in the hilar area of the liver. Histopathological examination confirmed the malignant nature of the mass, which was identified as a poorly differentiated grade 3 pancreatic NEC (TNM staging: T4NxM0. Therapeutic options were limited for the patient because of the extent of the primary mass involving the celiac axis, severe gastrointestinal toxicity experienced as a side effect of chemotherapy with cisplatin-etoposide and, later in the course of the disease, extensive liver metastases and carcinoid heart syndrome. Along with a palliative debulking surgery and right portal vein embolization, biotherapy with a high dose of lanreotide Autogel (120 mg/14 days contributed to alleviation of symptoms caused by hormone overproduction, even after the development of liver metastases. These results suggest that patients with poorly differentiated NECs who exhibit signs of carcinoid syndrome can benefit from treatment with somatostatin analogs.

  12. Pancreatic carcinoma: MR, MR angiography and dynamic helical CT in the evaluation of vascular invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the value of MR angiography in combination with contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and to compare MR imaging including MR angiography with dynamic contrast-enhanced dual phase helical CT in the preoperative assessment of vascular invasion in patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma. Methods and material: MR imaging only, MR imaging including MR angiography and dynamic contrast-enhanced dual phase helical CT images of 48 patients who were operated due to suspicion of pancreas cancer were correlated with the surgery results in terms of vascular invasion. Pathologic diagnosis were pancreatic adenocarcinoma in 31 patients of which nine had surgically confirmed vascular invasion. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values (including 95% confidence intervals) and accuracy of MR imaging only, MR imaging including MR angiography and helical CT were calculated. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy were 56, 100, 100, 85, 87%; 67, 100, 100, 88, 90% and 67, 100, 100, 88, 90%, respectively, for MR imaging only, MR imaging including MR angiography and helical CT in the adenocarcinoma group. The corresponding figures in the overall study group were 56, 97, 83, 90, 90%; 67, 97, 86, 93, 92% and 67, 97, 86, 93, 92%. Confidence intervals (95%) showed that the differences in the diagnostic efficacy of the techniques were not statistically significant in the overall study group, but the confidence intervals were undefined in the adenocarcinoma group due to the small sample size. Conclusion: Diagnostic efficacy of MR imaging when combined with MR angiography is equal to that of dynamic contrast-enhanced dual phase helical CT in the assessment of vascular invasion of pancreatic tumors

  13. The Problems of Radiofrequency Ablation as an Approach for Advanced Unresectable Ductal Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced ductal pancreatic carcinoma (PC) remains a challenge for current surgical and medical approaches. It has recently been claimed that radiofrequency ablation (RFA) may be beneficial for patients with locally advanced or metastatic PC. Using the MEDLINE database, we found seven studies involving 106 patients in which PC was treated using RFA. The PC was mainly located in the pancreatic head (66.9%) with a median size of 4.6 cm. RFA was carried out in 85 patients (80.1%) with locally advanced PC and in 21 (19.9%) with metastatic disease. Palliative surgical procedures were carried out in 41.5% of the patients. The average temperature used was 90 °C (with a temperature range of 30–105 °C) and the ratio between the number of passes of the probe and the size of the tumor in centimeters was 0.5 (range of 0.36–1). The median postoperative morbidity and mortality were 28.3% and 7.5%, respectively; the median survival was 6.5 months (range of 1–33 months). In conclusion, RFA is a feasible technique: however, its safety and long-term results are disappointing; Thus, the RFA procedure should not be recommended in clinical practice for a PC patient

  14. Primary clear cell carcinoma of the larynx.

    OpenAIRE

    G.Pesavento; Ferlito, A; Recher, G.

    1980-01-01

    The clinical and pathological findings in three patients with clear cell carcinoma of the larynx are described. This type of neoplasm in the larynx is extremely rare. The aggressiveness of the tumour and its high biological malignancy are stressed.

  15. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SCCUB) is an extremely rare tumor that exhibits aggressive behavior and accounts for approximately less than 1% of all primary bladder tumors. Small cell carcinoma generally occurs in the lung, accounting for 25% of all pulmonary malignancies. SCCUB exhibits a similar microscopic and immunohistochemical appearance to that of small cell carcinoma of the lung. There is no consensus about the standard therapy, owing to its rarity. Surgical resection seems to be the mainstay of treatment for patients with limited stage, together with neoadjuvant or adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. Radiation therapy has same small effect for palliative purposes, as well as being an alternative to radical cystectomy. Patients with advanced stage, although given platinum-based chemotherapy, have a poor prognosis. We herein review epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, pathological features, and current management of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. (author)

  16. Sunitinib benefits patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findings from clinical trial patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, a common kidney cancer, show they did not have accelerated tumor growth after treatment with sunitinib, in contrast to some study results in animals.

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jae Jung; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong Hee [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst is uncommon. The diagnosis of carcinoma arising in a cyst requires that there must be an area of microscopic transition from the benign epithelial cyst lining to the invasive squamous cell carcinoma. We report a histopathologically proven case of squamous cell carcinoma arising in a residual mandibular cyst in a 54-year-old woman.

  18. Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval, Mark Anthony S; Paz-Pacheco, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    A 63-year-old man consulted for a non-toxic thyroid nodule of 2 years’ duration. Fine needle aspiration revealed cell findings consistent with papillary thyroid carcinoma. He eventually underwent total thyroidectomy. Microscopic examination revealed histologic features of Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid. He received radioactive iodine therapy and suppressive levothyroxine treatment. Post-therapy whole body iodine-131 scan revealed thyroid tissue remnants limited to the anterior neck. Fo...

  19. ACANTHOLYTIC SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF PREPUCE

    OpenAIRE

    Mamina; Sarvesh; Viswanathan; Rehana

    2014-01-01

    An uncircumcised 65 year male, with history of phimosis presented with retention of urine and ulceration and bleeding in the prepuce. Circumcision was done under local anesthesia which revealed an ulcero-proliferative growth involving the prepuce and glans. The prepucial skin was sent for histopathological examination. The diagnosis was histopathologically confirmed as Acantholytic Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma is a highly malignant, unusual...

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma of anal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal is rather rare and amounts to 3.5% of all rectal neoplasms. Though it has a clear-cut clinical picture, 29.5% of patients admitted for specialized treatment suffer from stage 4 due to inadequate diagnosis. Surgery is the most effective method of management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Radiation therapy may be an adjuvant procedure to surgery

  1. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic ...

  2. Renal vein thrombosis in transitional cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A rare case of renal transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) associated with bland thrombus of the renal vein extending into the inferior vena cava is described. Tumour thrombus in renal cell carcinoma is frequently encountered, but only very rarely occurs with TCC. Bland renal vein thrombosis occurring with renal TCC has not been described before. Contrast enhanced computed tomography assisted in distinguishing between bland and tumour thrombosis and aided in surgical management

  3. Preparation of Pancreatic Acinar Cells for the Purpose of Calcium Imaging, Cell Injury Measurements, and Adenoviral Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Orabi, Abrahim I.; Muili, Kamaldeen A.; Wang, Dong; Jin, Shunqian; Perides, George; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2013-01-01

    The pancreatic acinar cell is the main parenchymal cell of the exocrine pancreas and plays a primary role in the secretion of pancreatic enzymes into the pancreatic duct. It is also the site for the initiation of pancreatitis. Here we describe how acinar cells are isolated from whole pancreas tissue and intracellular calcium signals are measured. In addition, we describe the techniques of transfecting these cells with adenoviral constructs, and subsequently measuring the leakage of lactate de...

  4. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas: A Possible Role of S-1 as Chemotherapy for Acinar Cell Carcinoma. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tameyoshi Yamamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignancy, accounting for 1-2% of pancreatic exocrine malignancies. This rarity makes it difficult to standardize a protocol of treatment for acinar cell carcinoma. Case report A 71-year-old male without any particular past history was referred to our institute with abdominal distention and mild liver dysfunction. Computed tomography (CT revealed a cystic lesion with a diameter of 3.5 cm, which originated from the neck of pancreas and had solid nodules inside. Several nodules were demonstrated surrounding the cystic tumor. Laparotomy and histological study demonstrated peritoneal dissemination of acinar cell carcinoma. The patient was treated with S-1 monotherapy (80 mg/m2 for four weeks with a two-week interval as one cycle. After one cycle of S-1 monotherapy, CT demonstrated remarkable shrinkage of the main tumor and disappearance of the nodules on the peritoneum. The patient underwent a radical distal pancreatectomy. The patient was then treated with 16 cycles of S-1 monotherapy after the radical pancreatectomy and remains without any recurrence of the disease two years later. Conclusion Initially inoperable acinar cell carcinoma was treated by monotherapy using S-1, resulting in curative operation and two years disease free survival post operation. S-1 might be more effective on acinar cell carcinoma, rather than gemcitabine

  5. Study on the biological characteristics of pancreatic cancer vascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雷

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the biological characteristics of pancreatic cancer vascular endothelial cells,including the aspects of morphology,species,genetics,vascular formation ability,and proliferation ability in vitro. Methods The human pancreatic cancer cells were inoculated in nude mice pancreas to get pancreatic cancer

  6. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26510396

  7. ERG gene rearrangements are common in prostatic small cell carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Lotan, Tamara L.; Gupta, Nilesh S; Wang, Wenle; Toubaji, Antoun; Haffner, Michael C; Chaux, Alcides; Hicks, Jessica L.; Meeker, Alan K.; Bieberich, Charles J.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J.

    2011-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the prostate is a rare subtype with an aggressive clinical course. Despite the frequent occurrence of ERG gene rearrangements in acinar carcinoma, the incidence of these rearrangements in prostatic small cell carcinoma is unclear. In addition, molecular markers to distinguish prostatic small cell carcinomas from lung and bladder small cell carcinomas may be clinically useful. We examined the occurrence of ERG gene rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization in...

  8. Effect of antidepressants on body weight, ethology and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of mirtazapine and fluoxetine, representatives of the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) and se- lective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepres- sant respectively, on body weight, ingestive behavior, locomotor activity and tumor growth of human pancre- atic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. METHODS: A subcutaneous xenograft model of hu- man pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was estab- lished in nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were ran- domly divided into mirtazapine group [10 mg/(kg'd)], (an equivalent normal saline solution) (7 mice in each group). Doses of all drugs were administered orally, once a day for 42 d. Tumor volume and body weight were measured biweekly. Food intake was recorded once a week. Locomotor activity was detected weekly using an open field test (OFT). RESULTS: Compared to the fluoxetine, mirtazapine significantly increased food intake from d 14 to 42 and attenuated the rate of weight loss from d 28 to 42 (t = 4.38, P = 10.89, P < 0.01). These effects disappeared in the mirtazapine and fluoxetine groups during 2-6 wk. The grooming activity was higher in the mirtazapine group than in the fluoxetine group (10.1 ± 2.1 vs 7.1 ± 1.9 ) (t = 2.40, P < 0.05) in the second week. There was no significant difference in tumor vol- ume and tumor weight of the three groups. CONCLUSION: Mirtazapine and fluoxetine have no effect on the growth of pancreatic tumor. However, mirtazapine can significantly increase food intake and improve nutrition compared with fluoxetine in a pan- creatic cancer mouse model.

  9. Anticancer effect of arsenite on cell migration, cell cycle and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    HORIBE, YOHEI; ADACHI, SEIJI; YASUDA, ICHIRO; YAMAUCHI, TAKAHIRO; KAWAGUCHI, JUNJI; KOZAWA, OSAMU; SHIMIZU, MASAHITO; MORIWAKI, HISATAKA

    2016-01-01

    The standard treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy, but its clinical outcome remains unsatisfactory. Therefore, the development of novel treatments for this malignancy is urgently required. In the present study, the anticancer effect of arsenite on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced migration, cell cycle and apoptosis was investigated in pancreatic cancer cells (AsPC-1 and BxPC-3), and compared with the effect on normal pancreatic epithelial (PE) cells. In the cell migration assay, arsenite clearly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced cell migration in AsPC-1 cells, but not in BxPC-3 or PE cells. Arsenite also caused cell apoptosis in AsPC-1 cells, but not in BxPC-3 or PE cells. In AsPC-1 cells, the levels of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein decreased following treatment with arsenite, but this was not observed in BxPC-3 cells. To further examine the differences between these two cell lines, the effect of arsenite on upstream p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt was investigated. PDGF-BB caused phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAPK and Akt in both cell lines. Pretreatment with arsenite significantly suppressed PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Akt, but not of p44/p42 MAPK in AsPC-1 cells. By contrast, arsenite did not affect these molecules in BxPC-3 cells. Since the inhibition of the Akt signaling pathway markedly reduced PDGF-BB-induced migration in AsPC-1 cells, the present results strongly suggest that arsenite inhibits PDGF-BB-induced migration by suppressing the Akt signaling pathway in AsPC-1 cells. Therefore, arsenite may be a useful tool for the treatment of patients with certain types of pancreatic cancer, without causing adverse effects on normal pancreatic cells.

