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Sample records for cell nucleus mitosis

  1. The Use of Living Cancer Cells Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein in the Nucleus and Red Fluorescence Protein in the Cytoplasm for Real-time Confocal Imaging of Chromosome and Cytoplasmic Dynamics During Mitosis.

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    Suetsugu, Atsushi; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Meng; Yamamoto, Norio; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Saji, Shigetoyo; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-05-01

    A library of dual-color fluorescent cancer cells with green fluorescent protein (GFP), linked to histone H2B, expressed in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein (RFP) expressed in the cytoplasm was previously genetically engineered. The aim of the current study was to use the dual-color cancer cells to visualize chromosome and cytoplasmic dynamics during mitosis. Using an Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope, a library of dual-color cells from the major cancer types was cultured on plastic. The cells were imaged by confocal microscopy to demonstrate chromosome and cytoplasmic dynamics during mitosis. Nuclear GFP expression enabled visualization of chromosomes behavior, whereas simultaneous cytoplasmic RFP expression enabled visualization of cytoplasmic behavior during mitosis. Thus, total cellular dynamics can be visualized at high resolution, including individual chromosomes in some cases, in living dual-color cells in real time. Dual-color cancer cells expressing H2B-GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm provide unique tools for visualizing subcellular nuclear and cytoplasm dynamics, including the behavior of individual chromosomes during mitosis. The dual-color cells can be used to evaluate chromosomal loss or gain in real time during treatment with a variety of agents or as the cells are selected for increased or decreased malignancy in culture or in vivo. The dual color cells will be a useful tool to discover and evaluate novel strategies for killing cancer cells. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Killing cells by targeting mitosis.

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    Manchado, E; Guillamot, M; Malumbres, M

    2012-03-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is a common feature of human cancer. Tumor cells accumulate mutations that result in unscheduled proliferation, genomic instability and chromosomal instability. Several therapeutic strategies have been proposed for targeting the cell division cycle in cancer. Whereas inhibiting the initial phases of the cell cycle is likely to generate viable quiescent cells, targeting mitosis offers several possibilities for killing cancer cells. Microtubule poisons have proved efficacy in the clinic against a broad range of malignancies, and novel targeted strategies are now evaluating the inhibition of critical activities, such as cyclin-dependent kinase 1, Aurora or Polo kinases or spindle kinesins. Abrogation of the mitotic checkpoint or targeting the energetic or proteotoxic stress of aneuploid or chromosomally instable cells may also provide further benefits by inducing lethal levels of instability. Although cancer cells may display different responses to these treatments, recent data suggest that targeting mitotic exit by inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex generates metaphase cells that invariably die in mitosis. As the efficacy of cell-cycle targeting approaches has been limited so far, further understanding of the molecular pathways modulating mitotic cell death will be required to move forward these new proposals to the clinic.

  3. Mitosis.

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    Henderson, Paula

    Cytology is the subject that is dealt with in this autoinstructional program. The process to be understood by secondary school students who are taking biology is mitosis. The material is presented to be adequate for achievers at the middle level. Knowledge of the structure of the DNA molecule and of the parts of the cell are considered as…

  4. Mitosis can drive cell cannibalism through entosis.

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    Durgan, Joanne; Tseng, Yun-Yu; Hamann, Jens C; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Collinson, Lucy; Hall, Alan; Overholtzer, Michael; Florey, Oliver

    2017-07-11

    Entosis is a form of epithelial cell cannibalism that is prevalent in human cancer, typically triggered by loss of matrix adhesion. Here, we report an alternative mechanism for entosis in human epithelial cells, driven by mitosis. Mitotic entosis is regulated by Cdc42, which controls mitotic morphology. Cdc42 depletion enhances mitotic deadhesion and rounding, and these biophysical changes, which depend on RhoA activation and are phenocopied by Rap1 inhibition, permit subsequent entosis. Mitotic entosis occurs constitutively in some human cancer cell lines and mitotic index correlates with cell cannibalism in primary human breast tumours. Adherent, wild-type cells can act efficiently as entotic hosts, suggesting that normal epithelia may engulf and kill aberrantly dividing neighbours. Finally, we report that Paclitaxel/taxol promotes mitotic rounding and subsequent entosis, revealing an unconventional activity of this drug. Together, our data uncover an intriguing link between cell division and cannibalism, of significance to both cancer and chemotherapy.

  5. Dynamic subcellular imaging of cancer cell mitosis in the brain of live mice.

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    Momiyama, Masashi; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Chishima, Takashi; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2013-04-01

    The ability to visualize cancer cell mitosis and apoptosis in the brain in real time would be of great utility in testing novel therapies. In order to achieve this goal, the cancer cells were labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein (RFP) in the cytoplasm, such that mitosis and apoptosis could be clearly imaged. A craniotomy open window was made in athymic nude mice for real-time fluorescence imaging of implanted cancer cells growing in the brain. The craniotomy window was reversibly closed with a skin flap. Mitosis of the individual cancer cells were imaged dynamically in real time through the craniotomy-open window. This model can be used to evaluate brain metastasis and brain cancer at the subcellular level.

  6. Mitosis can drive cell cannibalism through entosis

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    Durgan, Joanne; Tseng, Yun-Yu; Hamann, Jens C; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Collinson, Lucy; Overholtzer, Michael; Florey, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Entosis is a form of epithelial cell cannibalism that is prevalent in human cancer, typically triggered by loss of matrix adhesion. Here, we report an alternative mechanism for entosis in human epithelial cells, driven by mitosis. Mitotic entosis is regulated by Cdc42, which controls mitotic morphology. Cdc42 depletion enhances mitotic deadhesion and rounding, and these biophysical changes, which depend on RhoA activation and are phenocopied by Rap1 inhibition, permit subsequent entosis. Mitotic entosis occurs constitutively in some human cancer cell lines and mitotic index correlates with cell cannibalism in primary human breast tumours. Adherent, wild-type cells can act efficiently as entotic hosts, suggesting that normal epithelia may engulf and kill aberrantly dividing neighbours. Finally, we report that Paclitaxel/taxol promotes mitotic rounding and subsequent entosis, revealing an unconventional activity of this drug. Together, our data uncover an intriguing link between cell division and cannibalism, of significance to both cancer and chemotherapy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.27134.001 PMID:28693721

  7. Investigation of MEK activity in COS7 cells entering mitosis.

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    Shi, Huaiping; Zhang, Tianying; Yi, Yongqing; Luo, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Although the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been extensively investigated, numerous events remain unclear. In the present study, we examined mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) expression from interphase to mitosis. Following nocodazole treatment, COS7 cells gradually became round as early as 4 h after treatment. Cyclin B1 expression gradually increased from 4 to 24 h in the presence of nocodazole. When cells were treated with nocodazole for 4 h, the level of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated MEK phosphorylation did not significantly change between nocodazole-untreated and -treated (4 h) cells (P>0.05). However, EGF-mediated MEK phosphorylation was significantly inhibited upon treatment with nocodazole for 8 and 24 h compared to nocodazole-untreated cells (PMEK phosphorylation levels were comparable between 1, 5, 10 and 50 ng/ml EGF treatments. Phorbol 12-myristic 13-acetate (PMA) did not activate MEK in mitotic cells. Following treatment of COS7 cells at the interphase with AG1478 or U0126, MEK phosphorylation was blocked. In addition, the investigation of the expression of proteins downstream of MEK demonstrated that EGF does not significantly affect the phosphorylation level of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK) and Elk in mitotic cells (P>0.05). The results showed that MEK expression is gradually inhibited from cell interphase to mitosis, and that MEK downstream signaling is affected by this inhibition, which probably reflects the requirements of cell physiology during mitosis.

  8. Remodeling of bovine oviductal epithelium by mitosis of secretory cells.

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    Ito, Sayaka; Kobayashi, Yoshihiko; Yamamoto, Yuki; Kimura, Koji; Okuda, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Two types of oviductal epithelial cells, secretory and ciliated, play crucial roles in the first days after fertilization in mammals. Secretory cells produce various molecules promoting embryo development, while ciliated cells facilitate transport of oocytes and zygotes by ciliary beating. The proportions of the two cell types change during the estrous cycle. The proportion of ciliated cells on the oviductal luminal surface is abundant at the follicular phase, whereas the proportion of secretory cells gradually increases with the formation of the corpus luteum. In the present study, we hypothesize that the proportions of ciliated and secretory epithelial cells are regulated by mitosis. The proportion of the cells being positive for FOXJ1 (a ciliated cell marker) or Ki67 (a mitosis marker) in epithelial cells during the estrous cycle were immunohistochemically examined. Ki67 and FOXJ1 or PAX8 (a secretory cell marker), were double-stained to clarify which types of epithelial cells undergo mitosis. In the ampulla, the percentage of FOXJ1-positive cells was highest at the day of ovulation (Day 0) and decreased by about 50 % by Days 8-12, while in the isthmus it did not change during the estrous cycle. The proportion of Ki67-positive cells was highest at around the time of ovulation in both the ampulla and isthmus. All the Ki67-positive cells were PAX8-positive and FOXJ1-negative in both the ampulla and isthmus. These findings suggest that epithelial remodeling, which is regulated by differentiation and/or proliferation of secretory cells of the oviduct, provides the optimal environment for gamete transport, fertilization and embryonic development.

  9. Replication stress in Mammalian cells and its consequences for mitosis.

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    Gelot, Camille; Magdalou, Indiana; Lopez, Bernard S

    2015-05-22

    The faithful transmission of genetic information to daughter cells is central to maintaining genomic stability and relies on the accurate and complete duplication of genetic material during each cell cycle. However, the genome is routinely exposed to endogenous and exogenous stresses that can impede the progression of replication. Such replication stress can be an early cause of cancer or initiate senescence. Replication stress, which primarily occurs during S phase, results in consequences during mitosis, jeopardizing chromosome segregation and, in turn, genomic stability. The traces of replication stress can be detected in the daughter cells during G1 phase. Alterations in mitosis occur in two types: 1) local alterations that correspond to breaks, rearrangements, intertwined DNA molecules or non-separated sister chromatids that are confined to the region of the replication dysfunction; 2) genome-wide chromosome segregation resulting from centrosome amplification (although centrosomes do not contain DNA), which amplifies the local replication stress to the entire genome. Here, we discuss the endogenous causes of replication perturbations, the mechanisms of replication fork restart and the consequences for mitosis, chromosome segregation and genomic stability.

  10. Differential nuclear envelope assembly at the end of mitosis in suspension-cultured Apium graveolens cells.

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    Kimura, Yuta; Kuroda, Chie; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2010-04-01

    NMCP1 is a plant protein that has a long coiled-coil domain within the molecule. Newly identified NMCP2 of Daucus carota and Apium graveolens showed similar peripheral localization in the interphase nucleus, and the sequence spanning the coiled-coil domain exhibited significant similarity with the corresponding region of NMCP1. To better understand disassembly and assembly of the nuclear envelope (NE) during mitosis, subcellular distribution of NMCP1 and NMCP2 was examined using A. graveolens cells. AgNMCP1 (NMCP1 in Apium) disassembled at prometaphase, dispersed mainly within the spindle, and accumulated on segregating chromosomes, while AgNMCP2 (NMCP2 in Apium), following disassembly at prometaphase with timing similar to that of AgNMCP1, dispersed throughout the mitotic cytoplasm at metaphase and anaphase. The protein accumulated at the periphery of reforming nuclei at telophase. A probe for the endomembrane indicated that the nuclear membrane (NM) disappears at prometaphase and begins to reappear at early telophase. Growth of the NM continued after mitosis was completed. NMCP2 in the mitotic cytoplasm localized in vesicular structures that could be distinguished from the bulk endomembrane system. These results suggest that NMCP1 and NMCP2 are recruited for NE assembly in different pathways in mitosis and that NMCP2 associates with NM-derived vesicles in the mitotic cytoplasm.

  11. How protein kinases co-ordinate mitosis in animal cells.

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    Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y C

    2011-04-01

    Mitosis is associated with profound changes in cell physiology and a spectacular surge in protein phosphorylation. To accomplish these, a remarkably large portion of the kinome is involved in the process. In the present review, we will focus on classic mitotic kinases, such as cyclin-dependent kinases, Polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases, as well as more recently characterized players such as NIMA (never in mitosis in Aspergillus nidulans)-related kinases, Greatwall and Haspin. Together, these kinases co-ordinate the proper timing and fidelity of processes including centrosomal functions, spindle assembly and microtubule-kinetochore attachment, as well as sister chromatid separation and cytokinesis. A recurrent theme of the mitotic kinase network is the prevalence of elaborated feedback loops that ensure bistable conditions. Sequential phosphorylation and priming phosphorylation on substrates are also frequently employed. Another important concept is the role of scaffolds, such as centrosomes for protein kinases during mitosis. Elucidating the entire repertoire of mitotic kinases, their functions, regulation and interactions is critical for our understanding of normal cell growth and in diseases such as cancers.

  12. Monitoring the elasticity changes of HeLa cells during mitosis by atomic force microscopy

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    Jiang, Ningcheng; Wang, Yuhua; Zeng, Jinshu; Ding, Xuemei; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin

    2016-10-01

    Cell mitosis plays a crucial role in cell life activity, which is one of the important phases in cell division cycle. During the mitosis, the cytoskeleton micro-structure of the cell changed and the biomechanical properties of the cell may vary depending upon different mitosis stages. In this study, the elasticity property of HeLa cells during mitosis was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Also, the actin filaments in different mitosis stages of the cells were observed by confocal imaging. Our results show that the cell in anaphase is stiffer than that in metaphase and telophase. Furthermore, lots of actin filaments gathered in cells' center area in anaphase, which contributes to the rigidity of the cell in this phase. Our findings demonstrate that the nano-biomechanics of living cells could provide a new index for characterizing cell physiological states.

  13. The duration of mitosis and daughter cell size are modulated by nutrients in budding yeast.

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    Leitao, Ricardo M; Kellogg, Douglas R

    2017-11-06

    The size of nearly all cells is modulated by nutrients. Thus, cells growing in poor nutrients can be nearly half the size of cells in rich nutrients. In budding yeast, cell size is thought to be controlled almost entirely by a mechanism that delays cell cycle entry until sufficient growth has occurred in G1 phase. Here, we show that most growth of a new daughter cell occurs in mitosis. When the rate of growth is slowed by poor nutrients, the duration of mitosis is increased, which suggests that cells compensate for slow growth in mitosis by increasing the duration of growth. The amount of growth required to complete mitosis is reduced in poor nutrients, leading to a large reduction in cell size. Together, these observations suggest that mechanisms that control the extent of growth in mitosis play a major role in cell size control in budding yeast. © 2017 Leitao and Kellogg.

  14. Presenting Mitosis

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    Roche, Stephanie; Sterling, Donna R.

    2005-01-01

    When the topic of cell division is introduced in the classroom, students can showcase their interpretations of the stages of mitosis by creating a slide show illustrating prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase (see samples in Figure 1). With the help of a computer, they can create a model of mitosis that will help them distinguish the…

  15. Autophagic flux is highly active in early mitosis and differentially regulated throughout the cell cycle.

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    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Xin

    2016-06-28

    Mitosis is a fast process that involves dramatic cellular remodeling and has a high energy demand. Whether autophagy is active or inactive during the early stages of mitosis in a naturally dividing cell is still debated. Here we aimed to use multiple assays to resolve this apparent discrepancy. Although the LC3 puncta number was reduced in mitosis, the four different cell lines we tested all have active autophagic flux in both interphase and mitosis. In addition, the autophagic flux was highly active in nocodazole-induced, double-thymidine synchronization released as well as naturally occurring mitosis in HeLa cells. Multiple autophagy proteins are upregulated in mitosis and the increased Beclin-1 level likely contributes to the active autophagic flux in early mitosis. It is interesting that although the autophagic flux is active throughout the cell cycle, early mitosis and S phase have relatively higher autophagic flux than G1 and late G2 phases, which might be helpful to degrade the damaged organelles and provide energy during S phase and mitosis.

  16. Abnormal mitosis triggers p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in human tetraploid cells.

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    Kuffer, Christian; Kuznetsova, Anastasia Yurievna; Storchová, Zuzana

    2013-08-01

    Erroneously arising tetraploid mammalian cells are chromosomally instable and may facilitate cell transformation. An increasing body of evidence shows that the propagation of mammalian tetraploid cells is limited by a p53-dependent arrest. The trigger of this arrest has not been identified so far. Here we show by live cell imaging of tetraploid cells generated by an induced cytokinesis failure that most tetraploids arrest and die in a p53-dependent manner after the first tetraploid mitosis. Furthermore, we found that the main trigger is a mitotic defect, in particular, chromosome missegregation during bipolar mitosis or spindle multipolarity. Both a transient multipolar spindle followed by efficient clustering in anaphase as well as a multipolar spindle followed by multipolar mitosis inhibited subsequent proliferation to a similar degree. We found that the tetraploid cells did not accumulate double-strand breaks that could cause the cell cycle arrest after tetraploid mitosis. In contrast, tetraploid cells showed increased levels of oxidative DNA damage coinciding with the p53 activation. To further elucidate the pathways involved in the proliferation control of tetraploid cells, we knocked down specific kinases that had been previously linked to the cell cycle arrest and p53 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the checkpoint kinase ATM phosphorylates p53 in tetraploid cells after abnormal mitosis and thus contributes to proliferation control of human aberrantly arising tetraploids.

  17. Positive Feedback Keeps Duration of Mitosis Temporally Insulated from Upstream Cell-Cycle Events.

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    Araujo, Ana Rita; Gelens, Lendert; Sheriff, Rahuman S M; Santos, Silvia D M

    2016-10-20

    Cell division is characterized by a sequence of events by which a cell gives rise to two daughter cells. Quantitative measurements of cell-cycle dynamics in single cells showed that despite variability in G1-, S-, and G2 phases, duration of mitosis is short and remarkably constant. Surprisingly, there is no correlation between cell-cycle length and mitotic duration, suggesting that mitosis is temporally insulated from variability in earlier cell-cycle phases. By combining live cell imaging and computational modeling, we showed that positive feedback is the molecular mechanism underlying the temporal insulation of mitosis. Perturbing positive feedback gave rise to a sluggish, variable entry and progression through mitosis and uncoupled duration of mitosis from variability in cell cycle length. We show that positive feedback is important to keep mitosis short, constant, and temporally insulated and anticipate it might be a commonly used regulatory strategy to create modularity in other biological systems. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mitosis in circulating tumor cells stratifies highly aggressive breast carcinomas.

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    Adams, Daniel L; Adams, Diane K; Stefansson, Steingrimur; Haudenschild, Christian; Martin, Stuart S; Charpentier, Monica; Chumsri, Saranya; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Tang, Cha-Mei; Alpaugh, R Katherine

    2016-05-04

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) isolated from the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients holds promise as a clinically relevant, minimally invasive diagnostic test. However, CTC utility has been limited as a prognostic indicator of survival by the inability to stratify patients beyond general enumeration. In comparison, histological biopsy examinations remain the standard method for confirming malignancy and grading malignant cells, allowing for cancer identification and then assessing patient cohorts for prognostic and predictive value. Typically, CTC identification relies on immunofluorescent staining assessed as absent/present, which is somewhat subjective and limited in its ability to characterize these cells. In contrast, the physical features used in histological cytology comprise the gold standard method used to identify and preliminarily characterize the cancer cells. Here, we superimpose the methods, cytologically subtyping CTCs labeled with immunohistochemical fluorescence stains to improve their prognostic value in relation to survival. In this single-blind prospective pilot study, we tracked 36 patients with late-stage breast cancer over 24 months to compare overall survival between simple CTC enumeration and subtyping mitotic CTCs. A power analysis (1-β = 0. 9, α = 0.05) determined that a pilot size of 30 patients was sufficient to stratify this patient cohort; 36 in total were enrolled. Our results confirmed that CTC number is a prognostic indicator of patient survival, with a hazard ratio 5.2, p = 0.005 (95 % CI 1.6-16.5). However, by simply subtyping the same population based on CTCs in cytological mitosis, the hazard ratio increased dramatically to 11.1, p cancer, (2) mitotic CTCs may significantly correlate with shortened overall survival, and (3) larger and more defined patient cohort studies are clearly called for based on this initial pilot study.

  19. Do migrating cells need a nucleus?

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    Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2018-03-05

    How the nucleus affects cell polarity and migration is unclear. In this issue, Graham et al. (2018. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201706097) show that enucleated cells polarize and migrate in two but not three dimensions and propose that the nucleus is a necessary component of the molecular clutch regulating normal mechanical responses. © 2018 Hawkins.

  20. Quantitative comparison of a human cancer cell surface proteome between interphase and mitosis.

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    Özlü, Nurhan; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Toyoda, Yusuke; Renard, Bernhard Y; Mollaoglu, Gürkan; Özkan, Nazlı E; Bulbul, Selda; Poser, Ina; Timm, Wiebke; Hyman, Anthony A; Mitchison, Timothy J; Steen, Judith A

    2015-01-13

    The cell surface is the cellular compartment responsible for communication with the environment. The interior of mammalian cells undergoes dramatic reorganization when cells enter mitosis. These changes are triggered by activation of the CDK1 kinase and have been studied extensively. In contrast, very little is known of the cell surface changes during cell division. We undertook a quantitative proteomic comparison of cell surface-exposed proteins in human cancer cells that were tightly synchronized in mitosis or interphase. Six hundred and twenty-eight surface and surface-associated proteins in HeLa cells were identified; of these, 27 were significantly enriched at the cell surface in mitosis and 37 in interphase. Using imaging techniques, we confirmed the mitosis-selective cell surface localization of protocadherin PCDH7, a member of a family with anti-adhesive roles in embryos. We show that PCDH7 is required for development of full mitotic rounding pressure at the onset of mitosis. Our analysis provided basic information on how cell cycle progression affects the cell surface. It also provides potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers for anti-mitotic cancer chemotherapy. © 2014 The Authors.

  1. Cell death associated with abnormal mitosis observed by confocal imaging in live cancer cells.

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    Castiel, Asher; Visochek, Leonid; Mittelman, Leonid; Zilberstein, Yael; Dantzer, Francoise; Izraeli, Shai; Cohen-Armon, Malka

    2013-08-21

    Phenanthrene derivatives acting as potent PARP1 inhibitors prevented the bi-focal clustering of supernumerary centrosomes in multi-centrosomal human cancer cells in mitosis. The phenanthridine PJ-34 was the most potent molecule. Declustering of extra-centrosomes causes mitotic failure and cell death in multi-centrosomal cells. Most solid human cancers have high occurrence of extra-centrosomes. The activity of PJ-34 was documented in real-time by confocal imaging of live human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with vectors encoding for fluorescent γ-tubulin, which is highly abundant in the centrosomes and for fluorescent histone H2b present in the chromosomes. Aberrant chromosomes arrangements and de-clustered γ-tubulin foci representing declustered centrosomes were detected in the transfected MDA-MB-231 cells after treatment with PJ-34. Un-clustered extra-centrosomes in the two spindle poles preceded their cell death. These results linked for the first time the recently detected exclusive cytotoxic activity of PJ-34 in human cancer cells with extra-centrosomes de-clustering in mitosis, and mitotic failure leading to cell death. According to previous findings observed by confocal imaging of fixed cells, PJ-34 exclusively eradicated cancer cells with multi-centrosomes without impairing normal cells undergoing mitosis with two centrosomes and bi-focal spindles. This cytotoxic activity of PJ-34 was not shared by other potent PARP1 inhibitors, and was observed in PARP1 deficient MEF harboring extracentrosomes, suggesting its independency of PARP1 inhibition. Live confocal imaging offered a useful tool for identifying new molecules eradicating cells during mitosis.

  2. The effect of oleander glycosides on the germination of pollen grains and the mitosis of the generative nucleus in Tradescantia bracteata Small and Allium cepa L.

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    J. A. Tarkowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of water solution of a mixture of glycosides from oleander (Nerium oleander L. on the germination of pollen grains and on the mitosis of the generative nucleus in Tradescantia bracteata Small and Allium cepa L. has been studied. An inhibition of the germination and of the growth of pollen tubes was observed, proportionally to the concentration of glycosides. The pollen grains of A. cepa are more sensitive. The disturbances in mitosis lead to the formation of two or more uneven-sized doughter nuclei, or to the formation of restitution nuclei. These anomalies are more numerous in T. bracteata. From these results d t appears that pollen grains of A. cepa are characterized by a generally high physiological sensitivity and a small mitotic sensitivity, wheras for T. bracteata the opposite is true.

  3. Apoptosis and mitosis as prognostic factors in pathologically staged N1 nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Fujii, Takashi; Perkins, Penny; Ro, Jae Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Mason, Kathryn A.; Mountain, Clifton F.; Milas, Luka

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to establish whether spontaneous apoptosis or mitosis has prognostic value among patients with pathologically staged N1 nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) treated with surgical resection with or without adjuvant therapy. Methods and Materials: Material from 173 patients who had resections between 1970 and 1988 was analyzed for apoptosis and mitosis. There were 128 men and 45 women, with a median age of 61 years. There were 86 squamous cell carcinomas (SQ), 73 adenocarcinomas (AC), 3 large-cell carcinomas (LC), 6 SQ-AC, and 5 unclassified. Patients were observed from 2 to 209 months (median 27). Actuarial methods were used to assess survival and freedom from distant metastasis. Results: In NSCLC, apoptosis was found to range from 0.2% to 2.8% (median 1.0%) and mitosis from 0 to 1.8% (median 0.4%). Tumors having higher levels of apoptosis also had higher levels of mitosis (p = 0.001). The values of neither apoptosis nor mitosis depended on size, location, differentiation of tumors, age, performance status, or weight loss of patients. However, the values of apoptosis depended on tumor histology in that high values (greater than or equal to the median) were more frequent in SQ (49%) than in AC/LC (29%) (p 0.01). The overall survival for NSCLC patients, which was 33% at 5 years, did not depend on the level of either apoptosis or mitosis. The 5-year survival of patients having SQ was higher (43%) than that of patients having AC/LC (21%) (p = 0.03). Patients with high apoptosis showed significantly better 5-year overall (p = 0.008) and DMF (p = 0.0012) survivals in the SQ group compared to the AC/LC group. High mitosis compared to low mitosis was a significantly better predictor for 5-year survival (62% vs. 29%, respectively) (p = 0.035) in the SQ. However, high mitosis was a significantly worse 5-year DMF survival predictor compared to low mitosis: 13% vs. 56%, respectively (p = 0.05) in AC/LC. In the multivariate models for AC/LC, mitosis

  4. Mathematical imaging methods for mitosis analysis in live-cell phase contrast microscopy.

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    Grah, Joana Sarah; Harrington, Jennifer Alison; Koh, Siang Boon; Pike, Jeremy Andrew; Schreiner, Alexander; Burger, Martin; Schönlieb, Carola-Bibiane; Reichelt, Stefanie

    2017-02-15

    In this paper we propose a workflow to detect and track mitotic cells in time-lapse microscopy image sequences. In order to avoid the requirement for cell lines expressing fluorescent markers and the associated phototoxicity, phase contrast microscopy is often preferred over fluorescence microscopy in live-cell imaging. However, common specific image characteristics complicate image processing and impede use of standard methods. Nevertheless, automated analysis is desirable due to manual analysis being subjective, biased and extremely time-consuming for large data sets. Here, we present the following workflow based on mathematical imaging methods. In the first step, mitosis detection is performed by means of the circular Hough transform. The obtained circular contour subsequently serves as an initialisation for the tracking algorithm based on variational methods. It is sub-divided into two parts: in order to determine the beginning of the whole mitosis cycle, a backwards tracking procedure is performed. After that, the cell is tracked forwards in time until the end of mitosis. As a result, the average of mitosis duration and ratios of different cell fates (cell death, no division, division into two or more daughter cells) can be measured and statistics on cell morphologies can be obtained. All of the tools are featured in the user-friendly MATLAB®Graphical User Interface MitosisAnalyser. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. p53 Dependent Centrosome Clustering Prevents Multipolar Mitosis in Tetraploid Cells

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    Yi, Qiyi; Zhao, Xiaoyu; Huang, Yun; Ma, Tieliang; Zhang, Yingyin; Hou, Heli; Cooke, Howard J.; Yang, Da-Qing; Wu, Mian; Shi, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    Background p53 abnormality and aneuploidy often coexist in human tumors, and tetraploidy is considered as an intermediate between normal diploidy and aneuploidy. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether and how p53 influences the transformation from tetraploidy to aneuploidy. Principal Findings Live cell imaging was performed to determine the fates and mitotic behaviors of several human and mouse tetraploid cells with different p53 status, and centrosome and spindle immunostaining was used to investigate centrosome behaviors. We found that p53 dominant-negative mutation, point mutation, or knockout led to a 2∼ 33-fold increase of multipolar mitosis in N/TERT1, 3T3 and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), while mitotic entry and cell death were not significantly affected. In p53-/- tetraploid MEFs, the ability of centrosome clustering was compromised, while centrosome inactivation was not affected. Suppression of RhoA/ROCK activity by specific inhibitors in p53-/- tetraploid MEFs enhanced centrosome clustering, decreased multipolar mitosis from 38% to 20% and 16% for RhoA and ROCK, respectively, while expression of constitutively active RhoA in p53+/+ tetraploid 3T3 cells increased the frequency of multipolar mitosis from 15% to 35%. Conclusions p53 could not prevent tetraploid cells entering mitosis or induce tetraploid cell death. However, p53 abnormality impaired centrosome clustering and lead to multipolar mitosis in tetraploid cells by modulating the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. PMID:22076149

  6. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus

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    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells. PMID:24445418

  7. The Ability to Survive Mitosis in the Presence of Microtubule Poisons Differs Significantly Between Human Nontransformed (RPE-1) and Cancer (U2OS, HeLa) Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Daniela A.; Rieder, Conly L.

    2009-01-01

    We used live cell imaging to compare the fate of human nontransformed (RPE-1) and cancer (HeLa, U2OS) cells as they entered mitosis in nocodazole or taxol. In the same field, and in either drug, a cell in all lines could die in mitosis, exit mitosis and die within 10 h, or exit mitosis and survive ≥10 h. Relative to RPE-1 cells, significantly fewer HeLa or U2OS cells survived mitosis or remained viable after mitosis: in nocodazole concentrations that inhibit spindle microtubule assembly, or i...

  8. Maximized Inter-Class Weighted Mean for Fast and Accurate Mitosis Cells Detection in Breast Cancer Histopathology Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nateghi, Ramin; Danyali, Habibollah; Helfroush, Mohammad Sadegh

    2017-08-14

    Based on the Nottingham criteria, the number of mitosis cells in histopathological slides is an important factor in diagnosis and grading of breast cancer. For manual grading of mitosis cells, histopathology slides of the tissue are examined by pathologists at 40× magnification for each patient. This task is very difficult and time-consuming even for experts. In this paper, a fully automated method is presented for accurate detection of mitosis cells in histopathology slide images. First a method based on maximum-likelihood is employed for segmentation and extraction of mitosis cell. Then a novel Maximized Inter-class Weighted Mean (MIWM) method is proposed that aims at reducing the number of extracted non-mitosis candidates that results in reducing the false positive mitosis detection rate. Finally, segmented candidates are classified into mitosis and non-mitosis classes by using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Experimental results demonstrate a significant improvement in accuracy of mitosis cells detection in different grades of breast cancer histopathological images.

  9. Inhibitory effect of Polo-like kinase 1 depletion on mitosis and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xue-Hua; Lan, Bin; Qu, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Qing; Cai, Qu; Liu, Bing-Ya; Zhu, Zheng-Gang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) serine/threonine kinase plays a vital role in multiple phases of mitosis in gastric cancer cells. To investigate the effect of PLK1 depletion on mitosis and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells.

  10. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  11. Prolonged Mitosis of Neural Progenitors Alters Cell Fate in the Developing Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilaz, Louis-Jan; McMahon, John J; Miller, Emily E; Lennox, Ashley L; Suzuki, Aussie; Salmon, Edward; Silver, Debra L

    2016-01-06

    Embryonic neocortical development depends on balanced production of progenitors and neurons. Genetic mutations disrupting progenitor mitosis frequently impair neurogenesis; however, the link between altered mitosis and cell fate remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that prolonged mitosis of radial glial progenitors directly alters neuronal fate specification and progeny viability. Live imaging of progenitors from a neurogenesis mutant, Magoh(+/-), reveals that mitotic delay significantly correlates with preferential production of neurons instead of progenitors, as well as apoptotic progeny. Independently, two pharmacological approaches reveal a causal relationship between mitotic delay and progeny fate. As mitotic duration increases, progenitors produce substantially more apoptotic progeny or neurons. We show that apoptosis, but not differentiation, is p53 dependent, demonstrating that these are distinct outcomes of mitotic delay. Together our findings reveal that prolonged mitosis is sufficient to alter fates of radial glia progeny and define a new paradigm to understand how mitosis perturbations underlie brain size disorders such as microcephaly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Single-Cell Dynamic Analysis of Mitosis in Haploid Embryonic Stem Cells Shows the Prolonged Metaphase and Its Association with Self-diploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ao; Huang, Shichao; Yu, Jiali; Wang, Huihan; Li, Haisen; Pei, Gang; Shen, Li

    2017-05-09

    The recent establishment of mammalian haploid embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provides new possibilities for genetic screening and for understanding genome evolution and function. However, the dynamics of mitosis in haploid ESCs is still unclear. Here, we report that the duration of mitosis in haploid ESCs, especially the metaphase, is significantly longer than that in diploid ESCs. Delaying mitosis by chemicals increased self-diploidization of haploid ESCs, while shortening mitosis stabilized haploid ESCs. Taken together, our study suggests that the delayed mitosis of haploid ESCs is associated with self-diploidization. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Single-Cell Dynamic Analysis of Mitosis in Haploid Embryonic Stem Cells Shows the Prolonged Metaphase and Its Association with Self-diploidization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent establishment of mammalian haploid embryonic stem cells (ESCs provides new possibilities for genetic screening and for understanding genome evolution and function. However, the dynamics of mitosis in haploid ESCs is still unclear. Here, we report that the duration of mitosis in haploid ESCs, especially the metaphase, is significantly longer than that in diploid ESCs. Delaying mitosis by chemicals increased self-diploidization of haploid ESCs, while shortening mitosis stabilized haploid ESCs. Taken together, our study suggests that the delayed mitosis of haploid ESCs is associated with self-diploidization.

  14. Stage-Specific Gene Profiling of Germinal Cells Helps Delineate the Mitosis/Meiosis Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ting-Lu; Huang, Wei-Jie; He, Juan; Zhang, Dong; Tang, Wei-Hua

    2018-02-01

    In flowering plants, germ lines are induced from somatic meristems within reproductive organs. Within anthers, germinal cell initials first undergo several rounds of mitotic proliferation before synchronously entering meiosis. Our understanding of the progression and the molecular basis of this mitosis to meiosis transition is still limited. Taking advantage of the correlation between anther length and premeiotic germinal cell development in maize ( Zea mays ), we studied the transcriptome dynamics of germinal cells at three sequential stages, mitotic archesporial cells, enlarging pollen mother cells at the premeiosis interphase, and pollen mother cells at the early prophase of meiosis, using laser microdissection-based expression profiling. Our analysis showed that cells undergoing the mitosis-meiosis switch exhibit robust transcriptional changes. The three stages are distinguished by the expression of genes encoding transcription factor subsets, meiotic chromosome recombination proteins, and distinct E3 ubiquitin ligases, respectively. The transcription level of genes encoding protein turnover machinery was significantly higher in these three stages of germinal cells than in mature pollen, parenchyma cells, or seedlings. Our experimental results further indicate that many meiotic genes are not only transcribed, but also translated prior to meiosis. We suggest that the enlarging pollen mother cells stage represents a crucial turning point from mitosis to meiosis for developing germinal cells. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Cell Biology of the Caenorhabditis elegans Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Fix, Orna; Askjaer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the Caenorhabditis elegans nucleus have provided fascinating insight to the organization and activities of eukaryotic cells. Being the organelle that holds the genetic blueprint of the cell, the nucleus is critical for basically every aspect of cell biology. The stereotypical development of C. elegans from a one cell-stage embryo to a fertile hermaphrodite with 959 somatic nuclei has allowed the identification of mutants with specific alterations in gene expression programs, nuclear morphology, or nuclear positioning. Moreover, the early C. elegans embryo is an excellent model to dissect the mitotic processes of nuclear disassembly and reformation with high spatiotemporal resolution. We review here several features of the C. elegans nucleus, including its composition, structure, and dynamics. We also discuss the spatial organization of chromatin and regulation of gene expression and how this depends on tight control of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Finally, the extensive connections of the nucleus with the cytoskeleton and their implications during development are described. Most processes of the C. elegans nucleus are evolutionarily conserved, highlighting the relevance of this powerful and versatile model organism to human biology. PMID:28049702

  16. The resveratrol analogue trimethoxystilbene inhibits cancer cell growth by inducing multipolar cell mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversi, Gianandrea; Fiore, Mario; Percario, Zulema; Degrassi, Francesca; Cozzi, Renata

    2017-03-01

    Natural compounds are extensively studied for their potential use in traditional and non-traditional medicine. Several natural and synthetic Resveratrol analogues have shown interesting biological activities in the field of cancer chemoprevention. In the present study, we have focused on the ability of Resveratrol and two methoxylated derivatives (Trimethoxystilbene and Pterostilbene) to inhibit human cancer cell growth particularly analyzing their ability to interfere with tubulin dynamics at mitosis. We show that Trimethoxystilbene, differently from Resveratrol and Pterostilbene, alters microtubule polymerization dynamics in HeLa cells specifically inducing multipolar spindles and mitotic arrest coupled to a reduction of cell growth and an increase in apoptotic death by mitotic catastrophe. This work demonstrates that the structural modification of Rsv causes substantial changes in the mechanism of action of the derivatives. The presence of three extra methyl groups renders Trimethoxy very efficient in impairing cell proliferation by inducing mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons. PMID:21738832

  18. Deciphering the evolutionary history of open and closed mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazer, Shelley; Lynch, Michael; Needleman, Daniel

    2014-11-17

    The origin of the nucleus at the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition represents one of the most important events in the evolution of cellular organization. The nuclear envelope encircles the chromosomes in interphase and is a selectively permeable barrier between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm and an organizational scaffold for the nucleus. It remains intact in the 'closed' mitosis of some yeasts, but loses its integrity in the 'open' mitosis of mammals. Instances of both types of mitosis within two evolutionary clades indicate multiple evolutionary transitions between open and closed mitosis, although the underlying genetic changes that influenced these transitions remain unknown. A survey of the diversity of mitotic nuclei that fall between these extremes is the starting point from which to determine the physiologically relevant characteristics distinguishing open from closed mitosis and to understand how they evolved and why they are retained in present-day organisms. The field is now poised to begin addressing these issues by defining and documenting patterns of mitotic nuclear variation within and among species and mapping them onto a phylogenic tree. Deciphering the evolutionary history of open and closed mitosis will complement cell biological and genetic approaches aimed at deciphering the fundamental organizational principles of the nucleus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Restriction endonucleases from invasive Neisseria gonorrhoeae cause double-strand breaks and distort mitosis in epithelial cells during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyler, Linda; Engelbrecht, Mattias; Mata Forsberg, Manuel; Brehwens, Karl; Vare, Daniel; Vielfort, Katarina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Aro, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The host epithelium is both a barrier against, and the target for microbial infections. Maintaining regulated cell growth ensures an intact protective layer towards microbial-induced cellular damage. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections disrupt host cell cycle regulation machinery and the infection causes DNA double strand breaks that delay progression through the G2/M phase. We show that intracellular gonococci upregulate and release restriction endonucleases that enter the nucleus and damage human chromosomal DNA. Bacterial lysates containing restriction endonucleases were able to fragment genomic DNA as detected by PFGE. Lysates were also microinjected into the cytoplasm of cells in interphase and after 20 h, DNA double strand breaks were identified by 53BP1 staining. In addition, by using live-cell microscopy and NHS-ester stained live gonococci we visualized the subcellular location of the bacteria upon mitosis. Infected cells show dysregulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint proteins MAD1 and MAD2, impaired and prolonged M-phase, nuclear swelling, micronuclei formation and chromosomal instability. These data highlight basic molecular functions of how gonococcal infections affect host cell cycle regulation, cause DNA double strand breaks and predispose cellular malignancies.

  20. Tau excess impairs mitosis and kinesin-5 function, leading to aneuploidy and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougé, Anne-Laure; Parmentier, Marie-Laure

    2016-03-01

    In neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), cell cycle defects and associated aneuploidy have been described. However, the importance of these defects in the physiopathology of AD and the underlying mechanistic processes are largely unknown, in particular with respect to the microtubule (MT)-binding protein Tau, which is found in excess in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of affected individuals. Although it has long been known that Tau is phosphorylated during mitosis to generate a lower affinity for MTs, there is, to our knowledge, no indication that an excess of this protein could affect mitosis. Here, we studied the effect of an excess of human Tau (hTau) protein on cell mitosis in vivo. Using the Drosophila developing wing disc epithelium as a model, we show that an excess of hTau induces a mitotic arrest, with the presence of monopolar spindles. This mitotic defect leads to aneuploidy and apoptotic cell death. We studied the mechanism of action of hTau and found that the MT-binding domain of hTau is responsible for these defects. We also demonstrate that the effects of hTau occur via the inhibition of the function of the kinesin Klp61F, the Drosophila homologue of kinesin-5 (also called Eg5 or KIF11). We finally show that this deleterious effect of hTau is also found in other Drosophila cell types (neuroblasts) and tissues (the developing eye disc), as well as in human HeLa cells. By demonstrating that MT-bound Tau inhibits the Eg5 kinesin and cell mitosis, our work provides a new framework to consider the role of Tau in neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Effects of radiation and porphyrin on mitosis and chromosomes in human hematopoietic cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, J.C.; Huang, C.C.; Fiel, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The effect on mitosis of a human hematopoietic cell line RPMI-1788 treated with a metal chelate (Zn ++ ) of meso-tetra (p-carboxyphenyl) porphine (Zn-TCPP) alone at various concentrations or in combination with gamma-irradiation at various doses were studied. The results showed that both Zn-TCPP and radiation were effective in interfering with normal mitosis and that the effect of radiation was relatively more effective. Data also suggest interacting effects between Zn-TCPP and gamma-irradiation. At low doses of radiation, Zn-TCPP potentiated the effect of radiation. The reverse seemed to be true at a high dose of radiation. The effects of two porphyrins (Zn-TCPP and hematoporphyrin) and radiation on chromosomes were also studied. Chromosomal aberrations characteristic of radiation were observed. The porphyrins were found not to be effective chromosome-breaking agents under the experimental conditions tested

  2. Chk1 suppresses bypass of mitosis and tetraploidization in p53-deficient cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsker, Deborah; Chung, Jon H; Bunz, Fred

    2012-04-15

    Many cancer cells are unable to maintain a numerically stable chromosome complement. It is well established that aberrant cell division can generate progeny with increased ploidy, but the genetic factors required for maintenance of diploidy are not well understood. Using an isogenic model system derived by gene targeting, we examined the role of Chk1 in p53-proficient and -deficient cancer cells. Targeted inactivation of a single CHK1 allele in stably diploid cells caused an elevated frequency of mitotic bypass if p53 was naturally mutated or experimentally disrupted by homologous recombination. CHK1-haploinsufficient, p53-deficient cells frequently underwent sequential rounds of DNA synthesis without an intervening mitosis. These aberrant cell cycles resulted in whole-genome endoreduplication and tetraploidization. The unscheduled bypass of mitosis could be suppressed by targeted reversion of a p53 mutation or by exogenous expression of Cdk1. In contrast, the number of tetraploid cells was not increased in isogenic cell populations that harbor hypomorphic ATR mutations, suggesting that suppression of unscheduled mitotic bypass is a distinct function of Chk1. These results are consistent with a recently described role for Chk1 in promoting the expression of genes that promote cell cycle transitions and demonstrate how Chk1 might prevent tetraploidization during the cancer cell cycle.

  3. Mitotic Bookmarking: Maintaining the Stem Cell Identity during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Wang, Jianlong

    2017-06-01

    In Cell Reports, Liu et al. (2017) investigate mechanisms for how pluripotent stem cells maintain their identity during cell division. They show that the histone mark H3K27ac and pluripotency transcription factors remain associated with mitotic chromatin in ESCs and during iPSC reprogramming, demonstrating the importance of mitotic bookmarking in pluripotency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The ability to survive mitosis in the presence of microtubule poisons differs significantly between human nontransformed (RPE-1) and cancer (U2OS, HeLa) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Daniela A; Rieder, Conly L

    2009-08-01

    We used live cell imaging to compare the fate of human nontransformed (RPE-1) and cancer (HeLa, U2OS) cells as they entered mitosis in nocodazole or taxol. In the same field, and in either drug, a cell in all lines could die in mitosis, exit mitosis and die within 10 h, or exit mitosis and survive > or =10 h. Relative to RPE-1 cells, significantly fewer HeLa or U2OS cells survived mitosis or remained viable after mitosis: in nocodazole concentrations that inhibit spindle microtubule assembly, or in 500 nM taxol, 30% and 27% of RPE-1 cells, respectively, died in or within 10 h of exiting mitosis while 90% and 49% of U2OS and 78% and 81% of HeLa died. This was even true for clinically relevant taxol concentrations (5 nM) which killed 93% and 46%, respectively, of HeLa and U2OS cells in mitosis or within 10 h of escaping mitosis, compared to 1% of RPE-1 cells. Together these data imply that studies using HeLa or U2OS cells, harvested after a prolonged block in mitosis with nocodazole or taxol, are significantly contaminated with dead or dying cells. We also found that the relationship between the duration of mitosis and survival is drug and cell type specific and that lethality is related to the cell type and drug used to prevent satisfaction of the kinetochore attachment checkpoint. Finally, work with a pan-caspase inhibitor suggests that the primary apoptotic pathway triggered by nocodazole during mitosis in RPE-1 cells is not active in U2OS cells. Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Role-Playing Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyn, Mark A.; Stegink, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a role playing activity that actively engages students in the learning process of mitosis. Students play either chromosomes carrying information, or cells in the cell membrane. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/YDS)

  6. Planar Cell Polarity Breaks the Symmetry of PAR Protein Distribution prior to Mitosis in Drosophila Sensory Organ Precursor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Charlotte; Bernard, Fred; Corson, Francis; Rouault, Hervé; Reynaud, Elodie; Keder, Alyona; Mazouni, Khalil; Schweisguth, François

    2015-04-20

    During development, cell-fate diversity can result from the unequal segregation of fate determinants at mitosis. Polarization of the mother cell is essential for asymmetric cell division (ACD). It often involves the formation of a cortical domain containing the PAR complex proteins Par3, Par6, and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC). In the fly notum, sensory organ precursor cells (SOPs) divide asymmetrically within the plane of the epithelium and along the body axis to generate two distinct cells. Fate asymmetry depends on the asymmetric localization of the PAR complex. In the absence of planar cell polarity (PCP), SOPs divide with a random planar orientation but still asymmetrically, showing that PCP is dispensable for PAR asymmetry at mitosis. To study when and how the PAR complex localizes asymmetrically, we have used a quantitative imaging approach to measure the planar polarization of the proteins Bazooka (Baz, fly Par3), Par6, and aPKC in living pupae. By using imaging of functional GFP-tagged proteins with image processing and computational modeling, we find that Baz, Par6, and aPKC become planar polarized prior to mitosis in a manner independent of the AuroraA kinase and that PCP is required for the planar polarization of Baz, Par6, and aPKC during interphase. This indicates that a "mitosis rescue" mechanism establishes asymmetry at mitosis in PCP mutants. This study therefore identifies PCP as the initial symmetry-breaking signal for the planar polarization of PAR proteins in asymmetrically dividing SOPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential regulation of H3S10 phosphorylation, mitosis progression and cell fate by Aurora Kinase B and C in mouse preimplantation embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhi Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Coordination of cell division and cell fate is crucial for the successful development of mammalian early embryos. Aurora kinases are evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinases and key regulators of mitosis. Aurora kinase B (AurkB is ubiquitously expressed while Aurora kinase C (AurkC is specifically expressed in gametes and preimplantation embryos. We found that increasing AurkC level in one blastomere of the 2-cell embryo accelerated cell division and decreasing AurkC level slowed down mitosis. Changing AurkB level had the opposite effect. The kinase domains of AurkB and AurkC were responsible for their different ability to phosphorylate Histone H3 Serine 10 (H3S10P and regulate metaphase timing. Using an Oct4-photoactivatable GFP fusion protein (Oct4-paGFP and fluorescence decay after photoactivation assay, we found that AurkB overexpression reduced Oct4 retention in the nucleus. Finally, we show that blastomeres with higher AurkC level elevated pluripotency gene expression, which were inclined to enter the inner cell mass lineage and subsequently contributed to the embryo proper. Collectively, our results are the first demonstration that the activity of mitotic kinases can influence cell fate decisions in mammalian preimplantation embryos and have important implications to assisted reproduction.

  8. Mitosis in storage cells of the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Czerneková, Michaela; Jönsson, K. I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 178, č. 4 (2016), s. 888-896 ISSN 0024-4082 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cell division * coelomocytes * development * mitotic index * moulting * tardigrada Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2016

  9. PGRMC1 participates in late events of bovine granulosa cells mitosis and oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzaghi, L; Tessaro, I; Raucci, F; Merico, V; Mazzini, G; Garagna, S; Zuccotti, M; Franciosi, F; Lodde, V

    2016-08-02

    Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 (PGRMC1) is expressed in both oocyte and ovarian somatic cells, where it is found in multiple cellular sub-compartments including the mitotic spindle apparatus. PGRMC1 localization in the maturing bovine oocytes mirrors its localization in mitotic cells, suggesting a possible common action in mitosis and meiosis. To test the hypothesis that altering PGRMC1 activity leads to similar defects in mitosis and meiosis, PGRMC1 function was perturbed in cultured bovine granulosa cells (bGC) and maturing oocytes and the effect on mitotic and meiotic progression assessed. RNA interference-mediated PGRMC1 silencing in bGC significantly reduced cell proliferation, with a concomitant increase in the percentage of cells arrested at G2/M phase, which is consistent with an arrested or prolonged M-phase. This observation was confirmed by time-lapse imaging that revealed defects in late karyokinesis. In agreement with a role during late mitotic events, a direct interaction between PGRMC1 and Aurora Kinase B (AURKB) was observed in the central spindle at of dividing cells. Similarly, treatment with the PGRMC1 inhibitor AG205 or PGRMC1 silencing in the oocyte impaired completion of meiosis I. Specifically the ability of the oocyte to extrude the first polar body was significantly impaired while meiotic figures aberration and chromatin scattering within the ooplasm increased. Finally, analysis of PGRMC1 and AURKB localization in AG205-treated oocytes confirmed an altered localization of both proteins when meiotic errors occur. The present findings demonstrate that PGRMC1 participates in late events of both mammalian mitosis and oocyte meiosis, consistent with PGRMC1's localization at the mid-zone and mid-body of the mitotic and meiotic spindle.

  10. Preferential Phosphorylation on Old Histones during Early Mitosis in Human Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Han, Yumiao; Marchione, Dylan M.; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    How histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are inherited through the cell cycle remains poorly understood. Canonical histones are made in the S phase of the cell cycle. Combining mass spectrometry-based technologies and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, we question the distribution of multiple histone PTMs on old versus new histones in synchronized human cells. We show that histone PTMs can be grouped into three categories according to their distributions. Most lysine mono-methylation and acetylation PTMs are either symmetrically distributed on old and new histones or are enriched on new histones. In contrast, most di- and tri-methylation PTMs are enriched on old histones, suggesting that the inheritance of different PTMs is regulated distinctly. Intriguingly, old and new histones are distinct in their phosphorylation status during early mitosis in the following three human cell types: HeLa, 293T, and human foreskin fibroblast cells. The mitotic hallmark H3S10ph is predominantly associated with old H3 at early mitosis and becomes symmetric with the progression of mitosis. This same distribution was observed with other mitotic phosphorylation marks, including H3T3/T6ph, H3.1/2S28ph, and H1.4S26ph but not S28/S31ph on the H3 variant H3.3. Although H3S10ph often associates with the neighboring Lys-9 di- or tri-methylations, they are not required for the asymmetric distribution of Ser-10 phosphorylation on the same H3 tail. Inhibition of the kinase Aurora B does not change the distribution despite significant reduction of H3S10ph levels. However, K9me2 abundance on the new H3 is significantly reduced after Aurora B inhibition, suggesting a cross-talk between H3S10ph and H3K9me2. PMID:27226594

  11. PCTAIRE1 phosphorylates p27 and regulates mitosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Teruki; Krajewska, Maryla; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Reed, John C

    2014-10-15

    PCTAIRE1 is distant relative of the cyclin-dependent kinase family that has been implicated in spermatogenesis and neuronal development, but it has not been studied in cancer. Here, we report that PCTAIRE1 is expressed in prostate, breast, and cervical cancer cells, where its RNAi-mediated silencing causes growth inhibition with aberrant mitosis due to defects in centrosome dynamics. PCTAIRE1 was not similarly involved in proliferation of nontransformed cells, including diploid human IMR-90 fibroblasts. Through yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified tumor suppressor p27 as a PCTAIRE1 interactor. In vitro kinase assays showed PCTAIRE1 phosphorylates p27 at Ser10. PCTAIRE1 silencing modulated Ser10 phosphorylation on p27 and led to its accumulation in cancer cells but not in nontransformed cells. In a mouse xenograft model of PPC1 prostate cancer, conditional silencing of PCTAIRE1 restored p27 protein expression and suppressed tumor growth. Mechanistic studies in HeLa cells showed that PCTAIRE1 phosphorylates p27 during the S and M phases of the cell cycle. Notably, p27 silencing was sufficient to rescue cells from mitotic arrest caused by PCTAIRE1 silencing. Clinically, PCTAIRE1 was highly expressed in primary breast and prostate tumors compared with adjacent normal epithelial tissues. Together our findings reveal an unexpected role for PCTAIRE1 in regulating p27 stability, mitosis, and tumor growth, suggesting PCTAIRE1 as a candidate cancer therapeutic target. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Cholesterol is essential for mitosis progression and its deficiency induces polyploid cell formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Carlos; Lobo, Maria del Val T.; Gomez-Coronado, Diego; Lasuncion, Miguel A.

    2004-01-01

    As an essential component of mammalian cell membranes, cells require cholesterol for proliferation, which is either obtained from plasma lipoproteins or synthesized intracellularly from acetyl-CoA. In addition to cholesterol, other non-sterol mevalonate derivatives are necessary for DNA synthesis, such as the phosphorylated forms of isopentane, farnesol, geranylgeraniol, and dolichol. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of cholesterol in mitosis. For this, human leukemia cells (HL-60) were incubated in a cholesterol-free medium and treated with SKF 104976, which inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis by blocking sterol 14α-demethylase, and the expression of relevant cyclins in the different phases of the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Prolonged cholesterol starvation induced the inhibition of cytokinesis and the formation of polyploid cells, which were multinucleated and had mitotic aberrations. Supplementing the medium with cholesterol completely abolished these effects, demonstrating they were specifically due to cholesterol deficiency. This is the first evidence that cholesterol is essential for mitosis completion and that, in the absence of cholesterol, the cells fail to undergo cytokinesis, entered G1 phase at higher DNA ploidy (tetraploidy), and then progressed through S (rereplication) into G2, generating polyploid cells

  13. The fate of chrysotile-induced multipolar mitosis and aneuploid population in cultured lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz de Araujo Cortez

    Full Text Available Chrysotile is one of the six types of asbestos, and it is the only one that can still be commercialized in many countries. Exposure to other types of asbestos has been associated with serious diseases, such as lung carcinomas and pleural mesotheliomas. The association of chrysotile exposure with disease is controversial. However, in vitro studies show the mutagenic potential of chrysotile, which can induce DNA and cell damage. The present work aimed to analyze alterations in lung small cell carcinoma cultures after 48 h of chrysotile exposure, followed by 2, 4 and 8 days of recovery in fiber-free culture medium. Some alterations, such as aneuploid cell formation, increased number of cells in G2/M phase and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed even after 8 days of recovery. The presence of chrysotile fibers in the cell cultures was detected and cell morphology was observed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. After 4 and 8 days of recovery, only a few chrysotile fragments were present in some cells, and the cellular morphology was similar to that of control cells. Cells transfected with the GFP-tagged α-tubulin plasmid were treated with chrysotile for 24 or 48 h and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed by time-lapse microscopy. Fates of these cells were established: retention in metaphase, cell death, progression through M phase generating more than two daughter cells or cell fusion during telophase or cytokinesis. Some of them were related to the formation of aneuploid cells and cells with abnormal number of centrosomes.

