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Sample records for cell nucleus

  1. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Abhishek; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G V

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the eukaryotic cell functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to the stresses carried by these filaments is largely unexplored. We report here the results of studies of the translational and rotational dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblast cells, with the effects of cell migration suppressed by plating onto fibronectin-coated micro-fabricated patterns. Patterns of the same area but different shapes and/or aspect ratio were used to study the effect of cell geometry on the dynamics. On circles, squares and equilateral triangles, the nucleus undergoes persistent rotational motion, while on high-aspect-ratio rectangles of the same area it moves only back and forth. The circle and the triangle showed respectively the largest and the smallest angular speed. We show that our observations can be understood through a hydrodynamic approach in which the nucleus is treated as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active...

  2. The cell nucleus taking centre stage. Workshop on the functional organization of the cell nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gruenbaum, Y.; Raška, Ivan; Herrmann, H.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 12 (2006), s. 1211-1215. ISSN 1469-221X. [EMBO Workshop on the Functional Organization of the Cell Nucleus /3./. Prague, 05.05.2006-08.05.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/04/0692; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/06/1691; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cell nucleus * nuclear dynamics * nuclear structure and disease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.175, year: 2006

  3. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  4. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-09-14

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration. PMID:27406341

  5. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: Cell Autonomy and Network Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, David K.; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Kay, Steve A.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the primary circadian pacemaker in mammals. Individual SCN neurons in dispersed culture can generate independent circadian oscillations of clock gene expression and neuronal firing. However, SCN rhythmicity depends on sufficient membrane depolarization and levels of intracellular calcium and cAMP. In the intact SCN, cellular oscillations are synchronized and reinforced by rhythmic synaptic input from other cells, resulting in a reproducible topographic pattern of distinct phases and amplitudes specified by SCN circuit organization. The SCN network synchronizes its component cellular oscillators, reinforces their oscillations, responds to light input by altering their phase distribution, increases their robustness to genetic perturbations, and enhances their precision. Thus, even though individual SCN neurons can be cell-autonomous circadian oscillators, neuronal network properties are integral to normal function of the SCN. PMID:20148688

  6. Dorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Gary E; So, Kwok-Fai; Pu, Mingliang

    2015-10-01

    Retinal ganglion Y (alpha) cells are found in retinas ranging from frogs to mice to primates. The highly conserved nature of the large, fast conducting retinal Y cell is a testament to its fundamental task, although precisely what this task is remained ill-defined. The recent discovery that Y-alpha retinal ganglion cells send axon collaterals to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in addition to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN), pretectum and the superior colliculus (SC) has offered new insights into the important survival tasks performed by these cells with highly branched axons. We propose that in addition to its role in visual perception, the Y-alpha retinal ganglion cell provides concurrent signals via axon collaterals to the DRN, the major source of serotonergic afferents to the forebrain, to dramatically inhibit 5-HT activity during orientation or alerting/escape responses, which dis-facilitates ongoing tonic motor activity while dis-inhibiting sensory information processing throughout the visual system. The new data provide a fresh view of these evolutionarily old retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26363667

  7. Nonthermal Fluctuations and Mechanics of the Active Cell Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, K; Byrd, H; MacKintosh, F C; Kilfoil, M L

    2013-01-01

    We present direct measurements of fluctuations in the nucleus of yeast cells. While prior work has shown these fluctuations to be active and non-thermal in character, their origin and time dependence are not understood. We show that nuclear fluctuations can be quantitatively understood by uncorrelated, active force fluctuations driving a nuclear medium that is dominated by an uncondensed DNA solution, for which we perform rheological measurements on an in vitro model system under similar conditions to what is expected in the nucleus. We conclude that the eukaryotic nucleus of living cells is a nonequilibrium soft material whose fluctuations are actively driven, and are far from thermal in their time dependence.

  8. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paves Heiti

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area.

  9. Deciphering new roles for lipids in the cell nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hozák, Pavel

    Istanbul : Medical Biology and Genetics Society, 2013. [National Congress of Medical Biology and Genetics /13./. 27.10.2013-20.10.2013, Kusadasi] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk LD12063; GA MŠk LH12143 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cell nucleus * chromatin * nucleolus * nuclear myosin * PIP2 * 3D electron tomography * super-resolution microscopy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Nanoparticle-Based Immunocytochemistry Reveals Microarchitecture of the Cell Nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hozák, Pavel

    Kyoto : International Federation of Societies for Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, Japan Society of Histochemistry, 2012. [14th International Congress of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry. Kyoto (JP), 26.08.2012-29.08.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA MPO(CZ) FRTI3588 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : PIP2 * NMI * cell nucleus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  11. Nanoparticle-based immunocytochemistry reveals microarchitecture of the cell nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hozák, Pavel

    Mérida : CIASEM, AMM, 2011. ---. [Inter-American Congress on Microscopy /11./. 25.09.2011-29.09.2011, Mérida] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA AV ČR KAN200520704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : nanoparticles * immunogold detection * histochemistry * cell nucleus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  12. Nanoparticle-based immunocytochemistry reveals microarchitecture of the cell nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hozák, Pavel

    Istanbul: Turkish Society for Electron Microscopy, 2011. ---. [National Electron Microscopy Congress /20./. 25.10.2011-28.10.2011, Kemer] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA MŠk 2B06063; GA AV ČR KAN200520704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : nanoparticles * immunogold detection * histochemistry * cell nucleus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  13. Modelling diffusional transport in the interphase cell nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Wedemeier, Annika; Wu, Chen-Xu; Langowski, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a lattice model for diffusional transport of particles in the interphase cell nucleus is proposed. Dense networks of chromatin fibers are created by three different methods: randomly distributed, non-interconnected obstacles, a random walk chain model, and a self avoiding random walk chain model with persistence length. By comparing a discrete and a continuous version of the random walk chain model, we demonstrate that lattice discretization does not alter particle diffusion. The influence of the 3D geometry of the fiber network on the particle diffusion is investigated in detail, while varying occupation volume, chain length, persistence length and walker size. It is shown that adjacency of the monomers, the excluded volume effect incorporated in the self avoiding random walk model, and, to a lesser extent, the persistence length, affect particle diffusion. It is demonstrated how the introduction of the effective chain occupancy, which is a convolution of the geometric chain volume with the wal...

  14. Texture discrimination by cells in the cat lateral geniculate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, H C

    1990-01-01

    The spontaneous segregation of texture areas is an impressive perceptual phenomenon, the neural basis of which is not yet understood. In the texton concept (Julesz and Bergen 1983; Julesz 1984, 1986) it is assumed that the visual system analyzes a stimulus for certain features ('textons') the spatial distribution of which is pre-attentively registered and may provide the percept of dissected texture areas. Supposed textons are blobs of a given size, oriented lines, line intersections and line terminators, suggesting that texture analysis is exclusively mediated by form-specific filters at higher, e.g. cortical, processing levels. This paper investigates the contribution of cells in the cat lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) to segregation of typical texton differences. The results indicate that LGN cells, though not resembling the supposed texton filters, often distinguished textured arrangements of such features on the basis of a variety of other visual cues, such as global or local variations in mean luminance or differences in spatial frequency composition. Thus, cells responded to texture borders between areas differing in the size or the density of texture elements and often revealed differential firing rates to textures differing by the crossing or the terminator feature. For textures with differences in line orientation, however, only small variations of the firing rate were seen. In summary, the observations suggest a means of texture representation in the cat LGN which is different from recent concepts of texture segregation in man. For a given pair of textures, cells with receptive fields larger than, or similar to the texture raster respond to global and local luminance variations between areas and, in particular, to differences in their spatial frequency composition. These cells, hence, may signal the global texture difference without encoding spatial details of the pattern from which texton features could be identified. Cells with receptive fields small

  15. The Cell Nucleus in Physiological and Experimentally Induced Hypometabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, M.

    The main problem for manned space mission is, at present, represented by the mass penalty associated to the human presence. An efficient approach could be the induction of a hypometabolic stasis in the astronauts, thus drastically reducing the physical and psychological requirements of the crew. On the other hand, in the wild, a reduction in resource consumptions physiologi- cally occurs in certain animals which periodically enter hibernation, a hypometabolic state in which both the energy need and energy offer are kept at a minimum. During the last twelve years, we have been studying different tissues of hibernating dormice, with the aim of analyzing their features during the euthermia -hibernation-arousal cycle as well as getting insight into the mechanisms allowing adaptation to hypometabolism. We paid particular attention to the cell nucleus, as it is the site of chief metabolic functions, such as DNA replication and RNA transcription. Our observations revealed no significant modification in the basic features of cell nuclei during hibernation; however, the cell nuclei of hibernating dormice showed unusual nuclear bodies containing molecules involved in RNA pathways. Therefore, we supposed that they could represent storage/assembly sites of several factors for processing some RNA which could be slowly synthesised during hibernation and rapidly and abundantly released in early arousal in order to meet the increased metabolic needs of the cell. The nucleolus also underwent structural and molecular modifications during hibernation, maybe to continue important nucleolar functions, or, alternatively, permit a most efficient reactivation upon arousal. On the basis of the observations made in vivo , we recently tried to experimentally induce a reversible hypometabolic state in in vitro models, using cell lines derived from hibernating and non-hibernating species. By administering the synthetic opioid DADLE, we could significantly reduce both RNA transcrip- tion and

  16. Thermodynamic pathways to genome spatial organization in the cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodemi, Mario; Prisco, Antonella

    2009-03-18

    The architecture of the eukaryotic genome is characterized by a high degree of spatial organization. Chromosomes occupy preferred territories correlated to their state of activity and, yet, displace their genes to interact with remote sites in complex patterns requiring the orchestration of a huge number of DNA loci and molecular regulators. Far from random, this organization serves crucial functional purposes, but its governing principles remain elusive. By computer simulations of a statistical mechanics model, we show how architectural patterns spontaneously arise from the physical interaction between soluble binding molecules and chromosomes via collective thermodynamics mechanisms. Chromosomes colocalize, loops and territories form, and find their relative positions as stable thermodynamic states. These are selected by thermodynamic switches, which are regulated by concentrations/affinity of soluble mediators and by number/location of their attachment sites along chromosomes. Our thermodynamic switch model of nuclear architecture, thus, explains on quantitative grounds how well-known cell strategies of upregulation of DNA binding proteins or modification of chromatin structure can dynamically shape the organization of the nucleus. PMID:19289043

  17. Estimated Radiation on Mars, Hits per Cell Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This global map of Mars shows estimates for amounts of high-energy-particle cosmic radiation reaching the surface, a serious health concern for any future human exploration of the planet.The estimates are based on cosmic-radiation measurements made on the way to Mars by the Mars radiation environment experiment, an instrument on NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, plus information about Mars' surface elevations from the laser altimeter instrument on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. The areas of Mars expected to have least radiation are where elevation is lowest, because those areas have more atmosphere above them to block out some of the radiation. Earth's thick atmosphere shields us from most cosmic radiation, but Mars has a much thinner atmosphere than Earth does.Colors in the map refer to the estimated average number of times per year each cell nucleus in a human there would be hit by a high-energy cosmic ray particle. The range is generally from two hits (color-coded green), a moderate risk level, to eight hits (coded red), a high risk level.NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor missions for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. The Mars radiation environment experiment was developed by NASA's Johnson Space Center. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for Odyssey, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Internal dynamics of a living cell nucleus investigated by dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suissa, M.; Place, C.; Goillot, E.; Freyssingeas, E.

    2008-08-01

    Recent progresses in cellular biology have shown that the nucleus of a living cell is a structured integration of many functional domains with a complex spatial organization. This organization, as well as molecular and biochemical processes, is time regulated. In the past years many investigations have been performed using fluorescent microscopy techniques to study the internal dynamics of the nucleus of a living cell. These investigations, however, have never focussed on the global internal dynamics of the nucleus, which is still unknown. In this article we present an original light scattering experimental device that we built to investigate this dynamics during biological processes. By means of this experimental set-up, we investigated the global dynamics of the nucleus of a living cell treated with a DNA replication inhibitor. This dynamics presents different and independent kinds of relaxation well separated in time that vary as a function of the cell cycle phases.

  19. Nanomolar pyrophosphate detection and nucleus staining in living cells with simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Duobin Chao; Shitan Ni

    2016-01-01

    Great efforts have been made to develop fluorescent probes for pyrophosphate (PPi) detection. Nucleus staining with fluorescence microscopy has been also widely investigated. But fluorescent probes for PPi detection with high sensitivity in water medium and nucleus staining with low–cost non–precious metal complexes in living cells are still challenging. Herein, we report simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes for selective nanomolar PPi detection over ATP and ADP in water based on aggregation i...

  20. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We detailedly examine temperature effects of Fluo-3 AM labelling in adherent cells. •4 °C Loading and 20 °C de-esterification of Fluo-3 AM yields brighter nuclei. •Brighter nuclei labelling by Fluo-3 AM also depends on cell adhesion quality. •A qualitative model of the brighter nucleus is proposed. -- Abstract: Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca2+]c) and nuclear calcium ([Ca2+]n) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca2+]n detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca2+]n and [Ca2+]c in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells

  1. Heat-induced alterations in the cell nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperthermia may kill eukaryotic cells and may also enhance the radiosensitivity of those cells that survive the heat treatment. Clinically, the possible use of hyperthermia as an adjuvant in the radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer needs the understanding of mechanisms that underlay heat-induced cell death and radiosensitization. By in vitro heating of established human (HeLaS3) and rodent (Ehrlich Ascites Tumor and LM fibroblast) cell lines, both killing and radiosensitization were investigated. (author). 1067 refs.; 76 figs.; 19 tabs

  2. Effect of vertebroplasty filler materials on viability and gene expression of human nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazáry, Aron; Speer, Gábor; Varga, Péter Pál; Balla, Bernadett; Bácsi, Krisztián; Kósa, János P; Nagy, Zsolt; Takács, István; Lakatos, Péter

    2008-05-01

    Consequences of intradiscal cement leakage--often occurring after vertebral cement augmentation for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures--are still unknown. In this study, we have investigated the influences of vertebroplasty filler materials (polymethylmethacrylate-, calcium phosphate- and calcium sulfate-based bone cement) on isolated nucleus pulposus cells. Cell viability of cultured human nucleus pulposus cells were measured after treatment with vertebroplasty filler materials. Gene expression profile of selected genes was determined with quantitative real-time PCR. The widely used polymethylmethacrylate and calcium phosphate cement significantly decreased cell number in a dose- and time-dependent manner while calcium sulfate cement affected cell viability less. Expression of genes involved in matrix metabolism of nucleus pulposus--aggrecan, collagens, small proteoglycans--as well as important transcription factors have also significantly changed due to treatment (e.g., 2.5-fold decrease in aggrecan expression was determined in cultures due to polymethylmethacrylate treatment). Our results suggest that vertebroplasty filler materials--depending on the type of applied material--can accelerate the degeneration of nucleus pulposus cells resulting in a less flexible disc in case of intradiscal cement leakage. This process may increase the risk of a subsequent new vertebral fracture, the main complication of vertebral augmentation. PMID:18176942

  3. The three-dimensional organization of telomeres in the nucleus of mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrin Mathilde

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The observation of multiple genetic markers in situ by optical microscopy and their relevance to the study of three-dimensional (3D chromosomal organization in the nucleus have been greatly developed in the last decade. These methods are important in cancer research because cancer is characterized by multiple alterations that affect the modulation of gene expression and the stability of the genome. It is, therefore, essential to analyze the 3D genome organization of the interphase nucleus in both normal and cancer cells. Results We describe a novel approach to study the distribution of all telomeres inside the nucleus of mammalian cells throughout the cell cycle. It is based on 3D telomere fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by quantitative analysis that determines the telomeres' distribution in the nucleus throughout the cell cycle. This method enables us to determine, for the first time, that telomere organization is cell-cycle dependent, with assembly of telomeres into a telomeric disk in the G2 phase. In tumor cells, the 3D telomere organization is distorted and aggregates are formed. Conclusions The results emphasize a non-random and dynamic 3D nuclear telomeric organization and its importance to genomic stability. Based on our findings, it appears possible to examine telomeric aggregates suggestive of genomic instability in individual interphase nuclei and tissues without the need to examine metaphases. Such new avenues of monitoring genomic instability could potentially impact on cancer biology, genetics, diagnostic innovations and surveillance of treatment response in medicine.

  4. Nanomolar pyrophosphate detection and nucleus staining in living cells with simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Duobin; Ni, Shitan

    2016-01-01

    Great efforts have been made to develop fluorescent probes for pyrophosphate (PPi) detection. Nucleus staining with fluorescence microscopy has been also widely investigated. But fluorescent probes for PPi detection with high sensitivity in water medium and nucleus staining with low–cost non–precious metal complexes in living cells are still challenging. Herein, we report simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes for selective nanomolar PPi detection over ATP and ADP in water based on aggregation induced emission (AIE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). In addition, these terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes were successfully employed for nucleus staining in living cells. These results demonstrated simply obtained terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes are powerful tool for PPi detection and the development of PPi–related studies. PMID:27198968

  5. Nanomolar pyrophosphate detection and nucleus staining in living cells with simple terpyridine-Zn(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Duobin; Ni, Shitan

    2016-01-01

    Great efforts have been made to develop fluorescent probes for pyrophosphate (PPi) detection. Nucleus staining with fluorescence microscopy has been also widely investigated. But fluorescent probes for PPi detection with high sensitivity in water medium and nucleus staining with low-cost non-precious metal complexes in living cells are still challenging. Herein, we report simple terpyridine-Zn(II) complexes for selective nanomolar PPi detection over ATP and ADP in water based on aggregation induced emission (AIE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). In addition, these terpyridine-Zn(II) complexes were successfully employed for nucleus staining in living cells. These results demonstrated simply obtained terpyridine-Zn(II) complexes are powerful tool for PPi detection and the development of PPi-related studies. PMID:27198968

  6. Nanomolar pyrophosphate detection and nucleus staining in living cells with simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Duobin; Ni, Shitan

    2016-05-01

    Great efforts have been made to develop fluorescent probes for pyrophosphate (PPi) detection. Nucleus staining with fluorescence microscopy has been also widely investigated. But fluorescent probes for PPi detection with high sensitivity in water medium and nucleus staining with low–cost non–precious metal complexes in living cells are still challenging. Herein, we report simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes for selective nanomolar PPi detection over ATP and ADP in water based on aggregation induced emission (AIE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). In addition, these terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes were successfully employed for nucleus staining in living cells. These results demonstrated simply obtained terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes are powerful tool for PPi detection and the development of PPi–related studies.

  7. Computational prediction of strain-dependent diffusion of transcription factors through the cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Michele M; Fedele, Roberto; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear spreading plays a crucial role in stem cell fate determination. In previous works, we reported evidence of multipotency maintenance for mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on three-dimensional engineered niche substrates, fabricated via two-photon laser polymerization. We correlated maintenance of multipotency to a more roundish morphology of these cells with respect to those cultured on conventional flat substrates. To interpret these findings, here we present a multiphysics model coupling nuclear strains induced by cell adhesion to passive diffusion across the cell nucleus. Fully three-dimensional reconstructions of cultured cells were developed on the basis of confocal images: in particular, the level of nuclear spreading resulted significantly dependent on the cell localization within the niche architecture. We assumed that the cell diffusivity varies as a function of the local volumetric strain. The model predictions indicate that the higher the level of spreading of the cell, the higher the flux across the nucleus of small solutes such as transcription factors. Our results point toward nuclear spreading as a primary mechanism by which the stem cell translates its shape into a fate decision, i.e., by amplifying the diffusive flow of transcriptional activators into the nucleus. PMID:26476736

  8. THE COMPLEX ORGANIZATION OF EUKARYOTIC CELL NUCLEUS: THE NUCLEAR BODIES (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Campeanu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Identified short time after the discovery of cells, over 300 years ago, the cell nucleus of eukaryotes continuously focused the interest of scientists, which used increasingly sophisticated research tools to clarify its complex structure and functions. The results of all these studies, especially those carried out in the second half of the past century, proved and confirmed that the eukaryotic cell nucleus is the control center of all cellular activities and also ensures the continuity of genetic information along successive generations of cells. These vital functions are the result of selective expression of genes contained in the nuclear chromatin, which is a high ordered and dynamic structure, in permanent and bilateral relations with other nuclear components. Based on these considerations, the present review aims to synthetize the latest researches and concepts about the cell nuclear territory in three distinctive parts, according to the complexity of the topic

  9. Releasing dentate nucleus cells from Purkinje cell inhibition generates output from the cerebrocerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ishikawa

    Full Text Available The cerebellum generates its vast amount of output to the cerebral cortex through the dentate nucleus (DN that is essential for precise limb movements in primates. Nuclear cells in DN generate burst activity prior to limb movement, and inactivation of DN results in cerebellar ataxia. The question is how DN cells become active under intensive inhibitory drive from Purkinje cells (PCs. There are two excitatory inputs to DN, mossy fiber and climbing fiber collaterals, but neither of them appears to have sufficient strength for generation of burst activity in DN. Therefore, we can assume two possible mechanisms: post-inhibitory rebound excitation and disinhibition. If rebound excitation works, phasic excitation of PCs and a concomitant inhibition of DN cells should precede the excitation of DN cells. On the other hand, if disinhibition plays a primary role, phasic suppression of PCs and activation of DN cells should be observed at the same timing. To examine these two hypotheses, we compared the activity patterns of PCs in the cerebrocerebellum and DN cells during step-tracking wrist movements in three Japanese monkeys. As a result, we found that the majority of wrist-movement-related PCs were suppressed prior to movement onset and the majority of wrist-movement-related DN cells showed concurrent burst activity without prior suppression. In a minority of PCs and DN cells, movement-related increases and decreases in activity, respectively, developed later. These activity patterns suggest that the initial burst activity in DN cells is generated by reduced inhibition from PCs, i.e., by disinhibition. Our results indicate that suppression of PCs, which has been considered secondary to facilitation, plays the primary role in generating outputs from DN. Our findings provide a new perspective on the mechanisms used by PCs to influence limb motor control and on the plastic changes that underlie motor learning in the cerebrocerebellum.

  10. Communication Between the Cell Membrane and the Nucleus: Role of Protein Compartmentalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelievre, Sophie A; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-10-21

    Understanding how the information is conveyed from outside to inside the cell is a critical challenge for all biologists involved in signal transduction. The flow of information initiated by cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix contacts is mediated by the formation of adhesion complexes involving multiple proteins. Inside adhesion complexes, connective membrane skeleton (CMS) proteins are signal transducers that bind to adhesion molecules, organize the cytoskeleton, and initiate biochemical cascades. Adhesion complex-mediated signal transduction ultimately directs the formation of supramolecular structures in the cell nucleus, as illustrated by the establishment of multi complexes of DNA-bound transcription factors, and the redistribution of nuclear structural proteins to form nuclear subdomains. Recently, several CMS proteins have been observed to travel to the cell nucleus, suggesting a distinctive role for these proteins in signal transduction. This review focuses on the nuclear translocation of structural signal transducers of the membrane skeleton and also extends our analysis to possible translocation of resident nuclear proteins to the membrane skeleton. This leads us to envision the communication between spatially distant cellular compartments (i.e., membrane skeleton and cell nucleus) as a bidirectional flow of information (a dynamic reciprocity) based on subtle multilevel structural and biochemical equilibria. At one level, it is mediated by the interaction between structural signal transducers and their binding partners, at another level it may be mediated by the balance and integration of signal transducers in different cellular compartments.

  11. Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Coupled with Nuclear Localization Signal Peptide for Cell-Nucleus Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G; Chin, Y. Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-01-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe3O4 nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear locali...

  12. Cell surface acetylcholinesterase molecules on multinucleated myotubes are clustered over the nucleus of origin

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Multinucleated skeletal muscle fibers are compartmentalized with respect to the expression and organization of several intracellular and cell surface proteins including acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Mosaic muscle fibers formed from homozygous myoblasts expressing two allelic variants of AChE preferentially translate and assemble the polypeptides in the vicinity of the nucleus encoding the mRNA (Rotundo, R. L. 1990. J. Cell Biol. 110:715-719). To determine whether the locally synthesized AChE m...

  13. A Direct Neurokinin B Projection from the Arcuate Nucleus Regulates Magnocellular Vasopressin Cells of the Supraoptic Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, R; Sabatier, N; Ludwig, M; Millar, R P; Leng, G

    2016-04-01

    Central administration of neurokinin B (NKB) agonists stimulates immediate early gene expression in the hypothalamus and increases the secretion of vasopressin from the posterior pituitary through a mechanism that depends on the activation of neurokinin receptor 3 receptors (NK3R). The present study reports that, in the rat, immunoreactivity for NK3R is expressed in magnocellular vasopressin and oxytocin neurones in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, and that NKB immunoreactivity is expressed in fibres in close juxtaposition with vasopressin neurones at both of these sites. Retrograde tracing in the rat shows that some NKB-expressing neurones in the arcuate nucleus project to the SON and, in mice, using an anterograde tracing approach, it is found that kisspeptin-expressing neurones of the arcuate nucleus, which are known to co-express NKB, project to the SON and PVN. Finally, i.c.v. injection of the NK3R agonist senktide is shown to potently increase the electrical activity of vasopressin neurones in the SON in vivo with no significant effect detected on oxytocin neurones. The results suggest that NKB-containing neurones in the arcuate nucleus regulate the secretion of vasopressin from magnocellular neurones in rodents, and the possible significance of this is discussed. PMID:26610724

  14. DNA damage-induced translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus regulates cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulbricht Tobias

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins are able to react in response to distinct stress stimuli by alteration of their subcellular distribution. The stress-responsive protein S100A11 belongs to the family of multifunctional S100 proteins which have been implicated in several key biological processes. Previously, we have shown that S100A11 is directly involved in DNA repair processes at damaged chromatin in the nucleus. To gain further insight into the underlying mechanism subcellular trafficking of S100A11 in response to DNA damage was analyzed. Results We show that DNA damage induces a nucleolin-mediated translocation of S100A11 from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. This translocation is impeded by inhibition of the phosphorylation activity of PKCα. Translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus correlates with an increased cellular p21 protein level. Depletion of nucleolin by siRNA severely impairs translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus resulting in a decreased p21 protein level. Additionally, cells lacking nucleolin showed a reduced colony forming capacity. Conclusions These observations suggest that regulation of the subcellular distribution of S100A11 plays an important role in the DNA damage response and p21-mediated cell cycle control.

  15. Monodisperse magnetite nanoparticles coupled with nuclear localization signal peptide for cell-nucleus targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G; Chin, Y Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-03-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. These NLS-coated nanoparticles were introduced into the HeLa cell cytoplasm and nucleus, where the particles were monodispersed and non-aggregated. The success of labeling was examined and identified by fluorescence microscopy and MRI. The work demonstrates that monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles can be readily functionalized and stabilized for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:18080259

  16. Direct projection from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to hypophysiotrophic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus demonstrated...

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, N.; Larsen, P.J.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry......Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry...

  17. Imaging in situ protein-DNA interactions in the cell nucleus using FRET-FLIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the distribution of DNA-binding proteins inside the cell nucleus can be analyzed by immunolabeling or by tagging proteins with GFP, we cannot establish whether the protein is bound to DNA or not. Here, we describe a novel approach that allows imaging of the in situ interaction between a GFP-fusion protein and DNA in the cell nucleus, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). We used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) as a reliable tool to detect protein in contact with DNA. The method was successfully applied to the DNA-binding proteins histone H2B and the glucocorticoid receptor and to the heterochromatin-associated proteins HP1α and HP1β

  18. Segmentation of White Blood Cells through Nucleus Mark Watershed Operations and Mean Shift Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Liu, Jing; Xiao, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Hui; Li, Xiaomei; Chang, Jun; Zheng, Chengyun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for segmentation of white blood cells (WBCs) in peripheral blood and bone marrow images under different lights through mean shift clustering, color space conversion and nucleus mark watershed operation (NMWO). The proposed method focuses on obtaining seed points. First, color space transformation and image enhancement techniques are used to obtain nucleus groups as inside seeds. Second, mean shift clustering, selection of the C channel component in the CMYK model, and illumination intensity adjustment are employed to acquire WBCs as outside seeds. Third, the seeds and NMWO are employed to precisely determine WBCs and solve the cell adhesion problem. Morphological operations are further used to improve segmentation accuracy. Experimental results demonstrate that the algorithm exhibits higher segmentation accuracy and robustness compared with traditional methods. PMID:26370995

  19. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  20. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei, E-mail: biehzw@nus.edu.sg [Optical Bioimaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-09-08

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  1. Protective effect of cannabidiol on hydrogen peroxide‑induced apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress in nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Hou, Chen; Chen, Xin; Wang, Dong; Yang, Pinglin; He, Xijing; Zhou, Jinsong; Li, Haopeng

    2016-09-01

    Cannabidiol, a major component of marijuana, protects nerves, and exerts antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory and anti‑anxiety effects. In the current study, the protective effect of cannabidiol was observed to prevent hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress in nucleus pulposus cells. Nucleus pulposus cells were isolated from rats and cultured in vitro, and H2O2 was used to construct the nucleus pulposus cell model. Cell viability of the nucleus pulposus cells was assessed using a 3‑(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The ratio of apoptotic cells, and caspase‑3 or cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX‑2) mRNA expression was analyzed by annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium‑iodide staining and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The quantities of interleukin (IL)‑1β and interleukin‑6 were measured using a series of assay kits. B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression levels were analyzed using western blotting. The present study identified that cannabidiol enhanced cell viability and reduced apoptosis in H2O2‑treated nucleus pulposus cells in vitro using a lumbar disc herniation (LDH) model. In addition, cannabidiol reduced caspase‑3 gene expression and augmented the Bcl‑2 protein expression levels in the nucleus pulposus cells following H2O2 exposure. Pre‑treatment with cannabidiol suppressed the promotion of COX‑2, iNOS, IL‑1β and IL‑6 expression in the nucleus pulposus cells following H2O2 exposure. Taken together, these results suggest that cannabidiol potentially exerts its protective effect on LDH via the suppression of anti‑apoptosis, anti‑inflammation and anti‑oxidative activities in nucleus pulposus cells. PMID:27430346

  2. First observations of the nucleoplasmic lipid islets: "black holes" in the cell nucleus?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobol, Margaryta; Filimonenko, Anatolij; Filimonenko, Vlada; Hozák, Pavel

    Praha : ČSMS, 2013. [Mikroskopie 2013. 13.05.2013-14.05.2013, Lednice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MPO FR-TI3/588; GA MŠk LD12063; GA MŠk LH12143 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cell nucleus * chromatin * PIP2 * 3D electron tomography * super-resolution microscopy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. First observations of the nucleoplasmic lipid islets: "black holes: in the cell nucleus?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobol, Margaryta; Yildirim, Sukriye; Filimonenko, Vlada; Filimonenko, Anatolij; Hozák, Pavel

    Regensburg : European Microscopy Society, 2013, s. 341-342. [MC 2013 Regensburg. Regensburg (DE), 25.08.2013-30.08.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk LD12063; GA MŠk LH12143 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cell nucleus * chromatin * PIP2 * 3D electron tomography * super-resolution microscopy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  4. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes present two distinct modes of nucleus and kinetoplast segregation during cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Santos da Silva

    Full Text Available Here, we show the morphological events associated with organelle segregation and their timing in the cell cycle of a reference strain of Leishmania (L. amazonensis promastigotes, the main causative agent of Tegumentary leishmaniasis in the Americas. We show evidences that during the cell cycle, L. amazonensis promastigotes present two distinct modes of nucleus and kinetoplast segregation, which occur in different temporal order in different proportions of cells. We used DAPI-staining and EdU-labeling to monitor the segregation of DNA-containing organelles and DNA replication in wild-type parasites. The emergence of a new flagellum was observed using a specific monoclonal antibody. The results show that L. amazonensis cell cycle division is peculiar, with 65% of the dividing cells duplicating the kinetoplast before the nucleus, and the remaining 35% doing the opposite or duplicating both organelles concomitantly. In both cases, the new flagellum appeared during S to G2 phase in 1N1K cells and thus before the segregation of both DNA-containing organelles; however, we could not determine the exact timing of flagellar synthesis. Most of these results were confirmed by the synchronization of parasites using hydroxyurea. Altogether, our data show that during the cell cycle of L. amazonensis promastigotes, similarly to L. donovani, the segregation of nucleus and kinetoplast do not follow a specific order, especially when compared to other trypanosomatids, reinforcing the idea that this characteristic seems to be species-specific and may represent differences in cellular biology among members of the Leishmania genus.

  5. Transplantation of gene-modified nucleus pulposus cells reverses rabbit intervertebral disc degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong; LI Jian-min; HU You-gu

    2011-01-01

    Background Intervertebral disc degeneration is the main cause of low back pain. The purpose of this study was to explore potential methods for reversing the degeneration of lumbar intervertebral discs by transplantation of gene-modified nucleus pulposus cells into rabbit degenerative lumbar intervertebral discs after transfecting rabbit nucleus pulposus cells with adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2)-mediated connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP1) genes in vitro.Methods Computer tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous annulus fibrosus injury was performed to build degenerative lumbar intervertebral disc models in 60 New Zealand white rabbits. rAAV2-CTGF-IRES-TIMP1-transfected rabbit nucleus pulposus cells were transplanted into degenerative lumbar intervertebral discs (transplantation group),phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was injected into degenerative lumbar intervertebral discs (degeneration control group)and normal lumbar intervertebral discs served as a blank control group. After 6, 10 and 14 weeks, the disc height index (DHI) and signal intensity in intervertebral discs were observed by X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis.The expression of CTGF and TIMP1 in nucleus pulposus tissue was determined by Western blotting analysis, the synthesis efficiency of proteoglycan was determined by a 35S-sulfate incorporation assay, and the mRNA expression of type Ⅱ collagen and proteoglycan was detected by RT-PCR.Results MRI confirmed that degenerative intervertebral discs appeared two weeks after percutaneous puncture.Transgenic nucleus pulposus cell transplantation could retard the rapid deterioration of the DHI. MRI indicated that degenerative intervertebral discs were relieved in the transplantation group compared with the degeneration control group. The expression of collagen Ⅱ mRNA and proteoglycan mRNA was significantly higher in the transplantation group and the blank control group compared with the

  6. Three-Dimensional Microgel Platform for the Production of Cell Factories Tailored for the Nucleus Pulposus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Gianluca; Srivastava, Akshay; Thomas, Dilip; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Pandit, Abhay

    2015-07-15

    Intradiscal injection of growth factors or cells has been shown to attenuate symptoms of intervertebral disc degeneration. However, different approaches are needed to overcome limitations such as short-term efficacy and leakage of the injected solutions. The current study aims at creating a platform for the realization of functional cell factories by using in parallel cell delivery and gene therapy approaches. Superfect, a transfecting agent, was used as nonviral gene vector because of its ability to form complexes with plasmid DNA (polyplexes). Polyplexes were loaded into collagen hollow microsphere reservoirs, and their ability to transfect cells was ascertained in vitro. Adipose-derived stem cells were then embedded in three-dimensional (3D) microgels composed of type II collagen/hyaluronan, which mimics the environmental cues typical of the healthy nucleus pulposus. These were functionalized with polyplex-loaded collagen hollow spheres and the secretion of the target protein was assessed quantitatively. Delivery of polyplexes from a reservoir system lowered their toxicity significantly while maintaining high levels of transfection in a monolayer culture. In 3D microgels, lower levels of transfection were observed, however; increasing levels of luciferase were secreted from the microgels over 7 days of culture. These results indicate that 3D microgels, functionalized with polyplex-loaded reservoirs offer a reliable platform for the production of cell factories that are able to manufacture targeted therapeutic proteins for regenerative therapies that have applications in nucleus pulposus repair. PMID:25290910

  7. UV micro-irradiation of the Chinese hamster cell nucleus and caffeine post-treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV micro-irradiation of a small part of the Chinese hamster nucleus and caffeine post-incubation often results in shattered chromosomes at the first post-irradiation mitosis. In some of these mitotic cells, chromosome shattering is restricted to a few chromosomes spatially related in a small area of the metaphase spread; in others, shattering includes the whole chromosome complement. These 2 types of damage have been called partial and generalized chromosome shattering (PCS and GCS). Using antisera that specifically react with UV-irradiated DNA, we identified micro-irradiated chromatin in interphase nuclei and in mitotic cells with PCS or GCS by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. In PCS, immunofluorescence staining was found in the damaged area, while the surrounding intact chromosomes were not stained. In GCS, staining was also restricted to a small region of the shattered chromosome complement. In other experiments, cells synchronized in G1 were micro-irradiated in the nucleus, pulse-labelled with [3H]thymidine and post-incubated with caffeine. Autoradiographs of cells with GCS showed unscheduled DNA synthesis restricted to a small chromatin region. (orig./AJ)

  8. Current ideas on central chemoreception by neurons and glial cells in the retrotrapezoid nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Mulkey, Daniel K.; Wenker, Ian C.; Kréneisz, Orsolya

    2010-01-01

    Central chemoreception is the mechanism by which CO2/pH-sensitive neurons (i.e., chemoreceptors) regulate breathing in response to changes in tissue pH. A region of the brain stem called the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is thought to be an important site of chemoreception (23), and recent evidence suggests that RTN chemoreception involves two interrelated mechanisms: H+-mediated activation of pH-sensitive neurons (38) and purinergic signaling (19), possibly from pH-sensitive glial cells. A th...

  9. Localization of the simian virus 40 small t antigen in the nucleus and cytoplasm of monkey and mouse cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellman, M; Bikel, I; Figge, J; Roberts, T; Schlossman, R; Livingston, D M

    1984-01-01

    Monkey and mouse cells producing simian virus 40 small t antigen in the absence of clearly detectable intact or truncated large T antigens were subjected to indirect immunofluorescence and biochemical cell compartment analyses. Results revealed specific immunofluorescence and small t polypeptide in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of these cells.

  10. The formation of argpyrimidine, a methylglyoxal-arginine adduct, in the nucleus of neural cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is an endogenous metabolite in glycolysis and forms stable adducts primarily with arginine residues of intracellular proteins. The biological role of this modification in cell function is not known. In the present study, we found that a MG-detoxification enzyme glyoxalase I (GLO1) is mainly expressed in the ventricular zone (VZ) at embryonic day 16 which neural stem and progenitor cells localize. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that argpyrimidine, a major MG-arginine adduct, is predominantly produced in cortical plate neurons not VZ during cerebral cortex development and is exclusively located in the nucleus. Immunoblotting experiment showed that the formation of argpyrimidine occurs on some nuclear proteins of cortical neurons. To our knowledge, this is first report of the argpyrimidine formation in the nucleus of neuron. These findings suggest that GLO1, which is dominantly expressed in the embryonic VZ, reduces the intracellular level of MG and suppresses the formation of argpyrimidine in neural stem and progenitor cells. Argpyrimidine may contribute to the neural differentiation and/or the maintenance of the differentiated state via the modification of nuclear proteins.

  11. Characterisation of cell death inducing Phytophthora capsici CRN effectors suggests diverse activities in the host nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remco eStam

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant-Microbe interactions are complex associations that feature recognition of Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns by the plant immune system and dampening of subsequent responses by pathogen encoded secreted effectors. With large effector repertoires now identified in a range of sequenced microbial genomes, much attention centres on understanding their roles in immunity or disease. These studies not only allow identification of pathogen virulence factors and strategies, they also provide an important molecular toolset suited for studying immunity in plants. The Phytophthora intracellular effector repertoire encodes a large class of proteins that translocate into host cells and exclusively target the host nucleus. Recent functional studies have implicated the CRN protein family as an important class of diverse effectors that target distinct subnuclear compartments and modify host cell signalling. Here, we characterised three necrosis inducing CRNs and show that there are differences in the levels of cell death. We show that only expression of CRN20_624 has an additive effect on PAMP induced cell death but not AVR3a induced ETI. Given their distinctive phenotypes, we assessed localisation of each CRN with a set of nuclear markers and found clear differences in CRN subnuclear distribution patterns. These assays also revealed that expression of CRN83_152 leads to a distinct change in nuclear chromatin organisation, suggesting a distinct series of events that leads to cell death upon over-expression. Taken together, our results suggest diverse functions carried by CRN C-termini, which can be exploited to identify novel processes that take place in the host nucleus and are required for immunity or susceptibility.

  12. Delivery of oncolytic adenovirus into the nucleus of tumorigenic cells by tumor microparticles for virotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Li; Tan, Xiaohua; Li, Yanchun; Zhang, Huafeng; Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Dong, Wenqian; Tong, Tong; Liu, Yuying; Chen, Degao; Yin, Xiaonan; Liang, Xiaoyu; Tang, Ke; Ma, Jingwei; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Xuetao; Hu, Zhuowei; Qin, Xiaofeng; Huang, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Oncolytic viruses have been utilized for the treatment of various cancers. However, delivery of the viral particles to tumor cells remains a major challenge. Microparticles (MP) are vesicle forms of plasma membrane fragments of 0.1-1 μm in size that are shed by cells. We have previously shown the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs using tumor cell-derived MPs (T-MP). Here we report that T-MPs can be utilized as a unique carrier system to deliver oncolytic adenoviruses to human tumors, leading to highly efficient cytolysis of tumor cells needed for in vivo treatment efficacy. This T-MP-mediated oncolytic virotherapy approach holds multiple advantages, including: 1) delivery of oncolytic adenovirus by T-MPs is able to avoid the antiviral effect of host antibodies; 2) delivery of oncolytic adenovirus by T-MPs is not limited by virus-specific receptor that mediates the entry of virus into tumor cells; 3) T-MPs are apt at delivering oncolytic adenoviruses to the nucleus of tumor cells as well as to stem-like tumor-repopulating cells for the desired purpose of killing them. These findings highlight a novel oncolytic adenovirus delivery system with highly promising clinical applications. PMID:26950165

  13. ABCG2 Localizes to the Nucleus and Modulates CDH1 Expression in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ching Liang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer resistance protein [BCRP/ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2] is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family. The presence of ABCG2 on the plasma membrane in many kinds of human cancer cells contributes to multidrug resistance during chemotherapy, and it has been used as the side population marker for identifying cancer stem cells in lung cancers. We report here that, in addition to the membranous form, ABCG2 proteins are also found inside the nucleus, where they bind to the E-box of CDH1 (E-cadherin promoter and regulate transcription of this gene. Increased expression of ABCG2 causes an increase of E-cadherin and attenuates cell migration, whereas knockdown of ABCG2 downregulates E-cadherin and enhances cell motility. In mice, xenografted A549 cells that have less ABCG2 are more likely to metastasize from the subcutaneous inoculation site to the internal organs. However, for the cancer cells that have already entered the blood circulation, an increased level of ABCG2, and correspondingly increased E-cadherin, may facilitate circulating cancer cells to colonize at a distant site and form a metastatic tumor. We propose a novel role for nuclear ABCG2 that functions as a transcription regulator and participates in modulation of cancer metastasis.

  14. Nuclear genes involved in mitochondria-to-nucleus communication in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielson Edward

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction of nuclear and mitochondrial genes is an essential feature in maintenance of normal cellular function. Of 82 structural subunits that make up the oxidative phosphorylation system in the mitochondria, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA encodes 13 subunits and rest of the subunits are encoded by nuclear DNA. Mutations in mitochondrial genes encoding the 13 subunits have been reported in a variety of cancers. However, little is known about the nuclear response to impairment of mitochondrial function in human cells. Results We isolated a Rho0 (devoid of mtDNA derivative of a breast cancer cell line. Our study suggests that depletion of mtDNA results in oxidative stress, causing increased lipid peroxidation in breast cancer cells. Using a cDNA microarray we compared differences in the nuclear gene expression profile between a breast cancer cell line (parental Rho+ and its Rho0 derivative impaired in mitochondrial function. Expression of several nuclear genes involved in cell signaling, cell architecture, energy metabolism, cell growth, apoptosis including general transcription factor TFIIH, v-maf, AML1, was induced in Rho0 cells. Expression of several genes was also down regulated. These include phospholipase C, agouti related protein, PKC gamma, protein tyrosine phosphatase C, phosphodiestarase 1A (cell signaling, PIBF1, cytochrome p450, (metabolism and cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p19, and GAP43 (cell growth and differentiation. Conclusions Mitochondrial impairment in breast cancer cells results in altered expression of nuclear genes involved in signaling, cellular architecture, metabolism, cell growth and differentiation, and apoptosis. These genes may mediate the cross talk between mitochondria and the nucleus.

  15. Neurons and Glial Cells Are Added to the Female Rat Anteroventral Periventricular Nucleus During Puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Margaret A; Garcia, Francisca L; DonCarlos, Lydia L; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2016-06-01

    The anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) orchestrates the neuroendocrine-positive feedback response that triggers ovulation in female rodents. The AVPV is larger and more cell-dense in females than in males, and during puberty, only females develop the capacity to show a positive feedback response. We previously reported a potential new mechanism to explain this female-specific gain of function during puberty, namely a female-biased sex difference in the pubertal addition of new cells to the rat AVPV. Here we first asked whether this sex difference is due to greater cell proliferation and/or survival in females. Female and male rats received the cell birthdate marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU; 200 mg/kg, ip) on postnatal day (P) 30; brains were collected at short and long intervals after BrdU administration to assess cell proliferation and survival, respectively. Overall, females had more BrdU-immunoreactive cells in the AVPV than did males, with no sex differences in the rate of cell attrition over time. Thus, the sex difference in pubertal addition of AVPV cells appears to be due to greater cell proliferation in females. Next, to determine the phenotype of pubertally born AVPV cells, daily BrdU injections were given to female rats on P28-56, and tissue was collected on P77 to assess colocalization of BrdU and markers for mature neurons or glia. Of the pubertally born AVPV cells, approximately 15% differentiated into neurons, approximately 19% into astrocytes, and approximately 23% into microglia. Thus, both neuro- and gliogenesis occur in the pubertal female rat AVPV and potentially contribute to maturation of female reproductive function. PMID:27145006

  16. Retinal ganglion cell projections to the hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus, intergeniculate leaflet, and visual midbrain: bifurcation and melanopsin immunoreactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Blanchard, Jane H.; Provencio, Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) receives direct retinal input via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT), and the retinal ganglion cells contributing to this projection may be specialized with respect to direct regulation of the circadian clock. However, some ganglion cells forming the RHT bifurcate, sending axon collaterals to the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) through which light has secondary access to the circadian clock. The present studies provide a more extensive examination of ganglion cell bifurcation and evaluate whether ganglion cells projecting to several subcortical visual nuclei contain melanopsin, a putative ganglion cell photopigment. The results showed that retinal ganglion cells projecting to the SCN send collaterals to the IGL, olivary pretectal nucleus, and superior colliculus, among other places. Melanopsin-immunoreactive (IR) ganglion cells are present in the hamster retina, and some of these cells project to the SCN, IGL, olivary pretectal nucleus, or superior colliculus. Triple-label analysis showed that melanopsin-IR cells bifurcate and project bilaterally to each SCN, but not to the other visual nuclei evaluated. The melanopsin-IR cells have photoreceptive characteristics optimal for circadian rhythm regulation. However, the presence of moderately widespread bifurcation among ganglion cells projecting to the SCN, and projection by melanopsin-IR cells to locations distinct from the SCN and without known rhythm function, suggest that this ganglion cell type is generalized, rather than specialized, with respect to the conveyance of photic information to the brain. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. EphB4 localises to the nucleus of prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens-Walker, Inga, E-mail: inga.mertenswalker@qut.edu.au [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD (Australia); Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre—Queensland, Translational Research Institute, 37 Kent Street, Woolloongabba 4102, QLD (Australia); Lisle, Jessica E. [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD (Australia); Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre—Queensland, Translational Research Institute, 37 Kent Street, Woolloongabba 4102, QLD (Australia); Nyberg, William A. [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD (Australia); Stephens, Carson R. [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD (Australia); Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre—Queensland, Translational Research Institute, 37 Kent Street, Woolloongabba 4102, QLD (Australia); Burke, Leslie [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD (Australia); Rutkowski, Raphael; Herington, Adrian C.; Stephenson, Sally-Anne [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD (Australia); Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre—Queensland, Translational Research Institute, 37 Kent Street, Woolloongabba 4102, QLD (Australia)

    2015-04-10

    The EphB4 receptor tyrosine kinase is over-expressed in a variety of different epithelial cancers including prostate where it has been shown to be involved in survival, migration and angiogenesis. We report here that EphB4 also resides in the nucleus of prostate cancer cell lines. We used in silico methods to identify a bipartite nuclear localisation signal (NLS) in the extracellular domain and a monopartite NLS sequence in the intracellular kinase domain of EphB4. To determine whether both putative NLS sequences were functional, fragments of the EphB4 sequence containing each NLS were cloned to create EphB4NLS-GFP fusion proteins. Localisation of both NLS-GFP proteins to the nuclei of transfected cells was observed, demonstrating that EphB4 contains two functional NLS sequences. Mutation of the key amino residues in both NLS sequences resulted in diminished nuclear accumulation. As nuclear translocation is often dependent on importins we confirmed that EphB4 and importin-α can interact. To assess if nuclear EphB4 could be implicated in gene regulatory functions potential EphB4-binding genomic loci were identified using chromatin immunoprecipitation and Lef1 was confirmed as a potential target of EphB4-mediated gene regulation. These novel findings add further complexity to the biology of this important cancer-associated receptor. - Highlights: • The EphB4 protein can be found in the nucleus of prostate cancer cell lines. • EphB4 contains two functional nuclear localisation signals. • Chromatin immunoprecipitation has identified potential genome sequences to which EphB4 binds. • Lef1 is a confirmed target for EphB4-mediated gene regulation.

  18. EphB4 localises to the nucleus of prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EphB4 receptor tyrosine kinase is over-expressed in a variety of different epithelial cancers including prostate where it has been shown to be involved in survival, migration and angiogenesis. We report here that EphB4 also resides in the nucleus of prostate cancer cell lines. We used in silico methods to identify a bipartite nuclear localisation signal (NLS) in the extracellular domain and a monopartite NLS sequence in the intracellular kinase domain of EphB4. To determine whether both putative NLS sequences were functional, fragments of the EphB4 sequence containing each NLS were cloned to create EphB4NLS-GFP fusion proteins. Localisation of both NLS-GFP proteins to the nuclei of transfected cells was observed, demonstrating that EphB4 contains two functional NLS sequences. Mutation of the key amino residues in both NLS sequences resulted in diminished nuclear accumulation. As nuclear translocation is often dependent on importins we confirmed that EphB4 and importin-α can interact. To assess if nuclear EphB4 could be implicated in gene regulatory functions potential EphB4-binding genomic loci were identified using chromatin immunoprecipitation and Lef1 was confirmed as a potential target of EphB4-mediated gene regulation. These novel findings add further complexity to the biology of this important cancer-associated receptor. - Highlights: • The EphB4 protein can be found in the nucleus of prostate cancer cell lines. • EphB4 contains two functional nuclear localisation signals. • Chromatin immunoprecipitation has identified potential genome sequences to which EphB4 binds. • Lef1 is a confirmed target for EphB4-mediated gene regulation

  19. Increased expression of stefin B in the nucleus of T98G astrocytoma cells delays caspase activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao eSun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stefin B (cystatin B is an endogenous inhibitor of cysteine proteinases localized in the nucleus and the cytosol. Loss-of-function mutations in the stefin B gene (CSTB gene were reported in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease (EPM1. Our previous results showed that thymocytes isolated from stefin B-deficient mice are more sensitive to apoptosis induced by the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporin (STS than the wild-type control cells. We have also shown that the increased expression of stefin B in the nucleus of T98G astrocytoma cells delayed cell cycle progression through the S phase. In the present study we examined if the nuclear or cytosolic functions of stefin B are responsible for the accelerated induction of apoptosis observed in the cells from stefin B-deficient mice. We have shown that the overexpression of stefin B in the nucleus, but not in the cytosol of astrocytoma T98G cells, delayed caspase-3 and-7 activation. Pretreatment of cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe-fluoromethylketone completely inhibited caspase activation, while treatment with the inhibitor of calpains- and papain-like cathepsins (2S,3S-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-3-methyl-butane ethyl ester did not prevent caspase activation. We concluded that the delay of caspase activation in T98G cells overexpressing stefin B in the nucleus is independent of cathepsin inhibition.

  20. Cell death in the central division of the medial preoptic nucleus of male and female lamb fetuses

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Radhika C.; Scheldrup, Melissa; Meaker, Mary; Stormshak, Fred; Estill, Charles T.; Roselli, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    The medial preoptic area of the adult sheep contains an ovine sexually dimorphic nucleus (oSDN) that is larger and has more neurons in males than in females. In the lamb fetus, the nascent oSDN occupies the central division of the medial preoptic nucleus (MPNc) and consists of a cluster of cells that is organized by the action of testosterone during gestational days 60 to 90 of a 147 day term pregnancy. The current study sought to determine whether programmed cell death cont...

  1. Herbicide effects on freshwater benthic diatoms: Induction of nucleus alterations and silica cell wall abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benthic diatoms are well known bio-indicators of river pollution by nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus). Biological indexes, based on diatom sensitivity for non-toxic pollution, have been developed to assess the water quality. Nevertheless, they are not reliable tools to detect pollution by pesticides. Many authors have suggested that toxic agents, like pesticides, induce abnormalities of the diatom cell wall (frustule). High abnormal frustule abundances have been reported in natural diatom communities sampled in streams contaminated by pesticides. However, no direct link was found between the abundances of abnormal frustules in these communities and the pesticide concentrations in stream water. In the present study, a freshwater benthic diatom community, isolated from natural biofilm and cultured under controlled conditions, was treated with a known genotoxic herbicide, maleic hydrazide (MH). Cells were exposed to three concentrations of MH (5 x 10-6, 10-6, 10-7 M) for 6 h followed by a 24 h-recovery time. After MH treatments, nucleus alterations were observed: abnormal nucleus location, micronucleus, multinuclear cell or disruption of the nuclear membrane. A dose-dependent increase of nuclear alterations was observed. The difference between the control (9.65 nuclear alterations per 1000 cells observed (9.65 per mille ), S.D. = 4.23) and the highest concentrations (29.40 per mille , S.D. = 8.49 for 10-6 M and 35.96 per mille , S.D. = 3.71 for 5 x 10-6 M) was statistically significant (Tukey test, P -6 and 5 x 10-6 M; Tukey test, P < 0.05). These two parameters tended to increase together (Pearson correlation = 0.702, P < 0.05). The results suggest that the induction of abnormal frustules could be associated with the genotoxic effects of MH. The alterations observed could be related to the effects of MH on the synthesis of the proteins involved in frustule formation or in the regulation of the cytoskeleton of the diatom cells

  2. FLIM-FRET microscopy to visualize transcription factor interactions in the nucleus of the living cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard N.; Demarco, Ignacio A.; Voss, Ty C.; Chen, Ye; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2004-06-01

    Wide-field fluorescence microscopy was used to monitor the co-localization of the homeodomain (HD) transcription factor Pit-1 and the basic-leucine zipper protein CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPa), each labeled with fluorescent proteins (FP) in the living cell nucleus. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy was used to resolve the angstrom-scale spatial relationships of these expressed proteins, and the effect of a Pit-1 point mutation on the interaction with C/EBPa was characterized. Two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2p-FLIM) was then used as an independent method to detect these protein interactions. The excited-state lifetime for the cyan FP (CFP) labeling C/EBPa was determined, and the measurements were repeated in cells co-expressing yellow FP (YFP) labeled-proteins. The CFP lifetime was decreased in the presence of the YFP acceptor, which is consistent with donor quenching by FRET. This was verified by acceptor photobleaching, which caused a shift in the donor lifetime to that similar to the donor alone. However, a significant limitation of this technique was demonstrated by the observation that high-energy 2p-excitation resulted in CFP photobleaching and a parallel decrease in its excited-state lifetime. The key question is whether the sensitivity of this imaging approach will be sufficient to acquire significant data from living cells expressing physiological levels of the labeled proteins.

  3. HHV-8 encoded LANA-1 alters the higher organization of the cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein George

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA-1 of Human Herpes Virus 8 (HHV-8, alternatively called Kaposi Sarcoma Herpes Virus (KSHV is constitutively expressed in all HHV-8 infected cells. LANA-1 accumulates in well-defined foci that co-localize with the viral episomes. We have previously shown that these foci are tightly associated with the borders of heterochromatin 1. We have also shown that exogenously expressed LANA-1 causes an extensive re-organization of Hoechst 33248 DNA staining patterns of the nuclei in non-HHV-8 infected cells 2. Here we show that this effect includes the release of the bulk of DNA from heterochromatic areas, in both human and mouse cells, without affecting the overall levels of heterochromatin associated histone H3 lysine 9 tri-methylation (3MK9H3. The release of DNA from the heterochromatic chromocenters in LANA-1 transfected mouse cells co-incides with the dispersion of the chromocenter associated methylcytosin binding protein 2 (MECP2. The localization of 3MK9H3 to the remnants of the chromocenters remains unaltered. Moreover, exogeneously expressed LANA-1 leads to the relocation of the chromocenters to the nuclear periphery, indicating extensive changes in the positioning of the chromosomal domains in the LANA-1 harboring interphase nucleus. Using a series of deletion mutants we have shown that the chromatin rearranging effects of LANA-1 require the presence of a short (57 amino acid region that is located immediately upstream of the internal acidic repeats. This sequence lies within the previously mapped binding site to histone methyltransferase SUV39H1. We suggest that the highly concentrated LANA-1, anchored to the host genome in the nuclear foci of latently infected cells and replicated through each cell generation, may function as "epigenetic modifier". The induction of histone modification in adjacent host genes may lead to altered gene expression, thereby contributing to the viral oncogenesis.