  10. Connexins protect mouse pancreatic β cells against apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Philippe; Allagnat, Florent; Pontes, Helena; Cederroth, Manon; Charollais, Anne; Caille, Dorothée; Britan, Aurore; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Meda, Paolo

    2011-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes develops when most insulin-producing β cells of the pancreas are killed by an autoimmune attack. The in vivo conditions modulating the sensitivity and resistance of β cells to this attack remain largely obscure. Here, we show that connexin 36 (Cx36), a trans-membrane protein that forms gap junctions between β cells in the pancreatic islets, protects mouse β cells against both cytotoxic drugs and cytokines that prevail in the islet environment at the onset of type 1 diabetes. We documented that this protection was at least partially dependent on intercellular communication, which Cx36 and other types of connexin channels establish within pancreatic islets. We further found that proinflammatory cytokines decreased expression of Cx36 and that experimental reduction or augmentation of Cx36 levels increased or decreased β cell apoptosis, respectively. Thus, we conclude that Cx36 is central to β cell protection from toxic insults. PMID:22056383

  11. Bifurcation structure of a model of bursting pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Lading, B.; Yanchuk, S.; Maistrenko, Y.

    One- and two-dimensional bifurcation studies of a prototypic model of bursting oscillations in pancreatic P-cells reveal a squid-formed area of chaotic dynamics in the parameter plane, with period-doubling bifurcations on one side of the arms and saddle-node bifurcations on the other. The...

  12. Novel Hedgehog pathway targets against basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a key role in directing growth and patterning during embryonic development and is required in vertebrates for the normal development of many structures, including the neural tube, axial skeleton, skin, and hair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in adult tissue is associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), medulloblastoma, and a subset of pancreatic, gastrointestinal, and other cancers. This review will provide an overview of what is known about the mechanisms by which activation of Hedgehog signaling leads to the development of BCCs and will review two recent papers suggesting that agents that modulate sterol levels might influence the Hh pathway. Thus, sterols may be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of BCCs, and readily available agents such as statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) or vitamin D might be helpful in reducing BCC incidence

  13. Pancreatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor: A case report with clinicopathological features and a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Ta, Na; Huang, Xiao-Yi; Zhang, Ming-Hua; Xu, Jing-Jing; Zheng, Kai-Lian; Jin, Gang; Zheng, Jian-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) of the pancreas is an unusual tumor deriving from mesenchyma. This paper described a case of pancreatic PEComa, which was initially suspected as neuroendocrine carcinoma by biopsy, and therefore surgical treatment was recommended due to undetermined diagnosis. Examination of the surgical specimen under a microscope showed that the tumor cell's morphology was epithelioid or spindle-shaped, and ranged in a nested pattern. Additionally, these cells had a large extent of acidophilic cytoplasm, no mitotic figures, and expressed HMB-45, melan-p, and smooth muscle actin immunohistochemically. Pathological examination indicated that PEComa originated from the pancreas, but symptoms related to tuberous sclerosis were absent. Since PEComa is extremely rare in the pancreas, it is likely to be ignored in differential diagnosis. In conclusion, our article highlighted the clinicopathological features of PEComa, and we conducted a literature review focusing on PEComa so as to deepen the understanding of this tumor type. PMID:27053862

  14. Intraoperative and external beam radiotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma; Intraoperative und perkutane Radiotherapie des Pankreaskarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eble, M.J. [Abt. Klinische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Maurer, U. [Klinikum der Stadt Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    1996-05-01

    Therapeutic strategies in the treatment of pancreatic carcinoma are based on the high number of non-resectable cancers, the high relative radioresistance and the high distant metastases rate. Even in curatively resected carcinomas, a locally effective treatment modality is needed because of the risk of microscopical residual disease in the peripancreatic tissue. The efficacy of radiotherapy is dose dependent. Based on an analysis of published data a dose of more than 50 Gy is recommended, resulting in a high morbidity rate with external beam radiotherapy alone. The use of intraoperative radiotherapy allows locally restricted dose escalation without increased perioperative morbidity. In adjuvant and in primary treatment, local tumor control was improved (70-90%). With palliative intent, pain relief was obtained rapidly in over 60% of patients and led to improved patient performance. As a result of the high distant metastases rate, even in curatively resected carcinomas, the overall prognosis could not be significantly improved. Further dose escalation is limited by the increasing incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (20-30%). (orig.) [Deutsch] Therapiestrategien beim Pankreaskarzinom werden bestimmt durch den hohen Anteil primaer nicht resektabler Karzinome, der hohen relativen Strahlenresistenz und der hohen Fernmetastasierungsrate. Selbst kurativ resezierte Karzinome erfordern durch ihre hohe lokale Tumorzellpersistenz eine lokal effektive adjuvante Behandlungsmassnahme. Die Effektivitaet einer Radiotherapie ist dosisabhaengig. Aus der Analyse publizierter Daten wird eine Dosis von >50 Gy, welche bei der alleinigen perkutanen Bestrahlung mit einer hohen Morbiditaet verbunden ist, empfohlen. Mit der intraoperativen Radiotherapie ist eine lokal begrenzte Dosiseskalation ohne erhoehte perioperative Morbiditaet moeglich. Sowohl in der adjuvanten als auch in der primaeren Behandlung kann die lokale Tumorkontrolle deutlich verbessert werden (70-90%). Unter

  15. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Methods. CTAI was performed in 17 patients with stage IV pancreatic cancer with (n = 11) or without (n = 6) liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The inferior pancreatic artery (IPA) was embolized to achieve delivery of the pancreatic blood supply through only the celiac artery. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the primary tumor size, liver metastasis, and survival time and factors such as tumor size, tumor location, and stage of pancreatic carcinoma; the embolized arteries were analyzed with respect to treatment effects and prognosis. Results. A catheter was fixed in the gastroduodenal artery and splenic artery in 10 and 7 patients, respectively. Complete peripancreatic arterial occlusion was successful in 10 patients. CT showed a decrease in tumor size in 6 of 17 (35%) patients and a decrease in liver metastases in 6 of 11 (55%) patients. The survival time ranged from 4 to 18 months (mean ± SD, 8.8 ± 1.5 months). Complete embolization of arteries surrounding the pancreas was achieved in 10 patients; they manifested superior treatment effects and prognoses (p < 0.05). Conclusion. In patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, long-term CTAI with systemic chemotherapy appeared to be effective not only against the primary tumor but also against liver metastases. Patients with successfully occluded peripancreatic arteries tended to survive longer

  16. Fast-growing pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldmann Jens

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Predictive genetic screening and regular screening programs in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 are intended to detect and treat malignant tumors at the earliest stage possible. Malignant neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are the most frequent cause of death in these patients. However, the extent and intervals of screening in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 are controversial as neuroendocrine tumors are usually slow growing. Here we report the case of a patient who developed a fast-growing neuroendocrine carcinoma within 15 months of a laparoscopic distal pancreatic resection. Case presentation We followed a group of 45 patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 by an annual screening program in the Department of Visceral, Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery at the University Hospital Marburg in cooperation with the Department of Radiology and the Division of Endocrinology. A man with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 who was diagnosed with a recurrent primary hyperparathyroidism underwent a distal pancreatic resection for a non-functional neuroendocrine tumor. In the context of our regular screening program, a large non-functional neuroendocrine tumor was diagnosed in the pancreatic head 15 months after the first pancreatic surgery. Therefore, we performed an enucleation and regional lymph node resection. At histology, the diagnosis of a neuroendocrine carcinoma with one lymph node metastasis was established. There was no evidence of recurrence 9 months after re-operation. Conclusion Fast-growing neuroendocrine tumors are rare in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. The intervals, both postoperative and in newly diagnosed pancreatic lesions, in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 should be reduced to 6 months to establish the early diagnosis of rapidly progressive disease in a small subset of patients.

  17. Role of YAP and TAZ in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and in stellate cells associated with cancer and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvaridi, Susan; Dhall, Deepti; Greene, Mark I; Pandol, Stephen J; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by a fibrotic and inflammatory microenvironment that is formed primarily by activated, myofibroblast-like, stellate cells. Although the stellate cells are thought to contribute to tumorigenesis, metastasis and drug resistance of PDAC, the signaling events involved in activation of the stellate cells are not well defined. Functioning as transcription co-factors, Yes-associated protein (YAP) and its homolog transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) modulate the expression of genes involved in various aspects of cellular functions, such as proliferation and mobility. Using human tissues we show that YAP and TAZ expression is restricted to the centroacinar and ductal cells of normal pancreas, but is elevated in cancer cells. In particular, YAP and TAZ are expressed at high levels in the activated stellate cells of both chronic pancreatitis and PDAC patients as well as in the islets of Langerhans in chronic pancreatitis tissues. Of note, YAP is up regulated in both acinar and ductal cells following induction of acute and chronic pancreatitis in mice. These findings indicate that YAP and TAZ may play a critical role in modulating pancreatic tissue regeneration, neoplastic transformation, and stellate cell functions in both PDAC and pancreatitis. PMID:26567630

  18. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  19. PANCREATIC BETA-CELL FUNCTION AND ISLET-CELL PROLIFERATION - EFFECT OF HYPERINSULINEMIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOITER, TR; WIJKSTRA, S; VANDERSCHAAFVERDONK, GCJ; MOES, H; SCHUILING, GA

    1995-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell function was studied in adult female rats, in which endogenous insulin demand was fully met by SC infusion of human insulin (4.8 IU/24 h) for 6 days, resulting in hyperinsulinaemia and severe hypoglycaemia. The amount of pancreatic endocrine tissue declined by 40%, (pro)insulin

  20. Transarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with high intensity focused ultrasound for the treatment of pancreatic carcinomas: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of transarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of pancreatic carcinomas. Methods: A total of 64 patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinomas were randomly divided into study group (n=32) and control group (n=32). Transarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with HIFU was employed in patients of study group, while simple transarterial infusion chemotherapy was conducted in patients of control group. The effective rate, the clinical benefit rate (CBR), the occurrence of side effect and the survival time of the two groups were recorded. The results were compared between the two groups. Results: The effective rate (PR + MR), the median survival time and the one-year survival rate of the study group were 55.56%, 13.0 months and 68.75% respectively, while the effective rate (PR + MR), the median survival time and the one-year survival rate of the control group were 28.57%, 9.0 months and 43.75% respectively. Both the effective rate and the one-year survival rate of the study group were significantly higher than those of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Compared with pure transarterial infusion chemotherapy, transarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with HIFU can significantly improve the short-term efficacy and increase the one-year survival rate for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinomas. (authors)

  1. Effect of Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossum, Carlo G.; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch;

    Effect of Fish Protein Hydrolysates on Pancreatic Cancer Cells Carlo G. Ossum1, Lisa Lystbæk Andersen2, Henrik Hauch Nielsen2, Else K. Hoffmann1, and Flemming Jessen2 1University of Copenhagen, Department of Biology, Denmark, 2Technical University of Denmark (DTU), National Food Institute, Denmark...... activities affecting cell proliferation and ability to modulate caspase activity in pancreatic cancer cells COLO357 and BxPC-3 in vitro. A number of the hydrolysates showed caspase promoting activity; in particular products containing muscle tissue, i.e. belly flap, were able to stimulate caspase activity...... hydrolysates obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis on cancer cell proliferation. Skin and belly flap muscle from trout were hydrolysed with the unspecific proteases Alcalase, Neutrase, or UE1 (all from Novozymes, Bagsværd, Denmark) to a hydrolysis degree of 1-15%. The hydrolysates were tested for biological...

  2. The pancreatic stellate cell: a star on the rise in pancreatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Omary, M. Bishr; Lugea, Aurelia; Lowe, Anson W.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PaSCs) are myofibroblast-like cells found in the areas of the pancreas that have exocrine function. PaSCs are regulated by autocrine and paracrine stimuli and share many features with their hepatic counterparts, studies of which have helped further our understanding of PaSC biology. Activation of PaSCs induces them to proliferate, to migrate to sites of tissue damage, to contract and possibly phagocytose, and to synthesize ECM components to promote tissue repair. Su...