  14. Sequential Cdk1 and Plk1 phosphorylation of caspase-8 triggers apoptotic cell death during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthess, Yves; Raab, Monika; Knecht, Rainald; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Caspase-8 is crucial for cell death induction, especially via the death receptor pathway. The dysregulated expression or function of caspase-8 can promote tumor formation, progression and treatment resistance in different human cancers. Here, we show procaspase-8 is regulated during the cell cycle through the concerted inhibitory action of Cdk1/cyclin B1 and polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). By phosphorylating S387 in procaspase-8 Cdk1/cyclin B1 generates a phospho-epitope for the binding of the PBD of Plk1. Subsequently, S305 in procaspase-8 is phosphorylated by Plk1 during mitosis. Using an RNAi-based strategy we could demonstrate that the extrinsic cell death is increased upon Fas-stimulation when endogenous caspase-8 is replaced by a mutant (S305A) mimicking the non-phosphorylated form. Together, our data show that sequential phosphorylation by Cdk1/cyclin B1 and Plk1 decreases the sensitivity of cells toward stimuli of the extrinsic pathway during mitosis. Thus, the clinical Plk1 inhibitor BI 2536 decreases the threshold of different cancer cell types toward Fas-induced cell death. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Clusterin knockdown sensitizes prostate cancer cells to taxane by modulating mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nakouzi, Nader; Wang, Chris Kedong; Beraldi, Eliana; Jager, Wolfgang; Ettinger, Susan; Fazli, Ladan; Nappi, Lucia; Bishop, Jennifer; Zhang, Fan; Chauchereau, Anne; Loriot, Yohann; Gleave, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is a stress-activated molecular chaperone that confers treatment resistance to taxanes when highly expressed. While CLU inhibition potentiates activity of taxanes and other anti-cancer therapies in preclinical models, progression to treatment-resistant disease still occurs implicating additional compensatory survival mechanisms. Taxanes are believed to selectively target cells in mitosis, a complex mechanism controlled in part by balancing antagonistic roles of Cdc25C and Wee1 in mitosis progression. Our data indicate that CLU silencing induces a constitutive activation of Cdc25C, which delays mitotic exit and hence sensitizes cancer cells to mitotic-targeting agents such as taxanes. Unchecked Cdc25C activation leads to mitotic catastrophe and cell death unless cells up-regulate protective mechanisms mediated through the cell cycle regulators Wee1 and Cdk1. In this study, we show that CLU silencing induces a constitutive activation of Cdc25C via the phosphatase PP2A leading to relief of negative feedback inhibition and activation of Wee1-Cdk1 to promote survival and limit therapeutic efficacy. Simultaneous inhibition of CLU-regulated cell cycle effector Wee1 may improve synergistic responses of biologically rational combinatorial regimens using taxanes and CLU inhibitors. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  16. Arrest of irradiated G1, S, or G2 cells at mitosis using nocodazole promotes repair of potentially lethal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, G.; Nuesse, M.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of synchronized Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, irradiated in G1, S, and G2 phases, to repair potentially lethal damage when arrested at mitosis by using 0.4 μg/ml nocodazole, a specific inhibitor of microtubule polymerization, has been studied. Cells irradiated in these phases were found to repair potentially lethal damage at mitosis. The extent of this repair was similar to that observed for cells irradiated at the same stages in the cell cycle but allowed to repair potentially lethal damage by incubating in balanced salt solution for 6 hr after X irradiation

  17. The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 regulates cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, C W; Olsen, B B; Meek, D

    2008-01-01

    Cell-cycle transition from the G(2) phase into mitosis is regulated by the cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDK1) in complex with cyclin B. CDK1 activity is controlled by both inhibitory phosphorylation, catalysed by the Myt1 and Wee1 kinases, and activating dephosphorylation, mediated by the CDC...... interference results in delayed cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis. Knockdown of CK2beta causes stabilization of Wee1 and increased phosphorylation of CDK1 at the inhibitory Tyr15. PLK1-Wee1 association is an essential event in the degradation of Wee1 in unperturbed cell cycle. We have found...... regulatory subunit, identifying it as a new component of signaling pathways that regulate cell-cycle progression at the entry of mitosis.Oncogene advance online publication, 12 May 2008; doi:10.1038/onc.2008.146....

  18. Comparative influence of hyperthermia and ionizing radiation on cycle and mitosis lengths in EMT6 mouse tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Hooghe, M.C.; Hemon, D.; Malaise, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    With exponentially growing EMT6 mouse tumour cells in vitro, we have compared the effects of a dose of γ-radiation and different temperature-time combinations on the lengths of the cell cycle and of mitosis using time-lapse cinematography on individual cells. The radiation dose and various temperature-time combinations all produced 50 per cent lethality. The hyperthermia treatments between 42 and 45 0 C all caused a mitosis delay (MD) which was greater than that induced by ionizing radiation. The MD was greater with increasing temperature. In contrast, hyperthermia also induced a mitosis lengthening (ML) but this was only of the same order of magnitude as radioinduced ML. The results argue in favour of different mechanisms underlying thermoinduced MD and ML. (author)

  19. Mitosis and its regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frías Vázquez Sara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell division by mitosis is essential for the development of organisms and their reproduction; it is also neces- sary that each new cell is genetically identical to that from which it comes. In eukaryotes this is achieved by the presence of complex mechanisms that ensure the integrity of genomic material and their proper segregation during mitosis. The traditional view of mitosis has been divided into different stages that were characterized by morphological studies in dividing cells; advances in molecular biology have led beyond this characterization, so that we now know a range of participant molecules. This article will discuss the process of mitosis, both at the cellular and molecular level and a brief summary of the molecular players that regulate this process.

  20. Movie Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiages, Christopher; Hitt, Austin M.

    2008-01-01

    Mitosis and meiosis are essential for the growth, development, and reproduction of organisms. Because these processes are essential to life, both are emphasized in biology texts, state standards, and the National Science Education Standards. In this article, the authors present their methodology for teaching mitosis by having students produce…

  1. Preferential Phosphorylation on Old Histones during Early Mitosis in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Han, Yumiao; Marchione, Dylan M; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2016-07-15

    How histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are inherited through the cell cycle remains poorly understood. Canonical histones are made in the S phase of the cell cycle. Combining mass spectrometry-based technologies and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, we question the distribution of multiple histone PTMs on old versus new histones in synchronized human cells. We show that histone PTMs can be grouped into three categories according to their distributions. Most lysine mono-methylation and acetylation PTMs are either symmetrically distributed on old and new histones or are enriched on new histones. In contrast, most di- and tri-methylation PTMs are enriched on old histones, suggesting that the inheritance of different PTMs is regulated distinctly. Intriguingly, old and new histones are distinct in their phosphorylation status during early mitosis in the following three human cell types: HeLa, 293T, and human foreskin fibroblast cells. The mitotic hallmark H3S10ph is predominantly associated with old H3 at early mitosis and becomes symmetric with the progression of mitosis. This same distribution was observed with other mitotic phosphorylation marks, including H3T3/T6ph, H3.1/2S28ph, and H1.4S26ph but not S28/S31ph on the H3 variant H3.3. Although H3S10ph often associates with the neighboring Lys-9 di- or tri-methylations, they are not required for the asymmetric distribution of Ser-10 phosphorylation on the same H3 tail. Inhibition of the kinase Aurora B does not change the distribution despite significant reduction of H3S10ph levels. However, K9me2 abundance on the new H3 is significantly reduced after Aurora B inhibition, suggesting a cross-talk between H3S10ph and H3K9me2. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Unraveling the biomolecular snapshots of mitosis in healthy and cancer cells using plasmonically-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkanvalappil, Sajanlal R; Hira, Steven M; Mahmoud, Mahmoud A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2014-11-12

    Owing to the dynamic and complex nature of mitosis, precise and timely executions of biomolecular events are critical for high fidelity cell division. In this context, visualization of such complex events at the molecular level can provide vital information on the biomolecular processes in abnormal cells. Here, we explored the plasmonically enhanced light scattering properties of functionalized gold nanocubes (AuNCs) together with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to unravel the complex and dynamic biological processes involved in mitosis of healthy and cancerous cells from its molecular perspectives. By monitoring various stages of mitosis using SERS, we noticed that relatively high rate of conversion of mitotic proteins from their α-helix structure to β-sheet conformation is likely in the cancer cells during meta-, ana-, and telophases. Unique biochemical modifications to the lipid and amino acid moieties, associated with the observed protein conformational modifications, were also identified. However, in healthy cells, the existence of proteins in their β conformation was momentary and was largely in the α-helix form. The role of abnormal conformational modifications of mitotic proteins on the development of anomalous mitotic activities was further confirmed by looking at plasmonic nanoparticle-induced cytokinesis failure in cancer cells. Our findings illustrate the vast possibilities of SERS in real-time tracking of complex, subtle, and momentary modifications of biomolecules in live cells, which could provide new insights to the role of protein conformation dynamics during mitosis on the development of cancer and many other diseases.

  3. Automatic Detection of Mitosis and Nuclei From Cytogenetic Images by CellProfiler Software for Mitotic Index Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Jorge Ernesto; Radl, Analía; Romero, Ivonne; Barquinero, Joan Francesc; García, Omar; Di Giorgio, Marina

    2016-12-01

    Mitotic Index (MI) estimation expressed as percentage of mitosis plays an important role as quality control endpoint. To this end, MI is applied to check the lot of media and reagents to be used throughout the assay and also to check cellular viability after blood sample shipping, indicating satisfactory/unsatisfactory conditions for the progression of cell culture. The objective of this paper was to apply the CellProfiler open-source software for automatic detection of mitotic and nuclei figures from digitized images of cultured human lymphocytes for MI assessment, and to compare its performance to that performed through semi-automatic and visual detection. Lymphocytes were irradiated and cultured for mitosis detection. Sets of images from cultures were analyzed visually and findings were compared with those using CellProfiler software. The CellProfiler pipeline includes the detection of nuclei and mitosis with 80% sensitivity and more than 99% specificity. We conclude that CellProfiler is a reliable tool for counting mitosis and nuclei from cytogenetic images, saves considerable time compared to manual operation and reduces the variability derived from the scoring criteria of different scorers. The CellProfiler automated pipeline achieves good agreement with visual counting workflow, i.e. it allows fully automated mitotic and nuclei scoring in cytogenetic images yielding reliable information with minimal user intervention. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Automatic Detection of Mitosis and Nuclei from Cytogenetic Images by CellProfiler Software for Mitotic Index Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Jorge Ernesto; Romero, Ivonne; Garcia, Omar; Radl, Analia; Di Giorgio, Marina; Barquinero, Joan Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic Index (MI) estimation expressed as percentage of mitosis plays an important role as quality control endpoint. To this end, MI is applied to check the lot of media and reagents to be used throughout the assay and also to check cellular viability after blood sample shipping, indicating satisfactory/unsatisfactory conditions for the progression of cell culture. The objective of this paper was to apply the CellProfiler open-source software for automatic detection of mitotic and nuclei figures from digitized images of cultured human lymphocytes for MI assessment, and to compare its performance to that performed through semi-automatic and visual detection. Lymphocytes were irradiated and cultured for mitosis detection. Sets of images from cultures were analyzed visually and findings were compared with those using CellProfiler software. The CellProfiler pipeline includes the detection of nuclei and mitosis with 80% sensitivity and more than 99% specificity. We conclude that CellProfiler is a reliable tool for counting mitosis and nuclei from cytogenetic images, saves considerable time compared to manual operation and reduces the variability derived from the scoring criteria of different scorers. The CellProfiler automated pipeline achieves good agreement with visual counting workflow, i.e. it allows fully automated mitotic and nuclei scoring in cytogenetic images yielding reliable information with minimal user intervention. (authors)

  5. Rapid proliferation of daughter cells lacking particular chromosomes due to multipolar mitosis promotes clonal evolution in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Shi, Xiaoyun; Huang, Yun; Zhang, Zhen; Cooke, Howard J; Wang, Mingrong; Shi, Qinghua

    2012-07-15

    Aneuploidy and chromosome instability (CIN) are hallmarks of the vast majority of solid tumors. However, the origins of aneuploid cells are unknown. The aim of this study is to improve our understanding of how aneuploidy and/or CIN arise and of karyotype evolution in cancer cells. By using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on cells after long-term live cell imaging, we demonstrated that most (> 90%) of the newly generated aneuploid cells resulted from multipolar divisions. Multipolar division occurred in mononucleated and binucleated parental cells, resulting in variation of chromosome compositions in daughter cells. These karyotypes can have the same chromosome number as their mother clone or lack a copy of certain chromosomes. Interestingly, daughter cells that lost a chromosome were observed to survive and form clones with shorter cell cycle duration. In our model of cancer cell evolution, the rapid proliferation of daughter cells from multipolar mitosis promotes colonal evolution in colorectal cancer cells.

  6. Histochemical applications of x-ray microanalysis: the simultaneous assessment of mitosis and cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, I.D.; Lewis, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    The principles of x-ray microanalytical histochemistry are reviewed. The use of labelling and precipitation techniques are examined, and particular attention is paid to the localization of enzymatic activity. A new method is described for the simultaneous assessment of mitosis as represented by the incorporation of ( 3 H) thymidine, and cell death as represented by the localization of free acid phosphatase, in the same tissue section. The thymidine incorporation is demonstrated by the appearance of topographically and microanalytically detectable silver grains in an overlying emulsion and the cell lysis associated acid phosphatase activity is detected optically and microanalytically by means of a bromine-rich azo dye deposited as a result of coupling naphthol AS BI, enzymatically released from naphthyl AS BI phosphoric acid, with diazotized 2,5-dibromoaniline

  7. Nonanaplastic follicular cell-derived thyroid carcinoma: mitosis and necrosis in long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skansing, Daniel Bräuner; Londero, Stefano Christian; Asschenfeldt, Pia; Larsen, Stine Rosenkilde; Godballe, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Nonanaplastic follicular cell-derived thyroid carcinoma (NAFCTC) includes differentiated- (DTC) and poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (PDTC). DTC has an excellent prognosis, while PDTC is situated between DTC and anaplastic carcinomas. Short-term studies suggest that PDTC patients diagnosed only on tumor necrosis and/or mitosis have a prognosis similar to those diagnosed according to the TURIN proposal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate prognosis for NAFCTC based on long-term follow-up illuminating the significance of tumor necrosis and mitosis. A cohort of 225 patients with NAFCTC was followed more than 20 years. Age, sex, distant metastasis, histology, tumor size, extrathyroidal invasion, lymph node metastasis, tumor necrosis and mitosis were examined as possible prognostic factors. Median follow-up time for patients alive was 28 years (range 20-43 years). Age, distant metastasis, extrathyroidal invasion, tumor size, tumor necrosis and mitosis were independent prognostic factors in multivariate analysis for overall survival (OS). In disease specific survival (DSS) age was not significant. Using only necrosis and/or mitosis as criteria for PDTC the 5-, 10- and 20-year OS for DTC was 87, 79 and 69%, respectively. In DSS it was 95, 92 and 90%. For PDTC the 5-, 10- and 20-year OS was 57, 40 and 25%, respectively. In DSS it was 71, 55 and 48%. Tumor necrosis and mitosis are highly significant prognostic indicators in analysis of long time survival of nonanaplastic follicular cell-derived thyroid carcinoma indicating that a simplification of the actually used criteria for poorly differentiated carcinomas may be justified.

  8. The endoplasmic reticulum is partitioned asymmetrically during mitosis before cell fate selection in proneuronal cells in the early Drosophila embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eritano, Anthony S.; Altamirano, Arturo; Beyeler, Sarah; Gaytan, Norma; Velasquez, Mark; Riggs, Blake

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is the primary mechanism to generate cellular diversity, and it relies on the correct partitioning of cell fate determinants. However, the mechanism by which these determinants are delivered and positioned is poorly understood, and the upstream signal to initiate asymmetric cell division is unknown. Here we report that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is asymmetrically partitioned during mitosis in epithelial cells just before delamination and selection of a proneural cell fate in the early Drosophila embryo. At the start of gastrulation, the ER divides asymmetrically into a population of asynchronously dividing cells at the anterior end of the embryo. We found that this asymmetric division of the ER depends on the highly conserved ER membrane protein Jagunal (Jagn). RNA inhibition of jagn just before the start of gastrulation disrupts this asymmetric division of the ER. In addition, jagn-deficient embryos display defects in apical-basal spindle orientation in delaminated embryonic neuroblasts. Our results describe a model in which an organelle is partitioned asymmetrically in an otherwise symmetrically dividing cell population just upstream of cell fate determination and updates previous models of spindle-based selection of cell fate during mitosis. PMID:28381427

  9. Inhibitive effects of gamma-ray on root tip cells mitosis for different types of cultured rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Mei; Wang Cailian; Zhao Kongnan; Xu Gang

    1988-01-01

    Studies on twelve varieties of different cultured rice showed that the mitotic indexdose relationship could be fitted by linear regression equations. The mitotic index was decreased with the increase of dose. The inhibitive effects on root tip cells mitosis were similar for different types of cultured rice but rather different from variety to variety

  10. TRACMIT: An effective pipeline for tracking and analyzing cells on micropatterns through mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Burri

    Full Text Available The use of micropatterns has transformed investigations of dynamic biological processes by enabling the reproducible analysis of live cells using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. With micropatterns, thousands of individual cells can be efficiently imaged in parallel, rendering the approach well suited for screening projects. Despite being powerful, such screens remain challenging in terms of data handling and analysis. Typically, only a fraction of micropatterns is occupied in a manner suitable to monitor a given phenotypic output. Moreover, the presence of dying or otherwise compromised cells complicates the analysis. Therefore, focusing strictly on relevant cells in such large time-lapse microscopy dataset poses interesting analysis challenges that are not readily met by existing software packages. This motivated us to develop an image analysis pipeline that handles all necessary image processing steps within one open-source platform to detect and analyze individual cells seeded on micropatterns through mitosis. We introduce a comprehensive image analysis pipeline running on Fiji termed TRACMIT (pipeline for TRACking and analyzing cells on micropatterns through MITosis. TRACMIT was developed to rapidly and accurately assess the orientation of the mitotic spindle during metaphase in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of human cells expressing mCherry::histone 2B and plated on L-shaped micropatterns. This solution enables one to perform the entire analysis from the raw data, avoiding the need to save intermediate images, thereby decreasing data volume and thus reducing the data that needs to be processed. We first select micropatterns containing a single cell and then identify anaphase figures in the time-lapse recording. Next, TRACMIT tracks back in time until metaphase, when the angle of the mitotic spindle with respect to the micropattern is assessed. We designed the pipeline to allow for manual validation of selected cells with a simple

  11. Novel DNA damage checkpoint in mitosis: Mitotic DNA damage induces re-replication without cell division in various cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Sun-Yi; Rosen, Eliot M; Jang, Young-Joo

    2012-07-06

    DNA damage induces multiple checkpoint pathways to arrest cell cycle progression until damage is repaired. In our previous reports, when DNA damage occurred in prometaphase, cells were accumulated in 4 N-DNA G1 phase, and mitosis-specific kinases were inactivated in dependent on ATM/Chk1 after a short incubation for repair. We investigated whether or not mitotic DNA damage causes cells to skip-over late mitotic periods under prolonged incubation in a time-lapse study. 4 N-DNA-damaged cells re-replicated without cell division and accumulated in 8 N-DNA content, and the activities of apoptotic factors were increased. The inhibition of DNA replication reduced the 8 N-DNA cell population dramatically. Induction of replication without cell division was not observed upon depletion of Chk1 or ATM. Finally, mitotic DNA damage induces mitotic slippage and that cells enter G1 phase with 4 N-DNA content and then DNA replication is occurred to 8 N-DNA content before completion of mitosis in the ATM/Chk1-dependent manner, followed by caspase-dependent apoptosis during long-term repair. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Aurora B is regulated by acetylation/deacetylation during mitosis in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadri-Moskwik, Maria; Weiderhold, Kimberly N; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Chuang, Carol; Pan, Jing; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan

    2012-10-01

    Protein acetylation has been implicated in playing an important role during mitotic progression. Aurora B kinase is known to play a critical role in mitosis. However, whether Aurora B is regulated by acetylation is not known. Using IP with an anti-acetyl lysine antibody, we identified Aurora B as an acetylated protein in PC3 prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of HDAC3 or inhibiting HDAC3 deacetylase activity led to a significant increase (Pmitosis. Together, these results indicate that Aurora B is more active in its deacetylated state and further suggest a new mechanism by which dynamic acetylation/deacetylation acts as a rheostat to fine-tune Aurora B activity during mitotic progression.

  13. Stage-Specific Gene Profiling of Germinal Cells Helps Delineate the Mitosis/Meiosis Transition1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2018-01-01

    In flowering plants, germ lines are induced from somatic meristems within reproductive organs. Within anthers, germinal cell initials first undergo several rounds of mitotic proliferation before synchronously entering meiosis. Our understanding of the progression and the molecular basis of this mitosis to meiosis transition is still limited. Taking advantage of the correlation between anther length and premeiotic germinal cell development in maize (Zea mays), we studied the transcriptome dynamics of germinal cells at three sequential stages, mitotic archesporial cells, enlarging pollen mother cells at the premeiosis interphase, and pollen mother cells at the early prophase of meiosis, using laser microdissection-based expression profiling. Our analysis showed that cells undergoing the mitosis-meiosis switch exhibit robust transcriptional changes. The three stages are distinguished by the expression of genes encoding transcription factor subsets, meiotic chromosome recombination proteins, and distinct E3 ubiquitin ligases, respectively. The transcription level of genes encoding protein turnover machinery was significantly higher in these three stages of germinal cells than in mature pollen, parenchyma cells, or seedlings. Our experimental results further indicate that many meiotic genes are not only transcribed, but also translated prior to meiosis. We suggest that the enlarging pollen mother cells stage represents a crucial turning point from mitosis to meiosis for developing germinal cells. PMID:29187566

  14. Chinese hamster ovary cell mitosis and its response to ionizing radiation: A morphological analysis of the living cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Repeated microscopic observations of exponentially growing Chinese hamster ovary cells were made and the times and mitotic stages were recorded in control and irradiated cultures at 37 degree C. As determined by autoradiography, the time from the end of S phase to early prophase (the G2 phase) was 46 min, to breakdown of the nuclear envelope was 91 min, and to restoration of the nuclear envelope was 116 min. The time spent in morphologically distinguishable phases of mitosis and the effects of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 4.0 Gy of gamma or X radiation on cells at each phase were determined. Affected cells were found to be delayed without or with reversion to an earlier mitotic stage before recovering and advancing through mitosis. Cells were timed in the five steps comprising delay with reversion: inertia, cessation I, regression, cessation II, and reprogression. No cells treated in late prophase, i.e., within 8-10 min of nuclear envelope breakdown, were delayed by the doses used; therefore the critical or transition point must be situated in middle prophase. Cells irradiated in this stage were not delayed by 0.5 or 1.0 Gy, but suffered a dose-dependent delay with or without reversion after 1.5, 2.0, and 4.0 Gy. Cells irradiated in early prophase and very late interphase responded similarly, but a greater percentage of the latter reverted

  15. Analysis of structural and numerical chromosomal anomalies at the first, second, and third mitosis after irradiation of one-cell mouse embryos with X-rays or neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenborn, U.; Streffer, C.

    1988-01-01

    One-cell mouse embryos were irradiated with X-rays or neutrons. Analysis of the first, second, and third postradiation mitoses revealed yields of structural aberrations increasing linearly after exposure to both radiation qualities. For X-rays aberration frequency decreased from first to third mitosis; after neutrons it decreased from first to second mitosis but then increased in the third. RBEs of 4.7, 4.8, and 7.4 were calculated for corresponding mitoses. New aberrations were produced after the first postradiation mitosis and expressed during the second and third mitosis. Chromosome loss also increased with increasing radiation dose at the second mitosis. An RBE of 2 was calculated for this effect. Comparing the data with previous investigations on embryonic and fetal death after prenatal irradiation, it was concluded that the high radiosensitivity of the one-cell embryo is due to the induction of structural as well as of numerical chromosome aberrations. (author)

  16. Systematic Analysis of the Crosstalk between Mitosis and DNA Damage by a Live Cell siRNA Screen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronni Sølvhøi

    . The relative proportion and crosstalk between these causative versus consequent genome-destabilizing events remains elusive. The aim of this thesis was to assess the relationship between DNA damage and mitotic perturbations. Using large-scale, real-time siRNA screens and a live cell imaging approach......Recent research has shown, that the biological processes of DNA replication, DNA damage, cell cycle and mitosis cannot be considered as isolated cellular functions but are mechanistically linked in many ways. For instance, when cells are exposed to replication stress and enter mitosis...... with unresolved replication intermediates, it can give rise to chromosome lesions, which are then transmitted to the next cell cycle. Aberrations in the mitotic process itself can potentially give rise to post-mitotic DNA damage with serious onsequences for genome integrity in the ensuing cell generations...

  17. Cdc42 is not essential for filopodium formation, directed migration, cell polarization, and mitosis in fibroblastoid cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czuchra, Aleksandra; Wu, Xunwei; Meyer, Hannelore

    2005-01-01

    Cdc42 is a small GTPase involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and cell polarity. To test whether Cdc42 has an essential role in the formation of filopodia or directed cell migration, we generated Cdc42-deficient fibroblastoid cells by conditional gene inactivation. We report here that loss...... of Cdc42 did not affect filopodium or lamellipodium formation and had no significant influence on the speed of directed migration nor on mitosis. Cdc42-deficient cells displayed a more elongated cell shape and had a reduced area. Furthermore, directionality during migration and reorientation of the Golgi...... apparatus into the direction of migration was decreased. However, expression of dominant negative Cdc42 in Cdc42-null cells resulted in strongly reduced directed migration, severely reduced single cell directionality, and complete loss of Golgi polarization and of directionality of protrusion formation...

  18. Molecular networks linked by Moesin drive remodeling of the cell cortex during mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinet, Chantal; Decelle, Barbara; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Dorn, Jonas F.; Payrastre, Bernard; Payre, François; Carreno, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    The cortical mechanisms that drive the series of mitotic cell shape transformations remain elusive. In this paper, we identify two novel networks that collectively control the dynamic reorganization of the mitotic cortex. We demonstrate that Moesin, an actin/membrane linker, integrates these two networks to synergize the cortical forces that drive mitotic cell shape transformations. We find that the Pp1-87B phosphatase restricts high Moesin activity to early mitosis and down-regulates Moesin at the polar cortex, after anaphase onset. Overactivation of Moesin at the polar cortex impairs cell elongation and thus cytokinesis, whereas a transient recruitment of Moesin is required to retract polar blebs that allow cortical relaxation and dissipation of intracellular pressure. This fine balance of Moesin activity is further adjusted by Skittles and Pten, two enzymes that locally produce phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and thereby, regulate Moesin cortical association. These complementary pathways provide a spatiotemporal framework to explain how the cell cortex is remodeled throughout cell division. PMID:21969469

  19. Mitosis in neurons: Roughex and APC/C maintain cell cycle exit to prevent cytokinetic and axonal defects in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ruggiero

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of cell cycle exit by neurons remain poorly understood. Through genetic and developmental analysis of Drosophila eye development, we found that the cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitor Roughex maintains G1 cell cycle exit during differentiation of the R8 class of photoreceptor neurons. The roughex mutant neurons re-enter the mitotic cell cycle and progress without executing cytokinesis, unlike non-neuronal cells in the roughex mutant that perform complete cell divisions. After mitosis, the binucleated R8 neurons usually transport one daughter nucleus away from the cell body into the developing axon towards the brain in a kinesin-dependent manner resembling anterograde axonal trafficking. Similar cell cycle and photoreceptor neuron defects occurred in mutants for components of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome. These findings indicate a neuron-specific defect in cytokinesis and demonstrate a critical role for mitotic cyclin downregulation both to maintain cell cycle exit during neuronal differentiation and to prevent axonal defects following failed cytokinesis.

  20. Hepatocellular carcinoma repression by TNFα-mediated synergistic lethal effect of mitosis defect-induced senescence and cell death sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Fu, Jing; Du, Min; Zhang, Haibin; Li, Lu; Cen, Jin; Li, Weiyun; Chen, Xiaotao; Lin, Yunfei; Conway, Edward M; Pikarsky, Eli; Wang, Hongyan; Pan, Guoyu; Ji, Yuan; Wang, Hong-Yang; Hui, Lijian

    2016-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a cancer lacking effective therapies. Several measures have been proposed to treat HCCs, such as senescence induction, mitotic inhibition, and cell death promotion. However, data from other cancers suggest that single use of these approaches may not be effective. Here, by genetic targeting of Survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) that plays dual roles in mitosis and cell survival, we identified a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-mediated synergistic lethal effect between senescence and apoptosis sensitization in malignant HCCs. Survivin deficiency results in mitosis defect-associated senescence in HCC cells, which triggers local inflammation and increased TNFα. Survivin inactivation also sensitizes HCC cells to TNFα-triggered cell death, which leads to marked HCC regression. Based on these findings, we designed a combination treatment using mitosis inhibitor and proapoptosis compounds. This treatment recapitulates the therapeutic effect of Survivin deletion and effectively eliminates HCCs, thus representing a potential strategy for HCC therapy. Survivin ablation dramatically suppresses human and mouse HCCs by triggering senescence-associated TNFα and sensitizing HCC cells to TNFα-induced cell death. Combined use of mitotic inhibitor and second mitochondrial-derived activator of caspases mimetic can induce senescence-associated TNFα and enhance TNFα-induced cell death and synergistically eliminate HCC. (Hepatology 2016;64:1105-1120). © 2016 The Authors. (Hepatology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  1. Classical cadherins control nucleus and centrosome position and cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, Isabelle; Camand, Emeline; Etienne-Manneville, Sandrine

    2009-06-01

    Control of cell polarity is crucial during tissue morphogenesis and renewal, and depends on spatial cues provided by the extracellular environment. Using micropatterned substrates to impose reproducible cell-cell interactions, we show that in the absence of other polarizing cues, cell-cell contacts are the main regulator of nucleus and centrosome positioning, and intracellular polarized organization. In a variety of cell types, including astrocytes, epithelial cells, and endothelial cells, calcium-dependent cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions induce nucleus and centrosome off-centering toward cell-cell contacts, and promote orientation of the nucleus-centrosome axis toward free cell edges. Nucleus and centrosome off-centering is controlled by N-cadherin through the regulation of cell interactions with the extracellular matrix, whereas the orientation of the nucleus-centrosome axis is determined by the geometry of N-cadherin-mediated contacts. Our results demonstrate that in addition to the specific function of E-cadherin in regulating baso-apical epithelial polarity, classical cadherins control cell polarization in otherwise nonpolarized cells.

  2. Inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme modulate mitosis and gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M.K.; Baskaran, K.; Molteni, A. [Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril inhibits mitosis in several cell types that contain ACE and renin activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the ACE inhibitors captopril and CGS 13945 (10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}2}M) on proliferation and gene expression in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells in culture. These cells lack renin and ACE activity. Both ACE inhibitors produced a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation within 24 hr. Captopril at a concentration of 0.36 mM and CGS 13945 at 150 {mu}M decreased cellular growth rate to approximately half that of the control. Neither drug influenced the viability or the cell cycle distribution of the tumor cells. Slot blot analysis of mRNA for four genes, proliferation associated cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), K-ras, protein kinase C-{Beta} (PKC-{Beta}) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) was performed. Both ACE inhibitors increased K-ras expression by a factor of 2, and had no effect on CA II mRNA levels. Captopril also lowered PCNA by 40% and CGS 13945 lowered PKC-{Beta} gene expression to 30% of the control level. The data demonstrate that ACE inhibitors exhibit antimitotic activity and differential gene modulation in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells. The absence of renin and ACE activity in these cells suggests that the antimitotic action of captopril and CGS 13945 is independent of renin-angiotensin regulation. The growth inhibition may occur through downregulation of growth-related gene expression. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Cancer: Mitosis Run Amok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Scope, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Virtually every student knows someone who has battled cancer. It is a topic that is of great interest to many students because of their personal connection to the subject. Mitosis is an important topic in a middle school unit on cells and cell processes (National Science Standards, Grades 5?8: Life Sciences: Content Standard C). Studying cancer…

  4. Regulation of mitosis-meiosis transition by the ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP in male germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tadashi; Zhang, Teng; Kushi, Ryo; Nakano, Seiji; Endo, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Makiko; Yanagihara, Noriko; Zarkower, David; Nakayama, Keiko

    2017-11-15

    The mitosis-meiosis transition is essential for spermatogenesis. Specific and timely downregulation of the transcription factor DMRT1, and consequent induction of Stra8 expression, is required for this process in mammals, but the molecular mechanism has remained unclear. Here, we show that β-TrCP, the substrate recognition component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, targets DMRT1 for degradation and thereby controls the mitosis-meiosis transition in mouse male germ cells. Conditional inactivation of β-TrCP2 in male germ cells of β-TrCP1 knockout mice resulted in sterility due to a lack of mature sperm. The β-TrCP-deficient male germ cells did not enter meiosis, but instead underwent apoptosis. The induction of Stra8 expression was also attenuated in association with the accumulation of DMRT1 at the Stra8 promoter in β-TrCP-deficient testes. DMRT1 contains a consensus β-TrCP degron sequence that was found to bind β-TrCP. Overexpression of β-TrCP induced the ubiquitylation and degradation of DMRT1. Heterozygous deletion of Dmrt1 in β-TrCP-deficient spermatogonia increased meiotic cells with a concomitant reduction of apoptosis. Collectively, our data indicate that β-TrCP regulates the transition from mitosis to meiosis in male germ cells by targeting DMRT1 for degradation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Inhibition of cancer cell mitosis by reducing the availability of phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, John Rhys

    2016-11-01

    The addition of phosphate groups is an essential requirement for the proper functioning of cyclin and cyclin dependent kinase which control various stages in the mitotic division of cancer cells. Thus limiting the availability of phosphate is likely to interfere with the metabolism of rapidly growing malignant cells. The human hormone glucagon and the anti metabolite mithramycin reduce serum phosphate by increasing phosphaturia and are both very effective in treating Paget's disease of bone, a precancerous condition. In this disorder large doses of glucagon given intravenously relieve bone pain and cause serum phosphate and alkaline phosphatase as well as urine hydroxyproline to fall, indicating a marked reduction in bone turnover. A constant iv infusion of glucagon was given to each of three patients all of whom had secondary malignant bone deposits. Two of the patients had primary prostate cancer and one had a squamous cell lung tumour. All three patients had relief of bone pain and a fall in serum alkaline phosphatase. Serum acid phosphatase also fell in the two patients with prostate cancer. It is proposed that the marked drop in serum phosphate due to glucagon causes intracellular phosphate to fall. This in turn disrupts the addition and removal of phosphate groups essential for the proper functioning of cyclin and cyclin dependent kinase. These two proteins control the transition from G1 to S (DNA synthesis phase) and G2 to M (mitotic phase) in the dividing cycle of malignant cells. Depriving a tumour of an essential ingredient used in phosphorylation reactions will disrupt its growth. It is also proposed that, by the same mechanism, glucagon induced hypophosphataemia renders malignant cells more sensitive to established chemotherapeutic agents and radiation waves. If this hypothesis proves to be correct, lowering intracellular phosphate may become an useful tool in cancer therapy. However extensive studies are necessary to determine whether mitosis in cancer

  6. Targeting TAO Kinases Using a New Inhibitor Compound Delays Mitosis and Induces Mitotic Cell Death in Centrosome Amplified Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Chuay-Yeng; Giacomini, Caterina; Reyes-Corral, Marta; Olmos, Yolanda; Tavares, Ignatius A; Marson, Charles M; Linardopoulos, Spiros; Tutt, Andrew N; Morris, Jonathan D H

    2017-11-01

    Thousand-and-one amino acid kinases (TAOK) 1 and 2 are activated catalytically during mitosis and can contribute to mitotic cell rounding and spindle positioning. Here, we characterize a compound that inhibits TAOK1 and TAOK2 activity with IC 50 values of 11 to 15 nmol/L, is ATP-competitive, and targets these kinases selectively. TAOK inhibition or depletion in centrosome-amplified SKBR3 or BT549 breast cancer cell models increases the mitotic population, the percentages of mitotic cells displaying amplified centrosomes and multipolar spindles, induces cell death, and inhibits cell growth. In contrast, nontumorigenic and dividing bipolar MCF-10A breast cells appear less dependent on TAOK activity and can complete mitosis and proliferate in the presence of the TAOK inhibitor. We demonstrate that TAOK1 and TAOK2 localize to the cytoplasm and centrosomes respectively during mitosis. Live cell imaging shows that the TAOK inhibitor prolongs the duration of mitosis in SKBR3 cells, increases mitotic cell death, and reduces the percentages of cells exiting mitosis, whereas MCF-10A cells continue to divide and proliferate. Over 80% of breast cancer tissues display supernumerary centrosomes, and tumor cells frequently cluster extra centrosomes to avoid multipolar mitoses and associated cell death. Consequently, drugs that stimulate centrosome declustering and induce multipolarity are likely to target dividing centrosome-amplified cancer cells preferentially, while sparing normal bipolar cells. Our results demonstrate that TAOK inhibition can enhance centrosome declustering and mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells, and these proteins may therefore offer novel therapeutic targets suitable for drug inhibition and the potential treatment of breast cancers, where supernumerary centrosomes occur. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(11); 2410-21. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. TopBP1 is required at mitosis to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Kruse, Thomas; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Genome integrity is critically dependent on timely DNA replication and accurate chromosome segregation. Replication stress delays replication into G2/M, which in turn impairs proper chromosome segregation and inflicts DNA damage on the daughter cells. Here we show that TopBP1 forms foci upon mitotic entry. In early mitosis, TopBP1 marks sites of and promotes unscheduled DNA synthesis. Moreover, TopBP1 is required for focus formation of the structure-selective nuclease and scaffold protein SLX4 in mitosis. Persistent TopBP1 foci transition into 53BP1 nuclear bodies (NBs) in G1 and precise temporal depletion of TopBP1 just before mitotic entry induced formation of 53BP1 NBs in the next cell cycle, showing that TopBP1 acts to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells. Based on these results, we propose that TopBP1 maintains genome integrity in mitosis by controlling chromatin recruitment of SLX4 and by facilitating unscheduled DNA synthesis. PMID:26283799

  8. Nucleus and nucleus-cytoskeleton connections in 3D cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lingling, E-mail: liulingling2012@163.com; Luo, Qing, E-mail: qing.luo@cqu.edu.cn; Sun, Jinghui, E-mail: sunjhemail@163.com; Song, Guanbin, E-mail: song@cqu.edu.cn

    2016-10-15

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from embryonic development to cancer metastasis. Currently, accumulating data suggest that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3D) environments show well-defined differences compared to their well-established two-dimensional (2D) counterparts. During 3D migration, the cell body and nucleus must deform to allow cellular passage through the available spaces, and the deformability of the relatively rigid nucleus may constitute a limiting step. Here, we highlight the key evidence regarding the role of the nuclear mechanics in 3D migration, including the molecular components that govern the stiffness of the nucleus and review how the nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by cytoskeleton-based migration machinery. Intriguingly, nuclear movement must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading and trailing edges, which in turn impact the cytoplasmic dynamics that affect the migration efficiency. Thus, we suggest that alterations in the nuclear structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations that are necessary for efficient migration. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representations of a cell migrating on a 2D substrate and a cell migrating in a 3D extracellular matrix environment. (A) Nucleus-cytoskeleton connections are essential to 3D migration. Mechanical signals are transduced by integrins at the cell surface and channeled to cytoskeletal proteins, which generates prestress. The nucleus-cytoskeleton connections can either act as a stable skeleton to anchor the nuclei or provide active force to move the nuclei. The LINC complex is responsible for the nucleo-cytoskeletal coupling. Nesprins connect the cytoskeletal proteins to the inner nuclear membrane proteins SUN1 and SUN2. The SUN proteins connect to the lamins that form the lamina, which attaches to the chromatin. This physical connectivity transmits the mechanical signals from receptors at

  9. Nucleus and nucleus-cytoskeleton connections in 3D cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lingling; Luo, Qing; Sun, Jinghui; Song, Guanbin

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from embryonic development to cancer metastasis. Currently, accumulating data suggest that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3D) environments show well-defined differences compared to their well-established two-dimensional (2D) counterparts. During 3D migration, the cell body and nucleus must deform to allow cellular passage through the available spaces, and the deformability of the relatively rigid nucleus may constitute a limiting step. Here, we highlight the key evidence regarding the role of the nuclear mechanics in 3D migration, including the molecular components that govern the stiffness of the nucleus and review how the nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by cytoskeleton-based migration machinery. Intriguingly, nuclear movement must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading and trailing edges, which in turn impact the cytoplasmic dynamics that affect the migration efficiency. Thus, we suggest that alterations in the nuclear structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations that are necessary for efficient migration. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representations of a cell migrating on a 2D substrate and a cell migrating in a 3D extracellular matrix environment. (A) Nucleus-cytoskeleton connections are essential to 3D migration. Mechanical signals are transduced by integrins at the cell surface and channeled to cytoskeletal proteins, which generates prestress. The nucleus-cytoskeleton connections can either act as a stable skeleton to anchor the nuclei or provide active force to move the nuclei. The LINC complex is responsible for the nucleo-cytoskeletal coupling. Nesprins connect the cytoskeletal proteins to the inner nuclear membrane proteins SUN1 and SUN2. The SUN proteins connect to the lamins that form the lamina, which attaches to the chromatin. This physical connectivity transmits the mechanical signals from receptors at

  10. Altering the Rate of Mitosis by Introducing Low-Gigahertz Radiation to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, S.; Ashby, C.

    2017-12-01

    This experiment aims to assess the impact of low-frequency radiation (from common technological tools such as cell phones, scanners, and wifi) on the mitotic rates of cells. In particular, the focus of the study was on the growth and development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures that were exposed to radio waves from a wifi router, which were then compared to a cohort of the same species without exposure. Though routers emit a low gigahertz frequency, they are categorized as Group 2B radiation (possibly carcinogenic) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer of the World Health Organization, signifying that constant exposure poses a potential risk to humans. Twelve agar dishes of active Saccharomyces cerevisiae solution were prepared, with six dishes acting as the control under no added radiation and six acting as the experimental group under 2.4 GHz of radiation due to their proximity to the router. Data on how many cultures proliferated in each dish was collected every three days, with the experiment running for a total of twelve days. All subjects experienced growth curves until day 9 when the experimental group's growth peaked with an average of 62 colonies/dish. Three of the six dishes in this group lost colonies in the following three days, leaving the experimental group with an average of 61 colonies/dish on day 12, while the control group was still increasing by day 12 with an average of 48 colonies/dish, with only one dish undergoing a loss of colonies. Exposing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to low grade radiation resulted in accelerated mitosis, and though the experimental group faced colony death after nine days, the loss was likely due to overpopulation in the dish.

  11. 53BP1 and USP28 mediate p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in response to centrosome loss and prolonged mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Chii Shyang; Mazo, Gregory; Das, Tuhin; Goodman, Joshua; Kim, Minhee; O'Rourke, Brian P; Izquierdo, Denisse; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2016-07-02

    Mitosis occurs efficiently, but when it is disturbed or delayed, p53-dependent cell death or senescence is often triggered after mitotic exit. To characterize this process, we conducted CRISPR-mediated loss-of-function screens using a cell-based assay in which mitosis is consistently disturbed by centrosome loss. We identified 53BP1 and USP28 as essential components acting upstream of p53, evoking p21-dependent cell cycle arrest in response not only to centrosome loss, but also to other distinct defects causing prolonged mitosis. Intriguingly, 53BP1 mediates p53 activation independently of its DNA repair activity, but requiring its interacting protein USP28 that can directly deubiquitinate p53 in vitro and ectopically stabilize p53 in vivo. Moreover, 53BP1 can transduce prolonged mitosis to cell cycle arrest independently of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), suggesting that while SAC protects mitotic accuracy by slowing down mitosis, 53BP1 and USP28 function in parallel to select against disturbed or delayed mitosis, promoting mitotic efficiency.

  12. Genotoxic anti-cancer agents and their relationship to DNA damage, mitosis, and checkpoint adaptation in proliferating cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Lucy H; Golsteyn, Roy M

    2014-02-25

    When a human cell detects damaged DNA, it initiates the DNA damage response (DDR) that permits it to repair the damage and avoid transmitting it to daughter cells. Despite this response, changes to the genome occur and some cells, such as proliferating cancer cells, are prone to genome instability. The cellular processes that lead to genomic changes after a genotoxic event are not well understood. Our research focuses on the relationship between genotoxic cancer drugs and checkpoint adaptation, which is the process of mitosis with damaged DNA. We examine the types of DNA damage induced by widely used cancer drugs and describe their effects upon proliferating cancer cells. There is evidence that cell death caused by genotoxic cancer drugs in some cases includes exiting a DNA damage cell cycle arrest and entry into mitosis. Furthermore, some cells are able to survive this process at a time when the genome is most susceptible to change or rearrangement. Checkpoint adaptation is poorly characterised in human cells; we predict that increasing our understanding of this pathway may help to understand genomic instability in cancer cells and provide insight into methods to improve the efficacy of current cancer therapies.

  13. TopBP1 is required at mitosis to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Kruse, Thomas; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Genome integrity is critically dependent on timely DNA replication and accurate chromosome segregation. Replication stress delays replication into G2/M, which in turn impairs proper chromosome segregation and inflicts DNA damage on the daughter cells. Here we show that TopBP1 forms foci upon...... temporal depletion of TopBP1 just before mitotic entry induced formation of 53BP1 NBs in the next cell cycle, showing that TopBP1 acts to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells. Based on these results, we propose that TopBP1 maintains genome integrity in mitosis by controlling chromatin...

  14. Sp1 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 represses its DNA-binding activity during mitosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, J-Y; Wang, S-A; Yang, W-B; Yang, H-C; Hung, C-Y; Su, T-P; Chang, W-C; Hung, J-J

    2012-11-22

    Sp1 is important for the transcription of many genes. Our previous studies have shown that Sp1 is degraded in normal cell, but it is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis and exists a priori in the daughter cells, ready to engage in gene transcription and thereby contributes to the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. The mechanism by which Sp1 is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis remains unknown. In this study, we observed that Sp1 strongly colocalized with cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)/cyclin B1 during mitosis. Moreover, we showed that Sp1 is a novel mitotic substrate of CDK1/cyclin B1 and is phosphorylated by it at Thr 739 before the onset of mitosis. Phospho-Sp1 reduced its DNA-binding ability and facilitated the chromatin condensation process during mitosis. Mutation of Thr739 to alanine resulted in Sp1 remaining in the chromosomes, delayed cell-cycle progression, and eventually led to apoptosis. Screening of Sp1-associated proteins during mitosis by using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry indicated the tethering of Sp1 to myosin/F-actin. Furthermore, phospho-Sp1 and myosin/F-actin appeared to exist as a congregated ring at the periphery of the chromosome. However, at the end of mitosis and the beginning of interphase, Sp1 was dephosphorylated by PP2A and returned to the chromatin. These results indicate that cancer cells use CDK1 and PP2A to regulate the movement of Sp1 in and out of the chromosomes during cell-cycle progression, which may benefit cancer-cell proliferation.

  15. Sp1 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 represses its DNA-binding activity during mitosis in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, J-Y; Wang, S-A; Yang, W-B; Yang, H-C; Hung, C-Y; Su, T-P; Chang, W-C; Hung, J-J

    2013-01-01

    Sp1 is important for the transcription of many genes. Our previous studies have shown that Sp1 is degraded in normal cell, but it is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis and exists a priori in the daughter cells, ready to engage in gene transcription and thereby contributes to the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. The mechanism by which Sp1 is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis remains unknown. In this study, we observed that Sp1 strongly colocalized with cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)/cyclin B1 during mitosis. Moreover, we showed that Sp1 is a novel mitotic substrate of CDK1/cyclin B1 and is phosphorylated by it at Thr 739 before the onset of mitosis. Phospho-Sp1 reduced its DNA-binding ability and facilitated the chromatin condensation process during mitosis. Mutation of Thr739 to alanine resulted in Sp1 remaining in the chromosomes, delayed cell-cycle progression, and eventually led to apoptosis. Screening of Sp1-associated proteins during mitosis by using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry indicated the tethering of Sp1 to myosin/F-actin. Furthermore, phospho-Sp1 and myosin/F-actin appeared to exist as a congregated ring at the periphery of the chromosome. However, at the end of mitosis and the beginning of interphase, Sp1 was dephosphorylated by PP2A and returned to the chromatin. These results indicate that cancer cells use CDK1 and PP2A to regulate the movement of Sp1 in and out of the chromosomes during cell-cycle progression, which may benefit cancer-cell proliferation. PMID:22266860

  16. Adhesion of axolemmal fragments to Schwann cells: a signal- and target-specific process closely linked to axolemmal induction of Schwann cell mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobue, G.; Pleasure, D.

    1985-01-01

    Radioiodinated rat CNS axolemmal fragments adhered to cultured rat Schwann cells by a time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependent process independent of extracellular ionized calcium. Adhesion showed target and signal specificity; axolemmal fragments adhered to endoneurial or dermal fibroblasts to a much lesser extent than to Schwann cells, and plasma membrane fragments from skeletal muscle, erythrocytes, or PNS myelin adhered to Schwann cells to a lesser extent than did axolemmal fragments. Brief trypsinization removed 94 to 97% of bound radioactivity from Schwann cells previously incubated with 125 I-axolemmal fragments for up to 24 hr, indicating that adhesion was largely a surface phenomenon rather than the result of rapid internalization of axolemmal fragments by the Schwann cells. When adhesion was compared to the axolemmal mitogenic response of Schwann cells, the concentration of axolemmal fragments yielding half-maximal adhesion was the same as the concentration producing half-maximal stimulation of Schwann cell mitosis. Trypsin digestion, homogenization, or heating of axolemmal fragments before application to cultured Schwann cells diminished adhesion and axolemmal fragment-induced stimulation of Schwann cell mitosis in a parallel fashion. Whereas adhesion of axolemmal fragments to the surfaces of the cultured Schwann cells reached completion within 4 hr in this assay system, induction of Schwann cell mitosis by the fragments required contact with Schwann cells for a minimum of 6 to 8 hr and reached a maximum when the axolemmal fragments had adhered to the Schwann cells for 24 hr or more

  17. Novel functions of plant cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, ICK1/KRP1, can act non-cell-autonomously and inhibit entry into mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinl, Christina; Marquardt, Sebastian; Kuijt, Suzanne J H

    2005-01-01

    numbers of cells consistent with a function of CKIs in blocking the G1-S cell cycle transition. Here, we demonstrate that at least one inhibitor from Arabidopsis, ICK1/KRP1, can also block entry into mitosis but allows S-phase progression causing endoreplication. Our data suggest that plant CKIs act...... independently from ICK1/KRP1-induced endoreplication. Strikingly, we found that endoreplicated cells were able to reenter mitosis, emphasizing the high degree of flexibility of plant cells during development. Moreover, we show that in contrast with animal CDK inhibitors, ICK1/KRP1 can move between cells...

  18. Synthetic resveratrol-curcumin hybrid derivative inhibits mitosis progression in estrogen positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Silva, Matheus; Coelho, Letícia Ferreira; Guirelli, Isadora Mitestainer; Pereira, Rodrigo Machado; Ferreira-Silva, Guilherme Álvaro; Graravelli, Graciana Y; Horvath, Renato de Oliveira; Caixeta, Ester Siqueira; Ionta, Marisa; Viegas, Claudio

    2018-03-02

    Curcumin (1) and resveratrol (2) are bioactive natural compounds that display wide pharmacological properties, including antitumor activity. However, their clinical application has been limited due to their low solubility and bioavailability. Nevertheless, independent studies have considered these compounds as interesting prototypes for developing new chemical structures useful for anticancer therapy. Here in, we report the synthesis of novel curcumin-like hydrazide analogues (3a and 3b), and a series of curcumin-resveratrol hybrid compounds (4a-f), and the evaluation of their cytotoxic potential on three tumor cell lines MCF-7 (breast), A549 (lung), and HepG2 (liver). Cell viability was significantly reduced in all tested cell lines when compounds 4c-4e were used. The IC 50 values for these compounds on MCF-7 cells were lower than those for curcumin, resveratrol, or curcumin combined with resveratrol. We evidenced that 4c promoted a drastic increase of G2/M population. The accumulation of cells in mitosis onset in treated cultures was due to, at least in part, the ability of 4c to modulate nuclear kinase proteins, which orchestrate important events in mitosis progression. We have also observed significant reduction of the relative RNAm abundance of CCNB1, PLK1, AURKA, AURKB in samples treated with 4c, with concomitant increase of CDKN1A (p21). Thus, compound 4c is a promising multi-target antitumor agent that should be considered for further in vivo studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. JNK Controls the Onset of Mitosis in Planarian Stem Cells and Triggers Apoptotic Cell Death Required for Regeneration and Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuedo-Castillo, María; Crespo, Xenia; Seebeck, Florian; Bartscherer, Kerstin; Salò, Emili; Adell, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of lost tissues depends on the precise interpretation of molecular signals that control and coordinate the onset of proliferation, cellular differentiation and cell death. However, the nature of those molecular signals and the mechanisms that integrate the cellular responses remain largely unknown. The planarian flatworm is a unique model in which regeneration and tissue renewal can be comprehensively studied in vivo. The presence of a population of adult pluripotent stem cells combined with the ability to decode signaling after wounding enable planarians to regenerate a complete, correctly proportioned animal within a few days after any kind of amputation, and to adapt their size to nutritional changes without compromising functionality. Here, we demonstrate that the stress-activated c-jun–NH2–kinase (JNK) links wound-induced apoptosis to the stem cell response during planarian regeneration. We show that JNK modulates the expression of wound-related genes, triggers apoptosis and attenuates the onset of mitosis in stem cells specifically after tissue loss. Furthermore, in pre-existing body regions, JNK activity is required to establish a positive balance between cell death and stem cell proliferation to enable tissue renewal, remodeling and the maintenance of proportionality. During homeostatic degrowth, JNK RNAi blocks apoptosis, resulting in impaired organ remodeling and rescaling. Our findings indicate that JNK-dependent apoptotic cell death is crucial to coordinate tissue renewal and remodeling required to regenerate and to maintain a correctly proportioned animal. Hence, JNK might act as a hub, translating wound signals into apoptotic cell death, controlled stem cell proliferation and differentiation, all of which are required to coordinate regeneration and tissue renewal. PMID:24922054

  20. JNK controls the onset of mitosis in planarian stem cells and triggers apoptotic cell death required for regeneration and remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Almuedo-Castillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of lost tissues depends on the precise interpretation of molecular signals that control and coordinate the onset of proliferation, cellular differentiation and cell death. However, the nature of those molecular signals and the mechanisms that integrate the cellular responses remain largely unknown. The planarian flatworm is a unique model in which regeneration and tissue renewal can be comprehensively studied in vivo. The presence of a population of adult pluripotent stem cells combined with the ability to decode signaling after wounding enable planarians to regenerate a complete, correctly proportioned animal within a few days after any kind of amputation, and to adapt their size to nutritional changes without compromising functionality. Here, we demonstrate that the stress-activated c-jun-NH2-kinase (JNK links wound-induced apoptosis to the stem cell response during planarian regeneration. We show that JNK modulates the expression of wound-related genes, triggers apoptosis and attenuates the onset of mitosis in stem cells specifically after tissue loss. Furthermore, in pre-existing body regions, JNK activity is required to establish a positive balance between cell death and stem cell proliferation to enable tissue renewal, remodeling and the maintenance of proportionality. During homeostatic degrowth, JNK RNAi blocks apoptosis, resulting in impaired organ remodeling and rescaling. Our findings indicate that JNK-dependent apoptotic cell death is crucial to coordinate tissue renewal and remodeling required to regenerate and to maintain a correctly proportioned animal. Hence, JNK might act as a hub, translating wound signals into apoptotic cell death, controlled stem cell proliferation and differentiation, all of which are required to coordinate regeneration and tissue renewal.

  1. JNK controls the onset of mitosis in planarian stem cells and triggers apoptotic cell death required for regeneration and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuedo-Castillo, María; Crespo-Yanez, Xenia; Crespo, Xenia; Seebeck, Florian; Bartscherer, Kerstin; Salò, Emili; Adell, Teresa

    2014-06-01

    Regeneration of lost tissues depends on the precise interpretation of molecular signals that control and coordinate the onset of proliferation, cellular differentiation and cell death. However, the nature of those molecular signals and the mechanisms that integrate the cellular responses remain largely unknown. The planarian flatworm is a unique model in which regeneration and tissue renewal can be comprehensively studied in vivo. The presence of a population of adult pluripotent stem cells combined with the ability to decode signaling after wounding enable planarians to regenerate a complete, correctly proportioned animal within a few days after any kind of amputation, and to adapt their size to nutritional changes without compromising functionality. Here, we demonstrate that the stress-activated c-jun-NH2-kinase (JNK) links wound-induced apoptosis to the stem cell response during planarian regeneration. We show that JNK modulates the expression of wound-related genes, triggers apoptosis and attenuates the onset of mitosis in stem cells specifically after tissue loss. Furthermore, in pre-existing body regions, JNK activity is required to establish a positive balance between cell death and stem cell proliferation to enable tissue renewal, remodeling and the maintenance of proportionality. During homeostatic degrowth, JNK RNAi blocks apoptosis, resulting in impaired organ remodeling and rescaling. Our findings indicate that JNK-dependent apoptotic cell death is crucial to coordinate tissue renewal and remodeling required to regenerate and to maintain a correctly proportioned animal. Hence, JNK might act as a hub, translating wound signals into apoptotic cell death, controlled stem cell proliferation and differentiation, all of which are required to coordinate regeneration and tissue renewal.

  2. Analysis of structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations at the first and second mitosis after X irradiation of two-cell mouse embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenborn, U.; Streffer, C.