  4. Gold nanoparticle-aided brachytherapy with vascular dose painting: Estimation of dose enhancement to the tumor endothelial cell nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Berbeco, Ross I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Theoretical microdosimetry at the subcellular level is employed in this study to estimate the dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cell nuclei, caused by radiation-induced photo/Auger electrons originating from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) targeting the tumor endothelium, during brachytherapy. Methods: A tumor vascular endothelial cell (EC) is modeled as a slab of 2 {mu}m (thickness) x 10 {mu}m (length) x 10 {mu}m (width). The EC contains a nucleus of 5 {mu}m diameter and thickness of 0.5-1 {mu}m, corresponding to nucleus size 5%-10% of cellular volume, respectively. Analytic calculations based on the electron energy loss formula of Cole were carried out to estimate the dose enhancement to the nucleus caused by photo/Auger electrons from AuNPs attached to the exterior surface of the EC. The nucleus dose enhancement factor (nDEF), representing the ratio of the dose to the nucleus with and without the presence of gold nanoparticles was calculated for different AuNP local concentrations. The investigated concentration range considers the potential for significantly higher local concentration near the EC due to preferential accumulation of AuNP in the tumor vasculature. Four brachytherapy sources: I-125, Pd-103, Yb-169, and 50 kVp x-rays were investigated. Results: For nucleus size of 10% of the cellular volume and AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 140 mg/g, brachytherapy sources Pd-103, I-125, 50 kVp, and Yb-169 yielded nDEF values of 5.6-73, 4.8-58.3, 4.7-56.6, and 3.2-25.8, respectively. Meanwhile, for nucleus size 5% of the cellular volume in the same concentration range, Pd-103, I-125, 50 kVp, and Yb-169 yielded nDEF values of 6.9-79.2, 5.1-63.2, 5.0-61.5, and 3.3-28.3, respectively. Conclusions: The results predict that a substantial dose boost to the nucleus of endothelial cells can be achieved by applying tumor vasculature-targeted AuNPs in combination with brachytherapy. Such vascular dose boosts could induce tumor vascular shutdown, prompting

  5. Activated ErbB3 Translocates to the Nucleus via Clathrin-independent Endocytosis, Which Is Associated with Proliferating Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Raymond; Adawy, Alshaimaa; Vartak, Nachiket; Schröder, Jutta; Günther, Georgia; Ghallab, Ahmed; Schmidt, Marcus; Schormann, Wiebke; Hengstler, Jan G

    2016-02-19

    Members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family (RTK) have been shown to be present in the nucleus of cells; however, the mechanisms underlying their trafficking to the nucleus, and their relevance once there are poorly understood. In the present study, we focus on the RTK ErbB3 and elucidate the mechanisms regulating its trafficking. We show that heregulin-stimulation induces trafficking of phosphorylated ErbB3 from the plasma membrane to the nucleus via a clathrin-independent mechanism. Nuclear import of ErbB3 occurs via importin β1, which drives the receptor through the nuclear pore complex. In the nucleus, ErbB3 interacts with transcription complexes, and thereby has a role in transcriptional regulation. Our results also demonstrate that ErbB3 nuclear localization is transient as it is exported out of the nucleus by the nuclear receptor protein crm-1. Analysis of normal, regenerating tissues, and tumors showed that ErbB3 nuclear translocation is a common event in proliferating tissues. PMID:26719328

  6. Mechanical interplay between invadopodia and the nucleus in cultured cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revach, Or-Yam; Weiner, Allon; Rechav, Katya; Sabanay, Ilana; Livne, Ariel; Geiger, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Invadopodia are actin-rich membrane protrusions through which cells adhere to the extracellular matrix and degrade it. In this study, we explored the mechanical interactions of invadopodia in melanoma cells, using a combination of correlative light and electron microscopy. We show here that the core actin bundle of most invadopodia interacts with integrin-containing matrix adhesions at its basal end, extends through a microtubule-rich cytoplasm, and at its apical end, interacts with the nuclear envelope and indents it. Abolishment of invadopodia by microtubules or src inhibitors leads to the disappearance of these nuclear indentations. Based on the indentation profile and the viscoelastic properties of the nucleus, the force applied by invadopodia is estimated to be in the nanoNewton range. We further show that knockdown of the LINC complex components nesprin 2 or SUN1 leads to a substantial increase in the prominence of the adhesion domains at the opposite end of the invadopodia. We discuss this unexpected, long-range mechanical interplay between the apical and basal domains of invadopodia, and its possible involvement in the penetration of invadopodia into the matrix. PMID:25820462

  7. Descending projections from auditory cortex to excitatory and inhibitory cells in the nucleus of the brachium of the inferior colliculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Garrett Mellott

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Descending projections from the auditory cortex (AC terminate in subcortical auditory centers from the medial geniculate nucleus (MG to the cochlear nucleus, allowing the AC to modulate the processing of acoustic information at many levels of the auditory system. The nucleus of the brachium of the inferior colliculus (NBIC is a large midbrain auditory nucleus that is a target of these descending cortical projections. The NBIC is a source of several auditory projections, including an ascending projection to the MG. This ascending projection appears to originate from both excitatory and inhibitory NBIC cells, but whether the cortical projections contact either of these cell groups is unknown. In this study, we first combined retrograde tracing and immunochemistry for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD, a marker of GABAergic cells to identify GABAergic and non-GABAergic NBIC projections to the MG. Our first result is that GAD-immunopositive cells constitute ~17% of the NBIC to MG projection. We then used anterograde labeling and electron microscopy to examine the AC projection to the NBIC. Our second result is that cortical boutons in the NBIC form synapses with round vesicles and asymmetric synapses, consistent with excitatory effects. Finally, we combined fluorescent anterograde labeling of corticofugal axons with immunochemistry and retrograde labeling of NBIC cells that project to the MG. These final results suggest first that AC axons contact both GAD-negative and GAD-positive NBIC cells and, second, that some of cortically-contacted cells project to the MG. Overall, the results imply that corticofugal projections can modulate both excitatory and inhibitory ascending projections from the NBIC to the auditory thalamus.

  8. Identification of a Novel Nucleus Protein Involved in the Regulation of Urokinase in 95D Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang TONG; Li TAN; Ping LI; Yun-Song ZHU

    2005-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in cellular invasion.By using the downstream part of a 74 bp DNA region called the cooperation mediator (COM) of the uPA promoter as a bait sequence in the yeast one-hybrid screen, a gene called PBK1 was previously cloned from the cDNA library of the 95D lung cancer cell strain. In this study, the intracellular distribution of PBK1 was studied by using the transient transfection of pEGFP-C3-PBK1, and PBK1 was found to be localized in the nucleus. Co-transfection of pEGFP-C3-PBK1 and the deletion mutants of the pGL3-uPA promoter indicated that PBK1 can increase the uPA promoter activity by about 25% and this effect is uPA enhancer-dependent.Western blotting and Enzyme-linked immunoadsordent assay further confirmed that PBK1 can upregulate the expression of uPA. Our results suggest that PBK1 is involved in the regulation of uPA expression, which might provide a new clue to further understanding the regulation mechanism of uPA expression.

  9. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations at Fluences of Less Than One HZE Particle per Cell Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori J.; Wang, Minli; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    The assumption of a linear dose response used to describe the biological effects of high LET radiation is fundamental in radiation protection methodologies. We investigated the dose response for chromosomal aberrations for exposures corresponding to less than one particle traversal per cell nucleus by high energy and charge (HZE) nuclei. Human fibroblast and lymphocyte cells where irradiated with several low doses of <0.1 Gy, and several higher doses of up to 1 Gy with O (77 keV/ (long-s)m), Si (99 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (175 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (195 keV/ (long-s)m) or Fe (240 keV/ (long-s)m) particles. Chromosomal aberrations at first mitosis were scored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome specific paints for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 and DAPI staining of background chromosomes. Non-linear regression models were used to evaluate possible linear and non-linear dose response models based on these data. Dose responses for simple exchanges for human fibroblast irradiated under confluent culture conditions were best fit by non-linear models motivated by a non-targeted effect (NTE). Best fits for the dose response data for human lymphocytes irradiated in blood tubes were a NTE model for O and a linear response model fit best for Si and Fe particles. Additional evidence for NTE were found in low dose experiments measuring gamma-H2AX foci, a marker of double strand breaks (DSB), and split-dose experiments with human fibroblasts. Our results suggest that simple exchanges in normal human fibroblasts have an important NTE contribution at low particle fluence. The current and prior experimental studies provide important evidence against the linear dose response assumption used in radiation protection for HZE particles and other high LET radiation at the relevant range of low doses.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells regulate mechanical properties of human degenerated nucleus pulposus cells through SDF-1/CXCR4/AKT axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Han; Bian, Bai-Shi-Jiao; Cui, Xiang; Liu, Lan-Tao; Liu, Huan; Huang, Bo; Cui, You-Hong; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Zhou, Yue

    2016-08-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD) has shown promise for decelerating or arresting IVD degeneration. Cellular mechanical properties play crucial roles in regulating cell-matrix interactions, potentially reflecting specific changes that occur based on cellular phenotype and behavior. However, the effect of co-culturing of MSCs with nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) on the mechanical properties of NPCs remains unknown. In our study, we demonstrated that co-culture of degenerated NPCs with MSCs resulted in significantly decreased mechanical moduli (elastic modulus, relaxed modulus, and instantaneous modulus) and increased biological activity (proliferation and expression of matrix genes) in degenerated NPCs, but not normal NPCs. SDF-1, CXCR4 ligand, was highly expressed in MSCs when co-cultured with degenerated NPCs. Inhibition of SDF-1 using CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 or knocking-down CXCR4 in degenerated NPCs abolished the MSCs-induced decrease in the mechanical moduli and increased biological activity of degenerated NPCs, suggesting a crucial role for SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling. AKT and FAK inhibition attenuated the MSCs- or SDF-1-induced decrease in the mechanical moduli of degenerated NPCs. In conclusion, it was demonstrated in vitro that MSCs regulate the mechanical properties of degenerated NPCs through SDF-1/CXCR4/AKT signaling. These findings highlight a possible mechanical mechanism for MSCs-induced modulation with degenerated NPCs, which may be applicable to MSCs-based therapy for disc degeneration. PMID:27163878

  11. Cortical-Thalamic Axons are Required for Retinal Ganglion Cell Targeting to the Mouse Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Shanks, James Alexander

    2015-01-01

    AbstractJames A. ShanksCortical-Thalamic Axons are Required for Retinal Ganglion Cell Targeting to the Mouse Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus The human brain contains over 85 billion neurons, which make trillions of synapses in a very ordered and stereotypical manner (Williams and Herrup, 1988). The human cerebral cortex, which contains over 20 percent of the total number of neurons within the brain, is responsible for critical functions such as memory, attention, perception, awareness, lan...

  12. Visualizing Stable Features in Live Cell Nucleus for Evaluation of the Cell Global Motion Compensation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sorokin, D.V.; Suchánková, Jana; Bártová, Eva; Matula, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2014), s. 45-49. ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP302/12/G157; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : cell global motion compensation * UV laser bleaching * image registration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  13. Amyloid domains in the cell nucleus controlled by nucleoskeletal protein lamin B1 reveal a new pathway of mercury neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Arnhold

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg is a bioaccumulating trace metal that globally circulates the atmosphere and waters in its elemental, inorganic and organic chemical forms. While Hg represents a notorious neurotoxicant, the underlying cellular pathways are insufficiently understood. We identify amyloid protein aggregation in the cell nucleus as a novel pathway of Hg-bio-interactions. By mass spectrometry of purified protein aggregates, a subset of spliceosomal components and nucleoskeletal protein lamin B1 were detected as constituent parts of an Hg-induced nuclear aggregome network. The aggregome network was located by confocal imaging of amyloid-specific antibodies and dyes to amyloid cores within splicing-speckles that additionally recruit components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Hg significantly enhances global proteasomal activity in the nucleus, suggesting that formation of amyloid speckles plays a role in maintenance of protein homeostasis. RNAi knock down showed that lamin B1 for its part regulates amyloid speckle formation and thus likewise participates in nuclear protein homeostasis. As the Hg-induced cascade of interactions between the nucleoskeleton and protein homeostasis reduces neuronal signalling, amyloid fibrillation in the cell nucleus is introduced as a feature of Hg-neurotoxicity that opens new avenues of future research. Similar to protein aggregation events in the cytoplasm that are controlled by the cytoskeleton, amyloid fibrillation of nuclear proteins may be driven by the nucleoskeleton.

  14. Mouse nuclear myosin I knock-out shows interchangeability and redundancy of myosin isoforms in the cell nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Venit, Tomáš; Dzijak, Rastislav; Rohožková, Jana; Kalendová, Alžběta; Hozák, Pavel

    Debrecen : University of Debrecen, 2013. s. 45-45. [Wilhelm Bernard Workshop on the cell nucleus /23./. 19.08.2013-24.08.2013, Debrecen] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk LH12143 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * cell membrane * myosin 1C * NM1 * nuclear myosin I * myosin knock-out Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. PKCα translocation from mitochondria to nucleus is closely related to induction of apoptosis in gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Qiao(吴乔); LIU; Su(刘苏); DING; Liang(丁亮); YE; Xiaofeng(叶晓峰); SU; Wenjin(苏文金)

    2002-01-01

    PKCs have been implicated in the regulation of cellular differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis and signal transduction. It was demonstrated in this study that PKC? was located both at mitochondria and in cytosol in gastric cancer cell line BGC-823. Treatment of cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in the translocation of PKCα from both mitochondria and cytosol to nucleus as clearly shown by laser-scanning-confocal microscopy, while the protein level of PKCα was not changed by TPA treatment as detected by Western blot. The results also revealed that TPA-induced translocation of PKCα was in close association with apoptosis induction, and such association was further affirmed by other experiments where various apoptotic stimuli and specific inhibitors of PKC were used. Taken together, these findings indicate that translocation of PKCα from both mitochondria and cytosol to nucleus in gastric cancer cell is accompanied by induction of apoptosis, and may imply a new mechanism of the potential linking between cell apoptosis and PKCα translocation.

  16. Differentiation of rat adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells towards a nucleus pulposus-like phenotype in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Li-wei; FANG Huang; CHEN An-min; LI Feng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To differentiate rat adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) into cells with a nucleus pulposus-like phenotype in vitro,so as to lay a foundation for the cell-based transplantation therapy of degenerated intervertebral discs.Methods: Rat ADSCs were isolated only from the subcutaneous inguinal region and purified by limited dilution.ADSCs of the third passages were analyzed by fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) to detect the cell surface markers (Sca-1,CD44,CD45,CD11b).To induce ADSCs towards a nucleus pulposus-like phenotype,ADSCs were immobilized in 3-dimensional alginate hydrogels and cultured in an inducing medium containing transforming growth factor-betal (TGF-β1) under hypoxia (2% O2),while control groups under normoxia (21% O2) in alginate beads in medium with or without the presence of TGF-β1.Semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was carded out to evaluate phenotypic and biosynthetic activities in the process of differentiation.Meanwhile,Alcian blue staining were used to detect the formation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the differentiated cells.Results: The purified ADSCs were fibroblast-like and proliferated rapidly in vitro.The flow cytometry showed that ADSCs were positive for Sea-1 and CD44,negative for CD45 and CD11b.The results of RT-PCR manifested that the gene expressions of Sox-9,aggrecan and collagen Ⅱ,which were chondrocyte specific,were upregulated in medium containing TGF-β1 under hypoxia (2% O2).Likewise,gene expression of HIF-la,which was characteristics of intervertebral discs,was also upregulated.Simultaneously,Alcian blue staining exhibited the formation of many GAGs.Conclusions: The approach in our experiment is a simple and effective way to acquire a large quantity of homogenous ADSCs.Rat ADSCs can be differentiated into nucleus pulposus-like cells.ADSCs may replace bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as a new kind of seed cells in regeneration of

  17. 3D/4D architecture of chromosomal break point regions in the cell nucleus following irradiation of normal cells and tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of an effective analytical methodology for a correct description of oncogenic chromosomal aberrations is the challenge of medical radiobiology with respect to preventive therapeutic methods. Scope of the project was a better understanding of the behavior of break point regions dependent on the genome loci, the chromatin folding, the involved repair proteins and the beam quality with respect to an improvement and an efficient prognosis of the health consequences following radiation exposure. New microscopic insights in the normal cell nucleus are supposed to allow a better understanding of the spatial interactions on a molecular scale.

  18. Stereological analysis of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus in schizophrenia: volume, neuron number, and cell types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorph-Petersen, Karl-Anton; Pierri, Joseph N; Sun, Zhuoxin;

    2004-01-01

    The mediodorsal thalamic nucleus (MD) is the principal relay nucleus for the prefrontal cortex, a brain region thought to be dysfunctional in schizophrenia. Several, but not all, postmortem studies of the MD in schizophrenia have reported decreased volume and total neuronal number. However, it is...... differences were observed between the two groups of monkeys. Thus, these findings do not support the hypothesis that the MD is a locus of pathology in schizophrenia, although they cannot rule out important functional or structural changes in parameters not measured. Like other studies, this investigation is...... subject to the limitations involved in sampling from a heterogeneous population emphasizing the need to continue to improve the application of robust, unbiased techniques to quantitative studies of this complex brain disorder. Udgivelsesdato: 2004-May-10...

  19. Opposing Role for Egr3 in Nucleus Accumbens Cell Subtypes in Cocaine Action

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra, Ramesh; Francis, T. Chase; Konkalmatt, Prasad; Amgalan, Ariunzaya; Gancarz, Amy M.; Dietz, David M.; Lobo, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    An imbalance in molecular signaling cascades and transcriptional regulation in nucleus accumbens (NAc) medium spiny neuron (MSN) subtypes, those enriched in dopamine D1 versus D2 receptors, is implicated in the behavioral responses to psychostimulants. To provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms occurring in MSN subtypes by cocaine, we examined the transcription factor early growth response 3 (Egr3). We evaluated Egr3 because it is a target of critical cocaine-mediated signaling ...

  20. Color canals modification with canny edge detection and morphological reconstruction for cell nucleus segmentation and area measurement in normal Pap smear images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riana, Dwiza; Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti Octorina; Widyantoro, Dwi H.; Mengko, Tati Latifah R.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a cell nucleus segmentation and area measurement of Pap smear images by means of modification of color canals with Canny edge detection and morphological reconstruction methods. Cell nucleus characterization plays an important role for classifying the degree of abnormality in cervical cancer. The aim of this work is to find the matched measurement method with the manual nucleus area measurement. In this work, we utilized pap smear single cell images from Herlev data bank in RGB mode. The cell images were selected from 90 normal class subjects that include: Normal Superficial, Normal Intermediate, and Normal Columnar classes. The nucleus of each cell image was cropped manually to localize from the cytoplasm. The color canals modification was performed on each cropped nucleus image by, first, separating each R, G, B, and grayscale canals, then implementing addition operation based on color canals (R+G+B, R+G, R+B, G+B, and grayscale). The Canny edge detection was applied on those modifications resulting in binary edge images. The nucleus segmentation was implemented on the edge images by performing region filling based on morphological reconstruction. The area property was calculated based on the segmented nucleus area. The nucleus area from the proposed method was verified to the existing manual measurement (ground truth) of the Herlev data bank. Based on thorough observation upon the selected color canals and Canny edge detection. It can be concluded that Canny edge detection with R+G+B canal is the most significant for all Normal classes (r 0,305, p-value 0.05). While for Normal Superficial and Normal Intermediate, Canny edge detection is significant for all RGB modifications with (r 0.414 - 0.817 range, , p-value 0.05), and for Normal Columnar, Canny edge detection is significant for R+B canal (r 0.505, p-value 0.05).

  1. Mouse nuclear myosin I knock-out shows interchangeability and redundancy of myosin isoforms in the cell nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Venit, Tomáš; Dzijak, Rastislav; Kalendová, Alžběta; Kahle, Michal; Rohožková, Jana; Schmidt, V.; Rülicke, T.; Rathkolb, B.; Hans, W.; Bohla, A.; Eickelberg, O.; Stoeger, T.; Wolf, E.; Yildirim, A.Ö.; Gailus-Durner, V.; Fuchs, H.; de Angelis, M.H.; Hozák, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), e61406. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020022; GA MŠk LH12143; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : nuclear myosin * myosin isoforms * cell nucleus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  2. A Vivens Ex Vivo Study on the Synergistic Effect of Electrolysis and Freezing on the Cell Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugnani, Franco; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Marcuzzo, Thomas; Bottin, Cristina; Mikus, Paul; Guenther, Enric; Klein, Nina; Rubinsky, Liel; Stehling, Michael K.; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Freezing—cryosurgery, and electrolysis—electrochemical therapy (EChT), are two important minimally invasive surgery tissue ablation technologies. Despite major advantages they also have some disadvantages. Cryosurgery cannot induce cell death at high subzero freezing temperatures and requires multiple freeze thaw cycles, while EChT requires high concentrations of electrolytic products—which makes it a lengthy procedure. Based on the observation that freezing increases the concentration of solutes (including products of electrolysis) in the frozen region and permeabilizes the cell membrane to these products, this study examines the hypothesis that there could be a synergistic effect between freezing and electrolysis in their use together for tissue ablation. Using an animal model we refer to as vivens ex vivo, which may be of value in reducing the use of animals for experiments, combined with a Hematoxylin stain of the nucleus, we show that there are clinically relevant protocols in which the cell nucleus appears intact when electrolysis and freezing are used separately but is affected by certain combinations of electrolysis and freezing. PMID:26695185

  3. Y-like retinal ganglion cells innervate the dorsal raphe nucleus in the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liju Luan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN of the mesencephalon is a complex multi-functional and multi-transmitter nucleus involved in a wide range of behavioral and physiological processes. The DRN receives a direct input from the retina. However little is known regarding the type of retinal ganglion cell (RGC that innervates the DRN. We examined morphological characteristics and physiological properties of these DRN projecting ganglion cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Mongolian gerbils are highly visual rodents with a diurnal/crepuscular activity rhythm. It has been widely used as experimental animals of various studies including seasonal affective disorders and depression. Young adult gerbils were used in the present study. DRN-projecting RGCs were identified following retrograde tracer injection into the DRN, characterized physiologically by extracellular recording and morphologically after intracellular filling. The result shows that DRN-projecting RGCs exhibit morphological characteristics typical of alpha RGCs and physiological response properties of Y-cells. Melanopsin was not detected in these RGCs and they show no evidence of intrinsic photosensitivity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that RGCs with alpha-like morphology and Y-like physiology appear to perform a non-imaging forming function and thus may participate in the modulation of DRN activity which includes regulation of sleep and mood.

  4. Biological characteristics of adult degenerative nucleus pulposus cells in a three-dimensional microcarrier stirring culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Bin; Liu, Haifei; Gong, Weiming; Jiang, Jianhao; Hu, Yougu; Yang, Shang-You

    2013-06-01

    A major problem in reconstructing degenerative intervertebral discs is to obtain sufficient nucleus pulposus (NP) seeding cells with normal physiologic functions. The current study adopted a three-dimensional microcarrier culture system for massive cell expansion and evaluated the biological characteristics and physiological functions of the propagated adult degenerative NP cells. Isolated adult NP cells were cultured in either microcarrier stirring culturing system or traditional monolayer cultivation. The growth characteristics, proliferation, extracellular matrix secretion, and apoptosis potential were examined to evaluate the different features of the two cultivation methods. Compared to the monolayer cultivation system, the adhesion time of NP cells in the three-dimensional microcarrier culture system appeared longer with relatively transient stable growth period. MTT and (3)H-TdR assays suggested significantly elevated proliferation and higher thymidine incorporation rates in cells from microcarrier system compare to cells in the monolayer system at the exponential growth phase (p NP cells in the microcarrier system expressed significantly more protein levels of both type collagens at the exponential growth phase than that in the monolayer system (p p p NP seeding cells which maintain their normal physiological characteristics and functions. PMID:23335154

  5. New perspective for GdNCT. Gd-DTPA reaches the nucleus of glioblastoma cells in culture and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the prospects of gadolinium as a neutron capture therapy agent by combining three independent techniques to study the uptake of Gd-DTPA in vitro, in cultured glioblastoma cells, and in vivo, in the glioblastoma tissue sections after injection of Gd-DTPA and tumor extraction. We show that gadolinium not only penetrates the plasma membrane of glioblastoma cells grown in culture, but we also observe a statistically significant higher concentration of Gd in the nucleus relative to the cytoplasm. For the in vivo experiments, Gd-DTPA was administered to 6 glioblastoma patients before neurosurgery. The extracted bioptic tissue was then analyzed with spectromictroscopy, showing Gd localized in the nuclei of glioblastoma cells in 5 patients out of the 6 analyzed. (author)

  6. Genetic cell targeting uncovers specific neuronal types and distinct subregions in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Amanda Q; Dela Cruz, Julie A D; Sun, Yanjun; Holmes, Todd C; Xu, Xiangmin

    2016-08-15

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) plays an important role in fear, stress, and anxiety. It contains a collection of subnuclei delineated by gross cytoarchitecture features; however, there has yet to be a systematic examination of specific BNST neuronal types and their associated neurochemical makeup. The present study focuses on improved characterization of the anterior BNST based on differing molecular and chemical expression aided by mouse genetics. Specific Cre driver lines crossed with a fluorescent reporter line were used for genetic cell targeting and immunochemical staining. Using this new approach, we were able to robustly identify specific excitatory and inhibitory cell types in the BNST. The presence and distribution of excitatory neurons were firmly established; glutamatergic neurons in the anterior BNST accounted for about 14% and 31% of dorsal and ventral BNST cells, respectively. GABAergic neurons expressing different isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase were found to have differential subregional distributions. Almost no parvalbumin-expressing cells were found in the BNST, while somatostatin-expressing cells and calretinin-expressing cells account for modest proportions of BNST cells. In addition, vasoactive intestinal peptide-expressing axonal plexuses were prominent in the oval and juxtacapsular subregions. In addition, we discovered that corticotropin-releasing hormone-expressing cells contain GABAergic and glutamatergic subpopulations. Together, this study reveals new information on excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the BNST, which will facilitate genetic dissection and functional studies of BNST subregions. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2379-2399, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26718312

  7. Culture of nucleus pulposus cells from intervertebral disc on self-assembling KLD-12 peptide hydrogel scaffold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KLD-12 peptide is a new self-assembling biomaterial and it has been used as cell scaffold for cartilage repair. In this study, self-assembled KLD-12 peptide nanofiber was fabricated and the biocompatibility of this scaffold for nucleus pulposus (NP) cells was evaluated. The structure of this scaffold was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This hydrogel was structurally integral and homogeneous. KLD-12 peptide was able to self-assemble into nanofibers with a diameter of 10-30 nm (mean: 13.7 ± 4.7 nm) and a length of hundreds of nanometers. Two-week culture of rabbits NP cells in this scaffold showed that the self-assembled hydrogel maintained the live cell number by 93% and the cell viability increased gradually with the culture time. The expression of type II collagen mRNA was further confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of type II collagen was high in the hydrogel, however, type I collagen expression was observed in few cells. Furthermore, GAG content increased gradually accompanied with the extension of culture time. In conclusion, this self-assembled nanofiber scaffold provided a conducive microenvironment for NP cell to survive and proliferate in vitro.

  8. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2014-01-01

    Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence expensive compared to the generation of iPSC. Even with the latest SCNT technology, we are not sure whether one can make therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cell from any patient's somatic cells or by using oocytes from any donor. Combining iPSC technology with SCNT, that is, by using the nucleus of the candidate somatic cell which got reprogrammed to pluripotent state instead that of the unmodified nucleus of the candidate somatic cell, would boost the efficiency of the technique, and we would be able to generate therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cells. Induced pluripotent stem cell nuclear transfer (iPSCNT) combines the efficiency of iPSC generation with the speed and natural reprogramming environment of SCNT. The new technique may be called iPSCNT. This technique could prove to have very revolutionary benefits for humankind. This could be useful in generating organs for transplantation for patients and for reproductive cloning, especially for childless men and women who cannot have children by any other techniques. When combined with advanced gene editing techniques (such as CRISPR-Cas system) this technique might also prove useful to those who want to have healthy children but suffer from inherited diseases. The current code of ethics may be against reproductive cloning. However, this will change with time as it happened with most of the revolutionary scientific breakthroughs. After all, it is the right of every human to have healthy offspring and it is the question of

  9. Effect of monaural and binaural stimulation on cytoplasmic RNA content in cells of the central nucleus of the cat inferior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmigidina, G N

    1981-01-01

    A cytophotometric study of sections stained with gallocyanin and chrome alum showed that monaural stimulation for 2 h and binaural stimulation for 1.5 h with rhythmic noise signals led to a marked increase in the cytoplasmic RNA content per cell in the principal and large multipolar neurons of the dorsal and ventral parts of the ventrolateral region of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. The increase in cytoplasmic RNA content in the principal cells of the ipsi- and contralateral parts of this nucleus relative to the stimulated ear in the case of monaural stimulation and the increase in RNA content in response to binaural stimulation suggests a uniform distribution of bilaterally converging connections from the lower nuclei of the auditory system on the principal cells. The increase in cytoplasmic RNA in the large multipolar cells of the contralateral central nucleus in response to monaural stimulation is evidence of the predominantly contralateral projection to these cells. The results are evidence of convergence of binaural influences on the principal and large multipolar cells of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. PMID:6173796

  10. Variations in gene and protein expression in canine chondrodystrophic nucleus pulposus cells following long-term three-dimensional culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munetaka Iwata

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration greatly affects quality of life. The nucleus pulposus (NP of chondrodystrophic dog breeds (CDBs is similar to the human NP, because the cells disappear with age and are replaced by fibrochondrocyte-like cells. However, because IVD develops as early as within the first year of life, we used canines as a model to investigate in vitro the mechanisms underlying IVD degeneration. Specifically, we evaluated the potential of a three-dimensional (3D culture of healthy NP as an in vitro model system to investigate the mechanisms of IVD degeneration. Agarose hydrogels were populated with healthy NP cells from beagles after performing magnetic resonance imaging, and mRNA expression profiles and pericellular extracellular matrix (ECM protein distribution were determined. After 25 days of 3D culture, there was a tendency for redifferentiation into the native NP phenotype, and mRNA levels of Col2A1, COMP, and CK18 were not significantly different from those of freshly isolated cells. Our findings suggest that long-term 3D culture promoted chondrodystrophic NP redifferentiation through reconstruction of the pericellular microenvironment. Further, lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced expression of TNF-α, MMP3, MMP13, VEGF, and PGES mRNA in the 3D cultures, creating a molecular milieu that mimics that of degenerated NP. These results suggest that this in vitro model represents a reliable and cost-effective tool for evaluating new therapies for disc degeneration.

  11. The nucleus of differentiated root plant cells: modifications induced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Lingua

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The nuclei of plant cells show marked differences in chromatin organisation, related to their DNA content, which ranges from the type with large strands of condensed chromatin (reticulate or chromonematic nuclei to one with mostly decondensed chromatin (chromocentric or diffuse nuclei. A loosening of the chromatin structure generally occurs in actively metabolising cells, such as differentiating and secretory cells, in relation to their high transcriptional activity. Endoreduplication may occur, especially in plants with a small genome, which increases the availability of nuclear templates, the synthesis of DNA, and probably regulates gene expression. Here we describe structural and quantitative changes of the chromatin and their relationship with transcription that occur in differentiated cells following an increase of their metabolism. The nuclei of root cortical cells of three plants with different 2C DNA content (Allium porrum, Pisum sativum and Lycopersicon esculentm and their modifications induced by arbuscular mycorrhization, which strongly increase the metabolic activity of colonised cells, are taken as examples.

  12. The Multiple Functions of T Stellate/Multipolar/Chopper Cells in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Oertel, Donata; Wright, Samantha; Cao, Xiao-Jie; Ferragamo, Michael; Bal, Ramazan

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic information is brought to the brain by auditory nerve fibers, all of which terminate in the cochlear nuclei, and is passed up the auditory pathway through the principal cells of the cochlear nuclei. A population of neurons variously known as T stellate, type I multipolar, planar multipolar, or chopper cells forms one of the major ascending auditory pathways through the brain stem. T Stellate cells are sharply tuned; as a population they encode the spectrum of sounds. In these neurons...

  13. The ups and downs of somatic cell nucleus transfer (SCNT) in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Fulka, Josef; Langerova, Alena; Loi, Pasqualino; Ptak, Grazyna; Albertini, David; Fulka, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Achieving successful somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in the human and subhuman primate relative to other mammals has been questioned for a variety of technical and logistical issues. Here we summarize the gradual evolution of SCNT technology from the perspective of oocyte quality and cell cycle status that has recently led to the demonstration of feasibility in the human for deriving chromosomally normal stem cells lines. With these advances in hand, prospects for therapeutic cloning mus...

  14. Morphometry and morphology of nucleus of the Sertoli and interstitial cells of the tambaqui Colossoma macropomum (Cuvier, 1881) (Pisces: Characidae) during the reproductive cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Nakaghi L. S. O.; Mitsuiki D.; Santos H. S. L.; Pacheco M. R.; Ganeco L. N.

    2003-01-01

    This study allowed the characterization of the tambaqui Colossoma macropomum testes structural organization, emphasizing Sertoli and interstitial cells and analyzing morphometrically the Sertoli cell nucleus diameter and the interstitial tissue area during the reproductive cycle. Fragments of tambaqui testes were collected in the following reproductive cycle stages: immature, resting, maturation I and II, mature, and regression, and were histologically processed. The Sertoli cells were found ...

  15. Mechanical trapping of the nucleus on micropillared surfaces inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells but not cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Kazuaki; Hamaji, Yumi; Sato, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takeo

    2015-07-16

    The interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix on a topographically patterned surface can result in changes in cell shape and many cellular functions. In the present study, we demonstrated the mechanical deformation and trapping of the intracellular nucleus using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfabricated substrates with an array of micropillars. We investigated the differential effects of nuclear deformation on the proliferation of healthy vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and cervical cancer HeLa cells. Both types of cell spread normally in the space between micropillars and completely invaded the extracellular microstructures, including parts of their cytoplasm and their nuclei. We found that the proliferation of SMCs but not HeLa cells was dramatically inhibited by cultivation on the micropillar substrates, even though remarkable deformation of nuclei was observed in both types of cells. Mechanical testing with an atomic force microscope and a detailed image analysis with confocal microscopy revealed that SMC nuclei had a thicker nuclear lamina and greater expression of lamin A/C than those of HeLa cells, which consequently increased the elastic modulus of the SMC nuclei and their nuclear mechanical resistance against extracellular microstructures. These results indicate that the inhibition of cell proliferation resulted from deformation of the mature lamin structures, which might be exposed to higher internal stress during nuclear deformation. This nuclear stress-induced inhibition of cell proliferation occurred rarely in cancer cells with deformable nuclei. PMID:26054426

  16. Transfer of a eubacteria-type cell division site-determining factor CrMinD gene to the nucleus from the chloroplast genome in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU WeiZhong; HU Yong; ZHANG RunJie; ZHOU WeiWei; ZHU JiaYing; LIU XiangLin; HE YiKun

    2007-01-01

    MinD is a ubiquitous ATPase that plays a crucial role in selection of the division site in eubacteria, chloroplasts, and probably Archaea. In four green algae, Mesostigma viride, Nephroselmis olivacea, Chlorella vulgaris and Prototheca wickerhamii, MinD homologues are encoded in the plastid genome. However, in Arabidopsis, MinD is a nucleus-encoded, chloroplast-targeted protein involved in chloroplast division, which suggests that MinD has been transferred to the nucleus in higher land plants. Yet the lateral gene transfer (LGT) of MinD from plastid to nucleus during plastid evolution remains poorly understood. Here, we identified a nucleus-encoded MinD homologue from unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a basal species in the green plant lineage. Overexpression of CrMinD in wild type E. coli inhibited cell division and resulted in the filamentous cell formation, clearly demonstrated the conservation of the MinD protein during the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes. The transient expression of CrMinD-egfp confirmed the role of CrMinD protein in the regulation of plastid division. Searching all the published plastid genomic sequences of land plants, no MinD homologues were found, which suggests that the transfer of MinD from plastid to nucleus might have occurred before the evolution of land plants.

  17. Opposing role for Egr3 in nucleus accumbens cell subtypes in cocaine action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Francis, T Chase; Konkalmatt, Prasad; Amgalan, Ariunzaya; Gancarz, Amy M; Dietz, David M; Lobo, Mary Kay

    2015-05-20

    An imbalance in molecular signaling cascades and transcriptional regulation in nucleus accumbens (NAc) medium spiny neuron (MSN) subtypes, those enriched in dopamine D1 versus D2 receptors, is implicated in the behavioral responses to psychostimulants. To provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms occurring in MSN subtypes by cocaine, we examined the transcription factor early growth response 3 (Egr3). We evaluated Egr3 because it is a target of critical cocaine-mediated signaling pathways and because Egr3-binding sites are found on promoters of key cocaine-associated molecules. We first used a RiboTag approach to obtain ribosome-associated transcriptomes from each MSN subtype and found that repeated cocaine administration induced Egr3 ribosome-associated mRNA in NAc D1-MSNs while reducing Egr3 in D2-MSNs. Using Cre-inducible adeno-associated viruses combined with D1-Cre and D2-Cre mouse lines, we observed that Egr3 overexpression in D1-MSNs enhances rewarding and locomotor responses to cocaine, whereas overexpression in D2-MSNs blunts these behaviors. miRNA knock-down of Egr3 in MSN subtypes produced opposite behavioral responses from those observed with overexpression. Finally, we found that repeated cocaine administration altered Egr3 binding to promoters of genes that are important for cocaine-mediated cellular and behavioral plasticity. Genes with increased Egr3 binding to promoters, Camk2α, CREB, FosB, Nr4a2, and Sirt1, displayed increased mRNA in D1-MSNs and, in some cases, a reduction in D2-MSNs. Histone and the DNA methylation enzymes G9a and Dnmt3a displayed reduced Egr3 binding to their promoters and reduced mRNA in D1-MSNs. Our study provides novel insight into an opposing role of Egr3 in select NAc MSN subtypes in cocaine action. PMID:25995477

  18. Selective hair cell ablation and noise exposure lead to different patterns of changes in the cochlea and the cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Lee, Min Young; Heeringa, Amarins N; Beyer, Lisa A; Swiderski, Donald L; Kanicki, Ariane C; Kabara, Lisa L; Dolan, David F; Shore, Susan E; Raphael, Yehoash

    2016-09-22

    In experimental animal models of auditory hair cell (HC) loss, insults such as noise or ototoxic drugs often lead to secondary changes or degeneration in non-sensory cells and neural components, including reduced density of spiral ganglion neurons, demyelination of auditory nerve fibers and altered cell numbers and innervation patterns in the cochlear nucleus (CN). However, it is not clear whether loss of HCs alone leads to secondary degeneration in these neural components of the auditory pathway. To elucidate this issue, we investigated changes of central components after cochlear insults specific to HCs using diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) mice expressing DTR only in HCs and exhibiting complete HC loss when injected with diphtheria toxin (DT). We showed that DT-induced HC ablation has no significant impacts on the survival of auditory neurons, central synaptic terminals, and myelin, despite complete HC loss and profound deafness. In contrast, noise exposure induced significant changes in synapses, myelin and CN organization even without loss of inner HCs. We observed a decrease of neuronal size in the auditory pathway, including peripheral axons, spiral ganglion neurons, and CN neurons, likely due to loss of input from the cochlea. Taken together, selective HC ablation and noise exposure showed different patterns of pathology in the auditory pathway and the presence of HCs is not essential for the maintenance of central synaptic connectivity and myelination. PMID:27403879

  19. Activation of the c-fos gene in prodynorphin- and proenkephalin-expressing cells of nucleus tractus solitarius after seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, R K; Erickson, J T; Millhorn, D E

    1994-10-01

    We performed studies to determine the anatomical regions and chemical phenotypes of neurons within the rat medulla oblongata activated by pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures. Activated cells were identified by their expression of the c-fos gene, detected by in situ hybridization for c-fos mRNA and immunocytochemistry for Fos protein. Activated cells were located predominantly in nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), with c-fos mRNA appearing within 20 min after seizures (peak at 1-2 h), followed by Fos immunoreactivity visible at 1 h (peak at 2-4 h). Neither nonspecific noxious stimulation by intraperitoneal injection of saline nor brief exposure to hypoxic or hypercapnic gas mixtures to stimulate chemoreceptors reproduced this pattern of labeling. Prodynorphin or proenkephalin mRNA, detected by in situ hybridization, was colocalized with Fos immunoreactivity in many NTS cells. Thus, seizures activate neuronal pathways in the medulla oblongata which express genes for endogenous opioids. Potential long-term effects of seizures are suggested by the in situ hybridization finding that NTS prodynorphin mRNA increased 24 h after seizures compared to control levels. PMID:7957742

  20. Morphometry and morphology of nucleus of the Sertoli and interstitial cells of the tambaqui Colossoma macropomum (Cuvier, 1881) (Pisces: Characidae) during the reproductive cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaghi, L S O; Mitsuiki, D; Santos, H S L; Pacheco, M R; Ganeco, L N

    2003-02-01

    This study allowed the characterization of the tambaqui Colossoma macropomum testes structural organization, emphasizing Sertoli and interstitial cells and analyzing morphometrically the Sertoli cell nucleus diameter and the interstitial tissue area during the reproductive cycle. Fragments of tambaqui testes were collected in the following reproductive cycle stages: immature, resting, maturation I and II, mature, and regression, and were histologically processed. The Sertoli cells were found at the periphery of the cysts of germinative lineage cells and the nuclei were shown to be smaller as these cells developed. The interstitial cells were better observed between the seminiferous lobules next to vessels in the interstitial tissue of maturing testes. PMID:12914420

  1. Differential expression of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) in normal and degenerated human nucleus pulposus tissues and cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Weiguo, E-mail: liangweiguo@tom.com [Guangzhou Institute of Traumatic Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510220 (China); Fang, Dejian [Guangzhou Institute of Traumatic Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510220 (China); Ye, Dongping [Guangzhou Institute of Traumatic Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510220 (China); School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Zou, Longqiang; Shen, Yan; Dai, Libing [Guangzhou Institute of Traumatic Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510220 (China); Xu, Jiake, E-mail: jiake.xu@uwa.edu.au [Guangzhou Institute of Traumatic Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510220 (China); School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • ERK5 involved in NP cells. • ERK5 involved in NP tissue. • It was important modulator. - Abstract: Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and regulates a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, necrosis, apoptosis and degeneration. However, the expression of ERK5 and its role in degenerated human nucleus pulposus (NP) is hitherto unknown. In this study, we observed the differential expression of ERK5 in normal and degenerated human nucleus pulposus tissues by using immunohistochemical staining and Western blot. Treatment of NP cells with Pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α decreased ERK5 gene expression as well as NP marker gene expression; including the type II collagen and aggrecan. Suppression of ERK5 gene expression in NP cells by ERK5 siRNA resulted in decreased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK5 activation by BIX02188 (5 μM) decreased the gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan in NP cells. Our results document the expression of ERK5 in degenerated nucleus pulposus tissues, and suggest a potential involvement of ERK5 in human degenerated nucleus pulposus.

  2. The smooth monostratified ganglion cell: evidence for spatial diversity in the Y-cell pathway to the lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus in the macaque monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Joanna D; Peterson, Beth B; Packer, Orin S; Robinson, Farrel R; Gamlin, Paul D; Troy, John B; Dacey, Dennis M

    2008-11-26

    In the primate visual system approximately 20 morphologically distinct pathways originate from retinal ganglion cells and project in parallel to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and/or the superior colliculus. Understanding of the properties of these pathways and the significance of such extreme early pathway diversity for later visual processing is limited. In a companion study we found that the magnocellular LGN-projecting parasol ganglion cells also projected to the superior colliculus and showed Y-cell receptive field structure supporting the hypothesis that the parasol cells are analogous to the well studied alpha-Y cell of the cat's retina. We here identify a novel ganglion cell class, the smooth monostratified cells, that share many properties with the parasol cells. Smooth cells were retrogradely stained from tracer injections made into either the LGN or superior colliculus and formed inner-ON and outer-OFF populations with narrowly monostratified dendritic trees that surprisingly appeared to perfectly costratify with the dendrites of parasol cells. Also like parasol cells, smooth cells summed input from L- and M-cones, lacked measurable S-cone input, showed high spike discharge rates, high contrast and temporal sensitivity, and a Y-cell type nonlinear spatial summation. Smooth cells were distinguished from parasol cells however by smaller cell body and axon diameters but approximately 2 times larger dendritic tree and receptive field diameters that formed a regular but lower density mosaic organization. We suggest that the smooth and parasol populations may sample a common presynaptic circuitry but give rise to distinct, parallel achromatic spatial channels in the primate retinogeniculate pathway. PMID:19036959

  3. SGT, a Hsp90β binding partner, is accumulated in the nucleus during cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we reported that small glutamine-rich TPR-containing protein (SGT) interacted with not only Hsp90α but also Hsp90β. Confocal analysis showed that treatment of cells with Hsp90-specific inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) disrupted the interaction of SGT with Hsp90β and this contributed to the increase of nuclear localization of SGT in HeLa cells. The increased nuclear localization of SGT was further confirmed by the Western blotting in GA-treated HeLa cells and H1299 cells. In our previous study, SGT was found to be a new pro-apoptotic factor, so we wondered whether the sub-cellular localization of SGT was related with cell apoptosis. By confocal analysis we found that the nuclear import of SGT was significantly increased in STS-induced apoptotic HeLa cells, which implied that the sub-cellular localization of SGT was closely associated with Hsp90β and apoptosis

  4. Cell-type specific oxytocin gene expression from AAV delivered promoter deletion constructs into the rat supraoptic nucleus in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L Fields

    Full Text Available The magnocellular neurons (MCNs in the hypothalamus selectively express either oxytocin (OXT or vasopressin (AVP neuropeptide genes, a property that defines their phenotypes. Here we examine the molecular basis of this selectivity in the OXT MCNs by stereotaxic microinjections of adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors that contain various OXT gene promoter deletion constructs using EGFP as the reporter into the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON. Two weeks following injection of the AAVs, immunohistochemical assays of EGFP expression from these constructs were done to determine whether the EGFP reporter co-localizes with either the OXT- or AVP-immunoreactivity in the MCNs. The results show that the key elements in the OT gene promoter that regulate the cell-type specific expression the SON are located -216 to -100 bp upstream of the transcription start site. We hypothesize that within this 116 bp domain a repressor exists that inhibits expression specifically in AVP MCNs, thereby leading to the cell-type specific expression of the OXT gene only in the OXT MCNs.

  5. A fraction of neurofibromin interacts with PML bodies in the nucleus of the CCF astrocytoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godin, Fabienne; Villette, Sandrine; Vallee, Beatrice; Doudeau, Michel; Morisset-Lopez, Severine [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), UPR 4301, Universite d' Orleans et INSERM, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Ardourel, Maryvonne; Hevor, Tobias [Laboratoire de Neurobiologie, Universite d' Orleans, BP 6759, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Pichon, Chantal [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), UPR 4301, Universite d' Orleans et INSERM, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Benedetti, Helene, E-mail: helene.benedetti@cnrs-orleans.fr [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), UPR 4301, Universite d' Orleans et INSERM, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We validate the use of specific anti-Nf1 antibodies for immunofluorescence studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detect Nf1 in the cytoplasm and nucleus of CCF cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML nuclear bodies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that there is a direct interaction between a fraction of Nf1 and the PML bodies. -- Abstract: Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a common genetic disease that causes nervous system tumors, and cognitive deficits. It is due to mutations within the NF1 gene, which encodes the Nf1 protein. Nf1 has been shown to be involved in the regulation of Ras, cAMP and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In this study, using immunofluorescence experiments, we have shown a partial nuclear localization of Nf1 in the astrocytoma cell line: CCF and we have demonstrated that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML (promyelocytic leukemia) nuclear bodies. A direct interaction between Nf1 and the multiprotein complex has further been demonstrated using 'in situ' proximity ligation assay (PLA).

  6. Effect of corticosterone and adrenalectomy on NMDA-induced cholinergic cell death in rat magnocellular nucleus basalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, [No Value; Veenema, AH; Nyakas, C; Harkany, T; Bohus, BGJ; Luiten, PGM; Ábrahám, I.

    1997-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the effects of adrenalectomy and subcutaneously administered corticosterone on N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced neurodegeneration in the cholinergic magnocellular basal nucleus of the rat, NMDA was unilaterally injected into the nucleus basalis at different plasma corticos

  7. Effects of age, replicative lifespan and growth rate of human nucleus pulposus cells on selecting age range for cell-based biological therapies for degenerative disc diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J S; Lee, S M; Jeong, S W; Sung, Y G; Lee, J H; Kim, K W

    2016-07-01

    Autologous disc cell implantation, growth factors and gene therapy appear to be promising therapies for disc regeneration. Unfortunately, the replicative lifespan and growth kinetics of human nucleus pulposus (NP) cells related to host age are unclear. We investigated the potential relations among age, replicative lifespan and growth rate of NP cells, and determined the age range that is suitable for cell-based biological therapies for degenerative disc diseases. We used NP tissues classified by decade into five age groups: 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s. The mean cumulative population doubling level (PDL) and population doubling rate (PDR) of NP cells were assessed by decade. We also investigated correlations between cumulative PDL and age, and between PDR and age. The mean cumulative PDL and PDR decreased significantly in patients in their 60s. The mean cumulative PDL and PDR in the younger groups (30s, 40s and 50s) were significantly higher than those in the older groups (60s and 70s). There also were significant negative correlations between cumulative PDL and age, and between PDR and age. We found that the replicative lifespan and growth rate of human NP cells decreased with age. The replicative potential of NP cells decreased significantly in patients 60 years old and older. Young individuals less than 60 years old may be suitable candidates for NP cell-based biological therapies for treating degenerative disc diseases. PMID:27149303

  8. SDF-1/CXCR4 axis induces apoptosis of human degenerative nucleus pulposus cells via the NF-κB pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, ZONGCHAO; MA, CHUAN; SHEN, JIELIANG; WANG, DAWU; HAO, JIE; HU, ZHENMING

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) is a major cause of lower back pain, and increased cell apoptosis is a key characteristic of IVDD. The present study aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis on apoptosis in human degenerative nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs). The expression levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in human intervertebral discs (IVD) were determined using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Apoptosis of primary cultured NPCs was quantified by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining following stimulation with SDF-1 and knockdown of CXCR4 using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The association with the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway was investigated using CXCR4-siRNA and NF-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), treatment. The results demonstrated that SDF-1 and its receptor, CXCR4, were upregulated in degenerative IVD samples compared with normal samples. Stimulation with SDF-1 increased the level of apoptosis in cultured NPCs, and conversely, the apoptosis level was suppressed post-transfection with CXCR4 siRNA compared with SDF-1 stimulation alone. Furthermore, SDF-1 treatment increased the level of phosphorylated NF-κB subunit P65, which was downregulated following CXCR4 siRNA and PDTC treatment. In addition, CXCR4 siRNA and PDTC inhibited the nuclear translocation of P65, which was induced by SDF-1. Taken together, SDF-1-mediated apoptosis was suppressed by NF-κB inhibition using PDTC. In conclusion, the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis promoted cell apoptosis in human degenerative NPCs via the NF-κB pathway, thus suggesting that SDF-1/CXCR signaling may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of degenerative IVD diseases. PMID:27220474

  9. Angular velocity and head direction signals recorded from the dorsal tegmental nucleus of gudden in the rat: implications for path integration in the head direction cell circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, P E; Tinkelman, A; Cho, J

    2001-06-01

    When a rat navigates through space, head direction (HD) cells provide an ongoing signal of the rat's directional heading. It is thought that these cells rely, in part, on angular path integration of the rat's head movements. This integration requires that the HD cell system receive information about angular head movements and that this information be combined with the current directional signal, to generate the next "predicted" direction. Recent data suggest that the dorsal tegmental nucleus (DTN) may play a critical role in helping to generate the HD cell signal. To test this, recordings were made from cells in the DTN in freely moving rats. The following cell types were found: (a) "classic" HD cells, (b) angular velocity cells, and (c) cells that fired as a function of both head direction and angular velocity. Thus, DTN cells exhibit firing characteristics that are critical to the neural circuit hypothesized for generation of the HD cell signal. PMID:11439447

  10. An organism arises from every nucleus.

    OpenAIRE

    Nurullah Keklikoglu

    2009-01-01

    The fact that, cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) method has been performed, opened new horizons for cloning, and changed the way of our understanding and approach to cell and nucleus. The progress in cloning technology, brought the anticipation of the ability to clone an organism from each somatic cell nucleus. Therefore, the 'Cell Theory' is about to take the additional statement as "An organism arises from every nucleus". The development of gene targeting procedures which c...

  11. SDF‑1/CXCR4 axis induces apoptosis of human degenerative nucleus pulposus cells via the NF‑κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zongchao; Ma, Chuan; Shen, Jieliang; Wang, Dawu; Hao, Jie; Hu, Zhenming

    2016-07-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) is a major cause of lower back pain, and increased cell apoptosis is a key characteristic of IVDD. The present study aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of the stromal cell‑derived factor‑1 (SDF‑1)/C‑X‑C motif chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis on apoptosis in human degenerative nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs). The expression levels of SDF‑1 and CXCR4 in human intervertebral discs (IVD) were determined using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Apoptosis of primary cultured NPCs was quantified by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining following stimulation with SDF‑1 and knockdown of CXCR4 using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The association with the nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) signaling pathway was investigated using CXCR4‑siRNA and NF‑κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), treatment. The results demonstrated that SDF‑1 and its receptor, CXCR4, were upregulated in degenerative IVD samples compared with normal samples. Stimulation with SDF‑1 increased the level of apoptosis in cultured NPCs, and conversely, the apoptosis level was suppressed post‑transfection with CXCR4 siRNA compared with SDF‑1 stimulation alone. Furthermore, SDF‑1 treatment increased the level of phosphorylated NF‑κB subunit P65, which was downregulated following CXCR4 siRNA and PDTC treatment. In addition, CXCR4 siRNA and PDTC inhibited the nuclear translocation of P65, which was induced by SDF‑1. Taken together, SDF‑1‑mediated apoptosis was suppressed by NF‑κB inhibition using PDTC. In conclusion, the SDF‑1/CXCR4 axis promoted cell apoptosis in human degenerative NPCs via the NF‑κB pathway, thus suggesting that SDF‑1/CXCR signaling may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of degenerative IVD diseases. PMID:27220474

  12. Detection of space radiation-induced double strand breaks as a track in cell nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify DNA damage induced by space radiations such as the high linear energy transfer (LET) particles, phospho-H2AX (γH2AX) foci formation was analyzed in human cells frozen in an International Space Station freezer for 133 days. After recovering the frozen sample to the earth, the cells were cultured for 30 min, and then fixed. Here we show a track of γH2AX positive foci in them by immuno-cytochemical methods. It is suggested that space radiations, especially high LET particles, induced DSBs as a track. From the formation of the tracks in nuclei, exposure dose rate was calculated to be 0.7 mSv per day as relatively high-energy space radiations of Fe-ions (500 MeV/u, 200 keV/μm). From the physical dosimetry with CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors and thermo-luminescent dosimeters, dose rate was 0.5 mSv per day. These values the exposed dose rate were similar between biological and physical dosimetries.

  13. [Transport of newly synthesized rRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in freely suspended cells of parsley (Petroselinum sativum)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, U; Seitz, U

    1972-06-01

    A rapidly labelled rRNA precursor can be detected in callus cells of Petroselinum sativum grown on a liquid synthetic medium. Its molecular weight has been calculated to be 2.3×10(6). This value agrees with that of the rRNA precursor from other plant material. In order to follow the synthesis and processing of rRNA in time and to correlate single steps in this process with cell organelles it was necessary to obtain pure fractions of nuclei and ribosomes. The isolation method for nuclei is given in detail. The nucleic acids are separated on polyacrylamide gels of low acrylamide concentration. Pulse-chase experiments show that the rRNA precursor is split into two fragments within the nucleus: an 18S and a 25S component. The 18S RNA leaves the nucleus rapidly. It is already found quantitatively in the ribosomal fraction after 30-60 min chase. At that time the 25S RNA is still within the nucleus; it appears much later in the ribosomes. Since the increase in ribosomal label occurs simultaneously with the decrease in nuclear label, it is concluded that there is no degradation of 18S RNA within the nucleus. Apparently there are two distinct transport mechanisms with different kinetics for the two RNA components. PMID:24477955

  14. TGF-β1 and GDF5 Act Synergistically to Drive the Differentiation of Human Adipose Stromal Cells toward Nucleus Pulposus-like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombier, Pauline; Clouet, Johann; Boyer, Cécile; Ruel, Maëva; Bonin, Gaëlle; Lesoeur, Julie; Moreau, Anne; Fellah, Borhane-Hakim; Weiss, Pierre; Lescaudron, Laurent; Camus, Anne; Guicheux, Jérôme

    2016-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) primarily affects the central part of the intervertebral disc namely the nucleus pulposus (NP). DDD explains about 40% of low back pain and is characterized by massive cellular alterations that ultimately result in the disappearance of resident NP cells. Thus, repopulating the NP with regenerative cells is a promising therapeutic approach and remains a great challenge. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the potential of growth factor-driven protocols to commit human adipose stromal cells (hASCs) toward NP-like cell phenotype and the involvement of Smad proteins in this differentiation process. Here, we demonstrate that the transforming growth factor-β1 and the growth differentiation factor 5 synergistically drive the nucleopulpogenic differentiation process. The commitment of the hASCs was robust and highly specific as attested by the expression of NP-related genes characteristic of young healthy human NP cells. In addition, the engineered NP-like cells secreted an abundant aggrecan and type II collagen rich extracellular matrix comparable with that of native NP. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these in vitro engineered cells survived, maintained their specialized phenotype and secretory activity after in vivo transplantation in nude mice subcutis. Finally, we provide evidence suggesting that the Smad 2/3 pathway mainly governed the acquisition of the NP cell molecular identity while the Smad1/5/8 pathway controlled the NP cell morphology. This study offers valuable insights for the development of biologically-inspired treatments for DDD by generating adapted and exhaustively characterized autologous regenerative cells. Stem Cells 2016;34:653-667. PMID:26661057

  15. Effect of microRNA-21 on the proliferation of human degenerated nucleus pulposus by targeting programmed cell death 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the effect of microRNA-21 (miR-21 on the proliferation of human degenerated nucleus pulposus (NP by targeting programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4 tumor suppressor. NP tissues were collected from 20 intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD patients, and from 5 patients with traumatic spine fracture. MiR-21 expressions were tested. NP cells from IDD patients were collected and divided into blank control group, negative control group (transfected with miR-21 negative sequences, miR-21 inhibitor group (transfected with miR-21 inhibitors, miR-21 mimics group (transfected with miR-21 mimics and PDCD4 siRNA group (transfected with PDCD4 siRNAs. Cell growth was estimated by Cell Counting Kit-8; PDCD4, MMP-2,MMP-9 mRNA expressions were evaluated by qRT-PCR; PDCD4, c-Jun and p-c-Jun expressions were tested using western blot. In IDD patients, the expressions of miR-21 and PDCD4 mRNA were respectively elevated and decreased (both P<0.05. The miR-21 expressions were positively correlated with Pfirrmann grades, but negatively correlated with PDCD4 mRNA (both P<0.001. In miR-21 inhibitor group, cell growth, MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expressions, and p-c-Jun protein expressions were significantly lower, while PDCD4 mRNA and protein expressions were higher than the other groups (all P<0.05. These expressions in the PDCD4 siRNA and miR-21 mimics groups was inverted compared to that in the miR-21 inhibitor group (all P<0.05. MiR-21 could promote the proliferation of human degenerated NP cells by targeting PDCD4, increasing phosphorylation of c-Jun protein, and activating AP-1-dependent transcription of MMPs, indicating that miR-21 may be a crucial biomarker in the pathogenesis of IDD.