  3. Diabetic ketoacidosis with concurrent pancreatitis, pancreatic β islet cell tumor, and adrenal disease in an obese ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phair, Kristen A; Carpenter, James W; Schermerhorn, Thomas; Ganta, Chanran K; DeBey, Brad M

    2011-07-01

    A 5.5-y-old spayed female ferret (Mustela putorius furo) with a history of adrenal disease, respiratory disease, and chronic obesity was evaluated for progressive lethargy and ataxia, diminished appetite, and possible polyuria and polydipsia. Physical examination revealed obesity, lethargy, tachypnea, dyspnea, a pendulous abdomen, significant weakness and ataxia of the hindlimbs, prolonged skin tenting, and mild tail-tip alopecia. Clinicopathologic analysis revealed severe hyperglycemia, azotemia, an increased anion gap, glucosuria, ketonuria, proteinuria, and hematuria. Abdominal ultrasonography showed hyperechoic hepatomegaly, bilateral adrenomegaly, splenic nodules, mild peritoneal effusion, and thickened and mildly hypoechoic limbs of the pancreas with surrounding hyperechoic mesentery. Fine-needle aspirates of the liver were highly suggestive of hepatic lipidosis. In light of a diagnosis of concurrent diabetic ketoacidosis and pancreatitis, the ferret was treated with fluid therapy, regular and long-acting insulin administration, and pain medication. However, electrolyte derangements, metabolic acidosis, dyspnea, and the clinical appearance of the ferret progressively worsened despite treatment, and euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed severe hepatic lipidosis, severe suppurative pancreatitis and vacuolar degeneration of pancreatic islet cells, a pancreatic β islet cell tumor, bilateral adrenal cortical adenomas, and myocardial fibrosis. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of concurrent diabetes mellitus, pancreatitis, pancreatic β islet cell tumor (insulinoma), and adrenal disease in a domestic ferret. The simultaneous existence of 3 endocrine diseases, pancreatitis, and their associated complications is a unique and clinically challenging situation. PMID:21838985

  4. Radioimmunodetection with 111In-labeled monoclonal antibody Nd2 in patients with pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes results from an initial clinical evaluation of radioimmunodetection (RAID) in patients with pancreatic cancer using murine monoclonal antibody Nd2, directed against mucins from pancreatic cancer. Nd2 (2 mg) was labeled with 111In (2 mCi) and injected into 19 patients suspected of having pancreatic cancer. Planar scintigrams were taken 3 days post-infusion. As for final diagnoses after surgery, 14 cases were pancreatic cancer, and one case each was chronic pancreatitis, neurilemmoma, islet cell carcinoma, cholangioma, and apparent absence of suspected recurrent lesion of pancreatic cancer. Of 14 patients with pancreatic cancer, RAID was positive in 10 cases (71.4%). Cases other than pancreatic cancer were all negative, so the specificity was 100%. These results demonstrate that RAID using 111In-Nd2 can be useful in differentiating exocrine pancreatic cancer from benign conditions and other types of carcinomas in the pancreatoduodenal regions. (author)

  5. Cell therapies for pancreatic beta-cell replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okere, Bernard; Lucaccioni, Laura; Dominici, Massimo; Iughetti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment approach for type 1 diabetes is based on daily insulin injections, combined with blood glucose monitoring. However, administration of exogenous insulin fails to mimic the physiological activity of the islet, therefore diabetes often progresses with the development of serious complications such as kidney failure, retinopathy and vascular disease. Whole pancreas transplantation is associated with risks of major invasive surgery along with side effects of immunosuppressive therapy to avoid organ rejection. Replacement of pancreatic beta-cells would represent an ideal treatment that could overcome the above mentioned therapeutic hurdles. In this context, transplantation of islets of Langerhans is considered a less invasive procedure although long-term outcomes showed that only 10 % of the patients remained insulin independent five years after the transplant. Moreover, due to shortage of organs and the inability of islet to be expanded ex vivo, this therapy can be offered to a very limited number of patients. Over the past decade, cellular therapies have emerged as the new frontier of treatment of several diseases. Furthermore the advent of stem cells as renewable source of cell-substitutes to replenish the beta cell population, has blurred the hype on islet transplantation. Breakthrough cellular approaches aim to generate stem-cell-derived insulin producing cells, which could make diabetes cellular therapy available to millions. However, to date, stem cell therapy for diabetes is still in its early experimental stages. This review describes the most reliable sources of stem cells that have been developed to produce insulin and their most relevant experimental applications for the cure of diabetes. PMID:27400873

  6. Pancreas++: Automated Quantification of Pancreatic Islet Cells in Microscopy Images

    OpenAIRE

    StuartMaudsley; BronwenMartin; JenniferLFiori

    2013-01-01

    The microscopic image analysis of pancreatic Islet of Langerhans morphology is crucial for the investigation of diabetes and metabolic diseases. Besides the general size of the islet, the percentage and relative position of glucagon-containing alpha-, and insulin-containing beta-cells is also important for pathophysiological analyses, especially in rodents. Hence, the ability to identify, quantify and spatially locate peripheral, and “involuted” alpha-cells in the islet core is an important a...

  7. Dynamical complexity and temporal plasticity in pancreatic -cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard Bertram; Arthur Sherman

    2000-06-01

    We discuss some of the biological and mathematical issues involved in understanding and modelling the bursting electrical activity in pancreatic -cells. These issues include single-cell versus islet behaviour, parameter heterogeneity, channel noise, the effects of hormones, neurotransmitters, and ions, and multiple slow biophysical processes. Some of the key experimental and modelling studies are described, and some of the major open questions are discussed.

  8. Synergistic antitumor activity of gemcitabine combined with triptolide in pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    QIAO, ZHIXIN; He, Min; HE, MU; Li, Weijing; WANG, XUANLIN; Wang, Yanbing; KUAI, QIYUAN; Li, Changlan; REN, SUPING; Yu, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a fatal human malignancy associated with an exceptionally poor prognosis. Novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required to treat this disease. In addition to immunosuppressive activity, triptolide possesses strong antitumor activity and synergistically enhances the antitumor activities of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. The present study investigated the antitumor effects of triptolide in pancreatic cancer cells, either...

  9. ANALYSIS OF GENES ASSOCIATED WITH LYMPHATIC METASTASIS IN PANCREATIC CARCINOMA USING cDNA MICROARRAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭志军; 胡先贵; 曹贵松; 唐岩

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To identify new markers for prediction of lymph node metastasis. Methods: cDNA probes were prepared by labeling mRNA from samples of four pancreatic carcinoma tissues with Cy5-dUTP and mRNA from adjacent normal tissues with Cy3-dUTP respectively through reverse transcription. The mixed probes of each sample were then hybridized with 4,096 cDNA arrays (4,000 unique human cDNA sequences), and the fluorescent signals were scanned by ScanArray 3000 scanner (General Scanning, Inc.). The values of Cy5-dUTP and Cy3-dUTP on each spot were analyzed and calculated by ImaGene 3.0 software (BioDiscovery, Inc.). Genes that differentially expresses in each cancerous tissue were sought out according to the standard that the absolute value of natural logarithm of the ratio of Cy5 to Cy3 is greater than 0.69, i. e., more than 2 times change of gene expression, and the signal value of either Cy3 and Cy5 need to be greater than 600. Then, the genes differently expressed in cancer with and without lymphatic metastasis were screened out for further analysis. Results: Among 2 samples with lymphatic metastasis and 2 samples without metastasis, 56 genes, which accounted for 1.40% of genes on the microarray slides, exhibited differentially expression in cancerous tissues with lymphatic metastasis. There were 32 over-expressed genes including 11 having been registered in Genebank, and 24 under-expressed genes including 3 in Genebank. Conclusion: Microarray analysis may provide invaluable information to identify specific gene expression profile of lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

  10. Nicotine as a mitogenic stimulus for pancreatic acinar cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parimal Chowdhury; Kodetthoor B Udupa

    2006-01-01

    Cell proliferation is an important process in life for growth of normal and cancer cells. The signal transduction pathways activated during this process are strictly regulated. This editorial focuses on the role of nicotine,a mitogen, in the induction of signaling pathways resulting in proliferation of pancreatic tumor cells and compares these events with those in normal acinar cells isolated from the rat pancreas. The data shows striking similarities between these two cellular systems.In addition, the editorial reviews very recent literature of the contribution of MAPK signaling in cell lines associated with human diseases. A prospective cellular model of nicotine induced activation of MAPK cascade is presented.

  11. The roles of FOXM1 in pancreatic stem cells and carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Ming; Wang, PeiPei; Cui, Jiujie; Gao, Yong; Xie, Keping

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers. Over the past several decades, investigators have made great advances in the research of PDAC pathogenesis. Importantly, identification of pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) in pancreatic cancer cases has increased our understanding of PDAC biology and therapy. PCSCs are responsible for pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression via a number of mechanisms, including extensive proliferation, self-...

  12. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  13. Pancreatic Stellate Cells : A Starring Role in Normal and Diseased Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoti eApte

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While the morphology and function of cells of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas have been studied over several centuries, one important cell type in the gland, the pancreatic stellate cell (PSC, had remained undiscovered until as recently as twenty years ago. Even after its first description in 1982, it was to be another 16 years before its biology could begin to be studied, because it was only in 1998 that methods were developed to isolate and culture PSCs from rodent and human pancreas. PSCs are now known to play a critical role in pancreatic fibrosis, a consistent histological feature of two major diseases of the pancreas - chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In health, PSCs maintain normal tissue architecture via regulation of the synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins. Recent studies have also implied other additional functions for PSCs as progenitor cells, immune cells or intermediaries in exocrine pancreatic secretion in humans.During pancreatic injury, PSCs transform from their quiescent phase into an activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype that secretes excessive amounts of ECM proteins leading to the fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. An ever increasing number of factors that stimulate and/or inhibit PSC activation via paracrine and autocrine pathways are being identified and characterized. It is also now established that PSCs interact closely with pancreatic cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression. Based on these findings, several therapeutic strategies have been examined in experimental models of chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic cancer, in a bid to inhibit/retard PSC activation and thereby alleviate chronic pancreatitis or reduce tumour growth in pancreatic cancer. The challenge that remains is to translate these pre-clinical developments into clinically applicable treatments for patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  14. Pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration with phytotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Hosseini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although currently available drugs are useful in controlling early onset complications of diabetes, serious late onset complications appear in a large number of patients. Considering the physiopathology of diabetes, preventing beta cell degeneration and stimulating the endogenous regeneration of islets will be essential approaches for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The current review focused on phytochemicals, the antidiabetic effect of which has been proved by pancreatic beta cell protection/regeneration. Among the hundreds of plants that have been investigated for diabetes, a small fraction has shown the regenerative property and was described in this paper. Processes of pancreatic beta cell degeneration and regeneration were described. Also, the proposed mechanisms for the protective/regenerative effects of such phytochemicals and their potential side effects were discussed.

  15. Mucins and Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Van Seuningen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is characterized by an often dramatic outcome (five year survival < 5% related to a late diagnosis and a lack of efficient therapy. Therefore, clinicians desperately need new biomarkers and new therapeutic tools to develop new efficient therapies. Mucins belong to an ever increasing family of O-glycoproteins. Secreted mucins are the main component of mucus protecting the epithelia whereas membrane-bound mucins are thought to play important biological roles in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, in cell signaling and in modulating biological properties of cancer cells. In this review, we will focus on the altered expression pattern of mucins in pancreatic cancer, from the early neoplastic lesion Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PanIN to invasive pancreatic carcinomas, and the molecular mechanisms (including genetic and epigenetic regulation and signaling pathways known to control their expression. Moreover, we will discuss the recent advances about the biology of both secreted and membrane-bound mucins and their key roles in pancreatic carcinogenesis and resistance to therapy. Finally, we will discuss exciting opportunities that mucins offer as potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer.