    1989-01-01

    Two-cell mouse embryos were X-irradiated in the late G2 phase in vivo. The first and second postradiation mitoses were analyzed for chromosomal anomalies. The majority of structural aberrations visible at the first mitosis after irradiation were chromatid breaks and chromatid gaps; only a few interchanges and dicentrics were observed. The aberration frequency resulted in a dose-effect relationship which was well described by a linear model. At the second mitosis 29% of the structural aberrations of the first mitosis were counted; the aberration quality changed only slightly. It is discussed whether these aberrations are to be considered new, derived, or unchanged transmitted aberrations. Contrary to the results obtained after irradiation of one-cell embryos, little chromosome loss was induced by radiation in two-cell embryos

  3. The Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA) protein is contributed by the donor cell nucleus in cloned porcine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhonghua; Schatten, Heide; Hao, Yanhong; Lai, Liangxue; Wax, David; Samuel, Melissa; Zhong, Zhi-Sheng; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Prather, Randall S

    2006-05-01

    The Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA) protein is a multifunctional protein that is localized to the nucleus in interphase and to the poles of the mitotic apparatus during mitosis. In unfertilized porcine oocytes, NuMA is localized to the meiotic spindle. NuMA is removed along with the meiotic spindle during the enucleation process before reconstructing the egg by introducing the donor cell nucleus to produce cloned embryos. Questions have been raised regarding the source for NuMA in cloned embryos, as the enucleated oocyte does not contain detectable NuMA in the cytoplasm. To determine the source of NuMA in porcine nuclear transfer (NT) embryos, we conducted an immunofluorescence microscopy study with antibodies against NuMA to investigate the appearance and distribution of NuMA before and after reconstructing NT embryos with porcine skin fibroblasts. We used donor cells from a confluent culture with all cells in interphase. For comparative studies, we also determined the immunofluorescence pattern of NuMA, gamma-tubulin, and alpha-tubulin in porcine fibroblasts, parthenogenetic embryos and in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos. Results show that NuMA was localized in nuclei of 33.5% (163/456) of the serum-deprived fibroblasts used as donor cells. No NuMA staining was detected in enucleated pig oocytes. Immediately after nuclear transfer, NuMA staining was absent in all donor cell fibroblast nuclei (0 h) but staining was detected by 6 h within the reconstructed eggs, at which time the transferred somatic cell nucleus swelled in most cells (19/27) and became a pronucleus-like structure. NuMA was localized exclusively within the pronucleus-like structures (15/27). At 25 h, NuMA was detected inside the nucleus (16/25) either in one-cell or in 2-cell stage embryos. Interestingly, in parthenogenetic embryos, NuMA staining was not detected in all 42 eggs examined at 1 h, and evident NuMA staining was only detected inside a few (4/51 at 6 h; 6/48 at 25 h) of the nuclei. In IVF

  4. The terminal basal mitosis of chicken retinal Lim1 horizontal cells is not sensitive to cisplatin-induced cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi Fard, Shahrzad; Thyselius, Malin; All-Ericsson, Charlotta; Hallböök, Finn

    2014-01-01

    For proper development, cells need to coordinate proliferation and cell cycle-exit. This is mediated by a cascade of proteins making sure that each phase of the cell cycle is controlled before the initiation of the next. Retinal progenitor cells divide during the process of interkinetic nuclear migration, where they undergo S-phase on the basal side, followed by mitoses on the apical side of the neuroepithelium. The final cell cycle of chicken retinal horizontal cells (HCs) is an exception to this general cell cycle behavior. Lim1 expressing (+) horizontal progenitor cells (HPCs) have a heterogenic final cell cycle, with some cells undergoing a terminal mitosis on the basal side of the retina. The results in this study show that this terminal basal mitosis of Lim1+ HPCs is not dependent on Chk1/2 for its regulation compared to retinal cells undergoing interkinetic nuclear migration. Neither activating nor blocking Chk1 had an effect on the basal mitosis of Lim1+ HPCs. Furthermore, the Lim1+ HPCs were not sensitive to cisplatin-induced DNA damage and were able to continue into mitosis in the presence of γ-H2AX without activation of caspase-3. However, Nutlin3a-induced expression of p21 did reduce the mitoses, suggesting the presence of a functional p53/p21 response in HPCs. In contrast, the apical mitoses were blocked upon activation of either Chk1/2 or p21, indicating the importance of these proteins during the process of interkinetic nuclear migration. Inhibiting Cdk1 blocked M-phase transition both for apical and basal mitoses. This confirmed that the cyclin B1-Cdk1 complex was active and functional during the basal mitosis of Lim1+ HPCs. The regulation of the final cell cycle of Lim1+ HPCs is of particular interest since it has been shown that the HCs are able to sustain persistent DNA damage, remain in the cell cycle for an extended period of time and, consequently, survive for months.

  5. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paves Heiti

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area.

  6. Transcriptional Control of Mitosis: Deregulation and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nath, Somsubhra; Ghatak, Dishari; Das, Pijush; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2015-01-01

    Research over the past few decades has well established the molecular functioning of mitosis. Deregulation of these functions has also been attributed to the generation of aneuploidy in different tumor types. Numerous studies have given insight into the regulation of mitosis by cell cycle specific proteins. Optimum abundance of these proteins is pivotal to timely execution of mitosis. Aberrant expressions of these mitotic proteins have been reported in different cancer types. Several post-tra...

  7. Biosynthesis of copper nanoparticles and its effect on actively dividing cells of mitosis in Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaonkar, Dipali; Shende, Sudhir; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Nanobiotechnological application of copper nanoparticles has paved the way for advancement in agriculture owing to its bactericidal and fungicidal activities. Recently, researchers have focussed on bioinspired synthesis of copper nanoparticles as a viable alternative to existing physicochemical techniques. For the commercialization of nanocopper, the toxicity evaluation is a major issue. In this context, Citrus medica (L.) fruit extract-mediated copper nanoparticles were synthesized and its different concentrations (10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 µg mL(-1) ) were evaluated for its effect on actively dividing cells of Allium cepa. The study clearly revealed that copper nanoparticles increased mitotic index up to the concentration of 20 µg mL(-1) . In addition, a gradual decline in mitotic index and increase in abnormality index was observed as the concentration of copper nanoparticles and treatment duration were increased. Aberrations in chromosomal behavior such as sticky and disturbed chromosomes in metaphase and anaphase, c-metaphase, bridges, laggard, disturbed telophase, and vacuolated nucleus were also observed. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. The occurrence of apoptosis, abnormal mitoses, cells dying in mitosis and micronuclei in a human melanoma xenograft exposed to single dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falkvoll, K.H.; Norske Radiumhospital, Oslo)

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of cell loss, the cell proliferation and the immediate growth response were investigated in a human melanoma xenograft given single dose irradiation with 7.5 Gy and 15.0 Gy, respectively. The frequencies of apoptotic cells, mitoses, abnormal mitoses, cells dying in mitosis and micronuclei, were scored in histological sections. In the untreated xenograft, the occurrence of micronuclei and abnormal mitoses indicated the presence of reproductively dead cells. Cell loss manifested itself through the appearance of apoptosis, cells dying in mitosis and necrosis. After irradiation, the cell proliferation was temporarily inhibited due to a radiation induced division delay. When proliferation resumed, there was a dose-dependent increase in the frequencies of abnormal mitoses and micronuclei and thus in the fraction of reproductively dead cells. The incidence of cell loss through apoptosis and cells dying in mitosis also increased. This cell loss probably reduced transiently the fraction of reproductively dead cells, and accounted for the reduced amount of tumour cells the first days after 15.0 Gy irradiation. The incidence of apoptotic cell loss and micronuclei decreased, and the incidence of normal mitoses increased when tumour growth resumed. (orig.) [de

  9. Mitosis delay in cells of the root meristem of pea seedlings in S and G2-phases when irradiated with gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, I.N.; Zezina, N.V.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiation (800 rads) of pea seedlings, synchronized by a 24-hr treatment with 0.03% hydroxyurea, at the stage of G 1 →S, induced a 12-hr delay of mitosis peak; an 8-hr delay, in the early S-phase; a 4-hr delay, in the middle of S-phase; a 10-hr delay in the late S- and a 14-16-hr delay, in G 2 -phase. The number of cells having chromosome aberrations at the mitosis peak was similar in all the phases under study

  10. Relocalization of human chromatin remodeling cofactor TIP48 in mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigala, Barbara; Edwards, Mina; Puri, Teena; Tsaneva, Irina R.

    2005-01-01

    TIP48 is a highly conserved eukaryotic AAA + protein which is an essential cofactor for several complexes involved in chromatin acetylation and remodeling, transcriptional and developmental regulation and nucleolar organization and trafficking. We show that TIP48 abundance in HeLa cells did not change during the cell cycle, nor did its distribution in various biochemical fractions. However, we observed distinct changes in the subcellular localization of TIP48 during M phase using immunofluorescence microscopy. Our studies demonstrate that in interphase cells TIP48 was found mainly in the nucleus and exhibited a distinct localization in the nuclear periphery. As the cells entered mitosis, TIP48 was excluded from the condensing chromosomes but showed association with the mitotic apparatus. During anaphase, some TIP48 was detected in the centrosome colocalizing with tubulin but the strongest staining appeared in the mitotic equator associated with the midzone central spindle. Accumulation of TIP48 in the midzone and the midbody was observed in late telophase and cytokinesis. This redeployment of TIP48 during anaphase and cytokinesis was independent of microtubule assembly. The relocation of endogenous TIP48 to the midzone/midbody under physiological conditions suggests a novel and distinct function for TIP48 in mitosis and possible involvement in the exit of mitosis

  11. Anther-preferential expressing gene PMR is essential for the mitosis of pollen development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaqin; Xu, Ya; Ling, Sheng; Liu, Shasha; Yao, Jialing

    2017-06-01

    Phenotype identification, expression examination, and function prediction declared that the anther-preferential expressing gene PMR may participate in regulation of male gametophyte development in rice. Male germline development in flowering plants produces the pair of sperm cells for double fertilization and the pollen mitosis is a key process of it. Although the structural features of male gametophyte have been defined, the molecular mechanisms regulating the mitotic cell cycle are not well elucidated in rice. Here, we reported an anther-preferential expressing gene in rice, PMR (Pollen Mitosis Relative), playing an essential role in male gametogenesis. When PMR gene was suppressed via RNAi, the mitosis of microspore was severely damaged, and the plants formed unmatured pollens containing only one or two nucleuses at the anthesis, ultimately leading to serious reduction of pollen fertility and seed-setting. The CRISPR mutants, pmr-1 and pmr-2, both showed the similar defects as the PMR-RNAi lines. Further analysis revealed that PMR together with its co-expressing genes were liable to participate in the regulation of DNA metabolism in the nucleus, and affected the activities of some enzymes related to the cell cycle. We finally discussed that unknown protein PMR contained the PHD, SWIB and Plus-3 domains and they might have coordinating functions in regulation pathway of the pollen mitosis in rice.

  12. Action at a Distance in the Cell's Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondev, Jane

    Various functions performed by chromosomes involve long-range communication between DNA sequences that are tens of thousands of bases apart along the genome, and microns apart in the nucleus. In this talk I will discuss experiments and theory relating to two distinct modes of long-range communication in the nucleus, chromosome looping and protein hopping along the chromosome, both in the context of DNA-break repair in yeast. Yeast is an excellent model system for studies that link chromosome conformations to their function as there is ample experimental evidence that yeast chromosome conformations are well described by a simple, random-walk polymer model. Using a combination of polymer physics theory and experiments on yeast cells, I will demonstrate that loss of polymer entropy due to chromosome looping is the driving force for homology search during repair of broken DNA by homologous recombination. I will also discuss the spread of histone modifications along the chromosome and away from the DNA break point in the context of simple physics models based on chromosome looping and kinase hopping, and show how combining physics theory and cell-biology experiment can be used to dissect the molecular mechanism of the spreading process. These examples demonstrate how combined theoretical and experimental studies can reveal physical principles of long-range communication in the nucleus, which play important roles in regulation of gene expression, DNA recombination, and chromatin modification. This work was supported by the NSF DMR-1206146.

  13. Long Term Aggresome Accumulation Leads to DNA Damage, p53-dependent Cell Cycle Arrest, and Steric Interference in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meng; Boschetti, Chiara; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2015-11-13

    Juxtanuclear aggresomes form in cells when levels of aggregation-prone proteins exceed the capacity of the proteasome to degrade them. It is widely believed that aggresomes have a protective function, sequestering potentially damaging aggregates until these can be removed by autophagy. However, most in-cell studies have been carried out over a few days at most, and there is little information on the long term effects of aggresomes. To examine these long term effects, we created inducible, single-copy cell lines that expressed aggregation-prone polyglutamine proteins over several months. We present evidence that, as perinuclear aggresomes accumulate, they are associated with abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA double-strand breaks, resulting in cell cycle arrest via the phosphorylated p53 (Ser-15)-dependent pathway. Further analysis reveals that aggresomes can have a detrimental effect on mitosis by steric interference with chromosome alignment, centrosome positioning, and spindle formation. The incidence of apoptosis also increased in aggresome-containing cells. These severe defects developed gradually after juxtanuclear aggresome formation and were not associated with small cytoplasmic aggregates alone. Thus, our findings demonstrate that, in dividing cells, aggresomes are detrimental over the long term, rather than protective. This suggests a novel mechanism for polyglutamine-associated developmental and cell biological abnormalities, particularly those with early onset and non-neuronal pathologies. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. DNA replication stress in CHK1-depleted tumour cells triggers premature (S-phase) mitosis through inappropriate activation of Aurora kinase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuazua-Villar, P; Rodriguez, R; Gagou, M E; Eyers, P A; Meuth, M

    2014-05-22

    The disruption of DNA replication in cells triggers checkpoint responses that slow-down S-phase progression and protect replication fork integrity. These checkpoints are also determinants of cell fate and can help maintain cell viability or trigger cell death pathways. CHK1 has a pivotal role in such S-phase responses. It helps maintain fork integrity during replication stress and protects cells from several catastrophic fates including premature mitosis, premature chromosome condensation and apoptosis. Here we investigated the role of CHK1 in protecting cancer cells from premature mitosis and apoptosis. We show that premature mitosis (characterized by the induction of histone H3 phosphorylation, aberrant chromatin condensation, and persistent RPA foci in arrested S-phase cells) is induced in p53-deficient tumour cells depleted of CHK1 when DNA synthesis is disrupted. These events are accompanied by an activation of Aurora kinase B in S-phase cells that is essential for histone H3 Ser10 phosphorylation. Histone H3 phosphorylation precedes the induction of apoptosis in p53-/- tumour cell lines but does not appear to be required for this fate as an Aurora kinase inhibitor suppresses phosphorylation of both Aurora B and histone H3 but has little effect on cell death. In contrast, only a small fraction of p53+/+ tumour cells shows this premature mitotic response, although they undergo a more rapid and robust apoptotic response. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for CHK1 in the control of Aurora B activation during DNA replication stress and support the idea that premature mitosis is a distinct cell fate triggered by the disruption of DNA replication when CHK1 function is suppressed.

  15. The SUMO Pathway in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Debaditya; Dasso, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Mitosis is the stage of the cell cycle during which replicated chromosomes must be precisely divided to allow the formation of two daughter cells possessing equal genetic material. Much of the careful spatial and temporal organization of mitosis is maintained through post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination, of key cellular proteins. Here, we will review evidence that sumoylation, conjugation to the SUMO family of small ubiquitin-like modifiers, also serves essential regulatory roles during mitosis. We will discuss the basic biology of sumoylation, how the SUMO pathway has been implicated in particular mitotic functions, including chromosome condensation, centromere/kinetochore organization and cytokinesis, and what cellular proteins may be the targets underlying these phenomena.

  16. Local perinuclear calcium signals associated with mitosis-entry in early sea urchin embryos

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Using calcium-sensitive dyes together with their dextran conjugates and confocal microscopy, we have looked for evidence of localized calcium signaling in the region of the nucleus before entry into mitosis, using the sea urchin egg first mitotic cell cycle as a model. Global calcium transients that appear to originate from the nuclear area are often observed just before nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB). In the absence of global increases in calcium, confocal microscopy using Calcium Green- 1...

  17. Expression of progesterone receptor membrane component-2 within the immature rat ovary and its role in regulating mitosis and apoptosis of spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Daniel; Liu, Xiufang; Pru, Cindy; Pru, James K; Peluso, John J

    2014-08-01

    Progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (Pgrmc2) mRNA was detected in the immature rat ovary. By 48 h after eCG, Pgrmc2 mRNA levels decreased by 40% and were maintained at 48 h post-hCG. Immunohistochemical studies detected PGRMC2 in oocytes and ovarian surface epithelial, interstitial, thecal, granulosa, and luteal cells. PGRMC2 was also present in spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells, localizing to the cytoplasm of interphase cells and apparently to the mitotic spindle of cells in metaphase. Interestingly, PGRMC2 levels appeared to decrease during the G1 stage of the cell cycle. Moreover, overexpression of PGRMC2 suppressed entry into the cell cycle, possibly by binding the p58 form of cyclin dependent kinase 11b. Conversely, Pgrmc2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) treatment increased the percentage of cells in G1 and M stage but did not increase the number of cells, which was likely due to an increase in apoptosis. Depleting PGRMC2 did not inhibit cellular (3)H-progesterone binding, but attenuated the ability of progesterone to suppress mitosis and apoptosis. Taken together these studies suggest that PGRMC2 affects granulosa cell mitosis by acting at two specific stages of the cell cycle. First, PGRMC2 regulates the progression from the G0 into the G1 stage of the cell cycle. Second, PGRMC2 appears to localize to the mitotic spindle, where it likely promotes the final stages of mitosis. Finally, siRNA knockdown studies indicate that PGRMC2 is required for progesterone to slow the rate of granulosa cell mitosis and apoptosis. These findings support a role for PGRMC2 in ovarian follicle development. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  18. The Biochemistry of Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Samuel; Pines, Jonathon

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we will discuss the biochemistry of mitosis in eukaryotic cells. We will focus on conserved principles that, importantly, are adapted to the biology of the organism. It is vital to bear in mind that the structural requirements for division in a rapidly dividing syncytial Drosophila embryo, for example, are markedly different from those in a unicellular yeast cell. Nevertheless, division in both systems is driven by conserved modules of antagonistic protein kinases and phosphatases, underpinned by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, which create molecular switches to drive each stage of division forward. These conserved control modules combine with the self-organizing properties of the subcellular architecture to meet the specific needs of the cell. Our discussion will draw on discoveries in several model systems that have been important in the long history of research on mitosis, and we will try to point out those principles that appear to apply to all cells, compared with those in which the biochemistry has been specifically adapted in a particular organism. PMID:25663668

  19. Appearance of actin microfilament 'twin peaks' in mitosis and their function in cell plate formation, as visualized in tobacco BY-2 cells expressing GFP-fimbrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Toshio; Higaki, Takumi; Oda, Yoshihisa; Hayashi, Tomomi; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2005-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton of higher plants plays an essential role in plant morphogenesis and in maintaining various cellular activities. In this study we established a tobacco BY-2 cell line, stably transformed with a GFP-fimbrin actin-binding domain (ABD) 2 construct, that allows visualization of actin microfilaments (MFs) in living cells. Using this cell line, designated BY-GF11, we performed time-sequential observations of MF dynamics during cell-cycle progression. Detailed analyses revealed the appearance of a broad MF band in the late G2 phase that separated to form a structure corresponding to the so-called actin-depleted zone (ADZ) in mitosis. In BY-GF11, the MF structure at the cell cortex in mitosis appeared to form two bands rather than the ADZ. Measurements of fluorescent intensities of the cell cortex indicated an MF distribution that resembled two peaks, and we therefore named the structure MF 'twin peaks' (MFTP). The cell plate formed exactly within the valley between the MFTP at cytokinesis, and this cell-plate guidance was distorted by disruption of the MFTP by an inhibitor of actin polymerization. These results suggest that the MFTP originates from the broad MF band in the G2 phase and functions as a marker of cytokinesis.

  20. Cytoskeletal dynamics in interphase, mitosis and cytokinesis analysed through Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, H; Green, P; Sambade, A; Doonan, J H; Lloyd, C W

    2011-04-01

    Transient transformation with Agrobacterium is a widespread tool allowing rapid expression analyses in plants. However, the available methods generate expression in interphase and do not allow the routine analysis of dividing cells. Here, we present a transient transformation method (termed 'TAMBY2') to enable cell biological studies in interphase and cell division. Agrobacterium-mediated transient gene expression in tobacco BY-2 was analysed by Western blotting and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Time-lapse microscopy of cytoskeletal markers was employed to monitor cell division. Double-labelling in interphase and mitosis enabled localization studies. We found that the transient transformation efficiency was highest when BY-2/Agrobacterium co-cultivation was performed on solid medium. Transformants produced in this way divided at high frequency. We demonstrated the utility of the method by defining the behaviour of a previously uncharacterized microtubule motor, KinG, throughout the cell cycle. Our analyses demonstrated that TAMBY2 provides a flexible tool for the transient transformation of BY-2 with Agrobacterium. Fluorescence double-labelling showed that KinG localizes to microtubules and to F-actin. In interphase, KinG accumulates on microtubule lagging ends, suggesting a minus-end-directed function in vivo. Time-lapse studies of cell division showed that GFP-KinG strongly labels preprophase band and phragmoplast, but not the metaphase spindle. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Silencing of E2F3 suppresses tumor growth of Her2+ breast cancer cells by restricting mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Miyoung; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Saavedra, Harold I

    2015-11-10

    The E2F transcriptional activators E2F1, E2F2 and E2F3a regulate many important cellular processes, including DNA replication, apoptosis and centrosome duplication. Previously, we demonstrated that silencing E2F1 or E2F3 suppresses centrosome amplification (CA) and chromosome instability (CIN) in Her2+ breast cancer cells without markedly altering proliferation. However, it is unknown whether and how silencing a single E2F activator, E2F3, affects malignancy of human breast cancer cells. Thus, we injected HCC1954 Her2+ breast cancer cells silenced for E2F3 into mammary fat pads of immunodeficient mice and demonstrated that loss of E2F3 retards tumor growth. Surprisingly, silencing of E2F3 led to significant reductions in mitotic indices relative to vector controls, while the percentage of cells undergoing S phase were not affected. Nek2 is a mitotic kinase commonly upregulated in breast cancers and a critical regulator of Cdk4- or E2F-mediated CA. In this report, we found that Nek2 overexpression rescued back the CA caused by silencing of shE2F3. However, the effects of Nek2 overexpression in affecting tumor growth rates of shE2F3 and shE2F3; GFP cells were inconclusive. Taken together, our results indicate that E2F3 silencing decreases mammary tumor growth by reducing percentage of cells undergoing mitosis.

  2. SnapShot: Phosphoregulation of Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Andrew; Vuong, Jenny; Rogers, Samuel; Malumbres, Marcos; O'Donoghue, Seán I

    2017-06-15

    During mitosis, a cell divides its duplicated genome into two identical daughter cells. This process must occur without errors to prevent proliferative diseases (e.g., cancer). A key mechanism controlling mitosis is the precise timing of more than 32,000 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events by a network of kinases and counterbalancing phosphatases. The identity, magnitude, and temporal regulation of these events have emerged recently, largely from advances in mass spectrometry. Here, we show phosphoevents currently believed to be key regulators of mitosis. For an animated version of this SnapShot, please see http://www.cell.com/cell/enhanced/odonoghue2. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. The Aurora A-HP1γ pathway regulates gene expression and mitosis in cells from the sperm lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Phoebe H; Grzenda, Adrienne; Mathison, Angela; Morbeck, Dean E; Fredrickson, Jolene R; de Assuncao, Thiago M; Christensen, Trace; Salisbury, Jeffrey; Calvo, Ezequiel; Iovanna, Juan; Coddington, Charles C; Urrutia, Raul; Lomberk, Gwen

    2015-05-29

    HP1γ, a well-known regulator of gene expression, has been recently identified to be a target of Aurora A, a mitotic kinase which is important for both gametogenesis and embryogenesis. The purpose of this study was to define whether the Aurora A-HP1γ pathway supports cell division of gametes and/or early embryos, using western blot, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, shRNA-based knockdown, site-directed mutagenesis, and Affymetrix-based genome-wide expression profiles. We find that the form of HP1γ phosphorylated by Aurora A, P-Ser83 HP1γ, is a passenger protein, which localizes to the spermatozoa centriole and axoneme. In addition, disruption in this pathway causes centrosomal abnormalities and aberrations in cell division. Expression profiling of male germ cell lines demonstrates that HP1γ phosphorylation is critical for the regulation of mitosis-associated gene expression networks. In female gametes, we observe that P-Ser83-HP1γ is not present in meiotic centrosomes of M2 oocytes, but after syngamy, it becomes detectable during cleavage divisions, coinciding with early embryonic genome activation. These results support the idea that phosphorylation of HP1γ by Aurora A plays a role in the regulation of gene expression and mitotic cell division in cells from the sperm lineage and in early embryos. Combined, this data is relevant to better understanding the function of HP1γ in reproductive biology.

  4. Hepatocellular carcinoma repression by TNFα‐mediated synergistic lethal effect of mitosis defect‐induced senescence and cell death sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Fu, Jing; Du, Min; Zhang, Haibin; Li, Lu; Cen, Jin; Li, Weiyun; Chen, Xiaotao; Lin, Yunfei; Conway, Edward M.; Pikarsky, Eli; Wang, Hongyan; Pan, Guoyu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a cancer lacking effective therapies. Several measures have been proposed to treat HCCs, such as senescence induction, mitotic inhibition, and cell death promotion. However, data from other cancers suggest that single use of these approaches may not be effective. Here, by genetic targeting of Survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) that plays dual roles in mitosis and cell survival, we identified a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)‐mediated synergistic lethal effect between senescence and apoptosis sensitization in malignant HCCs. Survivin deficiency results in mitosis defect‐associated senescence in HCC cells, which triggers local inflammation and increased TNFα. Survivin inactivation also sensitizes HCC cells to TNFα‐triggered cell death, which leads to marked HCC regression. Based on these findings, we designed a combination treatment using mitosis inhibitor and proapoptosis compounds. This treatment recapitulates the therapeutic effect of Survivin deletion and effectively eliminates HCCs, thus representing a potential strategy for HCC therapy. Conclusion: Survivin ablation dramatically suppresses human and mouse HCCs by triggering senescence‐associated TNFα and sensitizing HCC cells to TNFα‐induced cell death. Combined use of mitotic inhibitor and second mitochondrial‐derived activator of caspases mimetic can induce senescence‐associated TNFα and enhance TNFα‐induced cell death and synergistically eliminate HCC. (Hepatology 2016;64:1105‐1120) PMID:27177758

  5. Tools for visualization of phosphoinositides in the cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalasova, Ilona; Fáberová, Veronika; Kalendová, Alžběta; Yildirim, Sukriye; Uličná, Lívia; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) are glycerol-based phospholipids containing hydrophilic inositol ring. The inositol ring is mono-, bis-, or tris-phosphorylated yielding seven PIs members. Ample evidence shows that PIs localize both to the cytoplasm and to the nucleus. However, tools for direct visualization of nuclear PIs are limited and many studies thus employ indirect approaches, such as staining of their metabolic enzymes. Since localization and mobility of PIs differ from their metabolic enzymes, these approaches may result in incomplete data. In this paper, we tested commercially available PIs antibodies by light microscopy on fixed cells, tested their specificity using protein-lipid overlay assay and blocking assay, and compared their staining patterns. Additionally, we prepared recombinant PIs-binding domains and tested them on both fixed and live cells by light microscopy. The results provide a useful overview of usability of the tools tested and stress that the selection of adequate tools is critical. Knowing the localization of individual PIs in various functional compartments should enable us to better understand the roles of PIs in the cell nucleus.

  6. Centrosome-declustering drugs mediate a two-pronged attack on interphase and mitosis in supercentrosomal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannu, V; Rida, P C G; Celik, B; Turaga, R C; Ogden, A; Cantuaria, G; Gopalakrishnan, J; Aneja, R

    2014-11-20

    Classical anti-mitotic drugs have failed to translate their preclinical efficacy into clinical response in human trials. Their clinical failure has challenged the notion that tumor cells divide frequently at rates comparable to those of cancer cells in vitro and in xenograft models. Given the preponderance of interphase cells in clinical tumors, we asked whether targeting amplified centrosomes, which cancer cells carefully preserve in a tightly clustered conformation throughout interphase, presents a superior chemotherapeutic strategy that sabotages interphase-specific cellular activities, such as migration. Herein we have utilized supercentrosomal N1E-115 murine neuroblastoma cells as a test-bed to study interphase centrosome declustering induced by putative declustering agents, such as Reduced-9-bromonoscapine (RedBr-Nos), Griseofulvin and PJ-34. We found tight 'supercentrosomal' clusters in the interphase and mitosis of ~80% of patients' tumor cells with excess centrosomes. RedBr-Nos was the strongest declustering agent with a declustering index of 0.36 and completely dispersed interphase centrosome clusters in N1E-115 cells. Interphase centrosome declustering caused inhibition of neurite formation, impairment of cell polarization and Golgi organization, disrupted cellular protrusions and focal adhesion contacts-factors that are crucial prerequisites for directional migration. Thus our data illustrate an interphase-specific potential anti-migratory role of centrosome-declustering agents in addition to their previously acknowledged ability to induce spindle multipolarity and mitotic catastrophe. Centrosome-declustering agents counter centrosome clustering to inhibit directional cell migration in interphase cells and set up multipolar mitotic catastrophe, suggesting that disbanding the nuclear-centrosome-Golgi axis is a potential anti-metastasis strategy.

  7. The phosphorylation-dependent regulation of nuclear SREBP1 during mitosis links lipid metabolism and cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoechea-Alonso, Maria Teresa; Ericsson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The SREBP transcription factors are major regulators of lipid metabolism. Disturbances in lipid metabolism are at the core of several health issues facing modern society, including cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes. In addition, the role of lipid metabolism in cancer cell growth is receiving increased attention. Transcriptionally active SREBP molecules are unstable and rapidly degraded in a phosphorylation-dependent manner by Fbw7, a ubiquitin ligase that targets several cell cycle regulatory proteins for degradation. We have previously demonstrated that active SREBP1 is stabilized during mitosis. We have now delineated the mechanisms involved in the stabilization of SREBP1 in mitotic cells. This process is initiated by the phosphorylation of a specific serine residue in nuclear SREBP1 by the mitotic kinase Cdk1. The phosphorylation of this residue creates a docking site for a separate mitotic kinase, Plk1. Plk1 interacts with nuclear SREBP1 in mitotic cells and phosphorylates a number of residues in the C-terminal domain of the protein, including a threonine residue in close proximity of the Fbw7 docking site in SREBP1. The phosphorylation of these residues by Plk1 blocks the interaction between SREBP1 and Fbw7 and attenuates the Fbw7-dependent degradation of nuclear SREBP1 during cell division. Inactivation of SREBP1 results in a mitotic defect, suggesting that SREBP1 could regulate cell division. We propose that the mitotic phosphorylation and stabilization of nuclear SREBP1 during cell division provides a link between lipid metabolism and cell proliferation. Thus, the current study provides additional support for the emerging hypothesis that SREBP-dependent lipid metabolism may be important for cell growth. PMID:27579997

  8. Allyl isothiocyanate arrests cancer cells in mitosis, and mitotic arrest in turn leads to apoptosis via Bcl-2 protein phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Feng; Tang, Li; Li, Yun; Yang, Lu; Choi, Kyoung-Soo; Kazim, A Latif; Zhang, Yuesheng

    2011-09-16

    Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) occurs in many commonly consumed cruciferous vegetables and exhibits significant anti-cancer activities. Available data suggest that it is particularly promising for bladder cancer prevention and/or treatment. Here, we show that AITC arrests human bladder cancer cells in mitosis and also induces apoptosis. Mitotic arrest by AITC was associated with increased ubiquitination and degradation of α- and β-tubulin. AITC directly binds to multiple cysteine residues of the tubulins. AITC induced mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis, as shown by cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytoplasm, activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and formation of TUNEL-positive cells. Inhibition of caspase-9 blocked AITC-induced apoptosis. Moreover, we found that apoptosis induction by AITC depended entirely on mitotic arrest and was mediated via Bcl-2 phosphorylation at Ser-70. Pre-arresting cells in G(1) phase by hydroxyurea abrogated both AITC-induced mitotic arrest and Bcl-2 phosphorylation. Overexpression of a Bcl-2 mutant prevented AITC from inducing apoptosis. We further showed that AITC-induced Bcl-2 phosphorylation was caused by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and AITC activates JNK. Taken together, this study has revealed a novel anticancer mechanism of a phytochemical that is commonly present in human diet.

  9. Contour Detection of Leukocyte Cell Nucleus Using Morphological Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriyanti, R.; Satrio, G. P.; Ramadhani, Y.; Siswandari, W.

    2017-04-01

    Leukocytes are blood cells that do not contain color pigments. Leukocyte function to the tool body’s defenses. Abnormal forms of leukocytes can be a sign of serious diseases such example is leukemia. Most laboratories still use cell morphology examination to assist the diagnosis of illness associated with white blood cells such example is leukemia because of limited resources, both infrastructure, and human resources as happens in developing nations, such as Indonesia. This examination is less expensive and quicker process. However, morphological review requires the expertise of a specialist clinical pathology were limited. This process is sometimes less valid cause in some cases trying to differentiate morphology blast cells into the type of myoblasts, lymphoblast, monoblast, or erythroblast thus potentially misdiagnosis. The goal of this research is to develop a detection device types of blood cells automatically as lower-priced, easy to use and accurate so that the tool can be distributed across all units in existing health services throughout Indonesia and in particular for remote areas. However, because the variables used in the identification of abnormal leukocytes are very complex, in this paper, we emphasize on the contour detection of leukocyte cell nucleus using the morphological image. The results show that this method is promising for further development.

  10. The roles of BDNF, pCREB and Wnt3a in the latent period preceding activation of progenitor cell mitosis in the adult dentate gyrus by fluoxetine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarlett B Pinnock

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The formation of new neurons continues into adult life in the dentate gyrus of the rat hippocampus, as in many other species. Neurogenesis itself turns out to be highly labile, and is regulated by a number of factors. One of these is the serotoninergic system: treatment with drugs (such as the SSRI fluoxetine markedly stimulates mitosis in the progenitor cells of the dentate gyrus. But this process has one remarkable feature: it takes at least 14 days of continuous treatment to be effective. This is despite the fact that the pharmacological action of fluoxetine occurs within an hour or so of first administration. This paper explores the role of BDNF in this process, using the effect of a Trk antagonist (K252a on the labelling of progenitor cells with the mitosis marker Ki67 and the associated expression of pCREB and Wnt3a. These experiments show that (i Fluoxetine increased Ki67 counts, as well as pCREB and Wnt3a expression in the dentate gyrus. The action of fluoxetine on the progenitor cells and on pCREB (but not Wnt3a depends upon Trk receptor activation, since it was prevented by icv infusion of K252a. (ii These receptors are required for both the first 7 days of fluoxetine action, during which no apparent change in progenitor mitosis occurs, as well as the second 7 days. Increased pCREB was always associated with progenitor cell mitosis, but Wnt3a expression may be necessary but not sufficient for increased progenitor cell proliferation. These results shed new light on the action of fluoxetine on neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus, and have both clinical and experimental interest.

  11. [Importance of proliferative potential (as the ratio of a proliferative cells number and duration of mitosis) in diagnoses of malignant degree and prognosis of adrenocortical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raĭkhlin, N T; Bukaeva, I A; Filimoniuk, A V; Smirnova, E A; Probatova, N A; Pavlovskaia, A I; Shabanov, M A; Ponomareva, M V

    2011-01-01

    The aim of research has been the estimation of a proliferative potential as simultaneous detection of a proliferative cells number (Ki-67 index) and duration of mitosis (nucleolar argyrophilic protein expression--B23/nucleophosmin and C23/nucleolin) at patients with adrenocortical cancer. In according to lifetime of patients after operation 2 groups had been sorted out. The first one included patients surviving 56.12 months, the second one--9.25 months. We've found out that different aspects of tumor diagnosis as well distinction of benignant or malignant tumor growth, a malignant degree of tumors, a prognostic criteria of illness, survival of patients etc. must be characterized by total research both a proliferative cells fraction (Ki-67 index) and a rate of mitosis (expressions of B23/nucleophosmin and C23/nucleolin).

  12. DeepMitosis: Mitosis detection via deep detection, verification and segmentation networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Wang, Xinggang; Liu, Wenyu; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2018-04-01

    Mitotic count is a critical predictor of tumor aggressiveness in the breast cancer diagnosis. Nowadays mitosis counting is mainly performed by pathologists manually, which is extremely arduous and time-consuming. In this paper, we propose an accurate method for detecting the mitotic cells from histopathological slides using a novel multi-stage deep learning framework. Our method consists of a deep segmentation network for generating mitosis region when only a weak label is given (i.e., only the centroid pixel of mitosis is annotated), an elaborately designed deep detection network for localizing mitosis by using contextual region information, and a deep verification network for improving detection accuracy by removing false positives. We validate the proposed deep learning method on two widely used Mitosis Detection in Breast Cancer Histological Images (MITOSIS) datasets. Experimental results show that we can achieve the highest F-score on the MITOSIS dataset from ICPR 2012 grand challenge merely using the deep detection network. For the ICPR 2014 MITOSIS dataset that only provides the centroid location of mitosis, we employ the segmentation model to estimate the bounding box annotation for training the deep detection network. We also apply the verification model to eliminate some false positives produced from the detection model. By fusing scores of the detection and verification models, we achieve the state-of-the-art results. Moreover, our method is very fast with GPU computing, which makes it feasible for clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Stimulatory Effect of Notochordal-Cell Conditioned Medium in a Nucleus Pulposus Explant Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Stefan; Doeselaar, Marina van; Meij, Björn; Tryfonidou, M; Ito, Keita

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) has previously shown to have a stimulatory effect on nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in alginate and pellet cultures. These culture methods provide a different environment than the nucleus pulposus (NP)

  14. The Stimulatory Effect of Notochordal Cell-Conditioned Medium in a Nucleus Pulposus Explant Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Stefan A H; van Doeselaar, Marina; Meij, Björn P; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Ito, K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) has previously shown to have a stimulatory effect on nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in alginate and pellet cultures. These culture methods provide a different environment than the nucleus pulposus (NP)

  15. Dual mode of cell death upon the photo-irradiation of a RuIIpolypyridyl complex in interphase or mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierroz, Vanessa; Rubbiani, Riccardo; Gentili, Christian; Patra, Malay; Mari, Cristina; Gasser, Gilles; Ferrari, Stefano

    2016-08-16

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive, complementary medical technique to chemotherapy. Among the different photosensitizers (PSs) employed, Ru(ii) polypyridyl complexes were found to be valid substitutes to porphyrin-based or phthalocyanine-based PSs. Here, we confirm that one such complex, namely [Ru(bipy) 2 -dppz-7-methoxy][PF 6 ] 2 (Ru65), which localizes in the nucleus of various cancer and normal cells, displays cytotoxicity only upon UV-A irradiation. Importantly, we disclose the molecular mechanism of the UV-A mediated cytotoxic action of Ru65. We demonstrate that Ru65 intercalates in DNA and, upon light irradiation, promotes guanine oxidation, resulting in nicks in the double helix. We confirm this mechanism of action in living cells, showing that the UV-A irradiation of cells loaded with Ru65 results in a transient DNA damage response and cell death. Strikingly, the photo-irradiation of Ru65 triggered distinct mechanisms of cell death in interphase or mitotic cells. The former underwent cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and massive cytoplasmic vacuolation, which was paralleled by an unfolded-protein stress response, resulting in a reduction of viability and cell death through a paraptosis-like mechanism. On the other hand, the UV-A irradiation of Ru65 in cells synchronized by G2/M block-release with a selective CDK1 inhibitor led to blocking mitotic entry and rapid cell death through classic apoptotic pathways. Importantly, targeting mitotic cells with Ru65 allowed increasing its photo-toxicity by a factor of 3.6. Overall, our findings show that the use of a combination of a cell cycle inhibitor and a PS targeting the nucleus could open up new avenues in PDT.

  16. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  17. Local perinuclear calcium signals associated with mitosis-entry in early sea urchin embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, M; Wright, E M; Patel, R; Ellis-Davies, G; Whitaker, M

    1996-10-01

    Using calcium-sensitive dyes together with their dextran conjugates and confocal microscopy, we have looked for evidence of localized calcium signaling in the region of the nucleus before entry into mitosis, using the sea urchin egg first mitotic cell cycle as a model. Global calcium transients that appear to originate from the nuclear area are often observed just before nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB). In the absence of global increases in calcium, confocal microscopy using Calcium Green-1 dextran indicator dye revealed localized calcium transients in the perinuclear region. We have also used a photoinactivatable calcium chelator, nitrophenyl EGTA (NP-EGTA), to test whether the chelator-induced block of mitosis entry can be reversed after inactivation of the chelator. Cells arrested before NEB by injection of NP-EGTA resume the cell cycle after flash photolysis of the chelator. Photolysis of chelator triggers calcium release. TreatmenT with caFfeine to enhance calcium-induced calcium release increases the amplitude of NEB-associated calcium transients. These results indicate that calcium increases local to the nucleus are required to trigger entry into mitosis. Local calcium transients arise in the perinuclear region and can spread from this region into the cytoplasm. Thus, cell cycle calcium signals are generated by the perinuclear mitotic machinery in early sea urchin embryos.

  18. Bacterial mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system...... movement is powered by insertional polymerization of ParM. Consistently, we find that segregating plasmids are positioned at the ends of extending ParM filaments. Thus, the process of R1 plasmid segregation in E. coli appears to be mechanistically analogous to the actin-based motility operating...

  19. NuMA is required for the proper completion of mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    NuMA is a 236-kD intranuclear protein that during mitosis is distributed into each daughter cell by association with the pericentrosomal domain of the spindle apparatus. The NuMA polypeptide consists of globular head and tail domains separated by a discontinuous 1500 amino acid coiled-coil spacer. Expression of human NuMA lacking its globular head domain results in cells that fail to undergo cytokinesis and assemble multiple small nuclei (micronuclei) in the subsequent interphase despite the appropriate localization of the truncated NuMA to both the nucleus and spindle poles. This dominant phenotype is morphologically identical to that of the tsBN2 cell line that carries a temperature-sensitive mutation in the chromatin-binding protein RCC1. At the restrictive temperature, these cells end mitosis without completing cytokinesis followed by micronucleation in the subsequent interphase. We demonstrate that the wild-type NuMA is degraded in the latest mitotic stages in these mutant cells and that NuMA is excluded from the micronuclei that assemble post-mitotically. Elevation of NuMA levels in these mutant cells by forcing the expression of wild-type NuMA is sufficient to restore post-mitotic assembly of a single normal-sized nucleus. Expression of human NuMA lacking its globular tail domain results in NuMA that fails both to target to interphase nuclei and to bind to the mitotic spindle. In the presence of this mutant, cells transit through mitosis normally, but assemble micronuclei in each daughter cell. The sum of these findings demonstrate that NuMA function is required during mitosis for the terminal phases of chromosome separation and/or nuclear reassembly. PMID:8432734

  20. Controlling kinase activity during the cell cycle: from the DNA damage response to mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, W.

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle is the process through which cells execute cell division. This is essential for many basal processes such as organismal development, tissue maintenance and reproduction. Disruption of the cell cycle, for example by damaged DNA, can have vast consequences and can lead to many diseases

  1. Spatial positive feedback at the onset of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Silvia D M; Wollman, Roy; Meyer, Tobias; Ferrell, James E

    2012-06-22

    Mitosis is triggered by the activation of Cdk1-cyclin B1 and its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Positive feedback loops regulate the activation of Cdk1-cyclin B1 and help make the process irreversible and all-or-none in character. Here we examine whether an analogous process, spatial positive feedback, regulates Cdk1-cyclin B1 redistribution. We used chemical biology approaches and live-cell microscopy to show that nuclear Cdk1-cyclin B1 promotes the translocation of Cdk1-cyclin B1 to the nucleus. Mechanistic studies suggest that cyclin B1 phosphorylation promotes nuclear translocation and, conversely, nuclear translocation promotes cyclin B1 phosphorylation, accounting for the feedback. Interfering with the abruptness of Cdk1-cyclin B1 translocation affects the timing and synchronicity of subsequent mitotic events, underscoring the functional importance of this feedback. We propose that spatial positive feedback ensures a rapid, complete, robust, and irreversible transition from interphase to mitosis and suggest that bistable spatiotemporal switches may be widespread in biological regulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging Mitosis in the Moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Moé; Miki, Tomohiro; Goshima, Gohta

    2016-01-01

    At first glance, mitosis in plants looks quite different from that in animals. In fact, terrestrial plants have lost the centrosome during evolution, and the mitotic spindle is assembled independently of a strong microtubule organizing center. The phragmoplast is a plant-specific mitotic apparatus formed after anaphase, which expands centrifugally towards the cell cortex. However, the extent to which plant mitosis differs from that of animals at the level of the protein repertoire is uncertain, largely because of the difficulty in the identification and in vivo characterization of mitotic genes of plants. Here, we discuss protocols for mitosis imaging that can be combined with endogenous green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagging or conditional RNA interference (RNAi) in the moss Physcomitrella patens, which is an emergent model plant for cell and developmental biology. This system has potential for use in the high-throughput study of mitosis and other intracellular processes, as is being done with various animal cell lines.

  3. AURKA, DLGAP5, TPX2, KIF11 and CKAP5: Five specific mitosis-associated genes correlate with poor prognosis for non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marc A; Christopoulos, Petros; Muley, Thomas; Warth, Arne; Klingmueller, Ursula; Thomas, Michael; Herth, Felix J F; Dienemann, Hendrik; Mueller, Nikola S; Theis, Fabian; Meister, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The growth of a tumor depends to a certain extent on an increase in mitotic events. Key steps during mitosis are the regulated assembly of the spindle apparatus and the separation of the sister chromatids. The microtubule-associated protein Aurora kinase A phosphorylates DLGAP5 in order to correctly segregate the chromatids. Its activity and recruitment to the spindle apparatus is regulated by TPX2. KIF11 and CKAP5 control the correct arrangement of the microtubules and prevent their degradation. In the present study, we investigated the role of these five molecules in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed the expression of the five genes in a large cohort of NSCLC patients (n=362) by quantitative real-time PCR. Each of the genes was highly overexpressed in the tumor tissues compared to corresponding normal lung tissue. The correlation of the expression of the individual genes depended on the histology. An increased expression of AURKA, DLGAP5, TPX2, KIF11 and CKAP5 was associated with poor overall survival (P=0.001-0.065). AURKA was a significant prognostic marker using multivariate analyses (P=0.006). Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the five mitosis-associated proteins co-localized with the spindle apparatus during cell division. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the expression of the mitosis-associated genes AURKA, DLGAP5, TPX2, KIF11 and CKAP5 is associated with the prognosis of NSCLC patients.

  4. All in one - integrating cell polarity, meiosis, mitosis and mechanical forces in early oocyte differentiation in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkouby, Yaniv M

    2017-01-01

    While the differentiation of oocytes is key for embryonic development, and its investigation is crucial for advancing our understanding of human reproduction and fertility, many fundamental questions in oogenesis have been long standing. However, recent technical advances have led to several breakthroughs mainly in mice and zebrafish. Here I review these recent findings, including regulation and organization of the germline cyst, the mechanistics of chromosomal pairing, establishment of cell polarity, and formation of a universal mRNA-protein (mRNP) granule called the Balbiani body. I discuss common themes in oogenesis from frogs, fish and mouse and compare them to findings from C. elegans and Drosophila. The zebrafish juvenile ovary is an attractive model where these individual processes can be investigated, but also revealing how they are inter-coordinated in oocyte differentiation. A conserved cellular organizer was discovered in the zebrafish oocyte that seems to function at a nexus of oocyte differentiation. This organizer, termed the Meiotic Vegetal Center (MVC), is composed of the oocyte centrosome, and couples meiotic chromosomal pairing with oocyte polarization and Balbiani body formation. The MVC breaks the oocyte symmetry, is regulated by upstream mitotic division in the cyst and nucleates Balbiani body mRNPs prion-like aggregation downstream. These processes can shed new light on broad questions in biology, such as how mitosis contributes to cell polarity, and how prion aggregation which lead to neurodegenerative disease when awry, is regulated in a physiological context. Furthermore, novel cytoskeletal structures can unravel cytoplasmic mechanical functions in chromosomal pairing. Finally, together with recently developed tools, genome editing technology now enables a robust genetic analysis of these fundamental processes in the zebrafish, paving the way for a comprehensive cell and developmental view of vertebrate oogenesis.

  5. Incoming human papillomavirus type 16 genome resides in a vesicular compartment throughout mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Luszczek, Wioleta; Keiffer, Timothy R; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Guion, Lucile G M; Sapp, Martin J

    2016-05-31

    During the entry process, the human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is trafficked to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), whereupon it enters the nucleus during mitosis. We previously demonstrated that the minor capsid protein L2 assumes a transmembranous conformation in the TGN. Here we provide evidence that the incoming viral genome dissociates from the TGN and associates with microtubules after the onset of mitosis. Deposition onto mitotic chromosomes is L2-mediated. Using differential staining of an incoming viral genome by small molecular dyes in selectively permeabilized cells, nuclease protection, and flotation assays, we found that HPV resides in a membrane-bound vesicle until mitosis is completed and the nuclear envelope has reformed. As a result, expression of the incoming viral genome is delayed. Taken together, these data provide evidence that HPV has evolved a unique strategy for delivering the viral genome to the nucleus of dividing cells. Furthermore, it is unlikely that nuclear vesicles are unique to HPV, and thus we may have uncovered a hitherto unrecognized cellular pathway that may be of interest for future cell biological studies.

  6. Pancreatic cancer cells express CD44 variant 9 and multidrug resistance protein 1 during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Shizuka; Ikeshita, Shunji; Miyatake, Yukiko; Kasahara, Masanori

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers with high metastatic potential and strong chemoresistance. Its intractable natures are attributed to high robustness in tumor cells for their survival. We demonstrate here that pancreatic cancer cells (PCCs) with an epithelial phenotype upregulate cell surface expression of CD44 variant 9 (CD44v9), an important cancer stem cell marker, during the mitotic phases of the cell cycle. Of five human CD44(+) PCC lines examined, three cell lines, PCI-24, PCI-43 and PCI-55, expressed E-cadherin and CD44 variants, suggesting that they have an epithelial phenotype. By contrast, PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 cells expressed vimentin and ZEB1, suggesting that they have a mesenchymal phenotype. PCCs with an epithelial phenotype upregulated cell surface expression of CD44v9 in prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase and downregulated CD44v9 expression in late-telophase, cytokinesis and interphase. Sorted CD44v9-negative PCI-55 cells resumed CD44v9 expression when they re-entered the mitotic stage. Interestingly, CD44v9(bright) mitotic cells expressed multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) intracellularly. Upregulated expression of CD44v9 and MDR1 might contribute to the intractable nature of PCCs with high proliferative activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fresh WNT into the regulation of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Ailine; Bastians, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling triggering β-catenin-dependent gene expression contributes to cell cycle progression, in particular at the G1/S transition. Recently, however, it became clear that the cell cycle can also feed back on Wnt signaling at the G2/M transition. This is illustrated by the fact that mitosis-specific cyclin-dependent kinases can phosphorylate the Wnt co-receptor LRP6 to prime the pathway for incoming Wnt signals when cells enter mitosis. In addition, there is accumulating evidence that various Wnt pathway components might exert additional, Wnt-independent functions that are important for proper regulation of mitosis. The importance of Wnt pathways during mitosis was most recently enforced by the discovery of Wnt signaling contributing to the stabilization of proteins other than β-catenin, specifically at G2/M and during mitosis. This Wnt-mediated stabilization of proteins, now referred to as Wnt/STOP, might on one hand contribute to maintaining a critical cell size required for cell division and, on the other hand, for the faithful execution of mitosis itself. In fact, most recently we have shown that Wnt/STOP is required for ensuring proper microtubule dynamics within mitotic spindles, which is pivotal for accurate chromosome segregation and for the maintenance of euploidy.

  8. Spatial and dynamic organization of molecular structures in the cell nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Anne-Kee

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we attempt to provide a better understanding of the principles that underlie the spatial dynamic organization of the cell nucleus. Chapter 1 reviews the current status of knowledge about the structural and functional organization of the cell nucleus. In chapter 2, the development of a

  9. Intravital FRET imaging of tumor cell viability and mitosis during chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.; Beerling, E.; Medema, R.; van Rheenen, J.

    2013-01-01

    Taxanes, such as docetaxel, are microtubule-targeting chemotherapeutics that have been successfully used in the treatment of cancer. Based on data obtained from cell cultures, it is believed that taxanes induce tumor cell death by specifically perturbing mitotic progression. Here, we report on data

  10. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; Vugt, Marcel A.T.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed

  11. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; Vugt, Marcel A.T.M. van, E-mail: m.vugt@umcg.nl

    2013-10-15

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed.

  12. The DNA damage response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2013-10-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mitotic accumulation of dimethylated lysine 79 of histone H3 is important for maintaining genome integrity during mitosis in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guppy, Brent J; McManus, Kirk J

    2015-02-01

    The loss of genome stability is an early event that drives the development and progression of virtually all tumor types. Recent studies have revealed that certain histone post-translational modifications exhibit dynamic and global increases in abundance that coincide with mitosis and exhibit essential roles in maintaining genomic stability. Histone H2B ubiquitination at lysine 120 (H2Bub1) is regulated by RNF20, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is altered in many tumor types. Through an evolutionarily conserved trans-histone pathway, H2Bub1 is an essential prerequisite for subsequent downstream dimethylation events at lysines 4 (H3K4me2) and 79 (H3K79me2) of histone H3. Although the role that RNF20 plays in tumorigenesis has garnered much attention, the downstream components of the trans-histone pathway, H3K4me2 and H3K79me2, and their potential contributions to genome stability remain largely overlooked. In this study, we employ single-cell imaging and biochemical approaches to investigate the spatial and temporal patterning of RNF20, H2Bub1, H3K4me2, and H3K79me2 throughout the cell cycle, with a particular focus on mitosis. We show that H2Bub1, H3K4me2, and H3K79me2 exhibit distinct temporal progression patterns throughout the cell cycle. Most notably, we demonstrate that H3K79me2 is a highly dynamic histone post-translational modification that reaches maximal abundance during mitosis in an H2Bub1-independent manner. Using RNAi and chemical genetic approaches, we identify DOT1L as a histone methyltransferase required for the mitotic-associated increases in H3K79me2. We also demonstrate that the loss of mitotic H3K79me2 levels correlates with increases in chromosome numbers and increases in mitotic defects. Collectively, these data suggest that H3K79me2 dynamics during mitosis are normally required to maintain genome stability and further implicate the loss of H3K79me2 during mitosis as a pathogenic event that contributes to the development and progression of tumors

  14. Targeting mitosis for anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakin, Valery; Yen, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Basic research that has focused on achieving a mechanistic understanding of mitosis has provided unprecedented molecular and biochemical insights into this highly complex phase of the cell cycle. The discovery process has uncovered an ever-expanding list of novel proteins that orchestrate and coordinate spindle formation and chromosome dynamics during mitosis. That many of these proteins appear to function solely in mitosis makes them ideal targets for the development of mitosis-specific cancer drugs. The clinical successes seen with anti-microtubule drugs such as taxanes and the vinca alkaloids have also encouraged the development of drugs that specifically target mitosis. Drugs that selectively inhibit mitotic kinesins involved in spindle and kinetochore functions, as well as kinases that regulate these activities, are currently in various stages of clinical trials. Our increased understanding of mitosis has also revealed that this process is targeted by inhibitors of farnesyl transferase, histone deacetylase, and Hsp90. Although these drugs were originally designed to block cell proliferation by inhibiting signaling pathways and altering gene expression, it is clear now that these drugs can also directly interfere with the mitotic process. The increased attention to mitosis as a chemotherapeutic target has also raised an important issue regarding the cellular determinants that specify drug sensitivity. One likely contribution is the mitotic checkpoint, a failsafe mechanism that delays mitotic exit so that cells whose chromosomes are not properly attached to the spindle have extra time to correct their errors. As the biochemical activity of the mitotic checkpoint is finite, cells cannot indefinitely sustain the delay, as in cases where cells are treated with anti-mitotic drugs. When the mitotic checkpoint activity is eventually lost, cells will exit mitosis and become aneuploid. While many of the aneuploid cells may die because of massive chromosome imbalance

  15. Arrangement of nuclear structures is not transmitted through mitosis but is identical in sister cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlova, Darya Yu; Stixová, Lenka; Kozubek, Stanislav; Gierman, Hinco J.; Šustáčková, Gabriela; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Medvedev, Ruslan N.; Legartová, Soňa; Versteeg, Rogier; Matula, Pavel; Stoklasa, Roman; Bártová, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Although it is well known that chromosomes are non-randomly organized during interphase, it is not completely clear whether higher-order chromatin structure is transmitted from mother to daughter cells. Therefore, we addressed the question of how chromatin is rearranged during interphase and whether

  16. Mitosis and cell death in the optic lobes of workers, queens and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the differences in the compound eyes in adults of these classes are achieved. The results showed that OL differentiation follows a similar pattern in the three classes of individuals studied, without structural differences in their development. The main non-structural differences involve cell division, mortality rates and timing.

  17. Abnormal mitosis in root meristem cells of Allium cepa L. induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This investigation was aimed to find mitotic abnormalities as cytological evidence induced by the dye in root tip cells of onion (Allium cepa L.) grown in different concentrations: 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0% (weight per volume) prepared in distilled water in separate treatment schedules for 24 and 48 h. Mitotic aberrations ...

  18. Golgi twins in late mitosis revealed by genetically encoded tags for live cell imaging and correlated electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaietta, Guido M; Giepmans, Ben N G; Deerinck, Thomas J; Smith, W Bryan; Ngan, Lucy; Llopis, Juan; Adams, Stephen R; Tsien, Roger Y; Ellisman, Mark H

    2006-01-01

    Combinations of molecular tags visible in light and electron microscopes become particularly advantageous in the analysis of dynamic cellular components like the Golgi apparatus. This organelle disassembles at the onset of mitosis and, after a sequence of poorly understood events, reassembles after

  19. The Cell Nucleus in Physiological and Experimentally Induced Hypometabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, M.