  16. Membrane-To-Nucleus Signaling Links Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1- and Stem Cell Factor-Activated Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yujiro; Asuzu, David T.; Gibbons, Simon J.; Aarsvold, Kirsten H.; Bardsley, Michael R.; Lomberk, Gwen A.; Mathison, Angela J.; Kendrick, Michael L.; Shen, K. Robert; Taguchi, Takahiro; Gupta, Anu; Rubin, Brian P.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Urrutia, Raul A.; Ordog, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell factor (mouse: Kitl, human: KITLG) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), acting via KIT and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), respectively, are critical for the development and integrity of several tissues. Autocrine/paracrine KITLG-KIT and IGF1-IGF1R signaling are also activated in several cancers including gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), the most common sarcoma. In murine gastric muscles, IGF1 promotes Kitl-dependent development of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), the non-neoplastic counterpart of GIST, suggesting cooperation between these pathways. Here, we report a novel mechanism linking IGF1-IGF1R and KITLG-KIT signaling in both normal and neoplastic cells. In murine gastric muscles, the microenvironment for ICC and GIST, human hepatic stellate cells (LX-2), a model for cancer niches, and GIST cells, IGF1 stimulated Kitl/KITLG protein and mRNA expression and promoter activity by activating several signaling pathways including AKT-mediated glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibition (GSK3i). GSK3i alone also stimulated Kitl/KITLG expression without activating mitogenic pathways. Both IGF1 and GSK3i induced chromatin-level changes favoring transcriptional activation at the Kitl promoter including increased histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3 lysine (K) 4 methylation, reduced H3K9 and H3K27 methylation and reduced occupancy by the H3K27 methyltransferase EZH2. By pharmacological or RNA interference-mediated inhibition of chromatin modifiers we demonstrated that these changes have the predicted impact on KITLG expression. KITLG knock-down and immunoneutralization inhibited the proliferation of GIST cells expressing wild-type KIT, signifying oncogenic autocrine/paracrine KITLG-KIT signaling. We conclude that membrane-to-nucleus signaling involving GSK3i establishes a previously unrecognized link between the IGF1-IGF1R and KITLG-KIT pathways, which is active in both physiologic and oncogenic contexts and can be exploited for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24116170

  17. Reversal of morphine-induced cell-type-specific synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens shell blocks reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearing, Matthew C; Jedynak, Jakub; Ebner, Stephanie R; Ingebretson, Anna; Asp, Anders J; Fischer, Rachel A; Schmidt, Clare; Larson, Erin B; Thomas, Mark John

    2016-01-19

    Drug-evoked plasticity at excitatory synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) drives behavioral adaptations in addiction. MSNs expressing dopamine D1 (D1R-MSN) vs. D2 receptors (D2R-MSN) can exert antagonistic effects in drug-related behaviors, and display distinct alterations in glutamate signaling following repeated exposure to psychostimulants; however, little is known of cell-type-specific plasticity induced by opiates. Here, we find that repeated morphine potentiates excitatory transmission and increases GluA2-lacking AMPA receptor expression in D1R-MSNs, while reducing signaling in D2-MSNs following 10-14 d of forced abstinence. In vivo reversal of this pathophysiology with optogenetic stimulation of infralimbic cortex-accumbens shell (ILC-NAc shell) inputs or treatment with the antibiotic, ceftriaxone, blocked reinstatement of morphine-evoked conditioned place preference. These findings confirm the presence of overlapping and distinct plasticity produced by classes of abused drugs within subpopulations of MSNs that may provide targetable molecular mechanisms for future pharmacotherapies. PMID:26739562

  18. Topoisomerase II binds importin α isoforms and exportin/CRM1 but does not shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm in proliferating cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistance to anticancer drugs that target DNA topoisomerase II (topo II) isoforms α and/or β is associated with decreased nuclear and increased cytoplasmic topo IIα. Earlier studies have confirmed that functional nuclear localization and export signal sequences (NLS and NES) are present in both isoforms. In this study, we show that topo II α and β bind and are imported into the nucleus by importin α1, α3, and α5 in conjunction with importin β. Topo IIα also binds exportin/CRM1 in vitro. However, wild-type topo IIα has only been observed in the cytoplasm of cells that are entering plateau phase growth. This suggests that topo IIα may shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm with the equilibrium towards the nucleus in proliferating cells but towards the cytoplasm in plateau phase cells. The CRM1 inhibitor Leptomycin B increases the nuclear localization of GFP-tagged topo IIα with a mutant NLS, suggesting that its export is being inhibited. However, homokaryon shuttling experiments indicate that fluorescence-tagged wild-type topo II α and β proteins do not shuttle in proliferating Cos-1 or HeLa cells. We conclude that topo II α and β nuclear export is inhibited in proliferating cells so that these proteins do not shuttle

  19. Cell Biological Mechanisms of Activity-Dependent Synapse to Nucleus Translocation of CRTC1 in Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toh Hean eCh'ng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have revealed a critical role for CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC1 in regulating neuronal gene expression during learning and memory. CRTC1 localizes to synapses but undergoes activity-dependent nuclear translocation to regulate the transcription of CREB target genes. Here we investigate the long-distance retrograde transport of CRTC1 in hippocampal neurons. We show that local elevations in calcium, triggered by activation of synaptic glutamate receptors and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, initiate active, dynein-mediated retrograde transport of CRTC1 along microtubules. We identify a nuclear localization signal within CRTC1, and characterize three conserved serine residues whose dephosphorylation is required for nuclear import. Domain analysis reveals that the amino-terminal third of CRTC1 contains all of the signals required for regulated nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. We fuse this region to Dendra2 to generate a reporter construct and perform live-cell imaging coupled with local uncaging of glutamate and photoconversion to characterize the dynamics of stimulus-induced retrograde transport and nuclear accumulation.

  20. Efficient Subcellular Targeting to the Cell Nucleus of Quantum Dots Densely Decorated with a Nuclear Localization Sequence Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-27

    Organelle-targeted drug delivery can enhance the efficiency of the intracellularly acting drugs and reduce their toxicity. We generated core-shell type CdSe-ZnS quantum dots (QDs) densely decorated with NLS peptidic targeting residues using a 3-stage decoration approach and investigated their endocytosis and nuclear targeting efficiencies. The diameter of the generated QDs increased following the individual decoration stages (16.3, 18.9, and 21.9 nm), the ζ-potential became less negative (-33.2, -17.5, and -11.9 mV), and characteristic changes appeared in the FTIR spectra following decoration with the linker and NLS peptides. Quantitative analysis of the last decoration stage revealed that 37.9% and 33.2% of the alkyne-modified NLS groups that were added to the reaction mix became covalently attached or adsorbed to the QDs surface, respectively. These numbers correspond to 63.6 and 55.7 peptides conjugated or adsorbed to a single QD (the surface density of 42 and 37 conjugated and adsorbed peptides per 1000 nm(2) of the QDs surface), which is higher than in the majority of previous studies that reported decoration efficiencies of formulations intended for nuclear-targeted drug delivery. QDs decorated with NLS peptides undergo more efficient endocytosis, as compared to other investigated QDs formulations, and accumulated to a higher extent in the cell nucleus or in close vicinity to it (11.9%, 14.6%, and 56.1% of the QDs endocytosed by an average cell for the QD-COOH, QD-azide, and QD-NLS formulations, respectively). We conclude that dense decoration of QDs with NLS residues increased their endocytosis and led to their nuclear targeting (preferential accumulation in the cells nuclei or in close vicinity to them). The experimental system and research tools that were used in this study allow quantitative investigation of the mechanisms that govern the QDs nuclear targeting and their dependence on the formulation properties. These findings will contribute to the

  1. Development of the method to snipe the microbeam at cell nucleus and cytoplasm with SPICE, the single particle irradiation system to cells. (I) Preparation of human HCT116 cell specimen for the irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPICE can snipe the ion particle of any number at cell nucleus automatically with its positioning program but cannot at cytoplasm yet. The present study describes strategies to irradiate the particle to the small, protean cytoplasm alone of the cell in the title after its fluorescent staining with Cell Tracker Orange or Cyto-Red and to expand its area with dibutyryl-cAMP added at culturing. The former strategy essentially stands on the idea that the sniping point can be defined at the position with the desired distance (in mc-m) from the nucleus previously stained with Hoechst 3342, and is to be conducted for programming. The latter was actually performed by culturing cells in the medium containing 1 mM dibutyryl-cAMP on a small (diameter 24 mm) SPICE dish, of which, after staining the nucleus and cytoplasm, microscopic fluorescent imaging and measuring with the software Image J revealed the enlargement of the mean cytoplasmic area 305 to 409 mc-m2. No significant toxicity of dibutyryl-cAMP was observed on cell doubling time. Thus the method in the title is almost established at present. (T.T)

  2. Neurons of human nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanović Maja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nucleus accumbens is a part of the ventral striatum also known as a drug active brain region, especially related with drug addiction. The aim of the study was to investigate the Golgi morphology of the nucleus accumbens neurons. Methods. The study was performed on the frontal and sagittal sections of 15 human brains by the Golgi Kopsch method. We classified neurons in the human nucleus accumbens according to their morphology and size into four types: type I - fusiform neurons; type II - fusiform neurons with lateral dendrite, arising from a part of the cell body; type III - pyramidal-like neuron; type IV - multipolar neuron. The medium spiny neurons, which are mostly noted regarding to the drug addictive conditions of the brain, correspond to the type IV - multipolar neurons. Results. Two regions of human nucleus accumbens could be clearly recognized on Nissl and Golgi preparations each containing different predominant neuronal types. Central part of nucleus accumbens, core region, has a low density of impregnated neurons with predominant type III, pyramidal-like neurons, with spines on secondary branches and rare type IV, multipolar neurons. Contrary to the core, peripheral region, shell of nucleus, has a high density of impregnated neurons predominantly contained of type I and type IV - multipolar neurons, which all are rich in spines on secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Conclusion. Our results indicate great morphological variability of human nucleus accumbens neurons. This requires further investigations and clarifying clinical significance of this important brain region.

  3. Actin microfilaments are associated with the migrating nucleus and the cell cortex in the green alga Micrasterias. Studies on living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindl, U; Zhang, D; Hepler, P K

    1994-07-01

    Rhodamine-phalloidin or FITC-phalloidin has been injected in small amounts into living, developing cells of Micrasterias denticulata and the stained microfilaments visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results reveal that two different actin filament systems are present in a growing cell: a cortical actin network that covers the inner surface of the cell and is extended far into the tips of the lobes in both the growing and the nongrowing semicell; it is also associated with the surface of the chloroplast. The second actin system ensheathes the nucleus at the isthmus-facing side during nuclear migration. Its arrangement corresponds to that of the microtubule system that has been described in earlier electron microscopic investigations. The spatial correspondence between the distribution of actin filaments and microtubules suggests a cooperation between both cytoskeleton elements in generating the motive force for nuclear migration. The function of the cortical actin network is not yet clear. It may be involved in processes like transport and fusion of secretory vesicles and may also function in shaping and anchoring the chloroplast. PMID:7983159

  4. Functional expression of P2 purinoceptors in a primary neuroglial cell culture of the rat arcuate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollatzek, Eric; Hitzel, Norma; Ott, Daniela; Raisl, Katrin; Reuter, Bärbel; Gerstberger, Rüdiger

    2016-07-01

    The arcuate nucleus (ARC) plays an important role in the hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis. Expression of various purinoceptor subtypes in the rat ARC and physiological studies suggest a modulatory function of P2 receptors within the neuroglial ARC circuitry. A differentiated mixed neuronal and glial microculture was therefore established from postnatal rat ARC, revealing neuronal expression of ARC-specific transmitters involved in food intake regulation (neuropeptide Y (NPY), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)). Some NPYergic neurons cosynthesized TH, while POMC and TH expression proved to be mutually exclusive. Stimulation with the general purinoceptor agonists 2-methylthioadenosine-5'triphosphate (2-MeSATP) and ATP but not the P2X1/P2X3 receptor subtype agonist α,β-methyleneadenosine-5'triphosphate (α,β-meATP) induced intracellular calcium signals in ARC neurons and astrocytes. Some 5-10% each of 2-MeSATP responsive neurons expressed POMC, NYP or TH. Supporting the calcium imaging data, radioligand binding studies to hypothalamic membranes showed high affinity for 2-MeSATP, ATP but not α,β-meATP to displace [α-(35)S]deoxyadenosine-5'thiotriphosphate ([(35)S]dATPαS) from P2 receptors. Repetitive superfusion with equimolar 2-MeSATP allowed categorization of ARC cells into groups with a high or low (LDD) degree of purinoceptor desensitization, the latter allowing further receptor characterization. Calcium imaging experiments performed at 37°C vs. room temperature showed further reduction of desensitization. Agonist-mediated intracellular calcium signals were suppressed in all LDD neurons but only 25% of astrocytes in the absence of extracellular calcium, suggestive of metabotropic P2Y receptor expression in the majority of ARC astrocytes. The highly P2Y1-selective receptor agonists MRS2365 and 2-methylthioadenosine-5'diphosphate (2-MeSADP) activated 75-85% of all 2-MeSATP-responsive ARC astrocytes. Taking into consideration the

  5. A SAP domain-containing protein shuttles between the nucleus and cell membranes and plays a role in adhesion and migration in D. discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica S. Kelsey

    2013-02-01

    The AmpA protein reduces cell adhesion, thereby influencing cell migration in Dictyostelium. To understand how ampA influences cell migration, second site suppressors of an AmpA overexpressing cell line were created by REMI mutagenesis. Mutant candidates were identified by their ability to suppress the large plaques that the AmpA overexpressing cells form on bacterial lawns as a result of their increased rate of migration. One suppressor gene, sma, encodes an uncharacterized protein, which contains a SAP DNA-binding domain and a PTEN-like domain. Using sma gene knockouts and Sma-mRFP expressing cell lines, a role for sma in influencing cell migration was uncovered. Knockouts of the sma gene in a wild-type background enhanced chemotaxis. An additional role for Sma in influencing cell–cell adhesion was also demonstrated. Sma protein transitions between cytosolic and nuclear localizations as a function of cell density. In growing cells migrating to folic acid it is localized to regions of actin polymerization and absent from the nucleus. A role for Sma in influencing ampA mRNA levels is also demonstrated. Sma additionally appears to be involved in ampA pathways regulating cell size, actin polymerization, and cell substrate adhesion. We present insights to the SAP domain-containing group of proteins in Dictyostelium and provide evidence of a role for a SAP domain-containing protein shuttling from the nucleus to sites of actin polymerization during chemotaxis to folic acid and influencing the efficiency of migration.

  6. A decrease in the addition of new cells in the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex between puberty and adulthood in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staffend, Nancy A; Mohr, Margaret A; DonCarlos, Lydia L; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2014-06-01

    Adolescence involves shifts in social behaviors, behavioral flexibility, and adaptive risk-taking that coincide with structural remodeling of the brain. We previously showed that new cells are added to brain regions associated with sexual behaviors, suggesting that cytogenesis may be a mechanism for acquiring adult-typical behaviors during adolescence. Whether pubertal cell addition occurs in brain regions associated with behavioral flexibility or motivation and whether these patterns differ between pubertal and adult animals had not been determined. Therefore, we assessed patterns of cell proliferation or survival in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Pubertal and adult male rats were given injections of bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU). To assess cell proliferation, half of the animals from each group were sacrificed 24 h following the last injection. The remaining animals were sacrificed at Day 30 following the last injection to evaluate cell survival. Adult animals had significantly lower densities of BrdU-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the prefrontal cortex, irrespective of post-BrdU survival time, whereas in the nucleus accumbens, adult animals had a lower density of BrdU-ir cells at the short survival time; however, the density of BrdU-ir cells was equivalent in pubertal and adult animals at the longer survival time. These data provide evidence that cell addition during puberty may contribute to the remodeling of brain regions associated with behavioral flexibility and motivation, and this cell addition continues into adulthood, albeit at lower levels. Higher levels of cell proliferation or survival in younger animals may reflect a higher level of plasticity, possibly contributing to the dynamic remodeling of the pubertal brain. PMID:24339170

  7. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Cell Nucleus: Comparison between simulated Parameters and Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractDespite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its three-dimensional structure is widely unknown, although it is important for gene regulation and replication. For a long time the interphase nucleus has been viewed as a 'spaghetti soup' of DNA without much internal stru

  8. Impact of Bep or Carboplatin Chemotherapy on Testicular Function and Sperm Nucleus of Subjects with Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, Marco; Berretta, Massimiliano; Bottacin, Alberto; Palego, Pierfrancesco; Sartini, Barbara; Cosci, Ilaria; Finos, Livio; Selice, Riccardo; Foresta, Carlo; Garolla, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Young males have testicular germ cells tumors (TGCT) as the most common malignancy and its incidence is increasing in several countries. Besides unilateral orchiectomy (UO), the treatment of TGCT may include surveillance, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy (CT), basing on tumor histology and stage of disease. It is well known that both radio and CT may have negative effects on testicular function, affecting spermatogenesis, and sex hormones. Many reports investigated these aspects in patients treated with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP), after UO. In contrast no data are available on the side effects of carboplatin treatment in these patients. We included in this study 212 consecutive subjects who undergone to sperm banking at our Andrology and Human Reproduction Unit after UO for TGCT. Hundred subjects were further treated with one or more BEP cycles (BEP-group), 54 with carboplatin (CARB group), and 58 were just surveilled (S-group). All patients were evaluated for seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidy, sperm DNA, sex hormones, volume of the residual testis at baseline (T0) and after 12 (T1) and 24 months (T2) from UO or end of CT. Seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidies, DNA status, gonadic hormones, and testicular volume at baseline were not different between groups. At T1, we observed a significant reduction of sperm concentration and sperm count in the BEP group versus baseline and versus both Carb and S-group. A significant increase of sperm aneuploidies was present at T1 in the BEP group. Similarly, the same group at 1 had altered sperm DNA integrity and fragmentation compared with baseline, S-group and Carb group. These alterations were persistent after 2 years from the end of BEP treatment. Despite a slight improvement at T2, the BEP group had still higher percentages of sperm aneuploidies than other groups. No impairment of sperm aneuploidies and DNA status were observed in the Carb group both after 1 and 2 years from the end of treatment. Despite

  9. Impact of Bep or Carboplatin Chemotherapy on Testicular Function and Sperm Nucleus of Subjects with Testicular Germ Cell Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, Marco; Berretta, Massimiliano; Bottacin, Alberto; Palego, Pierfrancesco; Sartini, Barbara; Cosci, Ilaria; Finos, Livio; Selice, Riccardo; Foresta, Carlo; Garolla, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Young males have testicular germ cells tumors (TGCT) as the most common malignancy and its incidence is increasing in several countries. Besides unilateral orchiectomy (UO), the treatment of TGCT may include surveillance, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy (CT), basing on tumor histology and stage of disease. It is well known that both radio and CT may have negative effects on testicular function, affecting spermatogenesis, and sex hormones. Many reports investigated these aspects in patients treated with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP), after UO. In contrast no data are available on the side effects of carboplatin treatment in these patients. We included in this study 212 consecutive subjects who undergone to sperm banking at our Andrology and Human Reproduction Unit after UO for TGCT. Hundred subjects were further treated with one or more BEP cycles (BEP-group), 54 with carboplatin (CARB group), and 58 were just surveilled (S-group). All patients were evaluated for seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidy, sperm DNA, sex hormones, volume of the residual testis at baseline (T0) and after 12 (T1) and 24 months (T2) from UO or end of CT. Seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidies, DNA status, gonadic hormones, and testicular volume at baseline were not different between groups. At T1, we observed a significant reduction of sperm concentration and sperm count in the BEP group versus baseline and versus both Carb and S-group. A significant increase of sperm aneuploidies was present at T1 in the BEP group. Similarly, the same group at 1 had altered sperm DNA integrity and fragmentation compared with baseline, S-group and Carb group. These alterations were persistent after 2 years from the end of BEP treatment. Despite a slight improvement at T2, the BEP group had still higher percentages of sperm aneuploidies than other groups. No impairment of sperm aneuploidies and DNA status were observed in the Carb group both after 1 and 2 years from the end of treatment. Despite

  10. IMPACT OF BEP OR CARBOPLATIN CHEMOTHERAPY ON TESTICULAR FUNCTION AND SPERM NUCLEUS OF SUBJECTS WITH TESTICULAR GERM CELL TUMOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eGhezzi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Young males have testicular germ cells tumours (TGCT as the most common malignancy and its incidence is increasing in several countries. Besides unilateral orchiectomy (UO, the treatment of TGCT may include surveillance, radiotherapy or chemotherapy (CT, basing on tumour histology and stage of disease. It is well known that both radio and CT may have negative effects on testicular function, affecting spermatogenesis and sex hormones. Many reports investigated these aspects in patients treated with bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin (BEP, after UO. In contrast no data are available on the side effects of carboplatin treatment in these patients. We included in this study 212 consecutive subjects who undergone to sperm banking at our Andrology and Human Reproduction Unit after UO for TGCT. Hundred subjects were further treated with one or more BEP cycles (BEP-group, 54 with carboplatin (Carb group and 58 were just surveilled (S-group. All patients were evaluated for seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidy, sperm DNA, sex hormones, volume of the residual testis at baseline (T0 and after 12 (T1 and 24 months (T2 from UO or end of CT. Seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidies, DNA status, gonadic hormones and testicular volume at baseline were not different between groups. At T1 we observed a significant reduction of sperm concentration and sperm count in the BEP group versus baseline and versus both Carb and S- group. A significant increase of sperm aneuploidies was present at T1 in the BEP group. Similarly, the same group at 1 had altered sperm DNA integrity and fragmentation compared with baseline, S group and Carb group. These alterations were persistent after two years from the end of BEP treatment. Despite a slight improvement at T2, the BEP group had still higher percentages of sperm aneuploidies than other groups. No impairment of sperm aneuploidies and DNA status were observed in the Carb group both after one and two years from the end of treatment

  11. Bupropion-induced inhibition of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and neurons from dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Gómez, Elizabeth; Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Mihailescu, Stefan; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2014-10-01

    The pharmacological activity of bupropion was compared between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus neurons. The inhibitory activity of bupropion was studied on GH3-α7 cells by Ca2+ influx, as well as on neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus and interneurons from the stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 region by using a whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. In addition, the interaction of bupropion with the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was determined by [3H]imipramine competition binding assays and molecular docking. The fast component of acetylcholine- and choline-induced currents from both brain regions was inhibited by methyllycaconitine, indicating the participation of α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Choline-induced currents in hippocampal interneurons were partially inhibited by 10 µM bupropion, a concentration that could be reached in the brain during clinical administration. Additionally, both agonist-induced currents were reversibly inhibited by bupropion at concentrations that coincide with its inhibitory potency (IC50=54 µM) and binding affinity (Ki=63 µM) for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from heterologous cells. The [3H]imipramine competition binding and molecular docking results support a luminal location for the bupropion binding site(s). This study may help to understand the mechanisms of actions of bupropion at neuronal and molecular levels related with its therapeutic actions on depression and for smoking cessation. PMID:25016090

  12. Cytoskeleton, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus alterations in CHO-K1 cell line after Crotalus durissus terrificus (South American rattlesnake venom treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Tamieti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake venoms are toxic to a variety of cell types. However, the intracellular damages and the cell death fate induced by venom are unclear. In the present work, the action of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus venom on CHO-K1 cell line was analyzed. The cells CHO-K1 were incubated with C. d. terrificus venom (10, 50 and 100g/ml for 1 and 24 hours, and structural alterations of actin filaments, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus were assessed using specific fluorescent probes and agarose gel electrophoresis for DNA fragmentation. Significant structural changes were observed in all analyzed structures. DNA fragmentation was detected suggesting that, at the concentrations used, the venom induced apoptosis.

  13. Insulin Phosphorylates Tyrosine Residue 464 of Tub and Translocates Tubby into the Nucleus in HIRcB Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyeon Soo; Kim, Sang Dae; Park, Jung Yul

    2014-01-01

    Background The tubby protein has a motif that might be relevant for its action in the insulin signaling pathway. Previous studies have indicated that tubby undergoes phosphorylation on tyrosine residues in response to several stimuli and is known to localize in the nucleus as well as in the plasma membrane. However, the relationship between phosphorylation and nuclear translocation is not well understood. Here, we report that insulin directly phosphorylates tubby, which translocates into the ...

  14. Development of Targeted Recombinant Polymers that can deliver siRNA to the Cytoplasm and Plasmid DNA to the Cell Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Canine, Brenda F.; Wang, Yuhua; Ouyang, Wenyun; Hatefi, Arash

    2010-01-01

    One of the major limitations to effective siRNA delivery is the lack of a siRNA-specific delivery system. Currently, the same delivery systems that are used for plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery to the cell nucleus are used for siRNA delivery to the cytoplasm. To fill this gap, the objective of this study was to design a biopolymer that can be programmed via its amino acid sequence to deliver siRNA specifically to cytoplasm. For pDNA delivery, a nuclear localization signal (NLS) was added to the bi...

  15. Study of high energy nucleus nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CERN experiment WA80 studies ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions by calorimetry and charged particle measurements over a large fraction of 4π. Here I want to concentrate on a closer study of nucleus nucleus collisions and recent results from the lead glass spectrometer Saphir. 6 refs., 5 figs

  16. Treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis by targeted delivery of the radio-labeled tumor homing peptide bi-DTPA-[F3]2 into the nucleus of tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enken Drecoll

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alpha-particle emitting isotopes are effective novel tools in cancer therapy, but targeted delivery into tumors is a prerequisite of their application to avoid toxic side effects. Peritoneal carcinomatosis is a widespread dissemination of tumors throughout the peritoneal cavity. As peritoneal carcinomatosis is fatal in most cases, novel therapies are needed. F3 is a tumor homing peptide which is internalized into the nucleus of tumor cells upon binding to nucleolin on the cell surface. Therefore, F3 may be an appropriate carrier for alpha-particle emitting isotopes facilitating selective tumor therapies. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dimer of the vascular tumor homing peptide F3 was chemically coupled to the alpha-emitter (213Bi ((213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2. We found (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 to accumulate in the nucleus of tumor cells in vitro and in intraperitoneally growing tumors in vivo. To study the anti-tumor activity of (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 we treated mice bearing intraperitoneally growing xenograft tumors with (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2. In a tumor prevention study between the days 4-14 after inoculation of tumor cells 6x1.85 MBq (50 microCi of (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 were injected. In a tumor reduction study between the days 16-26 after inoculation of tumor cells 6x1.85 MBq of (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 were injected. The survival time of the animals was increased from 51 to 93.5 days in the prevention study and from 57 days to 78 days in the tumor reduction study. No toxicity of the treatment was observed. In bio-distribution studies we found (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 to accumulate in tumors but only low activities were found in control organs except for the kidneys, where (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 is found due to renal excretion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion we report that (213Bi-DTPA-[F3](2 is a novel tool for the targeted delivery of alpha-emitters into the nucleus of tumor cells that effectively controls peritoneal carcinomatosis in preclinical models and may also be

  17. The Yb body, a major site for Piwi-associated RNA biogenesis and a gateway for Piwi expression and transport to the nucleus in somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hongying; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Ku, Hsueh-Yen; Liu, Na; Zhong, Mei; Lin, Haifan

    2011-02-01

    Despite exciting progress in understanding the Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway in the germ line, less is known about this pathway in somatic cells. We showed previously that Piwi, a key component of the piRNA pathway in Drosophila, is regulated in somatic cells by Yb, a novel protein containing an RNA helicase-like motif and a Tudor-like domain. Yb is specifically expressed in gonadal somatic cells and regulates piwi in somatic niche cells to control germ line and somatic stem cell self-renewal. However, the molecular basis of the regulation remains elusive. Here, we report that Yb recruits Armitage (Armi), a putative RNA helicase involved in the piRNA pathway, to the Yb body, a cytoplasmic sphere to which Yb is exclusively localized. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that Yb forms a complex with Armi. In Yb mutants, Armi is dispersed throughout the cytoplasm, and Piwi fails to enter the nucleus and is rarely detectable in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, somatic piRNAs are drastically diminished, and soma-expressing transposons are desilenced. These observations indicate a crucial role of Yb and the Yb body in piRNA biogenesis, possibly by regulating the activity of Armi that controls the entry of Piwi into the nucleus for its function. Finally, we discovered putative endo-siRNAs in the flamenco locus and the Yb dependence of their expression. These observations further implicate a role for Yb in transposon silencing via both the piRNA and endo-siRNA pathways. PMID:21106531

  18. Differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells toward nucleus pulposuslike cells induced by hypoxia and a three-dimensional chitosan-alginate gel scaffold in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhicheng; Li Fang; Tian Haiquan; Guan Kai; Zhao Guangmin; Shan Jianlin; Ren Dajiang

    2014-01-01

    Background Injectable three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds have the advantages of fluidity and moldability to fill irregularshaped defects,simple incorporation of bioactive factors,and limited surgical invasiveness.Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent and can be differentiated toward nucleus pulposus (NP)-Iike cells.A hypoxic environment may be important for differentiation to NP-like cells because the intervertebral disc is an avascular tissue.Hence,we investigated the induction effects of hypoxia and an injectable 3D chitosan-alginate (C/A) gel scaffold on ADSCs.Methods The C/A gel scaffold consisted of medical-grade chitosan and alginate.Gel porosity was calculated by liquid displacement method.Pore microstructure was analyzed by light and scanning electron microscopy.ADSCs were isolated and cultured by conventional methods.Passage 2 BrdU-labeled ADSCs were co-cultured with the C/A gel.ADSCs were divided into three groups (control,normoxia-induced,and hypoxia-induced groups).In the control group,cells were cultured in 10% FBS/DMEM.Hypoxia-induced and normoxia-induced groups were induced by adding transforming growth factor-β1,dexamethasone,vitamin C,sodium pyruvate,proline,bone morphogenetic protein-7,and 1% ITS-plus to the culture medium and maintaining in 2% and 20% O2,respectively.Histological and morphological changes were observed by light and electron microscopy.ADSCs were characterized by flow cytometry.Cell viability was investigated by BrdU incorporation.Proteoglycan and type Ⅱ collagen were measured by safranin O staining and the Sicool method,respectively.mRNA expression of hypoxia-inducing factor-1α (HIF-1α),aggrecan,and Type Ⅱ collagen was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.Results C/A gels had porous exterior surfaces with 80.57% porosity and 50-200 μm pore size.Flow cytometric analysis of passage 2 rabbit ADSCs showed high CD90 expression,while CD45 expression was very low.The morphology of

  19. 3D/4D architecture of chromosomal break point regions in the cell nucleus following irradiation of normal cells and tumor cells; 3D/4D Architektur von chromosomalen Bruchpunktregionen im Zellkern nach Bestrahlung von Normalzellen und Tumorzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausmann, M.; Cremer, C.; Friedl, A.; Dollinger, G.; Loebrich, M.; Friedland, W.

    2015-01-15

    The development of an effective analytical methodology for a correct description of oncogenic chromosomal aberrations is the challenge of medical radiobiology with respect to preventive therapeutic methods. Scope of the project was a better understanding of the behavior of break point regions dependent on the genome loci, the chromatin folding, the involved repair proteins and the beam quality with respect to an improvement and an efficient prognosis of the health consequences following radiation exposure. New microscopic insights in the normal cell nucleus are supposed to allow a better understanding of the spatial interactions on a molecular scale.

  20. ChAcNLS, a Novel Modification to Antibody-Conjugates Permitting Target Cell-Specific Endosomal Escape, Localization to the Nucleus, and Enhanced Total Intracellular Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Simon; Rondeau, Andreanne; Martel, Olivier; Bonin, Marc-Andre; van Lier, Johan E; Leyton, Jeffrey V

    2016-06-01

    The design of antibody-conjugates (ACs) for delivering molecules for targeted applications in humans has sufficiently progressed to demonstrate clinical efficacy in certain malignancies and reduced systemic toxicity that occurs with standard nontargeted therapies. One area that can advance clinical success for ACs will be to increase their intracellular accumulation. However, entrapment and degradation in the endosomal-lysosomal pathway, on which ACs are reliant for the depositing of their molecular payload inside target cells, leads to reduced intracellular accumulation. Innovative approaches that can manipulate this pathway may provide a strategy for increasing accumulation. We hypothesized that escape from entrapment inside the endosomal-lysosomal pathway and redirected trafficking to the nucleus could be an effective approach to increase intracellular AC accumulation in target cells. Cholic acid (ChAc) was coupled to the peptide CGYGPKKKRKVGG containing the nuclear localization sequence (NLS) from SV-40 large T-antigen, which is termed ChAcNLS. ChAcNLS was conjugated to the mAb 7G3 (7G3-ChAcNLS), which has nanomolar affinity for the cell-surface leukemic antigen interleukin-3 receptor-α (IL-3Rα). Our aim was to determine whether 7G3-ChAcNLS increased intracellular accumulation while retaining nanomolar affinity and IL-3Rα-positive cell selectivity. Competition ELISA and cell treatment assays were performed. Cell fractionation, confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and Western blot techniques were used to determine the level of antibody accumulation inside cells and in corresponding nuclei. In addition, the radioisotope copper-64 ((64)Cu) was also utilized as a surrogate molecular cargo to evaluate nuclear and intracellular accumulation by radioactivity counting. 7G3-ChAcNLS effectively escaped endosome entrapment and degradation resulting in a unique intracellular distribution pattern. mAb modification with ChAcNLS maintained 7G3 nM affinity and produced high

  1. THE MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN MUSCLE SPINDLES AND ALTERATIONS IN CELL ACTIVITY OF THE RATS' RED NUCLEUS AFTER 2 WEEKS' SIMULATED WEIGHTLESSNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Yongjin; Fan Xiaoli; Wu Sudi; Li Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the morphological changes of soleus muscle spindle and electrical activity of neurons in Red Nucleus(RN) of the rat after 2 weeks' simulated weightlessness, and to reveal the interaction between proprioceptive inputs of muscle spindles and reciprocal alterations in RN under simulated weightlessness. Methods Twenty female rats were exposed to weightlessness simulated by tail-suspension for 14 days (SW-14d). Body weight(200-220g) matched female rats were control group(Con). The morphological changes in isolated muscle spindle of soleus muscle, the discharges of red nucleus neurons were observed after 14d tail-suspensions by silver staining and extracellular recording respectively. Results Compared with control group ,the nerve ending of muscle spindle in SW-14d was distorted, degenerated and dissolved; the diameters of intrafusal fibers and capsule in equatorial region of soleus muscle spindles were diminished(P<0.05). The spontaneous cell activity and discharge of RN neurons (spikes/s) induced by afferent firing from muscle spindles after injection of succinylcholine were reduced after 2 weeks' simulated weightlessness respectively (18.44±5.96 vs. 10.19±6.88, 32.50±8.08 vs. 16.86±5.97, P<0.01). Conclusion The degeneration of muscle spindle induced by simulated weightlessness may be one of the causes that led to alterations in discharges of RN.

  2. CS/PAA@TPGS/PLGA nanoparticles with intracellular pH-sensitive sequential release for delivering drug to the nucleus of MDR cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Kong, Yan-Yan; Shao, Luan-Luan; Zhang, Fen-Yi; Gao, Yu; Mu, Xu; Wang, Jie; Li, Hao-Fan; Yu, Shu-Qin; Xu, Qian

    2016-09-01

    Development of novel nano-drug delivery systems (NDDS) that can transport anticancer drugs into cell nuclei is still a highly desirable strategy for reversing multi-drug resistance (MDR) in cancer therapy. Herein, we designed and prepared a novel NDDS, designated S@L NPs, in which several smaller nanoparticles are contained within a larger nanoparticle. Our S@L NPs (CS/PAA/VP-16@TPGS/PLGA NPs) possess a structure in which smaller nanoparticles (Chitosan-Poly(acrylic acid) nanoparticles, CS/PAA NPs) containing the drug etoposide (VP-16) are loaded within a larger nanoparticle (Vitamin E d-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles, TPGS/PLGA NPs). The system utilizes intracellular pH gradients to achieve pH-sensitive sequential release within different intracellular domains of MDR cells. S@L NPs could be triggered to degrade and release CS/PAA/VP-16 NPs in the acid environment of the cytosol, endosomes or lysosomes, and CS/PAA/VP-16 NPs were capable of entering the nucleus through nucleopores. It is significant that CS/PAA/VP-16 NPs exhibit disaggregation in the alkaline environment of the nucleus and thereby release the contained anticancer drug. Further mechanistic studies showed that CS/PAA/VP-16 NPs escaped retention and degradation within lysosomes and protected the drug from P-glycoprotein-induced efflux. Simultaneously, S@L NPs enhanced the anticancer effect of the loaded drug by inducing autophagy and apoptosis of MDR cells. This novel NDDS may provide a promising platform for nuclear drug delivery for reversing MDR. PMID:27289313

  3. The Significance of Studying the Origin of the Cell Nucleus and the Way for Studying%细胞核起源研究的意义和研究途径的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李靖炎

    2001-01-01

    The cell nucleus as the controller of all genetic and physiological activities within the cell,is the most prominent marker of eukaryotic cells.The formation of the cell nucleus is the key event during the origin of eukaryotic cells.The first appearance of the primitive cell nucleus indicates the emergence of the first eukaryotic cell.The research on the origin of the cell nucleus not only enriches the modern cell biology and evolutionary biology,but might also even influence the further development of the molecular cell biology by stimulating cell biologists to consider the significance of the viewpoint of evolution to cell researches.   However,for a long time,on the origin of the cell nucleus there were only several reckless and assumptions and a few earnest efforts which were unsuccessful or only indirectly related to the formation of the nucleus.One of the main reasons for this situation seems to be the lack of a practical way for the study.   Through searching for a long time we found a way.The essential point of the way is to consider the comprehension of the primitive nucleus as the key link for understanding the whole process of and early evolution of the cell nucleus.We have already known that the prokaryotic ancestor of eukaryotes must be one kind of ancient archaea (Li,1999).The primitive cell nucleus should be an intermediate link between the archaeal nucleoid and the typical cell nucleus.In order to obtain some features of the original nucleus,We' d better study the most primitive protists we can find today and investigate all aspects of their cell nucleus thoroughly.Then,combined with the present knowledge on archaea we would be able to propose a hypothetical model for the primitive cell nucleus,and arrange various possible experiments to examine it from various aspects in order to test,to modify,to improve it,or replace it with a new one.Along this way,we would finally obtain a convincing model of the primitive cell

  4. Effects of TGF-β1 and IGF-1 on proliferation of human nucleus pulposus cells in medium with different serum concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chao

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The low proliferative viability of human nucleus pulposus(NP cells is considered as a cause of intervertebral discs degeneration. Growth factors, such as TGF-β1 and IGF-1, have been implicated in cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. Objective To investigate the dose-response and time-course effect of transforming growth factorβ1(TGF-β1 and insulin-like growth factor-1(IGF-1 on proliferation of NP cells. Study design 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT is reduced by dehydrogenase in mitochondria of live cells. The proliferative viability of cells corresponds to the amount of MTT reduced, which is measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plate reader. In this study, we assessed dose- and time-dependent effects of NP cells to TGF-β1 and IGF-1 in medium with different serum concentrations by MTT assay. Methods After release of informed consent, tissue samples of NP were obtained from anterior surgical procedures performed on five donors with idiopathic scoliosis. Isolated cells were cultured in F12 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum(FBS. Cells were seeded in 96-well plates at 1 × 103 cells/well. After synchronization, medium was replaced by F12 containing 1% or 10% FBS with either single or combination of TGF-β1 and IGF-1. Dose-response and time-course effect were examined by MTT assay. Results In the presence of 1% FBS, the response to IGF-1 was less striking, whereas TGF-β1 had a remarkably stimulating effect on cell proliferation. In 10% FBS, both of the two growth factors had statistical significant mitogenic effects, especially TGF-β1. The dose-dependent effect of TGF and IGF on cell proliferation was found within different concentrations of each growth factor(TGF-β1 1–10 μg/L, IGF-1 10–100 μg/L. The time-course effect showed a significant elevation three days later. Conclusion TGF-β1 and IGF-1 were efficient to stimulate cell proliferation of human NP

  5. Matrix elasticity, cytoskeletal forces and physics of the nucleus: how deeply do cells ‘feel’ outside and in?

    OpenAIRE

    Buxboim, Amnon; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular organization within a multicellular organism requires that a cell assess its relative location, taking in multiple cues from its microenvironment. Given that the extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of the most abundant proteins in animals and contributes both structure and elasticity to tissues, ECM probably provides key physical cues to cells. In vivo, in the vicinity of many tissue cell types, fibrous characteristics of the ECM are less discernible than the measurably distinct elas...

  6. Human Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-2 is Internalized by Cells and Translocated to the Nucleus by the Importin System

    OpenAIRE

    Kempaiah, Prakasha; Chand, Hitendra S.; Kisiel, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) is a serine proteinase inhibitor that induces caspase-mediated apoptosis when offered to a variety of tumor cells. In order to investigate the mechanism of TFPI-2-induced apoptosis, we initially studied the uptake and trafficking of TFPI-2 by HT-1080 cells. Exogenously offered TFPI-2 was rapidly internalized and distributed in both the cytosolic and nuclear fractions. Nuclear localization of TFPI-2 was also detected in a variety of endothelial cells ...

  7. Leukocyte nucleus segmentation and nucleus lobe counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zong-Han

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leukocytes play an important role in the human immune system. The family of leukocytes is comprised of lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and neutrophils. Any infection or acute stress may increase or decrease the number of leukocytes. An increased percentage of neutrophils may be caused by an acute infection, while an increased percentage of lymphocytes can be caused by a chronic bacterial infection. It is important to realize an abnormal variation in the leukocytes. The five types of leukocytes can be distinguished by their cytoplasmic granules, staining properties of the granules, size of cell, the proportion of the nuclear to the cytoplasmic material, and the type of nucleolar lobes. The number of lobes increased when leukemia, chronic nephritis, liver disease, cancer, sepsis, and vitamin B12 or folate deficiency occurred. Clinical neutrophil hypersegmentation has been widely used as an indicator of B12 or folate deficiency.Biomedical technologists can currently recognize abnormal leukocytes using human eyes. However, the quality and efficiency of diagnosis may be compromised due to the limitations of the biomedical technologists' eyesight, strength, and medical knowledge. Therefore, the development of an automatic leukocyte recognition system is feasible and necessary. It is essential to extract the leukocyte region from a blood smear image in order to develop an automatic leukocyte recognition system. The number of lobes increased when leukemia, chronic nephritis, liver disease, cancer, sepsis, and vitamin B12 or folate deficiency occurred. Clinical neutrophil hypersegmentation has been widely used as an indicator of B12 or folate deficiency. Results The purpose of this paper is to contribute an automatic leukocyte nuclei image segmentation method for such recognition technology. The other goal of this paper is to develop the method of counting the number of lobes in a cell nucleus. The experimental results

  8. Three-dimensional scaffold of type II collagen promote the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells into a nucleus pulposus-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaopeng; Tao, Yiqing; Wang, Jingkai; Liu, Dongyu; Liang, Chengzhen; Li, Hao; Chen, Qixin

    2016-07-01

    Type II collagen is reported to have the capability of guiding adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) to differentiate towards a nucleus pulposus (NP)-like phenotype. So this study aimed to establish a three-dimensional (3D) collagen scaffold using N,N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethyl carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDAC/NHS) to increase the efficiency of ADSC differentiation into NP-like cells. Physical properties, such as porosity, biodegradation, and microstructure, and biological characteristics such as cytotoxicity, cell proliferation, and expression of relevant genes and proteins were measured to evaluate the efficacy of different scaffolds. Collagen scaffolds cross-linked with EDAC/NHS exhibited higher biological stability, better spatial structure, and higher gene and protein expression of functional markers such as aggrecan, SOX9 and COL2 than those of other groups. Based on the results, freeze-dried type II collagen cross-linked with EDAC/NHS formed the best 3D scaffold, for inducing ADSC proliferation and differentiation toward a NP-like phenotype. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1687-1693, 2016. PMID:26940048

  9. Levofloxacin increases the effect of serum deprivation on anoikis of rat nucleus pulposus cells via Bax/Bcl-2/caspase-3 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Si-Dong; Bai, Zhi-Long; Zhang, Feng; Ma, Lei; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Levofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, is a widely-used and effective antibiotic. However, various adverse side effects are associated with levofloxacin. The purpose of this study was to further explore the effects of levofloxacin on rat nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs). Inverted phase-contrast microscopy, flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assays were used and revealed that serum deprivation induced apoptosis, which was markedly increased by levofloxacin in a dose-dependent manner. Simultaneously, levofloxacin decreased cell binding to type II collagen (COL2). Thus, levofloxacin-induced apoptosis exhibits characteristics of anoikis, the process by which cell death is triggered by separation from the extracellular matrix, which contains COL2. Furthermore, real-time quantitative RT-PCR was used to further confirm that levofloxacin downregulates COL2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. At last, western blot was used to find that levofloxacin increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and active caspase-3 in a dose-dependent manner. Levofloxacin therefore increases the effects of serum deprivation on anoikis by downregulating COL2 in rat NPCs in vitro via Bax/Bcl-2/caspase-3 pathway. This research provides a novel insight into the mechanisms of levofloxacin-induced toxicity and may potentially lead to a better understanding of the clinical effects of levofloxacin, especially in terms of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:25224805

  10. High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Mediates Apoptosis and Extracellular Matrix Metabolic Imbalances Possibly via p38 MAPK Activation in Rat Nucleus Pulposus Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Ni, Bin; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate whether high glucose-induced oxidative stress is implicated in apoptosis of rat nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and abnormal expression of critical genes involved in the metabolic balance of extracellular matrix (ECM). Methods. NPCs were cultured with various concentrations of glucose to detect cell viability and apoptosis. Cells cultured with high glucose (25 mM) were untreated or pretreated with N-acetylcysteine or a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB 202190. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated. Activation of p38 MAPK was measured by Western blot. The expression of ECM metabolism-related genes, including type II collagen, aggrecan, SRY-related high-mobility-group box 9 (Sox-9), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), was analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results. High glucose reduced viability of NPCs and induced apoptosis. High glucose resulted in increased ROS generation and p38 MAPK activation. In addition, it negatively regulated the expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, Sox-9, and TIMP-1 and positively regulated MMP-3 expression. These results were changed by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine or SB 202190. Conclusions. High glucose might promote apoptosis of NPCs, trigger ECM catabolic pathways, and inhibit its anabolic activities, possibly through a p38 MAPK-dependent oxidative stress mechanism.

  11. Cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator muscle are located in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kenya; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Kawagishi, Kyutaro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2012-12-01

    Since the levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles despite being antigravity mixed muscles to involuntarily sustain eyelid opening and eyebrow lifting, this study has proposed a hypothetical mechanism to compensate for this anatomical defect. The voluntary contraction of fast-twitch fibres of the levator muscle stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to evoke proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study confirmed the presence of cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles. After confirming that severing the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induced ipsilateral eyelid ptosis, Fluorogold was applied as a tracer to the proximal stump of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve in rats. Fluorogold labelled the cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons, not in any regions of the rat brain including the trigeminal ganglion, but in the ipsilateral mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neighbouring the locus ceruleus. Some Fluorogold particles accumulated in the area of the locus ceruleus. The trigeminal proprioceptive neurons could be considered centrally displaced ganglion cells to transmit afferent signal from the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to the mesencephalon, where they may be able to make excitatory synaptic connections with both the oculomotor neurons and the frontalis muscle motoneurons for the involuntary coordination of the eyelid and eyebrow activities, and potentially to the locus ceruleus. PMID:23157498

  12. Transplantation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in the nucleus accumbens of cocaine self-administering rats provides protection from seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkiteswaran, Kala; Alexander, Danielle N; Puhl, Matthew D; Rao, Anand; Piquet, Amanda L; Nyland, Jennifer E; Subramanian, Megha P; Iyer, Puja; Boisvert, Matthew M; Handly, Erin; Subramanian, Thyagarajan; Grigson, Patricia Sue

    2016-05-01

    Chronic exposure to drugs and alcohol leads to damage to dopaminergic neurons and their projections in the 'reward pathway' that originate in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and terminate in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). This damage is thought to contribute to the signature symptom of addiction: chronic relapse. In this study we show that bilateral transplants of human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPECs), a cell mediated dopaminergic and trophic neuromodulator, into the medial shell of the NAc, rescue rats with a history of high rates of cocaine self-administration from drug-seeking when returned, after 2 weeks of abstinence, to the drug-associated chamber under extinction conditions (i.e., with no drug available). Excellent survival was noted for the transplant of RPECs in the shell and/or the core of the NAc bilaterally in all rats that showed behavioral recovery from cocaine seeking. Design based unbiased stereology of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cell bodies in the VTA showed better preservation (pdrug addiction via its effects directly on the NAc and its neural network with the VTA. PMID:26562520

  13. Small molecule tolfenamic acid and dietary spice curcumin treatment enhances antiproliferative effect in pancreatic cancer cells via suppressing Sp1, disrupting NF-kB translocation to nucleus and cell cycle phase distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Riyaz; Connelly, Sarah F; Sankpal, Umesh T; Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Patel, Hassaan; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Shelake, Sagar; Tabor-Simecka, Leslie; Shoji, Mamoru; Simecka, Jerry W; El-Rayes, Bassel

    2016-05-01

    Combination of dietary/herbal spice curcumin (Cur) and COX inhibitors has been tested for improving therapeutic efficacy in pancreatic cancer (PC). The objective of this study was to identify agent with low toxicity and COX-independent mechanism to induce PC cell growth inhibition when used along with Cur. Anticancer NSAID, tolfenamic acid (TA) and Cur combination were evaluated using PC cell lines. L3.6pl and MIA PaCa-2 cells were treated with Cur (5-25μM) or TA (25-100μM) or combination of Cur (7.5μM) and TA (50μM). Cell viability was measured at 24-72h posttreatment using CellTiter-Glo kit. While both agents showed a steady/consistent effect, Cur+TA caused higher growth inhibition. Antiproliferative effect was compared with COX inhibitors, Ibuprofen and Celebrex. Cardiotoxicity was assessed using cordiomyocytes (H9C2). The expression of Sp proteins, survivin and apoptotic markers (western blot), caspase 3/7 (caspase-Glo kit), Annexin-V staining (flow cytometry), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell cycle phase distribution (flow cytometry) was measured. Cells were treated with TNF-α, and NF-kB translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus was evaluated (immunofluorescence). When compared to individual agents, combination of Cur+TA caused significant increase in apoptotic markers, ROS levels and inhibited NF-kB translocation to nucleus. TA caused cell cycle arrest in G0/G1, and the combination treatment showed mostly DNA synthesis phase arrest. These results suggest that combination of Cur+TA is less toxic and effectively enhance the therapeutic efficacy in PC cells via COX-independent mechanisms. PMID:27133426

  14. Temporomandibular joint inflammation activates glial and immune cells in both the trigeminal ganglia and in the spinal trigeminal nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Luc

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glial cells have been shown to directly participate to the genesis and maintenance of chronic pain in both the sensory ganglia and the central nervous system (CNS. Indeed, glial cell activation has been reported in both the dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord following injury or inflammation of the sciatic nerve, but no data are currently available in animal models of trigeminal sensitization. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated glial cell activation in the trigeminal-spinal system following injection of the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA into the temporomandibular joint, which generates inflammatory pain and trigeminal hypersensitivity. Results CFA-injected animals showed ipsilateral mechanical allodynia and temporomandibular joint edema, accompanied in the trigeminal ganglion by a strong increase in the number of GFAP-positive satellite glial cells encircling neurons and by the activation of resident macrophages. Seventy-two hours after CFA injection, activated microglial cells were observed in the ipsilateral trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and in the cervical dorsal horn, with a significant up-regulation of Iba1 immunoreactivity, but no signs of reactive astrogliosis were detected in the same areas. Since the purinergic system has been implicated in the activation of microglial cells during neuropathic pain, we have also evaluated the expression of the microglial-specific P2Y12 receptor subtype. No upregulation of this receptor was detected following induction of TMJ inflammation, suggesting that any possible role of P2Y12 in this paradigm of inflammatory pain does not involve changes in receptor expression. Conclusions Our data indicate that specific glial cell populations become activated in both the trigeminal ganglia and the CNS following induction of temporomandibular joint inflammation, and suggest that they might represent innovative targets for controlling pain during trigeminal nerve sensitization.

  15. A Virulence Essential CRN Effector of Phytophthora capsici Suppresses Host Defense and Induces Cell Death in Plant Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Mafurah, Joseph Juma; Ma, Huifei; Zhang, Meixiang; Xu, Jing; HE Feng; Ye, Tingyue; Shen, Danyu; Yanyu CHEN; Rajput, Nasir Ahmed; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a soil-borne plant pathogen with a wide range of hosts. The pathogen secretes a large array of effectors during infection of host plants, including Crinkler (CRN) effectors. However, it remains largely unknown on the roles of these effectors in virulence especially in P. capsici. In this study, we identified a cell death-inducing CRN effector PcCRN4 using agroinfiltration approach. Transient expression of PcCRN4 gene induced cell death in N. benthamiana, N. tabacum and...

  16. Modulation of synaptic potentials and cell excitability by dendritic KIR and KAS channels in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons: A computational study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jessy John; Rohit Manchanda

    2011-06-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc), a critical structure of the brain reward circuit, is implicated in normal goal-directed behaviour and learning as well as pathological conditions like schizophrenia and addiction. Its major cellular substrates, the medium spiny (MS) neurons, possess a wide variety of dendritic active conductances that may modulate the excitatory post synaptic potentials (EPSPs) and cell excitability. We examine this issue using a biophysically detailed 189-compartment stylized model of the NAc MS neuron, incorporating all the known active conductances. We find that, of all the active channels, inward rectifying K+ (KIR) channels play the primary role in modulating the resting membrane potential (RMP) and EPSPs in the down-state of the neuron. Reduction in the conductance of KIR channels evokes facilitatory effects on EPSPs accompanied by rises in local input resistance and membrane time constant. At depolarized membrane potentials closer to up-state levels, the slowly inactivating A-type potassium channel (KAs) conductance also plays a strong role in determining synaptic potential parameters and cell excitability. We discuss the implications of our results for the regulation of accumbal MS neuron biophysics and synaptic integration by intrinsic factors and extrinsic agents such as dopamine.

  17. Functional Self-Assembled Peptide Nanofibers for Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Encapsulation and Regeneration in Nucleus Pulposus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaohong; Jia, Zhiwei; Liu, Longgang; Zhao, Yachao; Li, Hao; Wang, Chaofeng; Tao, Hui; Tang, Yong; He, Qing; Ruan, Dike

    2016-06-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is mainly caused by intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Recent studies have demonstrated that the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can regenerate regions that have undergone degeneration, and the regenerative effect can be enhanced by using a hydrogel carrier. This article describes an injectable functional hydrogel system manufactured by combining RADA16-I and RADA-KPSS (RADA-KPSS was manufactured by conjugating a bioactive motif derived from BMP-7 [KPSS] onto the C terminal of RADA16-I) at a volume ratio of 1:1. This hydrogel system can enhance the proliferation, differentiation, and chemotactic migration of BMSCs. In addition, the encapsulation of BMSCs with this system maintains cell viability for a long period after transplantation into an ex vivo cultured disc model. In conclusion, KPSS-conjugated RADKPS is an ideal encapsulation system for BMSCs in intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. PMID:27153338

  18. PGC-1 family coactivators and cell fate: roles in cancer, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease and retrograde mitochondria-nucleus signalling.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, A W; Z. Yao; Vicencio, J. M.; Karkucinska-Wieckowska, A.; Szabadkai, G.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, a complex nuclear transcriptional machinery controlling mitochondrial biogenesis and function has been described. Central to this network are the PGC-1 family coactivators, characterised as master regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. Recent literature has identified a broader role for PGC-1 coactivators in both cell death and cellular adaptation under conditions of stress, here reviewed in the context of the pathology associated with cancer, neurodegeneration and...

  19. Photon Exchange in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Bertulani, Carlos A.

    2002-01-01

    The strong electromagnetic fields in peripheral heavy ion collisions give rise to photon-photon and photon-nucleus interactions. I present a general survey of the photon-photon and photon-hadron physics accessible in these collisions. Among these processes I discuss the nuclear fragmentation through the excitation of giant resonances, the Coulomb dissociation method for application in nuclear astrophysics, and the production of particles.

  20. Different generations of rabbit nucleus pulposus cells:Morphological and biological properties%不同代次兔髓核细胞的形态学特征和生物学性状*★

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武海军; 银和平; 李树文; 白明; 杜志才; 曹振华

    2013-01-01

    properties of nucleus pulposus cells can provide theoretical basis for studying the mechanism underlying intervertebral disc degeneration, construction of the intervertebral disc by tissue engineering, and gene therapy. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the characteristics of different generations of rabbit nucleus pulposus cells, searching for the best suitable seed cells to treat degenerative disc diseases. METHODS: Nucleus pulposus cells from New Zealand white rabbits were separated, cultured and then passaged. The morphological changes of primary, passages 3 and 4 nucleus pulposus cells were observed by hematoxylin-eosin staining under an inverted microscope. The biological properties of rabbit nucleus pulposus cells were observed. Aggrecan and type Ⅱ colagen expressions w ere detected by toluidine blue and immunocytochemistry staining, respectively. Type nucleus pulposus cells were detected by reverse transcription-PCR. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Rabbit nucleus pulposus cells were successful y cultured and passaged in vitro. Primary nucleus pulposus cells were round or polygonal, and the average adherence time was 7 days. The first and third generations of nucleus pulposus cells were round or polygonal, and have strong vitality. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that nuclei were in a uniform blue-black, and cytoplasm showed light pink. The cytoplasm of nucleus pulposus cells was sky blue stained for toluidine blue staining, and type II col agen immunohistochemical staining showed the cytoplasm of nucleus pulposus cells displayed yel owish-brown. Passage 4 nucleus pulposus cells appeared with degeneration, and type mRNA expression was significantly decreased compared with previous generations. The first three generations of nucleus pulposus cells were exuberant in metabolism and showed consistent phenotypes and normal expression of aggrecan and type Ⅱ col agen. Passage 4 nucleus pulposus cells began to age and degenerate.

  1. [The route of a bacterium Holospora in the cell of Paramecium (Ciliophora, Protista) from phagosome to the nucleus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaneeva, E V; Fokin, S I; Kornilova, E S

    2002-01-01

    Problems encountered at the initial stages of stable symbiotic system formation are discussed in the review. The most studied models for interaction between pathogenic bacteria and metazoan cells are compared with a similar system including Paramecium (a ciliatte)--Holospora (a bacterium). Literary and our own data on the infection of P. caudatum with specific endocytobionts inhabiting the nuclear apparatus (H. obtusa in the macronucleus), and H. undulata (in the micronucleus) are analysed with respect to the modern understanding of the intracellular vesicle trafficking. PMID:12561729

  2. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2014-01-01

    Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence e...