  16. Chemoradiation of unresectable pancreatic carcinoma: impact of pretreatment hemoglobin level on patterns of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate, in patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma undergoing concomitant chemoradiation, the impact of pretreatment hemoglobin (Hb) concentration on the outcome in terms of clinical response, local control, metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Patients and Methods: 30 patients undergoing concomitant chemoradiation (5-fluorouracil [5-FU], 1,000 mg/m2/day, continuous i.v. infusion days 1-4 of radiotherapy) and external beam radiotherapy (50.4-59.4 Gy) were divided into two groups based on pretreatment median Hb value (11.5 g/dl). The potential prognostic factors examined besides Hb concentration were: tumor site (head vs body-tail), sex (female vs male), cN (cN0 vs cN1), dose of external beam radiotherapy (50.4 Gy vs 59.4 Gy), presence of jaundice at diagnosis (yes vs no), weight loss at diagnosis (≥ 5 kg vs 11.5 g/dl. Metastasis-free survival was 5.1 months in patients with an Hb ≤ 11.5 g/dl and 10.7 months in patients with an Hb > 11.5 g/dl (p = 0.010). Median actuarial disease-free survival was 5.1 and 10.2 months in patients with an Hb ≤ 11.5 and > 11.5 g/dl, respectively (p = 0.026). Median actuarial overall survival was 7.5 and 10.3 months in patients with an Hb ≤ 11.5 and > 11.5 g/dl, respectively (p = 0.039). On multivariate analysis, Hb concentration at diagnosis was the only factor prognostically correlated with metastasis-free survival (p = 0.026), disease-free survival (p = 0.032), and overall survival (p = 0.048). Conclusion: In a group of patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma treated with chemoradiation, a significant correlation was observed between pretreatment Hb levels and metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. (orig.)

  17. Epidemiologia do carcinoma basocelular Epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquiria Pessoa Chinem

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma basocelular é a neoplasia maligna mais comum em humanos e sua incidência vem aumentando nas últimas décadas. Sua grande frequência gera significativo ônus ao sistema de saúde, configurando problema de saúde pública. Apesar das baixas taxas de mortalidade e de rara ocorrência de metástases, o tumor pode apresentar comportamento invasivo local e recidivas após o tratamento, provocando importante morbidade. Exposição à radiação ultravioleta representa o principal fator de risco ambiental associado a sua gênese. Entretanto, descrevem-se outros elementos de risco: fotótipos claros, idade avançada, história familiar de carcinomas de pele, olhos e cabelos claros, sardas na infância e imunossupressão, além de aspectos comportamentais, como exercício profissional exposto ao sol, atividade rural e queimaduras solares na juventude. Entre 30% e 75% dos casos esporádicos estão associados à mutação do gene patched hedgehog, mas outras alterações genéticas são ainda descritas. A neoplasia é comumente encontrada concomitantemente com lesões cutâneas relacionadas à exposição solar crônica, tais como: queratoses actínicas, lentigos solares e telangiectasias faciais. A prevenção do carcinoma basocelular se baseia no conhecimento de fatores de risco, no diagnóstico e tratamento precoces e na adoção de medidas específicas, principalmente, nas populações susceptíveis. Os autores apresentam uma revisão da epidemiologia do carcinoma basocelular.Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant neoplasm in humans and its incidence has increased over the last decades. Its high frequency significantly burdens the health system, making the disease a public health issue. Despite the low mortality rates and the rare occurrence of metastases, the tumor may be locally invasive and relapse after treatment, causing significant morbidity. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the main environmental risk factor

  18. Pancreas++ : Automated Quantification of Pancreatic Islet Cells in Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StuartMaudsley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The microscopic image analysis of pancreatic Islet of Langerhans morphology is crucial for the investigation of diabetes and metabolic diseases. Besides the general size of the islet, the percentage and relative position of glucagon-containing alpha-, and insulin-containing beta-cells is also important for pathophysiological analyses, especially in rodents. Hence, the ability to identify, quantify and spatially locate peripheral and ‘involuted’ alpha-cells in the islet core is an important analytical goal. There is a dearth of software available for the automated and sophisticated positional-quantification of multiple cell types in the islet core. Manual analytical methods for these analyses, while relatively accurate, can suffer from a slow throughput rate as well as user-based biases. Here we describe a newly developed pancreatic islet analytical software program, Pancreas++, which facilitates the fully-automated, non-biased, and highly reproducible investigation of islet area and alpha- and beta-cell quantity as well as position within the islet for either single or large batches of fluorescent images. We demonstrate the utility and accuracy of Pancreas++ by comparing its performance to other pancreatic islet size and cell type (alpha, beta quantification methods. Our Pancreas++ analysis was significantly faster than other methods, while still retaining low error rates and a high degree of result correlation with the manually generated reference standard.

  19. Immunohistochemical localization of polypeptide hormones in pancreatic endocrine cells of a dipnoan fish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, D W; Adriaensen, D; Timmermans, J P; De Groodt-Lasseel, M H

    1991-01-01

    Light microscopical immunohistochemistry was used to demonstrate the regulatory peptides present in the endocrine pancreas of Protopterus aethiopicus. The peptides studied included insulin, glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide and somatostatin. The results showed that the 4 regulatory peptides commonly detected in the mammalian endocrine pancreas were immunologically discernible in this dipnoan fish. Large amounts of insulin-immunoreactive cells, in the centre of the pancreatic islets, were surrounded by a small rim of glucagon-or pancreatic polypeptide-immunoreactive cells. In addition, adjacent sections stained with anti-glucagon and anti-pancreatic polypeptide revealed that these hormones could be found in the same cells. Somatostatin-positive cells were scattered throughout the islets. Their processes were seen to contact many different endocrine pancreatic cells, suggesting that the somatostatin-immunoreactive cells control the functions of other endocrine pancreatic cells. PMID:1687100

  20. Connexins protect mouse pancreatic β cells against apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Klee, Philippe; Allagnat, Florent; Pontes, Helena; Cederroth, Manon; Charollais, Anne; Caille, Dorothée; Britan, Aurore; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Meda, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes develops when most insulin-producing β cells of the pancreas are killed by an autoimmune attack. The in vivo conditions modulating the sensitivity and resistance of β cells to this attack remain largely obscure. Here, we show that connexin 36 (Cx36), a trans-membrane protein that forms gap junctions between β cells in the pancreatic islets, protects mouse β cells against both cytotoxic drugs and cytokines that prevail in the islet environment at the onset of type 1 diabetes. W...

  1. Impact by pancreatic stellate cells on epithelial-mesenchymal transition and pancreatic cancer cell invasion: Adding a third dimension in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnevi, Emelie; Rosendahl, Ann H; Hilmersson, Katarzyna Said; Saleem, Moin A; Andersson, Roland

    2016-08-15

    Pancreatic cancer is associated with a highly abundant stroma and low-grade inflammation. In the local tumour microenvironment, elevated glucose levels, the presence of tumour-associated stellate cells and macrophages are hypothesised to promote the tumour progression and invasion. The present study investigated the influence by the microenvironment on pancreatic cancer cell invasion in vitro. After co-culture with tumour-associated pancreatic stellate cells (TPSCs), pancreatic cancer cells displayed up to 8-fold reduction in levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers E-cadherin and ZO-1, while β-catenin and vimentin levels were increased. A 3D organotypic model showed that TPSCs stimulated pancreatic cancer cell invasion, both as single cell (PANC-1) and cohort (MIAPaCa-2) invasion. The combined presence of TPSCs and M2-like macrophages induced invasion of the non-invasive BxPC-3 cells. High glucose conditions further enhanced changes in EMT markers as well as the cancer cell invasion. In summary, co-culture with TPSCs induced molecular changes associated with EMT in pancreatic cancer cells, regardless of differentiation status, and the organotypic model demonstrated the influence of microenvironmental factors, such as glucose, stellate cells and macrophages, on pancreatic cancer cell invasion. PMID:27443257

  2. Renal cell carcinoma presenting as mandibular metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmadnia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC has different manifestations, including uncommon metastasis and paraneoplastic syndromes. Here we report a rare case of RCC presenting as metastasis to the mandible. A 57-year-old patient with mandibular swelling was referred to the dentist. After necessary evaluations, an incisional biopsy of mandible showed metastatic RCC. The patient was referred to the urologist. The patient underwent right radical nephrectomy. Pathological examination showed clear renal cell carcinoma. Every abnormal bone lesion in the oral cavity should be evaluated carefully and the possibility of a malignant lesion should always be considered.

  3. Basal Cell Carcinoma in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Samet Vasfi Kuvat; Zuhal Gücin; Barış Keklik; Gülzade Özyalvaçlı; Karaca Başaran

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly seen nonmelanoma skin cancer which is rarely encountered in the childhood period. An 11-year old child was admitted to our clinic due to an erythematous and a slightly pigmented lesion with a 3 × 4 cm diameter on his posterior scalp. Macroscopically, the lesion was excised with a 10 mm safety margin. Pathologic examination revealed a basal cell carcinoma. No symptoms or signs of a syndrome were observed both in the patient and his family.

  4. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Tattooed Eyebrow

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Park, Jin; Kim, Seong-min; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk

    2009-01-01

    Malignant skin tumors, including squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, have occurred in tattoos. Seven documented cases of basal cell carcinoma associated with tattoos have also been reported in the medical literature. We encountered a patient with basal cell carcinoma in a tattooed eyebrow. We report on this case as the eighth reported case of a patient with basal cell carcinoma arising in a tattooed area.

  5. Diagnosis of Thymic Clear Cell Carcinoma by Cytology

    OpenAIRE

    Lale, Seema A.; Tiscornia-Wasserman, Patricia G.; Mohamed Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma of the thymus is a rare tumor. Few cases of clear-cell carcinoma of thymus have been documented (Truong et al., 1990 and Wolfe III et al., 1983). All these cases were diagnosed by histopathological examination of the tissue. Diagnosis of thymic clear cell carcinoma on cytology is extremely challenging. Here we report the first case of thymic clear cell carcinoma diagnosed by cytological examination of the pericardial fluid with the help of immunocytochemistry. Differentia...

  6. Resident Stem Cells and Renal Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Benedetta Bussolati; Alessia Brossa; Giovanni Camussi

    2011-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis tumors are maintained by a cancer stem cell population which is able to initiate and maintain tumors. Tumor-initiating stem cells display stem or progenitor cell properties such as self-renewal and capacity to re-establish tumors that recapitulate the tumor of origin. In this paper, we discuss data relative to the presence of cancer stem cells in human renal carcinoma and their possible origin from normal resident stem cells. The cancer stem cells ...

  7. Dynamics and Synchrony of Pancreatic beta-cells and Islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells secrete insulin in response to raised glucose levels. Malfunctioning of this system plays an important role in the metabolic disease diabetes. The biological steps from glucose stimulus to the final release of insulin are incompletely understood, and a more complete...... description of these processes and their interactions would provide important input in the search for a better treatment of the disease. The thesis describes several aspects of mathematical modeling of beta-cells relevant for the understanding of glucose stimulated insulin secretion. It consists of an...... biological hypotheses. The subjects addressed are: Quasi-steady-state approximations of enzyme reactions, the effect of noise on bursting electrical behavior, exciation wave propagation in pancreatic islets, intra- and inter-islet synchronization and pulsatile insulin secretion, and mitochondrial dynamics....

  8. Glycogen Rich Clear Cell Breast Carcinoma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Çınkır, Havva Yeşil; Dilek, Gülay Bilir; Demirci, Ayşe; Başal, Fatma Buğdaycı; Aydın, Kübra; Demirci, Umut; Öksüzoğlu, Berna; Alkış, Necati

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast is a rare type of breast carcinoma. Tumoral tissue is consist of intracytoplasmic glycogen-rich clear cells. We presented in here a 44-year old woman diagnosed with glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma.

  9. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma involving floor of the mouth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sah Kunal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Basaloid squamous cell carcinomas of oral mucosa are uncommon. Majority of them can be differentiated from squamous cell carcinoma by their aggressive clinical course and their histopathological features. This case report presents a case of 70-year-old male with basaloid squamous cell carcinoma involving the floor of the mouth.

  10. Comparative therapeutic trial of radiation with or without chemotherapy in pancreatic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    Two hundred and twenty-eight patients with carcinoma of the pancreas confined to the pancreas and peripancreatic area were randomly allocated to receive either radiation therapy alone to a dose of 6000 rad or radiation therapy delivered in conjunction with 5-fluorouracil (FU). Fluorouracil was administered concomitant with the first three days of 2000 rad increments of the radiation therapy and continued weekly indefinitely. The median survival of patients receiving radiation alone was 17.8 weeks compared to 35 weeks for patients receiving chemotherapy in conjunction with radiation (p < 0.001). Within the group receiving concomitant chemotherapy, two dose levels of radiation were evaluated by random assignment: 4000 vs 6000 rad. The superiority of 6000 rad plus 5-FU over 4000 rad plus 5-FU was established by median survival analysis, 39 weeks compared to 31 weeks and by time to progression, 31 weeks vs 22 weeks (p < 0.09). The survival curves of the 4000 and the 6000 rad arm intercepted by approximately week 60 such that there was essentially no difference in the fraction of patients surviving beyond one year. Thus, the addition of chemotherapy to radiation for pancreatic cancer potentiates the therapeutic effect and promotes longer survival. The importance of radiation dose to the therapeutic benefit can be detected in median survival but is not sustained beyond one year.