    The main problem for manned space mission is, at present, represented by the mass penalty associated to the human presence. An efficient approach could be the induction of a hypometabolic stasis in the astronauts, thus drastically reducing the physical and psychological requirements of the crew. On the other hand, in the wild, a reduction in resource consumptions physiologi- cally occurs in certain animals which periodically enter hibernation, a hypometabolic state in which both the energy need and energy offer are kept at a minimum. During the last twelve years, we have been studying different tissues of hibernating dormice, with the aim of analyzing their features during the euthermia -hibernation-arousal cycle as well as getting insight into the mechanisms allowing adaptation to hypometabolism. We paid particular attention to the cell nucleus, as it is the site of chief metabolic functions, such as DNA replication and RNA transcription. Our observations revealed no significant modification in the basic features of cell nuclei during hibernation; however, the cell nuclei of hibernating dormice showed unusual nuclear bodies containing molecules involved in RNA pathways. Therefore, we supposed that they could represent storage/assembly sites of several factors for processing some RNA which could be slowly synthesised during hibernation and rapidly and abundantly released in early arousal in order to meet the increased metabolic needs of the cell. The nucleolus also underwent structural and molecular modifications during hibernation, maybe to continue important nucleolar functions, or, alternatively, permit a most efficient reactivation upon arousal. On the basis of the observations made in vivo , we recently tried to experimentally induce a reversible hypometabolic state in in vitro models, using cell lines derived from hibernating and non-hibernating species. By administering the synthetic opioid DADLE, we could significantly reduce both RNA transcrip- tion and

  20. Transcriptional control of mitosis: deregulation and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsubhra eNath

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Research over the past few decades has well established the molecular functioning of mitosis. Deregulation of these functions has also been attributed to the generation of aneuploidy in different tumor types. Numerous studies have given insight into the regulation of mitosis by cell cycle specific proteins. Optimum abundance of these proteins is pivotal to timely execution of mitosis. Aberrant expressions of these mitotic proteins have been reported in different cancer types. Several post-transcriptional mechanisms and their interplay have subsequently been identified that control the level of mitotic proteins. However, to date, infrequent incidences of cancer-associated mutations have been reported for the genes expressing these proteins. Therefore, altered expression of these mitotic regulators in tumor samples can largely be attributed to transcriptional deregulation. This review discusses the biology of transcriptional control for mitosis and evaluates its role in the generation of aneuploidy and tumorigenesis.

  1. Positioning of the NOR-bearing chromosomes in relation to nucleoli in daughter cells after mitosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalmárová, Markéta; Smirnov, Evgeny; Kováčik, Lubomír; Popov, Alexey; Raška, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2008), s. 421-425 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/06/1691 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA304/06/1662; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535; Wellcome Trust(XE) 075834/04/Z Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : chromosome positioning * NORs * daughter cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  2. PRMT1 promotes mitosis of cancer cells through arginine methylation of INCENP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaolan; Von Keudell, Gottfried; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakakido, Makoto; Piao, Lianhua; Yoshioka, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2015-11-03

    Inner centromere protein (INCENP) is a part of a protein complex known as the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) that is essential for correcting non-bipolar chromosome attachments and for cytokinesis. We here demonstrate that a protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT1, which are overexpressed in various types of cancer including lung and bladder cancer, methylates arginine 887 in an Aurora Kinase B (AURKB)-binding region of INCENP both in vitro and in vivo. R887-substituted INCENP revealed lower binding-affinity to AURKB than wild-type INCENP in the presence of PRMT1. Knockdown of PRMT1 as well as overexpression of methylation-inactive INCENP attenuated the AURKB activity in cancer cells, and resulted in abnormal chromosomal alignment and segregation. Furthermore, introduction of methylation-inactive INCENP into cancer cells reduced the growth rate, compared with those introduced wild-type INCENP or Mock. Our data unveils a novel mechanism of PRMT1-mediated CPC regulation through methylation of INCENP.

  3. Kinases Involved in Both Autophagy and Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Both mitosis and autophagy are highly regulated dynamic cellular processes and involve various phosphorylation events catalysed by kinases, which play vital roles in almost all physiological and pathological conditions. Mitosis is a key event during the cell cycle, in which the cell divides into two daughter cells. Autophagy is a process in which the cell digests its own cellular contents. Although autophagy regulation has mainly been studied in asynchronous cells, increasing evidence indicates that autophagy is in fact tightly regulated in mitosis. Here in this review, we will discuss kinases that were originally identified to be involved in only one of either mitosis or autophagy, but were later found to participate in both processes, such as CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases, Aurora kinases, PLK-1 (polo-like kinase 1, BUB1 (budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles 1, MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases, mTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1, AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase, PI3K (phosphoinositide-3 kinase and protein kinase B (AKT. By focusing on kinases involved in both autophagy and mitosis, we will get a more comprehensive understanding about the reciprocal regulation between the two key cellular events, which will also shed light on their related therapeutic investigations.

  4. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  5. TopBP1-mediated DNA processing during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Irene; Christiansen, Signe Korbo; Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Lisby, Michael; Oestergaard, Vibe H

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is crucial to avoid cancer and other genetic diseases. Thus faced with DNA damage, cells mount a DNA damage response to avoid genome instability. The DNA damage response is partially inhibited during mitosis presumably to avoid erroneous processing of the segregating chromosomes. Yet our recent study shows that TopBP1-mediated DNA processing during mitosis is highly important to reduce transmission of DNA damage to daughter cells. (1) Here we provide an overview of the DNA damage response and DNA repair during mitosis. One role of TopBP1 during mitosis is to stimulate unscheduled DNA synthesis at underreplicated regions. We speculated that such genomic regions are likely to hold stalled replication forks or post-replicative gaps, which become the substrate for DNA synthesis upon entry into mitosis. Thus, we addressed whether the translesion pathways for fork restart or post-replicative gap filling are required for unscheduled DNA synthesis in mitosis. Using genetics in the avian DT40 cell line, we provide evidence that unscheduled DNA synthesis in mitosis does not require the translesion synthesis scaffold factor Rev1 or PCNA ubiquitylation at K164, which serve to recruit translesion polymerases to stalled forks. In line with this finding, translesion polymerase η foci do not colocalize with TopBP1 or FANCD2 in mitosis. Taken together, we conclude that TopBP1 promotes unscheduled DNA synthesis in mitosis independently of the examined translesion polymerases.

  6. Promoters active in interphase are bookmarked during mitosis by ubiquitination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Mansi; Zhang, Jie; Heine, George F.; Ozer, Gulcin; Liu, Hui-wen; Huang, Kun; Parvin, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed modification of chromatin by ubiquitination in human cells and whether this mark changes through the cell cycle. HeLa cells were synchronized at different stages and regions of the genome with ubiquitinated chromatin were identified by affinity purification coupled with next-generation sequencing. During interphase, ubiquitin marked the chromatin on the transcribed regions of ∼70% of highly active genes and deposition of this mark was sensitive to transcriptional inhibition. Promoters of nearly half of the active genes were highly ubiquitinated specifically during mitosis. The ubiquitination at the coding regions in interphase but not at promoters during mitosis was enriched for ubH2B and dependent on the presence of RNF20. Ubiquitin labeling of both promoters during mitosis and transcribed regions during interphase, correlated with active histone marks H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 but not a repressive histone modification, H3K27me3. The high level of ubiquitination at the promoter chromatin during mitosis was transient and was removed within 2 h after the cells exited mitosis and entered the next cell cycle. These results reveal that the ubiquitination of promoter chromatin during mitosis is a bookmark identifying active genes during chromosomal condensation in mitosis, and we suggest that this process facilitates transcriptional reactivation post-mitosis. PMID:22941662

  7. Condensins promote chromosome individualization and segregation during mitosis, meiosis, and amitosis inTetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Till, Rachel; Loidl, Josef

    2018-02-15

    Condensin is a protein complex with diverse functions in chromatin packaging and chromosome condensation and segregation. We studied condensin in the evolutionarily distant protist model Tetrahymena , which features noncanonical nuclear organization and divisions. In Tetrahymena , the germline and soma are partitioned into two different nuclei within a single cell. Consistent with their functional specializations in sexual reproduction and gene expression, condensins of the germline nucleus and the polyploid somatic nucleus are composed of different subunits. Mitosis and meiosis of the germline nucleus and amitotic division of the somatic nucleus are all dependent on condensins. In condensin-depleted cells, a chromosome condensation defect was most striking at meiotic metaphase, when Tetrahymena chromosomes are normally most densely packaged. Live imaging of meiotic divisions in condensin-depleted cells showed repeated nuclear stretching and contraction as the chromosomes failed to separate. Condensin depletion also fundamentally altered chromosome arrangement in the polyploid somatic nucleus: multiple copies of homologous chromosomes tended to cluster, consistent with a previous model of condensin suppressing default somatic pairing. We propose that failure to form discrete chromosome territories is the common cause of the defects observed in the absence of condensins. © 2018 Howard-Till and Loidl. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. EGFR/MEK/ERK/CDK5-dependent integrin-independent FAK phosphorylated on serine 732 contributes to microtubule depolymerization and mitosis in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, K; Sensi, M; Anichini, A; Canevari, S; Tomassetti, A

    2013-10-03

    FAK is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase contributing to migration and proliferation downstream of integrin and/or growth factor receptor signaling of normal and malignant cells. In addition to well-characterized tyrosine phosphorylations, FAK is phosphorylated on several serines, whose role is not yet clarified. We observed that phosphorylated FAK on serine 732 (P-FAKSer732) is present at variable levels in vitro, in several melanoma, ovarian and thyroid tumor cell lines and in vivo, in tumor cells present in fresh ovarian cancer ascites. In vitro P-FAKSer732 was barely detectable during interphase while its levels strongly increased in mitotic cells upon activation of the EGFR/MEK/ERK axis in an integrin-independent manner. P-FAKSer732 presence was crucial for the maintenance of the proliferation rate and its levels were inversely related to the levels of acetylated α-tubulin. P-FAKSer732 localized at the microtubules (MTs) of the spindle, biochemically associated with MTs and contributed to MT depolymerization. The lack of the phosphorylation on Ser732 as well as the inhibition of CDK5 activity by roscovitine impaired mitotic spindle assembly and correct chromosome alignment during mitosis. We also identified, for the first time, that the EGF-dependent EGFR activation led to increased P-FAKSer732 and polymerized MTs. Our data shed light on the multifunctional roles of FAK in neoplastic cells, being involved not only in integrin-dependent migratory signaling but also in integrin-independent MT dynamics and mitosis control. These findings provide a new potential target for inhibiting the growth of tumor cells in which the EGFR/MEK/ERK/CDK5 pathway is active.

  9. Changes in tumor oxygen tension during radiotherapy of uterine cervical cancer: relationships to changes in vascular density, cell density, and frequency of mitosis and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyng, Heidi; Sundfoer, Kolbein; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Changes in oxygen tension (pO 2 ) during the early phase of fractionated radiotherapy were studied in 22 patients with uterine cervical cancer. The aims were to investigate (a) whether possible changes in pO 2 differed among and within tumors and (b) whether the changes could be attributed to changes in vascular density, cell density, and frequency of mitosis and apoptosis. Methods and Materials: The pO 2 was measured polarographically in four regions of the tumors before treatment and after 2 weeks of radiotherapy. The vascular density, cell density, and frequency of mitosis and apoptosis were determined from biopsies taken from the tumor regions after each pO 2 measurement. Results: The changes in pO 2 during therapy differed among the tumors and were correlated to pO 2 before treatment (p 2 and vice versa. The tumors with increased pO 2 (n = 10) had a large decrease in cell density and a significant increase in apoptotic frequency. In contrast, the tumors with decreased pO 2 (n = 10) had a smaller decrease in cell density (p = 0.014) and no significant increase in apoptotic frequency. Vascular density and mitotic frequency showed no change during therapy; however, vascular damage other than decreased vascular density was observed. Conclusion: These results indicate that the oxygenation of cervix tumors generally changes during the early phase of radiotherapy. The change depends on the balance between the factor leading to an increase and that leading to a decrease in oxygenation; i.e., decreased cell density and vascular damage, respectively. Increased apoptotic frequency may contribute to a large decrease in cell density and hence increased oxygenation during therapy

  10. Using a Case-Study Article to Effectively Introduce Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoewyk, Doug

    2007-01-01

    Community college students in a nonmajors biology class are introduced to mitosis by reading a case-study article that allows them to gauge how many times various parts of their bodies have been regenerated. The case-study article allows students to develop a conceptual framework of the cell cycle prior to a lecture on mitosis. (Contains 1 figure.)

  11. Chromosome Bridges Maintain Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment throughout Mitosis and Rarely Break during Anaphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampalona, Judit; Roscioli, Emanuele; Silkworth, William T; Bowden, Brent; Genescà, Anna; Tusell, Laura; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during cell division is essential to maintain genome stability, and chromosome segregation errors are causally linked to genetic disorders and cancer. An anaphase chromosome bridge is a particular chromosome segregation error observed in cells that enter mitosis with fused chromosomes/sister chromatids. The widely accepted Breakage/Fusion/Bridge cycle model proposes that anaphase chromosome bridges break during mitosis to generate chromosome ends that will fuse during the following cell cycle, thus forming new bridges that will break, and so on. However, various studies have also shown a link between chromosome bridges and aneuploidy and/or polyploidy. In this study, we investigated the behavior and properties of chromosome bridges during mitosis, with the idea to gain insight into the potential mechanism underlying chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. We find that only a small number of chromosome bridges break during anaphase, whereas the rest persist through mitosis into the subsequent cell cycle. We also find that the microtubule bundles (k-fibers) bound to bridge kinetochores are not prone to breakage/detachment, thus supporting the conclusion that k-fiber detachment is not the cause of chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. Instead, our data suggest that while the microtubules bound to the kinetochores of normally segregating chromosomes shorten substantially during anaphase, the k-fibers bound to bridge kinetochores shorten only slightly, and may even lengthen, during anaphase. This causes some of the bridge kinetochores/chromosomes to lag behind in a position that is proximal to the cell/spindle equator and may cause the bridged chromosomes to be segregated into the same daughter nucleus or to form a micronucleus.

  12. JMJD5 (Jumonji Domain-containing 5) Associates with Spindle Microtubules and Is Required for Proper Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhimin; Wu, Junyu; Su, Xiaonan; Zhang, Ye; Pan, Lixia; Wei, Huimin; Fang, Qiang; Li, Haitao; Wang, Da-Liang; Sun, Fang-Lin

    2016-02-26

    Precise mitotic spindle assembly is a guarantee of proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Chromosome instability caused by disturbed mitosis is one of the major features of various types of cancer. JMJD5 has been reported to be involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the nucleus, but little is known about its function in mitotic process. Here we report the unexpected localization and function of JMJD5 in mitotic progression. JMJD5 partially accumulates on mitotic spindles during mitosis, and depletion of JMJD5 results in significant mitotic arrest, spindle assembly defects, and sustained activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Inactivating SAC can efficiently reverse the mitotic arrest caused by JMJD5 depletion. Moreover, JMJD5 is found to interact with tubulin proteins and associate with microtubules during mitosis. JMJD5-depleted cells show a significant reduction of α-tubulin acetylation level on mitotic spindles and fail to generate enough interkinetochore tension to satisfy the SAC. Further, JMJD5 depletion also increases the susceptibility of HeLa cells to the antimicrotubule agent. Taken together, these results suggest that JMJD5 plays an important role in regulating mitotic progression, probably by modulating the stability of spindle microtubules. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Tools for visualization of phosphoinositides in the cell nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalasová, Ilona; Fáberová, Veronika; Kalendová, Alžběta; Uličná, Lívia; Yildirim, Sukriye; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 145, č. 4 (2016), s. 485-496 ISSN 0948-6143 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-03403S; GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA CR GA16-03403S Grant - others:Human Frontier Science Program(FR) RGP0017/2013 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Nucleus * Phosphoinositides * PI(4,5)P2 * PI(4)P Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.553, year: 2016

  14. Okadaic acid suppresses calcium regulation of mitosis onset in sea urchin embryos.

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, R; Whitaker, M

    1991-01-01

    We show that a phosphatase inhibitor, okadaic acid, induces premature and persistent mitosis during the first cell cycle in sea urchin embryos. Okadaic acid-induced mitosis requires protein synthesis, suggesting that it activates the protein synthesis-requiring mitotic H1 kinase. By microinjecting the calcium chelators BAPTA and EGTA and by measuring Cai using fura-2, an indicator dye, we show that okadaic acid-induced mitosis is independent of the calcium signal that usually triggers mitosis...

  15. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-05-11

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT- bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position.

  16. Angiopoietin-1 receptor Tie2 distinguishes multipotent differentiation capability in bovine coccygeal nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekari, Adel; Chan, Samantha C W; Sakai, Daisuke; Grad, Sibylle; Gantenbein, Benjamin

    2016-05-23

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) has limited self-healing potential and disc repair strategies require an appropriate cell source such as progenitor cells that could regenerate the damaged cells and tissues. The objective of this study was to identify nucleus pulposus-derived progenitor cells (NPPC) and examine their potential in regenerative medicine in vitro. Nucleus pulposus cells (NPC) were obtained from 1-year-old bovine coccygeal discs by enzymatic digestion and were sorted for the angiopoietin-1 receptor Tie2. The obtained Tie2- and Tie2+ fractions of cells were differentiated into osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages in vitro. Colony-forming units were prepared from both cell populations and the colonies formed were analyzed and quantified after 8 days of culture. In order to improve the preservation of the Tie2+ phenotype of NPPC in monolayer cultures, we tested a selection of growth factors known to have stimulating effects, cocultured NPPC with IVD tissue, and exposed them to hypoxic conditions (2 % O2). After 3 weeks of differentiation culture, only the NPC that were positive for Tie2 were able to differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes as characterized by calcium deposition (p nucleus pulposus contains NPPC that are Tie2+. These cells fulfilled formally progenitor criteria that were maintained in subsequent monolayer culture for up to 7 days by addition of FGF2 or hypoxic conditions. We propose that the nucleus pulposus represents a niche of precursor cells for regeneration of the IVD.

  17. β-catenin at the centrosome: discrete pools of β-catenin communicate during mitosis and may co-ordinate centrosome functions and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbom, Bertrade C; Nelson, W James; Barth, Angela

    2013-09-01

    Beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein with critical roles in cell-cell adhesion, Wnt-signaling and the centrosome cycle. Whereas the roles of β-catenin in cell-cell adhesion and Wnt-signaling have been studied extensively, the mechanism(s) involving β-catenin in centrosome functions are poorly understood. β-Catenin localizes to centrosomes and promotes mitotic progression. NIMA-related protein kinase 2 (Nek2), which stimulates centrosome separation, binds to and phosphorylates β-catenin. β-Catenin interacting proteins involved in Wnt signaling such as adenomatous polyposis coli, Axin, and GSK3β, are also localized at centrosomes and play roles in promoting mitotic progression. Additionally, proteins associated with cell-cell adhesion sites, such as dynein, regulate mitotic spindle positioning. These roles of proteins at the cell cortex and Wnt signaling that involve β-catenin indicate a cross-talk between different sub-cellular sites in the cell at mitosis, and that different pools of β-catenin may co-ordinate centrosome functions and cell cycle progression. © 2013 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Rescue from replication stress during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkos, Michalis; Naim, Valeria

    2017-04-03

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer and a common feature of human disorders, characterized by growth defects, neurodegeneration, cancer predisposition, and aging. Recent evidence has shown that DNA replication stress is a major driver of genomic instability and tumorigenesis. Cells can undergo mitosis with under-replicated DNA or unresolved DNA structures, and specific pathways are dedicated to resolving these structures during mitosis, suggesting that mitotic rescue from replication stress (MRRS) is a key process influencing genome stability and cellular homeostasis. Deregulation of MRRS following oncogene activation or loss-of-function of caretaker genes may be the cause of chromosomal aberrations that promote cancer initiation and progression. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of replication stress, focusing on its persistence in mitosis as well as the mechanisms and factors involved in its resolution, and the potential impact of incomplete replication or aberrant MRRS on tumorigenesis, aging and disease.

  19. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guixian; Pan, Leiting; Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-17

    Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca(2+)]c) and nuclear calcium ([Ca(2+)]n) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca(2+)]n detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca(2+)]n and [Ca(2+)]c in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of the Nucleus as a Sensor of Cell Environment Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselme, Karine; Wakhloo, Nayana Tusamda; Rougerie, Pablo; Pieuchot, Laurent

    2017-12-28

    The proper integration of biophysical cues from the cell vicinity is crucial for cells to maintain homeostasis, cooperate with other cells within the tissues, and properly fulfill their biological function. It is therefore crucial to fully understand how cells integrate these extracellular signals for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Topography has emerged as a prominent component of the cellular microenvironment that has pleiotropic effects on cell behavior. This progress report focuses on the recent advances in the understanding of the topography sensing mechanism with a special emphasis on the role of the nucleus. Here, recent techniques developed for monitoring the nuclear mechanics are reviewed and the impact of various topographies and their consequences on nuclear organization, gene regulation, and stem cell fate is summarized. The role of the cell nucleus as a sensor of cell-scale topography is further discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Coupling mitosis to S-phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clijsters, L.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we studied the structural and biochemical findings described in the introduction, from a more cell biological perspective. We investigated how replication licensing and mitosis might be linked. We also asked, how the spindle checkpoint and the APC/C can coordinate mitotic exit and

  2. What's Nu(SAP) in mitosis and cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Jyoti; Moghe, Saili; Furukawa, Manabu; Tsai, Ming-Ying

    2011-06-01

    Unperturbed mitosis is a prerequisite for the generation of two genetically identical daughter cells. Nucleolar-spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is an important mitotic regulator. The activity of NuSAP is essential for a variety of cellular events that occur during mitosis starting from spindle assembly to cytokinesis. In addition to playing crucial roles during mitosis, NuSAP has been in the spotlight recently due to different studies exhibiting its importance in embryogenesis and cancer. In this review, we have extensively mined the current literature and made connections between different studies involving NuSAP. Importantly, we have assembled data pertaining to NuSAP from several proteomic studies and analyzed it thoroughly. Our review focuses on the role of NuSAP in mitosis and cancer, and brings to light several unanswered questions regarding the regulation of NuSAP in mitosis and its role in carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. ► tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. ► tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA Met (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA Met was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  4. Requirements of cyclin a for mitosis are independent of its subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienemann, Axel; Sprenger, Frank

    2004-06-22

    Cyclin A (CycA), the only essential mitotic cyclin in Drosophila, is cytoplasmic during interphase and accumulates in the nucleus during prophase. We show that interphase localization is mediated by Leptomycin B (LMB)-sensitive nuclear export. This is a feature shared with human CyclinB1, and it is assumed that nuclear accumulation is necessary for mitotic entry. Here, we tested if the unique mitotic function of CycA requires nuclear accumulation. We fused subcellular localization signals to CycA and tested their mitotic capability. Surprisingly, nuclear accumulation was not required, and even a membrane-tethered form of CycA was able to induce mitosis. We noted that Cyclin B (CycB) protein disappears prematurely in CycA mutants, reminiscent of rca1 mutants. Rca1 is an inhibitor of Fizzy-related-APC/C activity, and in rca1 mutants, mitotic cyclins are degraded in G2 of the 16(th) embryonic cell cycle. Overexpression of Rca1 can restore mitosis in CycA mutants, indicating that the mitotic failure of CycA mutants is caused by premature activation of the APC/C. The essential mitotic function of CycA is therefore not the activation of numerous mitotic substrates by Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation. Rather, CycA-dependent kinase activity is required to inhibit one inhibitor of mitosis, the Fzr protein.

  5. The Effect of radiation on T-cell mitosis and natural killer cell mediated cytotoxicity in solid cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Il Bong; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1986-01-01

    The present study has been conducted to investigate whether such tests can be used as a guideline in planning radiation therapy and in prognosticating radiation treatment of patients with a solid cancer. The first group consisted of 68 patients with solid tumors who received radiation therapy from May 1984 until July 1985 at the Department of Radiology, Catholic Medical College and these showed the following results of T-cell function change by the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation test and the response of the NK cell in vivo following radiation by NKMC test. Secondly the NKMC and PHA stimulation tests have been studied in 27 patients with solid tumors who did not receive radiation therapy (cancer control group) and thirdly 30 normal subjects were tested as normal control. (Author)

  6. The three-dimensional organization of telomeres in the nucleus of mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrin Mathilde

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The observation of multiple genetic markers in situ by optical microscopy and their relevance to the study of three-dimensional (3D chromosomal organization in the nucleus have been greatly developed in the last decade. These methods are important in cancer research because cancer is characterized by multiple alterations that affect the modulation of gene expression and the stability of the genome. It is, therefore, essential to analyze the 3D genome organization of the interphase nucleus in both normal and cancer cells. Results We describe a novel approach to study the distribution of all telomeres inside the nucleus of mammalian cells throughout the cell cycle. It is based on 3D telomere fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by quantitative analysis that determines the telomeres' distribution in the nucleus throughout the cell cycle. This method enables us to determine, for the first time, that telomere organization is cell-cycle dependent, with assembly of telomeres into a telomeric disk in the G2 phase. In tumor cells, the 3D telomere organization is distorted and aggregates are formed. Conclusions The results emphasize a non-random and dynamic 3D nuclear telomeric organization and its importance to genomic stability. Based on our findings, it appears possible to examine telomeric aggregates suggestive of genomic instability in individual interphase nuclei and tissues without the need to examine metaphases. Such new avenues of monitoring genomic instability could potentially impact on cancer biology, genetics, diagnostic innovations and surveillance of treatment response in medicine.

  7. ''Protective'' effect of cells gamma-irradiation at the metaphase of mitosis after UV-irradiation at the S-period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, L.I.; Chubykin, V.L.

    1975-01-01

    As a result of the ultraviolet irradiation in vitro of the embryo fibroblasts of BALB mice in the S-stage with an incident dose of 40 erg/mm 2 , 20.1% cells showed chromosome aberrations. Additional gamma irradiation of cells in the metaphase of the first mitosis with a dose of 5 krad leads with a high degree of certainty to a decrease to 11.7% in the frequency of aberrant cells observed in the same mitotic stage. The frequency of spontaneous aberrations does not change during the first few minutes after the gamma irradiation of intact cells. The ''protective'' effect of gamma rays cannot be attributed to non-uniform changes in the duration of the mitotic stages for aberrant and normal cells, to the adhesion of chromosome fragments or to the breaking of bridges in the anaphase. The destruction of cells during irradiation is also an unlikely explanation of the observed effect. It is assumed that the decrease in the frequency of aberrations is a result of the previously predicted modification of the processes involved, when potential chromosome damage becomes visible abberations during metaphase. (auth.)

  8. Acentrosomal microtubule assembly in mitosis: the where, when, and how

    OpenAIRE

    Meunier, Sylvain; Vernos, Isabelle, 1959-

    2016-01-01

    In mitosis the cell assembles the bipolar spindle, a microtubule (MT)-based apparatus that segregates the duplicated chromosomes into two daughter cells. Most animal cells enter mitosis with duplicated centrosomes that provide an active source of dynamic MTs. However, it is now established that spindle assembly relies on the nucleation of acentrosomal MTs occurring around the chromosomes after nuclear envelope breakdown, and on pre-existing microtubules. Where chromosome-dependent MT nucleati...

  9. Heat-induced alterations in the cell nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampinga, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Hyperthermia may kill eukaryotic cells and may also enhance the radiosensitivity of those cells that survive the heat treatment. Clinically, the possible use of hyperthermia as an adjuvant in the radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer needs the understanding of mechanisms that underlay heat-induced cell death and radiosensitization. By in vitro heating of established human (HeLaS3) and rodent (Ehrlich Ascites Tumor and LM fibroblast) cell lines, both killing and radiosensitization were investigated. (author). 1067 refs.; 76 figs.; 19 tabs

  10. Influence of collagen type II and nucleus pulposus cells on aggregation and differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Z.F.; Zandieh Doulabi, B.; Wuisman, P.I.; Bank, R.A.; Helder, M.N.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue microenvironment plays a critical role in guiding local stem cell differentiation. Within the intervertebral disc, collagen type II and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells are two major components. This study aimed to investigate how collagen type II and NP cells affect adipose tissue-derived stem

  11. Linking abnormal mitosis to the acquisition of DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellman, David

    2012-01-01

    Cellular defects that impair the fidelity of mitosis promote chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy. Increasing evidence reveals that errors in mitosis can also promote the direct and indirect acquisition of DNA damage and chromosome breaks. Consequently, deregulated cell division can devastate the integrity of the normal genome and unleash a variety of oncogenic stimuli that may promote transformation. Recent work has shed light on the mechanisms that link abnormal mitosis with the development of DNA damage, how cells respond to such affronts, and the potential impact on tumorigenesis. PMID:23229895

  12. Robust Nucleus/Cell Detection and Segmentation in Digital Pathology and Microscopy Images: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fuyong; Yang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Digital pathology and microscopy image analysis is widely used for comprehensive studies of cell morphology or tissue structure. Manual assessment is labor intensive and prone to inter-observer variations. Computer-aided methods, which can significantly improve the objectivity and reproducibility, have attracted a great deal of interest in recent literatures. Among the pipeline of building a computer-aided diagnosis system, nucleus or cell detection and segmentation play a very important role to describe the molecular morphological information. In the past few decades, many efforts have been devoted to automated nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the recent state-of-the-art nucleus/cell segmentation approaches on different types of microscopy images including bright-field, phase-contrast, differential interference contrast (DIC), fluorescence, and electron microscopies. In addition, we discuss the challenges for the current methods and the potential future work of nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. PMID:26742143

  13. The plant cell nucleus: a true arena for the fight between plants and pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandes, Laurent; Rivas, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Communication between the cytoplasm and the nucleus is a fundamental feature shared by both plant and animal cells. Cellular factors involved in the transport of macromolecules through the nuclear envelope, including nucleoporins, importins and Ran-GTP related components, are conserved among a variety of eukaryotic systems. Interestingly, mutations in these nuclear components compromise resistance signalling, illustrating the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking in plant innate immunity. Indeed, spatial restriction of defence regulators by the nuclear envelope and stimulus-induced nuclear translocation constitute an important level of defence-associated gene regulation in plants. A significant number of effectors from different microbial pathogens are targeted to the plant cell nucleus. In addition, key host factors, including resistance proteins, immunity components, transcription factors and transcriptional regulators shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, and their level of nuclear accumulation determines the output of the defence response, further confirming the crucial role played by the nucleus during the interaction between plants and pathogens. Here, we discuss recent findings that situate the nucleus at the frontline of the mutual recognition between plants and invading microbes.

  14. Mitosis as an anti-cancer target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, A; Medema, R H

    2011-06-23

    Most of the current drugs used to treat cancer can be classified as anti-proliferative drugs. These drugs perturb the proliferative cycle of tumor cells at diverse stages of the cell cycle. Examples of such drugs are DNA-damaging agents and inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases that arrest cell cycle progression at different stages of interphase. Another class of anti-proliferative drugs is the so-called anti-mitotic drugs, which selectively perturb progression through mitosis. Mitosis is the shortest and final stage in the cell cycle and has evolved to accurately divide the duplicated genome over the two daughter cells. This review deals with the different strategies that are currently considered to perturb mitotic progression in the treatment of cancer.

  15. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Interphase Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte

  16. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models, which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte

  17. Sorcin Links Calcium Signaling to Vesicle Trafficking, Regulates Polo-Like Kinase 1 and Is Necessary for Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalioti, Vasiliki S.; Ilari, Andrea; O'Connell, David J.; Poser, Elena; Sandoval, Ignacio V.; Colotti, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Sorcin, a protein overexpressed in many multi-drug resistant cancers, dynamically localizes to distinct subcellular sites in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts during cell-cycle progression. During interphase sorcin is in the nucleus, in the plasma membrane, in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cisternae, and in ER-derived vesicles localized along the microtubules. These vesicles are positive to RyR, SERCA, calreticulin and Rab10. At the beginning of mitosis, sorcin-containing vesicles associate with the mitotic spindle, and during telophase are concentrated in the cleavage furrow and, subsequently, in the midbody. Sorcin regulates dimensions and calcium load of the ER vesicles by inhibiting RYR and activating SERCA. Analysis of sorcin interactome reveals calcium-dependent interactions with many proteins, including Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), Aurora A and Aurora B kinases. Sorcin interacts physically with PLK1, is phosphorylated by PLK1 and induces PLK1 autophosphorylation, thereby regulating kinase activity. Knockdown of sorcin results in major defects in mitosis and cytokinesis, increase in the number of rounded polynucleated cells, blockage of cell progression in G2/M, apoptosis and cell death. Sorcin regulates calcium homeostasis and is necessary for the activation of mitosis and cytokinesis. PMID:24427308

  18. Releasing dentate nucleus cells from Purkinje cell inhibition generates output from the cerebrocerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ishikawa

    Full Text Available The cerebellum generates its vast amount of output to the cerebral cortex through the dentate nucleus (DN that is essential for precise limb movements in primates. Nuclear cells in DN generate burst activity prior to limb movement, and inactivation of DN results in cerebellar ataxia. The question is how DN cells become active under intensive inhibitory drive from Purkinje cells (PCs. There are two excitatory inputs to DN, mossy fiber and climbing fiber collaterals, but neither of them appears to have sufficient strength for generation of burst activity in DN. Therefore, we can assume two possible mechanisms: post-inhibitory rebound excitation and disinhibition. If rebound excitation works, phasic excitation of PCs and a concomitant inhibition of DN cells should precede the excitation of DN cells. On the other hand, if disinhibition plays a primary role, phasic suppression of PCs and activation of DN cells should be observed at the same timing. To examine these two hypotheses, we compared the activity patterns of PCs in the cerebrocerebellum and DN cells during step-tracking wrist movements in three Japanese monkeys. As a result, we found that the majority of wrist-movement-related PCs were suppressed prior to movement onset and the majority of wrist-movement-related DN cells showed concurrent burst activity without prior suppression. In a minority of PCs and DN cells, movement-related increases and decreases in activity, respectively, developed later. These activity patterns suggest that the initial burst activity in DN cells is generated by reduced inhibition from PCs, i.e., by disinhibition. Our results indicate that suppression of PCs, which has been considered secondary to facilitation, plays the primary role in generating outputs from DN. Our findings provide a new perspective on the mechanisms used by PCs to influence limb motor control and on the plastic changes that underlie motor learning in the cerebrocerebellum.

  19. Adequacy of herniated disc tissue as a cell source for nucleus pulposus regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegewald, Aldemar A; Endres, Michaela; Abbushi, Alexander; Cabraja, Mario; Woiciechowsky, Christian; Schmieder, Kirsten; Kaps, Christian; Thomé, Claudius

    2011-02-01

    The object of this study was to characterize the regenerative potential of cells isolated from herniated disc tissue obtained during microdiscectomy. The acquired data could help to evaluate the feasibility of these cells for autologous disc cell transplantation. From each of 5 patients (mean age 45 years), tissue from the nucleus pulposus compartment as well as from herniated disc was obtained separately during microdiscectomy of symptomatic herniated lumbar discs. Cells were isolated, and in vitro cell expansion for cells from herniated disc tissue was accomplished using human serum and fibroblast growth factor-2. For 3D culture, expanded cells were loaded in a fibrin-hyaluronan solution on polyglycolic acid scaffolds for 2 weeks. The formation of disc tissue was documented by histological staining of the extracellular matrix as well as by gene expression analysis of typical disc marker genes. Cells isolated from herniated disc tissue showed significant signs of dedifferentiation and degeneration in comparison with cells from tissue of the nucleus compartment. With in vitro cell expansion, further dedifferentiation with distinct suppression of major matrix molecules, such as aggrecan and Type II collagen, was observed. Unlike in previous reports of cells from the nucleus compartment, the cells from herniated disc tissue showed only a weak redifferentiation process in 3D culture. However, propidium iodide/fluorescein diacetate staining documented that 3D assembly of these cells in polyglycolic acid scaffolds allows prolonged culture and high viability. Study results suggested a very limited regenerative potential for cells harvested from herniated disc tissue. Further research on 2 major aspects in patient selection is suggested before conducting reasonable clinical trials in this matter: 1) diagnostic strategies to predict the regenerative potential of harvested cells at a radiological or cell biology level, and 2) clinical assessment strategies to elucidate the

  20. Dynamics of the mitochondrial network during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanfer, Gil; Kornmann, Benoît

    2016-04-15

    During mitosis, cells undergo massive deformation and reorganization, impacting on all cellular structures. Mitochondria, in particular, are highly dynamic organelles, which constantly undergo events of fission, fusion and cytoskeleton-based transport. This plasticity ensures the proper distribution of the metabolism, and the proper inheritance of functional organelles. During cell cycle, mitochondria undergo dramatic changes in distribution. In this review, we focus on the dynamic events that target mitochondria during mitosis. We describe how the cell-cycle-dependent microtubule-associated protein centromeric protein F (Cenp-F) is recruited to mitochondria by the mitochondrial Rho GTPase (Miro) to promote mitochondrial transport and re-distribution following cell division. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  1. Raman spectroscopy for DNA quantification in cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okotrub, K A; Surovtsev, N V; Semeshin, V F; Omelyanchuk, L V

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the feasibility of a novel approach to quantify DNA in cell nuclei. This approach is based on spectroscopy analysis of Raman light scattering, and avoids the problem of nonstoichiometric binding of dyes to DNA, as it directly measures the signal from DNA. Quantitative analysis of nuclear DNA contribution to Raman spectrum could be reliably performed using intensity of a phosphate mode at 1096 cm(-1) . When compared to the known DNA standards from cells of different animals, our results matched those values at error of 10%. We therefore suggest that this approach will be useful to expand the list of DNA standards, to properly adjust the duration of hydrolysis in Feulgen staining, to assay the applicability of fuchsines for DNA quantification, as well as to measure DNA content in cells with complex hydrolysis patterns, when Feulgen densitometry is inappropriate. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  2. Communication Between the Cell Membrane and the Nucleus: Role of Protein Compartmentalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelievre, Sophie A; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-10-21

    Understanding how the information is conveyed from outside to inside the cell is a critical challenge for all biologists involved in signal transduction. The flow of information initiated by cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix contacts is mediated by the formation of adhesion complexes involving multiple proteins. Inside adhesion complexes, connective membrane skeleton (CMS) proteins are signal transducers that bind to adhesion molecules, organize the cytoskeleton, and initiate biochemical cascades. Adhesion complex-mediated signal transduction ultimately directs the formation of supramolecular structures in the cell nucleus, as illustrated by the establishment of multi complexes of DNA-bound transcription factors, and the redistribution of nuclear structural proteins to form nuclear subdomains. Recently, several CMS proteins have been observed to travel to the cell nucleus, suggesting a distinctive role for these proteins in signal transduction. This review focuses on the nuclear translocation of structural signal transducers of the membrane skeleton and also extends our analysis to possible translocation of resident nuclear proteins to the membrane skeleton. This leads us to envision the communication between spatially distant cellular compartments (i.e., membrane skeleton and cell nucleus) as a bidirectional flow of information (a dynamic reciprocity) based on subtle multilevel structural and biochemical equilibria. At one level, it is mediated by the interaction between structural signal transducers and their binding partners, at another level it may be mediated by the balance and integration of signal transducers in different cellular compartments.

  3. Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Coupled with Nuclear Localization Signal Peptide for Cell-Nucleus Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G.; Chin, Y. Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-01-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe3O4 nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear locali...

  4. Dual mode of cell death upon the photo-irradiation of a Ru(II) polypyridyl complex in interphase or mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pierroz, Vanessa; Rubbiani, Riccardo; Gentili, Christian; Patra, Malay; Mari, Cristina; Gasser, Gilles; Ferrari, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive, complementary medical technique to chemotherapy. Among the different photosensitizers (PSs) employed, Ru(ii) polypyridyl complexes were found to be valid substitutes to porphyrin-based or phthalocyanine-based PSs. Here, we confirm that one such complex, namely [Ru(bipy)2-dppz-7-methoxy][PF6]2 (Ru65), which localizes in the nucleus of various cancer and normal cells, displays cytotoxicity only upon UV-A irradiation. Importantly, we disclose the mole...

  5. HEK293 cells express dystrophin Dp71 with nucleus-specific localization of Dp71ab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Atsushi; Yasuno, Sato; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Awano, Hiroyuki; Lee, Tomoko; Niba, Emma Tabe Eko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Hisahide; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    The dystrophin gene consists of 79 exons and encodes tissue-specific isoforms. Mutations in the dystrophin gene cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy, of which a substantial proportion of cases are complicated by non-progressive mental retardation. Abnormalities of Dp71, an isoform transcribed from a promoter in intron 62, are a suspected cause of mental retardation. However, the roles of Dp71 in human brain have not been fully elucidated. Here, we characterized dystrophin in human HEK293 cells with the neuronal lineage. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification of the full-length dystrophin transcript revealed the absence of fragments covering the 5' part of the dystrophin cDNA. In contrast, fragments covering exons 64-79 were present. The Dp71 promoter-specific exon G1 was shown spliced to exon 63. We demonstrated that the Dp71 transcript comprised two subisoforms: one lacking exon 78 (Dp71b) and the other lacking both exons 71 and 78 (Dp71ab). Western blotting of cell lysates using an antibody against the dystrophin C-terminal region revealed two bands, corresponding to Dp71b and Dp71ab. Immunohistochemical examination with the dystrophin antibody revealed scattered punctate signals in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Western blotting revealed one band corresponding to Dp71b in the cytoplasm and two bands corresponding to Dp71b and Dp71ab in the nucleus, with Dp71b being predominant. These results indicated that Dp71ab is a nucleus-specific subisoform. We concluded that Dp71, comprising Dp71b and Dp71ab, was expressed exclusively in HEK293 cells and that Dp71ab was specifically localized to the nucleus. Our findings suggest that Dp71ab in the nucleus contributes to the diverse functions of HEK293 cells.

  6. Genome accessibility is widely preserved and locally modulated during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Chris C-S; Morrissey, Christapher S; Udugama, Maheshi; Frank, Christopher L; Keller, Cheryl A; Baek, Songjoon; Giardine, Belinda; Crawford, Gregory E; Sung, Myong-Hee; Hardison, Ross C; Blobel, Gerd A

    2015-02-01

    Mitosis entails global alterations to chromosome structure and nuclear architecture, concomitant with transient silencing of transcription. How cells transmit transcriptional states through mitosis remains incompletely understood. While many nuclear factors dissociate from mitotic chromosomes, the observation that certain nuclear factors and chromatin features remain associated with individual loci during mitosis originated the hypothesis that such mitotically retained molecular signatures could provide transcriptional memory through mitosis. To understand the role of chromatin structure in mitotic memory, we performed the first genome-wide comparison of DNase I sensitivity of chromatin in mitosis and interphase, using a murine erythroblast model. Despite chromosome condensation during mitosis visible by microscopy, the landscape of chromatin accessibility at the macromolecular level is largely unaltered. However, mitotic chromatin accessibility is locally dynamic, with individual loci maintaining none, some, or all of their interphase accessibility. Mitotic reduction in accessibility occurs primarily within narrow, highly DNase hypersensitive sites that frequently coincide with transcription factor binding sites, whereas broader domains of moderate accessibility tend to be more stable. In mitosis, proximal promoters generally maintain their accessibility more strongly, whereas distal regulatory elements tend to lose accessibility. Large domains of DNA hypomethylation mark a subset of promoters that retain accessibility during mitosis and across many cell types in interphase. Erythroid transcription factor GATA1 exerts site-specific changes in interphase accessibility that are most pronounced at distal regulatory elements, but has little influence on mitotic accessibility. We conclude that features of open chromatin are remarkably stable through mitosis, but are modulated at the level of individual genes and regulatory elements. © 2015 Hsiung et al.; Published by

  7. Opposing actions of the progesterone metabolites, 5alpha-dihydroprogesterone (5alphaP) and 3alpha-dihydroprogesterone (3alphaHP) on mitosis, apoptosis, and expression of Bcl-2, Bax and p21 in human breast cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, John P; Beausoleil, Michel; Zhang, Guihua; Cialacu, Valentin

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that breast tissues and breast cell lines convert progesterone (P) to 5alpha-dihydroprogesterone (5alphaP) and 3alpha-dihydroprogesterone (3alphaHP) and that 3alphaHP suppresses, whereas 5alphaP promotes, cell proliferation and detachment. The objectives of the current studies were to determine if the 5alphaP- and 3alphaHP-induced changes in cell numbers are due to altered rates of mitosis and/or apoptosis, and if 3alphaHP and 5alphaP act on tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells, regardless of estrogen (E) and P receptor status. The studies were conducted on tumorigenic (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, T47D) and non-tumorigenic (MCF-10A) human breast cell lines, employing several methods to assess the effects of the hormones on cell proliferation, mitosis, apoptosis and expression of Bcl-2, Bax and p21. In all four cell lines, 5alphaP increased, whereas 3alphaHP decreased cell numbers, [(3)H]thymidine uptake and mitotic index. Apoptosis was stimulated by 3alphaHP and suppressed by 5alphaP. 5alphaP resulted in increases in Bcl-2/Bax ratio, indicating decreased apoptosis; 3alphaHP resulted in decreases in Bcl-2/Bax ratio, indicating increased apoptosis. The effects of either 3alphaHP or 5alphaP on cell numbers, [(3)H]thymidine uptake, mitosis, apoptosis, and Bcl-2/Bax ratio, were abrogated when cells were treated simultaneously with both hormones. The expression of p21 was increased by 3alphaHP, and was unaffected by 5alphaP. The results provide the first evidence that 5alphaP stimulates mitosis and suppresses apoptosis, whereas 3alphaHP inhibits mitosis and stimulates apoptosis. The opposing effects of 5alphaP and 3alphaHP were observed in all four breast cell lines examined and the data suggest that all breast cancers (estrogen-responsive and unresponsive) might be suppressed by blocking 5alphaP formation and/or increasing 3alphaHP. The findings further support the hypothesis that progesterone metabolites are key regulatory hormones and that changes

  8. Mobilisation of satellite cells following ischaemia and reperfusion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    occupied by the nucleus was only marginally reduced from. 60% to 55%. The plasmalemmae of the two cells remained approximately 30 nm apart. While satellite cell mitosis was not visualised, 2 of the 6 cells in this group contained centrioles. (Fig. 3). Cytoplasmic organelles were morphologically similar to those quiescent ...

  9. In situ mechanical characterization of the cell nucleus by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haijiao; Wen, Jun; Xiao, Yun; Liu, Jun; Hopyan, Sevan; Radisic, Milica; Simmons, Craig A; Sun, Yu

    2014-04-22

    The study of nuclear mechanical properties can provide insights into nuclear dynamics and its role in cellular mechanotransduction. While several methods have been developed to characterize nuclear mechanical properties, direct intracellular probing of the nucleus in situ is challenging. Here, a modified AFM (atomic force microscopy) needle penetration technique is demonstrated to mechanically characterize cell nuclei in situ. Cytoplasmic and nuclear stiffness were determined based on two different segments on the AFM indentation curves and were correlated with simultaneous confocal Z-stack microscopy reconstructions. On the basis of direct intracellular measurement, we show that the isolated nuclei from fibroblast-like cells exhibited significantly lower Young's moduli than intact nuclei in situ. We also show that there is in situ nucleus softening in the highly metastatic bladder cancer cell line T24 when compared to its less metastatic counterpart RT4. This technique has potential to become a reliable quantitative measurement tool for intracellular mechanics studies.

  10. Monodisperse magnetite nanoparticles coupled with nuclear localization signal peptide for cell-nucleus targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G; Chin, Y Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-03-07

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. These NLS-coated nanoparticles were introduced into the HeLa cell cytoplasm and nucleus, where the particles were monodispersed and non-aggregated. The success of labeling was examined and identified by fluorescence microscopy and MRI. The work demonstrates that monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles can be readily functionalized and stabilized for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  11. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Ryu [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Mizuno, Rie [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazunori, E-mail: watanabe@ric.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Ijiri, Kenichi [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  12. Distinct chromatin environment associated with phosphorylated H3S10 histone during pollen mitosis I in orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Santosh Kumar; Yamamoto, Maki; Mukai, Yasuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Pollen developmental pathway in plants involving synchronized transferal of cellular divisions from meiosis (microsporogenesis) to mitosis (pollen mitosis I/II) eventually offers a unique "meiosis-mitosis shift" at pollen mitosis I. Since the cell type (haploid microspore) and fate of pollen mitosis I differ from typical mitosis (in meristem cells), it is immensely important to analyze the chromosomal distribution of phosphorylated H3S10 histone during atypical pollen mitosis I to comprehend the role of histone phosphorylation in pollen development. We investigated the chromosomal phosphorylation of H3S10 histone during pollen mitosis I in orchids using immunostaining technique. The chromosomal distribution of H3S10ph during pollen mitosis I revealed differential pattern than that of typical mitosis in plants, however, eventually following the similar trends of mitosis in animals where H3S10 phosphorylation begins in the pericentromeric regions first, later extending to the whole chromosomes, and finally declining at anaphase/early cytokinesis (differentiation of vegetative and generative cells). The study suggests that the chromosomal distribution of H3S10ph during cell division is not universal and can be altered between different cell types encoded for diverse cellular processes. During pollen development, phosphorylation of histone might play a critical role in chromosome condensation events throughout pollen mitosis I in plants.

  13. Promyelocytic leukemia bodies tether to early endosomes during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palibrk, Vuk; Lång, Emma; Lång, Anna; Schink, Kay Oliver; Rowe, Alexander D; Bøe, Stig Ove

    2014-01-01

    During mitosis the nuclear envelope breaks down, leading to potential interactions between cytoplasmic and nuclear components. PML bodies are nuclear structures with tumor suppressor and antiviral functions. Early endosomes, on the other hand, are cytoplasmic vesicles involved in transport and growth factor signaling. Here we demonstrate that PML bodies form stable interactions with early endosomes immediately following entry into mitosis. The 2 compartments remain stably associated throughout mitosis and dissociate in the cytoplasm of newly divided daughter cells. We also show that a minor subset of PML bodies becomes anchored to the mitotic spindle poles during cell division. The study demonstrates a stable mitosis-specific interaction between a cytoplasmic and a nuclear compartment.

  14. Inter-chromosomal gene regulation in the mammalian cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Wouter; Grosveld, Frank

    2007-10-01

    Cellular phenotypes can critically rely on mono-allelic gene expression. Recent studies suggest that in mammalian cells inter-chromosomal DNA interactions may mediate the decision which allele to activate and which to silence. Here, these findings are discussed in the context of knowledge on gene competition, chromatin dynamics, and nuclear organization. We argue that data obtained by 4C technology strongly support the idea that chromatin folds according to self-organizing principles. In this concept, the nuclear positioning of a given locus is probabilistic as it also depends on the properties of neighbouring DNA segments and, by extrapolation, the whole chromosome. The linear distribution of repetitive DNA sequences and of active and inactive DNA regions is important for the folding and relative positioning of chromosomes. This stochastic concept of nuclear organization predicts that tissue-specific interactions between two selected loci present on different chromosomes will be rare.

  15. Direct projection from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to hypophysiotrophic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus demonstrated...

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, N.; Larsen, P.J.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry......Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry...

  16. Imaging and quantification of amyloid fibrillation in the cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnhold, Florian; Scharf, Andrea; von Mikecz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Xenobiotics, as well as intrinsic processes such as cellular aging, contribute to an environment that constantly challenges nuclear organization and function. While it becomes increasingly clear that proteasome-dependent proteolysis is a major player, the topology and molecular mechanisms of nuclear protein homeostasis remain largely unknown. We have shown previously that (1) proteasome-dependent protein degradation is organized in focal microenvironments throughout the nucleoplasm and (2) heavy metals as well as nanoparticles induce nuclear protein fibrillation with amyloid characteristics. Here, we describe methods to characterize the landscape of intranuclear amyloid on the global and local level in different systems such as cultures of mammalian cells and the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Application of discrete mathematics to imaging data is introduced as a tool to develop pattern recognition of intracellular protein fibrillation. Since stepwise fibrillation of otherwise soluble proteins to insoluble amyloid-like protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative protein-misfolding disorders including Alzheimer's disease, CAG repeat diseases, and the prion encephalopathies, investigation of intracellular amyloid may likewise aid to a better understanding of the pathomechanisms involved. We consider aggregate profiling as an important experimental approach to determine if nuclear amyloid has toxic or protective roles in various disease processes.

  17. Testing of mitosis and meiosis in female and male gametes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Kurilo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Method of quantitative evaluation of the immature germ cells, their pathology in mitosis and meiosis (in semen, embryo and fetal ovaries, of gonad biopsies or fragments of sectioned material is informative method and should be introduced into the clinical practice in andrology and gynecology and fundamental research. Quantitative analysis of mitosis and female meiosis development was initiated on experimental animals and fetal gonads from spontaneous or therapeutic abortions.

  18. Testing of mitosis and meiosis in female and male gametes

    OpenAIRE

    L. F. Kurilo; S. Sh. Khayat

    2016-01-01

    Method of quantitative evaluation of the immature germ cells, their pathology in mitosis and meiosis (in semen, embryo and fetal ovaries, of gonad biopsies or fragments of sectioned material) is informative method and should be introduced into the clinical practice in andrology and gynecology and fundamental research. Quantitative analysis of mitosis and female meiosis development was initiated on experimental animals and fetal gonads from spontaneous or therapeutic abortions.

  19. The small molecule inhibitor YK-4-279 disrupts mitotic progression of neuroblastoma cells, overcomes drug resistance and synergizes with inhibitors of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollareddy, Madhu; Sherrard, Alice; Park, Ji Hyun; Szemes, Marianna; Gallacher, Kelli; Melegh, Zsombor; Oltean, Sebastian; Michaelis, Martin; Cinatl, Jindrich; Kaidi, Abderrahmane; Malik, Karim

    2017-09-10

    Neuroblastoma is a biologically and clinically heterogeneous pediatric malignancy that includes a high-risk subset for which new therapeutic agents are urgently required. As well as MYCN amplification, activating point mutations of ALK and NRAS are associated with high-risk and relapsing neuroblastoma. As both ALK and RAS signal through the MEK/ERK pathway, we sought to evaluate two previously reported inhibitors of ETS-related transcription factors, which are transcriptional mediators of the Ras-MEK/ERK pathway in other cancers. Here we show that YK-4-279 suppressed growth and triggered apoptosis in nine neuroblastoma cell lines, while BRD32048, another ETV1 inhibitor, was ineffective. These results suggest that YK-4-279 acts independently of ETS-related transcription factors. Further analysis reveals that YK-4-279 induces mitotic arrest in prometaphase, resulting in subsequent cell death. Mechanistically, we show that YK-4-279 inhibits the formation of kinetochore microtubules, with treated cells showing a broad range of abnormalities including multipolar, fragmented and unseparated spindles, together leading to disrupted progression through mitosis. Notably, YK-4-279 does not affect microtubule acetylation, unlike the conventional mitotic poisons paclitaxel and vincristine. Consistent with this, we demonstrate that YK-4-279 overcomes vincristine-induced resistance in two neuroblastoma cell-line models. Furthermore, combinations of YK-4-279 with vincristine, paclitaxel or the Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237/Alisertib show strong synergy, particularly at low doses. Thus, YK-4-279 could potentially be used as a single-agent or in combination therapies for the treatment of high-risk and relapsing neuroblastoma, as well as other cancers. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Protective effect of cannabidiol on hydrogen peroxide‑induced apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress in nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Hou, Chen; Chen, Xin; Wang, Dong; Yang, Pinglin; He, Xijing; Zhou, Jinsong; Li, Haopeng

    2016-09-01

    Cannabidiol, a major component of marijuana, protects nerves, and exerts antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory and anti‑anxiety effects. In the current study, the protective effect of cannabidiol was observed to prevent hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress in nucleus pulposus cells. Nucleus pulposus cells were isolated from rats and cultured in vitro, and H2O2 was used to construct the nucleus pulposus cell model. Cell viability of the nucleus pulposus cells was assessed using a 3‑(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The ratio of apoptotic cells, and caspase‑3 or cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX‑2) mRNA expression was analyzed by annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium‑iodide staining and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The quantities of interleukin (IL)‑1β and interleukin‑6 were measured using a series of assay kits. B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression levels were analyzed using western blotting. The present study identified that cannabidiol enhanced cell viability and reduced apoptosis in H2O2‑treated nucleus pulposus cells in vitro using a lumbar disc herniation (LDH) model. In addition, cannabidiol reduced caspase‑3 gene expression and augmented the Bcl‑2 protein expression levels in the nucleus pulposus cells following H2O2 exposure. Pre‑treatment with cannabidiol suppressed the promotion of COX‑2, iNOS, IL‑1β and IL‑6 expression in the nucleus pulposus cells following H2O2 exposure. Taken together, these results suggest that cannabidiol potentially exerts its protective effect on LDH via the suppression of anti‑apoptosis, anti‑inflammation and anti‑oxidative activities in nucleus pulposus cells.