  3. Viscoelastic properties of human normal nucleus pulposus cells%正常髓核细胞的黏弹性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任龙韬; 卫陈刚; 牛建鹏; 郭志坚; 郝海虎

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the viscoelastic properties of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells from human in vitro. Methods NP was obtained from discarded NP tissue of 3 scoliosis patients aged from 13 to 16 years. Pancreatin and collagenase type Ⅱ were used to digest NP and cells were isolated from NP. Type Ⅱ collagen immunofluorescence and Fan seaing were used to identify NP cells. The micropipette aspiration test was used in combination with a three-parameter viscoelastic solid model to measure the mechanical properties of NP cells. Results The mean diameter of the digested NP cells was ( 15.40 ± 1.83) μm. In response to a prescribed pressure, the NP cells exhibited viscolastic solid creep behavior, which was characterized initially by a jump in displacement followed by a monotony decreasing rate of deformation that generally reached an equilibrium. NP cells were deformed to a length as much as 2 times the radius of the micropipette without completely entering the micropipette. The viscolastic parameters were k1 (0. 101 ±0. 052) kPa, k2 (0. 353 ± 0. 199) kPa, and μ ( 3. 034 ± 1. 843 ) kPa· s, respectively. Only the k1 was positively correlated to the cell diameter (r =-0. 389, P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion Human normal NP cells behave as a typical viscolastic solid creep. Micropipette aspiration technique is a valid method for the study on biomechanics of NP cells.%目的 观察正常髓核细胞的黏弹性。方法 髓核组织取材于3例脊柱侧凸矫形手术者术中取出废弃的髓核组织,用胰蛋白酶和Ⅱ型胶原酶消化分离细胞,Ⅱ型胶原免疫荧光组化和蕃红染色进行细胞鉴定,测量细胞直径,采用微管吸吮技术分析髓核细胞的黏弹性特性。结果 髓核细胞直径为(15.40±1.83)μm,正常髓核细胞的黏弹性参数k1(0.101 ±0.052) kPn、k2(0.353±0.199) kPa和μ(3.034±1.843) kPa·s。直线相关性分析表明,仅k1与髓核细胞直径明显相关(r=-0.389,P<0.05)。结论 正常髓核细胞表现为典

  4. 外侧膝状体细胞对边缘的响应模型%Response of Lateral Geniculate Nucleus Cells to Edges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任远

    2014-01-01

    Edges composing of stimuli of different intensities are common in both natural scenes and digital images.Edge detection is a basic step for machine visual systems,particularly machine biological visual systems.This paper establishes a model of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN)cells in a primary visual pathway,describes the LGN cell response to edges,and provides feature representations for designing image processing approaches based on neural mechanism. According to physiological characteristics of retinal ganglion cells,the paper uses the classical model of difference of Gaussians to describe the LGN cell response to stimuli,and obtains a re-sponse function via reasonable simplifications.Through simple analyses,several mathematical properties of the response function are obtained,which agree with the physiological characteristics of neurons.By further simplifying the contrast of a stimulus,a normalized response function is obtained.Numeric experiments show that similarities exist between the function’s response curve and the physiological curve discovered in a previous neural science research,showing validity of the described model.%边缘检测是机器视觉系统与生物视觉系统处理视觉信息的基础阶段。为初级视觉通路中的外侧膝状体(LGN)细胞建立一个模型,描述其对边缘的响应,为构建基于神经机制的图像处理方法提供特征表征。根据神经节细胞感受野的生理特性,用经典的高斯差模型描述 LGN 细胞对刺激的响应,通过合理地简化得到相对简单的响应函数。通过简单数学分析,能够得到函数的几点数学性质,且这些性质都与神经元的生理特性相符。进一步简化刺激的对比度,得到归一化的响应函数。数值实验发现,函数的响应曲线和神经科学研究得到的生理曲线具有相似性,说明该数学模型的合理性。

  5. 兔髓核与纤维环细胞生物学特性差异的研究%Different biological characteristics between nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢健; 童培建; 肖鲁伟; 金红婷; 吴承亮; 单乐天; 毛强; 潘佳菲

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To compare biological characteristics between nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells in vitro model.Methods:Five New Zealand white rabbits (2 to 3 kg,either gender) were isolated nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus under sterilized condition,then cultured in nutrient solution with 15% FBS and DMEM/F12 (1∶1) by enzyme digestion combined with tissue block method.When 90% cells fused,subcultring were performed.Cell morphology were observed by inverted phase contrast microscope,cell viability were detected by trypan blue staining,histological were observed by a toluidine blue and HE staining,cell proliferation were tested by MTT method,then the cell morphology,viability,proliferation between nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus were compared.Results:There were no obvioualy differences between nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus in original and the first strain.Physalides were appeared in annulus fibrosus on the second generation.The strapping time was later,and activity was lower in nucleus pulposus than annulus fibrosus.The growth of cell proliferation in nucleus pulposus was lower than annulus fibrosus from the ninth day.Conclusion:The cell activity in annulus fibrosus is higher than nucleus pulposus.Digenerative disc disease may caused by recession of nucleus pulposus,local biomechnical changes,furether caused structure change and function loss of annulus fibrosus.%目的:同时建立兔髓核细胞与纤维环细胞体外培养模型,比较两者生物学特性差异.方法:新西兰大白兔5只(2~3 kg,雌雄不限),无菌条件下分离髓核及纤维环,酶消化法联合组织块法含15%FBS的DMEM/F12(1∶1)培养液培养,当细胞90%融合后进行传代培养.通过倒置相差显微镜观测细胞形态,台盼蓝染色测定细胞活力,甲苯胺蓝和HE染色进行组织学观察,MTT法测定细胞增殖,分析比较髓核细胞与纤维环细胞形态、活力、增殖的差异.结果:原代及第1代髓核细胞和纤维

  6. An organism arises from every nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurullah Keklikoglu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The fact that, cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT method has been performed, opened new horizons for cloning, and changed the way of our understanding and approach to cell and nucleus. The progress in cloning technology, brought the anticipation of the ability to clone an organism from each somatic cell nucleus. Therefore, the 'Cell Theory' is about to take the additional statement as "An organism arises from every nucleus". The development of gene targeting procedures which can be applied with SCNT, showed us that it may be possible to obtain different versions of the original genetic constitution of a cell. Because of this opportunity which is provided by SCNT, in reproductive cloning, it would be possible to clone enhanced organisms which can adapt to different environmental conditions and survive. Furthermore, regaining the genetic characteristics of ancestors or reverse herediter variations would be possible. On the other hand, in therapeutic cloning, more precise and easily obtainable alternatives for cell replacement therapy could be presented. However, while producing healthier or different organisms from a nucleus, it is hard to foresee the side effects influencing natural processes in long term is rather difficult.

  7. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells exhibit immature nucleus pulposus cell phenotype in a laminin-rich pseudo-three-dimensional culture system

    OpenAIRE

    Chon, Brian H; Lee, Esther J.; Jing, Liufang; Lori A Setton; Chen, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cell supplementation to the herniated or degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD) is a potential strategy to promote tissue regeneration and slow disc pathology. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (HUCMSCs) – originating from the Wharton’s jelly – remain an attractive candidate for such endeavors with their ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. Previously, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been studied as a potential source for disc tissue regeneration. Howev...

  8. Nucleus Driven Electronic Pulsation

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, H; Xue, S -S

    2014-01-01

    We derive and solve by the spectral method the equations for a neutral system of ultra-relativistic electrons that are compressed to the radius of the nucleus and subject to a driving force. This driving force can be thought of as originating from a nuclear breathing mode, a possibility we discuss in detail.

  9. Enhancement of φ Mesons in Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The фmeson production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is investigated systematically usinga hadron-string cascade model LUCIAE. Within the framework of the model and relying on the collective

  10. A thalamic input to the nucleus accumbens mediates opiate dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingjie; Wienecke, Carl F R; Nachtrab, Gregory; Chen, Xiaoke

    2016-02-11

    Chronic opiate use induces opiate dependence, which is characterized by extremely unpleasant physical and emotional feelings after drug use is terminated. Both the rewarding effects of a drug and the desire to avoid withdrawal symptoms motivate continued drug use, and the nucleus accumbens is important for orchestrating both processes. While multiple inputs to the nucleus accumbens regulate reward, little is known about the nucleus accumbens circuitry underlying withdrawal. Here we identify the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus as a prominent input to the nucleus accumbens mediating the expression of opiate-withdrawal-induced physical signs and aversive memory. Activity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus to nucleus accumbens pathway is necessary and sufficient to mediate behavioural aversion. Selectively silencing this pathway abolishes aversive symptoms in two different mouse models of opiate withdrawal. Chronic morphine exposure selectively potentiates excitatory transmission between the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus and D2-receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons via synaptic insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Notably, in vivo optogenetic depotentiation restores normal transmission at these synapses and robustly suppresses morphine withdrawal symptoms. This links morphine-evoked pathway- and cell-type-specific plasticity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus to nucleus accumbens circuit to opiate dependence, and suggests that reprogramming this circuit holds promise for treating opiate addiction. PMID:26840481

  11. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE RAT MESENCEPHALIC TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LIEM, RSB; COPRAY, JCVM; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1991-01-01

    The subcellular morphology of the mesencephalic trigeminal (Me5) nucleus in the rat was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Most neurons in the thin rostral as well as in the major caudal part of Me5 appeared as large (40-50-mu-m), round-to ovoid-shaped unipolar cells. A few neurons (estima

  12. Inside a plant nucleus: discovering the proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrovská, Beáta; Šebela, M.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 6 (2015), s. 1627-1640. ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-28443S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Cell nucleus * chromatin * genome function Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.526, year: 2014

  13. Neutrino nucleus cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of our calculation which has been performed to study the nuclear effects in the quasielastic, inelastic and deep inelastic scattering of neutrinos(antineutrinos) from nuclear targets. These calculations are done in the local density approximation. We take into account the effect of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion, Coulomb effect, renormalization of weak transition strengths in the nuclear medium in the case of the quasielastic reaction. The inelastic reaction leading to production of pions is calculated in a $\\Delta $- dominance model taking into account the renormalization of $\\Delta$ properties in the nuclear medium and the final state interaction effects of the outgoing pions with the residual nucleus. We discuss the nuclear effects in the $F_{3}^{A}(x)$ structure function in the deep inelastic neutrino(antineutrino) reaction using a relativistic framework to describe the nucleon spectral function in the nucleus.

  14. Antinucleon-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical results on anti p-nucleus interactions are reviewed. We focus on determinations of the anti p optical potential from elastic scattering, the use of (anti p, anti p') inelastic scattering to reveal aspects of the spin-isospin dependence of N anti N amplitudes, and some puzzling features of (anti p, anti n) charge exchange reactions on nuclei. 47 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Polarized Proton Nucleus Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Trueman, T. L.

    2000-01-01

    We show that, to a very good approximation, the ratio of the spin-flip to the non-flip parts of the elastic proton-nucleus amplitude is the same as for proton-nucleon scattering at very high energy. The result is used to do a realistic calculation of the analyzing power A_N for pC scattering in the Coulomb-nuclear interference (CNI) region of momentum transfer.

  16. Hadron nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elastic and inelastic scattering of intermediate energy (less than or equal to 1 GeV) protons by nuclei is considered first. The discussion focuses on the determination of the proton-nucleus optical potential in terms of the elementary nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitudes and the properties of the target and residual nucleus. The result is a series of terms for the optical potential. Then the interaction of pions with nuclei for energies in the neighborhood of the Δ-resonance is discussed. In this energy domain an incident pion will with high probability be absorbed by a nucleon to produce the Δ-resonance and thus form a Δ-particle hole state in the nucleus. Next, the subject of hypernuclei is taken up. The Λ hypernuclei and a recently observed Σ hypernuclei comprise situations in which the core nucleus can be probed by a baryon of roughly the same mass as a nucleon, with similar albeit not identical interactions with nucleons. But the Λ (or Σ) does not need to satisfy the Pauli exclusion principle with respect to the nucleons, and therefore can be in orbits forbidden to it if it were a nucleon. As the energy of the projectile increases, it becomes correspondingly more important to take relativistic effects into account. The importance of these effects is strikingly revealed by experiments involving the collision of ultrarelativistic hadrons, protons, pions, kaons (up to Fermilab energies) with nuclei. This phenomenon forms part of the final topic, which includes as well as the collision of relativistic heavy ion projectiles with nuclei. A nuclear Weiszaecker-Williams method developed for dealing with peripheral collisions is described. 32 figures, 10 tables

  17. Modifications induced by low power microwaves in plant nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young rye plantlets exposed to low power microwaves from the X-band appeared affected at the cell nucleus level for various exposure times ranging between 30 minutes and 12 hours. Cell division capacity, controlled by cell nucleus seemed to be stimulated when the exposure was carried out on germinated caryopsides. Total number of abnormal nucleus divisions was enhanced by microwave exposure. Seed germination was slightly inhibited after electromagnetic exposure. Thermal as well as nonthermal effects at the level of nucleic acid macromolecules bearing genetic information might be invoked for the interpretation of the observed modifications

  18. Protein quality control in the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ramon D; Gardner, Richard G

    2016-06-01

    The nucleus is the repository for the eukaryotic cell's genetic blueprint, which must be protected from harm to ensure survival. Multiple quality control (QC) pathways operate in the nucleus to maintain the integrity of the DNA, the fidelity of the DNA code during replication, its transcription into mRNA, and the functional structure of the proteins that are required for DNA maintenance, mRNA transcription, and other important nuclear processes. Although we understand a great deal about DNA and RNA QC mechanisms, we know far less about nuclear protein quality control (PQC) mechanisms despite that fact that many human diseases are causally linked to protein misfolding in the nucleus. In this review, we discuss what is known about nuclear PQC and we highlight new questions that have emerged from recent developments in nuclear PQC studies. PMID:27015023

  19. TATA-binding protein-related factor 2 is localized in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells and much of it migrates to the nucleus in response to genotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung-ae; Tanaka, Yuji; Suenaga, Yusuke; Tamura, Taka-aki

    2006-10-31

    TBP (TATA-binding protein)-related factor 2 (TRF2) regulates transcription during a nuber of cellular processes. We previously demonstrated that it is localized in the cytoplasm and is translocated to the nucleus by DNA-damaging agents. However, the cytoplasmic localization of TRF2 is controversial. In this study, we reconfirmed its cytoplasmic localization in various ways and examined its nuclear migration. Stresses such as heat shock, redox agents, heavy metals, and osmotic shock did not affect localization whereas genotoxins such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), cisplatin, etoposide, and hydroxyurea caused it to migrate to the nucleus. Adriamycin, mitomycin C and gamma-rays had no obvious effect. We determined optimal conditions for the nuclear migration. The proportions of cells with nuclei enriched for TRF2 were 25-60% and 5-10% for stressed cells and control cells, respectively. Nuclear translocation was observed after 1 h, 4 h and 12 h for cisplatin, etoposide and MMS and hydroxyurea, respectively. The association of TRF2 with the chromatin and promoter region of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene, a putative target of TRF2, was increased by MMS treatment. Thus TRF2 may be involved in genotoxin-induced transcriptional regulation. PMID:17085973

  20. Thermally triggered injectable hydrogel, which induces mesenchymal stem cell differentiation to nucleus pulposus cells: Potential for regeneration of the intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A A; Boyes, V L; Sammon, C; Le Maitre, C L

    2016-05-01

    There is an urgent need for new therapeutic options for low back pain, which target degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). Here, we investigated a pNIPAM hydrogel system, which is liquid at 39°C ex vivo, where following injection into the IVD, body temperature triggers gelation. The combined effects of hypoxia (5% O2) and the structural environment of the hydrogel delivery system on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), towards an NP cell phenotype was investigated. hMSCs were incorporated into the liquid hydrogel, the mixture solidified and cultured for up to 6weeks under 21% O2 or 5% O2 where viability was maintained. Immunohistochemistry revealed significant increases in NP matrix components: aggrecan; collagen type II and chondroitin sulphate after culture for 1week in 5% O2, accompanied by increased matrix staining for proteoglycans and collagen, observed histologically. NP markers HIF1α, PAX1 and FOXF1 were also significantly increased where hMSC were incorporated into hydrogels with accelerated expression observed when cultured in 5% O2. hMSCs cultured under hypoxic conditions, which mimic the native disc microenvironment, accelerate differentiation of hMSCs within the hydrogel system, towards the NP phenotype without the need for chondrogenic inducing medium or additional growth factors, thus simplifying the treatment strategy for the repair of IVD degeneration. PMID:26996377

  1. Nucleus-Nucleus Collision as Superposition of Nucleon-Nucleus Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angular distributions of charged particles produced in 16O and 32S collisions with nuclear track emulsion were studied at momenta 4.5 and 200 A GeV/c. Comparison with the angular distributions of charged particles produced in proton-nucleus collisions at the same momentum allows to draw the conclusion, that the angular distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions can be seen as superposition of the angular distributions in nucleon-nucleus collisions taken at the same impact parameter bNA, that is mean impact parameter between the participating projectile nucleons and the center of the target nucleus

  2. Nucleus-Nucleus Collision as Superposition of Nucleon-Nucleus Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, G.I.; Adamovich, M.I.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Alexandrov, Y.A.; Andreeva, N.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Basova, E.S.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhasin, A.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bradnova, V.; Bubnov, V.I.; Cai, X.; Chasnikov, I.Y.; Chen, G.M.; Chernova, L.P.; Chernyavsky, M.M.; Dhamija, S.; Chenawi, K.El; Felea, D.; Feng, S.Q.; Gaitinov, A.S.; Ganssauge, E.R.; Garpman, S.; Gerassimov, S.G.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Grote, J.; Gulamov, K.G.; Gupta, S.K.; Gupta, V.K.; Henjes, U.; Jakobsson, B.; Kanygina, E.K.; Karabova, M.; Kharlamov, S.P.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Krasnov, S.A.; Kumar, V.; Larionova, V.G.; Li, Y.X.; Liu, L.S.; Lokanathan, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lukicheva, N.S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, S.B.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manhas, I.; Mittra, I.S.; Musaeva, A.K.; Nasyrov, S.Z.; Navotny, V.S.; Nystrand, J.; Otterlund, I.; Peresadko, N.G.; Qian, W.Y.; Qin, Y.M.; Raniwala, R.; Rao, N.K.; Roeper, M.; Rusakova, V.V.; Saidkhanov, N.; Salmanova, N.A.; Seitimbetov, A.M.; Sethi, R.; Singh, B.; Skelding, D.; Soderstrem, K.; Stenlund, E.; Svechnikova, L.N.; Svensson, T.; Tawfik, A.M.; Tothova, M.; Tretyakova, M.I.; Trofimova, T.P.; Tuleeva, U.I.; Vashisht, Vani; Vokal, S.; Vrlakova, J.; Wang, H.Q.; Wang, X.R.; Weng, Z.Q.; Wilkes, R.J.; Yang, C.B.; Yin, Z.B.; Yu, L.Z.; Zhang, D.H.; Zheng, P.Y.; Zhokhova, S.I.; Zhou, D.C

    1999-03-01

    Angular distributions of charged particles produced in {sup 16}O and {sup 32}S collisions with nuclear track emulsion were studied at momenta 4.5 and 200 A GeV/c. Comparison with the angular distributions of charged particles produced in proton-nucleus collisions at the same momentum allows to draw the conclusion, that the angular distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions can be seen as superposition of the angular distributions in nucleon-nucleus collisions taken at the same impact parameter b{sub NA}, that is mean impact parameter between the participating projectile nucleons and the center of the target nucleus.

  3. Antineutron-nucleus annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Botta, E

    2001-01-01

    The n-nucleus annihilation process has been studied by the OBELIX experiment at the CERN Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in the (50-400) MeV/c projectile momentum range on C, Al, Cu, Ag, Sn, and Pb nuclear targets. A systematic survey of the annihilation cross- section, sigma /sub alpha /(A, p/sub n/), has been performed, obtaining information on its dependence on the target mass number and on the incoming n momentum. For the first time the mass number dependence of the (inclusive) final state composition of the process has been analyzed. Production of the rho vector meson has also been examined. (13 refs).

  4. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, H.; /Tufts U.; Garvey, G.; /Los Alamos; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  5. Global features of nucleus-nucleus collisions in ultrarelativistic domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIJING generator simulation of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies is presented. It is shown that the global characteristics of nucleus-nucleus collisions, such as distribution of a charged multiplicity, total and electromagnetic transverse energy over pseudorapidity are rather sensitive to some predictions of models of high-exited nuclear medium formation, namely parton energy losses in dense nuclear matter. These losses result in appearance of a broad maximum in global variable distributions over pseudorapidity. The most profound of this effect occurs at central heavy ion collisions at LHC energy

  6. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  7. Sampling a Cometary Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Horst Uwe; Küppers, Michael; Kuehrt, Ekkehard

    Understanding of the physics and chemistry of the proto solar nebula and the formation of our planetary system is a prime objective of planetary research. The key role of comets as witnesses of the early conditions is well established. Material, dust and condensed compounds, were stored at very low temperatures in cometary nuclei and have since been preserved. These icy grains are the source material out of which all planetary bodies formed in more or less complex processes. Analysis of this material will provide fundamental (in its original meaning) information about the proto solar nebula and the physical processes that dominated during the final stages of its collapse toward the ecliptic plane and the formation of the sun. Recent observations of comets and modelling results have shown that pristine material can be found at a few centimetres or decimetres below the surface of cometary nuclei. Comets have been visited by space probes over the last 20 years with increasing frequency. All observations and analyses show that cometary nuclei have low density, are porous, and their (surface) material has a very low tensile strength. Therefore collecting a sample from a cometary nucleus is relatively simple (simpler than from any other planetary body) and does not even require landing (touch and go). The Rosetta spacecraft is on its way to rendezvous a short period comet. The evolution of cometary activity will be followed from its onset through perihelion. The spacecraft will be operated in the near nucleus environment over several months providing extensive experience. It is now the time to conceive and prepare a comet nucleus sample return (CNSR) mission. The focus of such a mission must lie on the sampling and the return of the material. The concept of a CNSR mission will be discussed based on our understanding of cometary nuclei consolidated by the recent Stardust and Deep Impact results. Taking advantage of the easy sample collection brings a CNSR mission well

  8. DIAGEN-generator of inelastic nucleus-nucleus interaction diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of the program code generating inelastic nucleus-nucleus interaction diagrams is given. Probabilities of various diagram appearance are determined within the framework of Glauber approximation. The code allows one to determine cross sections of any processes and the number of spectator nucleons. 12 refs.; 2 figs

  9. Caspase-1 promotes Epstein-Barr virus replication by targeting the large tegument protein deneddylase to the nucleus of productively infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Gastaldello

    Full Text Available The large tegument proteins of herpesviruses contain N-terminal cysteine proteases with potent ubiquitin and NEDD8-specific deconjugase activities, but the function of the enzymes during virus replication remains largely unknown. Using as model BPLF1, the homologue encoded by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, we found that induction of the productive virus cycle does not affect the total level of ubiquitin-conjugation but is accompanied by a BPLF1-dependent decrease of NEDD8-adducts and accumulation of free NEDD8. Expression of BPLF1 promotes cullin degradation and the stabilization of cullin-RING ligases (CRLs substrates in the nucleus, while cytoplasmic CRLs and their substrates are not affected. The inactivation of nuclear CRLs is reversed by the N-terminus of CAND1, which inhibits the binding of BPLF1 to cullins and prevents efficient viral DNA replication. Targeting of the deneddylase activity to the nucleus is dependent on processing of the catalytic N-terminus by caspase-1. Inhibition of caspase-1 severely impairs viral DNA synthesis and the release of infectious virus, pointing a previously unrecognized role of the cellular response to danger signals triggered by EBV reactivation in promoting virus replication.

  10. Protein quality control in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl; Rebula, Caio A.;

    2014-01-01

    to aggregate, cells have evolved several elaborate quality control systems to deal with these potentially toxic proteins. First, various molecular chaperones will seize the misfolded protein and either attempt to refold the protein or target it for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The...... particularly active in protein quality control. Thus, specific ubiquitin-protein ligases located in the nucleus, target not only misfolded nuclear proteins, but also various misfolded cytosolic proteins which are transported to the nucleus prior to their degradation. In comparison, much less is known about...... these mechanisms in mammalian cells. Here we highlight recent advances in our understanding of nuclear protein quality control, in particular regarding substrate recognition and proteasomal degradation....

  11. The retrotrapezoid nucleus and breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Abbott, Stephen B G; Depuy, Seth D; Kanbar, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is located in the rostral medulla oblongata close to the ventral surface and consists of a bilateral cluster of glutamatergic neurons that are non-aminergic and express homeodomain transcription factor Phox2b throughout life. These neurons respond vigorously to increases in local pCO(2) via cell-autonomous and paracrine (glial) mechanisms and receive additional chemosensory information from the carotid bodies. RTN neurons exclusively innervate the regions of the brainstem that contain the respiratory pattern generator (RPG). Lesion or inhibition of RTN neurons largely attenuates the respiratory chemoreflex of adult rats whereas their activation increases respiratory rate, inspiratory amplitude and active expiration. Phox2b mutations that cause congenital central hypoventilation syndrome in humans prevent the development of RTN neurons in mice. Selective deletion of the RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons by genetic means in mice eliminates the respiratory chemoreflex in neonates.In short, RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons are a major nodal point of the CNS network that regulates pCO(2) via breathing and these cells are probable central chemoreceptors. PMID:23080151

  12. In the absence of cellular poly (A) binding protein, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → PABP knock down and cell apoptosis. → Nuclear translocation of GAPDH in PABP depleted cells. → Role of p53 in apoptosis of PABP depleted cells. → Bax translocation and cytochrome C release and caspase 3 activation following PABP depletion. → Association of p53 with Bcl2 and Bax. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) interacts with 3' poly (A) tract of eukaryotic mRNA and is important for both translation and stability of mRNA. Previously, we have shown that depletion of PABP by siRNA prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. In the present investigation, we studied the mechanism of cell apoptosis. We show that in the absence of PABP, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53. As a result, p53 translocated to the mitochondria to initiate Bax mediated apoptosis.

  13. In the absence of cellular poly (A) binding protein, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangima Zannat, Mst.; Bhattacharjee, Rumpa B. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Bag, Jnanankur, E-mail: jbag@uoguelph.ca [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} PABP knock down and cell apoptosis. {yields} Nuclear translocation of GAPDH in PABP depleted cells. {yields} Role of p53 in apoptosis of PABP depleted cells. {yields} Bax translocation and cytochrome C release and caspase 3 activation following PABP depletion. {yields} Association of p53 with Bcl2 and Bax. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) interacts with 3' poly (A) tract of eukaryotic mRNA and is important for both translation and stability of mRNA. Previously, we have shown that depletion of PABP by siRNA prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. In the present investigation, we studied the mechanism of cell apoptosis. We show that in the absence of PABP, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53. As a result, p53 translocated to the mitochondria to initiate Bax mediated apoptosis.

  14. M-31 mutant (virA::Tn5) of Agrobacterium tumefaciens is capable of transferring its T-DNA into the nucleus of host cell, but incapable of integrating it into the chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, P; Yoshida, H; Shioiri, H; Nozue, M; Kojima, M

    2000-01-01

    An avirulent mutant (M-31 strain) was produced by the transposon (Tn5) mutagenesis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens (A-208 strain). A binary vector, pIG121-Hm, containing a kanamycin resistance gene (nptII) and beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene with an intron, was introduced into M-31 and A-208 strains. The resultant Agrobacteria were inoculated onto leaves of Kalanchoe daigremontiana and to tobacco BY-2 cells to assay GUS activity to monitor the T-DNA transfer into the nuclei of host cells. The results indicated that T-DNA was transferred into the nuclei of cells of both host plants inoculated with the M-31 mutant. The M-31 mutant strain had an insertion of Tn5 in the virA gene on its Ti plasmid. The introduction of the virA gene in the M-31 mutant complemented its avirulent phenotype. No kanamycin-resistant cells were observed when the M-31 mutant harboring the pIG121-Hm was inoculated to tobacco BY-2 cells. The M-31 mutant (virA::Tn5) seems to transfer T-DNA into the nucleus of the host cell, but is unable to integrate it to the chromosome. PMID:16232864

  15. Antiproton-nucleus interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugnon, J.; Vandermeulen, J.

    The antiproton-nucleus physics is reviewed. On the experimental side, the recent results obtained at the LEAR, BNL and KEK facilities are analyzed. A brief summary of the main pp and pn experimental data is also given. The antiproton-nucleus interaction can lead to elasic, inelastic and charge exchange scattering and to annihilation. The latter is very dominant. The scattering cross-sections are usually analyzed in terms of complex potential models. The relationship between potentials, charge conjugation and Dirac phenomenology is discussed. Much emphasis is put on the dynamics of the antiproton annihilation on nuclei. The energy transfer, pion absorption and target response are analyzed within the intranuclear cascade model. Special interest is devoted to strangeness production, hypernucleus formation and possible annihilation on two nucleons. Signatures for this new process are searched in experimental data. Finally, the highly debated question of quark-gluon formation is analyzed. Cet article constitue une revue de la physique antiproton-noyau. Du point de vue expérimental, cette revue porte particulièrement sur les récents résultats obtenus à LEAR, BNL et KEK. On y a aussi inclus une mise à jour des faits expérimentaux principaux pour pp et pn. L'interaction antiproton-noyau conduit à la diffusion élastique, inélastique et d'xA9change de charge et à des processus d'annihilation. Habituellement, les expériences de diffusion sont analysées en termes de potentiels complexes. La relation entre ces potentiels, la conjugaison de charge et la phénoménologie de Dirac est discutée. On s'est particulièrement intéressé à la dynamique de l'annihilation d'antiprotons sur des noyaux. Le transfert d'énergie, l'absorption de pions et la réponse de la cible sont analysés dans le cadre du modèle de cascade intranucléaire. Certains autres points sont discutés plus en détail: la production d'étrangeté, la formation d'hypernoyaux et l'annihilation sur

  16. Formation of light particles in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal experimental results on the yield of the light charged particles in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the low and intermediate energies are reviewed. Inclusive spectra of light particles and their coincidences with the characteristic KX-rays, γ-rays, neutrons, projectile-like fragments, other light particles, fission fragments, and evaporation residues are analyzed. The main theoretical models used for the description of the light particle formation are briefly outlined together with their merits and shortcomings. The unsolved problems of fast light particle formation, in particular, and of nucleus-nucleus interaction dynamics, on the whole, are discussed with the outlooks of new experiments able to clear up some of these problems. (author) 144 refs., 40 figs., 2 tabs

  17. A Monte Carlo Generator for High Energy Nucleus- Nucleus Collision

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, N. M.; El-Harby, N.; Hussein, M. T.

    1999-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulator is presented to reproduce data of nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energies. The program is designed in a microscopic point of view, where the cascade approach is applied. Moreover, each nucleon from both the target and the projectile is followed up on the time scale along the collision time. The effect of the mean field that depends on the nuclear density is considered. Elastic and inelastic scattering are allowed for the nucleon binary collisions during the casca...

  18. M-CSF TARGETING INTO LCL NUCLEUS BEHAVES AS A MALIGNANCY PROMOTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹震宇; 吴克复; 宋玉华; 李戈; 林永敏; 饶青; 马小彤

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the functions of nM-CSF in malignant cells. Methods: recombinant M-CSF was targeted into cell nucleus by employing a eukaryotic expression plasmid vector pCMV/myc/nuc. The constructed plasmid was transfected into cells of EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescent staining showed that recombinant M-CSF was localized into LCL cell nucleus. The transgenic cells showed elevated proliferation potential, enhanced resistance to apoptosis and increased ability of in vitro migration. Conclusion: Nucleus presenting M-CSF might act as a promoting factor in the processes of cell malignancy.

  19. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and imaging of the nucleus to characterize DNA contributions in different phases of the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Saumya; Zong, Xinying; Holton, Sarah E.; Prasanth, K. V.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    Determination of neoplasia is largely dependent on the state of cell growth. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has the potential to measure differences between normal and cancerous cells. When analyzing biopsy sections using IR spectroscopy, careful analyses become important since biochemical variations may be misinterpreted due to variations in cell cycle. Processes like DNA replication, transcription and translation to produce proteins are important in determining if the cells are actively dividing but no studies on this aspect using IR spectroscopy have been conducted on isolated cell nuclei. Nuclei hold critical information about the phase of cell and its capacity to divide, but IR spectra of nuclei are often confounded by cytoplasmic signals during data acquisition from intact cells and tissues. Therefore, we sought to separate nuclear signals from cytoplasmic signals and identify spectral differences that characterize different phases of the cell cycle. Both cells and isolated nuclei were analyzed to assess the effect of the cytoplasmic background and to identify spectral changes in nuclei in different phases of cell cycle. We observed that signals of DNA could be obtained when imaging nuclei isolated from cells in different phases of cell cycle, which is in contrast to the oft-cited case in cells wherein nuclear contributions are obscured. The differences across cell cycle phases were more pronounced in nucleic acid regions of the spectra, showing that the use of nuclear spectrum can provide additional information on cellular state. These results can aid in developing computational models that extract nuclear spectra from whole cells and tissues for more accurate assessment of biochemical variations.

  20. Transcripts of the MHM region on the chicken Z chromosome accumulate as non-coding RNA in the nucleus of female cells adjacent to the DMRT1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teranishi, M; Shimada, Y; Hori, T; Nakabayashi, O; Kikuchi, T; Macleod, T; Pym, R; Sheldon, B; Solovei, I; Macgregor, H; Mizuno, S

    2001-01-01

    The male hypermethylated (MHM) region, located near the middle of the short arm of the Z chromosome of chickens, consists of approximately 210 tandem repeats of a BamHI 2.2-kb sequence unit. Cytosines of the CpG dinucleotides of this region are extensively methylated on the two Z chromosomes in the male but much less methylated on the single Z chromosome in the female. The state of methylation of the MHM region is established after fertilization by about the 1-day embryonic stage. The MHM region is transcribed only in the female from the particular strand into heterogeneous, high molecular-mass, non-coding RNA, which is accumulated at the site of transcription, adjacent to the DMRT1 locus, in the nucleus. The transcriptional silence of the MHM region in the male is most likely caused by the CpG methylation, since treatment of the male embryonic fibroblasts with 5-azacytidine results in hypo-methylation and active transcription of this region. In ZZW triploid chickens, MHM regions are hypomethylated and transcribed on the two Z chromosomes, whereas MHM regions are hypermethylated and transcriptionally inactive on the three Z chromosomes in ZZZ triploid chickens, suggesting a possible role of the W chromosome on the state of the MHM region. PMID:11321370

  1. Nucleus management with irrigating vectis

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan Aravind

    2009-01-01

    The main objective in modern cataract surgery is to achieve a better unaided visual acuity with rapid post-surgical recovery and minimal surgery-related complications. Early visual rehabilitation and better unaided vision can be achieved only by reducing the incision size. In manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS), incision is between 5.5 to 7 mm. Once the nucleus is prolapsed into the anterior chamber, it can be extracted through the tunnel. Nucleus extraction with an irrigating vect...

  2. Morphometry and morphology of nucleus of the Sertoli and interstitial cells of the tambaqui Colossoma macropomum (Cuvier, 1881) (Pisces: Characidae) during the reproductive cycle Morfometria e morfologia do núcleo das células de Sertoli e intersticiais do tambaqui Colossoma macropomum (Cuvier, 1881) (Pisces: Characidae), durante o ciclo reprodutivo

    OpenAIRE

    L.S.O. Nakaghi; D. Mitsuiki; H. S. L. Santos; M.R. Pacheco; L. N. Ganeco

    2003-01-01

    This study allowed the characterization of the tambaqui Colossoma macropomum testes structural organization, emphasizing Sertoli and interstitial cells and analyzing morphometrically the Sertoli cell nucleus diameter and the interstitial tissue area during the reproductive cycle. Fragments of tambaqui testes were collected in the following reproductive cycle stages: immature, resting, maturation I and II, mature, and regression, and were histologically processed. The Sertoli cells were found ...

  3. Three-dimensional organization of the human interphase nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Wachsmuth (Malte); W. Waldeck (Waldemar); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    2002-01-01

    markdownabstractTo approach the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fibre was folded according to the Mu

  4. Three-dimensional organization of the human interphase nucleus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Wachsmuth (Malte); W. Waldeck (Waldemar); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fibre was folded according to the Multi-

  5. Three-dimensional organization of the human interphase nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Wachsmuth (Malte); W. Waldeck (Waldemar); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fibre was folded according to the Mul

  6. A stereological study of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus in Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, A S; Korbo, S; Uylings, H B M;

    2014-01-01

    The total number of neurons and glial cells in the mediodorsal thalamic (MDT) nucleus of four aged females with Down syndrome (DS; mean age 69years) was estimated and compared to six age- and sex-matched controls. The MDT nucleus was delineated on coronal sections, and cell numbers (large and small...

  7. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl+ K562 and Jak2(V617F)+ HEL Leukemia Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) and Jak2(V617F) in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD). We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F) positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD) of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F)-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl+ K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL cells, Stat5 is

  8. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl+ K562 and Jak2(V617F)+ HEL Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Axel; Borghouts, Corina; Brendel, Christian; Moriggl, Richard; Delis, Natalia; Brill, Boris; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) and Jak2(V617F) in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD). We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F) positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD) of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F)-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl+ K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL cells, Stat5 is

  9. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl+ K562 and Jak2(V617F+ HEL Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML and Jak2(V617F in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD. We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl+ K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL

  10. The use of Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry and Flourescence Resonance Energy Transfer to quantify force-induced protein dissociation in the nucleus of a living cell

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Yeh-Chuin Poh & Ning Wang ### Abstract Mechanical forces are known to play a significant role in biological processes. These forces can be transmitted to the cell through the cytoskeletal filament network, inducing different biochemical responses within the cytoplasm. Although there have been ample reports showing that cytoplasmic enzymes can be directly activated by a local stress on the cell surface via integrins, there has been no evidence that mechanical forces can di...

  11. The intra-nucleus integration of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNAin cervical mucosa cells and its relation with c-myc expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Jinying

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To explore the relationship between the integration of mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA in the nuclei of cervical epithelium cells and the expression of c-myc. Methods The expression of c-myc protein was measured by immunohistochemical test in 40 cases of the uterine cervix cancer, 30 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and 30 cases of normal cervical epithelium; the sequence of mtDNA in the nuclei was detected by in situ hybridization technique. Results The detection rates of mtDNA in the nuclei of cervical epithelium cells were 27.5%, 13.3% and 0% in cervical carcinoma, CIN, and normal cervical epithelium respectively. The expression rate of c-myc in cervical mucoma cells was 67% in the mtDNA sequence positive group and was significantly higher than that in the negative group (36%. Conclusion The integration of mtDNA into the nuclei of cervical epithelium cells may be involved in the carcinogenesis of cervical epithelium cells and the expression of c-myc might be related to the integration of mtDNA sequence into nuclei of cervical epithelium cells.

  12. Static polarization effects on the nucleus-nucleus potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of two variables : the distance between the centres of the nuclei R or equivalently the distance s0 between the surfaces s0 = R - R1 - R2 where Ri (i = 1,2) are the nuclear radii, and a surface thickness parameter a. The second variable was introduced in order to investigate the possibility of the polarization of the nuclei seen as a change in the thickness of the surface layer. (orig./AH)

  13. Selected Experimental Highlights from Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, H Z

    2006-01-01

    Nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC produce high temperature and high energy density matter which exhibits partonic degrees of freedom. We will discuss measurements of nuclear modification factors for light hadrons and non-photonic electrons from heavy quark decays, which reflect the flavor dependence of energy loss of high momentum partons traversing the dense QCD medium. The hadronization of bulk partonic matter exhibits collectivity in effective partonic degrees of freedom. Nuclear collisions at RHIC provide an intriguing environment, where many constituent quark ingredients are readily available for possible formation of exotic particles through quark coalescences or recombinations.

  14. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yongying; Wang, Ning; Li, Zhuxia; Scheid, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions 40Ca+40Ca, 48Ca+208Pb and 126Sn+130Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for 40Ca+40Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depth of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock c...

  15. The deafferented reticular thalamic nucleus generates spindle rhythmicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steriade, M; Domich, L; Oakson, G; Deschênes, M

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that nucleus reticularis thalami (RE) is the generator of spindle rhythmicity during electroencephalogram (EEG) synchronization was tested in acutely prepared cats. Unit discharges and focal waves were extracellularly recorded in the rostral pole of RE nucleus, which was completely disconnected by transections from all other thalamic nuclei. In some experiments, additional transections through corona radiata created a triangular island in which the rostral RE pole survived with the caudate nucleus, putamen, basal forebrain nuclei, prepyriform area, and the adjacent cortex. Similar results were obtained in two types of experiments: brain stem-transected preparations that exhibited spontaneous spindle sequences, and animals under ketamine anesthesia in which transient spindling was repeatedly precipitated during recording by very low doses of a short-acting barbiturate. Both spindle-related rhythms (7- to 16-Hz waves grouped in sequences that recur with a rhythm of 0.1-0.3 Hz) are seen in focal recordings of the deafferented RE nucleus. The presence of spindling rhythmicity in the disconnected RE nucleus contrasts with total absence of spindles in cortical EEG leads and in thalamic recordings behind the transection. Oscillations within the same frequency range as that of spontaneous spindles can be evoked in the deafferented RE nucleus by subcortical white matter stimulation. In deafferented RE cells, the burst structure consists of an initially biphasic acceleration-deceleration pattern, eventually leading to a long-lasting tonic tail. Quantitative group data show that the burst parameters of disconnected RE cells are very similar to those of RE neurons with intact connections. In the deafferented RE nucleus, spike bursts of RE neurons recur periodically (0.1-0.3 Hz) in close time-relation with simultaneously recorded focal spindle sequences. The burst occurrence of deafferented RE cells is greatly reduced after systemic administration of bicuculline

  16. Nucleus management with irrigating vectis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Aravind

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective in modern cataract surgery is to achieve a better unaided visual acuity with rapid post-surgical recovery and minimal surgery-related complications. Early visual rehabilitation and better unaided vision can be achieved only by reducing the incision size. In manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS, incision is between 5.5 to 7 mm. Once the nucleus is prolapsed into the anterior chamber, it can be extracted through the tunnel. Nucleus extraction with an irrigating vectis is a very simple technique, which combines mechanical and hydrostatic forces to express out the nucleus. This technique is time-tested with good results and more than 95% of nuclei in MSICS are extracted in this way offering all the merits of phacoemulsification with the added benefits of having wider applicability, better safety, shorter learning curve and lower cost.

  17. Anti p-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Status and future prospects of antiproton-nucleus scattering experiments are presented. These scattering experiments were conducted at antiproton beam momentums of 300 and 600 MeV/c on target nuclei of 6Li, 12C, 16O, 18O, 40Ca, 48Ca, and 208Pb. Antiproton-proton reactions investigated antiproton-nucleus bound or resonant states in antiproton reactions with d, 6Li, 12C, 63Cu, and 209Bi. Inelastic scattering experiments investigated the spin-isospin dependence of the NN interactions. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. A combinatorial relative mass value evaluation of endogenous bioactive proteins in three-dimensional cultured nucleus pulposus cells of herniated intervertebral discs: identification of potential target proteins for gene therapeutic approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demissew S Mern

    Full Text Available Painful degenerative disc diseases have been targeted by different biological treatment approaches. Nucleus pulposus (NP cells play a central role in intervertebral disc (IVD maintenance by orchestrating catabolic, anabolic and inflammatory factors that affect the extracellular matrix. IVD degeneration is associated with imbalances of these factors, resulting in a catabolic inflammatory metabolism. Therefore, accurate knowledge about their quantity and quality with regard to matrix synthesis is vital for a rational gene therapeutic approach. NP cells were isolated from 63 patients operated due to lumbar disc herniation (mean age 56 / range 29 - 84 years. Then, three-dimensional culture with low-glucose was completed in a collagen type I scaffold for four weeks. Subsequently cell proliferation evaluation was performed using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and intracellular concentration of 28 endogenously expressed anabolic, catabolic, inflammatory factors and relevant matrix proteins was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Specimen-related grades of degeneration were confirmed by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Independent from gender, age and grade of degeneration proliferation rates remained similar in all groups of NP cells. Progressive grades of degeneration, however, showed a significant influence on accumulation of selective groups of factors such as disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 and 5, matrix metalloproteinase 3, metalloproteinase inhibitor 1 and 2, interleukin-1β and interleukin-1 receptor. Along with these changes, the key NP matrix proteins aggrecan and collagen II decreased significantly. The concentration of anabolic factors bone morphogenetic proteins 2, 4, 6 and 7, insulin-like growth factor 1, transforming growth factor beta 1 and 3, however, remained below the minimal detectable quantities. These findings indicate that progressive degenerative

  19. Prestress mediates force propagation into the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several reports show that the nucleus is 10 times stiffer than the cytoplasm. Hence, it is not clear if intra-nuclear structures can be directly deformed by a load of physiologic magnitudes. If a physiologic load could not directly deform intra-nuclear structures, then signaling inside the nucleus would occur only via the mechanisms of diffusion or translocation. Using a synchronous detection approach, we quantified displacements of nucleolar structures in cultured airway smooth muscle cells in response to a localized physiologic load (∼0.4 μm surface deformation) via integrin receptors. The nucleolus exhibited significant displacements. Nucleolar structures also exhibited significant deformation, with the dominant strain being the bulk strain. Increasing the pre-existing tensile stress (prestress) in the cytoskeleton significantly increased the stress propagation efficiency to the nucleolus (defined as nucleolus displacement per surface deformation) whereas decreasing the prestress significantly lowered the stress propagation efficiency to the nucleolus. Abolishing the stress fibers/actin bundles by plating the cells on poly-L-lysine-coated dishes dramatically inhibited stress propagation to the nucleolus. These results demonstrate that the prestress in the cytoskeleton is crucial in mediating stress propagation to the nucleolus, with implications for direct mechanical regulation of nuclear activities and functions

  20. 123I-labeled HIV-1 tat peptide radioimmunoconjugates are imported into the nucleus of human breast cancer cells and functionally interact in vitro and in vivo with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21WAF-1/Cip-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the internalization and nuclear translocation of 123I-tat-peptide radioimmunoconjugates in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells and their ability to interact with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21WAF-1/Cip-1. Peptides [GRKKRRQRRRPPQGYGC] harboring the nuclear-localizing sequence from HIV tat domain were conjugated to anti-p21WAF-1/Cip-1 antibodies. Immunoreactivity was assessed by Western blot using lysate from MDA-MB-468 cells exposed to EGF to induce p21WAF-1/Cip-1. Internalization and nuclear translocation were measured. The ability of tat-anti-p21WAF-1/Cip-1 to block G1-S phase arrest in MDA-MB-468 cells caused by EGF-induced p21WAF-1/Cip-1 was evaluated. Tumor and normal tissue uptake were determined at 48 h p.i. in athymic mice implanted s.c. with MDA-MB-468 xenografts injected intratumorally with EGF. There was 13.4±0.2% of radioactivity internalized by MDA-MB-468 cells incubated with 123I-tat-anti-p21WAF-1/Cip-1 and 34.6±3.1% imported into the nucleus. Tat-anti-p21WAF-1/Cip-1(8 μM) decreased the proportion of EGF-treated cells in G1 phase from 81.9±0.7% to 46.1±0.7% (p1 phase fraction to that of unexposed cells (25.8±0.2%). Non-specific tat-mouse IgG did not block EGF-induced G1-S phase arrest. Tumor uptake of radioactivity was higher in mice injected with EGF to induce p21WAF-1/Cip-1 than in mice not receiving EGF (3.1±0.4% versus 1.8±0.2% ID/g; p=0.04). Western blot analysis of tumors revealed a threefold increase in the p21WAF-1/Cip-1/β-actin ratio. We conclude that intracellular and nuclear epitopes in cancer cells can be functionally targeted with tat-radioimmunoconjugates to exploit many more epitopes for imaging and radiotherapeutic applications than have previously been accessible. (orig.)

  1. Heavy-ion nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, M A; Haque, S

    2003-01-01

    Heavy ion-nucleus scattering is an excellent laboratory to probe high spin phenomena, exotic nuclei and for the analysis of various exit channels. The Strong Absorption Model or the generalized diffraction models, which are semi-classical in nature, have been employed in the description of various heavy ion-nucleus scattering phenomena with reasonable success. But one needs to treat the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically in the Wave Mechanical picture for the appropriate description of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering phenomena. We have brought the mathematics for the cross-section of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering to an analytic expression taking account of the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically. sup 9 Be, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 2 sup 0 Ne and sup 3 sup 2 S heavy-ion beams elastic scattering from sup 2 sup 8 Si, sup 2 sup 4 Mg and sup 4 sup 0 Ca target nuclei at various projectile energies over the range 20-151 MeV have been analysed in terms of the 2-paramet...

  2. Heavy-ion nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy ion-nucleus scattering is an excellent laboratory to probe high spin phenomena, exotic nuclei and for the analysis of various exit channels. The Strong Absorption Model or the generalized diffraction models, which are semi-classical in nature, have been employed in the description of various heavy ion-nucleus scattering phenomena with reasonable success. But one needs to treat the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically in the Wave Mechanical picture for the appropriate description of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering phenomena. We have brought the mathematics for the cross-section of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering to an analytic expression taking account of the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically. 9Be,16O, 20Ne and 32S heavy-ion beams elastic scattering from 28Si, 24Mg and 40Ca target nuclei at various projectile energies over the range 20-151 MeV have been analysed in terms of the 2-parameter formalism of the present quantal formulation and from the Strong Absorption Model for comparison. Typical fits are shown and the nuclear parameters obtained from the analyses of both approaches are presented. (author)

  3. Silk fibroin porous scaffolds for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Chao; Yang, Qiang [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhu, Meifeng [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Du, Lilong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhang, Jiamin [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ma, Xinlong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Xu, Baoshan, E-mail: xubaoshan99@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Wang, Lianyong, E-mail: wly@nankai.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are structurally complex tissue that hold the vertebrae together and provide mobility to spine. The nucleus pulposus (NP) degeneration often results in degenerative IVD disease that is one of the most common causes of back and neck pain. Tissue engineered nucleus pulposus offers an alternative approach to regain the function of the degenerative IVD. The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of porous silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds fabricated by paraffin-sphere-leaching methods with freeze-drying in the application of nucleus pulposus regeneration. The prepared scaffold possessed high porosity of 92.38 ± 5.12% and pore size of 165.00 ± 8.25 μm as well as high pore interconnectivity and appropriate mechanical properties. Rabbit NP cells were seeded and cultured on the SF scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy, histology, biochemical assays and mechanical tests revealed that the porous scaffolds could provide an appropriate microstructure and environment to support adhesion, proliferation and infiltration of NP cells in vitro as well as the generation of extracellular matrix. The NP cell–scaffold construction could be preliminarily formed after subcutaneously implanted in a nude mice model. In conclusion, The SF porous scaffold offers a potential candidate for tissue engineered NP tissue. - Highlights: • Paraffin microsphere-leaching method is used to fabricate silk fibroin scaffold. • The scaffold has appropriate mechanical property, porosity and pore size • The scaffold supports growth and infiltration of nucleus pulposus cells. • Nucleus pulposus cells can secrete extracellular matrix in the scaffolds. • The scaffold is a potential candidate for tissue engineered nucleus pulposus.

  4. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 translocates protein kinase C beta to nucleus and enhances plasma membrane association of protein kinase C alpha in renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simboli-Campbell, M; Gagnon, A; Franks, D J; Welsh, J

    1994-02-01

    1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)2-D3) increases membrane-associated protein kinase C (PKC) activity and immunoreactivity in renal epithelial (Madin Darby bovine kidney, MDBK) cells (Simboli-Campbell, M., Franks, D. J., and Welsh, J. E. (1992) Cell Signalling 4, 99-109). We have now characterized the effects of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 on the subcellular localization of three individual isozymes by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. Although the total amount of PKC alpha, PKC beta, and PKC zeta are unaffected by 1,25-(OH)2-D3, this steroid hormone induces subcellular redistribution of both PKC alpha and PKC beta. Treatment with 1,25-(OH)2-D3 (100 nM, 24 h) enhances plasma membrane association of PKC alpha and induces translocation of PKC beta to the nuclear membrane. The effects of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 appear to be limited to the calcium-dependent PKC isozymes, since 1,25-(OH)2-D3 has no effect on the calcium independent isozyme, PKC zeta. In contrast to rapid transient PKC translocation seen in response to agents which interact with membrane receptors to induce phospholipid hydrolysis, modulation of PKC alpha and PKC beta is observed after 24 h treatment with 1,25-(OH)2-D3. In MDBK cells, the phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (100 nM, 24 h) down-regulates PKC alpha and, to a lesser extent, PKC zeta, without altering their subcellular distribution. TPA also induces translocation of PKC beta to the nuclear membrane. MDBK cells treated with 1,25-(OH)2-D3, but not TPA, exhibit enhanced phosphorylation of endogenous nuclear proteins. In addition to the distinct effects of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 and TPA on PKC isozyme patterns, 1,25-(OH)2-D3 up-regulates both the vitamin D receptor and calbindin D-28K, whereas TPA down-regulates the expression of both proteins. These data support the involvement of PKC in the mechanism of action of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 and specifically implicate PKC beta in 1,25-(OH)2-D3-mediated nuclear events. PMID:8106362

  5. Action of gamma-radiation on the complexes of progesterone with the protein receptor of the nucleus and cytoplasm of human endometrium cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was shown that 50 r doses of gamma radiation cause a sharp drop in the binding of progesterone with the protein receptor of the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. The amount of cytoplasmic progesterone-receptor complex (PRC) recovered to the control level after as little as 55 minutes, but when nuclear PRC was irradiated, no recovery was shown in the next 12 hours. The nature of the progesterone binding curve showed the existence of at least two specific progesterone/protein-receptor complexes, with different radiosensitivities, in the nuclear fraction of cells of the human endometrium. (V.A.P.)

  6. Pattern adaptation of relay cells in the lateral geniculate nucleus of binocular and monocular vision-deprived cats%双眼和单眼视觉剥夺猫外膝体细胞的图形适应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 寿天德

    2000-01-01

    为测定丘脑外膝体细胞的图形适应是否依赖于早期视觉经验, 在细胞外记录了双眼和单眼缝合的猫外膝体中继细胞对长时间运动光栅刺激的反应. 在双眼剥夺猫,占68%的记录到的细胞在30 s内反应下降到稳定值,其平均反应值下降33%,适应程度较正常猫显著.在单眼剥夺猫,记录到的剥夺眼驱动的和非剥夺眼驱动的细胞中,分别有占53%和44%的细胞显示图形适应, 两者差别不大.研究表明, 早期视剥夺能增强或保持图形适应, 提示图形适应是外膝体细胞常见的固有性质,可能主要由遗传因素所决定.%To test whether the pattern adaptation in thalamus is dependent upon postnatal visual experience during early life, the responses of relay cells to prolonged drifting grating stimulation were recorded extracellularly from the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) of cats reared with binocular and monocular lid suture. In binocular vision-deprived cats, 68% of cells recorded showed significant adaptation to prolonged grating stimuli within 30 s, with a mean response decrease of 33%, and then stabilized gradually. This adaptation was stronger than that of relay cells in normal cats. In monocular vision-deprived cats, 53% of the cells driven by the deprived eye showed similar adaptation as did 44% of the cells driven by the non-deprived eye. These results indicate that pattern adaptation could be maintained or even enhanced after visual deprivation in early life. It is suggested that pattern adaptation is a general and intrinsic property of the dLGN cells, which may be mainly determined by genetic factors.

  7. Self-Targeted, Shape-Assisted, and Controlled-Release Self-Delivery Nanodrug for Synergistic Targeting/Anticancer Effect of Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Huang, Yu; Li, Yanxiu; Yang, Xiangrui; Wu, Hongjie; Wu, Shichao; Xie, Liya; Dai, Lizong; Hou, Zhenqing

    2015-11-25

    We constructed 10-hydroxycamptothecin (CPT) "nanodrugs" with functionalization of lipid-PEG-methotrexate (MTX) to prepare high-drug-loaded, and sustained/controlled-release MTX-PEG-CPT nanorods (NRs), in which MTX drug itself can serve as a specific "targeting ligand". The self-targeted nanodrug can codeliver both CPT and MTX drugs with distinct anticancer mechanisms. Furthermore, MTX-PEG-CPT NRs significantly reduced burst release, improved blood circulation and tumor accumulation, enhanced cellular uptake, and synergistically increased anticancer effect against tumor cells compared with MTX-PEG-CPT nanospheres (NSs) and either both free drugs or individual free drug. Therefore, the synergistic targeting/therapeuticy nano-multi-drug codelivery assisted by shape design may advantageously offer a promising new strategy for nanomedicine. PMID:26529185

  8. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A., E-mail: amitabha-62@rediffmail.com; Sarkar, S. [University of North Bengal, Department of Physics (India); Singh, G. [SUNY at Fredonia, Department of Computer and Information Science (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from {sup 84}Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from {sup 28}Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  9. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from 84Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from 28Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured

  10. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus

  11. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Ke-Mian [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Chang, Chia-Chun [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Qing-Ji [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); Sung, Li-Ying, E-mail: liyingsung@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  12. Evidence for a periaqueductal gray-nucleus retroambiguus spinal cord pathway in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holstege, G.; Kerstens, Lenka; Moes, M.C.; Horst, V.G.J.M. van der

    1997-01-01

    The nucleus retroambiguus in the cat has been shown to receive strong projections from the periaqueductal gray and to send fibres to distinct motoneuronal cell groups in brainstem and spinal cord. The nucleus retroambiguus plays a role in the production of vocalization and possibly copulatory (lordo

  13. Kaonic nuclei and kaon-nucleus interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ikuta, K; Masutani, K

    2002-01-01

    Although kaonic atoms provide valuable information concerning the K sup - -nucleus interaction at low energies, they cannot fully determine the K sup - - nucleus optical potential. We demonstrate that K sup - nuclear bound states, if they exist, can be useful in investigating the K sup - -nucleus interaction, especially in the interior of the nucleus. In order to show this possibility, we calculate the double differential cross sections for (K sup - , P) using the Green function method. (author)

  14. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibition modulates nucleus pulposus cell apoptosis in spontaneous resorption of herniated intervertebral discs: An experimental study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Liu, Jin-Tao; Yang, Li-Yan; Du, Wen-Pei; Li, Xiao-Chun; Qian, Xiang; Yu, Peng-Fei; Liu, Jian-Wen; Jiang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the role of p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the resorption of herniated intervertebral discs in 30 rats. In the non‑contained and p38 MAPK inhibition (p38i) groups, two coccygeal intervertebral discs (IVDs) were removed and wounded prior to relocation into the subcutaneous space of the skin of the back. In the contained group, the cartilage endplates maintained their integrity. Furthermore, SB203580 was injected intraperitoneally into the p38i group, whereas saline was injected into the other two groups. In the non‑contained group, the weight of the relocated IVDs decreased to a greater extent over time when compared with the contained and p38i groups. Phosphorylated p38, tumor necrosis factor‑α, and interleukin‑1β were observed to exhibit higher expression levels in the non‑contained group compared with the contained and p38i groups, at weeks 1 and 4 post‑surgery. The expression level of caspase‑3 and the densities of apoptotic disc cells were significantly higher in the non‑contained group compared with the contained and p38i groups at 4 weeks post‑surgery. In conclusion, p38 MAPK induces apoptosis in IVDs, while also accelerating the resorption of the relocated IVDs. Thus, p38 MAPK may be important in spontaneous resorption of IVDs. PMID:27035219

  15. 细胞核形态定量在小细胞肺癌的纤支镜细胞学中的应用研究%Application of cell nucleus morphometry in the bronchofiberscope brush cytology of small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文清; 郭华雄; 龚平; 赵廷宽; 李春燕

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the differential diagnostic value of the quantitative analysis on the cell nucleus morphometry in the bronchofiberscope cytological brush for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods By high multimedia image and word analysis system (HMIAS 2000), cell nucleus from SCLC tissues (22 cases), non small cell lung cancer tissues (76 cases) and benign lesions (40 cases) were quantitatively stereological studied with multi parameters. Results In all the 22 parameters, there were significant differences of 20 parameters between benigh lesions and small cell lung cancer between SCLC and benign lesions (P < 0.05), and of 16 parameters between SCLC and NSCLC (P<0.05). Conclusion The morphological characteristics of SCLC, NSCLC, and benign lesion were present by cell nucleus morphometry in the bronchofiberscope brush cytology of SCLC, which is valuable for the differential diagnosis for SCLC.%目的:探讨基于纤维支气管镜刷片细胞涂片中,多参数的细胞核形态定量分析对小细胞肺癌与非小细胞肺癌的鉴别诊断价值.方法:利用HMIAS-2000医学图文分析测量系统,对组织学确诊的纤维支气管镜刷片的小细胞肺癌与非小细胞肺癌的细胞核进行形态定量研究(腺癌48例、鳞癌28例、小细胞癌22例,阴性对照组40例).结果:在22个形态定量参数中,小细胞肺癌与良性对照20项参数有显著统计学差异(P<0.05),小细胞肺癌与非小细胞肺癌16项有统计学差异(P<0.05).结论:小细胞肺癌的多参数的形态计量揭示了纤支镜刷片细胞学的细胞核形态学计量特征,对辅助鉴别诊断小细胞肺癌具有一定的意义.