  11. Pancreatic Stem/Progenitor Cells for the Treatment of Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2010-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes, and most patients with type 2 diabetes, have associated hyperglycemia due to the absence or reduction of insulin production by pancreatic β-cells. Surgical resection of the pancreas may also cause insulin-dependent diabetes depending on the size of the remaining pancreas. Insulin therapy has greatly improved the quality of life of diabetic patients, but this method is inaccurate and requires lifelong treatment that only mitigates the symptoms. The successes achi...

  12. Intervention of Mirtazapine on gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia in nude mice with pancreatic carcinoma xenografts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Man Jiang; Jian-Hua Wu; Lin Jia

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of Mirtazapine on tumor growth,food intake,body weight,and nutritional status in gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia.METHODS:Fourteen mice with subcutaneous xenografts of a pancreatic cancer cell line (SW1990) were randomly divided into Mirtazapine and control groups.Either Mirtazapine (10 mg/kg) or saline solution was orally fed to the mice every day after tumor implantation.A model of mild cachexia was then established in both groups by intraperitoneal injection of Gemcitabine (50 mg/kg) 10 d,13 d,and 16 d after tumor implantation.Tumor size,food intake,body weight,and nutritional status were measured during the experiment.All mice were sacrificed at day 28.RESULTS:(1) After 7 d of gemcitabine administration,body-weight losses of 5%-7% which suggested mild cachexia were measured; (2) No significant difference in tumor size was detected between the Mirtazapine and control groups (P > 0.05); and (3) During the entire experimental period,food intake and body weight were slightly greater for the Mirtazapine group compared with controls (although these differences were not statistically significant).After 21 d,mice in the Mirtazapine group consumed significantly more food than control mice (3.95 ± 0.14 g vs 3.54 ± 0.10 g,P =0.004).After 25 d,mice in the Mirtazapine group were also significantly heavier than control mice (17.24 ± 0.53 g vs 18.05 ± 0.68 g,P =0.014).CONCLUSION:Mild cachexia model was successfully established by gemcitabine in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice.Mirtazapine can improve gemcitabine-induced mild cachexia in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice.It was believed to provide a potential therapeutic perspective for further studies on cachexia.

  13. Clinical presentation of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most common malignant tumour of the kidney is Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) and is known for its unpredictable clinical behaviour. Aetiology and risk factors are not completely understood. Extensive workup is being done in the understanding of the disease, especially to diagnose early and to treat promptly. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical presentation and pathological pattern of RCC. Methods: After approval from ethical committee a retrospective review of records was conducted extending from January 2012 to January 2014 to identify clinical characteristics of renal cell carcinomas. The study included all renal cancer patients presented to Sheikh Zayed Hospital Lahore with in this specified period. The data was retrieved regarding, history, physical examination and necessary investigations such as ultrasonography of abdomen and pelvis and CT scan of abdomen and pelvis. Results: There were total of 50 cases. The male to female ratio was 3:2. Mean age of patients were 52.38 (18-93) years old. Most common clinical presentation was gross haematuria(66%).The mean tumour size was 8.34 (3-24) cm. Tumour histology were clear cell (84%), papillary transitional cell carcinoma (12%) and oncosytoma contributed 4%. Conclusion: We observed that large number of the patients with RCC presented with haematuria and most of them were male. Common pathological type was clear cell carcinoma. (author)

  14. Peroxiredoxin III protects pancreatic ß cells from apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Gabriele; Aumann, Nicole; Michalska, Marta; Bast, Antje; Sonnemann, Jürgen; Beck, James F; Lendeckel, Uwe; Newsholme, Philip; Walther, Reinhard

    2010-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized by a progressive autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing β cells. Macrophages and T lymphocytes release cytokines, which induce the synthesis of oxygen and nitrogen radicals in the pancreatic islets. The resulting cellular and mitochondrial damage promotes β cell death. β cells are very sensitive to the autoimmune free radical-dependent attack due to their low content of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase and catalase. A focal point of β cell protection should be the control of the mitochondrial redox status, which will result in the preservation of metabolic stimulus-secretion coupling. For this reason, there is a considerable interest in the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin III (PRX III), a thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase, which was shown to be able to protect against both oxidative and nitrosative stress. Using the Tet-On-system, we generated stably transfected rat insulinoma cells over- or under-expressing PRX III in a doxycyclin-dependent manner to analyze the effect of increased or decreased amounts of cellular PRX III, following treatment with several stressors. We provide evidence that PRX III protects pancreatic β cells from cell stress induced by accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, or the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase or caspase-9 and -3 by pro-inflammatory cytokines or streptozotocin. Basal insulin secretion was markedly decreased in cells expressing lower levels of PRX III. We suggest PRX III may be a suitable target for promoting deceleration or even prevention of stress-associated apoptosis in pancreatic β cells and the manifestation of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. PMID:20807727

  15. Stem cell research in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyi SUN; Shi ZUO

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view that adult human liver tumors, mainly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), arise from mature cell types has been challenged in recent dec-ades. The results of several studies suggest that HCC can be derived from liver stem cells. There are four levels of cells in the liver stem cell lineage: hepatocytes, hepatic stem cells/oval cells, bone marrow stem cells and hepato-pancreas stem cells. However, whether HCC is resulted from the differentiation block of stem cells and, moreover, which liver stem cell lineage is the source cell of hepatocarcinogenesis remain controversial. In this review, we focus on the current status of liver stem cell research and their roles in carcinogenesis of HCC, in order to explore new approaches for stem cell therapy of HCC.

  16. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis : LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated memb

  17. Sarcomatoid carcinoma with small cell carcinoma component of the urinary bladder: a case report with review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    ISHIDA, MITSUAKI; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; OKABE, HIDETOSHI

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an uncommon neoplasm characterized histopathologically by the presence of malignant spindle cell and epithelial components. Albeit extremely rare, sarcomatoid carcinoma with small cell carcinoma has been reported. Herein, we describe an additional case of sarcomatoid carcinoma with small cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and review the clinicopathological features of this type of tumor. An 82-year-old Japanese mal...

  18. CONVENTIONAL RENAL CELL CARCINOMA WITH GRANULOMATOUS REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : Granulomatous inflammation is a distinctive pattern of chronic inflammatory reaction characterized by microscopic aggregation of activated macrophages which often develop epithelioid appearance and multinucleate giant cells. Granulomas are encountered in limited number of infectious and some non-infectious conditions. Granulomas have been described within the stroma of malignancies like carcinomas of the breast and colon, seminoma and Hodgkin’s lymphoma, where they represent T-cell-mediated reaction of the tumor stroma to antigens expressed by the tumor. Granulomatous reaction in association with renal cell carcinoma (RCC is uncommon, with only few published reports in the literature. We describe a case of conventional (clear cell RCC associated with epithelioid cell granulomas within the tumor parenchyma.

  19. The effectiveness of 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy for transplantation tumor of human pancreatic carcinoma in nude mice: an experiment in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the effectiveness and therapeutic mechanism of 125I interstitial brachytherapy for transplantation tumor of human pancreatic carcinoma in nude mice. Methods: The human pancreatic cell line Sw1990 was subcutaneously injected into the right lower limb partially dorsal area next to the groin of the immunodeficient BABL /c nude mice. The tumor was removed and cut into small pieces after it was formed,then the tumor pieces were inoculated in nude mice. The tumor developed to 8-10 mm in size after six weeks. A total of 16 nude mice with the suitable tumor size were used in this study. The 16 experimental mice were randomly and equally divided into two groups. The mice in study group (n = 8) were implanted with 125I seeds, while the mice in control group (n = 8) were implanted with ghost seeds. After the implantation both the long and short diameter of the tumors as well as the mouse body weight were measured every 4 days. The tumor weight was measured when the mouse was sacrificed. The paraffin-embedded samples were sent for histopathological examination. Apoptotic cells were checked with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was detected with immuno-histochemical staining. Results: The tumor grew slowly in the study group, but rapidly in the control group. The tumor weight in the study group and the control group was (2.68 ± 0.70)g and (4.68 ± 1.45)g, respectively, the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.021). The tumor inhibition rate was about 42.66%. No significant difference in body weight of nude mice existed between two groups both before and after the treatment (P > 0.05). Marked tumor necrosis was seen in study group, but no obvious, or only a little, tumor necrosis could be observed in the control group. The apoptotic index checked with the TUENL method in the study group and control group was (23.2 ± 1.9)% and

  20. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in the Thyroid Gland and Pancreas Showing Uptake on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT Scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthan, Gowri L; Schembri, Geoffrey Paul; Samra, Jaswinder; Roach, Paul; Hsiao, Edward

    2016-07-01

    Ga DOTATATE PET/CT is an imaging technique used in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors. We report a case of 66-year-old woman with a history of surgically removed renal cell carcinoma who presented for a DOTATATE PET/CT scan to characterize a newly diagnosed pancreatic lesion. DOTATATE-avid lesions were identified in the thyroid gland and pancreas. Subsequent biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma at both sites. It is important to be aware that tumors other than neuroendocrine tumors may also show uptake on DOTATATE PET/CT scan. A biopsy may be required if lesions are identified at atypical sites. PMID:27055137

  1. Whole exome sequencing reveals recurrent mutations in BRCA2 and FAT genes in acinar cell carcinomas of the pancreas

    OpenAIRE

    Toru Furukawa; Hitomi Sakamoto; Shoko Takeuchi; Mitra Ameri; Yuko Kuboki; Toshiyuki Yamamoto; Takashi Hatori; Masakazu Yamamoto; Masanori Sugiyama; Nobuyuki Ohike; Hiroshi Yamaguchi; Michio Shimizu; Noriyuki Shibata; Kyoko Shimizu; Keiko Shiratori

    2015-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor with a poor prognosis. Compared to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, its molecular features are poorly known. We studied a total of 11 acinar cell carcinomas, including 3 by exome and 4 by target sequencing. Exome sequencing revealed 65 nonsynonymous mutations and 22 indels with a mutation rate of 3.4 mutations/Mb per tumor, on average. By accounting for not only somatic but also germline mutations with loss of the wild-type allele, we ide...

  2. Choroidal metastasis from tubulopapillary renal cell carcinoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Elghissassi, Ibrahim; Inrhaoun, Hanane; Ismaili, Nabil; Errihani, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Choroidal metastases from renal carcinoma are rare. Most reported cases describe a clear cell carcinoma histologic subtype. Metastatic tubulopapillary renal cell carcinoma to the choroid plexus is very exceptional. We report the case of a 31-year-old man with a history of tubulopapillary renal cell carcinoma who presented two years later with metastatic disease to lungs and presternal soft tissue and three months after with choroidal metastasis revealed on ophtalmoscopic examination and magne...

  3. CT differentiation of renal tumor invading parenchyma and pelvis: renal cell carcinoma vs transitional cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differentiation between renal cell carcinoma(RCC) and transitional cell carcinoma(TCC) is important due to the different methods of treatment and prognosis. But occasionally it is difficult to draw a distinction between the two diseases when renal parenchyma and renal collecting systems are invaded simultaneously. We reviewed CT scans of 37 cases of renal cell carcinoma and 12 cases of transitional cell carcinoma which showed involvement of renal parenchyma and renal sinus fat on CT. Retrospective analysis was performed by 3 abdominal radiologists. Check points were renal contour bulging or reinform shape, location of mass center, intact parenchyma overlying the tumor, cystic change, calcification, LN metastasis, vessel invasion, and perirenal extention. There were renal contour bulging due to the tumor mass in 33 out of 37 cases of renal cell carcinoma, where a and nine of 12 cases of transitional cell carcinoma maintained the reinform appearance. This is significant statiscal difference between the two(P<0.005). Center of all TCCs were located in the renal sinus, and 24 out of 35 cases of RCC were located in the cortex(P<0.005). Thirty-six out of 37 cases of RCC lost the overlying parenchyma, where as 4 out of 9 cases of well enhanced TCC had intact overlying parenchyma(P<0.005) RCC showed uptic change within the tumor mags in 31 cases which was significanity higher than the 4 cases in TCC(P<0.05). CT findings of renal cell carcinoma are contour bulging, peripheral location, obliteration of parenchyma, and cystic change. Findings of transitional cell carcinoma are reinform appearance, central location within the kidney, intact overlying parenchyma, and rare cystic change

  4. Morphometric characteristics of basal cell carcinoma peritumoral stroma varies among basal cell carcinoma subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Lesack Kyle; Naugler Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The role that the peritumoral stroma plays in the growth of tumours is currently poorly understood. In this manuscript the morphometric characteristics of basal cell carcinoma subtypes and their associated peritumoral stromas are presented. Methods Ninety eight digitized basal cell carcinoma histology slides were categorized as infiltrative, nodular, or superficial subtypes, and were analysed using a combination of manual and computer-assisted approaches. The morphometric ...