  1. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-09-01

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  2. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei, E-mail: biehzw@nus.edu.sg [Optical Bioimaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-09-08

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  3. Resistance to paclitaxel in hepatoma cells is related to static JNK activation and prohibition into entry of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sunyoung; Kim, Young Bae; Lee, Jong-Soo; Cho, Hyeseong

    2012-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) generally shows chemoresistant features to anticancer agents. Paclitaxel has been clinically used in the treatment of various cancers. However, effect of paclitaxel on HCC has not been adequately addressed. Here, we found two categories of hepatoma cells in response to paclitaxel. Paclitaxel effectively decreased the cell viability of SNU475, Hep3B, and SNU387 HCC cells and Chang liver cells (death prone). In contrast, the other five hepatoma cell lines (SNU449, SNU398, SUN368, SNU354, and HepG2 cells) were resistant to paclitaxel (death reluctant). In response to paclitaxel, Bcl-2 was highly phosphorylated in death-prone cells, whereas much less Bcl-2 was phosphorylated in death-reluctant cells. Cotreatment with SP600125, an inhibitor JNK, significantly reduced the phosphorylated Bcl-2 in death-prone cells and caused a significant reduction in cell death. The reduced cell death was due to prohibition into mitotic entry as evidenced by low cyclin B(1)/Cdk1 kinase activity. In death-reluctant cells, inbuild-phospho-JNK levels were high but no longer activated in response to paclitaxel. We found that paclitaxel combined with caffeine or UCN-01, inhibitors of G(2) DNA damage checkpoint, was able to partially overcome resistance to paclitaxel in these cells. Thus our data provide the molecular basis of paclitaxel resistance in hepatoma cells, and appropriate combination therapy may increase treatment efficacy.

  4. Barley disease susceptibility factor RACB acts in epidermal cell polarity and positioning of the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Björn; Schnepf, Vera; Galgenmüller, Carolina; Ranf, Stefanie; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    RHO GTPases are regulators of cell polarity and immunity in eukaryotes. In plants, RHO-like RAC/ROP GTPases are regulators of cell shaping, hormone responses, and responses to microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) RAC/ROP protein RACB is required for full susceptibility to penetration by Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh), the barley powdery mildew fungus. Disease susceptibility factors often control host immune responses. Here we show that RACB does not interfere with early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses such as the oxidative burst or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. RACB also supports rather than restricts expression of defence-related genes in barley. Instead, silencing of RACB expression by RNAi leads to defects in cell polarity. In particular, initiation and maintenance of root hair growth and development of stomatal subsidiary cells by asymmetric cell division is affected by silencing expression of RACB. Nucleus migration is a common factor of developmental cell polarity and cell-autonomous interaction with Bgh RACB is required for positioning of the nucleus near the site of attack from Bgh We therefore suggest that Bgh profits from RACB's function in cell polarity rather than from immunity-regulating functions of RACB. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  5. Export of Precursor tRNAIle from the Nucleus to the Cytoplasm in Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wei

    Full Text Available In the current concept, tRNA maturation in vertebrate cells, including splicing of introns, trimming of 5' leader and 3' trailer, and adding of CCA, is thought to occur exclusively in the nucleus. Here we provide evidence to challenge this concept. Unspliced intron-containing precursor tRNAIle was identified in Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 virions, which are synthesized in the cytoplasm. Northern blot, confocal microscopy and quantitative RT-PCR further verified enrichment of this unspliced tRNAIle within the cytoplasm in human cells. In addition to containing an intron, the cytoplasmic precursor tRNAIle also contains a short incompletely processed 5´ leader and a 3´ trailer, which abundance is around 1000 fold higher than the nuclear precursor tRNAIle with long 5' leader and long 3' trailer. In vitro data also suggest that the cytoplasmic unspliced end-immature precursor tRNAIle could be processed by short isoform of RNase Z, but not long isoform of RNase Z. These data suggest that precursor tRNAs could export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in human cells, instead of be processed only in the nucleus.

  6. A hyperactive transcriptional state marks genome reactivation at the mitosis-G1 transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Chris C-S; Bartman, Caroline R; Huang, Peng; Ginart, Paul; Stonestrom, Aaron J; Keller, Cheryl A; Face, Carolyne; Jahn, Kristen S; Evans, Perry; Sankaranarayanan, Laavanya; Giardine, Belinda; Hardison, Ross C; Raj, Arjun; Blobel, Gerd A

    2016-06-15

    During mitosis, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and many transcription factors dissociate from chromatin, and transcription ceases globally. Transcription is known to restart in bulk by telophase, but whether de novo transcription at the mitosis-G1 transition is in any way distinct from later in interphase remains unknown. We tracked Pol II occupancy genome-wide in mammalian cells progressing from mitosis through late G1. Unexpectedly, during the earliest rounds of transcription at the mitosis-G1 transition, ∼50% of active genes and distal enhancers exhibit a spike in transcription, exceeding levels observed later in G1 phase. Enhancer-promoter chromatin contacts are depleted during mitosis and restored rapidly upon G1 entry but do not spike. Of the chromatin-associated features examined, histone H3 Lys27 acetylation levels at individual loci in mitosis best predict the mitosis-G1 transcriptional spike. Single-molecule RNA imaging supports that the mitosis-G1 transcriptional spike can constitute the maximum transcriptional activity per DNA copy throughout the cell division cycle. The transcriptional spike occurs heterogeneously and propagates to cell-to-cell differences in mature mRNA expression. Our results raise the possibility that passage through the mitosis-G1 transition might predispose cells to diverge in gene expression states. © 2016 Hsiung et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Synthesis, structural studies, and cytotoxic evaluation of novel ursolic acid hybrids with capabilities to arrest breast cancer cells in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattnaik, Banita; Lakshmi, Jerripothula K; Kavitha, Rachineni; Jagadeesh, Bharatam; Bhattacharjee, Debanjan; Jain, Nishant; Mallavadhani, Uppuluri V

    2017-03-01

    Some novel chemically modified frameworks of ursolic acid have been designed and synthesized. The key step was the cycloaddition of azidopropyl-3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oate with the appropriate C28 propargyl esters of ursolic, corosolic, asiatic, oleanolic, and betulinic acid under Click reaction conditions, and the products were obtained in 74-84% yields. In view of their intriguing structural diversity, they have been subjected to detailed 1D and 2D NMR studies and their structures are thoroughly assigned. The synthesized compounds were screened for their anticancer potential against two human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 & MDA-MB-231) using sulforhodamine B cell proliferation assay. The GI 50 data revealed that the synthesized compounds exhibit highly potent activities against the two tested cell lines. Interestingly, the synthesized compounds showed selectivity and higher activity against MDA-MB-231 cell line than MCF-7. Among the tested compounds, compound 17 is the most potent one with GI 50 value of 1.4 ± 0.1 μM and showed 2.9 times more activity than the standard doxorubicin against MDA-MB-231. In addition, 17 arrests cells in mitotic phase of cell cycle, resulting in a change in cell phenotype. In view of the selective and highly promising activity against breast cancer cell lines, these compounds can serve as promising leads for further development.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum generates calcium signalling microdomains around the nucleus and spindle in syncytial Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, H; McDougall, A; Whitaker, M

    2006-06-01

    Cell cycle calcium signals are generated by inositol trisphosphate-mediated release of calcium from internal stores [Ciapa, Pesando, Wilding and Whitaker (1994) Nature (London) 368, 875-878; Groigno and Whitaker (1998) Cell 92, 193-204]. The major internal calcium store is the ER (endoplasmic reticulum): the spatial organization of the ER during mitosis is important in defining a microdomain around the nucleus and mitotic spindle in early Drosophila embryos [Parry, McDougall and Whitaker (2005) J. Cell Biol. 171, 47-59]. Nuclear divisions in syncytial Drosophila embryos are accompanied by both cortical and nuclear localized calcium transients. Mitosis is prevented by the InsP(3) antagonists Xestospongin C and heparin. Nuclear-localized transients and cortical transients rely on extraembryonic calcium, suggesting that ER calcium levels are maintained by calcium influx.

  9. Spatial Reorganization of the Endoplasmic Reticulum during Mitosis Relies on Mitotic Kinase Cyclin A in the Early Drosophila Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zane J.; Mclaurin, Justin D.; Eritano, Anthony S.; Johnson, Brittany M.; Sims, Amanda Q.; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope. PMID:25689737

  10. Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis Persists during Unperturbed Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia K. Tacheva-Grigorova

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available How does mitosis influence the critical process of endocytosis? Some experiments lead to the conclusion that endocytosis arrests completely during mitosis, whereas others indicate that endocytosis persists. We have resolved this apparent discrepancy by showing how conditions of the experiment influence its outcome. The dynamics of clathrin-coated pit formation and the uptake of transferrin are maintained in naturally dividing cells but are nearly absent in mitotic cells arrested chemically by treatment with nocodazole, S-Trityl-L-cysteine, or RO-3306. Moreover, sequentially incubating cells at 4°C and then shifting them to 37°C or to serum starvation artificially increases the amount of transferrin receptor at the surface of naturally dividing cells, leading to the incorrect conclusion that endocytosis has ceased during mitosis. Thus, our data show that endocytosis is unaffected during all stages of natural cell division.

  11. MiR-509-3-5p causes aberrant mitosis and anti-proliferative effect by suppression of PLK1 in human lung cancer A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Hui; Lu, Yao; Liang, Jing-Jing; Cao, Ji-Xiang; Jin, Ya-Qiong; An, Guo-Shun; Ni, Ju-Hua; Jia, Hong-Ti; Li, Shu-Yan

    2016-09-16

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potent post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and play roles in DNA damage response (DDR). PLK1 is identified as a modulator of DNA damage checkpoint. Although down-regulation of PLK1 by certain microRNAs has been reported, little is known about the interplay between PLK1 and miR-509-3-5p in DDR. Here we have demonstrated that miR-509-3-5p repressed PLK1 expression by targeting PLK1 3'-UTR, thereby causing mitotic aberration and growth arrest of human lung cancer A549 cells. Repression of PLK1 by miR-509-3-5p was further evidenced by over-expression of miR-509-3-5p in A549, HepG2 and HCT116p53(-/-) cancer cells, in which PLK1 protein was suppressed. Consistently, miR-509-3-5p was stimulated, while PLK1 protein was down-regulated in A549 cells exposed to CIS and ADR, suggesting that suppression of PLK1 by miR-509-3-5p is a component of CIS/ADR-induced DDR pathway. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence labeling showed that over-expression of miR-509-3-5p in A549 induced G2/M arrest and aberrant mitosis characterized by abnormal bipolar mitotic spindles, condensed chromosomes, lagging DNA and chromosome bridges. In addition, over-expression of miR-509-3-5p markedly blocked A549 cell proliferation and sensitized the cells to CIS and ADR treatment. Taken together, miR-509-3-5p is a feasible suppressor for cancer by targeting PLK1. Our data may provide aid in potential design of combined chemotherapy and in our better understanding of the roles of microRNAs in response to DNA damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nucleocytoplasmic protein translocation during mitosis in the social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Budniak, Aldona

    2015-02-01

    Mitosis is a fundamental and essential life process. It underlies the duplication and survival of all cells and, as a result, all eukaryotic organisms. Since uncontrolled mitosis is a dreaded component of many cancers, a full understanding of the process is critical. Evolution has led to the existence of three types of mitosis: closed, open, and semi-open. The significance of these different mitotic species, how they can lead to a full understanding of the critical events that underlie the asexual duplication of all cells, and how they may generate new insights into controlling unregulated cell division remains to be determined. The eukaryotic microbe Dictyostelium discoideum has proved to be a valuable biomedical model organism. While it appears to utilize closed mitosis, a review of the literature suggests that it possesses a form of mitosis that lies in the middle between truly open and fully closed mitosis-it utilizes a form of semi-open mitosis. Here, the nucleocytoplasmic translocation patterns of the proteins that have been studied during mitosis in the social amoebozoan D. discoideum are detailed followed by a discussion of how some of them provide support for the hypothesis of semi-open mitosis. © 2014 The Authors. Biological Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  13. Mechanical response and buckling of a polymer simulation model of the cell nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banigan, Edward; Stephens, Andrew; Marko, John

    The cell nucleus must robustly resist extra- and intracellular forces to maintain genome architecture. Micromanipulation experiments measuring nuclear mechanical response reveal that the nucleus has two force response regimes: a linear short-extension response due to the chromatin interior and a stiffer long-extension response from lamin A, comprising the intermediate filament protein shell. To explain these results, we developed a quantitative simulation model with realistic parameters for chromatin and the lamina. Our model predicts that crosslinking between chromatin and the lamina is essential for responding to small strains and that changes to the interior topological organization can alter the mechanical response of the whole nucleus. Thus, chromatin polymer elasticity, not osmotic pressure, is the dominant regulator of this force response. Our model reveals a novel buckling transition for polymer shells: as force increases, the shell buckles transverse to the applied force. This transition, which arises from topological constrains in the lamina, can be mitigated by tuning the properties of the chromatin interior. Thus, we find that the genome is a resistive mechanical element that can be tuned by its organization and connectivity to the lamina.

  14. Translocation of the papillomavirus L2/vDNA complex across the limiting membrane requires the onset of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calton, Christine M; Bronnimann, Matthew P; Manson, Ariana R; Li, Shuaizhi; Chapman, Janice A; Suarez-Berumen, Marcela; Williamson, Tatum R; Molugu, Sudheer K; Bernal, Ricardo A; Campos, Samuel K

    2017-05-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L2 protein acts as a chaperone to ensure that the viral genome (vDNA) traffics from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and eventually the nucleus, where HPV replication occurs. En route to the nucleus, the L2/vDNA complex must translocate across limiting intracellular membranes. The details of this critical process remain poorly characterized. We have developed a system based on subcellular compartmentalization of the enzyme BirA and its cognate substrate to detect membrane translocation of L2-BirA from incoming virions. We find that L2 translocation requires transport to the TGN and is strictly dependent on entry into mitosis, coinciding with mitotic entry in synchronized cells. Cell cycle arrest causes retention of L2/vDNA at the TGN; only release and progression past G2/M enables translocation across the limiting membrane and subsequent infection. Microscopy of EdU-labeled vDNA reveals a rapid and dramatic shift in vDNA localization during early mitosis. At late G2/early prophase vDNA egresses from the TGN to a pericentriolar location, accumulating there through prometaphase where it begins to associate with condensed chromosomes. By metaphase and throughout anaphase the vDNA is seen bound to the mitotic chromosomes, ensuring distribution into both daughter nuclei. Mutations in a newly defined chromatin binding region of L2 potently blocked translocation, suggesting that translocation is dependent on chromatin binding during prometaphase. This represents the first time a virus has been shown to functionally couple the penetration of limiting membranes to cellular mitosis, explaining in part the tropism of HPV for mitotic basal keratinocytes.

  15. Translocation of the papillomavirus L2/vDNA complex across the limiting membrane requires the onset of mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Calton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 L2 protein acts as a chaperone to ensure that the viral genome (vDNA traffics from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN and eventually the nucleus, where HPV replication occurs. En route to the nucleus, the L2/vDNA complex must translocate across limiting intracellular membranes. The details of this critical process remain poorly characterized. We have developed a system based on subcellular compartmentalization of the enzyme BirA and its cognate substrate to detect membrane translocation of L2-BirA from incoming virions. We find that L2 translocation requires transport to the TGN and is strictly dependent on entry into mitosis, coinciding with mitotic entry in synchronized cells. Cell cycle arrest causes retention of L2/vDNA at the TGN; only release and progression past G2/M enables translocation across the limiting membrane and subsequent infection. Microscopy of EdU-labeled vDNA reveals a rapid and dramatic shift in vDNA localization during early mitosis. At late G2/early prophase vDNA egresses from the TGN to a pericentriolar location, accumulating there through prometaphase where it begins to associate with condensed chromosomes. By metaphase and throughout anaphase the vDNA is seen bound to the mitotic chromosomes, ensuring distribution into both daughter nuclei. Mutations in a newly defined chromatin binding region of L2 potently blocked translocation, suggesting that translocation is dependent on chromatin binding during prometaphase. This represents the first time a virus has been shown to functionally couple the penetration of limiting membranes to cellular mitosis, explaining in part the tropism of HPV for mitotic basal keratinocytes.

  16. Bacterial mitosis: partitioning protein ParA oscillates in spiral-shaped structures and positions plasmids at mid-cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2004-01-01

    The par2 locus of Escherichia coli plasmid pB171 encodes oscillating ATPase ParA, DNA binding protein ParB and two cis-acting DNA regions to which ParB binds (parC1 and parC2). Three independent techniques were used to investigate the subcellular localization of plasmids carrying par2. In cells w...

  17. Analysis of mitosis and antimitotic drug responses in tumors by in vivo microscopy and single-cell pharmacodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orth, James D; Kohler, Rainer H; Foijer, Floris; Sorger, Peter K; Weissleder, Ralph; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Cancer relies upon frequent or abnormal cell division, but how the tumor microenvironment affects mitotic processes in vivo remains unclear, largely due to the technical challenges of optical access, spatial resolution, and motion. We developed high-resolution in vivo microscopy methods to visualize

  18. Systematic Analysis of the Crosstalk between Mitosis and DNA Damage by a Live Cell siRNA Screen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronni Sølvhøi

    . The relative proportion and crosstalk between these causative versus consequent genome-destabilizing events remains elusive. The aim of this thesis was to assess the relationship between DNA damage and mitotic perturbations. Using large-scale, real-time siRNA screens and a live cell imaging approach...

  19. Unsuccessful mitosis in multicellular tumour spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Annie; Couvet, Morgane; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2017-04-25

    Multicellular spheroids are very attractive models in oncology because they mimic the 3D organization of the tumour cells with their microenvironment. We show here using 3 different cell types (mammary TSA/pc, embryonic kidney Hek293 and cervical cancer HeLa), that when the cells are growing as spheroids the frequency of binucleated cells is augmented as occurs in some human tumours.We therefore describe mitosis in multicellular spheroids by following mitotic markers and by time-lapse experiments. Chromosomes alignment appears to be correct on the metaphasic plate and the passenger complex is well localized on centromere. Moreover aurora kinases are fully active and histone H3 is phosphorylated on Ser 10. Consequently, the mitotic spindle checkpoint is satisfied and, anaphase proceeds as illustrated by the transfer of survivin on the spindle and by the segregation of the two lots of chromosomes. However, the segregation plane is not well defined and oscillations of the dividing cells are observed. Finally, cytokinesis fails and the absence of separation of the two daughter cells gives rise to binucleated cells.Division orientation is specified during interphase and persists throughout mitosis. Our data indicate that the cancer cells, in multicellular spheroids, lose their ability to regulate their orientation, a feature commonly encountered in tumours.Moreover, multicellular spheroid expansion is still sensitive to mitotic drugs as pactlitaxel and aurora kinase inhibitors. The spheroids thus represent a highly relevant model for studying drug efficiency in tumours.

  20. Influence of recipient cytoplasm cell stage on transcription in bovine nucleus transfer embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, S. D.; Soloy, E.; Kanka, J.

    1996-01-01

    Nucleus transfer for the production of multiple embryos derived from a donor embryo relies upon the reprogramming of the donor nucleus so that it behaves similar to a zygotic nucleus. One indication of nucleus reprogramming is the RNA synthetic activity. In normal bovine embryogenesis, the embryo...

  1. Nuclear anarchy: asynchronous mitosis in multinucleated fungal hyphae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladfelter, Amy S

    2006-12-01

    Multinucleated cells are found in diverse contexts and include filamentous fungi, developing insect embryos, skeletal muscle and metastasizing tumor cells. Some multinucleated cells such as those in muscles arise from cell fusion events, but many are formed through specialized cell cycles in which nuclear and cell division are uncoupled. Recent work in the fungus Ashbya gossypii illustrates how unique spatial and temporal regulation of conserved cell cycle regulators directs mitosis in multinucleated cells.

  2. The Functional Role of TopBP1 in DNA Maintenance at Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard

    When cells traverse mitosis, genome integrity of the emerging daughter cells is dependent on replication of the entire genome during the preceding S-phase and accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis. Replication stress may cause cells to enter mitosis with underreplicated loci, consisting...... can lead to anaphase bridges that impair accurate chromosome segregation. The recent decade featured many advances in our understanding of how cells cope with underreplicated loci in mitosis. A major advance was the description of ultra-fine anaphase bridges (UFBs), a class of anaphase bridges...... established Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study anaphase bridges, and we identified Dpb11/TopBP1 as a novel UFB-associated protein in yeast and avian DT40 cells, respectively. TopBP1 localized to confined areas on replication-stress induced UFBs. Upon onset of mitosis we observed a burst...

  3. The role of model organisms in the history of mitosis research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2014-09-02

    Mitosis is a cell-cycle stage during which condensed chromosomes migrate to the middle of the cell and segregate into two daughter nuclei before cytokinesis (cell division) with the aid of a dynamic mitotic spindle. The history of mitosis research is quite long, commencing well before the discovery of DNA as the repository of genetic information. However, great and rapid progress has been made since the introduction of recombinant DNA technology and discovery of universal cell-cycle control. A large number of conserved eukaryotic genes required for the progression from early to late mitotic stages have been discovered, confirming that DNA replication and mitosis are the two main events in the cell-division cycle. In this article, a historical overview of mitosis is given, emphasizing the importance of diverse model organisms that have been used to solve fundamental questions about mitosis. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  4. Is the Cell Nucleus a Necessary Component in Precise Temporal Patterning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Albert

    Full Text Available One of the functions of the cell nucleus is to help regulate gene expression by controlling molecular traffic across the nuclear envelope. Here we investigate, via stochastic simulation, what effects, if any, does segregation of a system into the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments have on the stochastic properties of a motif with a negative feedback. One of the effects of the nuclear barrier is to delay the nuclear protein concentration, allowing it to behave in a switch-like manner. We found that this delay, defined as the time for the nuclear protein concentration to reach a certain threshold, has an extremely narrow distribution. To show this, we considered two models. In the first one, the proteins could diffuse freely from cytoplasm to nucleus (simple model; and in the second one, the proteins required assistance from a special class of proteins called importins. For each model, we generated fifty parameter sets, chosen such that the temporal profiles they effectuated were very similar, and whose average threshold time was approximately 150 minutes. The standard deviation of the threshold times computed over one hundred realizations were found to be between 1.8 and 7.16 minutes across both models. To see whether a genetic motif in a prokaryotic cell can achieve this degree of precision, we also simulated five variations on the coherent feed-forward motif (CFFM, three of which contained a negative feedback. We found that the performance of these motifs was nowhere near as impressive as the one found in the eukaryotic cell; the best standard deviation was 6.6 minutes. We argue that the significance of these results, the fact and necessity of spatio-temporal precision in the developmental stages of eukaryotes, and the absence of such a precision in prokaryotes, all suggest that the nucleus has evolved, in part, under the selective pressure to achieve highly predictable phenotypes.

  5. Onuf's nucleus X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1981-01-01

    in the length of the nucleus was observed. Based on the cytoarchitecture the nucleus could be divided in three parts, a cranial, a dorsomedial and a ventrolateral. All parts of the nucleus consisted of chromatin-rich medium-sized neurons, and apparent direct appositions between different cells bodies as well...

  6. Folded genome as a platform for the functional compartmentalization of the eukaryotic cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioudinkova E. S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In a number of recent studies a tight interconnection between the spatial organization of the eukaryotic genome and its functioning has been demonstrated. Moreover, it is becoming evident that the folded DNA by itself consti- tutes an important, if not the key, factor supporting the internal nuclear organization. In this review, we will discuss the current state of chromatin research with the special attention focused on chromosome territories, chromatin folding and dynamics, chromatin domains, transcription and replication factories. Based on this analysis we will show how interphase chromosomes define the assembly of different nuclear compartments and underlie the spatial compartmentalization of the cell nucleus.

  7. N-Cadherin Maintains the Healthy Biology of Nucleus Pulposus Cells under High-Magnitude Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Leng, Jiali; Zhao, Yuguang; Yu, Dehai; Xu, Feng; Song, Qingxu; Qu, Zhigang; Zhuang, Xinming; Liu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical load can regulate disc nucleus pulposus (NP) biology in terms of cell viability, matrix homeostasis and cell phenotype. N-cadherin (N-CDH) is a molecular marker of NP cells. This study investigated the role of N-CDH in maintaining NP cell phenotype, NP matrix synthesis and NP cell viability under high-magnitude compression. Rat NP cells seeded on scaffolds were perfusion-cultured using a self-developed perfusion bioreactor for 5 days. NP cell biology in terms of cell apoptosis, matrix biosynthesis and cell phenotype was studied after the cells were subjected to different compressive magnitudes (low- and high-magnitudes: 2% and 20% compressive deformation, respectively). Non-loaded NP cells were used as controls. Lentivirus-mediated N-CDH overexpression was used to further investigate the role of N-CDH under high-magnitude compression. The 20% deformation compression condition significantly decreased N-CDH expression compared with the 2% deformation compression and control conditions. Meanwhile, 20% deformation compression increased the number of apoptotic NP cells, up-regulated the expression of Bax and cleaved-caspase-3 and down-regulated the expression of Bcl-2, matrix macromolecules (aggrecan and collagen II) and NP cell markers (glypican-3, CAXII and keratin-19) compared with 2% deformation compression. Additionally, N-CDH overexpression attenuated the effects of 20% deformation compression on NP cell biology in relation to the designated parameters. N-CDH helps to restore the cell viability, matrix biosynthesis and cellular phenotype of NP cells under high-magnitude compression. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. N-Cadherin Maintains the Healthy Biology of Nucleus Pulposus Cells under High-Magnitude Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Mechanical load can regulate disc nucleus pulposus (NP biology in terms of cell viability, matrix homeostasis and cell phenotype. N-cadherin (N-CDH is a molecular marker of NP cells. This study investigated the role of N-CDH in maintaining NP cell phenotype, NP matrix synthesis and NP cell viability under high-magnitude compression. Methods: Rat NP cells seeded on scaffolds were perfusion-cultured using a self-developed perfusion bioreactor for 5 days. NP cell biology in terms of cell apoptosis, matrix biosynthesis and cell phenotype was studied after the cells were subjected to different compressive magnitudes (low- and high-magnitudes: 2% and 20% compressive deformation, respectively. Non-loaded NP cells were used as controls. Lentivirus-mediated N-CDH overexpression was used to further investigate the role of N-CDH under high-magnitude compression. Results: The 20% deformation compression condition significantly decreased N-CDH expression compared with the 2% deformation compression and control conditions. Meanwhile, 20% deformation compression increased the number of apoptotic NP cells, up-regulated the expression of Bax and cleaved-caspase-3 and down-regulated the expression of Bcl-2, matrix macromolecules (aggrecan and collagen II and NP cell markers (glypican-3, CAXII and keratin-19 compared with 2% deformation compression. Additionally, N-CDH overexpression attenuated the effects of 20% deformation compression on NP cell biology in relation to the designated parameters. Conclusion: N-CDH helps to restore the cell viability, matrix biosynthesis and cellular phenotype of NP cells under high-magnitude compression.

  9. Cocaine Exposure Reorganizes Cell-Type and Input-Specific Connectivity in the Nucleus Accumbens

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAskill, Andrew F.; Cassel, John M.; Carter, Adam G.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cocaine alters the structural and functional properties of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc). These changes suggest a rewiring of the NAc circuit, with an enhancement of excitatory synaptic connections onto MSNs. However, it is unknown how drug exposure alters the balance of long-range afferents onto different cell types in the NAc. Here we use whole-cell recordings, two-photon microscopy, optogenetics and pharmacogenetics to show how repeated cocaine alters connectivity in the mouse NAc medial shell. We first determine that cocaine selectively enhances amygdala innervation of D1-MSNs relative to D2-MSNs. We then show that amygdala activity is required for cocaine-induced changes to behavior and connectivity. Finally, we establish how heightened amygdala innervation can explain the structural and functional changes induced by cocaine. Our findings reveal how exposure to drugs of abuse fundamentally reorganizes cell-type and input-specific connectivity in the NAc. PMID:25108911

  10. Primary immune system responders to nucleus pulposus cells: evidence for immune response in disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Murai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although intervertebral disc herniation and associated sciatica is a common disease, its molecular pathogenesis is not well understood. Immune responses are thought to be involved. This study provides direct evidence that even non-degenerated nucleus pulposus (NP cells elicit immune responses. An in vitro colony forming inhibition assay demonstrated the suppressive effects of autologous spleen cells on NP cells and an in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed the positive cytotoxic effects of natural killer (NK cells and macrophages on NP cells. Non-degenerated rat NP tissues transplanted into wild type rats and immune-deficient mice demonstrated a significantly higher NP cell survival rate in immune-deficient mice. Immunohistochemical staining showed the presence of macrophages and NK cells in the transplanted NP tissues. These results suggest that even non-degenerated autologous NP cells are recognized by macrophages and NK cells, which may have an immunological function in the early phase of disc herniation. These findings contribute to understanding resorption and the inflammatory reaction to disc herniation.

  11. Mitotic bookmarking in development and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festuccia, Nicola; Gonzalez, Inma; Owens, Nick; Navarro, Pablo

    2017-10-15

    The changes imposed on the nucleus, chromatin and its regulators during mitosis lead to the dismantlement of most gene regulatory processes. However, an increasing number of transcriptional regulators are being identified as capable of binding their genomic targets during mitosis. These so-called 'mitotic bookmarking factors' encompass transcription factors and chromatin modifiers that are believed to convey gene regulatory information from mother to daughter cells. In this Primer, we review mitotic bookmarking processes in development and stem cells and discuss the interest and potential importance of this concept with regard to epigenetic regulation and cell fate transitions involving cellular proliferation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Gaussian fluctuation of the diffusion exponent of virus capsid in a living cell nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itto, Yuichi

    2018-05-01

    In their work [4], Bosse et al. experimentally showed that virus capsid exhibits not only normal diffusion but also anomalous diffusion in nucleus of a living cell. There, it was found that the distribution of fluctuations of the diffusion exponent characterizing them takes the Gaussian form, which is, quite remarkably, the same form for two different types of the virus. This suggests high robustness of such fluctuations. Here, the statistical property of local fluctuations of the diffusion exponent of the virus capsid in the nucleus is studied. A maximum-entropy-principle approach (originally proposed for a different virus in a different cell) is applied for obtaining the fluctuation distribution of the exponent. Largeness of the number of blocks identified with local areas of interchromatin corrals is also examined based on the experimental data. It is shown that the Gaussian distribution of the local fluctuations can be derived, in accordance with the above form. In addition, it is quantified how the fluctuation distribution on a long time scale is different from the Gaussian distribution.

  13. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals widespread full phosphorylation site occupancy during mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Brunak, Søren; Olsen, JV

    2010-01-01

    ) or CDK2 were almost fully phosphorylated in mitotic cells. In particular, nuclear proteins and proteins involved in regulating metabolic processes have high phosphorylation site occupancy in mitosis. This suggests that these proteins may be inactivated by phosphorylation in mitotic cells....

  14. Turning rice meiosis into mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieulet, Delphine; Jolivet, Sylvie; Rivard, Maud; Cromer, Laurence; Vernet, Aurore; Mayonove, Pauline; Pereira, Lucie; Droc, Gaëtan; Courtois, Brigitte; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Mercier, Raphael

    2016-11-01

    Introduction of clonal reproduction through seeds (apomixis) in crops has the potential to revolutionize agriculture by allowing self-propagation of any elite variety, in particular F1 hybrids. In the sexual model plant Arabidopsis thaliana synthetic clonal reproduction through seeds can be artificially implemented by (i) combining three mutations to turn meiosis into mitosis (MiMe) and (ii) crossing the obtained clonal gametes with a line expressing modified CENH3 and whose genome is eliminated in the zygote. Here we show that additional combinations of mutations can turn Arabidopsis meiosis into mitosis and that a combination of three mutations in rice (Oryza sativa) efficiently turns meiosis into mitosis, leading to the production of male and female clonal diploid gametes in this major crop. Successful implementation of the MiMe technology in the phylogenetically distant eudicot Arabidopsis and monocot rice opens doors for its application to any flowering plant and paves the way for introducing apomixis in crop species.

  15. DNA precursor compartmentation in mammalian cells: distribution and rates of equilibration between nucleus and cytoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeds, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    A rapid nuclear isolation technique was adapted in order to examine the question of DNA precursor compartmentation in mammalian cells. By using this method a reproducible proportion of the cellular nucleotides remained associated with the isolated nuclei. Examination, at several different cell densities, of exponentially growing HeLa cells showed that the nuclei contained a constant but distinct proportion of each dNTP. The nuclear dATP and dTTP concentrations were equal at all densities examined even though the dTTP pool was 150% of the dATP whole-cell pool. The nuclear portion of the whole-cell pools was roughly equal to the volume occupied by the nucleus. The nuclear-cytoplasmic dNTP pool distribution did not change throughout the cell cycle of synchronized Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The rates at which either radiolabeled cytidine or deoxycytidine equilibrated with the nuclear and whole-cell dCTP pools of G1 and S phase CHO cells were compared. Experiments comparing the labeling kinetics of 3 H-thymidine in G1, S phase, and exponentially growing cells revealed that the S phase dTTP pool equilibrated with exogenously added thymidine faster than the G1 phase pool. The rate of equilibration in exponentially growing cells appeared to be a combination of that seen in G1 and S phases. A linear rate of 3 H-thymidine incorporation into DNA occurred at the same rate in S phase and exponentially growing cells

  16. Recruitment of glutathione into the nucleus during cell proliferation adjusts whole-cell redox homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana and lowers the oxidative defence shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Dong, Yingping; Ziegler, Kerstin; Markovic, Jelena; Pallardó, Federico V; Pellny, Till K; Verrier, Paul J; Foyer, Christine H

    2010-12-01

    Cellular redox homeostasis and signalling are important in progression of the eukaryotic cell cycle. In animals, the low-molecular-weight thiol tripeptide glutathione (GSH) is recruited into the nucleus early in the cell proliferation cycle. To determine whether a similar process occurs in plants, we studied cell proliferation in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that GSH co-localizes with nuclear DNA during the proliferation of A. thaliana cells in culture. Moreover, GSH localization in the nucleus was observed in dividing pericycle cells of the lateral root meristem. There was pronounced accumulation of GSH in the nucleus at points in the growth cycle at which a high percentage of the cells were in G(1) phase, as identified by flow cytometry and marker transcripts. Recruitment of GSH into the nucleus led to a high abundance of GSH in the nucleus (GSHn) and severe depletion of the cytoplasmic GSH pool (GSHc). Sequestration of GSH in the nucleus was accompanied by significant decreases in transcripts associated with oxidative signalling and stress tolerance, and an increase in the abundance of hydrogen peroxide, an effect that was enhanced when the dividing cells were treated with salicylic acid. Total cellular GSH and the abundance of GSH1 and GSH2 transcripts increased after the initial recruitment of GSH into the nucleus. We conclude that GSH recruitment into the nucleus during cell proliferation has a profound effect on the whole-cell redox state. High GSHn levels trigger redox adjustments in the cytoplasm, favouring decreased oxidative signalling and enhanced GSH synthesis. © 2010 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Retinal ganglion cell projections to the hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus, intergeniculate leaflet, and visual midbrain: bifurcation and melanopsin immunoreactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Blanchard, Jane H.; Provencio, Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) receives direct retinal input via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT), and the retinal ganglion cells contributing to this projection may be specialized with respect to direct regulation of the circadian clock. However, some ganglion cells forming the RHT bifurcate, sending axon collaterals to the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) through which light has secondary access to the circadian clock. The present studies provide a more extensive examination of ganglion cell bifurcation and evaluate whether ganglion cells projecting to several subcortical visual nuclei contain melanopsin, a putative ganglion cell photopigment. The results showed that retinal ganglion cells projecting to the SCN send collaterals to the IGL, olivary pretectal nucleus, and superior colliculus, among other places. Melanopsin-immunoreactive (IR) ganglion cells are present in the hamster retina, and some of these cells project to the SCN, IGL, olivary pretectal nucleus, or superior colliculus. Triple-label analysis showed that melanopsin-IR cells bifurcate and project bilaterally to each SCN, but not to the other visual nuclei evaluated. The melanopsin-IR cells have photoreceptive characteristics optimal for circadian rhythm regulation. However, the presence of moderately widespread bifurcation among ganglion cells projecting to the SCN, and projection by melanopsin-IR cells to locations distinct from the SCN and without known rhythm function, suggest that this ganglion cell type is generalized, rather than specialized, with respect to the conveyance of photic information to the brain. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. EphB4 localises to the nucleus of prostate cancer cells

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    Mertens-Walker, Inga, E-mail: inga.mertenswalker@qut.edu.au [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD (Australia); Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre—Queensland, Translational Research Institute, 37 Kent Street, Woolloongabba 4102, QLD (Australia); Lisle, Jessica E. [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD (Australia); Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre—Queensland, Translational Research Institute, 37 Kent Street, Woolloongabba 4102, QLD (Australia); Nyberg, William A. [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD (Australia); Stephens, Carson R. [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD (Australia); Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre—Queensland, Translational Research Institute, 37 Kent Street, Woolloongabba 4102, QLD (Australia); Burke, Leslie [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD (Australia); Rutkowski, Raphael; Herington, Adrian C.; Stephenson, Sally-Anne [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD (Australia); Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre—Queensland, Translational Research Institute, 37 Kent Street, Woolloongabba 4102, QLD (Australia)

    2015-04-10

    The EphB4 receptor tyrosine kinase is over-expressed in a variety of different epithelial cancers including prostate where it has been shown to be involved in survival, migration and angiogenesis. We report here that EphB4 also resides in the nucleus of prostate cancer cell lines. We used in silico methods to identify a bipartite nuclear localisation signal (NLS) in the extracellular domain and a monopartite NLS sequence in the intracellular kinase domain of EphB4. To determine whether both putative NLS sequences were functional, fragments of the EphB4 sequence containing each NLS were cloned to create EphB4NLS-GFP fusion proteins. Localisation of both NLS-GFP proteins to the nuclei of transfected cells was observed, demonstrating that EphB4 contains two functional NLS sequences. Mutation of the key amino residues in both NLS sequences resulted in diminished nuclear accumulation. As nuclear translocation is often dependent on importins we confirmed that EphB4 and importin-α can interact. To assess if nuclear EphB4 could be implicated in gene regulatory functions potential EphB4-binding genomic loci were identified using chromatin immunoprecipitation and Lef1 was confirmed as a potential target of EphB4-mediated gene regulation. These novel findings add further complexity to the biology of this important cancer-associated receptor. - Highlights: • The EphB4 protein can be found in the nucleus of prostate cancer cell lines. • EphB4 contains two functional nuclear localisation signals. • Chromatin immunoprecipitation has identified potential genome sequences to which EphB4 binds. • Lef1 is a confirmed target for EphB4-mediated gene regulation.

  19. EphB4 localises to the nucleus of prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens-Walker, Inga; Lisle, Jessica E.; Nyberg, William A.; Stephens, Carson R.; Burke, Leslie; Rutkowski, Raphael; Herington, Adrian C.; Stephenson, Sally-Anne

    2015-01-01

    The EphB4 receptor tyrosine kinase is over-expressed in a variety of different epithelial cancers including prostate where it has been shown to be involved in survival, migration and angiogenesis. We report here that EphB4 also resides in the nucleus of prostate cancer cell lines. We used in silico methods to identify a bipartite nuclear localisation signal (NLS) in the extracellular domain and a monopartite NLS sequence in the intracellular kinase domain of EphB4. To determine whether both putative NLS sequences were functional, fragments of the EphB4 sequence containing each NLS were cloned to create EphB4NLS-GFP fusion proteins. Localisation of both NLS-GFP proteins to the nuclei of transfected cells was observed, demonstrating that EphB4 contains two functional NLS sequences. Mutation of the key amino residues in both NLS sequences resulted in diminished nuclear accumulation. As nuclear translocation is often dependent on importins we confirmed that EphB4 and importin-α can interact. To assess if nuclear EphB4 could be implicated in gene regulatory functions potential EphB4-binding genomic loci were identified using chromatin immunoprecipitation and Lef1 was confirmed as a potential target of EphB4-mediated gene regulation. These novel findings add further complexity to the biology of this important cancer-associated receptor. - Highlights: • The EphB4 protein can be found in the nucleus of prostate cancer cell lines. • EphB4 contains two functional nuclear localisation signals. • Chromatin immunoprecipitation has identified potential genome sequences to which EphB4 binds. • Lef1 is a confirmed target for EphB4-mediated gene regulation

  20. The Stimulatory Effect of Notochordal Cell-Conditioned Medium in a Nucleus Pulposus Explant Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Stefan A H; van Doeselaar, Marina; Meij, Björn P; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Ito, Keita

    2016-01-01

    Notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) has previously shown to have a stimulatory effect on nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in alginate and pellet cultures. These culture methods provide a different environment than the nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue, in which the NCCM ultimately should exert its effect. The objective of this study is to test whether NCCM stimulates NPCs within their native environment, and whether combined stimulation with NCCM and addition of BMSCs has a synergistic effect on extracellular matrix production. Bovine NP tissue was cultured in an artificial annulus in base medium (BM), porcine NCCM, or BM supplemented with 1 μg/mL Link N. Furthermore, BM and NCCM samples were injected with 10(6) BMSCs per NP sample. Samples were cultured for 4 weeks, and analyzed for biochemical contents (water, glycosaminoglycan [GAG], hydroxyproline, and DNA), gene expression (COL1A1, COL2A1, ACAN, and SOX9), and histology by Safranin O/Fast Green staining. Culture in NCCM resulted in increased proteoglycan content compared to day 0 and BM, similar to Link N. However, only minor differences in gene expression compared to day 0 were observed. Addition of BMSCs did not result in increased GAG content, and surprisingly, DNA content in BMSC-injected groups was not higher than in the other groups after 4 weeks of culture. This study shows that, indeed, NCCM is capable of stimulating NPC matrix production within the NP environment. The lack of increased DNA content in the BMSC-injected groups indicates that BMSCs have died over time. Identification of the bioactive factors in NCCM is crucial for further development of an NCCM-based treatment for intervertebral disc regeneration.

  1. Increased expression of stefin B in the nucleus of T98G astrocytoma cells delays caspase activation

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    Tao eSun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stefin B (cystatin B is an endogenous inhibitor of cysteine proteinases localized in the nucleus and the cytosol. Loss-of-function mutations in the stefin B gene (CSTB gene were reported in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease (EPM1. Our previous results showed that thymocytes isolated from stefin B-deficient mice are more sensitive to apoptosis induced by the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporin (STS than the wild-type control cells. We have also shown that the increased expression of stefin B in the nucleus of T98G astrocytoma cells delayed cell cycle progression through the S phase. In the present study we examined if the nuclear or cytosolic functions of stefin B are responsible for the accelerated induction of apoptosis observed in the cells from stefin B-deficient mice. We have shown that the overexpression of stefin B in the nucleus, but not in the cytosol of astrocytoma T98G cells, delayed caspase-3 and-7 activation. Pretreatment of cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe-fluoromethylketone completely inhibited caspase activation, while treatment with the inhibitor of calpains- and papain-like cathepsins (2S,3S-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-3-methyl-butane ethyl ester did not prevent caspase activation. We concluded that the delay of caspase activation in T98G cells overexpressing stefin B in the nucleus is independent of cathepsin inhibition.

  2. Single-Cell Gene Expression Analysis of Cholinergic Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hoon Jeong

    Full Text Available The cholinoceptive system in the hypothalamus, in particular in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, plays a role in regulating food intake. Neurons in the ARC contain multiple neuropeptides, amines, and neurotransmitters. To study molecular and neurochemical heterogeneity of ARC neurons, we combine single-cell qRT-PCR and single-cell whole transcriptome amplification methods to analyze expression patterns of our hand-picked 60 genes in individual neurons in the ARC. Immunohistochemical and single-cell qRT-PCR analyses show choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-expressing neurons in the ARC. Gene expression patterns are remarkably distinct in each individual cholinergic neuron. Two-thirds of cholinergic neurons express tyrosine hydroxylase (Th mRNA. A large subset of these Th-positive cholinergic neurons is GABAergic as they express the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase and vesicular GABA transporter transcripts. Some cholinergic neurons also express the vesicular glutamate transporter transcript gene. POMC and POMC-processing enzyme transcripts are found in a subpopulation of cholinergic neurons. Despite this heterogeneity, gene expression patterns in individual cholinergic cells appear to be highly regulated in a cell-specific manner. In fact, membrane receptor transcripts are clustered with their respective intracellular signaling and downstream targets. This novel population of cholinergic neurons may be part of the neural circuitries that detect homeostatic need for food and control the drive to eat.

  3. Calcium Circadian Rhythmicity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: Cell Autonomy and Network Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Takako; Leise, Tanya L; Kingsbury, Nathaniel J; Diemer, Tanja; Wang, Lexie L; Henson, Michael A; Welsh, David K

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of mammalian physiology and behavior are coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus. Within SCN neurons, various aspects of cell physiology exhibit circadian oscillations, including circadian clock gene expression, levels of intracellular Ca 2+ ([Ca 2+ ] i ), and neuronal firing rate. [Ca 2+ ] i oscillates in SCN neurons even in the absence of neuronal firing. To determine the causal relationship between circadian clock gene expression and [Ca 2+ ] i rhythms in the SCN, as well as the SCN neuronal network dependence of [Ca 2+ ] i rhythms, we introduced GCaMP3, a genetically encoded fluorescent Ca 2+ indicator, into SCN neurons from PER2::LUC knock-in reporter mice. Then, PER2 and [Ca 2+ ] i were imaged in SCN dispersed and organotypic slice cultures. In dispersed cells, PER2 and [Ca 2+ ] i both exhibited cell autonomous circadian rhythms, but [Ca 2+ ] i rhythms were typically weaker than PER2 rhythms. This result matches the predictions of a detailed mathematical model in which clock gene rhythms drive [Ca 2+ ] i rhythms. As predicted by the model, PER2 and [Ca 2+ ] i rhythms were both stronger in SCN slices than in dispersed cells and were weakened by blocking neuronal firing in slices but not in dispersed cells. The phase relationship between [Ca 2+ ] i and PER2 rhythms was more variable in cells within slices than in dispersed cells. Both PER2 and [Ca 2+ ] i rhythms were abolished in SCN cells deficient in the essential clock gene Bmal1 . These results suggest that the circadian rhythm of [Ca 2+ ] i in SCN neurons is cell autonomous and dependent on clock gene rhythms, but reinforced and modulated by a synchronized SCN neuronal network.

  4. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  5. Identification of Mitosis-Specific Phosphorylation in Mitotic Chromosome-Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Kimura, Michiko; Takagi, Shunsuke; Toramoto, Iyo; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2016-09-02

    During mitosis, phosphorylation of chromosome-associated proteins is a key regulatory mechanism. Mass spectrometry has been successfully applied to determine the complete protein composition of mitotic chromosomes, but not to identify post-translational modifications. Here, we quantitatively compared the phosphoproteome of isolated mitotic chromosomes with that of chromosomes in nonsynchronized cells. We identified 4274 total phosphorylation sites and 350 mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites in mitotic chromosome-associated proteins. Significant mitosis-specific phosphorylation in centromere/kinetochore proteins was detected, although the chromosomal association of these proteins did not change throughout the cell cycle. This mitosis-specific phosphorylation might play a key role in regulation of mitosis. Further analysis revealed strong dependency of phosphorylation dynamics on kinase consensus patterns, thus linking the identified phosphorylation sites to known key mitotic kinases. Remarkably, chromosomal axial proteins such as non-SMC subunits of condensin, TopoIIα, and Kif4A, together with the chromosomal periphery protein Ki67 involved in the establishment of the mitotic chromosomal structure, demonstrated high phosphorylation during mitosis. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for regulation of chromosome restructuring in mitosis via protein phosphorylation. Our study generated a large quantitative database on protein phosphorylation in mitotic and nonmitotic chromosomes, thus providing insights into the dynamics of chromatin protein phosphorylation at mitosis onset.

  6. Mitosis as an anti-cancer drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Kallio, Marko J

    2013-10-01

    Suppression of cell proliferation by targeting mitosis is one potential cancer intervention. A number of existing chemotherapy drugs disrupt mitosis by targeting microtubule dynamics. While efficacious, these drugs have limitations, i.e. neuropathy, unpredictability and development of resistance. In order to overcome these issues, a great deal of effort has been spent exploring novel mitotic targets including Polo-like kinase 1, Aurora kinases, Mps1, Cenp-E and KSP/Eg5. Here we summarize the latest developments in the discovery and clinical evaluation of new mitotic drug targets.

  7. Regenerative and immunogenic characteristics of cultured nucleus pulposus cells from human cervical intervertebral discs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Stich

    Full Text Available Cell-based regenerative approaches have been suggested as primary or adjuvant procedures for the treatment of degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD diseases. Our aim was to evaluate the regenerative and immunogenic properties of mildly and severely degenerated cervical nucleus pulposus (NP cells with regard to cell isolation, proliferation and differentiation, as well as to cell surface markers and co-cultures with autologous or allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC including changes in their immunogenic properties after 3-dimensional (3D-culture. Tissue from the NP compartment of 10 patients with mild or severe grades of IVD degeneration was collected. Cells were isolated, expanded with and without basic fibroblast growth factor and cultured in 3D fibrin/poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid transplants for 21 days. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR showed the expression of characteristic NP markers ACAN, COL1A1 and COL2A1 in 2D- and 3D-culture with degeneration- and culture-dependent differences. In a 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester-based proliferation assay, NP cells in monolayer, regardless of their grade of degeneration, did not provoke a significant proliferation response in T cells, natural killer (NK cells or B cells, not only with donor PBMC, but also with allogeneic PBMC. In conjunction with low inflammatory cytokine expression, analyzed by Cytometric Bead Array and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS, a low immunogenicity can be assumed, facilitating possible therapeutic approaches. In 3D-culture, however, we found elevated immune cell proliferation levels, and there was a general trend to higher responses for NP cells from severely degenerated IVD tissue. This emphasizes the importance of considering the specific immunological alterations when including biomaterials in a therapeutic concept. The overall expression of Fas receptor, found on cultured NP cells, could have

  8. Melatonin resists oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruijun; Cui, Min; Lin, Hui; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Jiayu; Chen, Songfeng; Shao, Zengwu

    2018-04-15

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) is thought to be the major cause of low back pain (LBP), which is still in lack of effective etiological treatment. Oxidative stress has been demonstrated to participate in the impairment of nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs). As the most important neuroendocrine hormone in biological clock regulation, melatonin (MLT) is also featured by good antioxidant effect. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanisms of melatonin on oxidative stress-induced damage in rat NPCs. Cytotoxicity of H 2 O 2 and protecting effect of melatonin were analyzed with Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8). Cell apoptosis rate was detected by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining. DCFH-DA probe was used for the reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) changes were analyzed with JC-1 probe. Intracellular oxidation product and reductants were measured through enzymatic reactions. Extracellular matrix (ECM) and apoptosis associated proteins were analyzed with Western blot assays. Melatonin preserved cell viability of NPCs under oxidative stress. The apoptosis rate, ROS level and malonaldehyde (MDA) declined with melatonin. MLT/H 2 O 2 group showed higher activities of GSH and SOD. The fall of MMP receded and the expression of ECM protein increased with treatment of melatonin. The mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis was inhibited by melatonin. Melatonin alleviated the oxidative stress-induced apoptosis of NPCs. Melatonin could be a promising alternative in treatment of IVDD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Raptor is phosphorylated by cdc2 during mitosis.

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    Dana M Gwinn

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate control of mitotic entry and exit is reliant on a series of interlocking signaling events that coordinately drive the biological processes required for accurate cell division. Overlaid onto these signals that promote orchestrated cell division are checkpoints that ensure appropriate mitotic spindle formation, a lack of DNA damage, kinetochore attachment, and that each daughter cell has the appropriate complement of DNA. We recently discovered that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK modulates the G2/M phase of cell cycle progression in part through its suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling. AMPK directly phosphorylates the critical mTOR binding partner raptor inhibiting mTORC1 (mTOR-raptor rapamycin sensitive mTOR kinase complex 1. As mTOR has been previously tied to mitotic control, we examined further how raptor may contribute to this process.We have discovered that raptor becomes highly phosphorylated in cells in mitosis. Utilizing tandem mass spectrometry, we identified a number of novel phosphorylation sites in raptor, and using phospho-specific antibodies demonstrated that raptor becomes phosphorylated on phospho-serine/threonine-proline sites in mitosis. A combination of site-directed mutagenesis in a tagged raptor cDNA and analysis with a series of new phospho-specific antibodies generated against different sites in raptor revealed that Serine 696 and Threonine 706 represent two key sites in raptor phosphorylated in mitosis. We demonstrate that the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase cdc2/CDK1 is the kinase responsible for phosphorylating these sites, and its mitotic partner Cyclin B efficiently coimmunoprecipitates with raptor in mitotic cells.This study demonstrates that the key mTOR binding partner raptor is directly phosphorylated during mitosis by cdc2. This reinforces previous studies suggesting that mTOR activity is highly regulated and important for mitotic progression, and points to a direct

  10. Mitosis-specific phosphorylation of PML at T409 regulates spindle checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J; Liu, J

    2016-08-31

    During mitosis, Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs) change dramatically in morphology and composition, but little is known about function of PML in mitosis. Here, we show that PML is phosphorylated at T409 (PML p409) in a mitosis-specific manner. More importantly, PML p409 contributes to maintain the duration of pro-metaphase and regulates spindle checkpoint. Deficient PML p409 caused a shortening of pro-metaphase and challenged the nocodazole-triggered mitotic arrest. T409A mutation led to a higher frequency of misaligned chromosomes on metaphase plate, and subsequently death in late mitosis. In addition, inhibition of PML p409 repressed growth of tumor cells, suggesting that PML p409 is a potential target for cancer therapy. Collectively, our study demonstrated an important phosphorylated site of PML, which contributed to explore the role of PML in mitosis.

  11. Prothymosin alpha interacts with free core histones in the nucleus of dividing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covelo, Guillermo; Sarandeses, Concepción S; Díaz-Jullien, Cristina; Freire, Manuel

    2006-11-01

    The acidic protein prothymosin alpha (ProTalpha), with a broad presence in mammalian cells, has been widely considered to have a role in cell division, through an unrevealed mechanism in which histones may be involved in view of their ability to interact with ProTalpha in vitro. Results of co-immunoprecipitation experiments presented here demonstrate that ProTalpha interacts in vivo with core histones in proliferating B-lymphocytes (NC-37 cells). This interaction occurs with histones H3, H2A, H2B and H4 located free in the nucleoplasm, whereas no interaction was detected with histone H1, mono-nucleosome particles or chromatin. Moreover, the core histones form part of a nuclear multiprotein complex of about 700 kDa separated by ProTalpha-Sepharose affinity, with components including H3 and H4 acetyltranferases, H3 methyltransferases, hnRNP isotypes A3, A2/B1 and R, ATP-dependent and independent DNA helicases II, beta-actin and vimentin, all co-purifying by gel filtration. This indicates that the interaction of ProTalpha with core histones in the nucleus may be related to the structural modification of histones H3 and H4, and hence to chromatin activity, raising the possibility that the other proteins in the nuclear complex may play a role in this process.

  12. Pathologic mitoses and pathology of mitosis in tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RG Steinbeck

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The gist of my hypothesis (.. is a certain abnormal chromatin constitution. Each process, which brings about this chromatin constitution, would result in the origin of a malignant tumour. Certainly, I consider irregularities with mitosis as the normal mode of the origin of an incorrectly assembled nucleus. This statement by Boveri (1914 has considered earlier observations of asymmetric divisions in human cancers (Hansemann, 1890. The hypothesis is based on the understanding of mitosis as an equational bipartition of the hereditary substance (Flemming, 1879; Roux, 1883. Latest since it was known that genes are located on chromosomes (Sturtevant, 1913, their balanced transport in anaphase appeared as a condition of correct somatic proliferation. True mitoses guarantee the constancy of terminally differentiated tissues. Politzer (1934 has performed X-ray experiments to investigate abnormal karyokinesis with regard to anomalous chromatin condensation, chromosome breakage, spindle malformation, and failure in cytokinesis. On the basis of light microscopy, further significant progress in understanding the pathology of mitosis was not possible. Tumour cases with reduced chromosome numbers seduced to the idea that mitotic activity is rather under cytoplasmic than under nuclear control (Koller, 1947.

  13. Comparative proteomics of mitosis and meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravinder; Dhali, Snigdha; Srikanth, Rapole; Ghosh, Santanu Kumar; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2014-09-23

    Precise and timely segregation of genetic material and conservation of ploidy are the two foremost requirements for survival of a eukaryotic organism. Two highly regulated cell division processes, namely mitosis and meiosis are central to achieve this objective. The modes of chromosome segregation are distinct in these two processes that generate progeny cells of equal ploidy and half the ploidy in mitosis and meiosis, respectively. Additionally, the nutritional requirement and intracellular processing of biological cue also differ in these two processes. From this, it can be envisaged that proteome of mitotic and meiotic cells will differ significantly. Therefore, identification of proteins that differ in their level of expression between mitosis and meiosis would further reveal the mechanistic detail of these processes. In the present study, we have investigated the protein expression profile of mitosis and meiosis by comparing proteome of budding yeast cultures arrested at mitotic metaphase and metaphase-I of meiosis using proteomic approach. Approximately 1000 and 2000 protein spots were visualized on 2-DE and 2D-DIGE gels respectively, out of which 14 protein spots were significant in 2-DE and 22 in 2D-DIGE (pmitosis, an up-regulation of actin cytoskeleton and its negative regulator occurs in meiosis. Mitosis and meiosis are two different types of cell division cycles with entirely different outcomes with definite biological implication for almost all eukaryotic species. In this work, we investigated, for the first time, the differential proteomic profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture arrested at mitotic metaphase (M) and metaphase-I (MI) of meiosis using 2-DE and 2D-DIGE. Our findings of up-regulation of actin and its negative regulator cofilin during meiosis suggest that the rate of actin cytoskeleton turnover is more in meiosis and actin cytoskeleton may play more crucial role during meiosis compared to mitosis. Present study also suggests that actin

  14. EWSR1 regulates mitosis by dynamically influencing microtubule acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Long; Chen, Hui; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Yin, Rong-Hua; Li, Chang-Yan; Ge, Chang-Hui; Yu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-08-17

    EWSR1, participating in transcription and splicing, has been identified as a translocation partner for various transcription factors, resulting in translocation, which in turn plays crucial roles in tumorigenesis. Recent studies have investigated the role of EWSR1 in mitosis. However, the effect of EWSR1 on mitosis is poorly understood. Here, we observed that depletion of EWSR1 resulted in cell cycle arrest in the mitotic phase, mainly due to an increase in the time from nuclear envelope breakdown to metaphase, resulting in a high percentage of unaligned chromosomes and multipolar spindles. We also demonstrated that EWSR1 is a spindle-associated protein that interacts with α-tubulin during mitosis. EWSR1 depletion increased the cold-sensitivity of spindle microtubules, and decreased the rate of spindle assembly. EWSR1 regulated the level of microtubule acetylation in the mitotic spindle; microtubule acetylation was rescued in EWSR1-depleted mitotic cells following suppression of HDAC6 activity by its specific inhibitor or siRNA treatment. In summary, these results suggest that EWSR1 regulates the acetylation of microtubules in a cell cycle-dependent manner through its dynamic location on spindle MTs, and may be a novel regulator for mitosis progress independent of its translocation.