  16. Immobility, inheritance and plasticity of shape of the yeast nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrulis Erik D

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since S. cerevisiae undergoes closed mitosis, the nuclear envelope of the daughter nucleus is continuous with that of the maternal nucleus at anaphase. Nevertheless, several constitutents of the maternal nucleus are not present in the daughter nucleus. The present study aims to identify proteins which impact the shape of the yeast nucleus and to learn whether modifications of shape are passed on to the next mitotic generation. The Esc1p protein of S. cerevisiae localizes to the periphery of the nucleoplasm, can anchor chromatin, and has been implicated in targeted silencing both at telomeres and at HMR. Results Upon increased Esc1p expression, cell division continues and dramatic elaborations of the nuclear envelope extend into the cytoplasm. These "escapades" include nuclear pores and associate with the nucleolus, but exclude chromatin. Escapades are not inherited by daughter nuclei. This exclusion reflects their relative immobility, which we document in studies of prezygotes. Moreover, excess Esc1p affects the levels of multiple transcripts, not all of which originate at telomere-proximal loci. Unlike Esc1p and the colocalizing protein, Mlp1p, overexpression of selected proteins of the inner nuclear membrane is toxic. Conclusion Esc1p is the first non-membrane protein of the nuclear periphery which – like proteins of the nuclear lamina of higher eukaryotes – can modify the shape of the yeast nucleus. The elaborations of the nuclear envelope ("escapades" which appear upon induction of excess Esc1p are not inherited during mitotic growth. The lack of inheritance of such components could help sustain cell growth when parental nuclei have acquired potentially deleterious characteristics.

  17. Applying the elastic model for various nucleus-nucleus fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Elastic Model of two free parameters m,d given by Scalia has been used for wider energy regions to fit the available experimental data for potential barriers and cross sections. In order to generalize Scalia's formula in both sub- and above-barrier regions, we calculated m, d for pairs rather than those given by Scalia and compared the calculated cross sections with the experimental data. This makes a generalization of the Elastic Model in describing fusion process. On the other hand, Scalia's range of interacting systems was 24 ≤ A ≤194 where A is the compound nucleus mass number. Our extension of that model includes an example of the pairs of A larger than his final limit aiming to make it as a general formula for any type of reactants: light, intermediate or heavy systems. A significant point is the comparison of Elastic Model calculations with the well known methods studying complete fusion and compound nucleus formation, namely with the resultants of using Proximity potential with either Sharp or Smooth cut-off approximations

  18. Pion production at 1800 in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey experiment of pion production at 1800 in nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. Beams of 1.05 GeV/A and 2.1 GeV/A protons, alphas, and carbon were used, as well as proton beams of 0.80 GeV, 3.5 GeV, and 4.89 GeV, and argon beams of 1.05 GeV/A and 1.83 GeV/A. This is the first such experiment to use the heavier beams. Targets used ranged from carbon to lead. An in-depth review of the literature, both experimental and theoretical, is also presented. The systematics of the data are discussed, and comparisons are made both with prior experiments and with the predictions of the models reviewed. The cross sections appear consistent with a simple single nucleon-nucleon collision picture, without the need for collective or other exotic effects. Suggestions for future work are made

  19. Resonances in -light nucleus systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Khemchandani; N G Kelkar; M Nowakowski; B K Jain

    2006-04-01

    We locate resonances in -light nucleus elastic scattering using the time delay method. We solve few-body equations within the finite rank approximation in order to calculate the -matrices and hence the time delay for the - 3He and - 4He systems. We find a resonance very close to the threshold in - 3 He elastic scattering, at about 0.5 MeV above threshold with a width of ∼ 2 MeV. The calculations also hint at the presence of sub-threshold states in both the cases.

  20. New results on nuclear multifragmentation in nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some new aspects on the multifragmentation processes in nucleus-nucleus and nucleon-nucleus collisions at high energies are discussed in this work. Experimental data obtained in international collaborations (for example, MULTI Collaboration with KEK Tsukuba (Japan) and SKM 200 Collaboration with JINR Dubna (Russia)) are used to discuss new mechanisms in the target nucleus fragmentation. Correlations with stopping power, participant region size and energy density are included. Comparisons of the experimental results with the predictions of a phenomenological geometric model of intermediate mass fragment multiplicity, caloric curves and angular distributions are also presented. These results are used for global description of the multifragmentation processes in nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies. The size of the participant region and the average intermediate mass fragments multiplicity are taken into consideration using the free space probability. A few correlations between the deposited energy in the participant region and stability state of the intermediate mass fragments are presented in this work. The importance of the collision geometry in the multifragmentation processes is stressed. The results suggest different time moments for the incident nucleus fragmentation and for the target nucleus fragmentation. The associated entropies are distinct. (authors)

  1. Biocarbon-coated LiFePO4 nucleus nanoparticles enhancing electrochemical performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, X.G.; Zhang, X.D.; He, W.;

    2012-01-01

    We report a green biomimetic method to synthesize biocarbon-coated LiFePO4 nucleus nanoparticles using yeast cells as both a structural template and a biocarbon source for high-power lithium-ion batteries.......We report a green biomimetic method to synthesize biocarbon-coated LiFePO4 nucleus nanoparticles using yeast cells as both a structural template and a biocarbon source for high-power lithium-ion batteries....

  2. Determination of Coil Inductances Cylindrical Iron Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeddine Mazouz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the investigation and development of a structure and performance characteristics of a coil iron nucleus cylindrical (C.I.N.C. The coil iron nucleus cylindrical is a nonlinear electro radio in which the moving of the nucleus in a sense or in other causes change in inductance and can reach extreme values at the superposition of nucleus and coil centers. The variation of the inductance and the degree of freedom of movement of the nucleus can lead to a device with electromechanical conversion The aim of this paper is the determination and visualization of self inductance and mutual of the (C.I.N.C based on geometric dimensions and the displacement of the nucleus.  

  3. Fluctuations and intermittency in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluctuations of the particle densities in semi-central collisions of 16O, 28Si and 32S nuclei with heavy components of nuclear emulsion at different primary energies are studied. Various methods of data analysis have been used, ranging from the examination of the structure in individual events, to the study of the average factorial moments and conventional correlation functions. Emphasis is put on the analysis of the average factorial moments which appear to be the most efficient tool in searching for dynamical fluctuations. Unquestionable evidence for non-statistical fluctuations is found in 16O and 32S interactions with Ag/Br targets at 200 GeV/nucleon. Specifically, I observe larger deviations of individual pseudorapidity distributions from a smooth spectrum and more frequent occurrence of narrow spikes than expected from Monte Carlo simulations based on independent emission of secondary particles. Clear intermittency signals are found in pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle distributions. Intermittency effect is also observed in two dimensions, where it has turned out to be stronger and cleaner than in one-dimensional distributions. Multiplicity distributions in the restricted phase space domains are well described by the negative binomial formula and consequently I find that factorial moments can be equivalently obtained from the parameters of the negative binomial fits. On the other hand investigation of the two-particle correlation functions in pseudorapidity provides no supporting evidence for pronounced non-statistical correlations. The occurrence of large particle-density fluctuations is expected in the presence of phase transition in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions. Even though the obtained results can not be unambigously interpreted as an indication for quark-gluon plasma formation, nevertheless they clearly show that some collective effects are present in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. 84 refs. (author)

  4. Semiclassical description of hadron-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The yield of hadron-nucleus collisions are described in terms of the data on hadron-nucleon collisions and the data on the target-nucleus size and nucleon density distribution in it. A set of hadron-nucleus collision events may be treated as an interaction of hadron beam with a slab of nuclear matter. This way, the data on hadron-nucleus collisions are considered similarly as the data obtained in absorption experiments-when the interaction of a particle beam with a slab of a material is studied. The theory of probability and statistics is the natural mathematical apparatus for such kind

  5. Study of various models of nuclear interaction potentials: nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several models, performed within a mean field theory, are developed for the calculation of nucleon-nucleus interaction potentials. The first part of the thesis deals with the nucleon-nucleus average interaction. It is mainly devoted to the calculation of dynamical corrections to the Hartree-Fock approximation. Two approaches are used: a microscopic model performed in the framework of the nuclear structure approach and a semi-phenomenological one, based on the application of the dispersion relations to the empirical imaginary potential. Both models take into account finite size effects like collectivity or threshold effects which are important at low energy. The Green's function properties are used for both models. The second part of this work is devoted to the interaction potential between two heavy ions. This calculation, which is performed in the framework of the sudden approximation, uses the energy density formalism (Thomas-Fermi approximation). It has been extended to finite temperature. At T=0 the experimental fusion barriers of heavy systems are reproduced within 4%. Their temperature dependence is studied. The proximity scaling is checked and a universal function is obtained at T=0 and at finite temperature. It is found that the proximity theorem is well satisfied on the average. The dispersion around the mean behaviour increases with increasing temperature. At last, P+A* and α+A* interaction potentials are calculated within a double folding model using a schematic effective interaction

  6. Integrated Azimuthal Correlations in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at CERN SPS

    OpenAIRE

    Grebieszkow, Katarzyna; Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2011-01-01

    Azimuthal correlations of particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN SPS are discussed. The correlations quantified by the integral measure Phi are shown to be dominated by effects of collective flow.

  7. Physical meaning of the yields from hadron-nucleon, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions observed in experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A physical meaning of the outcomes from hadronic and nuclear collision processes at high energies is presented, as prompted experimentally. The fast and slow stages in hadron-nucleus collisions are distinguished. Hadrons are produced via intermediate objects observed in hadron-nucleus collisions. The intermediate objects may be treated as the groups of quarks or the quark bags. 37 refs

  8. Antibaryon-nucleus bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Hrtánková, J

    2014-01-01

    We calculated antibaryon ($\\bar{B}$ = $\\bar{p}$, $\\bar{\\Lambda}$, $\\bar{\\Sigma}$, $\\bar{\\Xi}$) bound states in selected nuclei within the relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. The G-parity motivated $\\bar{B}$-meson coupling constants were scaled to yield corresponding potentials consistent with available experimental data. Large polarization of the nuclear core caused by $\\bar{B}$ was confirmed. The $\\bar{p}$ annihilation in the nuclear medium was incorporated by including a phenomenological imaginary part of the optical potential. The calculations using a complex $\\bar{p}$-nucleus potential were performed fully self-consistently. The $\\bar{p}$ widths significantly decrease when the phase space reduction is considered for $\\bar{p}$ annihilation products, but they still remain sizeable for potentials consistent with $\\bar{p}$-atom data.

  9. Information Processing in the Parabrachial Nucleus of the Pons: Temporal Relationships of Input and Output

    OpenAIRE

    Di Lorenzo, Patricia M.; Platt, Daniel; Victor, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    As the second synapse in the central gustatory pathway of the rodent, the parabrachial nucleus of the pons (PbN) receives information about taste stimuli directly from the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Data show that NTS cells amplify taste responses before transmitting taste-related signals to the PbN. NTS cells of varied response profiles send converging input to PbN cells, though input from NTS cells with similar profiles is more effective at driving PbN responses. PbN cells follow ...

  10. GlyT2+ Neurons in the Lateral Cerebellar Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Uusisaari, Marylka; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) are a major hub in the cerebellar circuitry but the functional classification of their neurons is incomplete. We have previously characterized three cell groups in the lateral cerebellar nucleus: large non-GABAergic neurons and two groups of smaller neurons, one of which express green fluorescence protein (GFP) in a GAD67/GFP mouse line and is therefore GABAergic. However, as a substantial number of glycinergic and glycine/GABA co-expressing neurons have been ...

  11. Three-dimensional organization of the human interphase nucleus.

    OpenAIRE

    Knoch, Tobias; Münkel, Christian; Waldeck, Waldemar; Langowski, Jörg

    2002-01-01

    textabstractDespite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its three-dimensional structure is widely unknown, although it is important for gene regulation and replication. For a long time the interphase nucleus has been viewed as a 'spaghetti soup' of DNA without much internal structure, except during cell division. Only recently has it become apparent that chromosomes occupy distinct 'territories' also in interphase. Two models for the detailed folding of the 30 nm chromatin fi...

  12. Cellular effects of swim stress in the dorsal raphe nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Kirby, Lynn G.; Pan, Yu-Zhen; Freeman-Daniels, Emily; Rani, Shobha; Nunan, John D.; Akanwa, Adaure; Beck, Sheryl G

    2007-01-01

    Swim stress regulates forebrain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release in a complex manner and its effects are initiated in the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of swim stress on the physiology of DRN neurons in conjunction with 5-HT immunohistochemistry. Basic membrane properties, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptor-mediated responses and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were measured using whole-cell patch clamp technique...

  13. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, John H; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St John, Peter C; Wang, Thomas J; Bales, Benjamin B; Doyle, Francis J; Herzog, Erik D; Petzold, Linda R

    2016-04-19

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure. PMID:27044085

  14. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, John H.; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St. John, Peter C.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bales, Benjamin B.; Doyle, Francis J.; Herzog, Erik D.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2016-04-04

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure.

  15. Nucleus accumbens receives gastric vagal inputs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sangeeta MEHENDALE; Jing-tian XIE; Han H AUNG; Xiong-Fei GUAN; Chun-Su YUAN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To localize and characterize the response of single accumbal neurons to electrical stimulation of the gastric vagal fibers. METHODS: Unitary responses to electrical stimulation of the ventral and dorsal gastric vagal fibers which serve the proximal stomach were recorded extracellularly in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized cats.RESULTS: The evoked units recorded in the nucleus accumbens consisted of phasic and tonic responses, with a mean latency of (396±43) ms. Convergence of ventral and dorsal gastric vagal inputs onto single phasic and tonic accumbal units was observed. For tonic inhibitory responses, convergence was exhibited when stimulation applied to both the ventral and dorsal gastric vagal branches resulted in a significantly longer inhibitory period than did stimulation of a single gastric vagal branch. Comparing the gastric vagally evoked accumbal unitary responses to the neuronal responses recorded in the nucleus tractus solitarius, parabrachial nucleus and hypothalamus in our previous studies, our data showed a higher percentage of single spike responses and shorter response duration's in the nucleus accumbens than in the other nuclei. This suggests that the synaptic drive from the gastric vagal inputs to the nucleus accumbens is less powerful than in the other structures. CONCLUSION: The present study localized and characterized gastric vagally evoked responses in the nucleus accumbens, which suggest that the nucleus accumbens may process gastric signals concerned with the ingestive process.

  16. Angular characteristics of pion-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper pion-nucleus interactions have been studied using nuclear emulsion technique. The investigation of these interactions is expected to provide some very useful information about the multiparticle production mechanism. Nuclear emulsion is a material which memorizes the tracks of charged particles. When a primary particle collides with a nucleus, it may interact with the nucleons of the target nucleus in two ways. In the first case, independent reactions may take place between the incident particle and the nucleons present in the target nucleus. Secondly the primary particle may interact coherently with the various nucleons of the target nucleus and the secondary particles are produced. Angular distribution of charged secondaries produced in these interactions has been studied for central collision events. Different workers have used different criterion for the selection of central collisions. We analysed the events with high shower particle multiplicity i.e., Ns ≥ 28 and call them as central collision events

  17. Structures and functions in the crowded nucleus: new biophysical insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RonaldHancock

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Concepts and methods from the physical sciences have catalysed remarkable progress in understanding the cell nucleus in recent years. To share this excitement with physicists and encourage their interest in this field, this review offers an overview of how the physics which underlies structures and functions in the nucleus is becoming more clear thanks to methods which have been developed to simulate and study macromolecules, polymers, and colloids. The environment in the nucleus is very crowded with macromolecules, making entropic (depletion forces major determinants of interactions. Simulation and experiments are consistent with their key role in forming membraneless compartments such as nucleoli, PML and Cajal bodies, and discrete "territories" for chromosomes. The chromosomes, giant linear polyelectrolyte polymers, exist in vivo in a state like a polymer melt. Looped conformations are predicted in crowded conditions, and have been confirmed experimentally and are central to the regulation of gene expression. Polymer theory has revealed how the chromosomes are so highly compacted in the nucleus, forming a "crumpled globule" with fractal properties which avoids knots and entanglements in DNA while allowing facile accessibility for its replication and transcription. Entropic repulsion between looped polymers can explain the confinement of each chromosome to a discrete region of the nucleus. Crowding and looping are predicted to facilitate finding the specific targets of factors which modulate activities of DNA. Simulation shows that entropic effects contribute to finding and repairing potentially lethal double-strand breaks in DNA by increasing the mobility of the broken ends, favouring their juxtaposition for repair. Signaling pathways are strongly influenced by crowding, which favours a processive mode of response (consecutive reactions without releasing substrates. This new information contributes to understanding the sometimes counter

  18. [Possibility of the morphometry of the neuronal body and nucleus in cryostat sections of nerve tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, I B

    1982-02-01

    A method of fixation by the Carnoy liquid and of gallocyanine staining is proposed in order to obtain clear-cut boundaries of the neuron body, nucleus and nucleolus in cryostat sections of non-fixed frozen nerve tissue, for subsequent morphometry of the body and nucleus of nerve cells. In the resulting sections, the clearness of boundaries of the body and nucleus in a neuron is sufficient for measuring its diameter with the coefficient of variation not exceeding 2.5%. PMID:7041376

  19. β-Catenin Can Be Transported into the Nucleus in a Ran-unassisted Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoya, Fumihiko; Imamoto, Naoko; Tachibana, Taro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear accumulation of β-catenin plays an important role in the Wingless/Wnt signaling pathway. This study describes an examination of the nuclear import of β-catenin in living mammalian cells and in vitro semi-intact cells. When injected into the cell cytoplasm, β-catenin rapidly migrated into the nucleus in a temperature-dependent and wheat germ agglutinin–sensitive manner. In the cell-free import assay, β-catenin rapidly migrates into the nucleus without the exogenous addition of cyto...

  20. Isolation, culture and identification of nucleus pulposus-derived mesenchymal stem cells from adult rats in vitro%大鼠椎间盘髓核来源间充质干细胞的体外分离及培养鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芮云峰; 王善正; 谢鑫荟; 孙明辉; 林禹丞; 李刚; 王宸

    2013-01-01

    背景:目前椎间盘髓核组织的细胞组成和特性仍未阐明。  目的:旨在建立大鼠椎间盘髓核来源间充质干细胞的体外培养体系,并对其体外多项分化潜能进行鉴定。  方法:体外培养SD大鼠盘髓核来源间充质干细胞,取第3代细胞进行三系诱导分化,将成骨、成脂和成软骨分化作为实验组,基础细胞培养作为对照组。  结果与结论:低密度培养获得的髓核来源细胞早期可形成葵花样细胞集落,克隆样生长。第3代后,细胞形态趋向均一,呈成纤维细胞样生长。成骨诱导28 d,实验组茜素红染色阳性,且 RunX2、osteopontin 及osteocalcin表达较对照组显著增高(P OBJECTIVE:To establish the in vitro culture system of rat nucleus pulposus-derived mesenchymal stem cells and to identify their multi-lineage differentiation potential. METHODS:Mesenchymal stem cells from the nucleus pulposus tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured in vitro. Then, cells at passage 3 were induced to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes as experimental group. cells cultured with basic culture medium served as controls. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:cells isolated from rat nucleus pulposus could form the sunflower-like colonies and exhibit clone-like growth when they cultured at a low density. cells at passage 3 became homogeneous and exhibited fibroblast-like morphology. After 28 days of osteogenic induction, arizarin red positive signals were detected in the experimental group. The mRNA expressions of RunX2, osteopontin and osteocalcin were significantly increased in the experimental group, compared to the control group (P<0.05). After 21 days of adipogenic induction, oil red-O positive cells were detected in the experimental group. The mRNA expressions of C/EBPαand PPARγ2 were significantly increased in the experimental group, compared to the control group (P<0.05). After 21 days of chondrogenic

  1. Music and the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2015-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies over time, mainly because it allows expression and regulation of strong emotions, thus influencing moods and evoking pleasure. The nucleus accumbens (NA), the most important pleasure center of the human brain (dominates the reward system), is the 'king of neurosciences' and dopamine (DA) can be rightfully considered as its 'crown' due to the fundamental role that this neurotransmitter plays in the brain's reward system. Purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding the relation between music and the NA. Studies have shown that reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the NA, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. Listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the NA. The functional connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. Musical stimuli can significantly increase extracellular DA levels in the NA. NA DA and serotonin were found significantly higher in animals exposed to music. Finally, passive listening to unfamiliar although liked music showed activations in the NA. PMID:25102783

  2. Neurogenetic and morphogenetic heterogeneity in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurogenesis and morphogenesis in the rat bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (strial bed nucleus) were examined with [3H]thymidine autoradiography. For neurogenesis, the experimental animals were the offspring of pregnant females given an injection of [3H]thymidine on 2 consecutive gestational days. Nine groups of embryos were exposed to [3H]thymidine on E13-E14, E14-E15,... E21-E22, respectively. On P60, the percentage of labeled cells and the proportion of cells originating during 24-hour periods were quantified at six anteroposterior levels in the strial bed nucleus. On the basis of neurogenetic gradients, the strial bed nucleus was divided into anterior and posterior parts. The anterior strial bed nucleus shows a caudal (older) to rostral (younger) neurogenetic gradient. Cells in the vicinity of the anterior commissural decussation are generated mainly between E13 and E16, cells just posterior to the nucleus accumbens mainly between E15 and E17. Within each rostrocaudal level, neurons originate in combined dorsal to ventral and medial to lateral neurogenetic gradients so that the oldest cells are located ventromedially and the youngest cells dorsolaterally. The most caudal level has some small neurons adjacent to the internal capsule that originate between E17 and E20. In the posterior strial bed nucleus, neurons extend ventromedially into the posterior preoptic area. Cells are generated simultaneously along the rostrocaudal plane in a modified lateral (older) to medial (younger) neurogenetic gradient. Ventrolateral neurons originate mainly between E13 and E16, dorsolateral neurons mainly between E15 and E16, and medial neurons mainly between E15 and E17. The youngest neurons are clumped into a medial core area just ventral to the fornix

  3. Computational Diversity in the Cochlear Nucleus Angularis of the Barn Owl

    OpenAIRE

    Köppl, Christine; Carr, Catherine E.

    2002-01-01

    The cochlear nucleus angularis (NA) is widely assumed to form the starting point of a brain stem pathway for processing sound intensity in birds. Details of its function are unclear, however, and its evolutionary origin and relationship to the mammalian cochlear-nucleus complex are obscure. We have carried out extracellular single-unit recordings in the NA of ketamine-anesthetized barn owls. The aim was to re-evaluate the extent of heterogeneity in NA physiology because recent studies of cell...

  4. Analysis of Subthreshold Antiproton Production in p-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions in the RBUU Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Teis, S; Maruyama, T; Mosel, U; Teis, Stefan; Cassing, Wolfgang; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Mosel, Ulrich

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the subthreshold production of antiprotons in the Lorentz-covariant RBUU approach employing a weighted testparticle method to treat the antiproton propagation and absorption nonperturbatively. We find that the pbar differential cross sections are highly sensitive to the baryon and antiproton selfenergies in the dense baryonic environment. Adopting the baryon scalar and vector selfenergies from the empirical optical potential for proton-nucleus elastic scattering and from Dirac-Brueckner calculations at higher density rho > rho_0 we examine the differential pbar spectra as a function of the antiproton selfenergy. A detailed comparison with the available experimental data for p-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions shows that the antiproton feels a moderately attractive mean-field at normal nuclear matter density rho_0 which is in line with a dispersive potential extracted from the free annihilation cross section.

  5. Three-dimensional organization of the human interphase nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Knoch, Tobias; Wachsmuth, Malte; Waldeck, Waldemar; Langowski, Jörg

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fibre was folded according to the Multi-Loop-Subcompartment (MLS) model, in which ~100 kbp loops form rosettes, connected by a linker, and the Random-Walk/Giant-Loop (RW/GL) topology, in which 1-5 Mbp loops are attached to a flexible bac...

  6. Nucleus accumbens stimulation in pathological obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harat, Marek; Rudaś, Marcin; Zieliński, Piotr; Birska, Julita; Sokal, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    One of the potential treatment methods of obesity is deep brain stimulation (DBS) of nucleus accumbens. We describe the case of 19 years old woman with hypothalamic obesity. She weighted 151.4 kg before DBS and the non-surgical methods proved to be inefficient. She was treated with implantation of DBS electrode to nucleus accumbens bilaterally. Results were measured with body mass index and neuropsychological tests. Follow-up was 14 months. Fourteen months after surgery weight was 138 kg, BMI was 48.3. Neuropsychological test results were intact. The presented case supports the thesis of treatment of obesity with nucleus accumbens stimulation. PMID:27154450

  7. Local cholinergic and non-cholinergic neural pathways to the rat supraoptic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An estimated two thirds of the input to the supraoptic nucleus of the rat hypothalamus (SON) including a functionally significant cholinergic innervation, arise from local sources of unknown origin. The sources of these inputs were identified utilizing Golgi-Cox, retrograde tracing, choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and anterograde tracing methodologies. Multipolar Golgi impregnated neurons located dorsal and lateral to the SON extend spiney processes into the nucleus. Injections of the retrograde tracers, wheat germ agglutinin or wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase, into the SON labeled cells bilaterally in the arcuate nucleus, and ipsilaterally in the lateral hypothalamus, anterior hypothalamus, nucleus of the diagonal band, subfornical organ, medial preoptic area, lateral preoptic area and in the region dorsolateral to the nucleus. Immunocytochemistry for choline acetyltransferase revealed cells within the ventro-caudal portion of cholinergic cell group, Ch4, which cluster dorsolateral to the SON, and extend axon- and dendrite-like processes into the SON. Cells double-labeled by choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and retrograde tracer injections into the SON are localized within the same cholinergic cell group dorsolateral to the SON. Injections of the anterograde tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, deposited dorsolateral to the SON results in labeled pre-and post-synaptic processes within the SON. The identification and characterization of endogenous immunoglobulin within the SON and other neurons innervating areas lacking a blood-brain barrier established a novel and potentially important system for direct communication of the supraoptic cells with blood-borne constitutents

  8. Study of Hadron Production in Hadron-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    Selyuzhenkov, I; Rubbia, A; Di luise, S; Kowalski, S; Kaptur, E A; Kowalik, K L; Dominik, W M; Krasnoperov, A; Feofilov, G; Vinogradov, L; Johnson, S R; Mills, G B; Planeta, R J; Robert, A L; Marton, K; Messerly, B A; Puzovic, J; Bogomilov, M V; Bravar, A; Sgalaberna, D; Renfordt, R A E; Deveaux, M; Engel, R R; Grzeszczuk, A; Davis, N; Kuich, M; Lyubushkin, V; Igolkin, S; Kondratev, V; Kadija, K; Diakonos, F; Slodkowski, M A; Rauch, W H; Pistillo, C; Laszlo, A; Nakadaira, T; Hasegawa, T; Zambelli, L A; Sadovskiy, A; Morozov, S; Petukhov, O; Szuba, M K; Mathes, H; Herve, A E; Roehrich, D; Marino, A D; Wyszynski, O J; Grebieszkow, K; Wlodarczyk, Z; Rybczynski, M A; Wojtaszek-szwarc, A; Nirkko, M C; Sakashita, K; Golubeva, M; Kurepin, A; Manic, D; Kolev, D I; Kisiel, J E; Rondio, E; Larsen, D T; Czopowicz, T R; Seyboth, P; Turko, L; Guber, F; Marin, V; Busygina, O; Taranenko, A; Cirkovic, M; Ravonel salzgeber, M; Gazdzicki, M; Roth, M A; Pulawski, S M; Aduszkiewicz, A M; Bunyatov, S; Vechernin, V; Nagai, Y; Anticic, T; Dynowski, K M; Mackowiak-pawlowska, M K; Stefanek, G; Pavin, M; Fodor, Z P; Nishikawa, K; Tada, M; Kobayashi, T; Blondel, A P P; Hasler, A; Damyanova, A; Stroebele, H W; Rustamov, A; Posiadala, M Z; Kolesnikov, V; Andronov, E; Zimmerman, E D; Antoniou, N; Majka, Z; Veberic, D; Dumarchez, J; Naskret, M; Ivashkin, A; Tsenov, R V; Koziel, M G; Schmidt, K J; Melkumov, G; Popov, B; Panagiotou, A; Richter-was, E M; Ereditato, A; Paolone, V; Korzenev, A; Unger, M T; Wilczek, A G; Stepaniak, J M; Matulewicz, T N; Seryakov, A; Susa, T; Staszel, P P; Marcinek, A J; Brzychczyk, J; Maksiak, B; Tefelski, D B

    2007-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE (SHINE = SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) experiment is a large acceptance hadron spectrometer at the CERN SPS for the study of the hadronic final states produced in interactions of various beam particles (pions, protons, C, S and In) with a variety of fixed targets at the SPS energies. The main components of the current detector were constructed and used by the NA49 experiment. The physics program of NA61/SHINE consists of three main subjects. In the first stage of data taking (2007-2009) measurements of hadron production in hadron-nucleus interactions needed for neutrino (T2K) and cosmic-ray (Pierre Auger and KASCADE) experiments will be performed. In the second stage (2009-2011) hadron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus interactions needed as reference data for a better understanding of nucleus-nucleus reactions will be studied. In the third stage (2009-2013) energy dependence of hadron production properties will be measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as in p+p a...

  9. Coherent Pion Production in Neutrino Nucleus Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Saraswat, Kapil; Kumar, Vineet; Singh, Venktesh

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we study the coherent pion production in neutrino-nucleus interaction in the resonance region using the formalism based on partially conserved axial current (PCAC) theorem which relates the neutrino-nucleus cross section to the pion-nucleus elastic cross section. The pion nucleus elastic cross section is calculated using the Glauber model in terms of pion-nucleon cross sections obtained by parameterizing the experimental data. We calculate the differential and integrated cross sections for charged current coherent pion production in neutrino carbon scattering. The results of integrated cross section calculations are compared with the measured data. Predictions for the differential and integrated cross sections for coherent pion productions in neutrino iron scattering using above formalism are also made.

  10. Large philipsite crystal as ferromanganese nodule nucleus

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    We report here the occurrence of, to date, the largest (21 x 10 x 8 mm) phillipsite crystal forming the nucleus of a diagenetically formed ferromanganese nodule from the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB). Assuming an average rate of ferromanganese...

  11. Parabrachial nucleus involvement in multiple system atrophy☆

    OpenAIRE

    Benarroch, E.E.; Schmeichel, A.M.; Low, P. A.; Parisi, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is associated with respiratory dysfunction, including sleep apnea, respiratory dysrhythmia, and laryngeal stridor. Neurons of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) control respiratory rhythmogenesis and airway resistance.

  12. Modified meson-nucleus optical potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkin, C

    1973-01-01

    The author argues that the energy dependence of the meson-nucleus optical potential should be treated in a more dynamical fashion. When this is done, some of the difficulties found in phenomenological applications are eliminated. (13 refs).

  13. The nucleus in Finland - The second report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Finnish Nuclear Society (FNS) started the distribution of the Nucleus bulletin at the beginning of 1988. The volume of distribution has been extended since, including today nearly 1,000 persons. Both the English and the Finnish version of the bulletin is sent to various opinion leaders of society, i.e. the members of the parliament, ministries, the media, representatives of industry and other decision-makers of the energy field. After the five-year history of the Nucleus in Finland, it is time to look back and sum up the present status of the Nucleus. This report gives a short summary concerning the present distribution and its efficiency, the experiences gained and the influence of the bulletin in Finland. The first questionnaire was sent in November 1988, and the survey was repeated among the Finnish readers of the Nucleus in autumn 1992. The results of the latter survey are given in this report

  14. Effect of apigenin on apoptotic rate and matrix metabolism of human nucleus pulposus cells cultured in vitro under hydrostatic pressure%静水压下芹菜素对体外培养人髓核细胞凋亡率及基质代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳根哲; 陈江; 徐林; 李春根; 孙旗; 乔卫平; 朱志强

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal biomechanical environment and over-expression nitric oxide are the two important factors in theprocess of intervertebral disc degeneration.OBJECTIVE: To discuss the effect of apigenin on the apoptotic rate and matrix metabolism of monolayer cultured human nucleuspulposus cells in vitro under different hydrostatic pressures.METHODS: In the hydrostatic pressure loading system, 0.1-3 MPa pressure was imposed on the human nucleus pulposus cells(passage 4) in monolayer culture in vitro for 2 hours, while using apigenin and nitric oxide donor to intervene on nucleus pulposuscells, and analyzing the effect of apigenin on the apoptotic rate, matrix metalloproteinase and matrix metabolism of humannucleus pulposus cells under hydrostatic pressure.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Under 0.3 MPa hydrostatic pressure, apigenin could reduce the degradation of extracellularmatrix by regulating the balance between matrix metallo proteinases-3 (MMP-3) and human tissue inhibitor of metal protease-1(TIMP-1), and improving nucleus pulposus cells inhibition status due to the high concentration of nitric oxide. Under 3 MPahydrostatic pressure, apigenin had a role in reducing the apoptotic rate of nucleus pulposus cells and could alleviate theunbalance between the MMP-3 and TIMP-1. The results showed that apigenin has an influence on the function status andapoptotic rate of nucleus pulposus cells, the balance between MMP-3 and TIMP-1, and the effects are different under differenthydrostatic pressure environments.%背景:生物力学环境的异常及一氧化氮过度表达是椎间盘退变进程中重要的影响因素.目的:探讨静水压下芹菜素对体外单层培养的人髓核细胞凋亡率及基质代谢的影响.方法:在静水压加载系统中对体外单层培养的人髓核细胞(传4代)施以0.1~3.0 MPa的静压,加压2 h,同时使用芹菜素和一氧化氮供体对髓核细胞进行干预,分析不同静水压下芹菜素对髓核细胞凋亡率、基

  15. Testing string dynamics in lepton nucleus reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of nuclear attenuation of 10-100 GeV lepton nucleus (ell A) reactions to space-time aspects of hadronization is investigated within the context of the Lund string model. We consider two mechanisms for attenuation in a nucleus: final state cascading and string flip excitations. Implications for the evolution of the energy density in nuclear collisions are discussed. 16 refs., 10 figs

  16. Role of the RVM in Descending Pain Regulation Originating from the Cerebrospinal Fluid-Contacting Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Yan; Wang, Xin; Chen, Songsong; Zhou, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Chao; Li, Ying; Sun, Lihong; Zhang, Licai

    2016-07-01

    Evidence has suggested that cerebrospinal fluid-contacting nucleus (CSF-contacting nucleus) is correlated with the development and recurrence of pain. A recent research showed that the CSF-contacting nucleus acts as a component of the descending 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) system and plays a role in descending pain inhibition. However, limited studies are conducted to investigate the relationship between the CSF-contacting nucleus and pain. In present study, we explored the effect of CSF-contacting nucleus on nociceptive behaviors in both normal and neuropathic rats via targeted ablation of the CSF-contacting nucleus in the brainstem, using cholera toxin subunit B-saporin (CB-SAP), a cytotoxin coupled to cholera toxin subunit B. The CB-SAP-treated rats showed aggravated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Also, results from immunohistochemical experiments showed that rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) received fiber projection from the CSF-contacting nucleus, which disappeared after ablation of the CSF-contacting nucleus, and the CB-SAP treated rats showed downregulation of c-Fos expression in the RVM as compared with the rats receiving i.c.v. injection of phosphate buffer saline (PBS). A significant downregulation of 5-HT-labeled neurons and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) as the marker of 5-HT cells in the RVM, and 5-HT expression in spinal dorsal horn in both normal and chronic constriction injury (CCI) rats after i.c.v. injection of CB-SAP was observed. These results suggested that RVM may be involved in descending pain modulation originating from the CSF-contacting nucleus. PMID:26961890

  17. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein localized to the nucleus restores HBx-deficient virus replication in HepG2 cells and in vivo in hydrodynamically-injected mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identifying the requirements for the regulatory HBx protein in hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication is an important goal. A plasmid-based HBV replication assay was used to evaluate whether HBx subcellular localization influences its ability to promote virus replication, as measured by real time PCR quantitation of viral capsid-associated DNA. HBx targeted to the nucleus by a nuclear localization signal (NLS-HBx) was able to restore HBx-deficient HBV replication, while HBx containing a nuclear export signal (NES-HBx) was not. Both NLS-HBx and NES-HBx were expressed at similar levels (by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting), and proper localization of the signal sequence-tagged proteins was confirmed by deconvolution microscopy using HBx, NLS-HBx, and NES-HBx proteins fused to GFP. Importantly, these findings were confirmed in vivo by hydrodynamic injection into mice. Our results demonstrate that in these HBV replication assays, at least one function of HBx requires its localization to the nucleus.

  18. Integration of sensory quanta in cuneate nucleus neurons in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Bengtsson

    Full Text Available Discriminative touch relies on afferent information carried to the central nervous system by action potentials (spikes in ensembles of primary afferents bundled in peripheral nerves. These sensory quanta are first processed by the cuneate nucleus before the afferent information is transmitted to brain networks serving specific perceptual and sensorimotor functions. Here we report data on the integration of primary afferent synaptic inputs obtained with in vivo whole cell patch clamp recordings from the neurons of this nucleus. We find that the synaptic integration in individual cuneate neurons is dominated by 4-8 primary afferent inputs with large synaptic weights. In a simulation we show that the arrangement with a low number of primary afferent inputs can maximize transfer over the cuneate nucleus of information encoded in the spatiotemporal patterns of spikes generated when a human fingertip contact objects. Hence, the observed distributions of synaptic weights support high fidelity transfer of signals from ensembles of tactile afferents. Various anatomical estimates suggest that a cuneate neuron may receive hundreds of primary afferents rather than 4-8. Therefore, we discuss the possibility that adaptation of synaptic weight distribution, possibly involving silent synapses, may function to maximize information transfer in somatosensory pathways.

  19. Observation of high energy gamma rays in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beard, K.B.; Benenson, W.; Bloch, C.; Kashy, E.; Stevenson, J.; Morrissey, D.J.; Plicht, J. van der; Sherrill, B.; Winfield, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    High energy electrons and positrons observed in medium energy nucleus-nucleus collisions are shown to be primarily due to the external conversion of high energy gamma rays. The reaction 14N+Cu was studied at E/A=40 MeV, and a magnetic spectrograph was used with a specially constructed multiwire prop

  20. Investigation of the (232)Th Nucleus Excitations at the FEL {gamma} - Nucleus Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Koru, H; Sultansoy, S F; Sarer, B

    2001-01-01

    The physics search potential of the FEL {gamma} - Nucleus colliders is analysed using excitations of the (232)Th nucleus. It is shown that, due to the monochromacity of FEL {gamma} beam and high statistics, proposed colliders will play an important role in the field of "traditional" nuclear physics.

  1. Temperature measurement of quark-gluon plasma formed in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss lepton pair and real photon emission from quark-gluon plasma, which is very likely to be formed in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Measurement of pair production cross-section will provide one with accurate information of the temperature of this plasma. (author)

  2. Mineralogy and Petrology of COMET WILD2 Nucleus Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael; Bland, Phil; Bradley, John; Brearley, Adrian; Brennan, Sean; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald; Butterworth, Anna; Dai, Zurong; Ebel, Denton

    2006-01-01

    The sample return capsule of the Stardust spacecraft will be recovered in northern Utah on January 15, 2006, and under nominal conditions it will be delivered to the new Stardust Curation Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center two days later. Within the first week we plan to begin the harvesting of aerogel cells, and the comet nucleus samples they contain for detailed analysis. By the time of the LPSC meeting we will have been analyzing selected removed grains for more than one month. This presentation will present the first results from the mineralogical and petrological analyses that will have been performed.

  3. Nuclear myosin I is anchored in the nucleus via interactions with phosphatidylinositol -4,5- bisphosphate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yildirim, Sukriye; Sýkora, Jan; Kahle, Michal; Dzijak, Rastislav; Hof, Martin; Hozák, Pavel

    Gliwice : M. Curie-Sklodowska Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology , 2009. ---. [The Wilhelm Bernhard Workshop, International Workshop on the Cell Nucleus /21./. 31.08.09-04.09.09, Ustroń] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1592; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/05/H023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : nuclear myosin I * PIP2 * cell nucleus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  4. Embryonic and larval development of the sonic motor nucleus in the oyster toadfish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sonic motor nucleus (SMN), a likely homologue of the hypoglossal nucleus, provides the final common pathway for sound production in the oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau). SMN neurons increase in size and number for 7-8 years postnatally, and the swimbladder-sonic muscle complex grows throughout life. This study describes the normal embryonic and larval development of the SMN from its initial differentiation on about day 19 through day 40, when the yolk sac is resorbed and the fish is free swimming. In contrast to the rapid development of CNS nuclei in mammals, the SMN gradually increased in maturity with more active growth at the beginning and end of the observation period and a relatively static period in the middle. Consistent with a hypoglossal homology, the SMN differentiated within the spinal cord, added cells rostrally, and eventually extended into the medulla. Immature neurons appeared to originate from precursor cells in the ventral portion of the ventricular zone of the central canal. Such cells were initially round with little cytoplasmic development and later added processes and Nissl substance. The number of neurons increased 10-fold from a median of 35 to 322 cells, and no evidence of cell death was observed. Soma area approximately doubled from 20.6 to 41.2 micron 2, and cell nucleus area followed a similar pattern. [3H]-thymidine autoradiography demonstrated that neurons were added continuously throughout the nucleus during embryonic and larval development

  5. Nucleus-Nucleus Potential at Near-Barrier Energies from Self Consistent Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Skalski, J

    2003-01-01

    We determine the static nucleus-nucleus potential from Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations with the Skyrme interaction. To this aim, HF equations are solved on a spatial mesh, with the initial configuration consisting of target and projectile positioned at various relative distances. For a number of reaction partners, the calculated barrier heights reasonably well compare with those extracted from the measured fusion and capture cross sections. At smaller target-projectile distances, our results show the intrinsic barriers to heavy compound nucleus formation. We speculate on their possible connection with the fusion hindrance observed for large Z sub T Z sub P.

  6. Inner Structure of Boiling Nucleus and Interfacial Energy Between Nucleus and Bulk Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Dong; TIAN Yong; PENG Xiao-Feng; WANG Bu-Xuan

    2004-01-01

    @@ A model of two-region structure of a nucleus is proposed to describe nucleus evolution. The interfacial tension between bulk liquid phase and nucleus is dependent on the density gradient in the transition region and varies with the structure change of the transition region. With the interfacial tension calculated using this model, the predicted nucleation rate is very close to the experimental measurement. Furthermore, this model and associated analysis provide solid theoretical evidence to clarify the definition of nucleation rate and understand the nucleation phenomenon with insight into the physical nature.

  7. Uncovering the nucleus candidate for NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Günthardt, G I; Camperi, J A; Díaz, R J; Gomez, P L; Bosch, G; Schirmer, M

    2015-01-01

    NGC253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst which becomes the best candidate to study the relationship between starburst and AGN activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus. The near infrared spectroscopy could be advantageous in order to shed light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis and through the brightest infrared source. We present evidence showing that the brightest near infrared and mid infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a stellar supercluster, in fact, presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. It is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.0" of the symmetry center of the galactic bar. Moreover, our data indicate that this object i...

  8. LSP-Nucleus Elastic Scattering Cross Sections

    OpenAIRE

    Vergados, J. D.; Kosmas, T. S.

    1997-01-01

    We calculate LSP-nucleus elastic scattering cross sections using some representative input in the restricted SUSY parameter space. The coherent matrix elements are computed throughout the periodic table while the spin matrix elements for the proposed $^{207}Pb$ target which has a rather simple nuclear structure. The results are compared to those given from other cold dark matter detection targets.

  9. Delta excitations in neutrino-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, H; Horowitz, C J; Kim, Hungchong

    1995-01-01

    We derive the contribution of \\Delta-h excitations to quasielastic charged-current neutrino-nucleus scattering in the framework of relativistic mean-field theory. We discuss the effect of \\Delta production on the determination of the axial mass M_A in neutrino scattering experiments.

  10. Effects of adeno-associated virus (AAV) of transforming growth factors β1 and β3 (TGFβ1,3) on promoting synthesis of glycosaminoglycan and collagen type Ⅱ of dedifferentiated nucleus pulposus (NP) cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SAI; JiaMing; HU; YouGu; WANG; DeChun

    2007-01-01

    The effects of AAV-TGFβ1 and AAV-TGFβ3 on promoting synthesis of glycosaminoglycan and collagen type Ⅱ of dedifferentiated rabbit lumbar disc NP cells were studied in this work. The rabbit lumbar disc NP cells were isolated and cultured. The earlier and later dedifferentiated NP cells were established by subculture. The AAV transfection efficiency to dedifferentiated NP cells was analyzed with AAV-EGFP in vitro. After dedifferentiated NP cells were transfected by AAV-TGFβ1 or AAV-TGFβ3, their biological effects on promoting synthesis of glycosaminoglycan or collagen type Ⅱ were detected and compared by the methods of 35S incorporation or immunoblotting. The experimental results showed that AAV could transfect efficiently the earlier dedifferentiated NP cells, but its transfection rate was shown to be at a low level to the later dedifferentiated NP cells. Both AAV-TGFβ1 and AAV-TGFβ3 could promote the earlier dedifferentiated NP cells to synthesize glycosaminoglycan and collagen type Ⅱ, and the effect of AAV-TGFβ1 was better than that of AAV-TGFβ3. For the later dedifferentiated NP cells, the AAV-TGFβ3 could promote their synthesis, but AAV-TGFβ1 could slightly inhibit their synthesis. Therefore, AAV-TGFβ1 and AAV-TGFβ3 could be used for the earlier dedifferentiated NP cells, and the TGFβ3 could be used as the objective gene for the later dedifferentiated NP cells.

  11. Morphometric characteristics of Neuropeptide Y immunoreactive neurons of human cortical amygdaloid nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mališ Miloš

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cortical amygdaloid nucleus belongs to the corticomedial part of the amygdaloid complex. In this nucleus there are neurons that produce neuropetide Y. This peptide has important roles in sleeping, learning, memory, gastrointestinal regulation, anxiety, epilepsy, alcoholism and depression. Material and methods We investigated morphometric characteristics (numbers of primary dendrites, longer and shorter diameters of cell bodies and maximal radius of dendritic arborization of NPY immunoreactive neurons of human cortical amygdaloid nucleus on 6 male adult human brains, aged 46 to 77 years, by immunohistochemical avidin-biotin technique. Results Our investigation has shown that in this nucleus there is a moderate number of NPY immunoreactive neurons. 67% of found neurons were nonpyramidal, while 33% were pyramidal. Among the nonpyramidal neurons the dominant groups were multipolar neurons (41% - of which 25% were multipolar irregular, and 16% multipolar oval. Among the pyramidal neurons the dominant groups were the neurons with triangular shape of cell body (21%. All found NPY immunoreactive neurons (pyramidal and nonpyramidal altogether had intervals of values of numbers of primary dendrites 2 to 6, longer diameters of cell bodies 13 to 38 µm, shorter diameters of cell bodies 9 to 20 µm and maximal radius of dendritic arborization 50 to 340 µm. More than a half of investigated neurons (57% had 3 primary dendrites. Discussion and conclusion The other researchers did not find such percentage of pyramidal immunoreactive neurons in this amygdaloid nucleus. If we compare our results with the results of the ather researchers we can conclude that all pyramidal NPY immunoreactive neurons found in this human amygdaloid nucleus belong to the class I of neurons, and that all nonpyramidal NPY immunoreactive neurons belong to the class II of neurons described by other researchers. We suppose that all found pyramidal neurons were projectional.

  12. Visual signal processing in the macaque lateral geniculate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Thorstein; Valberg, Arne; Lee, Barry B

    2012-03-01

    Comparisons of S- or prepotential activity, thought to derive from a retinal ganglion cell afferent, with the activity of relay cells of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) have sometimes implied a loss, or leak, of visual information. The idea of the "leaky" relay cell is reconsidered in the present analysis of prepotential firing and LGN responses of color-opponent cells of the macaque LGN to stimuli varying in size, relative luminance, and spectral distribution. Above a threshold prepotential spike frequency, called the signal transfer threshold (STT), there is a range of more than 2 log units of test field luminance that has a 1:1 relationship between prepotential- and LGN-cell firing rates. Consequently, above this threshold, the LGN cell response can be viewed as an extension of prepotential firing (a "nonleaky relay cell"). The STT level decreased when the size of the stimulus increased beyond the classical receptive field center, indicating that the LGN cell is influenced by factors other than the prepotential input. For opponent ON cells, both the excitatory and the inhibitory response decreased similarly when the test field size increased beyond the center of the receptive field. These findings have consequences for the modeling of LGN cell responses and transmission of visual information, particularly for small fields. For instance, for LGN ON cells, information in the prepotential intensity-response curve for firing rates below the STT is left to be discriminated by OFF cells. Consequently, for a given light adaptation, the STT improves the separation of the response range of retinal ganglion cells into "complementary" ON and OFF pathways. PMID:22391245

  13. Developmental exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin may alter LH release patterns by abolishing sex differences in GABA/glutamate cell number and modifying the transcriptome of the male anteroventral periventricular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pino Sans, Javier; Clements, Kelsey J; Suvorov, Alexander; Krishnan, Sudha; Adams, Hillary L; Petersen, Sandra L

    2016-08-01

    Developmental exposure to arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands abolishes sex differences in a wide range of neural structures and functions. A well-studied example is the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), a structure that controls sex-specific luteinizing hormone (LH) release. In the male, testosterone (T) secreted by the developing testes defeminizes LH release mechanisms; conversely, perinatal AhR activation by 2,3,7,8,-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) blocks defeminization. To better understand developmental mechanisms altered by TCDD exposure, we first verified that neonatal TCDD exposure in male rats prevented the loss of AVPV GABA/glutamate neurons that are critical for female-typical LH surge release. We then used whole genome arrays and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) to compare AVPV transcriptomes of males treated neonatally with TCDD or vehicle. Our bioinformatics analyses showed that TCDD enriched gene sets important for neuron development, synaptic transmission, ion homeostasis, and cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, upstream regulatory analysis suggests that both estrogen receptors (ER) and androgen receptors (AR) regulate genes targeted by TCDD. Of the 23 mRNAs found to be changed by TCDD at least 2-fold (pbrain. These findings provide new insights into how TCDD may interfere with defeminization of LH release patterns. PMID:27185484

  14. Nucleon molecular orbitals and the transition mechanism between molecular orbitals in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular orbitals of the nucleon(s) in nucleus-nucleus collisions are dynamically defined as a linear combination of nucleon single-particle orbits (LCNO) in a rotating frame by using the coupled-reaction-channel (CRC) theory. Nucleon molecular orbitals and the promotions of nucleon, - especially due to the Landau-Zener radial coupling are discussed with the method above mentioned. (author)

  15. Random matrix theory and analysis of nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel method for analysis of experimental data obtained at relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The method, based on the ideas of Random Matrix Theory (RMT) is applied to detect systematic errors that occur at measurements of momentum distributions of emitted particles. The unfolded momentum distribution is well described by the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices, when the uncertainty in the momentum distribution is maximal. The method is free from unwanted background contributions

  16. Transverse energy distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transverse energy ET distributions of nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the framework of a simple geometrical model. The distributions for inclusive production of J/ψ and muon pairs in the mass continuum are analyzed. The shape of the ET distribution of the continuum agrees with the model. The previously observed decrease of the ratio (J/ψ)/continuum with increasing ET is due to the behavior of the J/ψ. (orig.)

  17. Study of -nucleus interaction through the formation of -nucleus bound state

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Jha; B J Roy; A Chatterjee; H Machner

    2006-05-01

    The question of possible existence of -mesic nuclei is quite intriguing. Answer to this question will deeply enrich our understanding of -nucleus interaction which is not so well-understood. We review the experimental efforts for the search of -mesic nuclei and describe the physics motivation behind it. We present the description of an experiment for the search of -nucleus bound state using the GeV proton beam, currently being performed at COSY.

  18. Hypoxia activates nucleus tractus solitarii neurons projecting to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    King, T. Luise; Heesch, Cheryl M.; Clark, Catharine G.; Kline, David D.; Hasser, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral chemoreceptor afferent information is sent to the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS), integrated, and relayed to other brain regions to alter cardiorespiratory function. The nTS projects to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), but activation and phenotype of these projections during chemoreflex stimulation is unknown. We hypothesized that activation of PVN-projecting nTS neurons occurs primarily at high intensities of hypoxia. We assessed ventilation and cardiovascular para...

  19. Systematic investigation of scaled factorial cumulant moments for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use scaled factorial cumulant moments to analyze pseudorapidity fluctuations in nucleus-nucleus collisions. This approach is similar to the method of scaled factorial moments except that it removes the effects of lower-order correlations upon a given moment. Significant second-order cumulants and cumulant indices (slopes with respect to bin size) are found for all of the interactions studied. These indices are found to have an inverse dependence upon average pseudorapidity particle density

  20. Centrality Dependence of Flow in High-Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红艳; 周代翠; 杨纯斌; 蔡勖

    2002-01-01

    Directed flow and elliptic flow of final state particles in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions in the EMU01 experiment have been studied. The dependences of directed flow and elliptic flow on incident energy and impact centrality of outgoing particles are presented. The results exhibit strong dependence of flow on centrality and energy. We also suggest a more reliable way to determine the event plane resolution here.

  1. Fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium & heavy nucleus-nucleus systems

    OpenAIRE

    Atta, Debasis; Basu, D. N.

    2014-01-01

    Existing data on near-barrier fusion excitation functions of medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems have been analyzed using a simple diffused barrier formula derived assuming the Gaussian shape of the barrier height distributions. Fusion cross section is obtained by folding the Gaussian barrier distribution with the classical expression for the fusion cross section for a fixed barrier. The energy dependence of the fusion cross section, thus obtained, provides good description to the existi...

  2. Critical periods during development of the dentate nucleus and their clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudović Radmila

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to identify the critical periods in the development of the human dentate nucleus in fetuses of different gestational ages and in one newborn brain. Material and Methods. The fetal brains were fixed in alcohol-formalin-acetic acid, embedded in paraffin, cut into 30m sections, and stained with cresyl violet. The sections were examined by light microscopy. In order to identify vulnerable periods, histological and stereological analyses were done. Formation of the dentate nucleus. The first appearance of the dentate nucleus was noticed in fetus of 12.5 weeks of gestation (wg, and its cells corresponded to the first and second stage of maturation. Formation of the dorsomedial lamina begins at the end of the 13th wg, and it starts to fold at 19.5 wg. At this time, cells correspond to the third stage of maturation, and formation of the ventromedial lamina begins. The first folds of the ventromedial lamina are noticed at 23.5 wg. Fourth stage maturity cells are noticed at 23.5 wg. remaining conspicuous up to birth. The numerical density of the nerve cell nuclei shows a constant decrease. Conclusion. Based on our results, we can conclude that during development of the dentate nucleus, there are two vulnerable periods. The first one corresponds to the fourth month of intrauterine life, and the second to the intensive growth of the dorsomedial and ventrolateral lamina (20.0 - 24.5 wg.

  3. The Baryon Production and Baryon Number Transfer in Hadron-Hadron, Hadron-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work concerns soft hadronic interactions which in the Standard Model carry most of the observable cross-section but are not amenable to quantitative predictions due to the very nature of the QCD (Theory of Strong Interactions). In the low momentum transfer region the evolving coupling constant caused perturbation theory to break down. In this situation better experimental understanding of the physics phenomena is needed. One aspect of the soft hadronic interactions will be discussed in this work: transfer of the baryon number from the initial to the final state of the interaction. The past experimental knowledge on this process is presented, reasons for its unsatisfactory status are discussed and condition necessary for improvement are outlined: that is experimental apparatus with superior performance over the full range of available interactions: hadron-hadron collision, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions. A consistent model-independent picture of the baryon number transfer process emerging from the data on the full range of interactions is shown. It offers serious challenge to theory to provide quantitative and detailed explanation of the measurements. (author)

  4. Transverse momentum spectra in high-energy nucleus-nucleus, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Jie

    2011-01-01

    The transverse momentum distributions of final-state particles produced in nucleus-nucleus (AA),proton-nucleus (pA),and proton-proton (pp) collisions at high energies are investigated using a multisource ideal gas model.Our calculated results show that the contribution of hard emission can be neglected in the study of transverse momentum spectra of charged pions and kaons produced in Cu-Cu collisions at (√SNN)=22.5 GeV.And if we consider the contribution of hard emission,the transverse momentum spectra of p and (P) produced in Cu-Cu collisions at (√SNN)=22.5 GeV,KsO produced in Pb-Pb collisions at 158 A GeV,J/ψ particles produced in p-Pb collisions at 400 GeV and π+,K+,p produced in proton-proton collisions at (√S)=200 GeV,can be described by the model,especially in the tail part of spectra.