  5. Oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of feline oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma are described. In both cases, diagnosis was achieved by radiography, endoscopy and cytology, and later confirmed by histology. One cat underwent oesophagectomy followed by end-to-end anastomosis, but died three days postsurgery; the second cat was euthanased after diagnosis

  6. Local thermal ablation of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: With evolving local thermal ablation technology, the clinical application of thermal ablation has been actively investigated in the treatment for renal cell carcinoma. We review the evolution and current status of radiofrequency ablation and microwave ablation for renal cell carcinoma. Materials and methods: All articles published in English on radiofrequency ablation or microwave ablation as a treatment for renal cell carcinoma were identified with a MEDLINE® and PubMed® search from 1990 to 2010. Results: Local thermal ablation has several advantages, including keeping more normal renal units, relatively simple operation, easy tolerance, fewer complications, a shorter hospitalization and convalescence period. Long-term data has determined radiofrequency ablation is responsible for poor surgical candidates with renal cell carcinoma, however, tumor size, location and shape might affect the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation. Microwave ablation can induce large ablation volumes and yield good local tumor control. Associated complications appear to be low. Conclusions: Local ablative approaches seem to represent an attractive alternative to extirpative surgery for the treatment of small renal neoplasms in select patients. Potential developments include concepts to improve the accuracy and effectiveness of thermal ablation by improving the guiding, monitoring capabilities and detection capacity of multi-center lesions to provide at least equivalent cancer control to conventional surgery.

  7. Rising incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Dorte; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen; Dahlstrøm, Karin;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive, skin cancer of obscure histogenesis, the incidence of which is rising. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment. Our aim was to evaluate the staging, investigation, treatment, and follow-up of MCC in eastern Denmark, and to...

  8. Opportunities and Challenges for Pancreatic Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrath, Sunitha; Jack, Rhonda M; Sahai, Vaibhav; Simeone, Diane M

    2016-09-01

    Sensitive and reproducible platforms have been developed for detection, isolation, and enrichment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs)-rare cells that enter the blood from solid tumors, including those of the breast, prostate gland, lung, pancreas, and colon. These might be used as biomarkers in diagnosis or determination of prognosis. CTCs are no longer simply detected and quantified; they are now used in ex vivo studies of anticancer agents and early detection. We review what we have recently learned about CTCs from pancreatic tumors, describing advances in their isolation and analysis and challenges to their clinical utility. We summarize technologies used to isolate CTCs from blood samples of patients with pancreatic cancer, including immunoaffinity and label-free physical attribute-based capture. We explain methods of CTC analysis and how findings from these studies might be used to detect cancer at earlier stages, monitor disease progression, and determine prognosis. We review studies that have expanded CTCs for testing of anticancer agents and how these approaches might be used to personalize treatment. Advances in the detection, isolation, and analysis of CTCs have increased our understanding of the dissemination and progression of pancreatic cancer. However, standardization of methodologies and prospective studies are needed for this emerging technology to have a significant effect on clinical care. PMID:27339829

  9. Basal cell carcinoma in oculo-cutaneous albinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin tumour especially affecting the white individuals worldwide. The exact incidence of basal cell carcinoma is not known from India but non melanoma skin cancers comprises about 1-2% of cutaneous tumour in India. The most common skin tumour is squamous cell carcinoma in albinism and the incidence of basal cell carcinoma is less. Hereby, we report a peculiar case of basal cell carcinoma in albinism to highlights the importance of early recognition and diagnosis of suspected lesions by performing histopathological examination in unusual circumstances. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2452-2454

  10. Establishing a human pancreatic stem cell line and transplanting induced pancreatic islets to reverse experimental diabetes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The major obstacle in using pancreatic islet transplantation to cure type I and some type II diabetes is the shortage of the donors. One of ways to overcome such obstacle is to isolate and clone pancreatic stem cells as "seed cells" and induce their differentiation into functional islets as an abundant trans-plantation source. In this study, a monoclonal human pancreatic stem cell (mhPSC) line was obtained from abortive fetal pancreatic tissues. Pancreatic tissues were taken from abortive fetus by sterile procedures, and digested into single cells and cell clusters with 0.1% type IV collagenase. Cultured in modified glucose-low DMEM with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), these single cells and cell clusters adhered to culture dishes, and then primary epidermal-like pancreatic stem cells started to clone. After digesting with 0.25% trypsin and 0.04% EDTA, fibroblasts and other cells were gradually eliminated and epithelioid pancreatic stem cells were gradually purified during generations. Using clone-ring selection, the mhPSCs were obtained. After addition of 10 ng/mL epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cell culture medium, the mhPSCs quickly grew and formed a gravelstone-like monolayer. Continuously proliferated, a mhPSC line, which was derived from a male abortive fetus of 4 months old, has been passed through 50 generations. More than 1×109 mhPSCs were cryo-preserved in liquid nitrogen. Karyotype analysis showed that the chromosome set of the mhPSC line was normal diploid. Immunocytochemistry results demonstrated that the mhPSC line was positive for the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19, and negative for the insulin, CD34, CD44 and CD45 protein expression. RT-PCR revealed further that the mhPSCs expressed transcription factors of the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19. Also, in vitro induced with β-mercaptoethanol, the mhPSCs differentiated into nerve cells that expressed the NF protein. Induced with nicotinamide, the mhPSCs differentiated into functional islet

  11. Loss of Fbw7 Reprograms Adult Pancreatic Ductal Cells into α, δ, and β Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sancho, Rocio; Gruber, Ralph; Gu, Guoqiang; Behrens, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Summary The adult pancreas is capable of limited regeneration after injury but has no defined stem cell population. The cell types and molecular signals that govern the production of new pancreatic tissue are not well understood. Here, we show that inactivation of the SCF-type E3 ubiquitin ligase substrate recognition component Fbw7 induces pancreatic ductal cells to reprogram into α, δ, and β cells. Loss of Fbw7 stabilized the transcription factor Ngn3, a key regulator of endocrine cell diff...

  12. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells in patients with pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Xu; Jun Hu; Min Wang; Feng Peng; Rui Tian; Xing-Jun Guo; Yu Xie; Ren-Yi Qin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are heterogeneous cell types that suppress T-cell responses in cancer patients and animal models, some MDSC subpopula-tions are increased in patients with pancreatic cancer. The present study was to investigate a specific subset of MDSCs in patients with pancreatic cancer and the mechanism of MDSCs increase in these patients. METHODS: Myeloid cells from whole blood were collected from 37 patients with pancreatic cancer, 17 with cholangiocarcinoma, and 47 healthy controls. Four pancreatic cancer cell lines were co-culturedwithnormalperipheralbloodmononuclearcells(PBMCs) to test the effect of tumor cells on the conversion of PBMCs to MDSCs. Levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and arginase activity in the plasma of cancer patients were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: CD14+/CD11b+/HLA-DR- MDSCs were increased in patients with pancreatic or bile duct cancer compared with those in healthy controls, and this increase was correlated with clinical cancer stage. Pancreatic cancer cell lines induced PBMCs to MDSCs in a dose-dependent manner. GM-CSF and arginase activity levels were significantly increased in the se-rum of patients with pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSIONS: MDSCsweretumorrelated:tumorcellsinduced PBMCs to MDSCs in a dose-dependent manner and circulating CD14+/CD11b+/HLA-DR- MDSCs in pancreatic cancer patients were positively correlated with tumor burden. MDSCs might be useful markers for pancreatic cancer detection and progression.

  13. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of 125I-[Tyr11]Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 ± 20 fmol/106 cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking 125I-[Tyr11]somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein Ni to inhibit adenylate cyclase

  6. Ceramide 1-phosphate regulates cell migration and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Presa, Natalia; Gangoiti, Patricia; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Trueba, Miguel; Fox, Todd; Kester, Mark; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2016-02-15

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive and devastating disease characterized by invasiveness, rapid progression and profound resistance to treatment. Despite years of intense investigation, the prognosis of this type of cancer is poor and there is no efficacious treatment to overcome the disease. Using human PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 cells, we demonstrate that the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) increases pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion. Treatment of these cells with selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt1, or mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTOR1), or with specific siRNAs to silence the genes encoding these kinases, resulted in potent inhibition of C1P-induced cell migration and invasion. Likewise, the extracellularly regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1-2), and the small GTPase RhoA, which regulates cytoskeleton reorganization, were also found to be implicated in C1P-stimulated ROCK1-dependent cancer cell migration and invasion. In addition, pre-treatment of the cancer cells with pertussis toxin abrogated C1P-induced cell migration, suggesting the intervention of a Gi protein-coupled receptor in this process. Pancreatic cancer cells engineered to overexpress ceramide kinase (CerK), the enzyme responsible for C1P biosynthesis in mammalian cells, showed enhanced spontaneous cell migration that was potently blocked by treatment with the selective CerK inhibitor NVP-231, or by treatment with specific CerK siRNA. Moreover, overexpression of CerK with concomitant elevations in C1P enhanced migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that C1P is a key regulator of pancreatic cancer cell motility, and suggest that targeting CerK expression/activity and C1P may be relevant factors for controlling pancreatic cancer cell dissemination. PMID:26707801

  7. 68Ga-DOTA-NOC somatostatin receptor-targeting imaging in pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To synthesize 68Ga-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid-1-Nal3-octreotide (DOTA-NOC) as a new generation of positron emitting radionuclide labeled somatostatin analogue, and perform 68Ga-DOTA-NOC micro PET imaging on CFPAC-1 pancreatic cancer bearing nude mice. Methods: Thirty-seven MBq (100 μl) GaCl3 and 20 μg DOTA-NOC were added into 20 μl hydroxyethyl piperazine ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) solution (0.1 mmol/L, pH=5.0), and heated for 15 min at 95 ℃. The radiochemical purity and in vitro stability of 68Ga-DOTA-NOC were analyzed with HPLC. Fifteen normal BALB/c mice were injected with 3.7 MBq 68Ga-DOTA-NOC via tail vein, and the biodistribution in dissected organs were measured at 5, 15, 30, 60 and 120 min respectively after the injection. CFPAC-1 pancreatic cancer cells were co-incubated with 68Ga-DOTA-NOC and the specific uptake ability was calculated. 68Ga-DOTA-NOC was injected into nude mice bearing CFPAC-1 tumors via tail vain. Dynamic and static images were performed by micro PET. ROI was drawn to calculate the T/NT and access TAC in tumor and main organs. The expression of SSTR (1-5) in CFPAC-1 cells in vivo was observed by flow cytometry. The correlation between the expression of SSTR and the T/NT was analyzed by linear correlation analysis. Results: 68Ga-NOTA-NOC had high radiolabeling yield of (98.8± 1.0)% and stability. Biodistribution study demonstrated that the predominant uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-NOC was found in the kidneys ((11.20±0.32) %ID/g at 5 min and (4.11±0.21) %ID/g at 60 min, respectively). The pancreas, lungs and stomach also showed high uptake. 68Ga-DOTA-NOC could be specifically uptaken by CFPAC-1 cells with high affinity. T/NT of 68Ga-DOTA-NOC in CFPAC-1 cancer xenografts was 3.2 ± 0.2 at 120 min post-injection. SSTR 1, 2, 4, 5 expressed in CFPAC-1 cells and xenograft tissues were (96.83± 1.23)%, (99.73±0.98)%, (90.42±0.63)% and (92.96±0.71)%, respectively. The SSTR 2, 5 expression level and

  8. Clear Cell Basal Cell Carcinoma with Sialomucin Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Do Young; Cho, Sung Bin; Chung, Kee Yang; Kim, You Chan

    2006-01-01

    Clear cell basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a variant of BCC with a characteristic clear cell component that may occupy all or part of the tumor islands. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining for glycogen is variably positive, and mild deposition of sulfated mucin has been noted. However, to our knowledge, clear cell BCC with sialomucin deposition has not been reported. Here we report a case of clear cell BCC showing sialomucin deposition. The clear tumor cells stained with PAS and showed incomple...