  15. ERK5 pathway regulates the phosphorylation of tumour suppressor hDlg during mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inesta-Vaquera, Francisco A. [Departamento de Inmunologia y Oncologia, Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco-UAM, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Campbell, David G.; Arthur, J. Simon C. [MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit, Sir James Black Building, School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH (United Kingdom); Cuenda, Ana, E-mail: acuenda@cnb.csic.es [Departamento de Inmunologia y Oncologia, Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco-UAM, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} hDlg is phosphorylated during mitosis in multiple residues. {yields} Prospho-hDlg is excluded from the midbody during mitosis. {yields} hDlg is not phosphorylated by p38{gamma} or JNK1/2 during mitosis. {yields} ERK5 pathway mediates hDlg phosphorylation in mitosis. -- Abstract: Human disc-large (hDlg) is a scaffold protein critical for the maintenance of cell polarity and adhesion. hDlg is thought to be a tumour suppressor that regulates the cell cycle and proliferation. However, the mechanism and pathways involved in hDlg regulation during these processes is still unclear. Here we report that hDlg is phosphorylated during mitosis, and we establish the identity of at least three residues phosphorylated in hDlg; some are previously unreported. Phosphorylation affects hDlg localisation excluding it from the contact point between the two daughter cells. Our results reveal a previously unreported pathway for hDlg phosphorylation in mitosis and show that ERK5 pathway mediates hDlg cell cycle dependent phosphorylation. This is likely to have important implications in the correct timely mitotic entry and mitosis progression.

  16. ERK5 pathway regulates the phosphorylation of tumour suppressor hDlg during mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inesta-Vaquera, Francisco A.; Campbell, David G.; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Cuenda, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → hDlg is phosphorylated during mitosis in multiple residues. → Prospho-hDlg is excluded from the midbody during mitosis. → hDlg is not phosphorylated by p38γ or JNK1/2 during mitosis. → ERK5 pathway mediates hDlg phosphorylation in mitosis. -- Abstract: Human disc-large (hDlg) is a scaffold protein critical for the maintenance of cell polarity and adhesion. hDlg is thought to be a tumour suppressor that regulates the cell cycle and proliferation. However, the mechanism and pathways involved in hDlg regulation during these processes is still unclear. Here we report that hDlg is phosphorylated during mitosis, and we establish the identity of at least three residues phosphorylated in hDlg; some are previously unreported. Phosphorylation affects hDlg localisation excluding it from the contact point between the two daughter cells. Our results reveal a previously unreported pathway for hDlg phosphorylation in mitosis and show that ERK5 pathway mediates hDlg cell cycle dependent phosphorylation. This is likely to have important implications in the correct timely mitotic entry and mitosis progression.

  17. A nutrient dependant switch explains mutually exclusive existence of meiosis and mitosis initiation in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannige, C T; Kulasiri, D; Samarasinghe, S

    2014-01-21

    Nutrients from living environment are vital for the survival and growth of any organism. Budding yeast diploid cells decide to grow by mitosis type cell division or decide to create unique, stress resistant spores by meiosis type cell division depending on the available nutrient conditions. To gain a molecular systems level understanding of the nutrient dependant switching between meiosis and mitosis initiation in diploid cells of budding yeast, we develop a theoretical model based on ordinary differential equations (ODEs) including the mitosis initiator and its relations to budding yeast meiosis initiation network. Our model accurately and qualitatively predicts the experimentally revealed temporal variations of related proteins under different nutrient conditions as well as the diverse mutant studies related to meiosis and mitosis initiation. Using this model, we show how the meiosis and mitosis initiators form an all-or-none type bistable switch in response to available nutrient level (mainly nitrogen). The transitions to and from meiosis or mitosis initiation states occur via saddle node bifurcation. This bidirectional switch helps the optimal usage of available nutrients and explains the mutually exclusive existence of meiosis and mitosis pathways. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cytosolic calcium elevation induced by orexin/hypocretin in granule cell domain cells of the rat cochlear nucleus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Miura, Shinya; Yoshida, Takashi; Kim, Juhyon; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2010-08-01

    Using rat brain slice preparations, we examined the effect of orexin on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) in the granule cell domain (GCD) cells of the cochlear nucleus that carry non-auditory information to the dorsal cochlear nucleus. Application of orexin concentration-dependently increased [Ca(2+)](i), and in two thirds of GCD cells these increases persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin. There was no significant difference between the dose-response curve for orexin-A and that for orexin-B. Extracellular Ca(2+) removal abolished the [Ca(2+)](i) elevation induced by orexin-B, whereas depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores had no effect. The orexin-B-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) was not blocked by inhibitors of reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) and nonselective cation channel, whereas it was blocked by lowering the extracellular Na(+) or by applying inhibitors of forward-mode NCX and voltage-gated R- and T-type Ca(2+) channels. The ORX-B-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was also blocked by inhibitors of adenylcyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA), but not by inhibitors of phosphatidylcholine-specific and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. In electrophysiological experiments using whole-cell patch clamp recordings, half of GCD cells were depolarized by orexin-B, and the depolarization was abolished by a forward-mode NCX inhibitor. These results suggest that orexin increases [Ca(2+)](i) postsynaptically via orexin 2 receptors, and the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) is induced via the AC-PKA-forward-mode NCX-membrane depolarization-mediated activation of voltage-gated R- and T-type Ca(2+) channels. The results further support the hypothesis that the orexin system participates in integrating neural systems that are involved in arousal, sensory processing, energy homeostasis and autonomic function. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA damage and cell cycle events implicate cerebellar dentate nucleus neurons as targets of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the cerebellum is considered to be predominantly involved in fine motor control, emerging evidence documents its participation in language, impulsive behavior and higher cognitive functions. While the specific connections of the cerebellar deep nuclei (CDN that are responsible for these functions are still being worked out, their deficiency has been termed "cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome" - a syndrome that bears a striking similarity to many of the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Using ectopic cell cycle events and DNA damage markers as indexes of cellular distress, we have explored the neuropathological involvement of the CDN in human AD. Results We examined the human cerebellar dentate nucleus in 22 AD cases and 19 controls for the presence of neuronal cell cycle events and DNA damage using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Both techniques revealed several instances of highly significant correlations. By contrast, neither amyloid plaque nor neurofibrillary tangle pathology was detected in this region, consistent with previous reports of human cerebellar pathology. Five cases of early stage AD were examined and while cell cycle and DNA damage markers were well advanced in the hippocampus of all five, few indicators of either cell cycle events (1 case or a DNA damage response (1 case were found in CDN. This implies that CDN neurons are most likely affected later in the course of AD. Clinical-pathological correlations revealed that cases with moderate to high levels of cell cycle activity in their CDN are highly likely to show deficits in unorthodox cerebellar functions including speech, language and motor planning. Conclusion Our results reveal that the CDN neurons are under cellular stress in AD and suggest that some of the non-motor symptoms found in patients with AD may be partly cerebellar in origin.

  20. Chronic tinnitus and unipolar brush cell alterations in the cerebellum and dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozoski, Thomas; Brozoski, Daniel; Wisner, Kurt; Bauer, Carol

    2017-07-01

    Animal model research has shown that the central features of tinnitus, the perception of sound without an acoustic correlate, include elevated spontaneous and stimulus-driven activity, enhanced burst-mode firing, decreased variance of inter-spike intervals, and distortion of tonotopic frequency representation. Less well documented are cell-specific correlates of tinnitus. Unipolar brush cell (UBC) alterations in animals with psychophysical evidence of tinnitus has recently been reported. UBCs are glutamatergic interneurons that appear to function as local-circuit signal amplifiers. UBCs are abundant in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and very abundant in the flocculus (FL) and paraflocculus (PFL) of the cerebellum. In the present research, two indicators of UBC structure and function were examined: Doublecortin (DCX) and epidermal growth factor receptor substrate 8 (Eps8). DCX is a protein that binds to microtubules where it can modify their assembly and growth. Eps8 is a cell-surface tyrosine kinase receptor mediating the response to epidermal growth factor; it appears to have a role in actin polymerization as well as cytoskeletal protein interactions. Both functions could contribute to synaptic remodeling. In the present research UBC Eps8 and DCX immunoreactivity (IR) were determined in 4 groups of rats distinguished by their exposure to high-level sound and psychophysical performance: Unexposed, exposed to high-level sound with behavioral evidence of tinnitus, and two exposed groups without behavioral evidence of tinnitus. Compared to unexposed controls, exposed animals with tinnitus had Eps8 IR elevated in their PFL; other structures were not affected, nor was DCX IR affected. This was interpreted as UBC upregulation in animals with tinnitus. Exposure that failed to produce tinnitus did not increase either Eps8 or DCX IR. Rather Eps8 IR was decreased in the FL and DCN of one subgroup (Least-Tinnitus), while DCX IR decreased in the FL of the other subgroup (No

  1. Tracking the oxygen status in the cell nucleus by using a Hoechst-tagged phosphorescent ruthenium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Kazuhito; Hara, Daiki; Umehara, Yui; Son, Aoi; Asahi, Wataru; Misu, Sotaro; Kurihara, Ryohsuke; Kondo, Teruyuki

    2018-02-21

    Molecular oxygen in living cells is distributed and consumed inhomogeneously, depending on the activity of each organelle. Therefore, tractable methods that can be used to monitor the oxygen status in each organelle are needed to understand cellular function. Here, we report the design of a novel oxygen-sensing probe for use in the cell nucleus. We prepared Ru-Hoechsts, which consist of a phosphorescent ruthenium complex linked to a Hoechst 33258 moiety, and characterized their properties as oxygen sensors. The Hoechst unit shows high DNA-binding properties in the nucleus, and the ruthenium complex shows oxygen-dependent phosphorescence. Thus, Ru-Hoechsts accumulated in the cell nucleus and shows oxygen-dependent signals that could be monitored. Among the Ru-Hoechsts prepared in this study, Ru-Hoechst b, in which the ruthenium complex and Hoechst unit were linked by a hexyl chain, showed the most suitable properties for monitoring the oxygen status. Ru-Hoechsts are novel probes with high potential for visualizing oxygen fluctuations in the nucleus. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. DGCR8 Localizes to the Nucleus as well as Cytoplasmic Structures in Mammalian Spermatogenic Cells and Epididymal Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akane Nakano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The localization of DGCR8 in spermatogenic cells and sperm from rat and mouse was studied by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Spermatogenic cells from these species yielded similar DGCR8 localization pattern. Immunofluorescence microscopy results showed that DGCR8 localized to both the cytoplasm and nucleus. In the cytoplasm, diffuse cytosolic and discrete granular staining was observed. Dual staining showed that DGCR8 colocalized to the granules with MAEL (a nuage marker. In the nucleus of spermatocytes, both the nucleoli and nucleoplasm were stained, whereas in the nucleus of early spermatids small spots were stained. In late spermatids, DGCR8 localized to the tip of their head and to small granules (neck granules of the neck cytoplasm. The neck granules were also observed in the neck of epididymal sperm. Immunoelectron microscopy results showed that DGCR8 localized to nuage structures. Moreover, DGCR8 localized to nonnuage structures in late spermatids. DGCR8 also localized to the nucleolus and euchromatin in spermatocytes and round spermatids and to small granules in the nucleus of late spermatids. The results suggest that in spermatogenic cells DGCR8 localizes not only to the nuclei but also to the cytoplasmic structures such as nuage and nonnuage structures. Furthermore, DGCR8 seems to be imported into the egg with neck granules in sperm during fertilization.

  3. Phosphorylation of AIB1 at Mitosis Is Regulated by CDK1/CYCLIN B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Macarena; Ferragud, Juan; Orlando, Leonardo; Valero, Luz; Sánchez del Pino, Manuel; Farràs, Rosa; Font de Mora, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the AIB1 oncogene has an important role during the early phase of the cell cycle as a coactivator of E2F1, little is known about its function during mitosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Mitotic cells isolated by nocodazole treatment as well as by shake-off revealed a post-translational modification occurring in AIB1 specifically during mitosis. This modification was sensitive to the treatment with phosphatase, suggesting its modification by phosphorylation. Using specific inhibitors and in vitro kinase assays we demonstrate that AIB1 is phosphorylated on Ser728 and Ser867 by Cdk1/cyclin B at the onset of mitosis and remains phosphorylated until exit from M phase. Differences in the sensitivity to phosphatase inhibitors suggest that PP1 mediates dephosphorylation of AIB1 at the end of mitosis. The phosphorylation of AIB1 during mitosis was not associated with ubiquitylation or degradation, as confirmed by western blotting and flow cytometry analysis. In addition, luciferase reporter assays showed that this phosphorylation did not alter the transcriptional properties of AIB1. Importantly, fluorescence microscopy and sub-cellular fractionation showed that AIB1 phosphorylation correlated with the exclusion from the condensed chromatin, thus preventing access to the promoters of AIB1-dependent genes. Phospho-specific antibodies developed against Ser728 further demonstrated the presence of phosphorylated AIB1 only in mitotic cells where it was localized preferentially in the periphery of the cell. Conclusions Collectively, our results describe a new mechanism for the regulation of AIB1 during mitosis, whereby phosphorylation of AIB1 by Cdk1 correlates with the subcellular redistribution of AIB1 from a chromatin-associated state in interphase to a more peripheral localization during mitosis. At the exit of mitosis, AIB1 is dephosphorylated, presumably by PP1. This exclusion from chromatin during mitosis may represent a mechanism for governing the

  4. Mcl-1 dynamics influence mitotic slippage and death in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloss, Olivia; Topham, Caroline; Diez, Maria; Taylor, Stephen

    2016-02-02

    Microtubule-binding drugs such as taxol are frontline treatments for a variety of cancers but exactly how they yield patient benefit is unclear. In cell culture, inhibiting microtubule dynamics prevents spindle assembly, leading to mitotic arrest followed by either apoptosis in mitosis or slippage, whereby a cell returns to interphase without dividing. Myeloid cell leukaemia-1 (Mcl-1), a pro-survival member of the Bcl-2 family central to the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, is degraded during a prolonged mitotic arrest and may therefore act as a mitotic death timer. Consistently, we show that blocking proteasome-mediated degradation inhibits taxol-induced mitotic apoptosis in a Mcl-1-dependent manner. However, this degradation does not require the activity of either APC/C-Cdc20, FBW7 or MULE, three separate E3 ubiquitin ligases implicated in targeting Mcl-1 for degradation. This therefore challenges the notion that Mcl-1 undergoes regulated degradation during mitosis. We also show that Mcl-1 is continuously synthesized during mitosis and that blocking protein synthesis accelerates taxol induced death-in-mitosis. Modulating Mcl-1 levels also influences slippage; overexpressing Mcl-1 extends the time from mitotic entry to mitotic exit in the presence of taxol, while inhibiting Mcl-1 accelerates it. We suggest that Mcl-1 competes with Cyclin B1 for binding to components of the proteolysis machinery, thereby slowing down the slow degradation of Cyclin B1 responsible for slippage. Thus, modulating Mcl-1 dynamics influences both death-in-mitosis and slippage. However, because mitotic degradation of Mcl-1 appears not to be under the control of an E3 ligase, we suggest that the notion of network crosstalk is used with caution.

  5. Agonist activation of cytosolic Ca2+ in subfornical organ cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. F.; Beltz, T. G.; Sharma, R. V.; Xu, Z.; Bhatty, R. A.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) is sensitive to both ANG II and ACh, and local application of these agents produces dipsogenic responses and vasopressin release. The present study examined the effects of cholinergic drugs, ANG II, and increased extracellular osmolarity on dissociated, cultured cells of the SFO that were retrogradely labeled from the supraoptic nucleus. The effects were measured as changes in cytosolic calcium in fura 2-loaded cells by using a calcium imaging system. Both ACh and carbachol increased intracellular ionic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). However, in contrast to the effects of muscarinic receptor agonists on SFO neurons, manipulation of the extracellular osmolality produced no effects, and application of ANG II produced only moderate effects on [Ca2+]i in a few retrogradely labeled cells. The cholinergic effects on [Ca2+]i could be blocked with the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and with the more selective muscarinic receptor antagonists pirenzepine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperdine methiodide (4-DAMP). In addition, the calcium in the extracellular fluid was required for the cholinergic-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. These findings indicate that ACh acts to induce a functional cellular response in SFO neurons through action on a muscarinic receptor, probably of the M1 subtype and that the increase of [Ca2+]i, at least initially, requires the entry of extracellular Ca2+. Also, consistent with a functional role of M1 receptors in the SFO are the results of immunohistochemical preparations demonstrating M1 muscarinic receptor-like protein present within this forebrain circumventricular organ.

  6. PICH promotes sister chromatid disjunction and co-operates with topoisomerase II in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Thomas Friberg; Huttner, Diana; Bizard, Anna H

    2015-01-01

    PICH is a SNF2 family DNA translocase that binds to ultra-fine DNA bridges (UFBs) in mitosis. Numerous roles for PICH have been proposed from protein depletion experiments, but a consensus has failed to emerge. Here, we report that deletion of PICH in avian cells causes chromosome structural......-193-treated cells. We propose that PICH and Topo II cooperate to prevent chromosome missegregation events in mitosis....

  7. Notochordal-cell derived extracellular vesicles exert regenerative effects on canine and human nucleus pulposus cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bach, Frances; Libregts, Sten; Creemers, Laura; Meij, Björn P; Ito, Keita; Wauben, Marca H M; Tryfonidou, Marianna A

    2017-01-01

    During intervertebral disc ageing, chondrocyte-like cells (CLCs) replace notochordal cells (NCs). NCs have been shown to induce regenerative effects in CLCs. Since vesicles released by NCs may be responsible for these effects, we characterized NC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) and determined

  8. A novel mitosis-associated lncRNA, MA-linc1, is required for cell cycle progression and sensitizes cancer cells to Paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bida, Or; Gidoni, Moriah; Ideses, Diana; Efroni, Sol; Ginsberg, Doron

    2015-09-29

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are major regulators of many cellular processes including cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis. In this study, we identify a novel lncRNA, MA-linc1, and reveal its effects on cell cycle progression and cancer growth. Inhibition of MA-linc1 expression alters cell cycle distribution, leading to a decrease in the number of G1 cells and a concomitant increase in all other stages of the cell cycle, and in particular G2/M, suggesting its involvement in the regulation of M phase. Accordingly, knock down of MA-linc1 inhibits M phase exit upon release from a mitotic block. We further demonstrate that MA-linc1 predominantly functions in cis to repress expression of its neighboring gene, Purα, which is often deleted in human cancers and whose ectopic expression inhibits cell cycle progression. Knock down of Purα partially rescues the MA-linc1 dependent inhibition of M phase exit. In agreement with its suggested role in M phase, inhibition of MA-linc1 enhances apoptotic cell death induced by the antimitotic drug, Paclitaxel and this enhancement of apoptosis is rescued by Purα knockdown. Furthermore, high levels of MA-linc1 are associated with reduced survival in human breast and lung cancer patients.Taken together, our data identify MA-linc1 as a novel lncRNA regulator of cell cycle and demonstrate its potential role in cancer progression and treatment.

  9. Examining pedagogical knowledge content on mitosis in a University context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. González

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitosis is a process of cell division occurring in eukaryotic organisms. Students from many countries experience difficulties learning this science topic, and its teaching demands substantial effort. Effective teachers develop a wide range of knowledge types to successfully transform science matter for students; this transformation of knowledge has been conceptualized as pedagogical content knowledge (PCK. In this study the PCK of two University teachers on mitosis was explored. As informed by the instruments employed (Content Representation and Pedagogical (CoRe, and Professional experiences Repertoires, analytical rubric (PaP-eR, and semi-structured interviews both participants’ PCK on mitosis can be characterized as incomplete, however not identical. PCK evolves throughout the professional practice so, in a context mostly limited to a traditional teacher-centered transmission of knowledge such as the university, development of teachers’ PCK emerges as a strategy to re-orient the teaching of mitosis to modalities based on the construction of scaffoldings to facilitate students’ learning.

  10. NEURON AND GLIAL CELL NUMBERS IN THE MEDIODORSAL THALAMIC NUCLEUS IN BRAINS OF SCHIZOPHRENIC SUBJECTS

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    Rune Damgaard Nielsen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Several stereological studies of schizophrenic subjects have shown reduction in both the total number of neurons and in the total volume of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus (MD. This is in contrast to other studies in that no differences have been found. Using systematic random sampling and an optical fractionator design, the total number of neuron and glial cells in the MD subdivisions: parvocellular (MDPC, magnocellular (MDMC, and densocellular (MDDC were counted in brains from 9 schizophrenic and 8 control subjects. The control subjects were age, height and body-weight matched to the schizophrenic subjects. We found the neuronal numbers in the schizophrenic subjects to range more than a factor of two, from 3.68 to 9.22 x 106. This is in contrast to the control subjects, who ranged from 5.24 to 7.10 x 106 in neuronal cell numbers. Within our inhomogeneous sample, some schizophrenic subjects thus exhibited relative high total neuron numbers in MD, while others exhibited relative low neuron numbers. The result is in line with the heterogeneity of this severe mental disease and may help to explain why different research groups get different results. The major limitation in this study is the small number of brains of schizophrenic subjects with a high degree of inhomogeneity in length of disease and age of onset. The debates of the comparison of the neurons in the MD in brains of schizophrenic subjects and control subjects and the possible impact of this variance on the disease are still not complete.

  11. Alpha-smooth muscle actin in pathological human disc nucleus pulposus cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastreiter, Dawn; Chao, Jeannie; Wang, Qi; Ozuna, Richard M; Spector, Myron

    2004-01-01

    That a contractile actin isoform has been found in cells of other cartilage tissues in healing and disease states prompted this investigation of the presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) in pathological human intervertebral disc tissue. The presence of this isoform has been reported in human intervertebral disc specimens obtained at autopsy from subjects for whom there were no reported symptoms. An objective of this study was to evaluate the cell density and percentage of alpha-SMA-containing cells in pathological nucleus pulposus tissue obtained from lumbar disc surgery from 17 patients. Additionally, explants of nucleus pulposus material were cultured to determine how alpha-SMA expression changed with time in vitro. Seventy-six 5-mm diameter explants (approximately 2 mm thick) pooled from six lumbar surgeries were cultured for 1, 2, 4, or 6 weeks. Microtomed sections of paraffin-embedded specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or a monoclonal antibody to alpha-SMA. Histologically, cells were categorized as to alpha-SMA phenotype (positive or negative), and the areal cell density was determined. The evaluation of the cultured nucleus pulposus explants also included documentation of the percentage of cells that were round or elongated and the percentage of the cells that were part of a group (group: >/= 2 cells). Every nucleus pulposus section exhibited the presence of alpha-SMA-containing cells, which accounted for approximately 24 percent of the cells in vivo. In vivo, the cell density was significantly higher in older individuals (p = 0.02). The average time for cell outgrowth from the explants was 8.6 days. Approximately 10-15 percent of the cells in the explants stained positive for alpha-SMA. The time in culture had no significant effect on any of the outcome measures except the percentage of alpha-SMA-containing cells that were round (p = 0.008), with values decreasing through 4 weeks and then slightly rising at 6 weeks. The role of

  12. CPEB4 is a cell survival protein retained in the nucleus upon ischemia or endoplasmic reticulum calcium depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Ming-Chung; Oruganty-Das, Aparna; Cooper-Morgan, Amalene; Jin, Guang; Swanger, Sharon A; Bassell, Gary J; Florman, Harvey; van Leyen, Klaus; Richter, Joel D

    2010-12-01

    The RNA binding protein CPEB (cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding) regulates cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translation in germ cells and the brain. In neurons, CPEB is detected at postsynaptic sites, as well as in the cell body. The related CPEB3 protein also regulates translation in neurons, albeit probably not through polyadenylation; it, as well as CPEB4, is present in dendrites and the cell body. Here, we show that treatment of neurons with ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists causes CPEB4 to accumulate in the nucleus. All CPEB proteins are nucleus-cytoplasm shuttling proteins that are retained in the nucleus in response to calcium-mediated signaling and alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase protein II (CaMKII) activity. CPEB2, -3, and -4 have conserved nuclear export signals that are not present in CPEB. CPEB4 is necessary for cell survival and becomes nuclear in response to focal ischemia in vivo and when cultured neurons are deprived of oxygen and glucose. Further analysis indicates that nuclear accumulation of CPEB4 is controlled by the depletion of calcium from the ER, specifically, through the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor, indicating a communication between these organelles in redistributing proteins between subcellular compartments.

  13. CPEB4 Is a Cell Survival Protein Retained in the Nucleus upon Ischemia or Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Depletion ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Ming-Chung; Oruganty-Das, Aparna; Cooper-Morgan, Amalene; Jin, Guang; Swanger, Sharon A.; Bassell, Gary J.; Florman, Harvey; van Leyen, Klaus; Richter, Joel D.

    2010-01-01

    The RNA binding protein CPEB (cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding) regulates cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translation in germ cells and the brain. In neurons, CPEB is detected at postsynaptic sites, as well as in the cell body. The related CPEB3 protein also regulates translation in neurons, albeit probably not through polyadenylation; it, as well as CPEB4, is present in dendrites and the cell body. Here, we show that treatment of neurons with ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists causes CPEB4 to accumulate in the nucleus. All CPEB proteins are nucleus-cytoplasm shuttling proteins that are retained in the nucleus in response to calcium-mediated signaling and alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase protein II (CaMKII) activity. CPEB2, -3, and -4 have conserved nuclear export signals that are not present in CPEB. CPEB4 is necessary for cell survival and becomes nuclear in response to focal ischemia in vivo and when cultured neurons are deprived of oxygen and glucose. Further analysis indicates that nuclear accumulation of CPEB4 is controlled by the depletion of calcium from the ER, specifically, through the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor, indicating a communication between these organelles in redistributing proteins between subcellular compartments. PMID:20937770

  14. Neurons of the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus show a circadian rhythm in membrane properties that is lost during prolonged whole-cell recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, J.; Bos, N. P.; de Jeu, M. T.; Geurtsen, A. M.; Meijer, J. H.; Pennartz, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus is commonly considered to contain the main pacemaker of behavioral and hormonal circadian rhythms. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, the membrane properties of suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons were investigated in order to get more insight in membrane physiological

  15. Mitosis and apoptosis: how is the balance set?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Caroline H; Taylor, Stephen S

    2013-12-01

    Anti-mitotic agents are used extensively during cancer chemotherapy. These agents target microtubules and thus block mitotic progression by activating the spindle assembly checkpoint. Following a prolonged mitotic arrest, cells either die in mitosis via apoptosis, or exit mitosis without dividing and survive, a process known as slippage. What dictates the balance between these two fates is unclear, but recent advances highlight the importance of the pro-survival Bcl2 family, with Mcl1 degradation emerging as a key determinant of mitotic cell fate. Here we review these advances, with a view towards identifying how the balance between apoptosis and slippage can be tipped in favour of death. This in turn may open up new opportunities to sensitize cancer cells to anti-mitotic agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cycling with BRCA2 from DNA repair to mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyunsook, E-mail: HL212@snu.ac.kr

    2014-11-15

    Genetic integrity in proliferating cells is guaranteed by the harmony of DNA replication, appropriate DNA repair, and segregation of the duplicated genome. Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 is a unique tumor suppressor that is involved in all three processes. Hence, it is critical in genome maintenance. The functions of BRCA2 in DNA repair and homology-directed recombination (HDR) have been reviewed numerous times. Here, I will briefly go through the functions of BRCA2 in HDR and focus on the emerging roles of BRCA2 in telomere homeostasis and mitosis, then discuss how BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in a cell-cycle specific manner in the maintenance of genomic integrity. - Highlights: • BRCA2 is a multifaceted tumor suppressor and is crucial in genetic integrity. • BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in cell cycle-specific manner. • Mitotic kinases regulate diverse functions of BRCA2 in mitosis and cytokinesis.

  17. Cycling with BRCA2 from DNA repair to mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyunsook

    2014-01-01

    Genetic integrity in proliferating cells is guaranteed by the harmony of DNA replication, appropriate DNA repair, and segregation of the duplicated genome. Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 is a unique tumor suppressor that is involved in all three processes. Hence, it is critical in genome maintenance. The functions of BRCA2 in DNA repair and homology-directed recombination (HDR) have been reviewed numerous times. Here, I will briefly go through the functions of BRCA2 in HDR and focus on the emerging roles of BRCA2 in telomere homeostasis and mitosis, then discuss how BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in a cell-cycle specific manner in the maintenance of genomic integrity. - Highlights: • BRCA2 is a multifaceted tumor suppressor and is crucial in genetic integrity. • BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in cell cycle-specific manner. • Mitotic kinases regulate diverse functions of BRCA2 in mitosis and cytokinesis

  18. Mitochondrial quality control and communications with the nucleus are important in maintaining mitochondrial function and cell health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotiadis, Vassilios N; Duchen, Michael R; Osellame, Laura D

    2014-04-01

    The maintenance of cell metabolism and homeostasis is a fundamental characteristic of living organisms. In eukaryotes, mitochondria are the cornerstone of these life supporting processes, playing leading roles in a host of core cellular functions, including energy transduction, metabolic and calcium signalling, and supporting roles in a number of biosynthetic pathways. The possession of a discrete mitochondrial genome dictates that the maintenance of mitochondrial 'fitness' requires quality control mechanisms which involve close communication with the nucleus. This review explores the synergistic mechanisms that control mitochondrial quality and function and ensure cellular bioenergetic homeostasis. These include antioxidant defence mechanisms that protect against oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species, while regulating signals transduced through such free radicals. Protein homeostasis controls import, folding, and degradation of proteins underpinned by mechanisms that regulate bioenergetic capacity through the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Autophagic machinery is recruited for mitochondrial turnover through the process of mitophagy. Mitochondria also communicate with the nucleus to exact specific transcriptional responses through retrograde signalling pathways. The outcome of mitochondrial quality control is not only reliant on the efficient operation of the core homeostatic mechanisms but also in the effective interaction of mitochondria with other cellular components, namely the nucleus. Understanding mitochondrial quality control and the interactions between the organelle and the nucleus will be crucial in developing therapies for the plethora of diseases in which the pathophysiology is determined by mitochondrial dysfunction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Frontiers of Mitochondrial Research. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Uncoupling of S phase and mitosis in cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes lacking the winged-helix transcription factor Trident

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver, W.; Schilham, M. W.; Moerer, P.; van den Hoff, M. J.; Dam, K.; Lamers, W. H.; Medema, R. H.; Clevers, H.

    1998-01-01

    In order to maintain a stable karyotype, the eukaryotic cell cycle is coordinated such that only one round of S phase precedes each mitosis, and mitosis is not initiated until DNA replication is completed. Several checkpoints and regulatory proteins have been defined in lower eukaryotes that govern

  20. Effect of a low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field on expression and secretion of IL-1β and TNF-α in nucleus pulposus cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yufeng; Qian, Jiale; Yang, Huilin

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate changes in nucleus pulposus cell expression and secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α following stimulation with a low-frequency (LF) pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF). Methods Primary rat nucleus pulposus cells were isolated and cultured in vitro, followed by stimulation with LF-PEMFs at a frequency of 2 Hz and different intensities, ranging from 0.5–3.0 A/m. Cells were observed for morphological changes, and proliferation rates were measured by cell viability counts. Expression of IL-1β and TNF-α within the nucleus pulposus cells was measured using western blotting, and levels of IL-1β and TNF-α secreted in the culture media were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Stimulation of nucleus pulposus cells with LF-PEMFs did not appear to affect cell morphology or nucleus pulposus cell IL-1β and TNF-α expression levels. LF-PEMFs did not significantly affect cell proliferation, however, levels of IL-1β and TNF-α secreted into the culture media were found to be significantly reduced in an intensity-dependent manner. Conclusion Low-frequency PEMF stimulation may inhibit secretion of IL-1β and TNF-α in cultured nucleus pulposus cells. PMID:28173722

  1. Nucleus pulposus cells derived IGF-1 and MCP-1 enhance osteoclastogenesis and vertebrae disruption in lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongjiao; Huang, Peng; Chong, Yanxue; George, Suraj K; Wen, Bingtao; Han, Na; Liu, Zhiqiang; Kang, Lixin; Lin, Nie

    2014-01-01

    Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation (LDH) cases were classified into bulging LDH, herniated LDH and prolapse LDH types according to imaging examination, and vertebrae disruptions were evaluated. Cytokines derived from the nucleus pulposus cells were detected, and their effects on osteoclastogenesis, as well as the mechanisms involved, were studied via an in vitro osteoclast differentiation system. To clarify the mechanisms of lumbar vertebrae resorption induced by lumbar herniation. Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation induced vertebrae erosion exacerbates quality of patients' life and clinical outcome. Although nucleus pulposus cells derived cytokines were reported to play an important role in this pathogenesis, the fundamental mechanisms underlying this process are still unclear. Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation patients were diagnosed with CT scan and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. RNA was extracted from 192 surgical specimens of the herniated lumbar disc and 29 surgical excisions of the lumbar disc from spinal injury patients. The expressions of osteoclastogenesis related cytokines and chemokines were examined using real time PCR. Monocytes were induced into osteoclast with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro, while the IGF-1 and MCP-1 were added into the differentiation procedure in order to evaluate the effects and explore the molecular mechanisms. Vertebrae erosion had a positive relationship with lumbar disc herniation severity types. In all of the osteoclastogenesis related cytokines, the IGF-1 and MCP-1 were the most highly expressed in the nucleus pulposus cells. IGF-1 enhances activation of NF-kB signaling directly, but MCP-1 upregulated the expression of RANK, so that enhanced cellular sensitivity to RANKL resulted in increasing osteoclastogenesis and activity. Lumbar herniation induced overexpression of IGF-1 and MCP-1 in nucleus pulposus cells aggravated vertebral erosions. Hence, this study suggests that targeting osteoclastogenesis

  2. Nucleus pulposus cells derived IGF-1 and MCP-1 enhance osteoclastogenesis and vertebrae disruption in lumbar disc herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongjiao; Huang, Peng; Chong, Yanxue; George, Suraj K; Wen, Bingtao; Han, Na; Liu, Zhiqiang; Kang, Lixin; Lin, Nie

    2014-01-01

    Study design: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation (LDH) cases were classified into bulging LDH, herniated LDH and prolapse LDH types according to imaging examination, and vertebrae disruptions were evaluated. Cytokines derived from the nucleus pulposus cells were detected, and their effects on osteoclastogenesis, as well as the mechanisms involved, were studied via an in vitro osteoclast differentiation system. Objective: To clarify the mechanisms of lumbar vertebrae resorption induced by lumbar herniation. Summary and background data: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation induced vertebrae erosion exacerbates quality of patients’ life and clinical outcome. Although nucleus pulposus cells derived cytokines were reported to play an important role in this pathogenesis, the fundamental mechanisms underlying this process are still unclear. Methods: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation patients were diagnosed with CT scan and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. RNA was extracted from 192 surgical specimens of the herniated lumbar disc and 29 surgical excisions of the lumbar disc from spinal injury patients. The expressions of osteoclastogenesis related cytokines and chemokines were examined using real time PCR. Monocytes were induced into osteoclast with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro, while the IGF-1 and MCP-1 were added into the differentiation procedure in order to evaluate the effects and explore the molecular mechanisms. Results: Vertebrae erosion had a positive relationship with lumbar disc herniation severity types. In all of the osteoclastogenesis related cytokines, the IGF-1 and MCP-1 were the most highly expressed in the nucleus pulposus cells. IGF-1 enhances activation of NF-kB signaling directly, but MCP-1 upregulated the expression of RANK, so that enhanced cellular sensitivity to RANKL resulted in increasing osteoclastogenesis and activity. Conclusion: Lumbar herniation induced overexpression of IGF-1 and MCP-1 in nucleus pulposus cells aggravated

  3. Visualizing Stable Features in Live Cell Nucleus for Evaluation of the Cell Global Motion Compensation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sorokin, D.V.; Suchánková, Jana; Bártová, Eva; Matula, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2014), s. 45-49 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP302/12/G157; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : cell global motion compensation * UV laser bleaching * image registration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  4. Expression of the nucleus-encoded chloroplast division genes and proteins regulated by the algal cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagishima, Shin-Ya; Suzuki, Kenji; Okazaki, Kumiko; Kabeya, Yukihiro

    2012-10-01

    Chloroplasts have evolved from a cyanobacterial endosymbiont and their continuity has been maintained by chloroplast division, which is performed by the constriction of a ring-like division complex at the division site. It is believed that the synchronization of the endosymbiotic and host cell division events was a critical step in establishing a permanent endosymbiotic relationship, such as is commonly seen in existing algae. In the majority of algal species, chloroplasts divide once per specific period of the host cell division cycle. In order to understand both the regulation of the timing of chloroplast division in algal cells and how the system evolved, we examined the expression of chloroplast division genes and proteins in the cell cycle of algae containing chloroplasts of cyanobacterial primary endosymbiotic origin (glaucophyte, red, green, and streptophyte algae). The results show that the nucleus-encoded chloroplast division genes and proteins of both cyanobacterial and eukaryotic host origin are expressed specifically during the S phase, except for FtsZ in one graucophyte alga. In this glaucophyte alga, FtsZ is persistently expressed throughout the cell cycle, whereas the expression of the nucleus-encoded MinD and MinE as well as FtsZ ring formation are regulated by the phases of the cell cycle. In contrast to the nucleus-encoded division genes, it has been shown that the expression of chloroplast-encoded division genes is not regulated by the host cell cycle. The endosymbiotic gene transfer of minE and minD from the chloroplast to the nuclear genome occurred independently on multiple occasions in distinct lineages, whereas the expression of nucleus-encoded MIND and MINE is regulated by the cell cycle in all lineages examined in this study. These results suggest that the timing of chloroplast division in algal cell cycle is restricted by the cell cycle-regulated expression of some but not all of the chloroplast division genes. In addition, it is

  5. Origin of the nucleus and Ran-dependent transport to safeguard ribosome biogenesis in a chimeric cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jékely Gáspár

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of the nucleus is a central problem about the origin of eukaryotes. The common ancestry of nuclear pore complexes (NPC and vesicle coating complexes indicates that the nucleus evolved via the modification of a pre-existing endomembrane system. Such an autogenous scenario is cell biologically feasible, but it is not clear what were the selective or neutral mechanisms that had led to the origin of the nuclear compartment. Results A key selective force during the autogenous origin of the nucleus could have been the need to segregate ribosome factories from the cytoplasm where ribosomal proteins (RPs of the protomitochondrium were synthesized. After its uptake by an anuclear cell the protomitochondrium transferred several of its RP genes to the host genome. Alphaproteobacterial RPs and archaebacterial-type host ribosomes were consequently synthesized in the same cytoplasm. This could have led to the formation of chimeric ribosomes. I propose that the nucleus evolved when the host cell compartmentalised its ribosome factories and the tightly linked genome to reduce ribosome chimerism. This was achieved in successive stages by first evolving karyopherin and RanGTP dependent chaperoning of RPs, followed by the evolution of a membrane network to serve as a diffusion barrier, and finally a hydrogel sieve to ensure selective permeability at nuclear pores. Computer simulations show that a gradual segregation of cytoplasm and nucleoplasm via these steps can progressively reduce ribosome chimerism. Conclusion Ribosome chimerism can provide a direct link between the selective forces for and the mechanisms of evolving nuclear transport and compartmentalisation. The detailed molecular scenario presented here provides a solution to the gradual evolution of nuclear compartmentalization from an anuclear stage. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene V Koonin, Martijn Huynen, Anthony M. Poole and Patrick Forterre.

  6. Cell thickness of UV absorption by the cell: relation to UV action spectrum shift in mammalian cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakharov, V.H.; Voronkova, L.N.; Blokhin, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    By means of reconstruction of series half - thin transverse sections the three - dimensional morphometry of SPEV cells for a series of their specific states in culture is performed: for exponential growth in a monolayer, in a merged monolayer, in the mitosis phase, for giant cells and suspension cells. In the monolayer the cell thickness in its central part depended mainly on the nucleus thickness and in average changed but slightly despite a wide range of changes in volumes of nuclei and cells and their density in culture. The cell thickness has noticeably increased in mitosis. For the above states of cells UV radiation absorption spectra are determined. It is shown that a certain shift of action spectrus of death of mammalian cells as compared with that for bacterial cell can be a seguence of selfshielding and not differences in the nature of active chromophores

  7. Periodic mechanical stress activates EGFR-dependent Rac1 mitogenic signals in rat nucleus pulpous cells via ERK1/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Gongming; Shen, Nan; Jiang, Xuefeng; Sun, Huiqing; Xu, Nanwei; Zhou, Dong; Nong, Luming; Ren, Kewei

    2016-01-01

    The mitogenic effects of periodic mechanical stress on nucleus pulpous cells have been studied extensively but the mechanisms whereby nucleus pulpous cells sense and respond to mechanical stimulation remain a matter of debate. We explored this question by performing cell culture experiments in our self-developed periodic stress field and perfusion culture system. Under periodic mechanical stress, rat nucleus pulpous cell proliferation was significantly increased (p < 0.05 for each) and was associated with increases in the phosphorylation and activation of EGFR, Rac1, and ERK1/2 (p < 0.05 for each). Pretreatment with the ERK1/2 selective inhibitor PD98059 reduced periodic mechanical stress-induced nucleus pulpous cell proliferation (p < 0.05 for each), while the activation levels of EGFR and Rac1 were not inhibited. Proliferation and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were inhibited after pretreatment with the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 in nucleus pulpous cells in response to periodic mechanical stress (p < 0.05 for each), while the phosphorylation site of EGFR was not affected. Inhibition of EGFR activity with AG1478 abrogated nucleus pulpous cell proliferation (p < 0.05 for each) and attenuated Rac1 and ERK1/2 activation in nucleus pulpous cells subjected to periodic mechanical stress (p < 0.05 for each). These findings suggest that periodic mechanical stress promotes nucleus pulpous cell proliferation in part through the EGFR-Rac1-ERK1/2 signaling pathway, which links these three important signaling molecules into a mitogenic cascade. - Highlights: • The mechanism involved in nucleus pulpous cells to respond to mechanical stimuli. • Periodic mechanical stress can stimulate the phosphorylation of EGFR. • EGFR activates Rac1 and leads to rat nucleus pulpous cell proliferation. • EGFR and Rac1 activate ERK1/2 mitogenic signals in nucleus pulpous cells. • EGFR-Rac1-ERK1/2 is constitutes at least one critical signal transduction pathway.

  8. Periodic mechanical stress activates EGFR-dependent Rac1 mitogenic signals in rat nucleus pulpous cells via ERK1/2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Gongming [Department of Orthopedics, The Affiliated Changzhou No. 2 Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Changzhou 213003 (China); Shen, Nan [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, The Affiliated Jiangyin Hospital of Southeast University Medical School, Jiangyin 214400 (China); Jiang, Xuefeng; Sun, Huiqing [Department of Orthopedics, The Affiliated Jiangyin Hospital of Southeast University Medical School, Jiangyin 214400 (China); Xu, Nanwei; Zhou, Dong [Department of Orthopedics, The Affiliated Changzhou No. 2 Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Changzhou 213003 (China); Nong, Luming, E-mail: lumingnong@hotmail.com [Department of Orthopedics, The Affiliated Changzhou No. 2 Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Changzhou 213003 (China); Ren, Kewei, E-mail: keweiren@hotmail.com [Department of Orthopedics, The Affiliated Jiangyin Hospital of Southeast University Medical School, Jiangyin 214400 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The mitogenic effects of periodic mechanical stress on nucleus pulpous cells have been studied extensively but the mechanisms whereby nucleus pulpous cells sense and respond to mechanical stimulation remain a matter of debate. We explored this question by performing cell culture experiments in our self-developed periodic stress field and perfusion culture system. Under periodic mechanical stress, rat nucleus pulpous cell proliferation was significantly increased (p < 0.05 for each) and was associated with increases in the phosphorylation and activation of EGFR, Rac1, and ERK1/2 (p < 0.05 for each). Pretreatment with the ERK1/2 selective inhibitor PD98059 reduced periodic mechanical stress-induced nucleus pulpous cell proliferation (p < 0.05 for each), while the activation levels of EGFR and Rac1 were not inhibited. Proliferation and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were inhibited after pretreatment with the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 in nucleus pulpous cells in response to periodic mechanical stress (p < 0.05 for each), while the phosphorylation site of EGFR was not affected. Inhibition of EGFR activity with AG1478 abrogated nucleus pulpous cell proliferation (p < 0.05 for each) and attenuated Rac1 and ERK1/2 activation in nucleus pulpous cells subjected to periodic mechanical stress (p < 0.05 for each). These findings suggest that periodic mechanical stress promotes nucleus pulpous cell proliferation in part through the EGFR-Rac1-ERK1/2 signaling pathway, which links these three important signaling molecules into a mitogenic cascade. - Highlights: • The mechanism involved in nucleus pulpous cells to respond to mechanical stimuli. • Periodic mechanical stress can stimulate the phosphorylation of EGFR. • EGFR activates Rac1 and leads to rat nucleus pulpous cell proliferation. • EGFR and Rac1 activate ERK1/2 mitogenic signals in nucleus pulpous cells. • EGFR-Rac1-ERK1/2 is constitutes at least one critical signal transduction pathway.

  9. Notochordal-cell derived extracellular vesicles exert regenerative effects on canine and human nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Frances; Libregts, Sten; Creemers, Laura; Meij, Björn; Ito, Keita; Wauben, Marca; Tryfonidou, Marianna

    2017-10-24

    During intervertebral disc ageing, chondrocyte-like cells (CLCs) replace notochordal cells (NCs). NCs have been shown to induce regenerative effects in CLCs. Since vesicles released by NCs may be responsible for these effects, we characterized NC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) and determined their effect on CLCs. EVs were purified from porcine NC-conditioned medium (NCCM) through size exclusion chromatography, ultracentrifugation or density gradient centrifugation. Additionally, the EVs were quantitatively analyzed by high-resolution flow cytometry. The effect of NCCM-derived EVs was studied on canine and human CLC micro-aggregates in vitro and compared with NCCM-derived proteins and unfractionated NCCM. Porcine NCCM contained a considerable amount of EVs. NCCM-derived EVs induced GAG deposition in canine CLCs to a comparable level as NCCM-derived proteins and unfractionated NCCM, and increased the DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of human micro-aggregates, although to a lesser extent than unfractionated NCCM. The biological EV effects were not considerably influenced by ultracentrifugation compared with size exclusion-based purification. Upon ultracentrifugation, interfering GAGs, but not collagens, were lost. Nonetheless, collagen type I or II supplemented to CLCs in a concentration as present in NCCM induced no anabolic effects. Porcine NCCM-derived EVs exerted anabolic effects comparable to NCCM-derived proteins, while unfractionated NCCM was more potent in human CLCs. GAGs and collagens appeared not to mediate the regenerative EV effects. Thus, NC-derived EVs have regenerative potential, and their effects may be influenced by the proteins present in NCCM. The optimal combination of NC-secreted factors needs to be determined to fully exploit the regenerative potential of NC-based technology.

  10. Thalamocortical projection from the parafascicular nucleus to layer V pyramidal cells in frontal and cingulate areas of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, G; Pianca, L; Tredici, G

    1996-01-19

    Thalamocortical projections originating from the parafascicular nucleus were reinvestigated using biocytin or biotylinated dextran amine as anterograde tracers in the rat. After stereotaxic injection of the marker in the lateral part of the parafascicular nucleus, labelled ascending fibres were observed running ipsilaterally to the frontal motor and anterior cingulate areas. Labelled fibres gave rise in layer VI to a plexus of thin ramifications ending in layer V, where sparse boutons en passant and terminaux were seen in close apposition to pyramidal cells. Few retrogradely labelled pyramidal somata, contacted by labelled varicosities, were also observed. Electron microscopy demonstrated the synaptic nature of the labelled contacts, displaying asymmetrical junctions and a round vesicular content. The direct loop parafascicular-motor cortex-parafascicular may be of great functional significance in motor control.

  11. Apoptosis and mitosis in the small intestine at radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, Junichiro; Ito, Masahiro; Onizuka, Shinya; Sekine, Ichiro; Uchida, Shinji

    1990-01-01

    A single whole body irradiation was given at a dose rate of 0.298 Gy/min in 6-week-old male mice. Intestinal crypt apoptosis and mitosis cells were determined by delivering radiation doses of 0.4, 0.6, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 Gy. The incidence of apoptosis was linearly increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 5.0 Gy, and thereafter, it was gradually decreased. There was a decreased tendency for mitosis with delivering higher radiation doses. The incidence of apoptosis rapidly increased 2 hours after irradiation with either 0.6 Gy or 2.0 Gy, and reached to the peak 4 hours later. It brought about a 18-fold and 28-fold increase for 0.6 Gy and 2.0 Gy, respectively, relative to that before irradiation. Mitosis cells decreased by half one hour after irradiation with 0.6 Gy, and then returned to the pre-irradiation value through synchronization 24 hours later. The number of cells positive to BrdU was 776 in the group of mice without irradiation and 479 in the group of mice irradiated with 2.0 Gy. (N.K.)

  12. DNA Cross-Bridging Shapes a Single Nucleus from a Set of Mitotic Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwer, Matthias; Schneider, Maximilian W G; Hoefler, Rudolf; Schmalhorst, Philipp S; Jude, Julian G; Zuber, Johannes; Gerlich, Daniel W

    2017-08-24

    Eukaryotic cells store their chromosomes in a single nucleus. This is important to maintain genomic integrity, as chromosomes packaged into separate nuclei (micronuclei) are prone to massive DNA damage. During mitosis, higher eukaryotes disassemble their nucleus and release individualized chromosomes for segregation. How numerous chromosomes subsequently reform a single nucleus has remained unclear. Using image-based screening of human cells, we identified barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) as a key factor guiding membranes to form a single nucleus. Unexpectedly, nuclear assembly does not require BAF's association with inner nuclear membrane proteins but instead relies on BAF's ability to bridge distant DNA sites. Live-cell imaging and in vitro reconstitution showed that BAF enriches around the mitotic chromosome ensemble to induce a densely cross-bridged chromatin layer that is mechanically stiff and limits membranes to the surface. Our study reveals that BAF-mediated changes in chromosome mechanics underlie nuclear assembly with broad implications for proper genome function. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Behavioral detectability of single-cell stimulation in the ventral posterior medial nucleus of the thalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Voigt (Birgit); M. Brecht (Michael); A.R. Houweling (Arthur)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn mammals, most sensory information passes through the thalamus before reaching cortex. In the rat whisker system, each macrovibrissa is represented by ∼250 neurons in the ventral posterior medial nucleus (VPM) of the thalamus and ∼10,000 neurons in a cortical barrel column. Here we

  14. Grafted fetal suprachiasmatic nucleus cells survive much better in tissue pieces than in suspension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, G. J.; Griffioen, H. A.; Saeed, P.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison was made between the survival of fetal suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) grafted either in tissue pieces or as tissue suspension. Donor tissue was obtained from day 15, 16 or 17 Wistar fetuses, and stereotaxically placed in the dorsal thalamus of the brain of vasopressin(VP)-deficient

  15. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ouabain affects cell migration via Na,K-ATPase-p130cas and via nucleus-centrosome association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ou

    Full Text Available Na,K-ATPase is a membrane protein that catalyzes ATP to maintain transmembrane sodium and potassium gradients. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also acts as a signal-transducing receptor for cardiotonic steroids such as ouabain and activates a number of signalling pathways. Several studies report that ouabain affects cell migration. Here we used ouabain at concentrations far below those required to block Na,K-ATPase pump activity and show that it significantly reduced RPE cell migration through two mechanisms. It causes dephosphorylation of a 130 kD protein, which we identify as p130cas. Src is involved, because Src inhibitors, but not inhibitors of other kinases tested, caused a similar reduction in p130cas phosphorylation and ouabain increased the association of Na,K-ATPase and Src. Knockdown of p130cas by siRNA reduced cell migration. Unexpectedly, ouabain induced separation of nucleus and centrosome, also leading to a block in cell migration. Inhibitor and siRNA experiments show that this effect is mediated by ERK1,2. This is the first report showing that ouabain can regulate cell migration by affecting nucleus-centrosome association.

  17. Toxoplasma exports dense granule proteins beyond the vacuole to the host cell nucleus and rewires the host genome expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Tardieux, Isabelle; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2014-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the most widespread apicomplexan parasite and occupies a large spectrum of niches by infecting virtually any warm-blooded animals. As an obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma has evolved a repertoire of strategies to fine-tune the cellular environment in an optimal way to promote growth and persistence in host tissues hence increasing the chance to be transmitted to new hosts. Short and long-term intracellular survival is associated with Toxoplasma ability to both evade the host deleterious immune defences and to stimulate a beneficial immune balance by governing host cell gene expression. It is only recently that parasite proteins responsible for driving these transcriptional changes have been identified. While proteins contained in the apical secretory Rhoptry organelle have already been identified as bona fide secreted effectors that divert host signalling pathways, recent findings revealed that dense granule proteins should be added to the growing list of effectors as they reach the host cell cytoplasm and nucleus and target various host cell pathways in the course of cell infection. Herein, we emphasize on a novel subfamily of dense granule residentproteins, exemplified with the GRA16 and GRA24 members we recently discovered as both are exported beyond the vacuole-containing parasites and reach the host cell nucleus to reshape the host genome expression. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Inhibiting MAP kinase activity prevents calcium transients and mitosis entry in early sea urchin embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipova, Rada; Larman, Mark G; Leckie, Calum P; Harrison, Patrick K; Groigno, Laurence; Whitaker, Michael

    2005-07-01

    A transient calcium increase triggers nuclear envelope breakdown (mitosis entry) in sea urchin embryos. Cdk1/cyclin B kinase activation is also known to be required for mitosis entry. More recently, MAP kinase activity has also been shown to increase during mitosis. In sea urchin embryos, both kinases show a similar activation profile, peaking at the time of mitosis entry. We tested whether the activity of both kinases is required for mitosis entry and whether either kinase controls mitotic calcium signals. We found that reducing the activity of either mitotic kinase prevents nuclear envelope breakdown, despite the presence of a calcium transient, when cdk1/cyclin B kinase activity is alone inhibited. When MAP kinase activity alone was inhibited, the calcium signal was absent, suggesting that MAP kinase activity is required to generate the calcium transient that triggers nuclear envelope breakdown. However, increasing intracellular free calcium by microinjection of calcium buffers or InsP(3) while MAP kinase was inhibited did not itself induce nuclear envelope breakdown, indicating that additional MAP kinase-regulated events are necessary. After MAP kinase inhibition early in the cell cycle, the early events of the cell cycle (pronuclear migration/fusion and DNA synthesis) were unaffected, but chromosome condensation and spindle assembly are prevented. These data indicate that in sea urchin embryos, MAP kinase activity is part of a signaling complex alongside two components previously shown to be essential for entry into mitosis: the calcium transient and the increase in cdk1/cyclinB kinase activity.

  19. Bora and Aurora-A continue to activate Plk1 in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Wytse; Macurek, Libor; Freire, Raimundo; Lindqvist, Arne; Medema, René H

    2014-02-15

    Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1) is required for proper cell division. Activation of Plk1 requires phosphorylation on a conserved threonine in the T-loop of the kinase domain (T210). Plk1 is first phosphorylated on T210 in G2 phase by the kinase Aurora-A, in concert with its cofactor Bora. However, Bora was shown to be degraded prior to entry into mitosis, and it is currently unclear how Plk1 activity is sustained in mitosis. Here we show that the Bora-Aurora-A complex remains the major activator of Plk1 in mitosis. We show that a small amount of Aurora-A activity is sufficient to phosphorylate and activate Plk1 in mitosis. In addition, a fraction of Bora is retained in mitosis, which is essential for continued Aurora-A-dependent T210 phosphorylation of Plk1. We find that once Plk1 is activated, minimal amounts of the Bora-Aurora-A complex are sufficient to sustain Plk1 activity. Thus, the activation of Plk1 by Aurora-A may function as a bistable switch; highly sensitive to inhibition of Aurora-A in its initial activation, but refractory to fluctuations in Aurora-A activity once Plk1 is fully activated. This provides a cell with robust Plk1 activity once it has committed to mitosis.