  5. 14-3-3 transits to the nucleus and participates in dynamic nucleocytoplasmic transport

    OpenAIRE

    Brunet, Anne; Kanai, Fumihiko; Stehn, Justine; Xu, Jian; Sarbassova, Dilara; Frangioni, John V.; Dalal, Sorab N.; DeCaprio, James A.; Greenberg, Michael E.; Yaffe, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins regulate the cell cycle and prevent apoptosis by controlling the nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of signaling molecules with which they interact. Although the majority of 14-3-3 molecules are present in the cytoplasm, we show here that in the absence of bound ligands 14-3-3 homes to the nucleus. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of one important 14-3-3 binding molecule, the transcription factor FKHRL1, at the 14-3-3 binding site occurs within the nucleus immediately bef...

  6. Nuclear effects in neutrino-nucleus DIS

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, M; Saitô, K

    2009-01-01

    We explain the current status of nuclear parton distribution functions in connection with neutrino-nucleus interactions. Neutrino deep inelastic scattering (DIS) measurements have been done for heavy nuclear targets such as iron and lead. In order to extract structure functions of the nucleon, one needs to remove nuclear effects from the data. However, recent studies indicate that there are inconsistencies in nuclear modifications between charged-lepton and neutrino scattering measurements. Nuclear medium effects could be also an origin for the NuTeV anomaly in the weak-mixing angle. In addition, the modifications could affect neutrino-oscillation experiments because some DIS events of neutrino-oxygen nucleus interactions are contained. On the other hand, the nuclear medium effects themselves are interesting and important for describing nuclei in terms of quark and gluon degrees of freedom.

  7. Correlations in neutrino-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Van Cuyck, Tom; Jachowicz, Natalie; González-Jiménez, Raul; Martini, Marco; Ryckebusch, Jan; Van Dessel, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed study of charged-current quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering and of the influence of correlations on one- and two-nucleon knockout processes. The quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering cross sections, including the influence of long-range correlations, are evaluated within a continuum random phase approximation approach. The short-range correlation formalism is implemented in the impulse approximation by shifting the complexity induced by the correlations from the wave functions to the operators. The model is validated by confronting $(e,e^\\prime)$ cross-section predictions with electron scattering data in the kinematic region where the quasielastic channel is expected to dominate. Further, the $^{12}$C$(\

  8. Coherency in Neutrino-Nucleus Elastic Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kerman, S; Deniz, M; Wong, H T; Chen, J -W; Li, H B; Lin, S T; Liu, C -P; Yue, Q

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering provides a unique laboratory to study the quantum mechanical coherency effects in electroweak interactions, towards which several experimental programs are being actively pursued. We report results of our quantitative studies on the transitions towards decoherency. A parameter ($\\alpha$) is identified to describe the degree of coherency, and its variations with incoming neutrino energy, detector threshold and target nucleus are studied. The ranges of $\\alpha$ which can be probed with realistic neutrino experiments are derived, indicating complementarity between projects with different sources and targets. Uncertainties in nuclear physics and in $\\alpha$ would constrain sensitivities in probing physics beyond the standard model. The maximum neutrino energies corresponding to $\\alpha$>0.95 are derived.

  9. Coherency in neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, S.; Sharma, V.; Deniz, M.; Wong, H. T.; Chen, J.-W.; Li, H. B.; Lin, S. T.; Liu, C.-P.; Yue, Q.; Texono Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering provides a unique laboratory to study the quantum mechanical coherency effects in electroweak interactions, towards which several experimental programs are being actively pursued. We report results of our quantitative studies on the transitions towards decoherency. A parameter (α ) is identified to describe the degree of coherency, and its variations with incoming neutrino energy, detector threshold, and target nucleus are studied. The ranges of α that can be probed with realistic neutrino experiments are derived, indicating complementarity between projects with different sources and targets. Uncertainties in nuclear physics and in α would constrain sensitivities in probing physics beyond the standard model. The maximum neutrino energies corresponding to α >0.95 are derived.

  10. Nickel-48, a very magic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni48, which is doubly magic and very exotic, has been observed in an experiment performed at the GANIL accelerator. This nucleus, which is composed of 20 neutrons and 28 protons, is the most neutron-deficient nucleus that can be obtained, its decay mode has not yet been determined but theory predicts a 2-proton emission. Ni48 nuclei were obtained when accelerated (75 MeV/A) Ni58 ions had undergone fragmentation on natural nickel target. During this experiment 4 nuclei of Ni48 were produced as well as other very exotic nuclei: 90 nuclei of Ni49, 50 of Fe45 and 290 of Cr42. This experiment lasted 10 days and 1017 Ni58 ions were projected on the target. (A.C.)

  11. Hadron production in the nucleus fragmentation region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RHIC hadron production data in hadronic collisions at the forward rapidities may hint the evidence of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC). However, in the opposite region, backward rapidities, new effects should be important in order to describe the observables. In this work, the charged hadron and π0 productions are investigated in the fragmentation region of the nucleus (backward rapidities) considering dAu and pp collisions in the context of the Color Glass Condensate. In the backward rapidity region, only the proton can be treated as a CGC, and the large x nuclear effects need to be considered in order to describe the cross section. The results are shown by means of the nuclear modification ratio comparing the proton-nucleus and proton-proton cross sections and such ratio presents some dependences on the large x nuclear effects. (author)

  12. Nucleus spectroscopy: extreme masses and deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author proposes a synthesis of research activities performed since 1995 in the field of experimental nuclear physics, and more particularly in the investigation of two nucleus extreme states: deformation on the one hand, heavy and very heavy nuclei on the other hand. After a presentation of the context of investigations on deformation, rotation, and heavy nuclei, he gives an overview of developments regarding instruments (gamma spectrometers, detection of fission fragments, and detection at the focal plane of spectrometers or separators) and analysis techniques. Experiments and results are then reported and discussed, concerning super-deformed states with a high angular moment, spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei, very heavy nuclei close to nucleus map borders. He finally draws perspectives for middle and long term studies on the heaviest nuclei

  13. Dropped nucleus following phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajunisah, I; Reddy, S C

    2007-12-01

    Twenty two cases of dropped nucleus following 1,196 phacoemulsification procedures in cataract surgery were examined retrospectively to determine the incidence, predisposing factors and visual outcomes of this dreaded complication. All the cases underwent pars plana vitrectomy and the lens fragments were removed with phacofragmotome, vitrectomy cutter or delivered through limbus. The incidence of dropped nucleus was 1.84%. The predisposing factors were hard cataracts (13.6%), polar cataracts (9.1%), previously vitrectomized eyes (4.5%) and high myopia (4.5%). The final visual outcome was > or = 6/12 in 10 eyes (45.5%); complications were seen in 5 eyes (22.7%). The interval between initial surgery and vitrectomy, the method of fragment removal and the type of lens implanted, did not influence the final visual outcome. PMID:18705466

  14. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl{sup +} K562 and Jak2(V617F){sup +} HEL Leukemia Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Axel [Georg-Speyer-Haus, Institute for Tumor Biology and Experimental Therapy, Frankfurt am Main 60596 (Germany); Borghouts, Corina [Ganymed Pharmaceuticals AG, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Brendel, Christian [Boston Children’s Hospital, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Moriggl, Richard [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Cancer Research (LBI-CR), Vienna 1090 (Austria); Delis, Natalia; Brill, Boris; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd, E-mail: Groner@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Georg-Speyer-Haus, Institute for Tumor Biology and Experimental Therapy, Frankfurt am Main 60596 (Germany)

    2015-03-19

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) and Jak2(V617F) in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD). We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F) positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD) of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F)-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl{sup +} K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL cells

  15. The fast Ice Nucleus chamber FINCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundke, U.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Wetter, T.; Klein, H.; Bingemer, H.

    2008-11-01

    We present first results of our new developed Ice Nucleus (IN) counter FINCH from the sixth Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6) campaign at Jungfraujoch station, 3571 m asl. Measurements were made at the total and the ICE CVI inlet. Laboratory measurements of ice onset temperatures by FINCH are compared to those of the static diffusion chamber FRIDGE (FRankfurt Ice Deposition Freezing Experiment). Within the errors of both new instruments the results compare well to published data.

  16. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  17. Revisiting the supratrigeminal nucleus in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujio, T; Sato, F; Tachibana, Y; Kato, T; Tomita, A; Higashiyama, K; Ono, T; Maeda, Y; Yoshida, A

    2016-06-01

    The supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup), originally proposed as a premotoneuron pool in the trigeminal reflex arc, is a key structure of jaw movement control. Surprisingly, however, the location of the rat Vsup has not precisely been defined. In light of our previous cat studies, we made two hypotheses regarding the rat Vsup: (1) the Vsup is cytoarchitectonically distinguishable from its surrounding structures; (2) the Vsup receives central axon terminals of the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) neurons which are primary afferents innervating muscle spindles of jaw-closing muscles and periodontal ligaments around the teeth. To test the first hypothesis, we examined the cytoarchitecture of the rat Vsup. The Vsup was identified as an area medially adjacent to the dorsomedial part of trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (Vp), and extended from the level just rostral to the caudal two-thirds of the trigeminal motor nucleus (Vmo) to the level approximately 150μm caudal to the Vmo. Our rat Vsup was much smaller and its location was considerably different in comparison to the Vsup reported previously. To evaluate the second hypothesis, we tested the distribution patterns of Vmes primary afferent terminals in the cytoarchitectonically identified Vsup. After transganglionic tracer applications to the masseter, deep temporal, and medial pterygoid nerves, a large number of axon terminals were observed in all parts of Vsup (especially in its medial part). After applications to the inferior alveolar, infraorbital, and lingual nerves, a small number of axon terminals were labeled in the caudolateral Vsup. The Vsup could also be identified electrophysiologically. After electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, evoked potentials with slow negative component were isolated only in the Vsup. The present findings suggest that the rat Vsup can be cytoarchitectonically and electrophysiologically identified, receives somatotopic termination of the trigeminal primary afferents, and

  18. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, Stephanie M.; Trujillo, Andrew J.; Glover, Gary H.; Knutson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be pres...

  19. Neutrino-nucleus reactions in supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhioev Alan A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study thermal effects on neutrino-nucleus reactions occurring under supernova conditions. The approach we use is based on the QRPA extended to finite temperature by the thermofield dynamics formalism. For the relevant supernova conditions we calculate inelastic neutrino scattering and neutrino absorption cross sections for two sample nuclei, 56Fe and 82Ge. In addition, we apply the approach to examine the rate of neutrino-antineutrino pair emission by hot nuclei.

  20. Radiative corrections to pion-nucleus bremsstrahlung

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, N.(Physik Department T39, Technische Universität München, Garching, D-85747, Germany); Friedrich, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the one-photon loop radiative corrections to virtual pion Compton scattering $\\pi^- \\gamma^* \\to \\pi^- \\gamma$, that subprocess which determines in the one-photon exchange approximation the pion-nucleus bremsstrahlung reaction $\\pi^- Z\\to \\pi^- Z \\gamma$. Ultraviolet and infrared divergencies of the loop integrals are both treated by dimensional regularization. Analytical expressions for the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha)$ corrections to the virtual Compton scattering amplitudes, $A(s,u,Q)$ a...

  1. Core nucleus polarization in Λ hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of the core nucleus to the Λ in a hypernucleus is studied with a local density approximation. This reproduces the energies and radii of the core nuclei as well as the Λ-single particle (s.p.) energies quite well. The polarizing effect of the Λ depends on the core response through an 'effective' compression modulus KA of the nucleus. For a certain class of energy functional, KA is found to be almost independent of the compression modulus K of the infinite nuclear matter. This indeed is a surprising result, and varies with the Hartree-Fock calculations with effective interactions. Reasons for this discrepancy are carefully examined. We consider values of K in the range ≅100-400 MeV. Furthermore, the polarizing effects also depend critically on D(ρ), the Λ binding in nuclear matter at density ρ. For only a direct ΛN force: D∝ρ and the core nucleus contracts giving rise to relatively larger core polarization. However, for a ''saturating'' D(ρ) (with a maximum at ρm0, where ρ0 is the nuclear matter equilibrium density), which is required to fit the s.p. data, the s-shell hypernuclei binding energies and the low energy Λp scattering data, which results from a ΛN force (including exchange) and ΛNN forces, there may be an expansion of the nucleus with nucleons flowing from the interior to the surface. This is shown to reduce the core polarization effects substantially (for ρm in the neighborhood of ρ0). The resulting changes in root mean square radius and core energy depend on A, but are mostly very small, justifying their general neglect

  2. Efficient nucleus detector in histopathology images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, J P; Van Leeuwen, M B; Van Deurzen, C H M; De Haan, G

    2013-02-01

    In traditional cancer diagnosis, (histo)pathological images of biopsy samples are visually analysed by pathologists. However, this judgment is subjective and leads to variability among pathologists. Digital scanners may enable automated objective assessment, improved quality and reduced throughput time. Nucleus detection is seen as the corner stone for a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. In this paper, we propose an efficient nucleus detector designed with machine learning. We applied colour deconvolution to reconstruct each applied stain. Next, we constructed a large feature set and modified AdaBoost to create two detectors, focused on different characteristics in appearance of nuclei. The proposed modification of AdaBoost enables inclusion of the computational cost of each feature during selection, thus improving the computational efficiency of the resulting detectors. The outputs of the two detectors are merged by a globally optimal active contour algorithm to refine the border of the detected nuclei. With a detection rate of 95% (on average 58 incorrectly found objects per field-of-view) based on 51 field-of-view images of Her2 immunohistochemistry stained breast tissue and a complete analysis in 1 s per field-of-view, our nucleus detector shows good performance and could enable a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. PMID:23252774

  3. The nucleus basalis in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A W; Parhad, I M; Folstein, S E; Whitehouse, P J; Hedreen, J C; Price, D L; Chase, G A

    1983-10-01

    The nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) provides most of the cholinergic input to the cerebral cortex. The loss of cortical choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type (SDAT) appears to be related to a severe depopulation of the nbM in this dementia. In Huntington's disease (HD), by contrast, there is no loss of cortical CAT activity. The present quantitative study indicates that (1) there is no significant loss of neurons from the nbM in HD, and (2) that the previously described cytologic changes in the neurons of this nucleus in HD patients do not differ significantly from controls. These findings are consistent with the working hypothesis that the types of dementia associated with reductions of neocortical CAT activity are characterized by dysfunction or death of neurons in the nbM, but dementing disorders with normal neocortical CAT activity manifest no major abnormalities in this cholinergic nucleus of the basal forebrain. PMID:6225032

  4. The INTEGRAL View of the Galactic Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Goldwurm, A; Goldoni, P; Paul, J; Terrier, R; Falanga, M; Ubertini, P; Bazzano, A; Santo, M D; Winkler, C; Parmar, A N; Kuulkers, E; Ebisawa, K; Roques, J P; Skinner, G K; Lund, N; Melia, F; Yusef-Zadeh, F

    2004-01-01

    We present the preliminary results of the observational campaign performed in 2003 to study the Galactic Nucleus with INTEGRAL. The mosaicked images obtained with the IBIS/ISGRI coded aperture instrument in the energy range above 20 keV, give a yet unseen view of the high-energy sources of this region in hard X and gamma-rays, with an angular resolution of 12'. We report on the discovery of a source, IGR J17456-2901, compatible with the instrument's point spread function and coincident with the Galactic Nucleus Sgr A* to within 0.9'. The source is visible up to 60-80 keV with a 20-100 keV luminosity at 8 kpc of 3 x 10E35 erg/s. Although we cannot unequivocally associate the new INTEGRAL source to the Galactic Nucleus, this is the first report of significant hard X-ray emission from within the inner 10' of the Galaxy and a contribution from the galactic center supermassive black hole itself cannot be excluded. Here we discuss the results obtained and the perspectives for future observations of the Galactic Nuc...

  5. Hypocretinergic facilitation of synaptic activity of neurons in the nucleus pontis oralis of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Ming Chu; Fung, Simon J; Yamuy, Jack; Morales, Francisco R; Chase, Michael H

    2003-06-27

    The present study was undertaken to explore the neuronal mechanisms of hypocretin actions on neurons in the nucleus pontis oralis (NPO), a nucleus which plays a key role in the generation of active (REM) sleep. Specifically, we sought to determine whether excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by stimulation of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) and spontaneous EPSPs in NPO neurons are modulated by hypocretin. Accordingly, recordings were obtained from NPO neurons in the cat in conjunction with the juxtacellular microinjection of hypocretin-1 onto intracellularly recorded cells. The application of hypocretin-1 significantly increased the mean amplitude of LDT-evoked EPSPs of NPO neurons. In addition, the frequency and the amplitude of spontaneous EPSPs in NPO neurons increased following hypocretin-1 administration. These data suggest that hypocretinergic processes in the NPO are capable of modulating the activity of NPO neurons that receive excitatory cholinergic inputs from neurons in the LDT. PMID:12763260

  6. Neurophysiological evidence for the presence of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soni, Neeraj; Satpathy, Shankha; Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana, which acts within the endocannabinoid (eCB) system as an agonist of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), exhibits addictive properties and has powerful actions on the state of arousal of an organism. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT), as a component of the reticular activating...... system, is involved in cortical activation and is important in the development of drug addiction-associated behaviours. Therefore, eCBs might exert behavioural effects by actions on the LDT; however, it is unknown whether eCBs have actions on neurons in this nucleus. Accordingly, whole-cell voltage- and...... changes the firing frequency and synaptic activity of neurons in this nucleus. Therefore, endogenous eCB transmission could play a role in processes involving the LDT, such as cortical activation and motivated behaviours and, further, behavioural actions of marijuana are probably mediated, in part, via...

  7. Characterization of a novel Dp71 dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) present in the nucleus of HeLa cells: Members of the nuclear DAPC associate with the nuclear matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dystrophin is an essential component in the assembly and maintenance of the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC), which includes members of the dystroglycan, syntrophin, sarcoglycan and dystrobrevin protein families. Distinctive complexes have been described in the cell membrane of different tissues and cultured cells. In this work, we report the identification and characterization of a novel DAPC present in the nuclei of HeLa cells, which contains dystrophin Dp71 as a key component. Using confocal microscopy and cell fractionation analyses, we found the presence of Dp71, β-sarcoglycan, β-dystroglycan, α- and β-syntrophin, α1- and β-dystrobrevin and nNOS in the nuclei of HeLa cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that most of these proteins form a complex in the nuclear compartment. Next, we analyze the possible association of the nuclear DAPC with the nuclear matrix. We found the presence of Dp71, β-dystroglycan, nNOS, β-sarcoglycan, α/β syntrophin, α1-dystrobrevin and β-dystrobrevin in the nuclear matrix protein fractions and in situ nuclear matrix preparations from HeLa cells. Moreover, we found that Dp71, β-dystroglycan and β-dystrobrevin co-immunoprecipitated with the nuclear matrix proteins lamin B1 and actin. The association of members of the nuclear DAPC with the nuclear matrix indicates that they may work as scaffolding proteins involved in nuclear architecture

  8. Development of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area and the influence of estrogen-like compounds*****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen He; Sherry Ann Ferguson; Li Cui; Lazar John Greenfield; Merle Gale Paule

    2013-01-01

    One of the wel -defined sexual y dimorphic structures in the brain is the sexual y dimorphic nucleus, a cluster of cells located in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus. The rodent sexual y dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area can be delineated histological y using conventional Nissl staining or immunohistochemical y using calbindin D28K immunoreactivity. There is increasing use of the bindin D28K-delineated neural cluster to define the sexual y dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area in rodents. Several mechanisms are proposed to underlie the processes that contribute to the sexual dimorphism (size difference) of the sexual y dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area. Recent evidence indicates that stem cellactivity, including proliferation and migration presumably from the 3rd ventricle stem cellniche, may play a critical role in the postnatal development of the sexual y dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area and its distinguishing sexual y dimorphic feature: a signifi-cantly larger volume in males. Sex hormones and estrogen-like compounds can affect the size of the sexual y dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area. Despite considerable research, it remains un-clear whether estrogen-like compounds and/or sex hormones increase size of the sexual y dimor-phic nucleus of the preoptic area via an increase in stem cellactivity originating from the 3rd ventricle stem cellniche.

  9. Excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the nucleus rotundus of pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, H F; Wu, G Y; Frost, B J; Wang, S R

    1995-01-01

    Rotundal neurons in pigeons (Columba livia) were examined for the effects of glutamate and its agonists NMDA and AMPA, antagonists CPP and CNQX, as well as of GABA and its antagonist bicuculline, on visual and tectal stimulation-evoked responses. Glutamate applied by iontophoresis excited all 48 rotundal cells tested, and this excitation was blocked by CNQX but not by CPP in 98% of cases, with 2% of cells being blocked by either CNQX or CPP. Out of 21 cells excited by AMPA, 20 were also excited by NMDA, indicating that AMPA and NMDA receptors may coexist in most rotundal cells. Action potentials were evoked in 36 additional cells by electrical stimulation applied to the tectum and they were also blocked by CNQX but not CPP. Visual responses recorded from a further eight luminance units and 21 motion-sensitive units were also blocked by CNQX and not CPP. On the other hand, GABA inhibited visual responses as well as responses evoked by tectal stimulation. An inhibitory period following tectal stimulation was eliminated by bicuculline. Taken together, these results indicate that glutamate may be an excitatory transmitter acting predominantly through non-NMDA receptors (AMPA receptors) in tectorotundal transmission. Meanwhile, GABA may be an inhibitory transmitter in the pigeon nucleus rotundus. PMID:8924406

  10. Suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons display endogenous resistance to excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottum, Kathleen; Poon, Emily; Haley, Benjamin; Karmarkar, Sumedha; Tischkau, Shelley A

    2010-02-01

    A comprehensive understanding of neuroprotective pathways is essential to progress in the battle against numerous neurodegenerative conditions. The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is endogenously resistant to glutamate (Glu) excitotoxicity in vivo. This study was designed to determine whether immortalized SCN neurons (SCN2.2 cells) retain this characteristic. We first established that SCN2.2 cells retained the ability to respond to Glu. SCN2.2 cells expressed N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtypes NR1 and NR2A/2B, suggesting the presence of functional receptors. mRNA for the NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B were higher in the SCN2.2 than in the control hypothalamic neurons (GT1-7). Specific NMDA receptor antagonists (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate and d-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid blocked Glu-induced activation of gene expression. SCN2.2 cells were resistant to Glu excitotoxicity compared with GT1-7 neurons as assessed with a mitochondrial function assay, cell death by trypan blue exclusion and apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. SCN2.2 resistance to Glu excitoxicity was retained in the presence of the broad spectrum Glu transport inhibitor, l-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4 dicarboxylate, excluding glial Glu uptake as a major neuroprotective mechanism. Collectively, these observations demonstrate endogenous neuroprotection in SCN2.2 cells; this cell line is resistant to excitotoxicity under conditions that are toxic to other immortalized cell lines. Thus, the SCN2.2 cell line may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms that confer endogenous neuroprotection in the SCN. PMID:20404040

  11. Perkembangan Praimplantasi Embrio Mencit dengan Materi Genetik yang Berasal dari Parental, Maternal, dan Inti Sel Somatik (PRE-IMPLANTATION DEVELOPMENT OF MOUSE EMBRYO WITH GENETIC MATERIAL DERIVED FROM PARENTAL, MATERNAL AND SOMATIC CELL NUCLEUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Murti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloned embryo and parthenogenetic embryo are a potential source of stem cells for regenerativemedicine. Stem cells derived from those embryos are expected to overcome the ethical issues to the use offertilization embryos for therapeutic purposes. The pre-implantation development is a critical step fordeveloping embryos reach the blastocyst stage. The objectives in vivo of this research are to produce mousecloned embryo, parthenogenetic embryo, and fertilized embryo and to study stages of  in vitro pre-implantation development culture. In vivo fertilized embryos, mouse oocytes, and cumulus cells were usedin this study. Treatment was performed on female mice superovulated with PMSG and hCG injections.Two-cell stage of in vivo fertilized embryos were collected on the second day post hCG injection. Clonedembryos were produced through Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT, which included enucleation, nucleartransfer and artificial activation. Parthenogenetic embryos were produced with artificial activationtechnique. The result of the research indicated that SCNT application was able to produce cloned embryos which could develop to blastocyst stage (3,2%. In addition, artificial activation of oocytes could produceparthenogenetic embryos which were able to develop up to the blastocyst stage (8,6%. In conclusion,efficiency level of parthenogenetic embryos that is able to reach the blastocyst stage was higher than in thecloned embryos. Fertilized embryos shows a better development and more efficient compared to in vitrocloned embryos and parthenogenetic embryos cultures.

  12. J/ψ production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions at the CERN SPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NA38 and NA50 experiments at the CERN SPS have measured charmonium production in different colliding systems with the aim of observing a phase transition from ordinary hadronic matter towards a state in which quarks and gluons are deconfined (Quark Gluon Plasma, QGP). This experimental research is based on the prediction that the J/ψ yield should be suppressed in deconfined matter. The analysis of the data collected by the NA50 experiment with Pb-Pb collisions at 158 GeV/c per nucleon shows that the J/ψ is anomalously suppressed with respect to the pattern observed in proton-nucleus and light ion reactions. (orig.)

  13. Formation of proton-fragments in hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The investigation of production of protons in hadron- and nucleus-nucleus interactions is a key problem allowing one to establish the singularities of dynamics of nuclear interactions. The formation of proton-fragments at high energies of colliding particles proceeds within both the interaction of hadrons with nuclei and in the process of decay of the nucleus or its de-excitation at peripheral interactions. At different stages of interaction of impinging particle with target nucleus, the different mechanisms of formation of proton-fragments: the direct knock-out of intranuclear nucleons in the process of high energy cascade of an initial hadron, intranuclear cascade of produced particles, decay of the excited multi-nucleon fragments and of the thermalized remnant nucleus, and the coalescence of nuclear fragments to the new clusters are realized with the certain probability, connected to the interaction parameters (the interaction energy, the parameter of collision, the intranuclear density, the configuration of Fermi momentum of nucleons and clusters of target nucleus et al.). In its turn, the mechanisms of formation of the final nuclear fragments are closely related to the type of excitation of an initial nucleus. The peripheral interactions proceed at small transfers of the momentum of an impinging particle and represent the wide class of reactions covering the processes from diffractive or coulomb collective excitations of the whole nucleus to the direct quasi-elastic knock-out of the separate nucleons. Non-peripheral interactions are caused by comparatively high local transfers of momentum to the intranuclear clusters allowing the development of intranuclear cascade and the asymmetric redistribution of energy of an impinging particle. The central collisions causing the full decay of nucleus on nucleons or few-nucleon fragments, are the limiting case of the maximal development of the intranuclear cascade. The interaction of the initial particles with

  14. Limits to the formation of hot fusion nuclei in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maximum temperature which can be sustained by a nucleus is discussed. Methods used to measure the temperature; values measured in fusion reactors; theoretical investigations on the value of the limiting temperature; and information about dynamical limitations on excitation energy storage in nuclei are reviewed. It is concluded that thermalized fusion nuclei are formed at temperatures up to 5 MeV for heavy systems and 6 MeV for medium mass systems. Thermal energy in central nucleus-nucleus collisions might not exceed some saturation value due to two effects: a sharing of the deposited energy into compressional and thermal energies; and a dynamical competition between thermal energy deposition and fast pre-equilibrium emission

  15. Oscillations of moments in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红艳; 周代翠; 钱琬燕; 王晓荣

    2001-01-01

    The definitions of density function and moment of multiplicity distribution are introduced,and the method of moment analysis in e+ e- and proton-proton (pp) interactions is extended into nu-cleus-nucleus (AA) interactions. We analyze the data for relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions and cal-culate the values of Hq for charged particle multiplicity distributions, by which we study systematically the dependences of Hq on incident energy, mass of colliding system, pseudorapidity interval, centrality and truncation of multiplicity. We compare the oscillation structures induced by e + e-, pp and AA inter-actions, and the comparison and analysis are carried out between experimental data and QCD predic-tion. The latest results are given in this paper.

  16. Cholinergic cells in the nucleus basalis of mice express the N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor subunit NR2C and its replacement by the NR2B subunit enhances frontal and amygdaloid acetylcholine levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Souza Silva, M. A.; Dolga, Amalia; Pieri, I.; Marchetti, L.; Eisel, U. L. M.; Huston, J. P.; Dere, E.

    2006-01-01

    It is known that glutamatergic and cholinergic systems interact functionally at the level of the cholinergic basal forebrain. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) is a multiprotein complex composed of NR1, NR2 and/or NR3 subunits. The subunit composition of NMDA-R of cholinergic cells in the n

  17. How to rule the nucleus: divide et impera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovei, Irina; Thanisch, Katharina; Feodorova, Yana

    2016-06-01

    Genome-wide molecular studies have provided new insights into the organization of nuclear chromatin by revealing the presence of chromatin domains of differing transcriptional activity, frequency of cis-interactions, proximity to scaffolding structures and replication timing. These studies have not only brought our understanding of genome function to a new level, but also offered functional insight for many phenomena observed in microscopic studies. In this review, we discuss the major principles of nuclear organization based on the spatial segregation of euchromatin and heterochromatin, as well as the dynamic genome rearrangements occurring during cell differentiation and development. We hope to unite the existing molecular and microscopic data on genome organization to get a holistic view of the nucleus, and propose a model, in which repeat repertoire together with scaffolding structures blueprint the functional nuclear architecture. PMID:26938331

  18. Jet Tomography of High-Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at Next-to-Leading Order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate that jet observables are highly sensitive to the characteristics of the vacuum and the in-medium QCD parton showers and propose techniques that exploit this sensitivity to constrain the mechanism of quark and gluon energy loss in strongly interacting plasmas. As a first example, we calculate the inclusive jet cross section in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions to O(αs3). Theoretical predictions for the medium-induced jet broadening and the suppression of the jet production rate due to cold and hot nuclear matter effects in Au+Au and Cu+Cu reactions at RHIC are presented.

  19. Aspects of Coulomb dissociation and interference in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystrand, Joakim; Baltz, Anthony; Klein, Spencer R.

    2001-10-21

    Coherent vector meson production in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. These interactions may occur for impact parameters much larger than the sum of the nuclear radii. Since the vector meson production is always localized to one of the nuclei, the system acts as a two-source interferometer in the transverse plane. By tagging the outgoing nuclei for Coulomb dissociation it is possible to obtain a measure of the impact parameter and thus the source separation in the interferometer. This is of particular interest since the life-time of the vector mesons are generally much shorter than the impact parameters of the collisions.

  20. Development of silicon pixels for strangeness detection in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antinori, F. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)]|[Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita and Sezione INFN, I-16146 Genoa (Italy); Barberis, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita and Sezione INFN, I-16146 Genoa (Italy); Beker, H. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita ``La Sapienza`` and Sezione INFN, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Beusch, W.; Campbell, M.; Cantatore, E. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Catanesi, M.G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita and Sezione INFN, I-70124 Bari (Italy); Chesi, E. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Genova 23 (Switzerland); Darbo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita and Sezione INFN, I-70124 Bari (Italy); Di Bari, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita and Sezione INFN, I-70124 Bari (Italy); Di Liberto, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita ``La Sapienza`` and Sezione INFN, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Elia, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell-Universita and Sezione INFN, I-70124 Bari (Italy); Heijne, E.H.M.; Helstrup, H.; Jacholkowski, A.; Klempt, W.; Knudson, K. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kralik, I. [Institute of Experimental Physics, SK-04353 Kosice (Slovakia); Lassalle, J.C. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Lenti, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita and Sezione INFN, I-70124 Bari (Italy); Lopez, L. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Luptak, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, SK-04353 Kosice (Slovakia); Martinengo, P. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Meddi, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita ``La Sapienza`` and Sezione INFN, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Middelkamp, P. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Presented by...

    1995-07-20

    Silicon microdetectors and in particular the novel silicon pixel detectors open up the way for a comprehensive study of strangeness detection in nucleus-nucleus collisions. We outline the philosophy behind this approach, describe an application in the pixel-based heavy-ion experiment WA97, and give some preliminary results on the performance of four silicon pixels planes in the 1994 Pb beam run of WA97. We conclude with an outlook on some possible future applications of silicon pixels. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  1. Development of silicon pixels for strangeness detection in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon microdetectors and in particular the novel silicon pixel detectors open up the way for a comprehensive study of strangeness detection in nucleus-nucleus collisions. We outline the philosophy behind this approach, describe an application in the pixel-based heavy-ion experiment WA97, and give some preliminary results on the performance of four silicon pixels planes in the 1994 Pb beam run of WA97. We conclude with an outlook on some possible future applications of silicon pixels. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  2. Dynamical aspects of intermediate-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of pions in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions by incoherent nucleon-nucleon collisions is studied within a microscopic quantal phase-space approach. Employing free production rates for the elementary process N+N → π+X experimental data for inclusive pion yields are approximately reproduced from 20-150 MeV/u within the first collision approximation. These results indicate that cooperative phenomena - apart from the time-dependent mean field - seem to play a minor role for energetic particle production even at very low bombarding energy. (orig.)

  3. High energy nucleus--nucleus studies at the Berkeley Bevalac. [Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1976-09-01

    A survey of high-energy nucleus--nucleus experiments performed at the Berkeley Bevalac Facility is presented. Experimental results are divided into the general areas of peripheral and central collisions. Results on projectile and target fragmentation, total cross-section measurements, pion and photon production, and charged-particle multiplicities are stressed. Recently, there have been theoretical predictions concerning the possibility of observing new phenomena such as shock waves, pion condensates, or collapsed nuclear matter. Existing data relevant to some of these speculations are discussed. A brief discussion of future developments with high-energy nuclear beams is also presented. 27 figures, 1 table.

  4. Pion and Kaon Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Intermediate Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes require accurate models for hadron production in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Codes require cross sections to be written in terms of lab frame variables and it is important to be able to verify models against experimental data in the lab frame. Several models are compared to lab frame data. It is found that models based on algebraic parameterizations are unable to describe intermediate energy differential cross section data. However, simple thermal model parameterizations, when appropriately transformed from the center of momentum to the lab frame, are able to account for the data.

  5. The effect of the relative nuclear size on the nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erofeeva, I. N.; Murzin, V. S.; Sivoklokov, S. Y.; Smirnova, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental data on the interactions of light nuclei (d, He(4), C(12)) at the momentum 4.2 GeV/cA with the carbon nuclei were taken in the 2-m propane bubble chamber. The distributions in the number of interacting nucleons, the spectra of protons, the mean energies of secondary pions and protons, the mean fractions of energy transferred to the pion and nucleon components are presented. The results of the investigation of the mechanism of nucleus-nucleus interactions can be used to calculate the nuclear cascades in the atmosphere.

  6. Azimuthal correlations of hadrons and fragments in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Two-particle (two-fragment) azimuthal correlation functions are studied by using a simple formula which describes uniformly azimuthal distributions of final-state charged particles and nuclear fragments.This formula is obtained in the framework of a multi-source thermal model (or multi-source ideal gas model).The calculated results are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data of charged hadrons and nuclear fragments in nucleus-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies.

  7. Nucleus-nucleus potential, energy dissipation and mass dispersion in fusion and transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Washiyama, Kouhei; Ayik, Sakir

    2009-01-01

    The nucleus-nucleus potential and energy dissipation in fusion reactions are obtained from microscopic mean-field dynamics. The deduced potentials nicely reproduce the one extracted from experimental data. Energy dissipation shows a universal behaviour between different reactions. Also, the dispersion of mass distribution in transfer reaction is investigated in a stochastic mean-field dynamics. By including initial fluctuations in collective space, the description of the dispersion is much improved compared to that of mean field only. The result is consistent with the macroscopic phenomenological analysis of the experimental data.

  8. Nuclear structure and neutrino-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent years have witnessed an intense experimental and theoretical activity oriented towards a better comprehension of neutrino nucleus interaction. While the main motivation for this task is the demand coming from oscillation experiments in their search for a precise determination of neutrino properties, the relevance of neutrino interaction with matter is more wide-ranging. It is imperative for astrophysics, hadronic and nuclear physics, and physics beyond the standard model. The experimental information on neutrino induced reactions is rapidly growing, and the corresponding theoretical description is a challenging proposition, since the energy scales of interest span a vast region, going from few MeV for solar neutrinos, to tens of MeV for the interpretation of experiments with the muon and pion decay at rest and the detection of neutrinos coming from the core collapse of supernova, and to hundreds of MeV or few GeV for the detection of atmospheric neutrinos, and for the neutrino oscillation program of the MiniBooNE experiment. The presence of neutrinos, being chargeless particles, can only be inferred by detecting the secondary particles created in colliding and interacting with the matter. Nuclei are often used as neutrino detectors, and in particular 12C which is a component of many scintillator detectors. Thus, the interpretation of neutrino data heavily relies on detailed and quantitative knowledge of the features of the neutrino-nucleus interaction. The nuclear structure methods used in the evaluation of the neutrino-nucleus cross section are reviewed. Detailed comparison between the experimental and theoretical results establishes benchmarks needed for verification and/or parameter adjustment of the nuclear models. Having a reliable tool for such calculation is of great importance in a variety of applications, such as the description of the r-process nucleosynthesis. (author)

  9. From the nucleus discovery to DWBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents a brief review of the main events in the field of nuclear reactions that are acknowledged as milestones because of their importance due to either experimental setting or physical interpretation. It is shown that the pace of discoveries has been strongly dependent on the technical progress in detection means at the beginning of nuclear physics and now is linked to the development of simulation means. The discovery of the neutron, the development of the Geiger counter, the theory of the compound nucleus or the first direct reactions are among these milestones

  10. Contemporary models of the atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Nemirovskii, P E

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary Models of the Atomic Nucleus discusses nuclear structure and properties, expounding contemporary theoretical concepts of the low-energy nuclear processes underlying in nuclear models. This book focuses on subjects such as the optical nuclear model, unified or collective model, and deuteron stripping reaction. Other topics discussed include the basic nuclear properties; shell model; theoretical analysis of the shell model; and radiative transitions and alpha-decay. The deuteron theory and the liquid drop nuclear model with its application to fission theory are also mentioned, but o

  11. Unveiling the nucleus of NGC 7172

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smajić, S.; Fischer, S.; Zuther, J.; Eckart, A.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: We present the results of near-infrared (NIR) H + K European Southern Observatory SINFONI integral field spectroscopy (IFS) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 7172. We investigate the central 800 pc, concentrating on excitation conditions, morphology, and stellar content. NGC 7172 was selected from a sample of the ten nearest Seyfert 2 galaxies from the Veron-Cetty & Veron catalogue. All objects were chosen as test cases for adaptive optics (AO) assisted observations that allow a detailed study (at high spatial and spectral resolution) of the nuclear and host environments. NGC 7172 has a prominent dustlane crossing the central galaxy region from east to west, which makes it an ideal candidate to investigate the effect of obscuration by strong galactic extinction on (active) galaxies and their classification. Methods: The NIR is less influenced by dust extinction than optical light and is sensitive to the mass-dominating stellar populations. SINFONI integral field spectroscopy combines NIR imaging and spectroscopy and provides us with the opportunity to analyze several emission and absorption lines to investigate the stellar populations and ionization mechanisms over the 4″ × 4″ field of view (FOV). Results: We present emission and absorption line measurements in the central 800 pc of NGC 7172. The detection of [Si vi] and broad Paα and Brγ components are clear signs of an accreting super-massive black hole hiding behind the prominent dustlane at visible wavelengths. Hot temperatures of about 1300 K are indicative of a dusty torus in the nuclear region. Narrow components of Paα and Brγ enable us to make an extinction measurement. Our measures of the molecular hydrogen lines, hydrogen recombination lines, and [Fe ii] indicate that the excitation of these lines is caused by an active galactic nucleus. The central region of the galactic disk is predominantly inhabited by gas, dust, and an old K-M type giant stellar population. The gaseous, molecular, and

  12. Thermal Bremsstrahlung probing nuclear multifragmentation in nucleus-nucleus collisions around the Fermi energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamical properties of nuclear matter at moderate temperatures and densities, in the vicinity of the predicted nuclear liquid-gas phase transition, are studied using as experimental probe the hard-photons (Eγ > 30 MeV) emitted in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Photon and charged-particle production in four different heavy-ion reactions (Ar36 + Au197, Ag107, Ni58, C12 at 60 A*MeV) is measured exclusively and inclusively coupling the TAPS photon spectrometer with two charged-particle and intermediate-mass-fragment detectors covering nearly 4π. We confirm that Bremsstrahlung emission in first-chance (off-equilibrium) proton-neutron collisions (pnγ) is the dominant origin of hard photons. We also firmly establish the existence of a thermal radiation component emitted in second-chance proton-neutron collisions. This thermal Bremsstrahlung emission takes place in semi-central and central nucleus-nucleus reactions involving heavy targets. We exploit this observation i) to demonstrate that thermal equilibrium is reached during the reaction, ii) to establish a new thermometer of nuclear matter based on Bremsstrahlung photons, iii) to derive the thermodynamical properties of the excited nuclear sources and, in particular, to establish a 'caloric curve' (temperature versus excitation energy), and iv) to assess the time-scales of the nuclear break-up process. (author)

  13. Radiative corrections to pion-nucleus bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, N

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the one-photon loop radiative corrections to virtual pion Compton scattering $\\pi^- \\gamma^* \\to \\pi^- \\gamma$, that subprocess which determines in the one-photon exchange approximation the pion-nucleus bremsstrahlung reaction $\\pi^- Z\\to \\pi^- Z \\gamma$. Ultraviolet and infrared divergencies of the loop integrals are both treated by dimensional regularization. Analytical expressions for the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha)$ corrections to the virtual Compton scattering amplitudes, $A(s,u,Q)$ and $B(s,u,Q)$, are derived with their full dependence on the (small) photon virtuality $Q$ from 9 classes of contributing one-loop diagrams. Infrared finiteness of these virtual radiative corrections is achieved (in the standard way) by including soft photon radiation below an energy cut-off $\\lambda$. In the region of low $\\pi^- \\gamma$ center-of-mass energies, where the pion-nucleus bremsstrahlung process is used to extract the pion electric and magnetic polarizabilities, we find radiative corrections up to about -3% fo...

  14. Electromagnetic transitions in the 16O nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of mean lives, and therefore of total widths of nuclei excited states, is critical as it allows the absolute value of nuclear matrix elements to be attained, and thus information on wave functions of the involved level and of the levels reached by de-excitation of this last one. However, the total width of a level can be decomposed into a sum of partial widths which can be independently obtained by absolute efficiency measurements or by branching fraction measurements when the mean life of the studied level is known. The objective of this research thesis is therefore to determine some partial widths in the Oxygen 16 nucleus. Mean lives of the first excited levels have been experimentally measured and some electromagnetic transitions have been studied. The author comments models which are proposed for the oxygen 16 nucleus, describes the experimental techniques and the experiments mainly performed on the Strasbourg Van de Graaff accelerator, and compares the obtained results with values deduced from theoretical works

  15. NUCLEUS-CHART. Chart of the Nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atomic Mass Data Center [Orsy (France)

    1998-05-05

    Nucleus is an interactive PC-based graphical viewer of NUBASE nuclear property data. NUBASE contains experimentally known nuclear properties, together with some values that have been estimated from extrapolation of experimental data for 3010 nuclides. NUBASE also contains data on those isomeric states that have half-lives greater than 1 millisecond; there are 669 such nuclides of which 58 have more than one isomeric state. The latest version of NUCLEUS-CHART has been corrected to include the names and the chemical symbols of the elements 104 to 109 that have been finally adopted by the Commission on Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry (CNIC) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). They differ from those recommended by the same commission a few years before and that were widely used in the evaluations AME`95 and NUBASE`97. It results in some shuffling of the names and symbols, that may cause confusion in the near future. At AMDC we`ll be as careful as possible to try to avoid such confusion. In advance we apologize if any will occur in the future and recommend the user to always double check these few names.

  16. Energy levels in (7Li) nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energies of the normal-parity states and positive parity states in (7Li) nucleus are calculated, using many-particle nuclear shell-model, and the harmonic oscillator-wave-functions, over the residual interaction of the Gaussian from the Serber force. Spin-orbit interactions are neglected. The kinetic energy is introduced as a variant quantity, through the variation of the harmonic oscillator parameter (r0) (r02=h/mw). Finally, we separate the ''spurious'' states (one quantum excitations of the center of mass of the nucleus) by the effect of the operator (R-i), for the coordinate of the center of mass on the different wave-functions of the ground state-configurations. The calculations show that the energy of the positive-parity states, separated into two groups; the first in the energy region (10-20 Mev) and described by the symmetries (43), (421); and the second group in the energy region (26-46 Mev) and described by the symmetries (31), (3211). 9 tabs.; 3 figs.; 64 refs

  17. A search for {phi} meson nucleus bound state using antiproton annihilation on nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, H., E-mail: h-ohnishi@riken.jp [RIKEN, RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Buehler, P.; Cargnelli, M. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut fNur subatomare Physik (Austria); Curceanu, C.; Guaraldo, C. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dellf INFN (Italy); Hartmann, O. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut fNur subatomare Physik (Austria); Hicks, K. [Ohio University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN, RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Ishiwatari, T. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut fNur subatomare Physik (Austria); Kienle, P. [Technische Universiat Munchen (Germany); Marton, J. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut fuer subatomare Physik (Austria); Muto, R.; Naruki, M. [KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) (Japan); Niiyama, M. [Kyoto University, Department of Physics (Japan); Noumi, H. [Osaka University, Research Center for Nuclear Physics (Japan); Okada, S.; Vidal, A. Romero [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dellf INFN (Italy); Sakaguchi, A. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Sakuma, F. [RIKEN, RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Sawada, S. [KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) (Japan); and others

    2012-12-15

    The mass shift of the vector mesons in nuclei is known to be a powerful tool for investigating the mechanism of generating hadron mass from the QCD vacuum. The mechanism is known to be the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. In 2007, KEK-PS E325 experiment reported about 3.4 % mass reduction of the {phi} meson in medium-heavy nuclei (Cu). This result is possibly one of the indications of the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei, however, unfortunately it is hard to make strong conclusions from the data. One of the ways to conclude the strength of the {phi} meson mass shift in nuclei will be by trying to produce only slowly moving {phi} mesons where the maximum nuclear matter effect can be probed. The observed mass reduction of the {phi} meson in the nucleus can be translated as the existence of an attractive force between {phi} meson and nucleus. Thus, one of the extreme conditions that can be achieved in the laboratory is indeed the formation of a {phi}-nucleus bound state, where the {phi} meson is 'trapped' in the nucleus. The purpose of the experiment is to search for a {phi}-nucleus bound state and measure the binding energy of the system. We will demonstrate that a completely background-free missing-mass spectrum can be obtained efficiently by (p-bar, {phi}) spectroscopy together with K{sup + }{Lambda} tagging, using the primary reaction channel p-bar p {yields} {phi} {phi}. This paper gives an overview of the physics motivation and the detector concept, and explains the direction of the initial research and development effort.

  18. A search for ϕ meson nucleus bound state using antiproton annihilation on nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, H.; Bühler, P.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu, C.; Guaraldo, C.; Hartmann, O.; Hicks, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Muto, R.; Naruki, M.; Niiyama, M.; Noumi, H.; Okada, S.; Vidal, A. Romero; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakuma, F.; Sawada, S.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Suzuki, K.; Tsukada, K.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Widmann, E.; Yokkaichi, S.; Zmeskal, J.

    The mass shift of the vector mesons in nuclei is known to be a powerful tool for investigating the mechanism of generating hadron mass from the QCD vacuum. The mechanism is known to be the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. In 2007, KEK-PS E325 experiment reported about 3.4 % mass reduction of the ϕ meson in medium-heavy nuclei (Cu). This result is possibly one of the indications of the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei, however, unfortunately it is hard to make strong conclusions from the data. One of the ways to conclude the strength of the ϕ meson mass shift in nuclei will be by trying to produce only slowly moving ϕ mesons where the maximum nuclear matter effect can be probed. The observed mass reduction of the ϕ meson in the nucleus can be translated as the existence of an attractive force between ϕ meson and nucleus. Thus, one of the extreme conditions that can be achieved in the laboratory is indeed the formation of a ϕ-nucleus bound state, where the ϕ meson is "trapped" in the nucleus. The purpose of the experiment is to search for a ϕ-nucleus bound state and measure the binding energy of the system. We will demonstrate that a completely background-free missing-mass spectrum can be obtained efficiently by (bar{p}, φ) spectroscopy together with K + Λ tagging, using the primary reaction channel bar{p} p rightarrow φ φ. This paper gives an overview of the physics motivation and the detector concept, and explains the direction of the initial research and development effort.

  19. 3-(Benzodioxan-2-ylmethoxy)-2,6-difluorobenzamides bearing hydrophobic substituents at the 7-position of the benzodioxane nucleus potently inhibit methicillin-resistant Sa and Mtb cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straniero, Valentina; Pallavicini, Marco; Chiodini, Giuseppe; Zanotto, Carlo; Volontè, Luca; Radaelli, Antonia; Bolchi, Cristiano; Fumagalli, Laura; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Menchinelli, Giulia; Delogu, Giovanni; Battah, Basem; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Valoti, Ermanno

    2016-09-14

    Lipophilic substituents at benzodioxane C (7) of 3-(benzodioxan-2-ylmethoxy)-2,6-difluorobenzamide improve the antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains to MIC values in the range of 0.2-2.5 μg/mL, whereas hydrophilic substituents at the same position and modifications at the benzodioxane substructure, excepting for replacement with 2-cromanyl, are deleterious. Some of the lead compounds also exhibit good activity against Mtb. Parallel SARs to those of 3-(2-benzothiazol-2-ylmethoxy)-2,6-difluorobenzamide, well known FtsZ inhibitor, and cells alterations typical of FtsZ inhibition indicate such a protein as the target of these potent antibacterial benzodioxane-benzamides. PMID:27191617

  20. Decrease and conquer: Phacoemulsification technique for hard nucleus cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Kyun

    2009-10-01

    I describe a technique to improve the control and safety of phacoemulsification during hard nucleus cataract surgery. Whereas the goal of the conventional nucleofractis technique is complete fragmentation of the lens, the technique aims to separate the endonuclear core from the epinucleus. This is done in 3 steps: circumferential disassembly, decreasing the central nucleus volume, and conquering the remnant. The technique offers safer and more effective phacoemulsification in patients with hard nucleus cataracts. PMID:19781457

  1. Nucleus management in manual small incision cataract surgery by phacosection

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindra M

    2009-01-01

    Nucleus management is critical in manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS), as the integrity of the tunnel, endothelium and posterior capsule needs to be respected. Several techniques of nucleus management are in vogue, depending upon the specific technique of MSICS. Nucleus can be removed in toto or bisected or trisected into smaller segments. The pressure in the eye can be maintained at the desired level with the use of an anterior chamber maintainer or kept at atmospheric levels. In ...

  2. Intrinsic properties and neuropharmacology of midline paraventricular thalamic nucleus neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloslav Kolaj

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei are components of an interconnected brainstem, limbic and prefrontal cortex neural network that is engaged during arousal, vigilance, motivated and addictive behaviors, and stress. To better understand the cellular mechanisms underlying these functions, here we review some of the recently characterized electrophysiological and neuropharmacological properties of neurons in the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT, derived from whole cell patch clamp recordings in acute rat brain slice preparations. PVT neurons display firing patterns and ionic conductances (IT and IH that exhibit significant diurnal change. Their resting membrane potential is maintained by various ionic conductances that include inward rectifier (Kir, hyperpolarization-activated nonselective cation (HCN and TWIK-related acid sensitive (TASK K+ channels. Firing patterns are regulated by high voltage-activated (HVA and low voltage-activated (LVA Ca2+ conductances. Moreover, transient receptor potential (TRP-like nonselective cation channels together with Ca2+- and Na+-activated K+ conductances (KCa; KNa contribute to unique slow afterhyperpolarizing potentials (sAHPs that are generally not detectable in lateral thalamic or reticular thalamic nucleus neurons. We also report on receptor-mediated actions of GABA, glutamate, monoamines and several neuropeptides: arginine vasopressin, gastrin-releasing peptide, thyrotropin releasing hormone and the orexins (hypocretins. This review represents an initial survey of intrinsic and transmitter-sensitive ionic conductances that are deemed to be unique to this population of midline thalamic neurons, information that is fundamental to an appreciation of the role these thalamic neurons may play in normal central nervous system (CNS physiology and in CNS disorders that involve the dorsomedial thalamus.

  3. Hyperdeformed band in the 36Ar nucleus?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The exotic shapes of atomic nuclei has attracted much attention recently both from the experimental and from the theoretical sides. E.g. the superdeformed (SD) shape in N = Z nuclei were observed experimentally during the last decade. In particular the SD band of the 36Ar nucleus was detected in 2000 [1]. Following the experimental observation a considerable theoretical effort has been concentrated on this band. In [2] e.g. the possible binary clusterizations of this state was studied systematically. Similar studies have been done also for the ground, and the hyperdeformed band. The latter one had been predicted from alphacluster model calculations [3]. The possible binary cluster-configurations are important not only for the better understanding of the structure of the shape isomers, but also from the viewpoint of predicting the favoured reaction channels to populate these states. This is the straightforward consequence of the close relation between the clusterization and reaction channels. (In fact, a cluster-configuration is defined by the reaction channel in which it can be observed.) One of the interesting conclusions of the work [2] was, that the hyperdeformed (HD) state of the 36Ar nucleus could be populated in the 24Mg+12C and 20Ne+16O reactions. A recent analysis of the 24Mg+12C elastic scattering [4] revealed the fact that the cross section can be described only by supposing resonances on top of the potential scattering. This very careful analysis incorporated phase-shift study, as well as Regge-pole and energy-dependent resonance calculations. The existence of five resonances have been proved, which have angular momenta 2, 4, 6, 7, 8. These states together with the resonances from the 20Ne+16O reactions seem to establish a rotational band, as shown in the upper part of Fig. 1. Its moment of inertia is in a very good agreement with that of the HD shape predicted from alpha-cluster model [3]. The similarity of the

  4. Specific energy from Auger and conversion electrons of 131I, 188Re-anti-CD20 to a lymphocyte's nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-García, E.; Carrillo-Cazares, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The typical radionuclides used to label anti-CD20 in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are 90Y, 131I, and 188Re, with the emission of beta particles, Auger electrons, and conversion electrons for the latter two. The aim of the present work was to calculate the contribution of high linear energy transfer radiation as Auger electrons (AE) and conversion electrons (CE) of 131I and 188Re-anti-CD20 to mean specific energy into the cell nucleus by Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), so as to infer therapeutic effectiveness on a dosimetric basis. MCS was used to quantify the frequency-mean specific energy into the cell nucleus, where the cell was modeled by two concentric spheres, considering two cell models. The results showed that 10% and 33% of the mean-specific energies (z¯) per disintegration imparted to the cell nucleus for both geometries are due to AE and CE; on the other hand, if the hit of AE and CE occurs, the contribution to (z¯) is about 64% and 86% for 131I and 188Re, respectively. According to the amount of specific energy from AE and CE into the cell nucleus by positive event, they can cause catastrophic effects in the nuclear DNA in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with 131I, 188Re-anti-CD20.

  5. Analysis of Intermediate-Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Spallation, Fission, and Fragmentation Reactions with the LAQGSM code

    OpenAIRE

    Mashnik, S. G.; Gudima, K. K.; Prael, R. E.; Sierk, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    The LAQGSM code has been recently developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to simulate nuclear reactions for proton radiography applications. We have benchmarked our code against most available measured data both for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions at incident energies from 10 MeV to 800 GeV and have compared our results with predictions of other current models used by the nuclear community. Here, we present a brief description of our code and show illustrative results obta...

  6. Dose enhancement effects to the nucleus and mitochondria from gold nanoparticles in the cytosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, A. L.; Kam, W. W. Y.; Scales, N.; McMahon, S. J.; Bennett, J. W.; Byrne, H. L.; Schuemann, J.; Paganetti, H.; Banati, R.; Kuncic, Z.

    2016-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown potential as dose enhancers for radiation therapy. Since damage to the genome affects the viability of a cell, it is generally assumed that GNPs have to localise within the cell nucleus. In practice, however, GNPs tend to localise in the cytoplasm yet still appear to have a dose enhancing effect on the cell. Whether this effect can be attributed to stress-induced biological mechanisms or to physical damage to extra-nuclear cellular targets is still unclear. There is however growing evidence to suggest that the cellular response to radiation can also be influenced by indirect processes induced when the nucleus is not directly targeted by radiation. The mitochondrion in particular may be an effective extra-nuclear radiation target given its many important functional roles in the cell. To more accurately predict the physical effect of radiation within different cell organelles, we measured the full chemical composition of a whole human lymphocytic JURKAT cell as well as two separate organelles; the cell nucleus and the mitochondrion. The experimental measurements found that all three biological materials had similar ionisation energies  ∼70 eV, substantially lower than that of liquid water  ∼78 eV. Monte Carlo simulations for 10–50 keV incident photons showed higher energy deposition and ionisation numbers in the cell and organelle materials compared to liquid water. Adding a 1% mass fraction of gold to each material increased the energy deposition by a factor of  ∼1.8 when averaged over all incident photon energies. Simulations of a realistic compartmentalised cell show that the presence of gold in the cytosol increases the energy deposition in the mitochondrial volume more than within the nuclear volume. We find this is due to sub-micron delocalisation of energy by photoelectrons, making the mitochondria a potentially viable indirect radiation target for GNPs that localise to the cytosol.

  7. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P. (eds.)

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  8. Dirac phenomenology and hyperon-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss various aspects of hyperon-nucleus interactions in the relativistic mean field theory. First, characteristics of Λ, Σ and ≡ hypernuclei, as well as multi strange baryonic objects, are investigated. The spin-orbit splittings and magnetic moments are shown to be very sensitive to the value of the tensor coupling fωy. Second, optical potentials for Λ and Σ scattering off nuclei are developed based on a global nucleon-nucleon Dirac optical potential and SU(3) symmetry. The tensor coupling has a large effect on the predictions for the analyzing power. Third, the Dirac approach is used in the calculations of the non-mesonic decay of Λ hypernuclei. The large discrepancy between the decay rates and data suggests the need for additional meson exchanges. (authors). 62 refs.,7 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Nature of multiple-nucleus cluster galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merritt, D.