  9. Loss of Fbw7 Reprograms Adult Pancreatic Ductal Cells into α, δ, and β Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Rocio; Gruber, Ralph; Gu, Guoqiang; Behrens, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Summary The adult pancreas is capable of limited regeneration after injury but has no defined stem cell population. The cell types and molecular signals that govern the production of new pancreatic tissue are not well understood. Here, we show that inactivation of the SCF-type E3 ubiquitin ligase substrate recognition component Fbw7 induces pancreatic ductal cells to reprogram into α, δ, and β cells. Loss of Fbw7 stabilized the transcription factor Ngn3, a key regulator of endocrine cell differentiation. The induced β cells resemble islet β cells in morphology and histology, express genes essential for β cell function, and release insulin after glucose challenge. Thus, loss of Fbw7 appears to reawaken an endocrine developmental differentiation program in adult pancreatic ductal cells. Our study highlights the plasticity of seemingly differentiated adult cells, identifies Fbw7 as a master regulator of cell fate decisions in the pancreas, and reveals adult pancreatic duct cells as a latent multipotent cell type. PMID:25105579

  10. The Expression of p53 and Cox-2 in Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Actinic Keratosis Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülker KARAGECE YALÇIN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate p53 and COX-2 expressions in basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, and to determine a possible relationship.Material and Method: 50 basal cell carcinoma, 45 squamous cell carcinoma and 45 actinic keratosis cases were evaluated. The type of tumor in basal cell carcinoma and tumor differentiation in squamous cell carcinoma were noted and the paraffin block that best represented the tumor was chosen. Immunostaining by p53 and COX-2 was performed on sections of the paraffin blocks.Results: p53 expression was observed in 98% of basal cell carcinoma, 88.9% of squamous cell carcinoma and all actinic keratosis cases. p53 expression was also noted in non-dysplastic appearing epithelium in actinic keratosis cases. COX-2 expression was seen in 90, 100 and 88.9% of the basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis groups, respectively. Skin appendages, inflammatory cells and vascular structures were also stained by COX-2 besides tumor tissue. COX-2 expression increased by the p53 expression increase in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. p53 and COX-2 expressions were not related in terms of tumor type in the BCC and were not related in terms of differentiation in SCC.Conclusion: The existence of p53 expression in actinic keratosis cases has supported the idea that p53 plays a role in the early steps of carcinogenesis in skin cancers. The fact that the expression of COX-2 increases in line with the increase of p53 expression in basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cases indicates that COX-2 expression may be affected by p53

  11. Issues relevant to the endoscopic and surgical management of pancreatic carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Frozanpor, Farshad

    2011-01-01

    Background: A substantial proportion of the patients with pancreatic cancer require palliative decompression of the extrahepatic bile duct obstruction by endoscopic stent insertion. Only 20% of patients with pancreatic cancer are suitable for resection, which is considered to be a high-risk procedure with postoperative pancreatic fistula (PF) formation in a central role. The main objectives of this thesis were divided into two parts: i.e. to determine whether a covered self-ex...

  12. Progenitor cell niches in the human pancreatic duct system and associated pancreatic duct glands: an anatomical and immunophenotyping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, Guido; Renzi, Anastasia; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Franchitto, Antonio; Onori, Paolo; Overi, Diletta; Rossi, Massimo; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Alvaro, Domenico; Reid, Lola M; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic duct glands (PDGs) are tubule-alveolar glands associated with the pancreatic duct system and can be considered the anatomical counterpart of peribiliary glands (PBGs) found within the biliary tree. Recently, we demonstrated that endodermal precursor niches exist fetally and postnatally and are composed functionally of stem cells and progenitors within PBGs and of committed progenitors within PDGs. Here we have characterized more extensively the anatomy of human PDGs as novel niches containing cells with multiple phenotypes of committed progenitors. Human pancreata (n = 15) were obtained from cadaveric adult donors. Specimens were processed for histology, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. PDGs were found in the walls of larger pancreatic ducts (diameters > 300 μm) and constituted nearly 4% of the duct wall area. All of the cells identified were negative for nuclear expression of Oct4, a pluripotency gene, and so are presumably committed progenitors and not stem cells. In the main pancreatic duct and in large interlobular ducts, Sox9(+) cells represented 5-30% of the cells within PDGs and were located primarily at the bottom of PDGs, whereas rare and scattered Sox9(+) cells were present within the surface epithelium. The expression of PCNA, a marker of cell proliferation, paralleled the distribution of Sox9 expression. Sox9(+) PDG cells proved to be Pdx1(+) /Ngn3(+/-) /Oct4A(-) . Nearly 10% of PDG cells were positive for insulin or glucagon. Intercalated ducts contained Sox9(+) /Pdx1(+) /Ngn3(+) cells, a phenotype that is presumptive of committed endocrine progenitors. Some intercalated ducts appeared in continuity with clusters of insulin-positive cells organized in small pancreatic islet-like structures. In summary, PDGs represent niches of a population of Sox9(+) cells exhibiting a pattern of phenotypic traits implicating a radial axis of maturation from the bottoms of the PDGs to the surface of pancreatic ducts. Our results complete the

  13. Significance of the neurotensin receptor Na+/H+-exchanger 1 axis in human pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by early dissemination and rapid acquisition of drug resistance, resulting in dismal prognosis in patients. New targeted therapies failed to improve the low five-year survival rates. Characterization of neuropeptides as growth factors for pancreatic cancer cells stimulated interest in the development of suitable inhibitors. In particular, neurotensin (NT) stimulated proliferation of cancer cell lines, and the NT receptor 1 (NTR1) antagonist SR48692 was found to inhibit growth of tumor xenografts. However, clinical application of SR48692 in small cell lung cancer failed to yield significant responses. Nevertheless, expression of NTRs in more than 90% of pancreatic tumors points to an important role of the NT - NTR system in this tumor entity. Therefore, the present study aimed at investigation of the significance of NT - NTR signaling by use of BxPC-3, PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells and the NTR-positive HT-29 colon carcinoma cell line for comparison. Functional NTR1 that triggers release of intracellular Ca2+ upon binding of the stable NT analog Lys8-Ψ-Lys9NT(8-13) was confirmed in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. The fraction of cells in S phase was increased in response to the NT analog and proliferation of the pancreatic cancer cells stimulated to a limited extent. In contrast to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), NTR1 expression was found to reach a maximum in confluent cultures of resting (G1/0 phase) BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells. In addition, again unlike EGFR, expression of NTR1 proved to be dependent on extracellular pH with highest levels under acidic conditions. Accordingly, Lys8-Ψ-Lys9NT(8-13) induced marked intracellular alkalinization in BxPC-3, PANC-1 and a panel of colon cancer cell lines and slight acidification in MIA PaCa-2 cells under conditions that confine regulation of intracellular pH to the ubiquitously expressed Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1). Similar results were obtained in bicarbonate

  14. Urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma with expression of KIT and PDGFRA and showing diverse differentiations into plasmacytoid, clear cell, acantholytic, nested, and spindle variants, and into adenocarcinoma, signet-ring cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, and pleomorphic carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Various tumors can arise in the urinary bladder (UB); most common is urothelial carcinoma (UC). UC of the UB have many variants. Other types of carcinomas such as adenocarcinoma (AC) and small cell carcinoma (SmCC) can occur in UB carcinomas. Expression of KIT and PDGFRA has not been reported. A 66-year-old man admitted to our hospital because of hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed papillary invasive tumor and a transurethral bladder tumorectomy (TUR-BT) was performed. The TUR-BT showed UC, AC, Sm...

  15. Pancreatic cancer stem cell markers and exosomes - the incentive push.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiler, Sarah; Wang, Zhe; Zöller, Margot

    2016-07-14

    Pancreatic cancer (PaCa) has the highest death rate and incidence is increasing. Poor prognosis is due to late diagnosis and early metastatic spread, which is ascribed to a minor population of so called cancer stem cells (CSC) within the mass of the primary tumor. CSC are defined by biological features, which they share with adult stem cells like longevity, rare cell division, the capacity for self renewal, differentiation, drug resistance and the requirement for a niche. CSC can also be identified by sets of markers, which for pancreatic CSC (Pa-CSC) include CD44v6, c-Met, Tspan8, alpha6beta4, CXCR4, CD133, EpCAM and claudin7. The functional relevance of CSC markers is still disputed. We hypothesize that Pa-CSC markers play a decisive role in tumor progression. This is fostered by the location in glycolipid-enriched membrane domains, which function as signaling platform and support connectivity of the individual Pa-CSC markers. Outside-in signaling supports apoptosis resistance, stem cell gene expression and tumor suppressor gene repression as well as miRNA transcription and silencing. Pa-CSC markers also contribute to motility and invasiveness. By ligand binding host cells are triggered towards creating a milieu supporting Pa-CSC maintenance. Furthermore, CSC markers contribute to the generation, loading and delivery of exosomes, whereby CSC gain the capacity for a cell-cell contact independent crosstalk with the host and neighboring non-CSC. This allows Pa-CSC exosomes (TEX) to reprogram neighboring non-CSC towards epithelial mesenchymal transition and to stimulate host cells towards preparing a niche for metastasizing tumor cells. Finally, TEX communicate with the matrix to support tumor cell motility, invasion and homing. We will discuss the possibility that CSC markers are the initial trigger for these processes and what is the special contribution of CSC-TEX. PMID:27468191

  16. Pancreatic cancer stem cell markers and exosomes - the incentive push

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiler, Sarah; Wang, Zhe; Zöller, Margot

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PaCa) has the highest death rate and incidence is increasing. Poor prognosis is due to late diagnosis and early metastatic spread, which is ascribed to a minor population of so called cancer stem cells (CSC) within the mass of the primary tumor. CSC are defined by biological features, which they share with adult stem cells like longevity, rare cell division, the capacity for self renewal, differentiation, drug resistance and the requirement for a niche. CSC can also be identified by sets of markers, which for pancreatic CSC (Pa-CSC) include CD44v6, c-Met, Tspan8, alpha6beta4, CXCR4, CD133, EpCAM and claudin7. The functional relevance of CSC markers is still disputed. We hypothesize that Pa-CSC markers play a decisive role in tumor progression. This is fostered by the location in glycolipid-enriched membrane domains, which function as signaling platform and support connectivity of the individual Pa-CSC markers. Outside-in signaling supports apoptosis resistance, stem cell gene expression and tumor suppressor gene repression as well as miRNA transcription and silencing. Pa-CSC markers also contribute to motility and invasiveness. By ligand binding host cells are triggered towards creating a milieu supporting Pa-CSC maintenance. Furthermore, CSC markers contribute to the generation, loading and delivery of exosomes, whereby CSC gain the capacity for a cell-cell contact independent crosstalk with the host and neighboring non-CSC. This allows Pa-CSC exosomes (TEX) to reprogram neighboring non-CSC towards epithelial mesenchymal transition and to stimulate host cells towards preparing a niche for metastasizing tumor cells. Finally, TEX communicate with the matrix to support tumor cell motility, invasion and homing. We will discuss the possibility that CSC markers are the initial trigger for these processes and what is the special contribution of CSC-TEX. PMID:27468191

  17. Pancreatic Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Interstitial Cajal Like Cells, and Telocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somanath Padhi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context The discovery and subsequent ultrastructural characterization of the interstitial Cajal like cells (now called telocytes in virtually every anatomic sites of the human body, by Laurentiu M Popescu and co-workers, have dramatically improved the understanding the function of these cells and pathogenesis of extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGIST. Pancreatic extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (pEGIST, phenotypically similar to pancreatic interstitial Cajal like cells, are extremely rare with an unpredictable biological behavior. Objective To review the clinicopathological, radiological, immunohistochemical, and therapeutic outcome data of all reported cases of pEGIST, and highlight the developments in the field of pancreatic interstitial Cajal like cells/telocytes. Methods A systematic review of English literature (January 2000 to July 2012 was done by using the search engine of PubMed, PubMed Central, Google Scholar, and the Directory of Open Access Journals. Results There have been 19 reported cases of pEGIST during the last decade, over an age range of 31 to 84 years (mean: 56 years with equal gender predilection ((male:female ratio: 9:10. Preoperative radiological characteristics have been mostly nondiagnostic though these were used, in some, for tissue diagnosis. Majority of pEGIST were localized to pancreatic head (8/19, 42.1%, and 15 of 19 patients (78.9% were symptomatic at first presentation. The mean size ranged from 2.5 to 35cm (mean: 14 cm. Histomorphological features were that of predominantly spindle cell tumor which consistently expressed c-KIT/CD117 and CD34 by immunohistochemistry, making these two as the most sensitive markers at this site. Results from studies involving discovery on gastrointestinal stromal tumor 1 (DOG-1,the most specific biomarker of GIST/EGIST, has been inconclusive and this was found to be positive in one case only. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib mesylate and sunitinib were used in few

  18. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Initially Presented as a Tongue Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz ALTINEL

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma is one of the most common tumours after lung and breast cancer to metastasize to the head and neck. Initial presentation by tongue metastasis is extremely rare. A 67-year-oldmale presented with a 4.8 cm mass on his tongue. The result of the punch biopsy from the tongue was diagnosed as a clear cell variant of squamous cell carcinoma. The biopsy was reevaluated due to the renal mass found during the check-up and the rapid enlargement of the mass. The excision of the tongue mass and the radical nephrectomy material confirmed the diagnosis of a metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the tongue and renal cell carcinoma in the kidney. Since metastasis of renal cell carcinoma to the tongue is uncommon it may cause difficulties in diagnosis and proper management. The metastasis of renal cell carcinoma should always be considered in the differential diagnosis among the clear cell neoplasms.