  20. EGF stimulates the activation of EGF receptors and the selective activation of major signaling pathways during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Ping; Shi, Huaiping; Jiang, Jennifer; Wang, Yuluan; Wang, Zhixiang

    2015-03-01

    Mitosis and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) are both targets for cancer therapy. The role of EGFR signaling in mitosis has been rarely studied and poorly understood. The limited studies indicate that the activation of EGFR and downstream signaling pathways is mostly inhibited during mitosis. However, we recently showed that EGFR is phosphorylated in response to EGF stimulation in mitosis. Here we studied EGF-induced EGFR activation and the activation of major signaling pathways downstream of EGFR during mitosis. We showed that EGFR was strongly activated by EGF during mitosis as all the five major tyrosine residues including Y992, Y1045, Y1068, Y1086, and Y1173 were phosphorylated to a level similar to that in the interphase. We further showed that the activated EGFR is able to selectively activate some downstream signaling pathways while avoiding others. Activated EGFR is able to activate PI3K and AKT2, but not AKT1, which may be responsible for the observed effects of EGF against nocodazole-induced cell death. Activated EGFR is also able to activate c-Src, c-Cbl and PLC-γ1 during mitosis. However, activated EGFR is unable to activate ERK1/2 and their downstream substrates RSK and Elk-1. While it activated Ras, EGFR failed to fully activate Raf-1 in mitosis due to the lack of phosphorylation at Y341 and the lack of dephosphorylation at pS259. We conclude that contrary to the dogma, EGFR is activated by EGF during mitosis. Moreover, EGFR-mediated cell signaling is regulated differently from the interphase to specifically serve the needs of the cell in mitosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Subcellular localization of adenosine kinase in mammalian cells: The long isoform of AdK is localized in the nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xianying Amy; Singh, Bhag; Park, Jae [Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., Canada L8N3Z5 (Canada); Gupta, Radhey S., E-mail: gupta@mcmaster.ca [Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., Canada L8N3Z5 (Canada)

    2009-10-09

    Two isoforms of adenosine kinase (AdK) have been identified in mammalian organisms with the long isoform (AdK-long) containing extra 20-21 amino acids at the N-terminus (NTS). The subcellular localizations of these isoforms are not known and they contain no identifiable targeting sequence. Immunofluorescence labeling of mammalian cells expressing either only AdK-long or both isoforms with AdK-specific antibody showed only nuclear labeling or both nucleus and cytoplasmic labeling, respectively. The AdK-long and -short isoforms fused at the C-terminus with c-myc epitope also localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively. Fusion of the AdK-long NTS to green fluorescent protein also resulted in its nuclear localization. AdK-long NTS contains a cluster of conserved amino acids (PKPKKLKVE). Replacement of KK in this sequence with either AA or AD abolished its nuclear localization capability, indicating that this cluster likely serves as a nuclear localization signal. AdK in nucleus is likely required for sustaining methylation reactions.

  2. Assessment of the Nucleus-to-Cytoplasmic Ratio in MCF-7 Cells Using Ultra-high Frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M. J.; Strohm, E. M.; Kolios, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    The nucleus-to-cytoplasmic (N:C) ratio of a cell is often used when assessing histology for the presence of malignant disease. In this proof of concept study, we present a new, non-optical method for determination of the N:C ratio using ultra-high Frequency ultrasound (US) and photoacoustics (PA). When using transducers in the 100 MHz-500 MHz range, backscattered US pulses and emitted PA waves are encoded with information pertaining to the dimension and morphology of micron-sized objects. If biological cells are interrogated, the diameter of the scattering or absorbing structure can be assessed by fitting the power spectra of the measured US or PA signals to theoretical models for US backscatter and PA emission from a fluid sphere. In this study, the cell and nucleus diameters of 9 MCF-7 breast cancer cells were determined using a new simplified model that calculates the theoretical values of the location of the power spectra minima for both US and PA signals. These diameters were then used to calculate the N:C ratio of the measured cells. The average cell diameter determined by US pulses from a transducer with a central frequency of 375 MHz was found to be 15.5 μ m± 1.8 μ m. The PA waves emitted by the cell nuclei were used to determine an average nuclear diameter of 12.0 μ m± 1.3 μ m. The N:C ratio for these cells was calculated to be 1.9± 1.0, which agrees well with previously reported N:C values for this cell type.

  3. Inducement of mitosis delay by cucurbitacin E, a novel tetracyclic triterpene from climbing stem of Cucumis melo L., through GADD45γ in human brain malignant glioma (GBM) 8401 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Y-C; Chen, M-J; Huang, T-Y

    2014-02-27

    Cucurbitacin E (CuE) is a natural compound previously shown to have anti-feedant, antioxidant and antitumor activities as well as a potent chemo-preventive action against cancer. The present study investigates its anti-proliferative property using MTT assay; CuE demonstrated cytotoxic activity against malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells and induced cell cycle G2/M arrest in these cells. CuE-treated cells accumulated in metaphase (CuE 2.5-10 μM) as determined using MPM-2 by flow cytometry. We attempted to characterize the molecular pathways responsible for cytotoxic effects of CuE in GBM 8401 cells. We studied the genome-wide gene expression profile on microarrays and molecular networks by using pathway analysis tools of bioinformatics. The CuE reduced the expression of 558 genes and elevated the levels of 1354 genes, suggesting an existence of the common pathways involved in induction of G2/M arrest. We identified the RB (GADD45β and GADD45γ) and the p53 (GADD45α) signaling pathways as the common pathways, serving as key molecules that regulate cell cycle. Results indicate that CuE produced G2/M arrest as well as the upregulation of GADD45 γ and binding with CDC2. Both effects increased proportionally with the dose of CuE, suggesting that the CuE-induced mitosis delay is regulated by GADD45γ overexpression. Our findings suggest that, in addition to the known effects on cancer prevention, CuE may have antitumor activity in glioma therapy.

  4. Excess free histone H3 localizes to centrosomes for proteasome-mediated degradation during mitosis in metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wike, Candice L; Graves, Hillary K; Wason, Arpit; Hawkins, Reva; Gopalakrishnan, Jay; Schumacher, Jill; Tyler, Jessica K

    2016-08-17

    The cell tightly controls histone protein levels in order to achieve proper packaging of the genome into chromatin, while avoiding the deleterious consequences of excess free histones. Our accompanying study has shown that a histone modification that loosens the intrinsic structure of the nucleosome, phosphorylation of histone H3 on threonine 118 (H3 T118ph), exists on centromeres and chromosome arms during mitosis. Here, we show that H3 T118ph localizes to centrosomes in humans, flies, and worms during all stages of mitosis. H3 abundance at the centrosome increased upon proteasome inhibition, suggesting that excess free histone H3 localizes to centrosomes for degradation during mitosis. In agreement, we find ubiquitinated H3 specifically during mitosis and within purified centrosomes. These results suggest that targeting of histone H3 to the centrosome for proteasome-mediated degradation is a novel pathway for controlling histone supply, specifically during mitosis.

  5. Stereological analysis of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus in schizophrenia: volume, neuron number, and cell types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorph-Petersen, Karl-Anton; Pierri, Joseph N; Sun, Zhuoxin

    2004-01-01

    The mediodorsal thalamic nucleus (MD) is the principal relay nucleus for the prefrontal cortex, a brain region thought to be dysfunctional in schizophrenia. Several, but not all, postmortem studies of the MD in schizophrenia have reported decreased volume and total neuronal number. However......, it is not clear whether the findings are specific for schizophrenia nor is it known which subtypes of thalamic neurons are affected. We studied the left MD in 11 subjects with schizophrenia, 9 control subjects, and 12 subjects with mood disorders. Based on morphological criteria, we divided the neurons into two...... subclasses, presumably corresponding to projection neurons and local circuit neurons. We estimated MD volume and the neuron number of each subclass using methods based on modern unbiased stereological principles. We also estimated the somal volumes of each subclass using a robust, but biased, approach...

  6. SU-E-T-494: Influence of Proton Track-Cell Nucleus Incidence Angle On Relative Biological Effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, P; Backstrom, G; Enger, S; Seuntjens, J; El Naqa, I [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Villegas, F; Ahnesjo, A [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explain a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation artifact whereby differences in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the induction of initial double strand breaks are observed as a function of the proton track incidence angles in a geometric cell nucleus model. Secondly, to offer an alternative isotropic irradiation procedure to mitigate this effect. Methods: MC tracks of 1 MeV protons were generated in an event-by-event mode. They were overlaid on a cylindrical model of a cell nucleus containing 6×109 nucleotide base pairs. The tracks incidence angle θ with respect to the cell nucleus’s axis was varied in 10 degrees intervals, each time generating one hundred fractions of ∼2 Gy. Strand breaks were scored in the modeled DNA sugar-phosphate groups and further sub-classified into single or double strand breaks (ssbs or dsbs). For each angle, an RBE for the induction of initial dsbs with reference to Co-60 was calculated. Results: Our results show significant angular dependencies of RBE, with maximum values for incidence angles parallel to the nucleus central axis. Further examination shows that the higher cross-sections for the creation of dsbs is due to the preferential alignment of tracks with geometrical sub-parts of the cell nucleus model, especially the nucleosomes containing the sugar-phosphate groups. To alleviate the impact of this simulation artifact, an average RBE was calculated with a procedure based on a weighted sampling of the angular data. Conclusion: This work demonstrates a possible numerical artifact in estimated RBE if the influence of the particle incidence angle is not correctly taken into account. A correction procedure is presented to better conform the simulations to real-life experimental conditions. We would like to acknowledge support from the Fonds de recherche du Quebec Sante (FRQS), from the CREATE Medical Physics Research Training Network grant (number 432290) of NSERC, support from NSERC under grants RGPIN 397711-11 and

  7. Mouse nuclear myosin I knock-out shows interchangeability and redundancy of myosin isoforms in the cell nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Venit, Tomáš; Dzijak, Rastislav; Kalendová, Alžběta; Kahle, Michal; Rohožková, Jana; Schmidt, V.; Rülicke, T.; Rathkolb, B.; Hans, W.; Bohla, A.; Eickelberg, O.; Stoeger, T.; Wolf, E.; Yildirim, A.Ö.; Gailus-Durner, V.; Fuchs, H.; de Angelis, M.H.; Hozák, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), e61406 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020022; GA MŠk LH12143; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : nuclear myosin * myosin isoforms * cell nucleus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  8. A Vivens Ex Vivo Study on the Synergistic Effect of Electrolysis and Freezing on the Cell Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugnani, Franco; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Marcuzzo, Thomas; Bottin, Cristina; Mikus, Paul; Guenther, Enric; Klein, Nina; Rubinsky, Liel; Stehling, Michael K; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Freezing-cryosurgery, and electrolysis-electrochemical therapy (EChT), are two important minimally invasive surgery tissue ablation technologies. Despite major advantages they also have some disadvantages. Cryosurgery cannot induce cell death at high subzero freezing temperatures and requires multiple freeze thaw cycles, while EChT requires high concentrations of electrolytic products-which makes it a lengthy procedure. Based on the observation that freezing increases the concentration of solutes (including products of electrolysis) in the frozen region and permeabilizes the cell membrane to these products, this study examines the hypothesis that there could be a synergistic effect between freezing and electrolysis in their use together for tissue ablation. Using an animal model we refer to as vivens ex vivo, which may be of value in reducing the use of animals for experiments, combined with a Hematoxylin stain of the nucleus, we show that there are clinically relevant protocols in which the cell nucleus appears intact when electrolysis and freezing are used separately but is affected by certain combinations of electrolysis and freezing.

  9. Correlative analysis on the relationship between PMI and DNA degradation of cell nucleus in human different tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiji; Liu, Yaling; Ren, Liang; He, Fanggang; Zhou, Hongyan; Liu, Lijiang; Liu, Liang

    2005-01-01

    To determining the postmortem interval (PMI) through quantitative analysis of the DNA degradation of cell nucleus in human brain and spleen by using image analysis technique (IAT). The brain and spleen tissues from 32 cadavers with known PMI were collected, subjected to cell smear every 1 h within the first 5-36 h after death, stained by Feulgen-Van's staining, Three indices reflecting DNA in brain cells (astrocytes) and splenic lymphocytes, including integral optical density (IOD), average optical density (AOD), average gray (AG) were measured by employing the mage analysis instrument. The results showed that IOD and AOD declined and AG increased with the prolongation of dead time within 5-36 h. A correlation between the PMI and gray parameters (IOD, AOD and AG) was identified and the corresponding regression equation was obtained. The parameters (IOD, AOD and AG) were proved to be effective quantitative indicators for accurate estimation of PMI within 5-36 h after death.

  10. New perspective for GdNCT. Gd-DTPA reaches the nucleus of glioblastoma cells in culture and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasio, G. de; Gilbert, B.; Frazer, B.H.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the prospects of gadolinium as a neutron capture therapy agent by combining three independent techniques to study the uptake of Gd-DTPA in vitro, in cultured glioblastoma cells, and in vivo, in the glioblastoma tissue sections after injection of Gd-DTPA and tumor extraction. We show that gadolinium not only penetrates the plasma membrane of glioblastoma cells grown in culture, but we also observe a statistically significant higher concentration of Gd in the nucleus relative to the cytoplasm. For the in vivo experiments, Gd-DTPA was administered to 6 glioblastoma patients before neurosurgery. The extracted bioptic tissue was then analyzed with spectromictroscopy, showing Gd localized in the nuclei of glioblastoma cells in 5 patients out of the 6 analyzed. (author)

  11. Direct evidence that radiation induced micronuclei of early embryos require a mitosis for expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.U.; Schlusen, I.; Streffer, C.

    1991-01-01

    The naturally synchronous development of early mouse embryos was exploited to address the question, whether micronuclei require a mitosis for expression or whether they can be expressed in the same cell cycle, in which exposure to X-rays or caffeine took place. Experiments with 2-cell and with 4-cell embryos showed that micronulcei are expressed only if a mitosis is completed. There was no indication, even after doses up to 20 Gy, that micronuclei can be expressed before the mitosis was reached, which followed exposure. Furthermore, no nuclear fragmentation pointing to apoptosis could be detected in the cycle, in which cells were exposed. The same results were obtained when caffeine (5 mM) was used as micronucleus inducing agent. (orig.)

  12. Comprehensive Identification of SUMO2/3 Targets and Their Dynamics during Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Julie; Kelstrup, Christian D; Hayward, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    During mitosis large alterations in cellular structures occur rapidly, which to a large extent is regulated by post-translational modification of proteins. Modification of proteins with the small ubiquitin-related protein SUMO2/3 regulates mitotic progression, but few mitotic targets have been...... identified so far. To deepen our understanding of SUMO2/3 during this window of the cell cycle, we undertook a comprehensive proteomic characterization of SUMO2/3 modified proteins in mitosis and upon mitotic exit. We developed an efficient tandem affinity purification strategy of SUMO2/3 modified proteins...... from mitotic cells. Combining this purification strategy with cell synchronization procedures and quantitative mass spectrometry allowed for the mapping of numerous novel targets and their dynamics as cells progressed out of mitosis. This identified RhoGDIα as a major SUMO2/3 modified protein...

  13. Single-cell transcriptomics of the developing lateral geniculate nucleus reveals insights into circuit assembly and refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish, Brian T.; Cheadle, Lucas; Hrvatin, Sinisa; Nagy, M. Aurel; Rivera, Samuel; Crow, Megan; Gillis, Jesse; Kirchner, Rory

    2018-01-01

    Coordinated changes in gene expression underlie the early patterning and cell-type specification of the central nervous system. However, much less is known about how such changes contribute to later stages of circuit assembly and refinement. In this study, we employ single-cell RNA sequencing to develop a detailed, whole-transcriptome resource of gene expression across four time points in the developing dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), a visual structure in the brain that undergoes a well-characterized program of postnatal circuit development. This approach identifies markers defining the major LGN cell types, including excitatory relay neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, microglia, and endothelial cells. Most cell types exhibit significant transcriptional changes across development, dynamically expressing genes involved in distinct processes including retinotopic mapping, synaptogenesis, myelination, and synaptic refinement. Our data suggest that genes associated with synapse and circuit development are expressed in a larger proportion of nonneuronal cell types than previously appreciated. Furthermore, we used this single-cell expression atlas to identify the Prkcd-Cre mouse line as a tool for selective manipulation of relay neurons during a late stage of sensory-driven synaptic refinement. This transcriptomic resource provides a cellular map of gene expression across several cell types of the LGN, and offers insight into the molecular mechanisms of circuit development in the postnatal brain. PMID:29343640

  14. Extracellular matrix production by nucleus pulposus and bone marrow stem cells in response to altered oxygen and glucose microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syeda M; Buckley, Conor T

    2015-12-01

    Bone marrow (BM) stem cells may be an ideal source of cells for intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. However, the harsh biochemical microenvironment of the IVD may significantly influence the biological and metabolic vitality of injected stem cells and impair their repair potential. This study investigated the viability and production of key matrix proteins by nucleus pulposus (NP) and BM stem cells cultured in the typical biochemical microenvironment of the IVD consisting of altered oxygen and glucose concentrations. Culture-expanded NP cells and BM stem cells were encapsulated in 1.5% alginate and ionically crosslinked to form cylindrical hydrogel constructs. Hydrogel constructs were maintained under different glucose concentrations (1, 5 and 25 mM) and external oxygen concentrations (5 and 20%). Cell viability was measured using the Live/Dead® assay and the production of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), and collagen was quantified biochemically and histologically. For BM stem cells, IVD-like micro-environmental conditions (5 mM glucose and 5% oxygen) increased the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. In contrast, low glucose conditions (1 mM glucose) combined with 5% external oxygen concentration promoted cell death, inhibiting proliferation and the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. NP-encapsulated alginate constructs were relatively insensitive to oxygen concentration or glucose condition in that they accumulated similar amounts of sGAG under all conditions. Under IVD-like microenvironmental conditions, NP cells were found to have a lower glucose consumption rate compared with BM cells and may in fact be more suitable to adapt and sustain the harsh microenvironmental conditions. Considering the highly specialised microenvironment of the central NP, these results indicate that IVD-like concentrations of low glucose and low oxygen are critical and influential for the survival and biological behaviour of stem cells. Such findings may promote and accelerate

  15. Phosphorylation of SAF-A/hnRNP-U Serine 59 by Polo-Like Kinase 1 Is Required for Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Morrice, Nicholas; Britton, Sébastien; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2015-08-01

    Scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), also called heterogenous nuclear ribonuclear protein U (hnRNP-U), is phosphorylated on serine 59 by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in response to DNA damage. Since SAF-A, DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), which interacts with DNA-PKcs, have all been shown to have roles in mitosis, we asked whether DNA-PKcs phosphorylates SAF-A in mitosis. We show that SAF-A is phosphorylated on serine 59 in mitosis, that phosphorylation requires polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) rather than DNA-PKcs, that SAF-A interacts with PLK1 in nocodazole-treated cells, and that serine 59 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mitosis. Moreover, cells expressing SAF-A in which serine 59 is mutated to alanine have multiple characteristics of aberrant mitoses, including misaligned chromosomes, lagging chromosomes, polylobed nuclei, and delayed passage through mitosis. Our findings identify serine 59 of SAF-A as a new target of both PLK1 and PP2A in mitosis and reveal that both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of SAF-A serine 59 by PLK1 and PP2A, respectively, are required for accurate and timely exit from mitosis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Role of neural stem cell activity in postweaning development of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhen; Ferguson, Sherry A; Cui, Li; Greenfield, L John; Paule, Merle G

    2013-01-01

    The sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) has received increased attention due to its apparent sensitivity to estrogen-like compounds found in food and food containers. The mechanisms that regulate SDN-POA volume remain unclear as is the extent of postweaning development of the SDN-POA. Here we demonstrate that the female Sprague-Dawley SDN-POA volume increased from weaning to adulthood, although this increase was not statistically significant as it was in males. The number of cells positive for Ki67, a marker of cell proliferation, in both the SDN-POA and the hypothalamus was significantly higher at weaning than at adulthood in male rats. In contrast, the number of Ki67-positive cells was significantly higher in the hypothalamus but not in the SDN-POA (p>0.05) at weaning than at adulthood in female rats. A subset of the Ki67-positive cells in the SDN-POA displayed the morphology of dividing cells. Nestin-immunoreactivity delineated a potential macroscopic neural stem cell niche in the rostral end of the 3rd ventricle. In conclusion, stem cells may partially account for the sexually dimorphic postweaning development of the SDN-POA.

  17. Properties of Fiber Cell Plasma Membranes Isolated from the Cortex and Nucleus of the Porcine Eye Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; O’Brien, William J.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2012-01-01

    The organization and physical properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from the eyes lenses of two-year-old pigs were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling. Membrane fluidity, hydrophobicity, and the oxygen transport parameter (OTP) were assessed from the EPR spectra of precisely positioned spin labels. Intact cortical and nuclear membranes, which include membrane proteins, were found to contain three distinct lipid environments. These lipid environments were termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain (lipids in protein aggregates). The amount of boundary and trapped lipids was greater in intact nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. The properties of intact membranes were compared with the organization and properties of lens lipid membranes made of the total lipid extracts from the lens cortex or nucleus. In cortical lens lipid membranes, only one homogenous environment was detected, which was designated as a bulk lipid domain (phospholipid bilayer saturated with cholesterol). Lens lipid membranes prepared from the lens nucleus possessed two domains, assigned as a bulk lipid domain and a cholesterol bilayer domain (CBD). In intact nuclear membranes, it was difficult to discriminate the CBD, which was clearly detected in nuclear lens lipid membranes because the OTP measured in the CBD is the same as in the domain formed by trapped lipids. The two domains unique to intact membranes—namely, the domain formed by boundary lipids and the domain formed by trapped lipids—were most likely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins. It is concluded that formation of rigid and practically impermeable domains is enhanced in the lens nucleus, indicating changes in membrane composition that may help to maintain low oxygen concentration in this lens region. PMID:22326289

  18. The Functional Role of TopBP1 in DNA Maintenance at Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard

    that are devoid of histones and do not stain with DAPI. Some of these UFBs are induced by replication stress and interlink CFSs on segregating sister chromatids in anaphase. Another major advance was the discovery of active processing of underreplicated loci by structure-selective endonucleases MUS81 and GEN1......When cells traverse mitosis, genome integrity of the emerging daughter cells is dependent on replication of the entire genome during the preceding S-phase and accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis. Replication stress may cause cells to enter mitosis with underreplicated loci, consisting....... This active processing was found to be an underlying mechanism of CFS expression. A final advance was the description of how DNA damage, arising as a consequence of replication stress in S-phase, was shielded in 53BP1 nuclear bodies (NBs), preventing untimely DNA repair during the subsequent G1-phase. We...

  19. Bookmarking target genes in mitosis: a shared epigenetic trait of phenotypic transcription factors and oncogenes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Grandy, Rodrigo A; Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; Montecino, Martin; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2014-01-15

    The regulatory information for phenotype, proliferation, and growth of normal and tumor cells must be maintained through genome replication in the S phase and cell division during mitosis. Epigenetic mechanisms that include DNA methylation, posttranslational modifications of histones, selective utilization of histone variants, and inheritable RNA molecules play pivotal roles in maintaining cellular identity through mitotic divisions. Recent studies demonstrate that mitotic occupancy of genes, which are determinants of cell fate, growth, and proliferation, by lineage-restricted transcription factors is a key epigenetic mechanism for retention and transmission of cellular expression memory. Evidence is emerging for the presence of distinct transcriptional regulatory microenvironments in mitotic chromosomes in which the genes bookmarked for reactivation postmitotically reside. Importantly, some oncoproteins are present in mitotic microenvironments where they occupy target genes during mitosis and may contribute to perpetuating the transformed phenotype. We discuss emerging regulatory implications of epigenetically bookmarking genes during mitosis for physiologic control as well as for the onset and progression of cancer.

  20. Phosphorylation of DEPDC1 at Ser110 is required to maintain centrosome organization during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Ito, Satoko; Hyodo, Toshinori; Asano-Inami, Eri; Yuan, Hong; Senga, Takeshi

    2017-09-15

    DEPDC1 (DEP domain containing 1) is overexpressed in multiple cancers and is associated with cell cycle progression. In this report, we have investigated the expression, localization, phosphorylation and function of DEPDC1 during mitosis. DEPDC1 has two isoforms (isoform a and isoform b), and both of them are increased in mitosis and degraded once cells exit mitosis. DEPDC1a is localized to the centrosome in metaphase, whereas DEPDC1b is localized to the entire cell cortex during mitosis. DEPDC1a, but not DEPDC1b, was required for the integrity of centrosome and organization of the bipolar spindle. Mass spectrometry and biochemical analyses revealed phosphorylation of DEPDC1 at Ser110. The phosphorylation of Ser110 is essential for localization of DEPDC1a to the centrosome. Consistently, non-phosphorylation mutants of DEPDC1a did not rescue disruption of centrosome organization by depletion of endogenous DEPDC1. Our results show a novel role for DEPDC1 in maintaining centrosome integrity during mitosis for the accurate distribution of chromosomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Insulin-induced translocation of IR to the nucleus in insulin responsive cells requires a nuclear translocation sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesten, Dov; Horovitz-Fried, Miriam; Brutman-Barazani, Tamar; Sampson, Sanford R

    2018-04-01

    Insulin binding to its cell surface receptor (IR) activates a cascade of events leading to its biological effects. The Insulin-IR complex is rapidly internalized and then is either recycled back to the plasma membrane or sent to lysosomes for degradation. Although most of the receptor is recycled or degraded, a small amount may escape this pathway and migrate to the nucleus of the cell where it might be important in promulgation of receptor signals. In this study we explored the mechanism by which insulin induces IR translocation to the cell nucleus. Experiments were performed cultured L6 myoblasts, AML liver cells and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Insulin treatment induced a rapid increase in nuclear IR protein levels within 2 to 5 min. Treatment with WGA, an inhibitor of nuclear import, reduced insulin-induced increases nuclear IR protein; IR was, however, translocated to a perinuclear location. Bioinformatics tools predicted a potential nuclear localization sequence (NLS) on IR. Immunofluorescence staining showed that a point mutation on the predicted NLS blocked insulin-induced IR nuclear translocation. In addition, blockade of nuclear IR activation in isolated nuclei by an IR blocking antibody abrogated insulin-induced increases in IR tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear PKCδ levels. Furthermore, over expression of mutated IR reduced insulin-induced glucose uptake and PKB phosphorylation. When added to isolated nuclei, insulin induced IR phosphorylation but had no effect on nuclear IR protein levels. These results raise questions regarding the possible role of nuclear IR in IR signaling and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mitosis-targeting natural products for cancer prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chinthalapally V; Kurkjian, Carla D; Yamada, Hiroshi Y

    2012-12-01

    Mitosis is a complex process resulting in division of a cell into two daughter cells, and its failure often results in the death of the daughter cells (via apoptotic, necrotic, or proliferative/senescent death). Many chemicals that inhibit the mitotic process (anti-mitotic drugs) have proven effective for killing cancer cells in vitro and in clinical settings. Among the most studied anti-mitotic drugs are plant-origin natural products including taxanes (e.g. paclitaxel, docetaxel) and vinca alkaloids (e.g. vincristine, vinblastine), whose validated target is the spindle microtubules. With the success of these agents, efforts have been made to develop other spindle poisons as well as to improve efficacy of existing spindle poisons with structural modifications. Novel drugs and natural products that inhibit other proteins involved in mitosis (nonmicrotubule targets) have been sought in hopes of expanding available cancer-directed therapies. Recently, significant advances have been made in the understanding of mitotic mechanisms in tumor cells as well as in normal epithelial cells. These advances help us to identify and develop potential natural agents for the prevention and treatment of cancer. This review will focus on natural products that target mitotic process and/or proteins involved in mitotic progression.

  3. The Ran pathway in Drosophila melanogaster mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Wakefield

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the small GTPase Ran has emerged as a central regulator of both mitosis and meiosis, particularly in the generation, maintenance and regulation of the microtubule (MT-based bipolar spindle. Ran-regulated pathways in mitosis bear many similarities to the well-characterized functions of Ran in nuclear transport and, as with transport, the majority of these mitotic effects are mediated through affecting the physical interaction between karyopherins and Spindle Assembly Factors (SAFs - a loose term describing proteins or protein complexes involved in spindle assembly through promoting nucleation, stabilization, and/or depolymerization of MTs, through anchoring MTs to specific structures such as centrosomes, chromatin or kinetochores, or through sliding MTs along each other to generate the force required to achieve bipolarity. As such, the Ran-mediated pathway represents a crucial functional module within the wider spindle assembly landscape. Research into mitosis using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has contributed substantially to our understanding of centrosome and spindle function. However, in comparison to mammalian systems, very little is known about the contribution of Ran-mediated pathways in Drosophila mitosis. This article sets out to summarize our understanding of the roles of the Ran pathway components in Drosophila mitosis, focusing on the syncytial blastoderm embryo, arguing that, far from being superfluous, it can provide important insights into the conserved functions on Ran during spindle formation.

  4. Hypoxic regulation of β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase 1 expression in nucleus pulposus cells of the rat intervertebral disc: role of hypoxia-inducible factor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogate, Shilpa S; Nasser, Rena; Shapiro, Irving M; Risbud, Makarand V

    2011-07-01

    To determine whether hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) proteins regulate expression of β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase 1 (GlcAT-1), a key enzyme in glycosaminoglycan synthesis in nucleus pulposus cells. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were used to measure GlcAT-1 expression. Transfections were performed to determine the effect of HIF-1α and HIF-2α on GlcAT-1 promoter activity. Under hypoxic conditions there was an increase in GlcAT-1 expression; a significant increase in promoter activity was seen both in nucleus pulposus cells and in N1511 chondrocytes. We investigated whether HIF controlled GlcAT-1 expression. Suppression of HIF-1α and HIF-2α induced GlcAT-1 promoter activity and expression only in nucleus pulposus cells. Transfection with CA-HIF-1α as well as with CA-HIF-2α suppressed GlcAT-1 promoter activity only in nucleus pulposus cells, suggesting a cell type-specific regulation. Site-directed mutagenesis and deletion constructs were used to further confirm the suppressive effect of HIFs on GlcAT-1 promoter function in nucleus pulposus cells. Although it was evident that interaction of HIF with hypoxia-responsive elements resulted in suppression of basal promoter activity, it was not necessary for transcriptional suppression. This result suggested both a direct and an indirect mode of regulation, possibly through recruitment of a HIF-dependent repressor. Finally, we showed that hypoxic expression of GlcAT-1 was also partially dependent on MAPK signaling. These studies demonstrate that hypoxia regulates GlcAT-1 expression through a signaling network comprising both activator and suppressor molecules, and that this regulation is unique to nucleus pulposus cells. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Molecular Therapy for Degenerative Disc Disease: Clues from Secretome Analysis of the Notochordal Cell-Rich Nucleus Pulposus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Ajay; Karim, M. Zia; Isenman, David E.; Erwin, W. Mark

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is associated with spinal pain often leading to long-term disability. However, the non-chondrodystrophic canine intervertebral disc is protected from the development of DDD, ostensibly due to its retention of notochordal cells (NC) in the nucleus pulposus (NP). In this study, we hypothesized that secretome analysis of the NC-rich NP will lead to the identification of key proteins that delay the onset of DDD. Using mass-spectrometry, we identified 303 proteins including components of TGFβ- and Wnt-signaling, anti-angiogeneic factors and proteins that inhibit axonal ingrowth in the bioactive fractions of serum free, notochordal cell derived conditioned medium (NCCM). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed TGFβ1 and CTGF as major hubs in protein interaction networks. In vitro treatment with TGFβ1 and CTGF promoted the synthesis of healthy extra-cellular matrix proteins, increased cell proliferation and reduced cell death in human degenerative disc NP cells. A single intra-discal injection of recombinant TGFβ1 and CTGF proteins in a pre-clinical rat-tail disc injury model restored the NC and stem cell rich NP. In conclusion, we demonstrate the potential of TGFβ1 and CTGF to mitigate the progression of disc degeneration and the potential use of these molecules in a molecular therapy to treat the degenerative disc. PMID:28358123

  6. A novel PHD-finger protein 14/KIF4A complex overexpressed in lung cancer is involved in cell mitosis regulation and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Huang, Qin; Lou, Jiatao; Zou, Liangjian; Wang, Yiguo; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Junyi; Yu, Lan; Yan, Dai; Zhang, Chenyi; Qiao, Jing; Wang, Shuting; Wang, Sai; Xu, Yongdong; Ji, Hongbin; Chen, Zhengjun; Zhang, Zhe

    2017-03-21

    The plant homeodomain (PHD) finger-containing proteins have been implicated in many human diseases including cancer. In this study, we found that PHF14, a newly identified PHD finger protein, is highly expressed in lung cancer. The high expression level of PHF14 was associated with adenocarcinoma and poor survival in lung cancer patients. Knocking down PHF14 suppressed cancer cell growth and carcinogenesis, while over-expressing PHF14 promoted cell proliferation. During cell division, PHF14 directly bound to and co-localized with KIF4A (a nuclear motor protein involved in lung carcinogenesis) to form a functional complex. Similarly to the effect of KIF4A depletion, silencing PHF14 in several cell lines caused cell mitotic defects, prolonged M phase, and inhibited cell proliferation. What's more, these two proteins had a synergistic effect on cell proliferation and were significantly co-overexpressed in lung cancer tissues. Our data provide new insights into the biological significance of PHD finger proteins and imply that PHF14 may be a potential biomarker for lung cancer.

  7. Intervertebral disc repair with activated nucleus pulposus cell transplantation: a three-year, prospective clinical study of its safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mochida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral discs is irreversible, with no treatment currently available. Building upon experimental studies that demonstrated the importance of the nucleus pulposus (NP in preserving disc structure, we demonstrated that reinsertion of NP cells slowed further disc degeneration and that direct cell-to-cell contact co-culture with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs significantly upregulated the viability of NP cells in basic and pre-clinical studies in vitro and in vivo using animal models and human cells. Here, we report a 3-year result of a prospective clinical study, aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of activated NP cell transplantation in the degenerate lumbar intervertebral disc. Candidates were 9 patients aged 20-29 years who had Pfirrmann’s grade III disc degeneration at the level adjacent to the level scheduled for posterior lumbar intervertebral fusion. Viable NP cells from the fused disc were co-cultured in direct contact with autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs. One million activated NP cells were transplanted into the degenerated disc adjacent to the fused level at 7 d after the first fusion surgery. No adverse effects were observed during the 3-year follow-up period. Magnetic resonance imaging did not show any detrimental effects to the transplanted discs and revealed a mild improvement in 1 case. No cases reported any low back pain. Our clinical study confirmed the safety of activated NP cell transplantation, and the findings suggest the minimal efficacy of this treatment to slow the further degeneration of human intervertebral discs.

  8. Robust interactions between the effects of auditory and cutaneous electrical stimulations on cell activities in the thalamic reticular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akihisa

    2017-04-15

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a cluster of GABAergic cells, is thought to regulate bottom-up and top-down streams of sensory processing in the loop circuitry between the thalamus and cortex. Provided that sensory inputs of different modalities interact in the TRN, the TRN could contribute to fast and flexible cross-modal modulation of attention and perception that incessantly takes place in our everyday life. Indeed, diverse subthreshold interactions of auditory and visual inputs have been revealed in TRN cells (Kimura, 2014). To determine whether such sensory interaction could extend across modalities as a universal neural mechanism, the present study examined TRN cell activities elicited by auditory and cutaneous electrical stimulations in anesthetized rats. Juxta-cellular recording and labeling techniques were used. Recordings were obtained from 129 cells. Auditory or somatosensory responses were modulated by subthreshold electrical stimulation or sound (noise burst) in the majority of recordings (77 of 85 auditory and 13 of 15 somatosensory cells). Additionally, 22 bimodal cells and seven cells that responded only to combined stimulation were recognized. Suppression was predominant in modulation that was observed in both early and repeatedly evoked late responses. Combined stimulation also induced de novo cell activities. Further, response latency and burst spiking were modulated. Axonal projections of cells showing modulation terminated in first- or higher-order thalamic nuclei. Nine auditory cells projected to somatosensory thalamic nuclei. These results suggest that the TRN could regulate sensory processing in the loop circuitry between the thalamus and cortex through the sensory interaction pervasive across modalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mitosis Detection for Invasive Breast Cancer Grading in Histopathological Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Angshuman; Mukherjee, Dipti Prasad

    2015-11-01

    Histopathological grading of cancer not only offers an insight to the patients' prognosis but also helps in making individual treatment plans. Mitosis counts in histopathological slides play a crucial role for invasive breast cancer grading using the Nottingham grading system. Pathologists perform this grading by manual examinations of a few thousand images for each patient. Hence, finding the mitotic figures from these images is a tedious job and also prone to observer variability due to variations in the appearances of the mitotic cells. We propose a fast and accurate approach for automatic mitosis detection from histopathological images. We employ area morphological scale space for cell segmentation. The scale space is constructed in a novel manner by restricting the scales with the maximization of relative-entropy between the cells and the background. This results in precise cell segmentation. The segmented cells are classified in mitotic and non-mitotic category using the random forest classifier. Experiments show at least 12% improvement in F1 score on more than 450 histopathological images at 40× magnification.

  10. Kindlin1 regulates microtubule function to ensure normal mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hitesh; Stavrou, Ifigeneia; Shrestha, Roshan L; Draviam, Viji; Frame, Margaret C; Brunton, Valerie G

    2016-08-01

    Loss of Kindlin 1 (Kin1) results in the skin blistering disorder Kindler Syndrome (KS), whose symptoms also include skin atrophy and reduced keratinocyte proliferation. Kin1 binds to integrins to modulate their activation and more recently it has been shown to regulate mitotic spindles and cell survival in a Plk1-dependent manner. Here we report that short-term Kin1 deletion in mouse skin results in impaired mitosis, which is associated with reduced acetylated tubulin (ac-tub) levels and cell proliferation. In cells, impaired mitosis and reduced ac-tub levels are also accompanied by reduced microtubule stability, all of which are rescued by HDAC6 inhibition. The ability of Kin1 to regulate HDAC6-dependent cellular ac-tub levels is dependent on its phosphorylation by Plk1. Taken together, these data define a novel role for Kin1 in microtubule acetylation and stability and offer a mechanistic insight into how certain KS phenotypes, such as skin atrophy and reduced cell proliferation, arise. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS.

  11. INPP5E Preserves Genomic Stability through Regulation of Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra Potchanant, Elizabeth A; Cerabona, Donna; Sater, Zahi Abdul; He, Ying; Sun, Zejin; Gehlhausen, Jeff; Nalepa, Grzegorz

    2017-03-15

    The partially understood phosphoinositide signaling cascade regulates multiple aspects of cellular metabolism. Previous studies revealed that INPP5E, the inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase that is mutated in the developmental disorders Joubert and MORM syndromes, is essential for the function of the primary cilium and maintenance of phosphoinositide balance in nondividing cells. Here, we report that INPP5E further contributes to cellular homeostasis by regulating cell division. We found that silencing or genetic knockout of INPP5E in human and murine cells impairs the spindle assembly checkpoint, centrosome and spindle function, and maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Consistent with a cell cycle regulatory role, we found that INPP5E expression is cell cycle dependent, peaking at mitotic entry. INPP5E localizes to centrosomes, chromosomes, and kinetochores in early mitosis and shuttles to the midzone spindle at mitotic exit. Our findings identify the previously unknown, essential role of INPP5E in mitosis and prevention of aneuploidy, providing a new perspective on the function of this phosphoinositide phosphatase in health and development. Copyright © 2017 Sierra Potchanant et al.

  12. One pot synthesis of highly luminescent polyethylene glycol anchored carbon dots functionalized with a nuclear localization signal peptide for cell nucleus imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Jiang, Weihua; Qiu, Lipeng; Jiang, Xuewei; Zuo, Daiying; Wang, Dongkai; Yang, Li

    2015-03-01

    Strong blue fluorescent polyethylene glycol (PEG) anchored carbon nitride dots (CDs@PEG) with a high quantum yield (QY) of 75.8% have been synthesized by a one step hydrothermal treatment. CDs with a diameter of ca. 6 nm are well dispersed in water and present a graphite-like structure. Photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal that CDs display excitation-dependent behavior and are stable under various test conditions. Based on the as-prepared CDs, we designed novel cell nucleus targeting imaging carbon dots functionalized with a nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. The favourable biocompatibilities of CDs and NLS modified CDs (NLS-CDs) are confirmed by in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Importantly, intracellular localization experiments in MCF7 and A549 cells demonstrate that NLS-CDs could be internalized in the nucleus and show blue light, which indicates that CDs may serve as cell nucleus imaging probes.Strong blue fluorescent polyethylene glycol (PEG) anchored carbon nitride dots (CDs@PEG) with a high quantum yield (QY) of 75.8% have been synthesized by a one step hydrothermal treatment. CDs with a diameter of ca. 6 nm are well dispersed in water and present a graphite-like structure. Photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal that CDs display excitation-dependent behavior and are stable under various test conditions. Based on the as-prepared CDs, we designed novel cell nucleus targeting imaging carbon dots functionalized with a nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. The favourable biocompatibilities of CDs and NLS modified CDs (NLS-CDs) are confirmed by in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Importantly, intracellular localization experiments in MCF7 and A549 cells demonstrate that NLS-CDs could be internalized in the nucleus and show blue light, which indicates that CDs may serve as cell nucleus imaging probes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The formulation of PEGylation CD optimization procedure, Table S1 and Fig. S1-S7. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01080

  13. High amplitude and low frequency cyclic mechanical strain promotes degeneration of human nucleus pulposus cells via the NF-κB p65 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengjie; Li, Jie; Tian, Jiwei; Yu, Zhenghong; Gao, Kun; Shao, Jia; Li, Ang; Xing, Shuai; Dong, Yonghui; Li, Zhiyong; Gao, Yanzheng; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J

    2018-03-25

    Disc degeneration alters the structure and function of intervertebral discs and is the basis of spinal degenerative diseases. To establish the molecular mechanism of intervertebral disc degeneration caused by mechanical strain, this study examined the effects of different amplitude (3%, 9%, 19%) cyclic mechanical strain (CMS) at a low frequency (0.01 Hz) on the secretion of cartilage extracellular matrix, expression of inflammatory cytokines and catabolic proteases, and activation of NF-κB signaling pathway in human nucleus pulposus cells. We also investigated effects of low frequency and high amplitude (19%) CMS on degeneration of human nucleus pulposus cells in the presence or absence of p65 inhibitor, p65 silencing shRNA, or p65 overexpression. While 3% CMS did not significantly decrease aggrecan or type II collagen expression, or increase TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 expression, 9% and 19% CMS showed the significant effects. Low frequency and high amplitude (19%) CMS was found to promote p65 activation in human nucleus pulposus cells, and IL-1β was found to promote p65 nuclear translocation though IκB kinase phosphorylation. Furthermore, degeneration process of nucleus pulposus cells was found attenuated in the presence of p65 inhibitor or p65 silencing shRNA, but promoted with p65 overexpression. These data suggest that high amplitude and low frequency CMS could promote degeneration of human nucleus pulposus cells significantly via the NF-κB p65 pathway. Our findings have uncovered the effect of CMS on human nucleus pulposus cell degeneration and have identified a previously unknown intrinsic underlying mechanism. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. DNA-damage response during mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P; Zaki, Bassem I; Compton, Duane A

    2014-11-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here, we show that activation of the DNA-damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and PLK1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or CHK2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, the DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs, creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. The genome-protective role of the DDR depends on its ability to delay cell division until damaged DNA can be fully repaired. Here, we show that when DNA damage is induced during mitosis, the DDR unexpectedly induces errors in the segregation of entire chromosomes, thus linking structural and numerical chromosomal instabilities. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Nuclear reprogramming of somatic nucleus hybridized with embryonic stem cells by electrofusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Masako; Tada, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Cell fusion is a powerful tool for understanding the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic reprogramming. In hybrid cells of somatic cells and pluripotential stem cells, including embryonic stem (ES) and embryonic germ cells, somatic nuclei acquire pluripotential competence. ES and embryonic germ cells retain intrinsic trans activity to induce epigenetic reprogramming. For generating hybrid cells, we have used the technique of electrofusion. Electrofusion is a highly effective, reproducible, and biomedically safe in vitro system. For successful cell fusion, two sequential steps of electric pulse stimulation are required for the alignment (pearl chain formation) of two different types of cells between electrodes in response to alternating current stimulation and for the fusion of cytoplasmic membranes by direct current stimulation. Optimal conditions for electrofusion with a pulse generator are introduced for ES and somatic cell fusion. Topics in the field of stem cell research include the successful production of cloned animals via the epigenetic reprogramming of somatic cells and contribution of spontaneous cell fusion to generating intrinsic plasticity of tissue stem cells. Cell fusion technology may make important contributions to the fields of epigenetic reprogramming and regenerative medicine.

  16. Continuation of mitosis after selective laser microbeam destruction of the centriolar region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berns, N.W.; Richardson, S.M.

    1977-01-01

    The centriole regions of prophase PTK2 cells were irradiated with a laser microbeam. Cells continued through mitosis normally. Ultrastructural analysis revealed either an absence of centrioles or severely damaged centrioles at the irradiated poles. Microtubules appeared to focus into pericentriolar cloud material

  17. Dysregulation of the mitosis-meiosis switch in testicular carcinoma in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Nielsen, John E; Almstrup, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    , except in spermatocytic seminoma (not derived from CIS). In conclusion, this study indicates that meiosis signalling is dysregulated in CIS cells and that a key regulator of the mitosis-meiosis switch, DMRT1, is expressed in 'early-stage' CIS cells but is down-regulated with further invasive...

  18. Genome reactivation after the silence in mitosis: recapitulating mechanisms of development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaret, Kenneth S

    2014-04-28

    Transcription is silenced during mitosis and reactivated at mitotic exit. The dynamics and identities of "bookmarking" transcription factors and chromatin marks that mediate reactivation often recapitulate those observed during cell identity establishment in development. Thus, features of postmitotic gene reactivation can provide insights into mechanisms of developmental cell fate establishment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Continuation of mitosis after selective laser microbeam destruction of the centriolar region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berns, N.W.; Richardson, S.M.

    1977-12-01

    The centriole regions of prophase PTK2 cells were irradiated with a laser microbeam. Cells continued through mitosis normally. Ultrastructural analysis revealed either an absence of centrioles or severely damaged centrioles at the irradiated poles. Microtubules appeared to focus into pericentriolar cloud material.

  20. Nuclear transport factors: global regulation of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Douglass J; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew S; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear import receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator - the γ-TuRC complex - and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores toward the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide is expressed in the human and the rat cultured nucleus pulposus cells and suppresses apoptosis induced by hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haolin Sun

    Full Text Available Apoptosis plays pivotal role in the pathogenesis of degenerative disc diseases, which is the primary contributor to low back pain. Although the role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S in cell apoptosis is well appreciated, the effects and mechanism that H2S regulates the program death of intervertebral disc cell are not yet elucidated. In this study, we utilized the nucleus pulposus (NP from patients with lumbar disc herniation to investigate the relationship between endogenous H2S and NP cells apoptosis in human. Furthermore, we analyzed primary rat NP cells to study the effects of exogenous H2S on hypoxia induced cell apoptosis. Human NP samples were obtained from patients with lumbar disc herniation and were divided into uncontained and contained herniation groups. Using immunohistochemistry staining and sulphur-sensitive electrode, we detected the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, as well as the production of endogenous H2S in human NP. Tunel staining showed increased apoptosis in NP from herniated disc; and there was significant correlation between H2S generation and apoptosis in human NP. CoCl2 was then used to induce hypoxia in cultured primary rat NP cells. Annexin V staining indicated that exogenous NaHS attenuated hypoxia induced apoptosis in rat NP cells. Furthermore, hypoxia significantly increased the levels of multiple apoptosis associated proteins (Fas, Cytochromes C, Caspase 9 and cleaved-Caspase-3 in cells, which were eliminated by NaHS. Our study demonstrates the presence of endogenous H2S in human intervertebral disc; and the endogenous H2S generation rate is associated with NP apoptosis in herniated disc. In vitro study showes exogenous H2S donor attenuates hypoxia induced apoptosis in primary rat NP cells. Thus, our work provides insights that H2S may have beneficial effects in treating degenerative disc diseases.

  2. Meeting report--Getting Into and Out of Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchedlishvili, Nunu; Jonak, Katarzyna; Saurin, Adrian T

    2015-11-15

    The Company of Biologists Workshop 'Getting Into and Out of Mitosis' was held 10-13 May 2015 at Wiston House in West Sussex, UK. The workshop brought together researchers from wide-ranging disciplines and provided a forum to discuss their latest work on the control of cell division from mitotic entry to exit. This report highlights the main topics and summarises the discussion around the key themes and questions that emerged from the meeting. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Mitosis-targeted anti-cancer therapies: where they stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K-S; Koh, C-G; Li, H-Y

    2012-10-18

    The strategy of clinically targeting cancerous cells at their most vulnerable state during mitosis has instigated numerous studies into the mitotic cell death (MCD) pathway. As the hallmark of cancer revolves around cell-cycle deregulation, it is not surprising that antimitotic therapies are effective against the abnormal proliferation of transformed cells. Moreover, these antimitotic drugs are also highly selective and sensitive. Despite the robust rate of discovery and the development of mitosis-selective inhibitors, the unpredictable complexities of the human body's response to these drugs still herald the biggest challenge towards clinical success. Undoubtedly, the need to bridge the gap between promising preclinical trials and effective translational bedside treatment prompts further investigations towards mapping out the mechanistic pathways of MCD, understanding how these drugs work as medicine in the body and more comprehensive target validations. In this review, current antimitotic agents are summarized with particular emphasis on the evaluation of their clinical efficacy as well as their limitations. In addition, we discuss the basis behind the lack of activity of these inhibitors in human trials and the potential and future directions of mitotic anticancer strategies.

  4. Selective deletion of cochlear hair cells causes rapid age-dependent changes in spiral ganglion and cochlear nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Ling; Strong, Melissa K; Kaur, Tejbeer; Juiz, Jose M; Oesterle, Elizabeth C; Hume, Clifford; Warchol, Mark E; Palmiter, Richard D; Rubel, Edwin W

    2015-05-20

    During nervous system development, critical periods are usually defined as early periods during which manipulations dramatically change neuronal structure or function, whereas the same manipulations in mature animals have little or no effect on the same property. Neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus (CN) are dependent on excitatory afferent input for survival during a critical period of development. Cochlear removal in young mammals and birds results in rapid death of target neurons in the CN. Cochlear removal in older animals results in little or no neuron death. However, the extent to which hair-cell-specific afferent activity prevents neuronal death in the neonatal brain is unknown. We further explore this phenomenon using a new mouse model that allows temporal control of cochlear hair cell deletion. Hair cells express the human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor behind the Pou4f3 promoter. Injections of DT resulted in nearly complete loss of organ of Corti hair cells within 1 week of injection regardless of the age of injection. Injection of DT did not influence surrounding supporting cells directly in the sensory epithelium or spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Loss of hair cells in neonates resulted in rapid and profound neuronal loss in the ventral CN, but not when hair cells were eliminated at a more mature age. In addition, normal survival of SGNs was dependent on hair cell integrity early in development and less so in mature animals. This defines a previously undocumented critical period for SGN survival. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357878-14$15.00/0.

  5. The response of nucleus pulposus cell senescence to static and dynamic compressions in a disc organ culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianmin; Pang, Lianglong; Jiao, Shouguo

    2018-04-27

    Mechanical stimuli obviously affect disc nucleus pulposus (NP) biology. Previous studies have indicated that static compression exhibits detrimental effects on disc biology compared with dynamic compression. To study disc NP cell senescence under static compression and dynamic compression in a disc organ culture, porcine discs were cultured and subjected to compression (static compression: 0.4 MPa for 4 h once per day; dynamic compression: 0.4 MPa at a frequency of 1.0 Hz for 4 h once per day) for 7 days using a self-developed mechanically active bioreactor. The non-compressed discs were used as controls. Compared with the dynamic compression, static compression significantly promoted disc NP cell senescence, reflected by the increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) activity, senescence-associated heterochromatic foci (SAHF) formation and senescence markers expression, and the decreased telomerase (TE) activity and NP matrix biosynthesis. Static compression accelerates disc NP cell senescence compared with the dynamic compression in a disc organ culture. The present study provides that acceleration of NP cell senescence may be involved in previously reported static compression-mediated disc NP degenerative changes. © 2018 The Author(s).

  6. Variations in gene and protein expression in canine chondrodystrophic nucleus pulposus cells following long-term three-dimensional culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munetaka Iwata

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration greatly affects quality of life. The nucleus pulposus (NP of chondrodystrophic dog breeds (CDBs is similar to the human NP, because the cells disappear with age and are replaced by fibrochondrocyte-like cells. However, because IVD develops as early as within the first year of life, we used canines as a model to investigate in vitro the mechanisms underlying IVD degeneration. Specifically, we evaluated the potential of a three-dimensional (3D culture of healthy NP as an in vitro model system to investigate the mechanisms of IVD degeneration. Agarose hydrogels were populated with healthy NP cells from beagles after performing magnetic resonance imaging, and mRNA expression profiles and pericellular extracellular matrix (ECM protein distribution were determined. After 25 days of 3D culture, there was a tendency for redifferentiation into the native NP phenotype, and mRNA levels of Col2A1, COMP, and CK18 were not significantly different from those of freshly isolated cells. Our findings suggest that long-term 3D culture promoted chondrodystrophic NP redifferentiation through reconstruction of the pericellular microenvironment. Further, lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced expression of TNF-α, MMP3, MMP13, VEGF, and PGES mRNA in the 3D cultures, creating a molecular milieu that mimics that of degenerated NP. These results suggest that this in vitro model represents a reliable and cost-effective tool for evaluating new therapies for disc degeneration.

  7. Application of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Intended to Investigate the Reward Response of Nucleus Accumbens in a Local Demyelination Model of Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Goodarzvand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Demyelination is the most common complication of multiple sclerosis in that the myelin sheaths around the axons and cerebral nucleus are damaged. The accumbens nucleus is a part of the striatum of the CNS that has role in reward response. Recently, stem cell therapy has been considered by many researchers. Therefore, the aim of this study was application of mesenchymal stem cells to assess demyelination (apoptosis, remyelination (neuronal differentiation and reward response of accumbens nucleus in a local demyelination model. Method and Materials: Male Wistar rats weighting 250-300 gr were anesthetized with chloral hydrate. Ethidium bromide was directly injected into the nucleus accumbens. A thin canola was mounted into the ventricle coordination, simultaneously. Animals were divided into 4 groups: Control (received saline as solvent of EB, sham, PBS 14 and 28 (received PBS as vehicle of stem cell and experiments 14 and 28 (received mesenchymal 5* 100000 of stem cells. Conditioned Place Preference (CPP was done in days zero, 14 and 28 post surgery and morphine was subcutaneously injected to assess reward response. Results: This study showed CCP increment in experiment groups compared to PBS ones, significantly. Discussion: The results of the present study suggesting stem cell therapy as an effective factor to swift the healing processes of the CNS and to improve reward response should be considered.

  8. Clathrin is spindle-associated but not essential for mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Borlido

    Full Text Available Clathrin is a multimeric protein involved in vesicle coat assembly. Recently clathrin distribution was reported to change during the cell cycle and was found to associate with the mitotic spindle. Here we test whether the recruitment of clathrin to the spindle is indicative of a critical functional contribution to mitosis.Previously a chicken pre-B lymphoma cell line (DKO-R was developed in which the endogenous clathrin heavy chain alleles were replaced with the human clathrin heavy chain under the control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter. Receptor-mediated and fluid-phase endocytosis were significantly inhibited in this line following clathrin knockout, and we used this to explore the significance of clathrin heavy chain expression for cell cycle progression. We confirmed using confocal microscopy that clathrin colocalised with tubulin at mitotic spindles. Using a propidium iodide flow cytometric assay we found no statistical difference in the cell cycle distribution of the knockout cells versus the wild-type. Additionally, we showed that the ploidy and the recovery kinetics following cell cycle arrest with nocodazole were unchanged by repressing clathrin heavy chain expression.We conclude that the association of clathrin with the mitotic spindle and the contribution of clathrin to endocytosis are evolutionarily conserved. However we find that the contribution of clathrin to mitosis is less robust and dependent on cellular context. In other cell-lines silencing RNA has been used by others to knockdown clathrin expression resulting in an increase in the mitotic index of the cells. We show an effect on the G2/M phase population of clathrin knockdown in HEK293 cells but show that repressing clathrin expression in the DKO-R cell-line has no effect on the size of this population. Consequently this work highlights the need for a more detailed molecular understanding of the recruitment and function of clathrin at the spindle, since the

  9. The nucleus of differentiated root plant cells: modifications induced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Lingua

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The nuclei of plant cells show marked differences in chromatin organisation, related to their DNA content, which ranges from the type with large strands of condensed chromatin (reticulate or chromonematic nuclei to one with mostly decondensed chromatin (chromocentric or diffuse nuclei. A loosening of the chromatin structure generally occurs in actively metabolising cells, such as differentiating and secretory cells, in relation to their high transcriptional activity. Endoreduplication may occur, especially in plants with a small genome, which increases the availability of nuclear templates, the synthesis of DNA, and probably regulates gene expression. Here we describe structural and quantitative changes of the chromatin and their relationship with transcription that occur in differentiated cells following an increase of their metabolism. The nuclei of root cortical cells of three plants with different 2C DNA content (Allium porrum, Pisum sativum and Lycopersicon esculentm and their modifications induced by arbuscular mycorrhization, which strongly increase the metabolic activity of colonised cells, are taken as examples.