    1984-05-01

    In models for the evolution of galaxy clusters which include dynamical friction with the dark binding matter, the distribution of galaxies becomes more concentrated to the cluster center with time. In a cluster like Coma, this evolution could increase by a factor of approximately 3 the probability of finding a galaxy very close to the cluster center, without decreasing the typical velocity of such a galaxy significantly below the cluster mean. Such an enhancement is roughly what is needed to explain the large number of first-ranked cluster galaxies which are observed to have extra ''nuclei''; it is also consistent with the high velocities typically measured for these ''nuclei.'' Unlike the cannibalism model, this model predicts that the majority of multiple-nucleus systems are transient phenomena, and not galaxies in the process of merging.

  10. Laser-Nucleus Interactions: The Quasiadiabatic Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Pálffy, Adriana; Hoefer, Axel; Weidenmüller, Hans A

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between nuclei and a strong zeptosecond laser pulse with coherent MeV photons is investigated theoretically. We provide a first semi-quantitative study of the quasiadiabatic regime where the photon absorption rate is comparable to the nuclear equilibration rate. In that regime, multiple photon absorption leads to the formation of a compound nucleus in the so-far unexplored regime of excitation energies several hundred MeV above the yrast line. The temporal dynamics of the process is investigated by means of a set of master equations that account for dipole absorption, stimulated dipole emission, neutron decay and induced fission in a chain of nuclei. That set is solved numerically by means of state-of-the-art matrix exponential methods also used in nuclear fuel burnup and radioactivity transport calculations. Our quantitative estimates predict the excitation path and range of nuclei reached by neutron decay and provide relevant information for the layout of future experiments.

  11. High energy hadron-nucleus collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a lecture note concerning high energy hadron-nucleus collision. The lecture gives the inelastic total cross section and the Glanber approximate multiple scattering formula at first. The mechanism of nuclear spallation is described in a cylindrical image. The multiplicity, the one particle distribution and the time-space structure of particle production are discussed. Various models are presented. The attenuation of forward particles and the structure of hadrons are discussed for each model. The atomic number (A) dependence of the production of large transverse momentum particles and jet, and the A dependence of charged multiplicity are presented. The backward production of particles and many body correlation are discussed. Lepton pair production and the initial interaction of constituents, collective interaction, multi quark state and phase transition are described. (Kato, T.)

  12. Retrotrapezoid nucleus, respiratory chemosensitivity and breathing automaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyenet, Patrice G.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Fortuna, Michal G.; Abbott, Stephen B.; Depuy, Seth D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Breathing automaticity and CO2 regulation are inseparable neural processes. The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a group of glutamatergic neurons that express the transcription factor Phox2b, may be a crucial nodal point through which breathing automaticity is regulated to maintain CO2 constant. This review updates the analysis presented in prior publications. Additional evidence that RTN neurons have central respiratory chemoreceptor properties is presented but this is only one of many factors that determine their activity. The RTN is also regulated by powerful inputs from the carotid bodies and, at least in the adult, by many other synaptic inputs. We also analyze how RTN neurons may control the activity of the downstream central respiratory pattern generator. Specifically, we review the evidence which suggests that RTN neurons a) innervate the entire ventral respiratory column, and b) control both inspiration and expiration. Finally, we argue that the RTN neurons are the adult form of the parafacial respiratory group in neonate rats. PMID:19712903

  13. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta Δ(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe Δ-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented

  14. Electron-Nucleus Collisions at THERA

    CERN Document Server

    Frankfurt, L L; McDermott, M; Strikman, M I

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear option at THERA provides an ideal and unique opportunity to investigate the black body limit (BBL) of high energy Deep Inelastic Scattering of highly virtual photons off heavy nuclear targets and thereby probe QCD in a new regime. At high enough energies, whichever hadronic configuration the photon fluctuates into, the interaction at a given impact parameter with the heavy nuclear target will eventually reach its geometrical limit corresponding to the scattering from a black disk. An attractive feature of the BBL regime for a large nucleus is that the interaction is strong although the coupling constant is small. Predictions for longitudinal and transverse distributions of the leading hadrons in inclusive and diffractive channels and exclusive vector meson production are found to be strikingly different in BBL and the leading twist approximation. In particular, the multiplicity of leading hadrons in the current fragmentation region is strongly suppressed, while the cross section of diffractive vec...

  15. The mitogaligin protein is addressed to the nucleus via a non-classical localization signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitogaligin, a protein encoded by galig, an internal cytotoxic gene of the galectin-3 locus, is mostly a mitochondrial protein. Mitochondrial targeting is due to an already identified mitochondrial localization signal. Interaction of mitogaligin with mitochondria leads to cytochrome c cytosolic leakage and ultimately to cell death. We have previously pointed out that mitogaligin can also be directed to the nucleus when the mitochondrial addressing signal is inactivated, indicating a possible dual intracellular localization of the protein. When expressed in the nucleus, mitogaligin exhibits also apoptotic properties leading to cell death. In this report, we show that nuclear addressing of mitogaligin depends on a sequence differing from classical signals containing basic, lysine or proline-tyrosine rich residues. The signal consists of a long sequence of amino acids residues based on a series of a short repetitive degenerated sequence.

  16. The Nucleus Accumbens: Mechanisms of Addiction across Drug Classes Reflect the Importance of Glutamate Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, M D; Heinsbroek, J A; Gipson, C D; Kupchik, Y M; Spencer, S; Smith, A C W; Roberts-Wolfe, D; Kalivas, P W

    2016-07-01

    The nucleus accumbens is a major input structure of the basal ganglia and integrates information from cortical and limbic structures to mediate goal-directed behaviors. Chronic exposure to several classes of drugs of abuse disrupts plasticity in this region, allowing drug-associated cues to engender a pathologic motivation for drug seeking. A number of alterations in glutamatergic transmission occur within the nucleus accumbens after withdrawal from chronic drug exposure. These drug-induced neuroadaptations serve as the molecular basis for relapse vulnerability. In this review, we focus on the role that glutamate signal transduction in the nucleus accumbens plays in addiction-related behaviors. First, we explore the nucleus accumbens, including the cell types and neuronal populations present as well as afferent and efferent connections. Next we discuss rodent models of addiction and assess the viability of these models for testing candidate pharmacotherapies for the prevention of relapse. Then we provide a review of the literature describing how synaptic plasticity in the accumbens is altered after exposure to drugs of abuse and withdrawal and also how pharmacological manipulation of glutamate systems in the accumbens can inhibit drug seeking in the laboratory setting. Finally, we examine results from clinical trials in which pharmacotherapies designed to manipulate glutamate systems have been effective in treating relapse in human patients. Further elucidation of how drugs of abuse alter glutamatergic plasticity within the accumbens will be necessary for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of addiction across all classes of addictive substances. PMID:27363441

  17. Forward masking in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Berrebi, Albert S

    2016-05-01

    Perception of acoustic stimuli is modulated by the temporal and spectral relationship between sound components. Forward masking experiments show that the perception threshold for a probe tone is significantly impaired by a preceding masker stimulus. Forward masking has been systematically studied at the level of the auditory nerve, cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus and auditory cortex, but not yet in the superior olivary complex. The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB), a principal cell group of the superior olive, plays an essential role in sound localization. The MNTB receives excitatory input from the contralateral cochlear nucleus via the calyces of Held and innervates the ipsilateral lateral and medial superior olives, as well as the superior paraolivary nucleus. Here, we performed single-unit extracellular recordings in the MNTB of rats. Using a forward masking paradigm previously employed in studies of the inferior colliculus and auditory nerve, we determined response thresholds for a 20-ms characteristic frequency pure tone (the probe), and then presented it in conjunction with another tone (the masker) that was varied in intensity, duration, and frequency; we also systematically varied the masker-to-probe delay. Probe response thresholds increased and response magnitudes decreased when a masker was presented. The forward suppression effects were greater when masker level and masker duration were increased, when the masker frequency approached the MNTB unit's characteristic frequency, and as the masker-to-probe delay was shortened. Probe threshold shifts showed an exponential decay as the masker-to-probe delay increased. PMID:25921974

  18. Study by Monte Carlo simulation of the absorbed dose in cells of breast cancer of the line MDA-MB231, due to sources of {sup 111}In, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 99m}Tc internalized in the nucleus. First results; Estudio por simulacion Monte Carlo de la dosis absorbida en celulas de cancer de seno de la linea MDA-MB231, debida a fuentes de {sup 11I}n, {sup 177}Lu y {sup 99m}Tc internalizadas en el nucleo. Primeros resultados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E. L.; Perez A, M., E-mail: leticia.rojas@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The necessity to design innovative treatments and to diagnose the cancer early, has taken to investigate therapies at cellular and molecular level. The design of appropriate radio-molecules to these therapies makes necessary to characterize in way exhaustive radionuclides that they are of accessible production in our country and to study as distributing the dose at cellular level with bio-molecules glued them. In this context, was realized the present work. Using Monte Carlo simulation, the energy deposited in a geometric model of cells of breast cancer was obtained, MDA-MB231, due to different radionuclides. The energy deposited in the nucleus was evaluated, in the cytoplasm and in the membrane of the cell, using the simulation code Monte Carlo Penelope 2008. A punctual source was simulated in the center of the cell nucleus. In each case all the emissions of each radionuclide majors to 400 eV were simulated. The energies deposited by disintegration in the nucleus, cytoplasm, membrane of the cell and in a sphere of 2 cm surrounding the source (in eV) were: 4.30E3, 4.85E2, 1.07E2 and 3.29E4, correspondingly, for the {sup 111}In; 4.46E3, 3.76E3, 1.26E3 and 1.33E5 for the {sup 177}Lu and; 2.12E3, 2.58E2, 9.33E1 and 1.88E4 for the {sup 99m}Tc. We can conclude that if the union of these radionuclides happens to a compound that was internalized to the cell nucleus, the best for therapy at this level is the conjugate with the {sup 177}Lu, followed by that with {sup 111}In and in third place that with {sup 99m}Tc. (Author)

  19. TRPV1 Marks Synaptic Segregation of Multiple Convergent Afferents at the Rat Medial Solitary Tract Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, James H.; McDougall, Stuart J.; Fawley, Jessica A.; Andresen, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    TRPV1 receptors are expressed on most but not all central terminals of cranial visceral afferents in the caudal solitary tract nucleus (NTS). TRPV1 is associated with unmyelinated C-fiber afferents. Both TRPV1+ and TRPV1- afferents enter NTS but their precise organization remains poorly understood. In horizontal brainstem slices, we activated solitary tract (ST) afferents and recorded ST-evoked glutamatergic excitatory synaptic currents (ST-EPSCs) under whole cell voltage clamp conditions fro...

  20. Role of G-proteins in the effects of leptin on pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Paige; Mahaffey, Susan; Urbano, Francisco J.; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), the cholinergic arm of the reticular activating system, regulates waking and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Here, we demonstrate immunohistochemical labeling of the leptin receptor signaling isoform in PPN neurons, and investigated the effects of G-protein modulation and the leptin triple antagonist (TA) on the action of leptin in the PPN. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed in rat brainstem slices from 9–17 day old pups. Previous results show...

  1. Three-dimensional organization of the human interphase nucleus: Experiments compared to simulations.

    OpenAIRE

    Knoch, Tobias; Münkel, Christian; Waldeck, Waldemar; Langowski, Jörg

    2000-01-01

    markdownabstractDespite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its three-dimensional structure is widely unknown, although it is important for gene regulation and replication. For a long time the interphase nucleus has been viewed as a 'spaghetti soup' of DNA without much internal structure, except during cell division. Only recently has it become apparent that chromosomes occupy distinct 'territories' also in interphase. Two models for the detailed folding of the 30 nm chromati...

  2. The Addicted Synapse: Mechanisms of Synaptic and Structural Plasticity in Nucleus Accumbens

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Scott J.; Dietz, David M.; Dumitriu, Dani; Malenka, Robert C.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Addictive drugs cause persistent restructuring of several neuronal cell types in the brain’s limbic regions thought to be responsible for long-term behavioral plasticity driving addiction. Although these structural changes are well documented in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons, little is known regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms. Additionally, it remains unclear whether structural plasticity and its synaptic concomitants drive addictive behaviors, or whether they reflect home...

  3. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus as a Gene Transfer Vector in the Rat Nucleus Tractus Solitarii

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, L. H.; Langasek, J. E.; Talman, L. S.; Taktakishvili, O. M.; Talman, W. T.

    2009-01-01

    Gene transfer has been used to examine the role of putative neurotransmitters in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). Most such studies used adenovirus vector-mediated gene transfer although adenovirus vector transfects both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Successful transfection in the NTS has also been reported with lentivirus as the vector. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a lentivirus, may preferentially transfect neurons and could be a powerful tool to delineate physiological effect...

  4. GABAergic control of the ascending input from the median raphe nucleus to the limbic system

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shaomin; Varga, Viktor; Sik, Attila; Kocsis, Bernat

    2005-01-01

    The median raphe nucleus (MRN) is the primary source of serotonergic afferents to the limbic system which are generally considered to suppress hippocampal theta oscillations. GABA receptors are expressed in the MRN by serotonergic and non-serotonergic cells, including GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. This study investigated the mechanisms by which the fluctuating GABA tone in the MRN leads to induction or suppression of hippocampal theta rhythm. 1. We found that MRN application of the GAB...

  5. Total inclusive neutron cross sections and multiplicities in nucleus-nucleus collisions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total integrated inclusive cross section, sigma(T>T0), for the emission of neutrons above an energy T0 by neon ions with an average energy of 337 MeV per nucleon reacting in targets of uranium, copper, aluminum, and carbon is described by sigma-bar/sub NN/(R-bar/sub G//r/sub o/)/sup( alphaT/o). Here sigma-bar/sub NN/ is the isospin-averaged nucleon-nucleon cross section evaluated at an energy equal to the bombarding energy per nucleon, and R-bar/sub G/ is the arithmetic mean value of the radii of the projectile and the target measured in units of the radius parameter r0 ( = 1.2 fm). In the limit T0 = 0, the exponent α(T0) = 5. A useful formula is derived for calculating mean neutron multiplicities in nucleus-nucleus collisions

  6. Production of cold fragments in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the Fermi-energy domain

    CERN Document Server

    Veselsky, M

    2007-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of nucleus-nucleus collisions at projectile energies around the Fermi energy is investigated with emphasis on the production of fragmentation-like residues. The results of simulations are compared to experimental mass distributions of elements with Z = 21 - 29 observed in the reactions 86Kr+124,112Sn at 25 AMeV. The model of incomplete fusion is modified and a component of excitation energy of the cold fragment dependent on isospin asymmetry is introduced. The modifications in the model of incomplete fusion appear consistent with both overall model framework and available experimental data. A prediction is provided for the production of very neutron-rich nuclei using a secondary beam of 132Sn where e.g. the reaction 132Sn+238U at 28 AMeV appears as a possible alternative to the use of fragmentation reactions at higher energies.

  7. Experimental and phenomenological investigations of QCD matter in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is heterogeneous, comprising experimental papers at low energies (SIS-18 at GSI) and at the LHC, papers on phenomenology of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions, and papers on detectors. The overview covers the experimental papers and those on phenomenology. I have chosen to write it in a general manner, intended to be accessible to non-experts. It emphasizes recent measurements and their understanding at the LHC. The detector papers, which address many principle aspects of gaseous detectors, are summarized and placed in context in the review I co-wrote and which closes the stack. The detector papers included here are the outcome of an R and D program for the Transition Radiation Detector of ALICE.

  8. Experimental and phenomenological investigations of QCD matter in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronic, Anton

    2014-07-15

    This thesis is heterogeneous, comprising experimental papers at low energies (SIS-18 at GSI) and at the LHC, papers on phenomenology of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions, and papers on detectors. The overview covers the experimental papers and those on phenomenology. I have chosen to write it in a general manner, intended to be accessible to non-experts. It emphasizes recent measurements and their understanding at the LHC. The detector papers, which address many principle aspects of gaseous detectors, are summarized and placed in context in the review I co-wrote and which closes the stack. The detector papers included here are the outcome of an R and D program for the Transition Radiation Detector of ALICE.

  9. Nonmonotonic Target Excitation Dependence of Pion Clans in Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Dutta, Srimonti

    Target excitation dependence of fluctuation of produced pions (i.e. classifying data of the fluctuation pattern on pions on the basis of the number of gray tracks) is studied for nucleus-nucleus collisions at different projectile energies. In each set the experimental multiplicity distribution is compared with the negative binomial distribution (NBD), which is found to describe the experimental distribution quite well. Target excitation dependence is studied in respect of the clan model parameters bar {n}c and bar {N}, which are extracted from the NBD fit parameters bar {n} and k. A detailed comparison between different interactions at the same energy and the same interactions at different energies is also drawn. A nonmonotonic dependence of D2/bar {n} on is revealed, which is also a characteristic of multiplicity fluctuations at RHIC data.

  10. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions and the MINERvA Neutrino Nucleus Scattering Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering have been studied in the frame-work of a χ2 analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs)1. A set of iron PDFs have been extracted which are then used to compute xBj-dependent and Q2-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. Upon comparing our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for l±-iron scattering we find that, except for very high xBj, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering. The MINERvA neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab, will systematically study neutrino nuclear effects off of He, C, Fe and Pb for a more thorough A-dependent study of nuclear PDFs and these correction factors.

  11. Dissipation and fluctuation of the relative momentum in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissipation of the relative momentum in nucleus-nucleus collisions is treated in terms of a Langevin equation with a fluctuating force. Equations of motion for first and second moments of the macroscopic variables are derived directly from the Langevin equation. The properties of the fluctuating force which results from random particle exchange are investigated in detail. Drift and diffusion coefficients are calculated microscopically and analytical expressions are given which can be used in any trajectory calculation. An important feature of the model is that the Einstein relation between dissipation and fluctuation turns out to be only a limiting case of a more general expression which included nonthermal fluctuations. By treating the two nuclei as intrinsically equilibrated but not in thermal equilibrium with respect to each other several important aspects of the dissipative behaviour, seen in heavy ion collisions with final energies above the Coloumb barrier, can be understood. (orig.)

  12. Study of Strange and Multistrange Particles in Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Vande vyvre, P; Feofilov, G; Snoeys, W; Hetland, K F; Campbell, M; Klempt, W

    2002-01-01

    % NA57\\\\ \\\\ The goal of the experiment is to study the production of strange and multi-strange particles in nucleus-nucleus collisions. This study was initiated at the OMEGA spectrometer, where three ion experiments have been performed: WA85 (S-W and p-W collisions at 200 A GeV/c), WA94 (S-S and p-S collisions at 200 A GeV/c) and WA97 (Pb-Pb, p-Pb and p-Be collisions at 160 A GeV/c).\\\\ \\\\ The experiment aims at extending the scope of WA97 by:\\\\ \\\\ - investigating the beam energy dependence of the enhancements of multi-strange particle production reported by the previous experiments, and by\\\\ \\\\\\\\ \\\\- measuring the yields of strange and multi-strange particles over an extended centrality range compared with the previous experiments.\\\\ \\\\ The apparatus consists mainly of silicon pixel detector planes.

  13. Recent Developments in the Study of Deconfinement in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Gazdzicki, M; Seyboth, P

    2014-01-01

    Deconfinement refers to the creation of a state of quasi-free quarks and gluons in strongly interacting matter. Model predictions and experimental evidence for the onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions were discussed in our first review on this subject. These results motivated further experimental and theoretical studies. This review addresses two subjects. First, a summary of the past, present and future experimental programmes related to discovery and study of properties of the onset of deconfinement are %briefly presented. Second, recent progress is reviewed on analysis methods and preliminary experimental results for new strongly intensive fluctuation measures are discussed, which are relevant for current and future studies of the onset of deconfinement and searches for the critical point of strongly interacting matter

  14. Stopping in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions in the RQMD-approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most intensely studied questions of today's high energy nuclear physics is that of the transition of normal nuclear matter to a quark gluon plasma state (QGP). The phase transition should occur in probes of nuclear matter of very high temperature and density. It is generally believed that these circumstances should preferentially occur in collisions of heavy nuclei with high energies. This question is considered giving a hint to the direction which has to be taken first in order to obtain answers to the question of QGP. The behaviour of two large nuclei which collide with high relative momentum is investigated. Comparisons are shown between RQMD and CERN-SPS experiments and it was found that the RQMD calculations of nucleus-nucleus collisions are in nearly perfect agreement with the available experimental data. (R.P.) 17 refs.; 6 figs

  15. Jet energy loss and bulk parton collectivity in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Huan-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    Nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC produce high temperature and high energy density matter which exhibits paxtonic degrees of freedom. We will discuss measurements of nuclear modification factors for light hadrons and non-photonic electrons from heavy quark decays, which reflect the flavor dependence of energy loss of high momentum partons traversing the dense QCD medium. The dense QCD medium responds to energy loss of high momentum patrons in a pattern consistent with that expected from a hydrodynamic fluid. The hadronization of bulk partonic matter exhibits collectivity with effective partonic degrees of freedom. Nuclear collisions at RHIC provide an intriguing environment, where many constituent quark ingredients are readily available for possible formation of exotic particles through quark coalescence or recombinations.

  16. Implications of gamma band activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rill, E; Luster, B; D'Onofrio, S; Mahaffey, S; Bisagno, V; Urbano, F J

    2016-07-01

    The fact that the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the reticular activating system places it in a unique position to modulate sensory input and fight-or-flight responses. Arousing stimuli simultaneously activate ascending projections of the PPN to the intralaminar thalamus to trigger cortical high-frequency activity and arousal, as well as descending projections to reticulospinal systems to alter posture and locomotion. As such, the PPN has become a target for deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, modulating gait, posture, and higher functions. This article describes the latest discoveries on PPN physiology and the role of the PPN in a number of disorders. It has now been determined that high-frequency activity during waking and REM sleep is controlled by two different intracellular pathways and two calcium channels in PPN cells. Moreover, there are three different PPN cell types that have one or both calcium channels and may be active during waking only, REM sleep only, or both. Based on the new discoveries, novel mechanisms are proposed for insomnia as a waking disorder. In addition, neuronal calcium sensor protein-1 (NCS-1), which is over expressed in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, may be responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in at least some patients with these diseases. Recent results suggest that NCS-1 modulates PPN gamma band activity and that lithium acts to reduce the effects of over expressed NCS-1, accounting for its effectiveness in bipolar disorder. PMID:26597124

  17. Nucleus -nucleus interactions at a few GeV/C per nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Since the period of the ancient Egyptians people are looking for unusual phenomena, which may enable to give interpretation for nature. Physicists believe that the study of A-A interactions will shed light on the mechanism of high-energy nuclear interactions. It is important to systematize the results of nucleus-nucleus interactions and to have an overall picture of cross-section, multiplicity-distributions, angular distributions, etc It is important to systematize the results of nucleus-nucleus interactions and to have an overall picture of: cross-section, multiplicity-distributions, angular distributions, etc Beams: Beams are mainly from Dubna Synchrophasotron including 1H, 2H, 3He, 4He, 12C, 160,22Ne, 24Mg, 28Si and 32S at 4.1∼ 4.5 GeV/c. Experimental Technique: Stacks of Br-2 emulsion were exposed to 4.1- 4.5 A GeV/c nuclei at Dubna Synchrophasotron. The pellicles of emulsion have the dimensions of 20 cm x 10 cm x 600 μm (undeveloped emulsion). The intensity of the beam was ≡104 particles/cm2 and the beam diameter was approximately 1 cm. The emitted particles are classified to:Shower tracks producing s-particleshaving a relative ionization I*≤ 1.4. Its multiplicity is denoted by ns after the exclusion of tracks having an emission angle θ≤3ο.Grey tracks producing g-particleshaving I* > 1.4 and L>3 mm. Its multiplicity is denoted by ng and does not include those tracks with an emission angle θ≤ 3ο. Black tracks producing b-particleshaving L b and does not include those tracks having an angle of emission θ≤3ο.The band gtracks are both called heavily ionizing tracks producing h-particlesand nh denotes its multiplicity

  18. Recurrent Inhibition to the Medial Nucleus of the Trapezoid Body in the Mongolian Gerbil (Meriones Unguiculatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondzillo, Anna; Thompson, John A.; Klug, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Principal neurons in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) receive strong and temporally precise excitatory input from globular bushy cells in the cochlear nucleus through the calyx of Held. The extremely large synaptic currents produced by the calyx have sometimes led to the view of the MNTB as a simple relay synapse which converts incoming excitation to outgoing inhibition. However, electrophysiological and anatomical studies have shown the additional presence of inhibitory glycinergic currents that are large enough to suppress action potentials in MNTB neurons at least in some cases. The source(s) of glycinergic inhibition to MNTB are not fully understood. One major extrinsic source of glycinergic inhibitory input to MNTB is the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body. However, it has been suggested that MNTB neurons receive additional inhibitory inputs via intrinsic connections (collaterals of glycinergic projections of MNTB neurons). While several authors have postulated their presence, these collaterals have never been examined in detail. Here we test the hypothesis that collaterals of MNTB principal cells provide glycinergic inhibition to the MNTB. We injected dye into single principal neurons in the MNTB, traced their projections, and immunohistochemically identified their synapses. We found that collaterals terminate within the MNTB and provide an additional source of inhibition to other principal cells, creating an inhibitory microcircuit within the MNTB. Only about a quarter to a third of MNTB neurons receive such collateral inputs. This microcircuit could produce side band inhibition and enhance frequency tuning of MNTB neurons, consistent with physiological observations. PMID:27489949

  19. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  20. A Frame Nucleus on a Two-side Prequantale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUShao-xian; WANGShun-qin; MAFei-fei

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a Frame nucleus and prime elements in a Prequantale are defined. The concrete structure of a Frame prequantic quotient is considered, and the relation between the half-prime element and the Frame nucleus in a two-side Prequantale are obtained.

  1. The small GTPase RhoA localizes to the nucleus and is activated by Net1 and DNA damage signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi D Dubash

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rho GTPases control many cellular processes, including cell survival, gene expression and migration. Rho proteins reside mainly in the cytosol and are targeted to the plasma membrane (PM upon specific activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs. Accordingly, most GEFs are also cytosolic or associated with the PM. However, Net1, a RhoA-specific GEF predominantly localizes to the cell nucleus at steady-state. Nuclear localization for Net1 has been seen as a mechanism for sequestering the GEF away from RhoA, effectively rendering the protein inactive. However, considering the prominence of nuclear Net1 and the fact that a biological stimulus that promotes Net1 translocation out the nucleus to the cytosol has yet to be discovered, we hypothesized that Net1 might have a previously unidentified function in the nucleus of cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an affinity precipitation method to pulldown the active form of Rho GEFs from different cellular fractions, we show here that nuclear Net1 does in fact exist in an active form, contrary to previous expectations. We further demonstrate that a fraction of RhoA resides in the nucleus, and can also be found in a GTP-bound active form and that Net1 plays a role in the activation of nuclear RhoA. In addition, we show that ionizing radiation (IR specifically promotes the activation of the nuclear pool of RhoA in a Net1-dependent manner, while the cytoplasmic activity remains unchanged. Surprisingly, irradiating isolated nuclei alone also increases nuclear RhoA activity via Net1, suggesting that all the signals required for IR-induced nuclear RhoA signaling are contained within the nucleus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate the existence of a functional Net1/RhoA signaling pathway within the nucleus of the cell and implicate them in the DNA damage response.

  2. Characterization of cap binding proteins associated with the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eucaryotic mRNAs a carry 7-methylguanosine triphosphate residue (called cap structure) at their 5' terminus. The cap plays an important role in RNA recognition. Cap binding proteins (CBP) of HeLa cells were identified by photoaffinity labelling using the cap analogue γ-(32P)-(4-(benzoyl-phenyl)methylamido)-7-methylguanosine-5'-triphosphate (BP-m7GTP). Photoreaction of this cap analogue with HeLa cell initiation factors resulted in specific labelling of two polypeptides of Msub(r) 37000 and 26000. The latter was also labelled in crude initiation factors prepared from reticulocytes and is identical to the cap binding protein CBP I previously identified. These cap binding proteins were also affinity labelled in poliovirus infected cell extracts. Photoaffinity reaction with BP-m7GTP of whole HeLa cell homogenate showed three additional polypeptides with Msub(r) 120000, 89000 and 80000. These cap binding proteins were found to be associated with the nucleus and are therefore referred to as nuclear cap binding proteins, i.e. NCBP 1, NCBP 2 and NCBP 3. They were also present in splicing extracts. Photoaffinity labelling in these nuclear extracts was differentially inhibited by various cap analogues and capped mRNAs. Affinity chromatography on immobilized globin mRNA led to a partial separation of the three nuclear cap binding proteins. Chromatography on m7GTP-Sepharose resulted in a specific binding of NCBP 3. The different behaviour of the cap binding proteins suggests that they are functionally distinct and that they might be involved in different processes requiring cap recognition. (Author)

  3. Noradrenaline as a putative neurotransmitter mediating hypotension—induced FOs—like immunoreactivity in the supraoptic nucleus of the rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENEH; XIASUN

    1995-01-01

    Hemorrhage or hypotension induces extensive Fos-like immunoreactivity in the magnocellular neurosecretory cells in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus in rat,especially in the vasopressin neurons.The present study was to explore the neurotransmitter mediating this effect,Microinfusion of the alpha-adrenergic blocker into the supraoptic nucleus reduced the hypotension-induced FOs.whereas beta-antagonist did not affect it significantly.Alaha1-and alpha2-antagonist,prazosin and yohimbine,both reduced the Fos-Positive cell counts.However,the effective dosage of yohimbine was much larger,Alpha1-agonist,methoxamine,induced abundant Fos-like immunoreactivity in the vasopressin cells in this nucleus,while beta-and alpha2-agonist did not elicit such effect.Administration of the noradrenergic re-uptake inhibitor desipramine,to this nucleus to locally accumulate the spontaneously released noradrenaline from the nerve terminals also induced Fos expression,mostly in the vasopressin cells.

  4. Identification of different types of respiratory neurones in the dorsal brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, Hari H.; Chow, Chin Moi; Balnave, Ron J.

    2007-01-01

    In Nembutal anaesthetised, spontaneously breathing rats, stereotaxic mapping of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) for respiratory neuronal activity was undertaken. Eight different types of respiratory cells were found between 0.25 and 1.5 mm lateral to midline, extending 0.5 mm caudal to 1.5 mm r

  5. Ultraviolet-induced movement of the human DNA repair protein, xeroderma pigmentosum type G, in the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xeroderma pigmentosum type G (XPG) is a human genetic disease exhibiting extreme sensitivity to sunlight. XPG patients are defective XPG endonuclease, which is an enzyme essential for DNA repair of the major kinds of solar ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damages. Here we describe a novel dynamics of this protein within the cell nucleus after UV irradiation of human cells. USing confocal microscopy, we have localized the immunofluorescent, antigenic signal of XPG protein to foci throughout the cell nucleus. Our biochemical studies also established that XPG protein forms a tight association with nuclear structure(s). In human skin fibroblast cells, the number of XPG foci decreased within 2 h after UV irradiation, whereas total nuclear XPG fluorescence intensity remained constant, suggesting redistribution of XPG from a limited number of nuclear foci to the nucleus overall. Within 8 h after UV, most XPG antigenic signal was found as foci. Using β-galactosidase-XPG fusion constructs (β-gal-XPG) transfected into HeLa cells, we have identified a single region of XPG that is evidently responsible both for foci formation and for the UV dynamic response. The fusion protein carrying the C terminus of XPG (amino acids 1146-1185) localized β-gal specific antigenic signal to foci and to the nucleolus regions. After UV irradiation, antigenic β-gal translocated reversibly from the subnuclear structures to the whole nucleus with kinetics very similar to the movements of XPG protein. These findings lead us to propose a model in which distribution of XPG protein may regulate the rate of DNA repair within transcriptionally active and inactive compartments of the cell nucleus. 50 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. The new magic nucleus 96Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 96Zr nucleus is expected to be magic due to the subshell closures at Z = 40 and N = 56. Recent gamma-spectroscopic studies involving in-beam techniques and beta decay certainly revealed a remarkably simple level pattern consisting of the 1,750 keV 2+ - 2,439 keV 3+ doublet, a few levels decaying to the 3- octupole state by strong E1 or E2 transitions, and a band built on the shape isomeric first excited 0+ state. While quadrupole vibrational collectivity is restricted to this latter intruder band the octupole mode is expected to be strong, according to systematics and an earlier lifetime result for the 3- state. since low-lying particle-hole excitations, and a strong octupole mode in particular, are typical for magic nuclei like 208Pb it is important to test to what extent 96Zr resembles the well known magic nuclei. In this paper, inelastic deuteron scattering and RPA studies show that the lowest states of doubly closed subshell 96Zr are particle-hole excitations, the first 2+ state being a neutron excitation of 3s1/2 2d5/2-1 type. The octupole collectively is enhanced by a factor of about two with respect to 90Zr due mainly to the contribution of 1h1 1/2 2d5/2-1 neutron excitations, suggesting an unusually high B(E3) value

  7. 34Si: a new doubly magic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 34Al β decay was studied at the CERN on-line mass separator ISOLDE. Gamma-ray singles, β-γ, and β-γ-γ coincidence measurements, were registered with two 80% Ge detectors. A 34Al β-decay scheme to 34Si bound states is established. The first level scheme in 34Si includes three levels at 3327.7 ± 0.5, 4257.3 ± 0.4 and 4382.7 ± 0.7 keV with respectively a Jπ assignment of 2+, 3- and (4,5)-. The 34Si level scheme is consistent with the assignment of Jπ=4- for the34Al ground state. The value of P1n=0.27(5) has been deduced for the β-delayed 1n emission of 34Al. The 34Si level scheme is found to agree with the present shell-model predictions. In the resulting picture, 34Si appears to be a new doubly magic nucleus

  8. The Chemical Evolution of Starburst Nucleus Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Coziol, R; Davoust, E; Considère, S

    1997-01-01

    The metallicities derived from spectroscopic observations of a sample of Starburst Nucleus Galaxies (SBNGs) are compared to those of several other types of galaxies (normal giant galaxies, Irregular and HII galaxies) drawn from the literature. The SBNGs are deficient in metals with respect to normal galaxies of same morphological type, suggesting that - SBNGs are galaxies still in the process of formation. Breaking the SBNGs into early-types (Sb and earlier) and late-types reveals that the former seem to follow the same linear luminosity-metallicity relation as the irregular and elliptical galaxies, whereas the latter and the giant spirals show comparable (0.2 and 0.3 dex) excess abundances with respect to the linear relation. This difference between the two types of SBNGs is consistent with the predictions of the model of hierarchical formation of galaxies: the early-type SBNGs are building their bulges by successive mergers of small stellar and gaseous systems, while the late-type SBNGs are mostly accreting...

  9. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nucleus $^{286}$Fl

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, Dorin N

    2016-01-01

    The decimal logarithm of spontaneous fission half-life of the superheavy nucleus $^{286}$Fl experimentally determined is $\\log_{10} T_f^{exp} (s) = -0.632$. We present a method to calculate the half-life based on the cranking inertia and the deformation energy, functions of two independent surface coordinates, using the best asymmetric two center shell model. In the first stage we study the statics. At a given mass asymmetry up to about $\\eta=0.5$ the potential barrier has a two hump shape, but for larger $\\eta$ it has only one hump. The touching point deformation energy versus mass asymmetry shows the three minima, produced by shell effects, corresponding to three decay modes: spontaneous fission, cluster decay and $\\alpha$~decay. The least action trajectory is determined in the plane $(R,\\eta)$ where $R$ is the separation distance of the fission fragments and $\\eta$ is the mass asymmetry. We may find a sequence of several trajectories one of which gives the least action. The parametrization with two deforma...

  10. Delivering Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes to the Nucleus Using Engineered Nuclear Protein Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Patrick D; Ganesh, Sairaam; Qin, Zhao; Holt, Brian D; Buehler, Markus J; Islam, Mohammad F; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-02-10

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential for cell-based therapies due to their unique intrinsic optical and physical characteristics. Consequently, broad classes of dispersants have been identified that individually suspend SWCNTs in water and cell media in addition to reducing nanotube toxicity to cells. Unambiguous control and verification of the localization and distribution of SWCNTs within cells, particularly to the nucleus, is needed to advance subcellular technologies utilizing nanotubes. Here we report delivery of SWCNTs to the nucleus by noncovalently attaching the tail domain of the nuclear protein lamin B1 (LB1), which we engineer from the full-length LMNB1 cDNA. More than half of this low molecular weight globular protein is intrinsically disordered but has an immunoglobulin-fold composed of a central hydrophobic core, which is highly suitable for associating with SWCNTs, stably suspending SWCNTs in water and cell media. In addition, LB1 has an exposed nuclear localization sequence to promote active nuclear import of SWCNTs. These SWCNTs-LB1 dispersions in water and cell media display near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectra with sharp van Hove peaks and an NIR fluorescence spectra, suggesting that LB1 individually disperses nanotubes. The dispersing capability of SWCNTs by LB1 is similar to that by albumin proteins. The SWCNTs-LB1 dispersions with concentrations ≥150 μg/mL (≥30 μg/mL) in water (cell media) remain stable for ≥75 days (≥3 days) at 4 °C (37 °C). Further, molecular dynamics modeling of association of LB1 with SWCNTs reveal that the exposure of the nuclear localization sequence is independent of LB1 binding conformation. Measurements from confocal Raman spectroscopy and microscopy, NIR fluorescence imaging of SWCNTs, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy show that millions of these SWCNTs-LB1 complexes enter HeLa cells, localize to the nucleus of cells, and interact with DNA. We postulate that the

  11. Notochordal cells maintain the proliferation and phenotype of chondrocyte-like cells in the disc nucleus pulposus%脊索细胞维持椎间盘髓核软骨样细胞增殖与表型的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨哲; 李树文

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The immature disc nucleus pulposus is composed of notochordal cels, but there is no notochordal cel in the mature human intervertebral disc, in which the notochordal cels are replaced by chondrocyte-like cels. It is very important to comprehend the disappearance of the notochordal cels; however, it is stil unknown at present. OBJECTIVE: To elaborate the feasibility of notochordal cels to maintain the proliferation and phenotype of chondrocyte-like cels and to induce the cartilage-like differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cels. METHODS: The first author used the computer to retrieve PubMed and Wanfang databases using the key words of “notochord cels; nucleus pulposus cels; identify” in English and Chinese, respectively. Totaly 9 896 relevant articles published from January 1999 to August 2015 were retrieved. Repetitive studies were excluded, and finaly 36 articles were in accordance with the inclusion criteria. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Now, the main functions of notochordal cels are to promote synthesis of extracelular matrix in the nucleus pulposus, induce directional differentiation of mesenchymal cels into nucleus pulposus cels or act as “seed cels” to form the nucleus pulposus cels. The presence and disappearance of notochordal cels is related to intervertebral disc degeneration. Cel apoptosis is involved in static compressionviadeath receptor signals, and then leads to intervertebral disc degeneration. fas ligand can mediate the reduction of notochordal cels, and hypoxia-inducible factor can induce spinal cord injury thereby triggering cel death and complete disappearance of nucleus pulposus. The measurement and verification of immune makers of notochordal cels, CK-8, CK-18 and galectin-3, can benefit to the identification and isolation of notochordal cels, and thereby help the studies on cel growth and differentiation, function and its mechanism of apoptosis.%背景:未成熟的椎间盘髓核是由脊索细胞所组成,但在

  12. Otolith ocular reflex function of the tangential nucleus in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, H; Gilland, E; Baker, R

    1999-05-28

    In teleost fish, the tangential nucleus can be identified as a compact, separate cell group lying ventral to the VIIIth nerve near the middle of the vestibular complex. Morphological analysis of larval and adult hindbrains utilizing biocytin and fluorescent tracers showed the tangential nucleus to be located entirely within rhombomeric segment 5 with all axons projecting into the contralateral MLF. Combined single-cell electrophysiology and morphology in alert goldfish found three classes of neurons whose physiological sensitivity could be readily correlated with rotational axes about either the anterior (45 degrees), posterior (135 degrees), or horizontal (vertical axis) semicircular canals. Tangential neurons could be distinguised from those in semicircular-canal specific subnuclei by an irregular, spontaneous background of 10-15 sp/s and sustained static sensitivity after +/- 4 degrees head displacements. Each axis-specific tangential subtype terminated appropriately onto oculomotor subnuclei responsible for either vertical, torsional, or horizontal eye movements and, in a few cases, axon collaterals descended in the MLF toward the spinal cord. We hypothesize, therefore, that the tangential nucleus consists of 3 axis-specific phenotypes that process gravitoinertial signals largely responsible for controlling oculomotor function, but that also in part, maintain body posture. PMID:10409097

  13. Single-prolonged stress induces apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus in the rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Dongjuan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is an anxiety disorder that develops after exposure to a life-threatening traumatic experience. Meta-analyses of the brainstem showed that midsagittal area of the pons was significantly reduced in patients with PTSD, suggesting a potential apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus after single-prolonged stress (SPS. The aim of this study is to investigate whether SPS induces apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus in PTSD rats, which may be a possible mechanism of reduced volume of pons and density of gray matter. Methods In this study, rats were randomly divided into 1d, 7d and 14d groups after SPS along with the control group. The apoptosis rate was determined using annexin V-FITC/PI double-labeled flow cytometry (FCM. Levels of Cytochrome c (Cyt-C was examined by Western blotting. Expression of Cyt-C on mitochondria in the dorsal raphe nucleus neuron was determined by enzymohistochemistry under transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The change of thiamine monophosphatase (TMP levels was assessed by enzymohistochemistry under light microscope and TEM. Morphological changes of the ultrastructure of the dorsal raphe nucleus neuron were determined by TEM. Results Apoptotic morphological alterations were observed in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron for all SPS-stimulate groups of rats. The apoptosis rates were significantly increased in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron of SPS rats, along with increased release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm, increased expression of Cyt-C and TMP levels in the cytoplasm, which reached to the peak of increase 7 days of SPS. Conclusions The results indicate that SPS induced Cyt-C released from mitochondria into cytosol and apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron of rats. Increased TMP in cytoplasm facilitated the clearance of apoptotic cells. We propose that this presents one of the mechanisms that lead to reduced volume of pons and gray matter associated

  14. Antiproton-nucleus interaction: review of the experimental situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will review the experimental situation of a few well-defined channels of the anti-p-nucleus interaction where the antiproton does not annihilate. It will not mention any experiment which studies annihilation of antiporotons in nuclei. The anti-p-nucleus reactions that will be reviewed are the following: 1. A(anti-p,anti-p)A elastic scattering which deals with the anti-p-nucleus system in a positive energy state. 2. Anti-p-nucleus atoms where the anti-p-nucleus system is almost at zero energy and interacts mostly through the Coulomb interaction, the strong interaction being only a perturbation. 3. A(anti-p,p)X proton knock-out reaction used to produce possible bound states or resonances of the anti-p-nucleus system via strong interaction. The main reasons for studying these three channels are to provide information about the anti-p-nucleus optical potential and also, through microscopic calculations which use the elementary anti-NN amplitudes and the nuclear matter densities as inputs, to get information about these quantities. 4. A(anti-p,anti-p')A* inelastic scattering - inelastic in the sense that the nucleus is left in an excited state but the antiproton does not annihilate, that is it deals only with the elastic part of the elementary anti-NN amplitude. Inelastic scattering from collective states also sets constraints on the anti-p-nucleus potential when analysed in terms of coupled-channel calculations. When unnatural parity states are concerned, it provides a sensitive test of the spin and isospin components of these amplitudes. In addition, this paper will focus essentially on the recent experiments performed at LEAR

  15. Gluon production from non-Abelian Weizsaecker-Williams fields in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovner, A.; McLerran, L.; Weigert, H. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    1995-12-01

    We consider the collisions of large nuclei using the theory of McLerran and Venugopalan. The two nuclei are ultrarelativistic and sources of non-Abelian Weizseacker-Williams fields. These sources are in the end averaged over all color orientations locally with a Gaussian weight. We show that there is a solution of the equations of motion for the two nucleus scattering problem where the fields are time and rapidity independent before the collision. After the collision the solution depends on proper time, but is independent of rapidity. We show how to extract the produced gluons from the classical evolution of the fields.

  16. Quarkonium-nucleus bound states from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, S.  R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chang, E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Cohen, S.  D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Detmold, W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lin, H. -W. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Orginos, K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Parreño, A. [Univ., de Barcelona, Marti Franques (Spain); Savage, M.  J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Quarkonium-nucleus systems are composed of two interacting hadronic states without common valence quarks, which interact primarily through multi-gluon exchanges, realizing a color van der Waals force. We present lattice QCD calculations of the interactions of strange and charm quarkonia with light nuclei. Both the strangeonium-nucleus and charmonium-nucleus systems are found to be relatively deeply bound when the masses of the three light quarks are set equal to that of the physical strange quark. Extrapolation of these results to the physical light-quark masses suggests that the binding energy of charmonium to nuclear matter is B < 40 MeV.

  17. Medium effects in the nucleon- nucleus reaction cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nucleon-nucleus reaction cross-section, σR , has been calculated using Gabblers multiple scattering theory in its optical limit, A medium modified nuclear phase shift function has been obtained for nucleon-nucleus scattering using a medium two body scattering amplitude. In the present calculations, the Coulomb modified Glauber model is used. Also different forms of Gaussian density distribution, for the target nucleus, are used. A comparison of medium modified calculations with the corresponding experimental data has shown that application of the medium effect in the total reaction cross- section plays an important role for low values of energy

  18. Analysis of the thematic content of review Nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer programme for performing standardized analysis of research areas and key concepts of nuclear science and technology under development at Cubaenergia is presented. Main components of the information processing system, as well as computational methods and modules for thematic content analysis of INIS Database record files are described. Results of thematic content analysis of review Nucleus from 1986 to 2005 are shown. Furthermore, results of demonstrative study Nucleus, Science, Technology and Society are also shown. The results provide new elements to asses the significance of the thematic content of review Nucleus in the context of innovation in interrelated multidisciplinary research areas

  19. Neurons of the ventral medulla oblongata that contain both somatostatin and enkephalin immunoreactivities project to nucleus tractus solitarii and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhorn, D E; Seroogy, K; Hökfelt, T; Schmued, L C; Terenius, L; Buchan, A; Brown, J C

    1987-10-20

    The ventral aspect of the medulla oblongata of colchicine-treated rats was examined immunohistochemically using mouse monoclonal antibodies raised against somatostatin (SOM) and rabbit polyclonal antibodies to methionine enkephalin (ENK). Numerous perikarya showed positive immunostaining for both antisera. For the most part, the double-labelled cells were located (1) along the ventrolateral surface in a region that corresponds to nucleus paragigantocellularis, (2) in the region of nucleus gigantocellularis-nucleus raphe magnus and (3) in a discrete area just above the inferior olivary nucleus. In an attempt to determine the projection sites of the SOM/ENK somata, the retrogradely transported fluorescent dye Fluoro-Gold was injected into either the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) or the upper part of the thoracic spinal cord. SOM/ENK cells in all 3 regions were labelled by dye administered into the spinal cord whereas only those SOM/ENK cells located in nucleus paragigantocellularis were stained by dye microinjected into NTS. This is the first evidence of a SOM/ENK projection from the ventral medulla to either the spinal cord or NTS. PMID:2446706

  20. Macaque accessory optic system: I. Definition of the medial terminal nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of the accessory optic system (AOS) has been studied in the macaque monkey following intravitreal injections of tritiated amino acids in one eye. Retinal projections to the dorsal (DTN) and the lateral (LTN) terminal nuclei are identical to those previously described in other primate species. We observed an additional group of retinorecipient cells of the AOS, located between the cerebral peduncle and the substantia nigra, which we define as the interstitial nucleus of the superior fasiculus, medial fibers. In this report, we focus our attention on the medial terminal nucleus (MTN). Although a ventral division of this nucleus (MTNv) was not observed in the macaque, the retina projects to a group of cells in the midbrain reticular formation (MRF), which we argue to be homologous to the dorsal division of the MTN (MTNd). To provide evidence in support of this homology, the retinal projection to the MTNv and MTNd was also examined in 21 additional species from 11 orders of mammals including carnivores, marsupials, lagomorphs, rodents, bats, insectivores, tree shrews, hyraxes, pholidotes, edentates, and five additional species of primates. Whereas the retina projects to both ventral and dorsal divisions in all species studied, in haplorhine primates only the projection to the MTNd is conserved. The relative topological position of the MTNd in the MRF, dorsomedial to the substantia nigra and ventrolateral to the red nucleus, remains constant throughout the mammals. The trajectory of fiber paths innervating the MTNd is also similar in all species. In addition, the MTNd has comparable afferent and efferent connections with retina, pretectum, and vestibular nuclei in all species thus far studied. These results support the unequivocal conclusion that the MTNd is an unvarying feature of the mammalian AOS

  1. Macaque accessory optic system: I. Definition of the medial terminal nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, H.M.; Baleydier, C.; Magnin, M. (Vision et Motricite, Bron (France))

    1990-12-08

    The organization of the accessory optic system (AOS) has been studied in the macaque monkey following intravitreal injections of tritiated amino acids in one eye. Retinal projections to the dorsal (DTN) and the lateral (LTN) terminal nuclei are identical to those previously described in other primate species. We observed an additional group of retinorecipient cells of the AOS, located between the cerebral peduncle and the substantia nigra, which we define as the interstitial nucleus of the superior fasiculus, medial fibers. In this report, we focus our attention on the medial terminal nucleus (MTN). Although a ventral division of this nucleus (MTNv) was not observed in the macaque, the retina projects to a group of cells in the midbrain reticular formation (MRF), which we argue to be homologous to the dorsal division of the MTN (MTNd). To provide evidence in support of this homology, the retinal projection to the MTNv and MTNd was also examined in 21 additional species from 11 orders of mammals including carnivores, marsupials, lagomorphs, rodents, bats, insectivores, tree shrews, hyraxes, pholidotes, edentates, and five additional species of primates. Whereas the retina projects to both ventral and dorsal divisions in all species studied, in haplorhine primates only the projection to the MTNd is conserved. The relative topological position of the MTNd in the MRF, dorsomedial to the substantia nigra and ventrolateral to the red nucleus, remains constant throughout the mammals. The trajectory of fiber paths innervating the MTNd is also similar in all species. In addition, the MTNd has comparable afferent and efferent connections with retina, pretectum, and vestibular nuclei in all species thus far studied. These results support the unequivocal conclusion that the MTNd is an unvarying feature of the mammalian AOS.

  2. Transient expression of somatostatin messenger RNA and peptide in the hypoglossal nucleus of the neonatal rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroogy, K B; Bayliss, D A; Szymeczek, C L; Hökfelt, T; Millhorn, D E

    1991-06-21

    The postnatal developmental expression of somatostatin mRNA and peptide in the rat hypoglossal nucleus was analyzed using immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization techniques. Both the neuropeptide and its cognate mRNA were found to be transiently present within a subpopulation of hypoglossal motoneurons during the neonatal period. At the day of birth, a large population of perikarya situated in caudal, ventral regions of the hypoglossal nucleus expressed somatostatin. By postnatal day 7, the number of hypoglossal somata which expressed somatostatin had diminished considerably, and by 2 weeks postnatal, only few such cell bodies were found. By 3-4 weeks postnatal, somatostatin peptide- and mRNA-containing hypoglossal motoneurons were rarely observed, and in the adult, they were never detected, despite the use of colchicine. A double-labeling co-localization technique was used to demonstrate that somatostatin, when present perinatally, always coexisted with calcitonin gene-related peptide in hypoglossal motoneurons. The latter peptide, in contrast to somatostatin, was expressed in large numbers of somata throughout the entire hypoglossal nucleus and persisted within the motoneurons throughout development into adulthood. These results demonstrate that somatostatin is transiently expressed in motoneurons of the caudal, ventral tier of the hypoglossal nucleus in the neonatal rat. The developmental disappearance of somatostatin is most likely not due to cell death; hypoglossal somata continue to express calcitonin gene-related peptide, with which somatostatin coexisted perinatally, a high levels throughout development. Thus, it appears that the regulation of somatostatin expression in hypoglossal neurons occurs at the level of gene transcription or mRNA stability/degradation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1680035

  3. Presence of a dynorphin-like peptide in a restricted subpopulation of catecholaminergic neurons in rat nucleus tractus solitarii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccatelli, S; Seroogy, K B; Millhorn, D E; Terenius, L

    1992-09-01

    Immunofluorescence colocalization techniques were used to examine the extent of coexistence of the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin with catecholamines and the related opioid peptide enkephalin within neurons of the rat medulla oblongata. Immunoreactivities for dynorphin and the catecholamine-synthesizing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase were found to coexist within a limited subpopulation of A2 catecholamine cells, localized to the medial nucleus of the nucleus tractus solitarii. Colocalization of the two opioid peptides was found mainly within perikarya situated in the medial and ventrolateral nuclei of the nucleus tractus solitarii. Triple-labeling studies revealed only rare cases of catecholamine/dynorphin/enkephalin coexistence. These data demonstrate that dynorphin is present within a restricted subpopulation of catecholamine neurons in the dorsal medulla oblongata. In addition, the content of either of the opioids enkephalin or dynorphin appears to distinguish subsets of medullary catecholamine neurons. PMID:1356595

  4. The linear and rotational motions of the fission yeast nucleus are governed by the stochastic dynamics of spatially distributed microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Tsz Hin; Zheng, Fan; Lin, Yuan; Fu, Chuanhai

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic nuclei are involved in a wide variety of fundamental biological processes including cell migration, cell division and fertilization. Here, we develop a mathematical model, in combination with live-cell imaging at high temporal resolution, to quantitatively elucidate how the linear and rotational motions of the nucleus are governed by the stochastic dynamics of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Our simulation and experimental results demonstrate that microtubule rescue and catastrophe frequencies are the decisive factors in regulating the nuclear movement. Lower rescue and catastrophe frequencies can lead to significantly larger angular and translational oscillations of the nucleus. In addition, our model also suggests that the stochastic dynamics of individual spatially distributed microtubules works collectively as a restoring force to maintain nuclear centering and hence ensures symmetric cell division, in excellent agreement with direct experimental observations. PMID:26921917

  5. Electromagnetic probes of a pure-glue initial state in nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Vovchenko, V; Gorenstein, M I; Satarov, L M; Mishustin, I N; Kämpfer, B; Stoecker, H

    2016-01-01

    Partonic matter produced in the early stage of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is assumed to be composed mainly of gluons, and quarks and antiquarks are produced at later times. To study the implications of such a scenario, the dynamical evolution of the chemically nonequilibrated system is described by the ideal (2+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics with a time dependent (anti)quark fugacity. The equation of state interpolates linearly between the lattice data for the pure gluonic matter and the lattice data for the chemically equilibrated quark-gluon plasma. The spectra and elliptic flows of thermal dileptons and photons are calculated for central Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC energy of $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} = 2.76$ TeV. We test the sensitivity of the results to the choice of equilibration times, including also the case where the complete chemical equilibrium of partons is reached already at the initial stage. It is shown that a suppression of quarks at early times leads to a significant reduction of t...

  6. Semiclassical model for single-particle transitions in nucleus-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A previously elaborated semiclassical one-body model for the dynamics of a single particle, moving in two potentials, in heavy-ion reactions or in fissioning systems has been extended with respect to the inclusion of angular momenta and more realistic separable potentials. The collective relative motion is assumed to proceed along a trajectory which is calculated from classical equations of motion including conservative and phenomenological friction forces. The formalism has been derived involving three-dimensional trajectories for symmetric as well as for asymmetric nucleus-nucleus systems. The model allows for the calculation of correct quantum mechanical transition amplitudes to final bound and continuum states. It has been applied for the investigation of the excitation of a neutron during a fission process, covering also non-statistical differential emission probabilities. From the numerical calculations, using parameters adapted to 252Cf(sf), one can conclude that in the underlying model without 'sudden' processes the energy spectrum consists of two parts. The low lying component is created in the neck region while a high lying part seems to be governed mainly by the dynamics of the underlying collective motion rather than by the specific initial conditions. (orig.)

  7. Multiparticle excitations in the 149 Gd superdeformed nucleus. Signature of new C4 nucleus symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of 8 π and EUROGAM phase I multi-detectors for the study of high spin states of 149 Gd nucleus has revealed unexpected new phenomenons about the superdeformation in this nucleus. The new excited bands confirm the omnipresence of twin bands phenomenon. A new multi-particle excitation (two protons and one neutron) has been discovered. Thanks to the second generation EUROGAM detector, unexpected discoveries such as C4 symmetry, level interactions, complete backbending were obtained for the second potential well. The knowledge of interacting levels gives informations about the nucleon-nucleon residual interaction and could allow the determination of SD bands excitation energy. The complex processing and analysis of high multiplicity events has led to the development of new computing tools. An automatic band research program has been written for the discovery of new excited bands, and an exact method for the elimination of uncorrected events has been developed. The improvements of multi-detector performances should allow the discovery of more exceptional phenomenons and new anomalies in the SD bands. (J.S.). 222 refs., 86 figs., 38 tabs

  8. Transparency and abrasion in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soft spheres geometric model of nucleus-nucleus collisions has been used to incorporate a tapered nuclear density distribution into considerations of transparency and of the abrasion step of the (hard spheres) abrasion-ablation model. The useful concept of an average target transparency tr > required a careful definition to accommodate the fact the transparency becomes unity as the impact parameter approaches infinity. The result is a simple numerical and calculation that gives tr > as a function of the soft spheres parameter χ. The latter depends in a known way on the target and projectile dimensions and on the energy-dependent nucleon-nucleon cross section. In the specific case of projectile = target, the result is an analytical expression reminiscent of the Fernbach, Serber and Taylor result for hard spheres. tr > = 1 - e-χ(χ+1)/χ2. Applications are expected to be valid for any projectile-target combination at intermediate (several hundred MeV/A) through ultrarelativistic (several hundred EeV/A) energies

  9. EOS: A time projection chamber for the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Bevalac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual design is presented for a detector to identify and measure (Δp/p ≅ 1%) most of the 200 or so mid-rapidity charged particles (p, d, t, 3He, 4He, π+-, K+-) produced in each central nucleus-nucleus collision (Au + Au) at Bevalac energies, as well as K30 and Λ0. The beam particles and heavy spectator fragments are excluded from the detection volume by means of a central vacuum pipe. Particle identification is achieved by a combination of dE/dx measurements in the TPC, and of time-of-flight measurements in a scintillator array. The TPC is single-ended and its end cap is entirely covered with cathode pads (about 25,000 pads and about 1000 anode wires). A non-uniform pad distribution is proposed to accommodate the high multiplicity of particles emitted at forward angles. The performance of the detector is assessed with regard to multihit capability, tracking, momentum resolution, particle identification, Λ0 reconstruction, space charge effects, field non-uniformity, dynamic range, data acquisition rate, and data analysis rate. 72 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs

  10. Relativistic transport approach for nucleus-nucleus collisions based on a NJL lagrangian

    CERN Document Server

    Ehehalt, W; Ehehalt, Wolfgang; Cassing, Wolfgang

    1995-01-01

    We formulate a covariant transport approach for high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions where the real part of the hadron selfenergies is evaluated on the basis of a NJL-type Lagrangian for the quark degrees of freedom. The parameters of the model Lagrangian are fixed by the Gell-Mann, Oakes and Renner relation, the pion-nucleon \\Sigma-term, the nucleon energy as well as the nuclear binding energy at saturation density \\rho_0. We find the resulting scalar and vector selfenergies for nucleons to be well in line with either Dirac-Brueckner results or those from the phenomenological optical potential when accounting for a swelling of the nucleon at finite nuclear matter density. The imaginary part of the hadron selfenergies is determined by a string fragmentation model which accounts for the in-medium mass of hadrons in line with the chiral dynamics employed. The applicability of the 'chiral' transport approach is demonstrated in comparison with experimental data from SIS to SPS energies. The enhancement of the K...