  19. Diagnostic Dilemma in a Patient with Jaundice: How to Differentiate between Autoimmune Pancreatitis, Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Pancreas Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Buechter

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old male patient was referred to our institution in May 2011 for a suspected tumor in the pancreatic head with consecutive jaundice. Using magnetic resonance imaging, further differentiation between chronic inflammation and a malignant process was not possible with certainty. Apart from cholestasis, laboratory studies showed increased values for CA 19-9 to 532 U/ml (normal <37 U/ml and hypergammaglobulinemia (immunoglobulin G, IgG of 19.3% (normal 8.0–15.8% with an elevation of the IgG4 subtype to 2,350 mg/l (normal 52–1,250 mg/l. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a prominent stenosis of the distal ductus hepaticus communis caused by pancreatic head swelling and also a bihilar stenosis of the main hepatic bile ducts. Cytology demonstrated inflammatory cells without evidence of malignancy. Under suspicion of autoimmune pancreatitis with IgG4-associated cholangitis, immunosuppressive therapy with steroids and azathioprine was started. Follow-up endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after 3 months displayed regressive development of the diverse stenoses. Jaundice had disappeared and blood values had returned to normal ranges. Moreover, no tumor of the pancreatic head was present in the magnetic resonance control images. Due to clinical and radiological similarities but a consecutive completely different prognosis and therapy, it is of fundamental importance to differentiate between pancreatic cancer and autoimmune pancreatitis. Especially, determination of serum IgG4 levels and associated bile duct lesions induced by inflammation should clarify the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and legitimate immunosuppressive therapy.

  20. Palliative thyroidectomy in the setting of a metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A secondary neoplasm of the thyroid gland is a distinctly uncommon cause of thyroid enlargement. These tumors mimic primary thyroid gland tumors and often lead to diagnostic difficulties. We report an interesting case of secondary thyroid tumor coexisting with a micropapillary carcinoma in an elderly male patient following a radical nephrectomy done 15 years prior for a renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Interestingly, the previously described coincidental association of thyroid and pancreatic metastases in a metastatic RCC was also noted in our patient as was demonstrated in the positron emission tomography-computed tomography which was done as part of the metastatic workup. This association needs to be further explored as also the role of palliative thyroidectomy in the setting of a metastatic RCC. The possibility of metastatic RCC should be kept as a differential during the course of the evaluation of clear cell renal tumor of the thyroid gland

  1. A Microwell Cell Culture Platform for the Aggregation of Pancreatic β-Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, Abigail B.; Lin, Chien-Chi; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2012-01-01

    Cell–cell contact between pancreatic β-cells is important for maintaining survival and normal insulin secretion. Various techniques have been developed to promote cell–cell contact between β-cells, but a simple yet robust method that affords precise control over three-dimensional (3D) β-cell cluster size has not been demonstrated. To address this need, we developed a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microwell platform using photolithography. This microwell cell-culture platform promotes t...

  2. File list: InP.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 Input control Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells SRX174587 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: NoD.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 No description Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: InP.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells mm9 Input control Pancreas Pancreatic cancer... cells SRX174587 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_cancer_cells.bed ...

  5. Expression of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 by Pancreatic Stellate Cells and Its Implications for Matrix Secretion and Turnover in Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Shek, Fanny Wai-Tsing; Benyon, Robert Christopher; Walker, Fiona Mairi; McCrudden, Peter Raymond; Pender, Sylvia Lin Foon; Williams, Elizabeth Jean; Johnson, Penelope Ann; Johnson, Colin David; Bateman, Adrian Calvin; Fine, David Roger; Iredale, John Peter

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells mediate fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs)-1 and -2 are crucial modulators of fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a key regulator of extracellular matrix production and myofibroblast proliferation. We have examined MMP and TIMP synthesis by transformed cultured pancreatic stellate cells and their regulation by TGF-β1. By Northern analysis they expressed mRNAs for procoll...

  6. Generation of polyhormonal and multipotent pancreatic progenitor lineages from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korytnikov, Roman; Nostro, Maria Cristina

    2016-05-15

    Generation of pancreatic β-cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has enormous importance in type 1 diabetes (T1D), as it is fundamental to a treatment strategy based on cellular therapeutics. Being able to generate β-cells, as well as other mature pancreatic cells, from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) will also enable the development of platforms that can be used for disease modeling and drug testing for a variety of pancreas-associated diseases, including cystic fibrosis. For this to occur, it is crucial to develop differentiation strategies that are robust and reproducible across cell lines and laboratories. In this article we describe two serum-free differentiation protocols designed to generate specific pancreatic lineages from hPSCs. Our approach employs a variety of cytokines and small molecules to mimic developmental pathways active during pancreatic organogenesis and allows for the in vitro generation of distinct pancreatic populations. The first protocol is designed to give rise to polyhormonal cells that have the potential to differentiate into glucagon-producing cells. The second protocol is geared to generate multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells, which harbor the potential to generate all pancreatic lineages including: monohormonal endocrine cells, acinar, and ductal cells. PMID:26515645

  7. Pancreatic stellate cells as a morphological basis for the development of pancreatic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sirenko O.Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Last decade in Ukraine and many countries there is a clear tendency to increase the number of cases of pancreatic diseases. For more than century study of the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis it has been proposed many hypotheses. Some of them were eventually dismissed, partially confirmed by other clinical and experimental research. Significant progress in understanding the process of fibrosis in the pancreas is associated with the identification, isolation and description of pancreatic s...

  8. Oral Cavity Clear Cell Odontogenic Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Villaflor, Victoria; Cipriani, Nicole A

    2016-06-01

    A case of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma of the oral cavity is described in this sine qua non radiology-pathology correlation article. CT demonstrated a solid and cystic mass arising from the mandible. Histology demonstrated variably-sized nests of clear to pale eosinophilic cells with occasional central necrosis embedded in a hyalinized to fibrocellular stroma. The specimen was also positive for the characteristic rearrangement of the EWSR1 (22q12) locus in 93.5 % of interphase cells. PMID:25994920

  9. Multilocular Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: An Unusual Gross Appearance

    OpenAIRE

    Nikumbh, Dhiraj B.; Sunil V. Jagtap; Gaurav Jain; Roopali K Mali

    2011-01-01

    Multilocular Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma (MCRCC) represents a rare variant of clear cell (conventional) renal cell carcinomas. Attributable to its distinct characteristics in prognosis and its natural history, MCRCC was recognised as a separate subtype of renal cell carcinoma in the 2004 WHO classification of adult renal tumors. We report this case of MCRCC from antemortem surgical specimen, due to its unusual gross appearance and a rare clinical entity.

  10. Sarcomatoid chromophobe renal cell carcinoma: Cytohistopathological correlation of a case

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabarti Indranil; Giri Amita; Majumdar Kaushik; DE, Anuradha

    2010-01-01

    Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinomas of the kidney are rare neoplasms constituting about 1-5% of all renal malignant neoplasms. These are aggressive tumors and are commonly associated with conventional (clear cell) renal cell carcinomas, but cases associated with chromophobe renal cell carcinomas are sparse. Cytological features of such lesions have rarely been reported. Here, we report a unique case of a 48-year-old male patient who presented with right flank lump and pain. A fine needle...

  11. Multilocular Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: An Unusual Gross Appearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj B Nikumbh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Multilocular Cystic Renal Cell Carcinoma (MCRCC represents a rare variant of clear cell (conventional renal cell carcinomas. Attributable to its distinct characteristics in prognosis and its natural history, MCRCC was recognised as a separate subtype of renal cell carcinoma in the 2004 WHO classification of adult renal tumors. We report this case of MCRCC from antemortem surgical specimen, due to its unusual gross appearance and a rare clinical entity.

  12. ATP regulates sodium channel kinetics in pancreatic islet beta cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Na; Rupnik, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cells act as glucose sensors, in which intracellular ATP ([ATP](i)) are altered with glucose concentration change. The characterization of voltage-gated sodium channels under different [ATP](i) remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that increasing [ATP](i) within a certain range of concentrations (2-8 mM) significantly enhanced the voltage-gated sodium channel currents, compared with 2 mM cytosolic ATP. This enhancement was attenuated by even high intracellular ATP (12 mM). F...

  13. The secretory process in the pancreatic exocrine cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, G A

    1979-07-01

    Recent findings that contribute to an understanding of the secretory process in the pancreatic exocrine cell are reviewed. These include (1) the separation, identification, and characterization of secreted proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, (2) the intracellular route and timetable of movement of secretory proteins from one intracellular compartment to another, (3) the mechanism by which presecretory proteins are thought to be transported across the lipid bilayer of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (the transport peptide hypothesis), and (4) the importance of accessory peptide domains that determine the ultimate location and site-specific function of exportable proteins. PMID:449414

  14. Cell-free DNA next-generation sequencing in pancreatobiliary carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Zill, Oliver A.; Greene, Claire; Sebisanovic, Dragan; Siew, LaiMun; Leng, Jim; Vu, Mary; HENDIFAR, ANDREW E.; Zhen WANG; Atreya, Chloe E.; Kelley, Robin K.; Van Loon, Katherine; Ko, Andrew H.; Tempero, Margaret A.; Bivona, Trever G; Munster, Pamela N.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic and biliary carcinomas lack personalized treatment options, in part because biopsies are often inadequate for molecular characterization. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing may enable a precision oncology approach in this setting. We attempted to prospectively analyze 54 genes in tumor and cfDNA for 26 patients. Tumor sequencing failed in nine patients (35%). In the remaining 17, 90.3% (95% CI: 73.1–97.5%) of mutations detected in tumor biopsies were also detected in cf...

  15. Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic beta Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 2012 (2012), s. 932838. ISSN 1942-0900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : beta cells * reactive oxygen species homeostasis * mitochondria Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.393, year: 2012

  16. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:18823376

  17. Renal Preservation Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yichun Chiu; Allen W. Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Renal preservation therapy has been a promising concept for the treatment of localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) for 20 years. Nowadays partial nephrectomy (PN) is well accepted to treat the localized RCC and the oncological control is proved to be the same as the radical nephrectomy (RN). Under the result of well oncological control, minimal invasive method gains more popularity than the open PN, like laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) and robot assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy...

  18. Targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, P H; Chaganti, R.S.K.; Motzer, R J

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has historically been refractory to cytotoxic and hormonal agents; only interleukin 2 and interferon alpha provide response in a minority of patients. We reviewed RCC biology and explored the ways in which this understanding led to development of novel, effective targeted therapies. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and novel agents are all being studied, and phase II studies show promising activity of sunitinib, sorafenib a...

  19. Linear Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ichinokawa, Yuko; Ohtuki, Akiko; Hattori, Mariko; Sadamasa, Hiroko; Hiruma, Masataro; Matumoto, Toshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) presents with diverse clinical features, and several morphologic and histologic variants of BCC have been reported [Sexton et al.: J Am Acad Dermatol 1990;23:1118-1126]. Linear BCC was first described as a new clinical subtype in 1985 by Lewis [Int J Dematol 1985;24:124-125]. Here, we present a case of linear BCC that we recently encountered in an elderly Japanese patient, and review other cases reported in Japan.

  20. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    MISHRA, LOPA

    2014-01-01

    Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the fun...