  11. Charm quarks as a probe of matter produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yasir

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Direct measurement of hadrons containing charm quark carries important information about the initial stage of the nucleus-nucleus collision at relativistic energies. The study of open charm in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS energies will be a powerful tool to investigate the production of heavy flavours and their interaction with the medium produced in such collisions. A feasibility study was initiated for the measurement of the D0 mesons (open charm by its two-body decay into pion and kaon in central Pb-Pb collision at SPS energies in NA61/SHINE experiment. To generate the physical input we used AMPT (A Multi Phase Transport Model event generator and employed GEANT4 application to describe particle transport through the NA61/SHINE experimental setup supplemented by a future vertex detector (VD that will allow for precise vertex reconstruction close to the primary interaction point. The results of the simulation shows that this measurement is feasible with a dedicated VD which allows the precise tracking close to the target.

  12. Nuclear mean field and double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Khoa, Dao T; Loan, Doan Thi; Loc, Bui Minh

    2016-01-01

    Realistic density dependent CDM3Yn versions of the M3Y interaction have been used in an extended Hartree-Fock (HF) calculation of nuclear matter (NM), with the nucleon single-particle potential determined from the total NM energy based on the Hugenholtz-van Hove theorem that gives rise naturally to a rearrangement term (RT). Using the RT of the single-nucleon potential obtained exactly at different NM densities, the density- and energy dependence of the CDM3Yn interactions was modified to account properly for both the RT and observed energy dependence of the nucleon optical potential. Based on a local density approximation, the double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential has been extended to take into account consistently the rearrangement effect and energy dependence of the nuclear mean-field potential, using the modified CDM3Yn interactions. The extended double-folding model was applied to study the elastic $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C and $^{16}$O+$^{12}$C scattering at the refractive energies, wher...

  13. EOS: A time projection chamber for the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Bevalac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, H.G.; Odyniec, G.; Rai, G.; Seidl, P.

    1986-12-01

    The conceptual design is presented for a detector to identify and measure (..delta..p/p approx. = 1%) most of the 200 or so mid-rapidity charged particles (p, d, t, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He, ..pi../sup + -/, K/sup + -/) produced in each central nucleus-nucleus collision (Au + Au) at Bevalac energies, as well as K/sub 3//sup 0/ and ..lambda../sup 0/. The beam particles and heavy spectator fragments are excluded from the detection volume by means of a central vacuum pipe. Particle identification is achieved by a combination of dE/dx measurements in the TPC, and of time-of-flight measurements in a scintillator array. The TPC is single-ended and its end cap is entirely covered with cathode pads (about 25,000 pads and about 1000 anode wires). A non-uniform pad distribution is proposed to accommodate the high multiplicity of particles emitted at forward angles. The performance of the detector is assessed with regard to multihit capability, tracking, momentum resolution, particle identification, ..lambda../sup 0/ reconstruction, space charge effects, field non-uniformity, dynamic range, data acquisition rate, and data analysis rate. 72 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Energy-Dependence of Nucleus-Nucleus Potential and Friction Parameter in Fusion Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Kai; Li, Zhu-Xia; Wu, Xi-Zhen; Zhang, Ying-Xun; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2014-01-01

    Applying a macroscopic reduction procedure on the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD), the energy dependences of the nucleus-nucleus potential, the friction parameter, and the random force characterizing a one-dimensional Langevin-type description of the heavy-ion fusion process are investigated. Systematic calculations with the ImQMD show that the fluctuation-dissipation relation found in the symmetric head-on fusion reactions at energies just above the Coulomb barrier fades out when the incident energy increases. It turns out that this dynamical change with increasing incident energy is caused by a specific behavior of the friction parameter which directly depends on the microscopic dynamical process, i.e., on how the collective energy of the relative motion is transferred into the intrinsic excitation energy. It is shown microscopically that the energy dissipation in the fusion process is governed by two mechanisms: One is caused by the nucleon exchanges between two fusing nuclei, and the other is ...

  15. Statistical Model of the Early Stage of nucleus-nucleus collisions with exact strangeness conservation

    CERN Document Server

    Poberezhnyuk, R V; Gorenstein, M I

    2015-01-01

    The Statistical Model of the Early Stage, SMES, describes a transition between confined and deconfined phases of strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The model was formulated in the late 1990s for central Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS energies. It predicted several signals of the transition (onset of deconfinement) which were later observed by the NA49 experiment. The grand canonical ensemble was used to calculate entropy and strangeness production. This approximation is valid for reactions with mean multiplicities of particles carrying conserved charges being significantly larger than one. Recent results of NA61/SHINE on hadron production in inelastic p+p interactions suggest that the deconfinement may also take place in these reactions. However, in this case mean multiplicity of particles with non-zero strange charge is smaller than one. Thus for the modeling of p+p interactions the exact strangeness conservation has to be implemented in the SMES. This extension of the SMES ...

  16. Nucleus--nucleus interactions in the inner crust of neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kobyakov, D

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between nuclei in the inner crust of neutron stars consists of two contributions, the so-called "direct" interaction and an "induced" one due to density changes in the neutron fluid. For large nuclear separations $r$ the contributions from nuclear forces to each of these terms are shown to be nonzero. In the static limit they are equal in magnitude but have opposite signs and they cancel exactly. We analyze earlier results on effective interactions in the light of this finding. We consider the properties of long-wavelength collective modes and, in particular, calculate the degree of mixing between the lattice phonons and the phonons in the neutron superfluid. Using microscopic theory, we calculate the net non-Coulombic contribution to the nucleus--nucleus interaction and show that, for large $r$, the leading term is due to exchange of two phonons and varies as $1/r^7$: it is an analog of the Casimir--Polder interaction between neutral atoms.

  17. Estimation of nuclear destruction in high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is assumed that: 1) a projectile particle invokes into target nucleus a cascade of quark-gluon exchanges; 2) the nucleons involved in the cascade are ejected from the nucleus which leads to the nuclear destruction. On these bases a simple model to estimate the nuclear destruction at the fast stage of the interaction is proposed. The allowed region of the model parameters is determined at the proton-emulsion high-energy interaction data analysis: an analysis of gold interactions with nuclei at an energy of 600 MeV/nucleon fixes the parameter values. The distributions on the energy in zero degree calorimeter (TZDC) in the interactions of Si+Al, Cu, Pb (14 GeV/nucleon) and Au+Au (10 GeV/nucleon) calculated in the framework of the model and in the cascade-evaporation model (CEM) are presented. The proposed model describes the nuclear destruction at intermediate and high energies better than CEM does. The estimation of the average values of impact parameter and the number of intra-nuclear collisions for Au+Au interactions in the events with different TZDC is given. 34 refs., 11 figs

  18. Transcutaneous induction of stimulus timing dependent plasticity in dorsal cochlear nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin Wu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The cochlear nucleus (CN is the first site of multisensory integration in the ascending auditory pathway. The principal output neurons of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN, fusiform cells, receive somatosensory information relayed by the CN granule cells from the trigeminal and dorsal column pathways. Integration of somatosensory and auditory inputs results in long-term enhancement or suppression in a stimulus timing dependent manner. Here we demonstrate that stimulus timing dependent plasticity (STDP can be induced in DCN fusiform cells using paired auditory and transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the face and neck to activate trigeminal and dorsal column pathways to the CN, respectively. Long-lasting changes in fusiform cell firing rates persisted for up to two hours after this bimodal stimulation, and followed Hebbian or anti-Hebbian rules, depending on tone duration, but not somatosensory stimulation location: 50 ms paired tones evoked predominantly Hebbian, while 10 ms paired tones evoked predominantly anti-Hebbian plasticity. The tone-duration dependent STDP was strongly correlated with first inter-spike intervals, implicating intrinsic cellular properties as determinants of STDP. This study demonstrates that transcutaneous stimulation with precise auditory-somatosensory timing parameters can non-invasively induce fusiform cell long-term modulation, which could be harnessed in the future to moderate tinnitus-related hyperactivity in DCN.

  19. Electrical stimulation of cerebellar fastigial nucleus protects rat brain, in vitro, from staurosporine-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P; Qian, L; Glickstein, S B; Golanov, E V; Pickel, V M; Reis, D J

    2001-10-01

    Electrical stimulation of the cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) elicits a prolonged ( approximately 10 days) and substantial (50-80%) protection against ischemic and excitotoxic injuries. The mechanism(s) of protection are unknown. We investigated whether FN stimulation directly protects brain cells against apoptotic cell death in an in vitro rat brain slice culture model. Rats were electrically stimulated in FN or, as control, the cerebellar dentate nucleus (DN). Coronal slices through the forebrain were explanted, exposed to staurosporine, harvested, and analyzed for caspase-3 activity by a fluorescence assay. FN, but not DN, stimulation significantly reduced staurosporine-induced caspase-3 activity by 39 +/- 7% at 3 h, 31 +/- 3% at 6 h and 26 +/- 4% at 10 h of incubation. Immunocytochemistry revealed FN-specific reductions in activated caspase-3 mainly in glial-like cells throughout the forebrain. FN stimulation also results in a 56.5% reduction in cytochrome c release upon staurosporine incubation. We conclude that neuroprotection elicited from FN stimulation can directly modify the sensitivity of brain cells to apoptotic stimuli and thereby suppress staurosporine induced apoptosis in adult rat brain slices. This model indicates that neuroprotection can be studied in vitro and provides new insight into the potential role of glial cells in ischemic protection of neurons induced by FN stimulation. PMID:11677261

  20. Thermalization in high energy proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relativistic proton-nucleus collision using the intranuclear cascade model is studied. The purpose is to verify the equilibration hypothesis at fragmentation time made by many nuclear fragmentation models. (author)

  1. Red nucleus connectivity as revealed by constrained spherical deconvolution tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milardi, Demetrio; Cacciola, Alberto; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Marino, Silvia; Irrera, Mariangela; Cacciola, Giorgio; Santoro, Giuseppe; Ciolli, Pietro; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-07-28

    Previous Diffusion Tensor Imaging studies have demonstrated that the human red nucleus is widely interconnected with sensory-motor and prefrontal cortices. In this study, we assessed red nucleus connectivity by using a multi-tensor model called non- negative Constrained Spherical Deconvolution (CSD), which is able to resolve more than one fiber orientation per voxel. Connections of the red nuclei of fifteen volunteers were studied at 3T using CSD axonal tracking. We found significant connectivity between RN and the following cortical and subcortical areas: cerebellar cortex, thalamus, paracentral lobule, postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, superior frontal gyrus and dentate nucleus. We confirmed that red nucleus is tightly linked with the cerebral cortex and has dense subcortical connections with thalamus and cerebellar cortex. These findings may be useful in a clinical context considering that RN is involved in motor control and it is known to have potential to compensate for injury of the corticospinal tract. PMID:27181514

  2. Isotope Dependence of Superheavy Nucleus Formation Cross Section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zu-Hua; BAG Jing-Dong

    2006-01-01

    The dynamical process in the superheavy nucleus synthesis is studied on the basis of the two-dimensional Smolu-chowski equation. Special attention is paid to the isotope dependence of the cross section for the superheavy nucleus formation by means of making a comparison among the reaction systems of 54Fe + 204Pb, 56Fe + 206Pb, and 58Fe + 208Pb. It is found by this comparison that the formation cross section is very sensitive to the conditional saddle-point height and the neutron separation energy of the compound nucleus. Reaction systems with lower height of conditional saddle-point and smaller neutron separation energy are more favourable for the synthesis of the superheavy nucleus.

  3. Low-Energy Antinucleon-Nucleus Interaction Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, E

    2015-01-01

    Annihilation cross sections of antiprotons and antineutrons on the proton between 50 and 400 MeV/c show Coulomb focusing below 200 MeV/c and almost no charge-dependence above 200 MeV/c. Similar comparisons for heavier targets are not possible for lack of overlap between nuclear targets studied with $\\bar p$ and $\\bar n$ beams. Interpolating between $\\bar p$-nucleus annihilation cross sections with the help of an optical potential to compare with $\\bar n$-nucleus annihilation cross sections reveal unexpected features of Coulomb interactions in the latter. Direct comparisons between $\\bar n$-nucleus and $\\bar p$-nucleus annihilations at very low energies could be possible if $\\bar p$ cross sections are measured on the same targets and at the same energies as the available cross sections for $\\bar n$. Such measurements may be feasible in the foreseeable future.

  4. Microscopic relativistic model for deuteron-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relativistic deuteron structure described by the Bethe-Salpeter formalism is used to obtain the deuteron-nucleus interaction from the covariant convolution of Dirac-phenomenology nucleon-nucleus potentials. Multiple scattering contributions to deuteron-nucleus scattering are taken into account by the positive energy subtracted impulse approximation which results from an analysis of the role played by the relativistic degrees of freedom. A detailed comparison of calculations with deuteron-nucleus elastic scattering data at intermediate energies, including polarization observables, is presented. It is shown that good agreement with the data is obtained when the full spin structure of the interaction that results from the relativistic model is included in the calculations. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. Nucleus management in manual small incision cataract surgery by phacosection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleus management is critical in manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS, as the integrity of the tunnel, endothelium and posterior capsule needs to be respected. Several techniques of nucleus management are in vogue, depending upon the specific technique of MSICS. Nucleus can be removed in toto or bisected or trisected into smaller segments. The pressure in the eye can be maintained at the desired level with the use of an anterior chamber maintainer or kept at atmospheric levels. In MSICS, unlike phacoemulsification, there is no need to limit the size of the tunnel or restrain the size of capsulorrhexis. Large well-structured tunnels and larger capsulorrhexis provide better control on the surgical maneuvers. Safety and simplicity of MSICS has made it extremely popular. The purpose of this article is to describe nucleus management by phacosection in MSICS.

  6. Asymptotic properties of high-pT particle production in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tokarev, M V

    2001-01-01

    The concept of z-scaling reflecting the general features of particle substructure, constituent interaction and mechanism of particle formation is reviewed. Experimental data on the cross sections obtained at ISR, SpS and Tevatron are used in the analysis. The properties of data z-presentation, the energy and angular independencies, the power law, A- and F-dependencies, are discussed. The use of z-scaling to search for new physics phenomena in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is suggested. The violation of z-scaling characterized by the change of the fractal dimension is considered as a new and complimentary signature of nuclear phase transition.

  7. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) somatic nucleus can dedifferentiate in rabbit ooplasm and support early development of the reconstructed egg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大元; 孙青原; 刘冀珑; 李光鹏; 廉莉; 王敏康; 韩之明; 宋祥芬; 李劲松; 孙强; 陈玉村; 张亚平; 丁波

    1999-01-01

    The giant panda skeletal muscle cells, uterus epithelial cells and mammary gland cells from an adult individual were cultured and used as nucleus donor for the construction of interspecies embryos by transferring them into enucleated rabbit eggs. All the three kinds of somatic cells were able to reprogram in rabbit ooplasm and support early embryo development, of which mammary gland cells were proven to be the best, followed by uterus epithelial cells and skeletal muscle cells. The experiments showed that direct injection of mammary gland cell into enucleated rabbit ooplasm, combined with in vivo development in ligated rabbit oviduct, achieved higher blastoeyst development than in vitro culture after the somatic cell was injected into the perivitelline space and fused with the enucleated egg by electrical stimulation. The chromosome analysis demonstrated that the genetic materials in reconstructed blastocyst cells were the same as that in panda somatic cells. In addition, giant panda mitochondrial DNA (

  8. CNTF Receptor Alpha is Expressed by Magnocellular Neurons and Expression is Upregulated in the Rat Supraoptic Nucleus During Axonal Sprouting

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, John A.; Lo, David; Cranston, Harwood J.; Paden, Charles M

    2008-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is expressed by glial cells at multiple levels of the magnocellular neurosecretory system (MNS). CNTF is present in astrocytes in the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus (SON) as well as in perivascular cells in the neurohypophysis, and a several fold increase in CNTF immunoreactivity occurs in the SON following either axotomy of magnocellular neurons or during axonal sprouting by intact magnocellular neurons. CNTF also promotes survival and stimulates process o...

  9. Specific structure of the 6He nucleus and fragmentation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the microscopic α+2n model, transverse momentum distributions of α-particles and neutrons as well as α-particle - neutron momentum correlation function have been calculated for the radioactive 6He nucleus fragmentation. The results show that these momentum distributions reflect a specific structure of the 6He nucleus, i.e. the experiments on fragmentation provide with the information on 6He structure. (orig.)

  10. Nucleus Pearl Coating Process of Freshwater Mussel Anodonta woodiana (Unionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    WASMEN MANALU; DEDY DURYADI SOLIHIN; SATA YOSHIDA SRIE RAHAYU; RIDWAN AFFANDI

    2013-01-01

    The limiting factor which is a weakness of sea water pearl production are high costs, the risk of major business failures and a long coating time. From the issue of freshwater pearls appear to have prospects of alternative substitution for sea water pearl. This present study aimed to evaluate effect of loads (the number and diameter nucleus) on freshwater pearl coating process and the number and size of the appropriate nucleus diameter, to produce the optimum coating thickness of half-round p...

  11. Limbic and cortical information processing in the nucleus accumbens

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Yukiori; Grace, Anthony A.

    2008-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens regulates goal-directed behaviors by integrating information from limbic structures and the prefrontal cortex. Here, we review recent studies in an attempt to provide an integrated view of the control of information processing in the nucleus accumbens in terms of the regulation of goal-directed behaviors and how disruption of these functions might underlie the pathological states in drug addiction and other psychiatric disorders. We propose a model that could account for...

  12. Vacuum polarization and quadrupole moment of a heavy nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution of the vacuum polarization to the quadrupole moment of a heavy nucleus is considered. The leading term is obtained exactly in Zα, using the electron Green function in the Coulomb field. This term contains the large logarithm of the ratio λ/R, where R is the nucleus radius and λ is the electron Compton wavelength. The spatial distributions of the induced charge and potential are discussed also. 9 refs.; 1 fig

  13. Ion-beam spectroscopic studies of the 69As nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excited state of the neutron deficient 69As nucleus were investigated in the 58Ni(14N,2pn) reaction by ion-beam γ spectroscopic methods (excitation functions, γγ-coincidences, angular distributions and linear polarization gated with neutrons). A new more complete level scheme of 69As has been proposed with spin-parity values. The structure of the nucleus is discussed in the framework of the interaction boson-fermion model (IBFM). (authors)

  14. New computational methods for determining antikaon-nucleus bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical potential for antikaon-nucleus strong interactions are constructed using elementary antikaon-nucleus potentials determined previously. The optical potentials are used to determine the existence of a kaon hypernucleus. Modern three dimensional visualization techniques are used to study model dependences, new methods for speeding the calculation of the optical potential are developed, and previous approximation to avoid full Fermi averaging are eliminated. 19 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Inelaticity in hadron-nucleus collisions from emulsion chamber studies

    CERN Document Server

    Wilk, G

    1999-01-01

    The inelasticity of hadron-carbon nucleus collisions in the energy region exceeding 100 TeV is estimated from the carbon-emulsion chamber data at Pamirs to be $ = 0.65\\pm 0.08$. When combined with the recently presented data on hadron-lead nucleus collisions taken at the same energy range it results in the $K\\sim A^{0.086}$ mass number dependence of inelasticity. The evaluated partial inelasticity for secondary ($\

  16. Shell Correction at the Saddle Point for Superheavy Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张炜; 张时声; 张双全; 孟杰

    2003-01-01

    The potential energy surface for superheavy nucleus has been studied within the framework of the constrained relativistic mean field theory, and the shell correction energy as a function of deformation has been extracted by the Strutinsky shell correction procedure. Contrary to the usual expectation, the shell correction energy at the saddle point is too important to be neglected, and it has essential contribution to the fission barrier in superheavy nucleus.

  17. 3200 Phaethon, Asteroid or Comet Nucleus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Benkhoff, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    Physico-chemical modeling is central to understand the important physical processes in small solar system bodies. We have developed a computer simulation, SUISEI, that includes the physico-chemical processes relevant to comets within a global modeling framework. Our goals are to gain valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of cometary nuclei so we can better understand observations and in situ measurements. SUISEI includes a 3-D model of gas and heat transport in porous sub-surface layers in the interior of the nucleus.We present results on the application of SUISEI to the near-Sun object, Phaethon. Discovered in 1983 and classified as an asteroid, it has recently exhibited an active dust coma. Phaethon has long been associated as the source of the Geminids meteor shower so the dust activity provides a clear link to the meteor shower. The observed dust activity would traditionally lead to Phaethon being also classified as a comet (e.g., 2060-95P/Chiron, 133P/Elst-Pizarro). This is unusual since the orbit of Phaethon has a perihelion of 0.14 AU, resulting in surface temperatures of more than 1025K, much too hot for water ice or other volatiles to exist near the surface and drive the activity. This situation and others such as the “Active Asteroids” necessitates a revision of how we understand and classify these small asteroid-comet transition objects.We conclude the following for Phaethon:1. It is likely to contain relatively pristine volatiles in its interior despite repeated near perihelion passages of 0.14 AU during its history in its present orbit,2. Steady water gas fluxes at perihelion and throughout its orbit are insufficient to entrain the currently observed dust production,3. Thermal gradients into the surface as well as those caused by diurnal rotation are consistent with the mechanism of dust release due to thermal fracture,4. The initial large gas release during the first perihelion passage may be sufficient to produce enough dust to explain

  18. A Universal Description of Pseudorapidity Distributions in Both Nucleus-Nucleus and p-p Collisions at Currently Available Energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations have shown that the collective motion appears not only in nucleus-nucleus but also in p-p collisions. The best tool for depicting such collective motion is relativistic hydrodynamics. In this paper, the collective motion is assumed to obey the hydrodynamic model which integrates the features of Landau and Hwa-Bjorken theory and is one of a very few analytically solvable models. The fluid is then supposed to freeze out into charged particles from a space-like hypersurface with a fixed time of tFO. The investigations of present paper show that this part of charged particles together with leading particles, which, by conventional definition, carry on the quantum numbers of colliding nucleons and take away the most part of incident energy, can give a proper universal description to the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles measured in both nucleus-nucleus and p-p collisions at currently available energies.

  19. Herpesvirus nuclear egress: Pseudorabies Virus can simultaneously induce nuclear envelope breakdown and exit the nucleus via the envelopment-deenvelopment-pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Katharina S; Klupp, Barbara G; Granzow, Harald; Passvogel, Lars; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2015-11-01

    Herpesvirus replication takes place in the nucleus and in the cytosol. After entering the cell, nucleocapsids are transported to nuclear pores where viral DNA is released into the nucleus. After gene expression and DNA replication new nucleocapsids are assembled which have to exit the nucleus for virion formation in the cytosol. Since nuclear pores are not wide enough to allow passage of the nucleocapsid, nuclear egress occurs by vesicle-mediated transport through the nuclear envelope. To this end, nucleocapsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane (INM) recruiting a primary envelope which then fuses with the outer nuclear membrane (ONM). In the absence of this regulated nuclear egress, mutants of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus have been described that escape from the nucleus after virus-induced nuclear envelope breakdown. Here we review these exit pathways and demonstrate that both can occur simultaneously under appropriate conditions. PMID:25678269

  20. The picture of the nuclei disintegration mechanism - from nucleus-nucleus collision experimental data at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental data on nuclear collisions at high energies, mainly obtained from photographic emulsions, are considered from the point of view of the picture of the nuclear collision processes mechanisms prompted experimentally. In fact, the disintegration products of each nucleus involved in a nuclear collision, in its own rest-frame, are similar to that produced by the impact of a number of nucleons of velocity equal to that of the moving primary nucleus

  1. Modulation of the arcuate nucleus-medial preoptic nucleus lordosis regulating circuit: a role for GABAB receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Sinchak, Kevin; Dewing, Phoebe; Ponce, Laura; Gomez, Liliana; Christensen, Amy; Berger, Max; Micevych, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Estradiol rapidly activates a microcircuit in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH) that is needed for maximal female sexual receptivity. Membrane estrogen receptor-α complexes with and signals through the metabotropic glutamate receptor-1a stimulating NPY release within the ARH activating proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. These POMC neurons project to the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) and release β-endorphin. Estradiol treatment induces activation/internalization of MPN μ-opioid re...

  2. ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF MORPHOLOGICALLY-IDENTIFIED MEDIAL VESTIBULAR NUCLEUS NEURONS PROJECTING TO THE ABDUCENS NUCLEUS IN THE CHICK EMBRYO

    OpenAIRE

    Gottesman-Davis, Adria; Shao, Mei; Hirsch, June C.; Peusner, Kenna D.

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) show a wide range of axonal projection pathways, intrinsic firing properties, and responses to head movements. To determine whether MVN neurons participating in the vestibulocular reflexes (VOR) have distinctive electrophysiological properties related to their output pathways, a new preparation was devised using transverse brain slices containing the chicken MVN and abducens nucleus. Biocytin Alexa Fluor was injected extracellularly into the abdu...

  3. Electrotonic signals along intracellular membranes may interconnect dendritic spines and nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Shemer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Synapses on dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons show a remarkable ability to induce phosphorylation of transcription factors at the nuclear level with a short latency, incompatible with a diffusion process from the dendritic spines to the nucleus. To account for these findings, we formulated a novel extension of the classical cable theory by considering the fact that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an effective charge separator, forming an intrinsic compartment that extends from the spine to the nuclear membrane. We use realistic parameters to show that an electrotonic signal may be transmitted along the ER from the dendritic spines to the nucleus. We found that this type of signal transduction can additionally account for the remarkable ability of the cell nucleus to differentiate between depolarizing synaptic signals that originate from the dendritic spines and back-propagating action potentials. This study considers a novel computational role for dendritic spines, and sheds new light on how spines and ER may jointly create an additional level of processing within the single neuron.

  4. On the Role of the Transition State Nucleus in Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although it is well-known that times. In order for fission to compete favourably with gamma-ray and neutron emission, a fixed amount of energy, equivalent to an activation energy in a chemical reaction, must be supplied to the heavy nucleus. This energy (often referred to as the fission threshold) is approximately 5 to 6 MeV for U238, and is the minimum energy required to produce the deformed transition state nucleus (zero internal excitation energy). In the process of stretching the original nucleus into the transition state nucleus (whose distortion is sometimes described as the saddle-point deformation), the increase in energy due to the short-range nuclear forces (surface tension) is greater than the decrease in energy due to the long-range Coulomb forces. However, as the particular distortion defining the transition state nucleus is approached, the decrease in Coulomb energy becomes equal to the increase in surface energy. The degree of distortion needed to produce the transition state nucleus is a function of several nuclear parameters and, hence, the saddle shape and threshold energy for fission change markedly for different nuclei. Since a large fraction of the excitation energy of the initial compound nucleus is consumed in deformation energy in passing to the fission saddle point, the transition state nucleus is thermodynamically ''cold''. Hence, for low excitation energies where the non-fission degrees of freedom favour the passage of the barrier with only a small kinetic energy, it seems reasonable to postulate that the traversal time of the saddle or the lifetime of the transition state nucleus is many orders of magnitude longer than the characteristic nuclear time. This leads to the prediction that the highly deformed transition state nucleus will have properties, including a spectrum of excited states, analogous to those of normal nuclei. Information on highly deformed transition state nuclei obtained by fission-fragment angular distribution studies

  5. Fluctuations and correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions within transport approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konchakovski, Volodymyr P.

    2009-10-01

    The current thesis is devoted to a systematic study of fluctuations and correlations in heavy-ion collisions, which might be considered as probes for the phase transition and the critical point in the phase diagram, within the Hadron-String- Dynamics (HSD) microscopic transport approach. This is a powerful tool to study nucleus-nucleus collisions and allows to completely simulate experimental collisions on an event-by-event basis. Thus, the transport model has been used to study fluctuations and correlations including the influence of experimental acceptance as well as centrality, system size and collision energy. The comparison to experimental data can separate the effects induced by a phase transition since there is no phase transition in the HSD version used here. Firstly the centrality dependence of multiplicity fluctuations has been studied. Different centrality selections have been performed in the analysis in correspondence to the experimental situation. For the fixed target experiment NA49 events with fixed numbers of the projectile participants have been studied while in the collider experiment PHENIX centrality classes of events have been defined by the multiplicity in certain phase space region. A decrease of participant number fluctuations (and thus volume fluctuations) in more central collisions for both experiments has been obtained. Another area of this work addresses to transport model calculations of multiplicity fluctuations in nucleus-nucleus collisions as a function of colliding energy and system size. This study is in full correspondence to the experimental program of the NA61 Collaboration at the SPS. Central C+C, S+S, In+In, and Pb+Pb nuclear collisions at Elab = 10, 20, 30, 40, 80, 158 AGeV have been investigated. The expected enhanced fluctuations - attributed to the critical point and phase transition - can be observed experimentally on top of a monotonic and smooth 'hadronic background'. These findings should be helpful for the

  6. Fluctuations and correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions within transport approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current thesis is devoted to a systematic study of fluctuations and correlations in heavy-ion collisions, which might be considered as probes for the phase transition and the critical point in the phase diagram, within the Hadron-String- Dynamics (HSD) microscopic transport approach. This is a powerful tool to study nucleus-nucleus collisions and allows to completely simulate experimental collisions on an event-by-event basis. Thus, the transport model has been used to study fluctuations and correlations including the influence of experimental acceptance as well as centrality, system size and collision energy. The comparison to experimental data can separate the effects induced by a phase transition since there is no phase transition in the HSD version used here. Firstly the centrality dependence of multiplicity fluctuations has been studied. Different centrality selections have been performed in the analysis in correspondence to the experimental situation. For the fixed target experiment NA49 events with fixed numbers of the projectile participants have been studied while in the collider experiment PHENIX centrality classes of events have been defined by the multiplicity in certain phase space region. A decrease of participant number fluctuations (and thus volume fluctuations) in more central collisions for both experiments has been obtained. Another area of this work addresses to transport model calculations of multiplicity fluctuations in nucleus-nucleus collisions as a function of colliding energy and system size. This study is in full correspondence to the experimental program of the NA61 Collaboration at the SPS. Central C+C, S+S, In+In, and Pb+Pb nuclear collisions at Elab = 10, 20, 30, 40, 80, 158 AGeV have been investigated. The expected enhanced fluctuations - attributed to the critical point and phase transition - can be observed experimentally on top of a monotonic and smooth 'hadronic background'. These findings should be helpful for the optimal

  7. Nucleus24人工耳蜗系统直电极与弯电极神经反应遥测值的比较%Compare NRT value of straight electrode and contour electrode in Nucleus24 cochlear implant system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶勇; 郑芸; 王恺; 孟照莉; 胥科

    2012-01-01

    Objectlve;To learn the neural response of spiral ganglion cell to electrical stimulus by comparing the neural response teletnetry(NRT) value between straight electrode and contour electrode in Nucleus 24 cochlear implant system. Method: Fourty-six patients with Nucleus 24 cochlear implants were paired into two groups: 23 with contour electrode and 23 with straight electrode respectively. NRT value of each group were tested and com-pared. Resull:The NRT value of straight electrode fell in the range of 160 μV to 170 μV and contour electrode 150 μV to 160 /zV. The NRT were going up higher a little bit from electrode twenty to electrode one. Conclusion; The contour electrode requires less power consumption than straight electrode in Nucleus 24 cochlear implant sys-tem.%目的:测试和比较Nucleus 24人工耳蜗系统中直电极与弯电极神经反应遥测(NRT)值的差别,分析内耳螺旋神经节细胞对不同电极电刺激反应特性的差异.方法:对46例进行耳蜗植入和编程的Nucleus 24人工耳蜗系统直电极与弯电板患者进行配对分析,计算患者vNRT值的均值,并进行统计学比较.结果:直电极的NRT值为160~170 μV,弯电极为150~160 μV,总的趋势是低频值较低而高频值较高.结论:Nucleus 24人工耳蜗系统弯电极较直电极所需电刺激量略低.

  8. Pedunculopontine Nucleus Gamma Band Activity-Preconscious Awareness, Waking, and REM Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Urbano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN is a major component of the reticular activating system (RAS that regulates waking and REM sleep, states of high frequency EEG activity. Recently, we described the presence of high threshold, voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type calcium channels in RAS nuclei that subserve gamma band oscillations in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN, intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf, and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD. Cortical gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. That is, the RAS may play an early permissive role in volition. Our latest results suggest that, 1 the manifestation of gamma band activity during waking may employ a separate intracellular pathway compared to that during REM sleep, 2 neuronal calcium sensor (NCS-1 protein, which is over expressed in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, modulates gamma band oscillations in the PPN in a concentration-dependent manner, 3 leptin, which undergoes resistance in obesity resulting in sleep dysregulation, decreases sodium currents in PPN neurons, accounting for its normal attenuation of waking, and 4 following our discovery of electrical coupling in the RAS, we hypothesize that there are cell clusters within the PPN that may act in concert. These results provide novel information on the mechanisms controlling high frequency activity related to waking and REM sleep by elements of the RAS.

  9. Upregulation of cathepsin D in the caudate nucleus of primates with experimental parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flynn Claudia T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Parkinson's disease there is progressive loss of dopamine containing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. The neuronal damage is not limited to the substantia nigra but progresses to other regions of brain, leading to loss of motor control as well as cognitive abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to examine causes of progressive damage in the caudate nucleus, which plays a major role in motor coordination and cognition, in experimental Parkinson's disease. Results Using chronic 1-methyl-4phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine treatment of rhesus monkeys to model Parkinson's disease, we found a upregulation of Cathepsin D, a lysosomal aspartic protease, in the caudate nucleus of treated monkeys. Immunofluorescence analysis of caudate nucleus brain tissue showed that the number of lysosomes increased concurrently with the increase in Cathepsin D in neurons. In vitro overexpression of Cathepsin D in a human neuroblastoma cell line led to a significant increase in the number of the lysosomes. Such expression also resulted in extralysosomal Cathepsin D and was accompanied by significant neuronal death associated with caspase activation. We examined apoptotic markers and found a strong correlation of Cathepsin D overexpression to apoptosis. Conclusions Following damage to the substantia nigra resulting in experimental Parkinson's disease, we have identified pathological changes in the caudate nucleus, a likely site of changes leading to the progression of disease. Cathepsin D, implicated in pathogenic mechanisms in other disorders, was increased, and our in vitro studies revealed its overexpression leads to cellular damage and death. This work provides important clues to the progression of Parkinson's, and provides a new target for strategies to ameliorate the progression of this disease.

  10. Femtosecond laser combined with non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique for soft-nucleus cataract surgery: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Lin, Haotian; Chen, Wan; Zhang, Bo; Xiang, Wu; Li, Jing; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Soft-lens cataract surgeries are becoming increasingly common for cataract surgeons and chopping the soft nucleus using conventional techniques is problematic. We introduced a femtosecond laser combined with a non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique for soft-nucleus cataract surgery and evaluated the safety and efficacy of using this technique. Sixty-six patients with soft-nucleus cataracts ranging from grade 1~3 were divided into 3 groups based on nuclear staging. Those groups were further divided into three subgroups: femtosecond laser pretreatment combined with a non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique (subgroup 1), conventional manual cataract surgery with a non-chopping rotation technique (subgroup 2) and conventional manual cataract surgery with a quick-chop technique (subgroup 3).Patients were followed up at 1, 7, and 30 days after surgery. There was an 84.6% and a 63.34% reduction in ultrasound time and cumulative dissipated energy, respectively, between the subgroup 1 and the subgroup 3; and this was associated with a 36.1% and 29.7% reduction in endothelial cell loss and aqueous flare. There were no adverse events at the follow-up times. With its reduced ultrasound energy, endothelial cell loss and aqueous flare, the femtosecond laser pretreatment combined with a non-chopping rotation technique was more efficient than conventional manual cataract surgery for soft-nucleus cataracts. PMID:26728573

  11. Neurons excitability changes in rat medial vestibular nucleus following vestibular neurectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金麟毅

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic excitabilities of acutely isolated medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons of rats with normal labyrinth and with undergoingvestibular compensation from 30 min to 24 h after unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD) were compared. In control rats, proportions of type A andB cells were 30 and 70%, respectively, however, the proportion of type A cells increased following UVD. Bursting discharge and irregular firingpatterns were recorded from 2 to 12 h post UVD. The spontaneous discharge rate of neurons in the ipsilesional MVN increased significantly at 2 hpost-UVD and remained high until 12 h post-UVD in both type A and type B cells. Mter-hyperpolarization (AHP) of the MVN neurons decreasedsignificantly from 2 h post-UVD in both types of cells. These results suggest that the early stage of vestibular compensation after peripheralneurectomy is associated with an increase in intrinsic excitability due to reduction of AHP in MVN neurons.

  12. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  13. 体外静水压环境下细胞因子诱导骨髓间充质干细胞向髓核样细胞分化%Cytokine-induced differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into nucleus pulposus-like cells under hydrostatic pressure in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江; 贾育松; 柳根哲; 孙旗; 白文博; 王利

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cels is induced by integrated factors.In vitro interaction of cytokine complex and certain cel mechanical stimulation is carried out to further improve the efficiency of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cels differentiating into nucleus pulposus-like cels. OBJECTIVE:To investigate the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cels into nucleus pulposus-like cels induced by transforming growth factor-β1 and insulin-like growth factor-1 under hydrostatic pressure. METHODS: Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cels from adult rats were separated, cultured and purified in vitro. Passage 3 cels were induced in vitrowith transforming growth factor-β1 and insulin-like growth factor-1 under hydrostatic pressure (hydrostatic pressure group), with transforming growth factor-β1 and insulin-like growth factor-1 under normal pressure (drug group), or with normal culture medium under normal pressure (blank control group). RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:At day 14 after culture, polygonal nucleus pulposus-like cels were observed in the hydrostatic pressure group, but irregular cels in the drug group. There was no obvious change in the blank control group. Levels of colagen type II and DNA were higher in the hydrostatic pressure group than the other two groups. These findings indicate that the combination of transforming growth factor-β1 and insulin-like growth factor-1 can successfuly induce the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cels into nucleus pulposus-like cels under hydrostatic pressure, and the differentiation efficiency is higher under hydrostatic pressure than under normal pressure.%背景:骨髓间充质干细胞的诱导分化受到综合因素的共同作用,体外通过一定的细胞力学刺激结合细胞因子复合体共同作用,以期进一步提高干细胞髓核样细胞分化的效率。目的:观察在体外静水压环境下转化生长因子β1联合类胰岛素生长因子1诱导骨

  14. Cytological organization of the alpha component of the anterior olfactory nucleus and olfactory limbus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A Larriva-Sahd

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the microscopic organization of a wedge-shaped area at the intersection of the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, or olfactory limbus , and an additional component of the anterior olfactory nucleus or alpha accessory olfactory bulb that lies underneath of the accessory olfactory bulb. The olfactory limbus consists of a modified bulbar cortex bounded anteriorly by the main olfactory bulb and posteriorly by the accessory olfactory bulb. In Nissl-stained specimens the olfactory limbus differs from the main olfactory bulb by a progressive, antero-posterior decrease in thickness or absence of the external plexiform, mitral/tufted cell, and granule cell layers. On cytoarchitectual grounds the olfactory limbus is divided from rostral to caudal into three distinct components: a stripe of glomerular-free cortex or preolfactory area, a second or necklace glomerular area, and a wedge-shaped or interstitial area crowned by the so-called modified glomeruli that appear to belong to the anterior accessory olfactory bulb. The strategic location and interactions with the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, together with the previously noted functional and connectional evidence, suggest that the olfactory limbus may be related to both sensory modalities. The alpha component of the anterior olfactory nucleus, a slender cellular cluster (i.e., 650 x 150 µm paralleling the base of the accessory olfactory bulb, contains two neuron types: a pyramidal-like neuron and an interneuron. Dendrites of pyramidal-like cells organize into a single bundle that ascends avoiding the accessory olfactory bulb to resolve in a trigone bounded by the edge of the olfactory limbus, the accessory olfactory bulb and the dorsal part of the anterior olfactory nucleus. Utrastructurally, the neuropil of the alpha component contains three types of synaptic terminals; one of them immunoreactive to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase, isoform 67.

  15. Nucleus Pearl Coating Process of Freshwater Mussel Anodonta woodiana (Unionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WASMEN MANALU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The limiting factor which is a weakness of sea water pearl production are high costs, the risk of major business failures and a long coating time. From the issue of freshwater pearls appear to have prospects of alternative substitution for sea water pearl. This present study aimed to evaluate effect of loads (the number and diameter nucleus on freshwater pearl coating process and the number and size of the appropriate nucleus diameter, to produce the optimum coating thickness of half-round pearls. The research consists of experimental implantation of 2, 4, and 6 nucleus number per individual mussel was maintained by the method stocked in hapa in bottom waters. Observation method and factorial randomized block design used in the study of the influence of the load to the successfulness of pearl coating and the pearl layer thickness. The results showed that A. woodiana can be utilized as a producer of freshwater pearls. In addition, the number of optimum nucleus that can be attached to the mussel A. woodiana was 2 grains/individuals with a diameter of 10 mm. Shells implanted with the optimum nucleus diameter and number of pearls produced the highest layer thickness of 17 m after 9 months cultivation. This result was good enough compared with the layer thickness of sea water pearl production after the same cultivation time.

  16. The hadron-nucleus collision reaction mechanism memorized by fast nucleons emitted from target nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown in this work that: 1. The target-nucleus damaged in a hadron-nucleus nuclear collision memorizes information about the collision mechanism; 2. Similar information is contained in characteristics of the incident hadron passage through the target nucleus. The mechanism of the hadron-nucleus collision process is presented - as experimentally based, from the collision reaction starting up to the destroyed target-nucleus transmutation into stable fragments. 34 refs., 2 figs

  17. Biosynthesis of vitamin B12: concerning the origin of the methine protons of the corrin nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    13C NMR spectroscopy has been used to locate six deuterium atoms incorporated biosynthetically on the periphery of the corrin nucleus of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) derived from cells of Propionibacterium shermanii grown in a medium containing 50% 2H2O and 13C-enriched delta-aminolevulinic acid. The implications of these results for the mechanism of vitamin B12 biosynthesis are discussed, and it is concluded that the same oxidation level of the intermediates is maintained throughout the biosynthetic pathway, from delta-aminolevulinic acid to corrin

  18. A Well-Controlled Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Culture System with Injection Port for Evaluating Regenerative Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Arkesteijn, ITM Irene; Mouser, WHM; F Mwale; van Dijk; Ito, K Keita

    2015-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue regeneration would be useful, but current systems for NP culture are not ideal for injections. The aim of this study was to develop a long-term culture system for NP tissue that allows injections of regenerative agents. Bovine caudal NPs were harvested and placed in the newly designed culture system. After equilibration of the tissue to 0.3 MPa the volume was fixed and the tissue was cultured for 28 days. The cell viability and extracellular...

  19. Mechanism of inhibition of calcium channels in rat nucleus tractus solitarius by neurotransmitters.

    OpenAIRE

    Rhim, H; Toth, P. T.; Miller, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. High-threshold Ca2+ channel currents were measured every 15 s following a 200 ms voltage step from -80 mV to 0 mV in order to study the coupling mechanism between neurotransmitter receptors and Ca2+ channels in neurones acutely isolated from the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the rat. 2. Application of 30 microM baclofen (GABAB receptor agonist) caused 38.9 +/- 1.2% inhibition of the peak inward Ba2+ current (IBa2+) in most NTS cells tested (n = 85 of 88). Somatostatin, 300 nM, also r...

  20. Experimentally induced postinhibitory rebound in rat nucleus ambiguus is dependent on hyperpolarization parameters and membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J B; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M; Millhorn, D E

    1989-06-01

    Postinhibitory rebound (PIR), a transient depolarization subsequent to release from experimental hyperpolarization, was identified and characterized in 81% of the cells studied in the nucleus ambiguus in slices from medulla of rat. Hyperpolarizing current pulses were administered via the recording microelectrode in the bridge-balanced mode to test for PIR. The voltage trajectory was characterized by a depolarizing sag during the pulse, rebound depolarization (PIR) after the pulse and increased input resistance during rebound. The amplitude and time course of PIR were dependent on prepulse membrane potential, pulse amplitude and pulse duration. These results suggest a potential role of PIR in respiratory rhythmogenesis. PMID:2771207

  1. Subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation restores altered electrophysiological properties of cortical neurons in parkinsonian rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Degos

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological recordings performed in parkinsonian patients and animal models have confirmed the occurrence of alterations in firing rate and pattern of basal ganglia neurons, but the outcome of these changes in thalamo-cortical networks remains unclear. Using rats rendered parkinsonian, we investigated, at a cellular level in vivo, the electrophysiological changes induced in the pyramidal cells of the motor cortex by the dopaminergic transmission interruption and further characterized the impact of high-frequency electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, a procedure alleviating parkinsonian symptoms. We provided evidence that a lesion restricted to the substantia nigra pars compacta resulted in a marked increase in the mean firing rate and bursting pattern of pyramidal neurons of the motor cortex. These alterations were underlain by changes of the electrical membranes properties of pyramidal cells including depolarized resting membrane potential and increased input resistance. The modifications induced by the dopaminergic loss were more pronounced in cortico-striatal than in cortico-subthalamic neurons. Furthermore, subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation applied at parameters alleviating parkinsonian signs regularized the firing pattern of pyramidal cells and restored their electrical membrane properties.

  2. Optimal reactions for the synthesis of superheavy nucleus 270Hs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zuhua; BAO Jingdong

    2006-01-01

    The superheavy nucleus 270 Hs iS expected to be a "double-magic" deformed nucleus.We have calculated its cross sections of evaporation residue for the reactions 248Cm(26Mg,4n)270Hs,244pu(30Si,4n)270Hs,238U(36S,4n)270Hs and 226Ra(48Ca,4n)270Hs using a two-parameter Smoluchowski equation.It is found from our results that 226Ra(48Ca,4n)270Hs and 238U(36S,4n)270Hs are two optimal reactions for the synthesis of the superheavy nucleus 270Hs due to their large negative Q-values.

  3. Extreme alpha-clustering in the 18O nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, E D; Goldberg, V Z; Brown, S; Robson, D; Crisp, A M; Cottle, P D; Fu, C; Giles, J; Green, B W; Kemper, K W; Lee, K; Roeder, B T; Tribble, R E

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the 18O nucleus at excitation energies above the alpha decay threshold was studied using 14C+alpha resonance elastic scattering. A number of states with large alpha reduced widths have been observed, indicating that the alpha-cluster degree of freedom plays an important role in this N not equal Z nucleus. However, the alpha-cluster structure of this nucleus is very different from the relatively simple pattern of strong alpha-cluster quasi-rotational bands in the neighboring 16O and 20Ne nuclei. A 0+ state with an alpha reduced width exceeding the single particle limit was identified at an excitation energy of 9.9+/-0.3 MeV. We discuss evidence that states of this kind are common in light nuclei and give possible explanations of this feature.

  4. ERK1/2 Phosphorylation in the Rat Supraoptic Nucleus, Dorsal Raphe Nucleus, and Locus Coeruleus Neurons Following Noxious Stimulation to the Hind Paw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnerer, Josef; Liebmann, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Phospho-ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) fluorescence-immunohistochemistry is specifically well suited to mirror neuronal activity in the pain pathway at the cellular level. This study employed this method to visualize neuronal activity in 3 rat CNS nuclei following an acute noxious stimulation. The rat hind paw was stimulated either by heat or by a sequence of mustard oil and heat. Two min after the thermal stimulation or after the combined mustard oil and thermal stimulation, there was a significant increase in cells showing pERK1/2 immunoreactivity in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), and in the locus coeruleus (LC). Pretreatment with the opioid analgesic morphine or the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist MK-801 markedly attenuated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These findings support the concept that the SON, the DRN, and the LC are integrated into pain processing at the hypothalamic and brain stem level. PMID:26599629

  5. Discharge properties of neurons recorded in the parvalbumin-positive (PV1) nucleus of the rat lateral hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintas, Alessandra

    2014-06-13

    This study reports for the first time the extracellular activity recorded, in anesthetized rats, from cells located in an identified cluster of parvalbumin (PV)-positive neurons of the lateral hypothalamus forming the PV1-nucleus. Random-like firing characterized the majority (21/30) of the cells, termed regular cells, with a median firing rate of 1.7 spikes/s, Fano factor equal to 1, and evenly distributed along the rostro-caudal axis. Four cells exhibiting an oscillatory activity in the range 1.6-2.1Hz were observed only in the posterior part of the PV1-nucleus. The asynchronous activity of PV1 neurons is likely to produce a "network-driven" effect on their main target within the periaqueductal gray matter. The hypothesis is raised that background random-like firing of PV1-nucleus is associated with functional network activity likely to contribute dynamic information related to condition transitions of awareness and non-conscious perception. PMID:24780564

  6. Non-destructive trace element microanalysis of as-received cometary nucleus samples using synchrotron x ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Synchrotron X ray Fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, will be an excellent instrument for non-destructive trace element analyses of cometary nucleus samples. Trace element analyses of as-received cometary nucleus material will also be possible with this technique. Bulk analysis of relatively volatile elements will be important in establishing comet formation conditions. However, as demonstrated for meteorites, microanalyses of individual phases in their petrographic context are crucial in defining the histories of particular components in unequilibrated specimens. Perhaps most informative in comparing cometary material with meteorites will be the halogens and trace metals. In-situ, high spatial resolution microanalyses will be essential in establishing host phases for these elements and identifying terrestrial (collection/processing) overprints. The present SXRF microprobe is a simple, yet powerful, instrument in which specimens are excited with filtered, continuum synchrotron radiation from a bending magnet on a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring. A refrigerated cell will be constructed to permit analyses at low temperatures. The cell will consist essentially of an air tight housing with a cold stage. Kapton windows will be used to allow the incident synchrotron beam to enter the cell and fluorescent x rays to exit it. The cell will be either under vacuum or continuous purge by ultrapure helium during analyses. Several other improvements of the NSLS microprobe will be made prior to the cometary nucleus sample return mission that will greatly enhance the sensitivity of the technique

  7. Study on Action of Acupuncture on Ventromedial Nucleus of Hypothalamus in Obese Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Effects of acupuncture on the spontaneous discharge of nerve cells and levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in ventromedial nucleus of hypothalamus (VMH) of the obese rats were investigated. Results indicated that the levels of tyrosine (Tyr) and dopamine (DA) were lowered, the levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydoxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) increased, and the frequency of the spontaneous discharge of nerve cells in VMH lowered in the obese rat group as compared with the normal group. When acupuncture obtained the effect of weight reduction, the frequency of spontaneous discharges of nerve cells in VMH were markedly increased, and the levels of Tyr, DA and tryptamine (Typ) and 5-HT/5-HIAA ratio elevated, and the 5-HT level lowered. It is suggested that the virtuous regulative action of acupuncture on VMH might be one of the key factors in acupuncture for weight reduction.

  8. Neuroglobin expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus: colocalization, innervation, and response to light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, C A; Hannibal, J; Fahrenkrug, J;

    2010-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a myoglobin-like (Mb) heme-globin, belonging the globin family located only in neuronal tissue of the central nervous system. Ngb has been shown to be upregulated in and to protect neurons from hypoxic and ischemic injury, but the function of Ngb-in particular how Ngb may...... localization, colocalization, innervation, and response to light of Ngb-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Our results demonstrate that the majority of Ngb-expressing neurons in the SCN belong to a cell group not previously characterized by neurotransmitter content; only a...... small portion was found to co-store GRP in the ventral SCN. Furthermore, some Ngb-containing neurons were responsive to light stimulation at late night evaluated by the induction of cFOS and only a few cells were found to express the core clock gene PER1 during the 24-hour light/dark cycle. The Ngb...

  9. Capsaicin binds to prohibitin 2 and displaces it from the mitochondria to the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capsaicin is widely used as a food additive and as an analgesic agent. Besides its well-known role in nociception, which is mediated by vanilloid receptor 1 specifically expressed in dorsal root ganglion neurons, capsaicin has also been considered as a potential anticancer agent, as it inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in various types of cancer cells. Here we identified a new molecular target of capsaicin from human myeloid leukemia cells. We show that capsaicin binds to prohibitin (PHB) 2, which is normally localized to the inner mitochondrial membrane, and induces its translocation to the nucleus. PHB2 is implicated in the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and the control of apoptosis. We also provide evidence suggesting that capsaicin causes apoptosis directly through the mitochondria and that PHB2 contributes to capsaicin-induced apoptosis at multiple levels. This work will serve as an important foundation for further understanding of anticancer activity of capsaicin.

  10. High plasma triglyceride levels strongly correlate with low kisspeptin in the arcuate nucleus of male rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, A; Axel, A M; Lie, M E;

    2015-01-01

    signals to the GnRH neurons. METHODS: In this study, we measured body weight and plasma concentrations of leptin, insulin, testosterone, and triglycerides after high fat diet exposure and correlated these parameters with the number of kisspeptin-immunoreactive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of male rats....... In this model, a high fat diet (45% or 60% energy from fat, respectively) or a control diet (10% energy from fat) was provided after weaning for three months. RESULTS: We find a significant increase in body weight and plasma leptin concentration, but no change in the number of kisspeptin......-immunoreactive cells with increased fat in the diet. Kisspeptin-immunoreactive cells are not correlated with body weight, testosterone, leptin or insulin. However, we find that the number of kisspeptin-immunoreactive cells is strongly and negatively correlated with the level of plasma triglycerides (R2=0.49, p=0...

  11. Heavy quarks in proton-nucleus collisions - the hybrid formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Altinoluk, Tolga; Beuf, Guillaume; Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We explore the quark mass effects on inclusive hadron production in proton-nucleus collisions at high energies. We consider two processes. First, we compute the single inclusive cross-section for production of hadrons with open heavy flavour in the proton forward direction at leading order. Next, in the same kinematics, we calculate the heavy-quark contribution to single inclusive production of light or unidentified hadrons at next-to-leading-order. For both studies we exploit the hybrid formalism, that is the collinear factorisation on the proton side while high-density and high-energy effects are resummed on the side of the nucleus.

  12. Formation and decay of a hot compound nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compound nucleus plays an important role in nuclear reactions over a wide range of projectile-target combinations and energies. The limits that angular momentum places on its formation and existence are, for the most part, well understood. The limits on its excitation energy are not as clear. Here we first analyze general geometrical and thermodynamical features of a hot compound nucleus. We then discuss the manners by which it can decay and close by speculating on the high energy limit to its formation and existence. (author)

  13. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge G. Morfín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  14. An occultation of the inner Seyfert nucleus of NGC 4151

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brightness of the unresolved nucleus of NGC 4151 was monitored over five months in 1983. Variations of ≅ 0.1 mag/day were observed in the U-band and no significant variation was found of the -OIII] 5007 A emission line. However, an event that was observed on the nights of the 10/11 and 11/12 February 1983 in the continuum around 5672 A has all the characteristics of an occultation. It is proposed that an inner synchrotron nucleus of ≅ 3 a.u. diameter was occulted by an opaque cloud ≅ 6 a.u. across on those two nights

  15. Weak interaction and nucleus: the relationship keeps on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers the lectures made at the Joliot-Curie international summer school in 2003 whose theme, that year, was the relationship between weak interaction and nucleus. There were 8 contributions whose titles are: 1) before the standard model: from beta decay to neutral currents; 2) the electro-weak theory and beyond; 3) testing of the standard model at low energies; 4) description of weak processes in nuclei; 5) 20.000 tonnes underground, an approach to the neutrino-nucleus interaction; 6) parity violation from atom to nucleon; 7) how neutrinos got their masses; and 8) CP symmetry

  16. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  17. Hyper deformation and clustering configuration in 168Yb nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently an exhaustive experimental search for hyper deformation in 168Yb with β ∼ 1.0 and axis ratio 3:1 at spins 70-80ℎ has yielded negative result which is attributed either to the fact that the fission of the compound nucleus prevented population of hyper deformed states or that the amount of angular momentum brought into the compound system was not sufficient to allow population of hyper deformed states. A systematic theoretical search for detection of such hyper deformation in this nucleus using the cranked Nilsson Strutinsky method with tuning to fixed spins was undertaken

  18. Examination of the fission time of the Z =120 nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, A. K.; Ray, A.; Chatterjee, A.

    2016-04-01

    We show that the large difference in the measured lifetime for asymmetric fission of the highly excited (T ≈1.5 -MeV ) Z =120 nucleus as measured by the atomic techniques (crystal blocking and x-ray methods) with those measured by the nuclear techniques (mass-angle distribution and prefission neutron multiplicity) cannot be due to the different sensitivities of the atomic and nuclear techniques in different time domains. The claim of formation of a superheavy Z =120 nucleus with a high fission barrier on the basis of an observed long fission time by the atomic techniques is in direct conflict with all other available measurements and calculations.

  19. Electromagnetic properties of the Beryllium-11 nucleus in Halo EFT

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer H.-W.; Phillips D.R.

    2010-01-01

    We compute electromagnetic properties of the Beryllium-11 nucleus using an effective field theory that exploits the separation of scales in this halo system. We fix the parameters of the EFT from measured data on levels and scattering lengths in the 10Be plus neutron system. We then obtain predictions for the B(E1) strength of the 1/2+ to 1/2− transition in the 11Be nucleus. We also compute the charge radius of the ground state of 11Be. Agreement with experiment within the expected accurac...

  20. Sensitivity of reaction cross sections to halo nucleus density distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Sarantsev, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus--nucleus reaction cross sections $\\sigma_R$ to the nuclear matter distributions in exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated the values of $\\sigma_R$ for scattering of $^6$He, $^{11}$Li, and $^{19}$C nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon. The calculations were performed in the "rigid target" approximation to the Glauber theory, different shapes of the nuclear density distributions in $^6$He, $^{11}$Li, and $^{19}$C ...