  10. The mitosis-regulating and protein-protein interaction activities of astrin are controlled by aurora-A-induced phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Shao-Chih; Chen, Jo-Mei Maureen; Wei, Tong-You Wade; Cheng, Tai-Shan; Wang, Ya-Hui Candice; Ku, Chia-Feng; Lian, Chiao-Hsuan; Liu, Chun-Chih Jared; Kuo, Yi-Chun; Yu, Chang-Tze Ricky

    2014-09-01

    Cells display dramatic morphological changes in mitosis, where numerous factors form regulatory networks to orchestrate the complicated process, resulting in extreme fidelity of the segregation of duplicated chromosomes into two daughter cells. Astrin regulates several aspects of mitosis, such as maintaining the cohesion of sister chromatids by inactivating Separase and stabilizing spindle, aligning and segregating chromosomes, and silencing spindle assembly checkpoint by interacting with Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein (SKAP) and cytoplasmic linker-associated protein-1α (CLASP-1α). To understand how Astrin is regulated in mitosis, we report here that Astrin acts as a mitotic phosphoprotein, and Aurora-A phosphorylates Astrin at Ser(115). The phosphorylation-deficient mutant Astrin S115A abnormally activates spindle assembly checkpoint and delays mitosis progression, decreases spindle stability, and induces chromosome misalignment. Mechanistic analyses reveal that Astrin phosphorylation mimicking mutant S115D, instead of S115A, binds and induces ubiquitination and degradation of securin, which sequentially activates Separase, an enzyme required for the separation of sister chromatids. Moreover, S115A fails to bind mitosis regulators, including SKAP and CLASP-1α, which results in the mitotic defects observed in Astrin S115A-transfected cells. In conclusion, Aurora-A phosphorylates Astrin and guides the binding of Astrin to its cellular partners, which ensures proper progression of mitosis. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Probing MPS1 function in mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliedrecht, T.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of MPS1 in mitosis has been established for several years. Even though recent years have seen quite some development in the elucidation of the molecular pathways concerning MPS1 signaling, many aspects remained to be uncovered at the onset of the research presented in this thesis. In

  12. Mitosis and cell death in the optic lobes of workers, queens and drones of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) during metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roat, Thaisa Cristina; Landim, Carminda da Cruz

    2010-09-01

    Colonies of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, consist of males and two female castes: workers and queens. The castes and males from A. mellifera have a distinct morphology, physiology and behaviour that correlate with their roles in the society and are characterized by some brain polymorphisms. Compound eyes are one of the characteristics that differ among the castes and sexes. A. mellifera is a holometabolous insect; therefore, the development of adult organs during metamorphosis, which will produce these differences, requires the precise coordination of three main programmed cellular processes: proliferation, differentiation and death. These processes take place simultaneously during pupation. Our purpose was to investigate cell division and death in the optic lobes (OL) of workers, queens and males during pupation to identify how the differences in the compound eyes in adults of these classes are achieved. The results showed that OL differentiation follows a similar pattern in the three classes of individuals studied, without structural differences in their development. The main non-structural differences involve cell division, mortality rates and timing. The results suggest a modelling of the brain during differentiation, which contributes to the specific functions of each individual class.

  13. Antioxidants in aqueous extract of Myristica fragrans (Houtt.) suppress mitosis and cyclophosphamide-induced chromosomal aberrations in Allium cepa L. cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinboro, Akeem; Mohamed, Kamaruzaman Bin; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza; Sofiman, Othman Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    In this study, freeze-dried water extract from the leaves of Myristica fragrans (Houtt.) was tested for mutagenic and antimutagenic potentials using the Allium cepa assay. Freeze-dried water extract alone and its combination with cyclophosphamide (CP) (50 mg/kg) were separately dissolved in tap water at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 mg/kg. Onions (A. cepa) were suspended in the solutions and controls for 48 h in the dark. Root tips were prepared for microscopic evaluation. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals’ scavenging power of the extract was tested using butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as standards. Water extract of Myristica fragrans scavenged free radicals better than BHA, but worse than BHT. The extract alone, as well as in combination with CP suppressed cell division, and induced chromosomal aberrations that were insignificantly different from the negative control (P≤0.05). However, cytotoxic and mutagenic actions of CP were considerably suppressed. The observed effects on cell division and chromosomes of A. cepa may be principally connected to the antioxidant properties of the extract. The obtained results suggest mitodepressive and antimutagenic potentials of water extract of the leaves of M. fragrans as desirable properties of a promising anticancer agent. PMID:22042656

  14. Experimental risk assessment of bovine viral diarrhea virus transmission via in vitro embryo production using somatic cell nucleus transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, K; Chen, S H; Sadeghieh, S; Guerra, T; Xiang, T; Meredith, J; Polejaeva, I

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a comprehensive risk assessment on infectious disease transmission in the system of in vitro embryo production via somatic cell nucleus transfer (SCNT) technology using bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) as a model. The risks of BVDV transmission in each step of the SCNT embryo production procedure, from donor cells to preimplantation SCNT embryo culture, were carefully examined using a sensitive real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. The identified primary source of BVDV transmission in SCNT embryo production was donor cell infection, most likely caused by contaminated fetal bovine serum in the culture medium. The risk of disease transmission through contaminated oocytes from an abattoir was relatively low, and it can be greatly minimized by cumulus cell removal and adequate oocyte washing procedures. Of the 200 cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) and more than 1500 cumulus cell-free oocyte (CFO) samples collected from multiple sources over a course of 7 months, only 2.5% of the COCs were BVDV positive, and all of the CFOs (100%) were BVDV negative. To evaluate the risk of BVDV introduction during in vitro SCNT embryo culture, 324 SCNT embryos were produced from 18 different cell lines using oocytes from 26 different batches collected over a course of 9 months. The embryos were cultured in vitro for 7 days and then tested for BVDV. All of the 324 SCNT embryos (100%) were negative, indicating that the embryo culture system is virtually risk-free for BVDV transmission. Based on these results, a standard operational protocol (SOP) for SCNT embryo production was proposed to greatly minimize the risk of BVDV transmission through the SCNT embryo production system. This SOP could be a starting point to produce a SCNT system that is virtually risk-free for disease transmission in general.

  15. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L.; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  16. Novel functions for the endocytic regulatory proteins MICAL-L1 and EHD1 in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, James B; Katafiasz, Dawn; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    During interphase, recycling endosomes mediate the transport of internalized cargo back to the plasma membrane. However, in mitotic cells, recycling endosomes are essential for the completion of cytokinesis, the last phase of mitosis that promotes the physical separation the two daughter cells. Despite recent advances, our understanding of the molecular determinants that regulate recycling endosome dynamics during cytokinesis remains incomplete. We have previously demonstrated that Molecule Interacting with CasL Like-1 (MICAL-L1) and C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain protein 1 (EHD1) coordinately regulate receptor transport from tubular recycling endosomes during interphase. However, their potential roles in controlling cytokinesis had not been addressed. In this study, we show that MICAL-L1 and EHD1 regulate mitosis. Depletion of either protein resulted in increased numbers of bi-nucleated cells. We provide evidence that bi-nucleation in MICAL-L1- and EHD1-depleted cells is a consequence of impaired recycling endosome transport during late cytokinesis. However, depletion of MICAL-L1, but not EHD1, resulted in aberrant chromosome alignment and lagging chromosomes, suggesting an EHD1-independent function for MICAL-L1 earlier in mitosis. Moreover, we provide evidence that MICAL-L1 and EHD1 differentially influence microtubule dynamics during early and late mitosis. Collectively, our new data suggest several unanticipated roles for MICAL-L1 and EHD1 during the cell cycle. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Regulation of nuclear envelope dynamics via APC/C is necessary for the progression of semi-open mitosis in Schizosaccharomyces japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Keita; Shiwa, Yuh; Takada, Hiraku; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Niki, Hironori

    2013-09-01

    Three types of mitosis, which are open, closed or semi-open mitosis, function in eukaryotic cells, respectively. The open mitosis involves breakage of the nuclear envelope before nuclear division, whereas the closed mitosis proceeds with an intact nuclear envelope. To understand the mechanism and significance of three types of mitotic division in eukaryotes, we investigated the process of semi-open mitosis, in which the nuclear envelope is only partially broken, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces japonicus. In anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) mutants of Sz. japonicus, the nuclear envelope remained relatively intact during anaphase, resulting in impaired semi-open mitosis. As a suppressor of apc2 mutant, a mutation of Oar2, which was a 3-oxoacyl-[acyl carrier protein] reductase, was obtained. The level of the Oar2, which had two destruction-box motifs recognized by APC/C, was increased in APC/C mutants. Furthermore, the defective semi-open mitosis observed in an apc2 mutant was restored by mutated oar2+. Based on these findings, we propose that APC/C regulates the dynamics of the nuclear envelope through degradation of Oar2 dependent on APC/C during the metaphase-to-anaphase transition of semi-open mitosis in Sz. japonicus. © 2013 The Authors Genes to Cells © 2013 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. De novo post-pollen mitosis II tobacco pollen tube transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Hafidh, S. (Said); Breznenová, K. (Katarína); Honys, D. (David)

    2012-01-01

    In our previous study we applied the Agilent 44K tobacco gene chip to introduce and analyze the tobacco male gametophyte transcriptome in mature pollen and 4h pollen tubes. Here we extended our analysis post-pollen mitosis II (PMII) by including a new data set obtained from more advanced stage of the ongoing progamic phase – pollen tubes cultivated in vitro for 24 h. Pollen mitosis II marks key events in the control of male gametophyte development, the production of two sperm cells. In bicell...

  19. Mechanobiology of bone marrow stem cells: from myosin-II forces to compliance of matrix and nucleus in cell forms and fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-Won; Swift, Joe; Ivanovska, Irena; Spinler, Kyle R; Buxboim, Amnon; Discher, Dennis E

    2013-10-01

    Adult stem cells and progenitors are of great interest for their clinical application as well as their potential to reveal deep sensitivities to microenvironmental factors. The bone marrow is a niche for at least two types of stem cells, and the prototype is the hematopoietic stem cell/progenitors (HSC/Ps), which have saved many thousands of patients for several decades now. In bone marrow, HSC/Ps interact functionally with marrow stromal cells that are often referred to as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or derivatives thereof. Myosin and matrix elasticity greatly affect MSC function, and these mechanobiological factors are now being explored with HSC/Ps both in vitro and in vivo. Also emerging is a role for the nucleus as a mechanically sensitive organelle that is semi-permeable to transcription factors which are modified for nuclear entry by cytoplasmic mechanobiological pathways. Since therapies envisioned with induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells generally involve in vitro commitment to an adult stem cell or progenitor, a very deep understanding of stem cell mechanobiology is essential to progress with these multi-potent cells. © 2013 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Morphometry and morphology of nucleus of the Sertoli and interstitial cells of the tambaqui Colossoma macropomum (Cuvier, 1881) (Pisces: Characidae) during the reproductive cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaghi, L S O; Mitsuiki, D; Santos, H S L; Pacheco, M R; Ganeco, L N

    2003-02-01

    This study allowed the characterization of the tambaqui Colossoma macropomum testes structural organization, emphasizing Sertoli and interstitial cells and analyzing morphometrically the Sertoli cell nucleus diameter and the interstitial tissue area during the reproductive cycle. Fragments of tambaqui testes were collected in the following reproductive cycle stages: immature, resting, maturation I and II, mature, and regression, and were histologically processed. The Sertoli cells were found at the periphery of the cysts of germinative lineage cells and the nuclei were shown to be smaller as these cells developed. The interstitial cells were better observed between the seminiferous lobules next to vessels in the interstitial tissue of maturing testes.

  1. Downregulation of Wip1 phosphatase modulates the cellular threshold of DNA damage signaling in mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macurek, Libor; Benada, Jan; Müllers, Erik; Halim, Vincentius A.; Krejčíková, Kateřina; Burdová, Kamila; Pecháčková, Sona; Hodný, Zdeněk; Lindqvist, Arne; Medema, René H.; Bartek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Cells are constantly challenged by DNA damage and protect their genome integrity by activation of an evolutionary conserved DNA damage response pathway (DDR). A central core of DDR is composed of a spatiotemporally ordered net of post-translational modifications, among which protein phosphorylation plays a major role. Activation of checkpoint kinases ATM/ATR and Chk1/2 leads to a temporal arrest in cell cycle progression (checkpoint) and allows time for DNA repair. Following DNA repair, cells re-enter the cell cycle by checkpoint recovery. Wip1 phosphatase (also called PPM1D) dephosphorylates multiple proteins involved in DDR and is essential for timely termination of the DDR. Here we have investigated how Wip1 is regulated in the context of the cell cycle. We found that Wip1 activity is downregulated by several mechanisms during mitosis. Wip1 protein abundance increases from G1 phase to G2 and declines in mitosis. Decreased abundance of Wip1 during mitosis is caused by proteasomal degradation. In addition, Wip1 is phosphorylated at multiple residues during mitosis, and this leads to inhibition of its enzymatic activity. Importantly, ectopic expression of Wip1 reduced γH2AX staining in mitotic cells and decreased the number of 53BP1 nuclear bodies in G1 cells. We propose that the combined decrease and inhibition of Wip1 in mitosis decreases the threshold necessary for DDR activation and enables cells to react adequately even to modest levels of DNA damage encountered during unperturbed mitotic progression. PMID:23255129

  2. SGT, a Hsp90β binding partner, is accumulated in the nucleus during cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Hongyan; Wang Hanzhou; Zong Hongliang; Chen Xiaoning; Wang Yanlin; Yun Xiaojing; Wu Yihong; Wang Jiadong; Gu Jianxin

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we reported that small glutamine-rich TPR-containing protein (SGT) interacted with not only Hsp90α but also Hsp90β. Confocal analysis showed that treatment of cells with Hsp90-specific inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) disrupted the interaction of SGT with Hsp90β and this contributed to the increase of nuclear localization of SGT in HeLa cells. The increased nuclear localization of SGT was further confirmed by the Western blotting in GA-treated HeLa cells and H1299 cells. In our previous study, SGT was found to be a new pro-apoptotic factor, so we wondered whether the sub-cellular localization of SGT was related with cell apoptosis. By confocal analysis we found that the nuclear import of SGT was significantly increased in STS-induced apoptotic HeLa cells, which implied that the sub-cellular localization of SGT was closely associated with Hsp90β and apoptosis

  3. Cell-Poor Septa Separate Representations of Digits in the Ventroposterior Nucleus of the Thalamus in Monkeys and Prosimian Galagos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hui-Xin; Gharbawie, Omar A.; Wong, Peiyan; Kaas, Jon H.

    2013-01-01

    The architectonic features of the ventroposterior nucleus (VP) were visualized in coronal brain sections from two macaque monkeys, two owl monkeys, two squirrel monkeys, and three galagos that were processed for cytochrome oxidase, Nissl bodies, or the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2). The traditional ventroposterior medial (VPM) and ventroposterior lateral (VPL) subnuclei were easily identified, as well as the forelimb and hindlimb compartments of VPL, as they were separated by poorly staining, cell-poor septa. Septa also separated other cell groups within VPM and VPL, specifically in the medial compartment of VPL representing the hand (hand VPL). In one squirrel monkey and one galago we demonstrated that these five groups of cells represent digits 1–5 in a mediolateral sequence by injecting tracers into the cortical representation of single digits, defined by microelectrode recordings, and relating concentrations of labeled neurons to specific cell groups in hand VPL. The results establish the existence of septa that isolate the representation of the five digits in VPL of primates and demonstrate that the isolated cell groups represent digits 1–5 in a mediolateral sequence. The present results show that the septa are especially prominent in brain sections processed for vGluT2, which is expressed in the synaptic terminals of excitatory neurons in most nuclei of the brainstem and thalamus. As vGluT2 is expressed in the synaptic terminations from dorsal columns and trigeminal brainstem nuclei, the effectiveness of vGluT2 preparations in revealing septa in VP likely reflects a lack of synapses using glutamate in the septa. J. Comp. Neurol. 519:738–758, 2011. PMID:21246552

  4. Potential of Human Nucleus Pulposus-Like Cells Derived From Umbilical Cord to Treat Degenerative Disc Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cruet, Mick; Beeravolu, Naimisha; McKee, Christina; Brougham, Jared; Khan, Irfan; Bakshi, Shreeya; Chaudhry, G Rasul

    2018-02-26

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a common spinal disorder that manifests with neck and lower back pain caused by the degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs). Currently, there is no treatment to cure this debilitating ailment. To investigate the potential of nucleus pulposus (NP)-like cells (NPCs) derived from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to restore degenerated IVDs using a rabbit DDD model. NPCs differentiated from MSCs were characterized using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical analysis. MSCs and NPCs were labeled with fluorescent dye, PKH26, and transplanted into degenerated IVDs of a rabbit model of DDD (n = 9 each). Magnetic resonance imaging of the IVDs was performed before and after IVD degeneration, and following cell transplantation. IVDs were extracted 8 wk post-transplantation and analyzed by various biochemical, immunohistological, and molecular techniques. NPC derivatives of MSCs expressed known NP-specific genes, SOX9, ACAN, COL2, FOXF1, and KRT19. Transplanted cells survived, dispersed, and integrated into the degenerated IVDs. IVDs augmented with NPCs showed significant improvement in the histology, cellularity, sulfated glycosaminoglycan and water contents of the NP. In addition, expression of human genes, SOX9, ACAN, COL2, FOXF1, KRT19, PAX6, CA12, and COMP, as well as proteins, SOX9, ACAN, COL2, and FOXF1, suggest NP biosynthesis due to transplantation of NPCs. Based on these results, a molecular mechanism for NP regeneration was proposed. The findings of this study demonstrating feasibility and efficacy of NPCs to regenerate NP should spur interest for clinical studies to treat DDD using cell therapy.

  5. Isotachophoresis for fractionation and recovery of cytoplasmic RNA and nucleus from single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Kentaro; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Santiago, Juan G

    2015-07-01

    There is a substantial need for simultaneous analyses of RNA and DNA from individual single cells. Such analysis provides unique evidence of cell-to-cell differences and the correlation between gene expression and genomic mutation in highly heterogeneous cell populations. We present a novel microfluidic system that leverages isotachophoresis to fractionate and isolate cytoplasmic RNA and genomic DNA (gDNA) from single cells. The system uniquely enables independent, sequence-specific analyses of these critical markers. Our system uses a microfluidic chip with a simple geometry and four end-channel electrodes, and completes the entire process in RNA output reservoirs, each containing high quality and purity aliquots with no measurable cross-contamination of cytoplasmic RNA versus gDNA. We demonstrate our system with simultaneous, sequence-specific quantitation using off-chip RT-qPCR and qPCR for simultaneous cytoplasmic RNA and gDNA analyses, respectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Never tear us a-PARP : Dealing with DNA lesions during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonen, Pepijn M; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2018-01-01

    Tumors defective in homologous recombination (HR) are highly sensitive to poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibition, however the cell biological mechanisms underlying this synthetic lethality remain elusive. We recently identified that PARP inhibitor-induced DNA lesions persist until mitosis,

  7. Centrosomes split in the presence of impaired DNA integrity during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, HMJ; Lemstra, W; Blaauw, EH; van Cappellen, GWA; Kampinga, HH; Sibon, OCM

    A well-established function of centrosomes is their role in accomplishing a successful mitosis that gives rise to a pair of identical daughter cells. We recently showed that DNA replication defects and DNA damage in Drosophila embryos trigger centrosomal changes, but it remained unclear whether

  8. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. Cell-type specific oxytocin gene expression from AAV delivered promoter deletion constructs into the rat supraoptic nucleus in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L Fields

    Full Text Available The magnocellular neurons (MCNs in the hypothalamus selectively express either oxytocin (OXT or vasopressin (AVP neuropeptide genes, a property that defines their phenotypes. Here we examine the molecular basis of this selectivity in the OXT MCNs by stereotaxic microinjections of adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors that contain various OXT gene promoter deletion constructs using EGFP as the reporter into the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON. Two weeks following injection of the AAVs, immunohistochemical assays of EGFP expression from these constructs were done to determine whether the EGFP reporter co-localizes with either the OXT- or AVP-immunoreactivity in the MCNs. The results show that the key elements in the OT gene promoter that regulate the cell-type specific expression the SON are located -216 to -100 bp upstream of the transcription start site. We hypothesize that within this 116 bp domain a repressor exists that inhibits expression specifically in AVP MCNs, thereby leading to the cell-type specific expression of the OXT gene only in the OXT MCNs.

  10. A fraction of neurofibromin interacts with PML bodies in the nucleus of the CCF astrocytoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godin, Fabienne; Villette, Sandrine; Vallee, Beatrice; Doudeau, Michel; Morisset-Lopez, Severine [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), UPR 4301, Universite d' Orleans et INSERM, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Ardourel, Maryvonne; Hevor, Tobias [Laboratoire de Neurobiologie, Universite d' Orleans, BP 6759, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Pichon, Chantal [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), UPR 4301, Universite d' Orleans et INSERM, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Benedetti, Helene, E-mail: helene.benedetti@cnrs-orleans.fr [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), UPR 4301, Universite d' Orleans et INSERM, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We validate the use of specific anti-Nf1 antibodies for immunofluorescence studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detect Nf1 in the cytoplasm and nucleus of CCF cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML nuclear bodies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that there is a direct interaction between a fraction of Nf1 and the PML bodies. -- Abstract: Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a common genetic disease that causes nervous system tumors, and cognitive deficits. It is due to mutations within the NF1 gene, which encodes the Nf1 protein. Nf1 has been shown to be involved in the regulation of Ras, cAMP and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In this study, using immunofluorescence experiments, we have shown a partial nuclear localization of Nf1 in the astrocytoma cell line: CCF and we have demonstrated that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML (promyelocytic leukemia) nuclear bodies. A direct interaction between Nf1 and the multiprotein complex has further been demonstrated using 'in situ' proximity ligation assay (PLA).

  11. Accumulation of transcription factors and cell signaling-related proteins in the nucleus during citrus-Xanthomonas interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, T Swaroopa; Durgeshwar, P; Podile, Appa Rao

    2015-07-20

    The nucleus is the maestro of the cell and is involved in the modulation of cell signaling during stress. We performed a comprehensive nuclear proteome analysis of Citrus sinensis during interaction with host (Xanthomonas citri pv. citri-Xcc) and non-host (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae-Xoo) pathogens. The nuclear proteome was obtained using a sequential method of organelle enrichment and determined by nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 243 proteins accumulated differentially during citrus-Xanthomonas interaction, belonging to 11 functional groups, with signaling and transcription-related proteins dominating. MADS-box transcription factors, DEAD-box RNA helicase and leucine aminopeptidase, mainly involved in jasmonic acid (JA) responses, were in high abundance during non-host interaction (Xoo). Signaling-related proteins like serine/threonine kinase, histones (H3.2, H2A), phosphoglycerate kinase, dynamin, actin and aldolase showed increased accumulation early during Xoo interaction. Our results suggest that there is a possible involvement of JA-triggered defense responses during non-host resistance, with early recognition of the non-host pathogen. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Extrahypothalamic vasopressin and oxytocin in the human brain; presence of vasopressin cells in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fliers, E.; Guldenaar, S. E.; van de Wal, N.; Swaab, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    In the present study, the distribution of extrahypothalamic vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OXT) in the human brain was investigated by means of immunocytochemistry. In the septum verum, few VP fibers were found in the nucleus septalis lateralis and medialis (NSL and NSM), and in the bed nucleus of

  13. Three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories in the human interphase cell nucleus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1998-01-01

    markdownabstractThe synthesis of proteins, maintenance of structure and duplication of the eukaryotic cell itself are all fine-tuned biochemical processes that depend on the precise structural arrangement of the cellular components. The regulation of genes – their transcription and replication -

  14. Induction of chromosome aberrations in unirradiated chromatin after partial irradiation of a cell nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludwików, G.; Xiao, Yun; Hoebe, R. A.; Franken, N. A. P.; Darroudi, F.; Stap, J.; van Oven, C. H.; van Noorden, C. J. F.; Aten, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: It is generally accepted that chromosome exchanges in irradiated cells the formed through interactions between separate DNA doable-strand breaks (DSB). Here we tested whether non-irradiated DNA participate; in the formation of chromosome aberrations wen complex DNA DSB are induced elsewhere

  15. Dynamic imaging demonstrates that pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) suppress IL‐6 transcription in bovine nucleus pulposus cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinyan; Alliston, Tamara; Coughlin, Dezba; Miller, Stephanie; Zhang, Nianli; Waldorff, Erik I.; Ryaby, James T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inflammatory cytokines play a dominant role in the pathogenesis of disc degeneration. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) are noninvasive biophysical stimulus that has been used extensively in the orthopaedic field for many years. However, the specific cellular responses and mechanisms involved are still unclear. The objective of this study was to assess the time‐dependent PEMF effects on pro‐inflammatory factor IL‐6 expression in disc nucleus pulposus cells using a novel green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter system. An MS2‐tagged GFP reporter system driven by IL‐6 promoter was constructed to visualize PEMF treatment effect on IL‐6 transcription in single living cells. IL‐6‐MS2 reporter‐labeled cells were treated with IL‐1α to mimic the in situ inflammatory environment of degenerative disc while simultaneously exposed to PEMF continuously for 4 h. Time‐lapse imaging was recorded using a confocal microscope to track dynamic IL‐6 transcription activity that was demonstrated by GFP. Finally, real‐time RT‐PCR was performed to confirm the imaging data. Live cell imaging demonstrated that pro‐inflammatory factor IL‐1α significantly promoted IL‐6 transcription over time as compared with DMEM basal medium condition. Imaging and PCR data demonstrated that the inductive effect of IL‐1α on IL‐6 expression could be significantly inhibited by PEMF treatment in a time‐dependent manner (early as 2 h of stimulus initiation). Our data suggest that PEMF may have a role in the clinical management of patients with chronic low back pain. Furthermore, this study shows that the MS2‐tagged GFP reporter system is a useful tool for visualizing the dynamic events of mechanobiology in musculoskeletal research. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research® Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:778–787, 2018. PMID:28851112

  16. Effects of age, replicative lifespan and growth rate of human nucleus pulposus cells on selecting age range for cell-based biological therapies for degenerative disc diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J S; Lee, S M; Jeong, S W; Sung, Y G; Lee, J H; Kim, K W

    2016-07-01

    Autologous disc cell implantation, growth factors and gene therapy appear to be promising therapies for disc regeneration. Unfortunately, the replicative lifespan and growth kinetics of human nucleus pulposus (NP) cells related to host age are unclear. We investigated the potential relations among age, replicative lifespan and growth rate of NP cells, and determined the age range that is suitable for cell-based biological therapies for degenerative disc diseases. We used NP tissues classified by decade into five age groups: 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s. The mean cumulative population doubling level (PDL) and population doubling rate (PDR) of NP cells were assessed by decade. We also investigated correlations between cumulative PDL and age, and between PDR and age. The mean cumulative PDL and PDR decreased significantly in patients in their 60s. The mean cumulative PDL and PDR in the younger groups (30s, 40s and 50s) were significantly higher than those in the older groups (60s and 70s). There also were significant negative correlations between cumulative PDL and age, and between PDR and age. We found that the replicative lifespan and growth rate of human NP cells decreased with age. The replicative potential of NP cells decreased significantly in patients 60 years old and older. Young individuals less than 60 years old may be suitable candidates for NP cell-based biological therapies for treating degenerative disc diseases.

  17. Quantitative determination of the proportion of microtubule polymer present during the mitosis-interphase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Y; Borisy, G G

    1994-04-01

    We have developed a new method for determining levels of tubulin polymer, based on quantitative fluorescence detection of x-rhodamine tubulin microinjected into living cells and we have applied this method to analysis of the mitosis-interphase transition. LLC-PK cells in interphase and mitosis were microinjected, then cooled and rewarmed to drive tubulin incorporation. Total tubulin fluorescence in individual, living cells was quantified using a cooled, scientific grade CCD image sensor. Cells were then washed and lysed into a microtubule-stabilizing buffer to extract the soluble pool. Total tubulin polymer fluorescence was determined for the extracted cells in the same way as for living cells. Fluorescence images were corrected by flat-fielding and background subtraction. The ratio of extracted cell fluorescence/living cell fluorescence for individual cells, was taken as the proportion of tubulin as polymer. Cells in M-phase, G1 and random interphase were analyzed. G1 cells had almost the same proportion as random interphase cells. Mitotic cells gave a value of 90 +/- 5% of G1 cells at 37 degrees C. Within M-phase, levels of tubulin as polymer in metaphase and early anaphase were not significantly different. In contrast to the general expectation of microtubule depolymerization at anaphase onset, these results indicate that as cells exit mitosis, the overall proportion of tubulin as polymer does not change dramatically even though the mitotic spindle disassembles. We conclude that the mitosis-interphase transition is accompanied by a redistribution of tubulin at an essentially constant polymer level. Therefore, a global shift to depolymerization conditions is not the driving force for anaphase chromosome movement.

  18. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudana Girija Sanal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC, we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence expensive compared to the generation of iPSC. Even with the latest SCNT technology, we are not sure whether one can make therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cell from any patient’s somatic cells or by using oocytes from any donor. Combining iPSC technology with SCNT, that is, by using the nucleus of the candidate somatic cell which got reprogrammed to pluripotent state instead that of the unmodified nucleus of the candidate somatic cell, would boost the efficiency of the technique, and we would be able to generate therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cells. Induced pluripotent stem cell nuclear transfer (iPSCNT combines the efficiency of iPSC generation with the speed and natural reprogramming environment of SCNT. The new technique may be called iPSCNT. This technique could prove to have very revolutionary benefits for humankind. This could be useful in generating organs for transplantation for patients and for reproductive cloning, especially for childless men and women who cannot have children by any other techniques. When combined with advanced gene editing techniques (such as CRISPR-Cas system this technique might also prove useful to those who want to have healthy children but suffer from inherited diseases. The current code of ethics may be against reproductive cloning. However, this will change with time as it happened with most of the revolutionary scientific breakthroughs. After all, it is the right of every human to have healthy offspring and it is

  19. Use of Limiting Dilution Method for Isolation of Nucleus Pulposus Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitor Cells and Effects of Plating Density on Biological Characteristics and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linghan Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the effects of the limiting dilution method and plating density in rat nucleus pulposus mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (NPMSCs. Materials and Methods. Nucleus pulposus tissues were isolated from 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats and NPMSCs were isolated using limiting dilution method. Cells were then classified into 3 groups according to plating density. Cell morphologies were observed, and colony-forming units, migration abilities, proliferative capacities, cell cycle percentages, multilineage differentiation capacities, stem cell biomarker expression levels, and immunophenotyping were also examined in each group. Results. Low density group (LD had higher morphological homogeneity, stronger colony-forming ability, higher cell proliferation capacity, and enhanced cell migration ability relative to the other two groups (p<0.05. Moreover, LD had more cells entering S phase, with fewer cells arrested in G0/G1 phase (p<0.05. While all three density groups showed a multilineage differentiation potential, LD showed a higher degree of observed and semiquantified lineage specific staining (p<0.05. Furthermore, LD displayed higher expression levels of stem cell biomarkers (Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2 and showed higher percentages of CD29+, CD44+, and CD90+ cells (p<0.05 following flow cytometry analysis. Conclusions. Limiting dilution method is suggested when isolating NPMSCs as a means of improving cell activity and plasticity.

  20. Reduced noradrenergic innervation of ventral midbrain dopaminergic cell groups and the subthalamic nucleus in MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilamoni, Gunasingh Jeyaraj; Groover, Olivia; Smith, Yoland

    2017-04-01

    There is anatomical and functional evidence that ventral midbrain dopaminergic (DA) cell groups and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) receive noradrenergic innervation in rodents, but much less is known about these interactions in primates. Degeneration of NE neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) and related brainstem NE cell groups is a well-established pathological feature of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the development of such pathology in animal models of PD has been inconsistent across species and laboratories. We recently demonstrated 30-40% neuronal loss in the LC, A5 and A6 NE cell groups of rhesus monkeys rendered parkinsonian by chronic administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). In this study, we used dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DβH) immunocytochemistry to assess the impact of this neuronal loss on the number of NE terminal-like varicosities in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC), ventral tegmental area (VTA), retrorubral field (RRF) and STN of MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys. Our findings reveal that the NE innervation of the ventral midbrain and STN of normal monkeys is heterogeneously distributed being far more extensive in the VTA, RRF and dorsal tier of the SNC than in the ventral SNC and STN. In parkinsonian monkeys, all regions underwent a significant (~50-70%) decrease in NE innervation. At the electron microscopic level, some DβH-positive terminals formed asymmetric axo-dendritic synapses in VTA and STN. These findings demonstrate that the VTA, RRF and SNCd are the main ventral midbrain targets of ascending NE inputs, and that these connections undergo a major break-down in chronically MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys. This severe degeneration of the ascending NE system may contribute to the pathophysiology of ventral midbrain and STN neurons in PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mitosis-associated repression in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Emilia; Lim, Bomyi; Guessous, Ghita; Falahati, Hanieh; Levine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Transcriptional repression is a pervasive feature of animal development. Here, we employ live-imaging methods to visualize the Snail repressor, which establishes the boundary between the presumptive mesoderm and neurogenic ectoderm of early Drosophila embryos. Snail target enhancers were attached to an MS2 reporter gene, permitting detection of nascent transcripts in living embryos. The transgenes exhibit initially broad patterns of transcription but are refined by repression in the mesoderm following mitosis. These observations reveal a correlation between mitotic silencing and Snail repression. We propose that mitosis and other inherent discontinuities in transcription boost the activities of sequence-specific repressors, such as Snail. © 2016 Esposito et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Dissecting Cell-Type Composition and Activity-Dependent Transcriptional State in Mammalian Brains by Massively Parallel Single-Nucleus RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Fabyanic, Emily; Kwon, Deborah Y; Tang, Sheng; Zhou, Zhaolan; Wu, Hao

    2017-12-07

    Massively parallel single-cell RNA sequencing can precisely resolve cellular diversity in a high-throughput manner at low cost, but unbiased isolation of intact single cells from complex tissues such as adult mammalian brains is challenging. Here, we integrate sucrose-gradient-assisted purification of nuclei with droplet microfluidics to develop a highly scalable single-nucleus RNA-seq approach (sNucDrop-seq), which is free of enzymatic dissociation and nucleus sorting. By profiling ∼18,000 nuclei isolated from cortical tissues of adult mice, we demonstrate that sNucDrop-seq not only accurately reveals neuronal and non-neuronal subtype composition with high sensitivity but also enables in-depth analysis of transient transcriptional states driven by neuronal activity, at single-cell resolution, in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of microRNA-21 on the proliferation of human degenerated nucleus pulposus by targeting programmed cell death 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the effect of microRNA-21 (miR-21 on the proliferation of human degenerated nucleus pulposus (NP by targeting programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4 tumor suppressor. NP tissues were collected from 20 intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD patients, and from 5 patients with traumatic spine fracture. MiR-21 expressions were tested. NP cells from IDD patients were collected and divided into blank control group, negative control group (transfected with miR-21 negative sequences, miR-21 inhibitor group (transfected with miR-21 inhibitors, miR-21 mimics group (transfected with miR-21 mimics and PDCD4 siRNA group (transfected with PDCD4 siRNAs. Cell growth was estimated by Cell Counting Kit-8; PDCD4, MMP-2,MMP-9 mRNA expressions were evaluated by qRT-PCR; PDCD4, c-Jun and p-c-Jun expressions were tested using western blot. In IDD patients, the expressions of miR-21 and PDCD4 mRNA were respectively elevated and decreased (both P<0.05. The miR-21 expressions were positively correlated with Pfirrmann grades, but negatively correlated with PDCD4 mRNA (both P<0.001. In miR-21 inhibitor group, cell growth, MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expressions, and p-c-Jun protein expressions were significantly lower, while PDCD4 mRNA and protein expressions were higher than the other groups (all P<0.05. These expressions in the PDCD4 siRNA and miR-21 mimics groups was inverted compared to that in the miR-21 inhibitor group (all P<0.05. MiR-21 could promote the proliferation of human degenerated NP cells by targeting PDCD4, increasing phosphorylation of c-Jun protein, and activating AP-1-dependent transcription of MMPs, indicating that miR-21 may be a crucial biomarker in the pathogenesis of IDD.

  4. Possible mechanisms of chromosomal aberrations: VII. Comparative dynamics of sister chromatid disjunction and realization of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations during mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, L.I.; Akhmamet'eva, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    An increase in radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations during c-metaphase sister chromatid disjunction was demonstrated in murine bone marrow cells exposed to a total γ-irradiation at 0.5 Gy. Caffeine (Cf) treatment during mitosis partially suppressed the chromatid disjunction rate and increased the number of radiation-induced aberrations in this mitosis. Nalidixic acid (NA) treatment of c-metaphase cells completely suppressed chromatid disjunction and the realization of induced aberrations. Topoisomerase 2 was assumed to be involved during mitosis in both processes

  5. Mechanosensing of matrix by stem cells: From matrix heterogeneity, contractility, and the nucleus in pore-migration to cardiogenesis and muscle stem cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lucas; Cho, Sangkyun; Discher, Dennis E

    2017-11-01

    Stem cells are particularly 'plastic' cell types that are induced by various cues to become specialized, tissue-functional lineages by switching on the expression of specific gene programs. Matrix stiffness is among the cues that multiple stem cell types can sense and respond to. This seminar-style review focuses on mechanosensing of matrix elasticity in the differentiation or early maturation of a few illustrative stem cell types, with an intended audience of biologists and physical scientists. Contractile forces applied by a cell's acto-myosin cytoskeleton are often resisted by the extracellular matrix and transduced through adhesions and the cytoskeleton ultimately into the nucleus to modulate gene expression. Complexity is added by matrix heterogeneity, and careful scrutiny of the evident stiffness heterogeneity in some model systems resolves some controversies concerning matrix mechanosensing. Importantly, local stiffness tends to dominate, and 'durotaxis' of stem cells toward stiff matrix reveals a dependence of persistent migration on myosin-II force generation and also rigid microtubules that confer directionality. Stem and progenitor cell migration in 3D can be further affected by matrix porosity as well as stiffness, with nuclear size and rigidity influencing niche retention and fate choices. Cell squeezing through rigid pores can even cause DNA damage and genomic changes that contribute to de-differentiation toward stem cell-like states. Contraction of acto-myosin is the essential function of striated muscle, which also exhibit mechanosensitive differentiation and maturation as illustrated in vivo by beating heart cells and by the regenerative mobilization of skeletal muscle stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Autophagy is activated in compression-induced cell degeneration and is mediated by reactive oxygen species in nucleus pulposus cells exposed to compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, K-G; Shao, Z-W; Yang, S-H; Wang, J; Wang, B-C; Xiong, L-M; Wu, Q; Chen, S-F

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of degenerative disc disease (DDD) or retards the intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, and investigate the possible relationship between compression-induced autophagy and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in vitro. The autophagosome and autophagy-related markers were used to explore the role of autophagy in rat NP cells under compressive stress, which were measured directly by electronic microscopy, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, immunofluorescence, western blot, and indirectly by analyzing the impact of pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy such as 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ). And the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis was investigated by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI)-fluorescein staining. In addition, ROS were measured to determine whether these factors are responsible for the development of compression-induced autophagy. Our results indicated that rat NP cells activated autophagy in response to the same strong apoptotic stimuli that triggered apoptosis by compression. Autophagy and apoptosis were interconnected and coordinated in rat NP cells exposed to compression stimuli. Compression-induced autophagy was closely related to intracellular ROS production. Enhanced degradation of damaged components of NP cells by autophagy may be a crucial survival response against mechanical overload, and extensive autophagy may trigger autophagic cell death. Regulating autophagy and reducing the generation of intracellular ROS may retard IVD degeneration. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Automated morphological analysis of bone marrow cells in microscopic images for diagnosis of leukemia: nucleus-plasma separation and cell classification using a hierarchical tree model of hematopoesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krappe, Sebastian; Wittenberg, Thomas; Haferlach, Torsten; Münzenmayer, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The morphological differentiation of bone marrow is fundamental for the diagnosis of leukemia. Currently, the counting and classification of the different types of bone marrow cells is done manually under the use of bright field microscopy. This is a time-consuming, subjective, tedious and error-prone process. Furthermore, repeated examinations of a slide may yield intra- and inter-observer variances. For that reason a computer assisted diagnosis system for bone marrow differentiation is pursued. In this work we focus (a) on a new method for the separation of nucleus and plasma parts and (b) on a knowledge-based hierarchical tree classifier for the differentiation of bone marrow cells in 16 different classes. Classification trees are easily interpretable and understandable and provide a classification together with an explanation. Using classification trees, expert knowledge (i.e. knowledge about similar classes and cell lines in the tree model of hematopoiesis) is integrated in the structure of the tree. The proposed segmentation method is evaluated with more than 10,000 manually segmented cells. For the evaluation of the proposed hierarchical classifier more than 140,000 automatically segmented bone marrow cells are used. Future automated solutions for the morphological analysis of bone marrow smears could potentially apply such an approach for the pre-classification of bone marrow cells and thereby shortening the examination time.

  8. Cell Biological Mechanisms of Activity-Dependent Synapse to Nucleus Translocation of CRTC1 in Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toh Hean eCh'ng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have revealed a critical role for CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC1 in regulating neuronal gene expression during learning and memory. CRTC1 localizes to synapses but undergoes activity-dependent nuclear translocation to regulate the transcription of CREB target genes. Here we investigate the long-distance retrograde transport of CRTC1 in hippocampal neurons. We show that local elevations in calcium, triggered by activation of synaptic glutamate receptors and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, initiate active, dynein-mediated retrograde transport of CRTC1 along microtubules. We identify a nuclear localization signal within CRTC1, and characterize three conserved serine residues whose dephosphorylation is required for nuclear import. Domain analysis reveals that the amino-terminal third of CRTC1 contains all of the signals required for regulated nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. We fuse this region to Dendra2 to generate a reporter construct and perform live-cell imaging coupled with local uncaging of glutamate and photoconversion to characterize the dynamics of stimulus-induced retrograde transport and nuclear accumulation.

  9. Phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) influences spindle assembly and chromosome segregation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfang; Beauchemin, Myriam; Bertrand, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Functional analysis of a series of phosphorylation mutants reveals that Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) influences cell entry into anaphase and mitotic exit in taxol-exposed cells compared with cells expressing wild-type Bcl-xL or a series of other phosphorylation mutants, an effect that appears to be independent of its anti-apoptotic activity. During normal mitosis progression, Bcl-xL(Ser62) is strongly phosphorylated by PLK1 and MAPK14/SAPKp38α at the prometaphase, metaphase, and the anaphase boundaries, while it is de-phosphorylated at telophase and cytokinesis. Phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) localizes in centrosomes with γ-tubulin and in the mitotic cytosol with some spindle-assembly checkpoint signaling components, including PLK1, BubR1, and Mad2. In taxol- and nocodazole-exposed cells, phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) also binds to Cdc20- Mad2-, BubR1-, and Bub3-bound complexes, while Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) does not. Silencing Bcl-xL expression and expressing the phosphorylation mutant Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) lead to an increased number of cells harboring mitotic spindle defects including multipolar spindle, chromosome lagging and bridging, aneuploidy with micro-, bi-, or multi-nucleated cells, and cells that fail to resolve undergo mitosis within 6 h. Together, the data indicate that during mitosis, Bcl-xL(Ser62) phosphorylation impacts on spindle assembly and chromosome segregation, influencing chromosome stability. Observations of mitotic cells harboring aneuploidy with micro-, bi-, or multi-nucleated cells, and cells that fail to resolve undergo mitosis within 6 h were also made with cells expressing the phosphorylation mutant Bcl-xL(Ser49Ala) and dual mutant Bcl-xL(Ser49/62Ala).

  10. The Hippo component YAP localizes in the nucleus of human papilloma virus positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Faisal; Clattenburg, Leanne; Muruganandan, Shanmugam; Bullock, Martin; MacIsaac, Kaitlyn; Wigerius, Michael; Williams, Blair A; Graham, M Elise R; Rigby, Matthew H; Trites, Jonathan R B; Taylor, S Mark; Sinal, Christopher J; Fawcett, James P; Hart, Robert D

    2017-02-22

    HPV infection causes cervical cancer, mediated in part by the degradation of Scribble via the HPV E6 oncoprotein. Recently, Scribble has been shown to be an important regulator of the Hippo signaling cascade. Deregulation of the Hippo pathway induces an abnormal cellular transformation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, which promotes oncogenic progression. Given the recent rise in oropharyngeal HPV squamous cell carcinoma we sought to determine if Hippo signaling components are implicated in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Molecular and cellular techniques including immunoprecipiations, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were used to identify the key Hippo pathway effector Yes-Associated Protein (YAP)1. Oropharyngeal tissue was collected from CO 2 laser resections, and probed with YAP1 antibody in tumor and pre-malignant regions of HPV positive OPSCC tissue. This study reveals that the Scribble binding protein Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Adaptor Protein (NOS1AP) forms a complex with YAP. Further, the NOS1APa and NOS1APc isoforms show differential association with activated and non-activated YAP, and impact cellular proliferation. Consistent with deregulated Hippo signaling in OPSCC HPV tumors, we see a delocalization of Scribble and increased nuclear accumulation of YAP1 in an HPV-positive OPSCC. Our preliminary data indicates that NOS1AP isoforms differentially associate with YAP1, which, together with our previous findings, predicts that loss of YAP1 enhances cellular transformation. Moreover, YAP1 is highly accumulated in the nucleus of HPV-positive OPSCC, implying that Hippo signaling and possibly NOS1AP expression are de-regulated in OPSCC. Further studies will help determine if NOS1AP isoforms, Scribble and Hippo components will be useful biomarkers in OPSCC tumor biology.

  11. Long-term load duration induces N-cadherin down-regulation and loss of cell phenotype of nucleus pulposus cells in a disc bioreactor culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Zhang, Ruijie; Wang, Liyuan; Gan, Yibo; Xu, Yuan; Song, Lei; Luo, Lei; Zhao, Chen; Zhang, Chengmin; Ouyang, Bin; Tu, Bing; Zhou, Qiang

    2017-04-30

    Long-term exposure to a mechanical load causes degenerative changes in the disc nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue. A previous study demonstrated that N-cadherin (N-CDH)-mediated signalling can preserve the NP cell phenotype. However, N-CDH expression and the resulting phenotype alteration in NP cells under mechanical compression remain unclear. The present study investigated the effects of the compressive duration on N-CDH expression and on the phenotype of NP cells in an ex vivo disc organ culture. Porcine discs were organ cultured in a self-developed mechanically active bioreactor for 7 days. The discs were subjected to different dynamic compression durations (1 and 8 h at a magnitude of 0.4 MPa and frequency of 1.0 Hz) once per day. Discs that were not compressed were used as controls. The results showed that long-term compression duration (8 h) significantly down-regulated the expression of N-CDH and NP-specific molecule markers (Brachyury, Laminin, Glypican-3 and Keratin 19), attenuated Alcian Blue staining intensity, decreased glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and hydroxyproline (HYP) contents and decreased matrix macromolecule (aggrecan and collagen II) expression compared with the short-term compression duration (1 h). Taken together, these findings demonstrate that long-term load duration can induce N-CDH down-regulation, loss of normal cell phenotype and result in attenuation of NP-related matrix synthesis in NP cells. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. Dynamic imaging demonstrates that pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) suppress IL-6 transcription in bovine nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinyan; Alliston, Tamara; Coughlin, Dezba; Miller, Stephanie; Zhang, Nianli; Waldorff, Erik I; Ryaby, James T; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2018-02-01

    Inflammatory cytokines play a dominant role in the pathogenesis of disc degeneration. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) are noninvasive biophysical stimulus that has been used extensively in the orthopaedic field for many years. However, the specific cellular responses and mechanisms involved are still unclear. The objective of this study was to assess the time-dependent PEMF effects on pro-inflammatory factor IL-6 expression in disc nucleus pulposus cells using a novel green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter system. An MS2-tagged GFP reporter system driven by IL-6 promoter was constructed to visualize PEMF treatment effect on IL-6 transcription in single living cells. IL-6-MS2 reporter-labeled cells were treated with IL-1α to mimic the in situ inflammatory environment of degenerative disc while simultaneously exposed to PEMF continuously for 4 h. Time-lapse imaging was recorded using a confocal microscope to track dynamic IL-6 transcription activity that was demonstrated by GFP. Finally, real-time RT-PCR was performed to confirm the imaging data. Live cell imaging demonstrated that pro-inflammatory factor IL-1α significantly promoted IL-6 transcription over time as compared with DMEM basal medium condition. Imaging and PCR data demonstrated that the inductive effect of IL-1α on IL-6 expression could be significantly inhibited by PEMF treatment in a time-dependent manner (early as 2 h of stimulus initiation). Our data suggest that PEMF may have a role in the clinical management of patients with chronic low back pain. Furthermore, this study shows that the MS2-tagged GFP reporter system is a useful tool for visualizing the dynamic events of mechanobiology in musculoskeletal research. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research® Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:778-787, 2018. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research® Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  13. Live imaging of mitosis in the developing mouse embryonic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilaz, Louis-Jan; Silver, Debra L

    2014-06-04

    Although of short duration, mitosis is a complex and dynamic multi-step process fundamental for development of organs including the brain. In the developing cerebral cortex, abnormal mitosis of neural progenitors can cause defects in brain size and function. Hence, there is a critical need for tools to understand the mechanisms of neural progenitor mitosis. Cortical development in rodents is an outstanding model for studying this process. Neural progenitor mitosis is commonly examined in fixed brain sections. This protocol will describe in detail an approach for live imaging of mitosis in ex vivo embryonic brain slices. We will describe the critical steps for this procedure, which include: brain extraction, brain embedding, vibratome sectioning of brain slices, staining and culturing of slices, and time-lapse imaging. We will then demonstrate and describe in detail how to perform post-acquisition analysis of mitosis. We include representative results from this assay using the vital dye Syto11, transgenic mice (histone H2B-EGFP and centrin-EGFP), and in utero electroporation (mCherry-α-tubulin). We will discuss how this procedure can be best optimized and how it can be modified for study of genetic regulation of mitosis. Live imaging of mitosis in brain slices is a flexible approach to assess the impact of age, anatomy, and genetic perturbation in a controlled environment, and to generate a large amount of data with high temporal and spatial resolution. Hence this protocol will complement existing tools for analysis of neural progenitor mitosis.

  14. Elimination of radiation-induced chromosome damages in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. 2. The frequency of aberrations in the first-fifth post-irradiation mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatkin, E.K.; Pokrovskaya, V.N.; Nugis, V.Yu.

    1982-01-01

    The number of chromosome aberrations in 1.-5. mitoses cultivated from lymphocyte PHA of peripheric man blood after gamma irradiation in vitro in 1e5; 3 and 6 Gy has been determined. For all the doses, as the cells passed 1. and successive postradiation divisiops, observed was the decrease in the number of aberrant metaphases and all the aberrations of the chromosomal typee at that their elimination rate increases with the dose increase. No considerable differences in the frequency of pair fragments in 1.-4. mitosis after irradiation in 1,5 Gy dose, in 1.-3. mitoses after irradiation in 3 Gy dose and in 1.-2. mitoses after irradiation in 6 Gy dose were found. In lymphocyte cultures irradiated in 3 and 6 Gy doses the number of dicentries in 2. mitosis was approximately 2 times smaller than in 1. mitosis and in 3. mitosis two times smaller than in 2. mitosis. In 1. mitosis almost all the dicentrics have accompanying pair fragments in 2. and 3. mitoses a share of the dicentrics without fragments constituted about 30-70 %, and in 4.-5. mitoses amounted to 95-100 %. The reduction of the number of irregular chromosomes in the process of cell passing of 1. and successive postradiation mitosis was noted only during lymphocyte investigation irradiated in 6 Gy. At 1,5 and 3 Gy doses these aberration frequency in 1.-5. and 1.-4. mitoses were nearly the same

  15. Elimination of radiation-induced chromosome damages in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. 2. The frequency of aberrations in the first-fifth post-irradiation mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyatkin, E.K.; Pokrovskaya, V.N.; Nugis, V.Yu. (Institut Biofiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    1982-11-01

    The number of chromosome aberrations in 1.-5. mitoses cultivated from lymphocyte PHA of peripheric man blood after gamma irradiation in vitro in 1e5; 3 and 6 Gy has been determined. For all the doses, as the cells passed 1. and successive postradiation divisions, observed was the decrease in the number of aberrant metaphases and all the aberrations of the chromosomal typee at that their elimination rate increases with the dose increase. No considerable differences in the frequency of pair fragments in 1.-4. mitosis after irradiation in 1,5 Gy dose, in 1.-3. mitoses after irradiation in 3 Gy dose and in 1.-2. mitoses after irradiation in 6 Gy dose were found. In lymphocyte cultures irradiated in 3 and 6 Gy doses the number of dicentrics in 2. mitosis was approximately 2 times smaller than in 1. mitosis and in 3. mitosis two times smaller than in 2. mitosis. In 1. mitosis almost all the dicentrics have accompanying pair fragments in 2. and 3. mitoses a share of the dicentrics without fragments constituted about 30-70 %, and in 4.-5. mitoses amounted to 95-100 %. The reduction of the number of irregular chromosomes in the process of cell passing of 1. and successive postradiation mitosis was noted only during lymphocyte investigation irradiated in 6 Gy. At 1,5 and 3 Gy doses these aberration frequency in 1.-5. and 1.-4. mitoses were nearly the same.

  16. Mitosis, double strand break repair, and telomeres: a view from the end: how telomeres and the DNA damage response cooperate during mitosis to maintain genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare, Anthony J

    2014-11-01

    Double strand break (DSB) repair is suppressed during mitosis because RNF8 and downstream DNA damage response (DDR) factors, including 53BP1, do not localize to mitotic chromatin. Discovery of the mitotic kinase-dependent mechanism that inhibits DSB repair during cell division was recently reported. It was shown that restoring mitotic DSB repair was detrimental, resulting in repair dependent genome instability and covalent telomere fusions. The telomere DDR that occurs naturally during cellular aging and in cancer is known to be refractory to G2/M checkpoint activation. Such DDR-positive telomeres, and those that occur as part of the telomere-dependent prolonged mitotic arrest checkpoint, normally pass through mitosis without covalent ligation, but result in cell growth arrest in G1 phase. The discovery that suppressing DSB repair during mitosis may function primarily to protect DDR-positive telomeres from fusing during cell division reinforces the unique cooperation between telomeres and the DDR to mediate tumor suppression. © 2014 The Author. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  17. p21 is Responsible for Ionizing Radiation-induced Bypass of Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu Rui; Liu, Yong Ai; Sun, Fang; Li, He; Lei, Su Wen; Wang, Ju Fang

    2016-07-01

    To explore the role of p21 in ionizing radiation-induced changes in protein levels during the G2/M transition and long-term G2 arrest. Protein expression levels were assessed by western blot in the human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells after treatment with ionizing radiation. Depletion of p21 was carried out by employing the siRNA technique. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry combined with histone H3 phosphorylation at Ser28, an M-phase marker. Senescence was assessed by senescence- associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining combined with Ki67 staining, a cell proliferation marker. Accompanying increased p21, the protein levels of G2/M transition genes declined significantly in 92-1 cells irradiated with 5 Gy of X-rays. Furthermore, these irradiated cells were blocked at the G2 phase followed by cellular senescence. Depletion of p21 rescued radiation-induced G2 arrest as demonstrated by the upregulation of G2/M transition kinases, as well as the high expression of histone H3 phosphorylated at Ser28. Knockdown of p21 resulted in entry into mitosis of irradiated 92-1 cells. However, cells with serious DNA damage failed to undergo cytokinesis, leading to the accumulation of multinucleated cells. Our results indicated that p21 was responsible for the downregulation of G2/M transition regulatory proteins and the bypass of mitosis induced by irradiation. Downregulation of p21 by siRNA resulted in G2-arrested cells entering into mitosis with serious DNA damage. This is the first report on elucidating the role of p21 in the bypass of mitosis. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of hypoxia and growth and differentiation factor-5 on differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards intervertebral nucleus pulposus-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JV Stoyanov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can differentiate towards an intervertebral disc (IVD-like phenotype. We compared the standard chondrogenic protocol using transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFß to the effects of hypoxia, growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF5, and coculture with bovine nucleus pulposus cells (bNPC. The efficacy of molecules recently discovered as possible nucleus pulposus (NP markers to differentiate between chondrogenic and IVD-like differentiation was evaluated. MSCs were isolated from human bone marrow and encapsulated in alginate beads. Beads were cultured in DMEM (control supplemented with TGFß or GDF5 or under indirect coculture with bNPC. All groups were incubated at low (2 % or normal (20 % oxygen tension for 28 days. Hypoxia increased aggrecan and collagen II gene expression in all groups. The hypoxic GDF5 and TGFß groups demonstrated most increased aggrecan and collagen II mRNA levels and glycosaminoglycan accumulation. Collagen I and X were most up-regulated in the TGFß groups. From the NP markers, cytokeratin-19 was expressed to highest extent in the hypoxic GDF5 groups; lowest expression was observed in the TGFß group. Levels of forkhead box F1 were down-regulated by TGFß and up-regulated by coculture with bNPC. Carbonic anhydrase 12 was also down-regulated in the TGFß group and showed highest expression in the GDF5 group cocultured with bNPC under hypoxia. Trends in gene expression regulation were confirmed on the protein level using immunohistochemistry. We conclude that hypoxia and GDF5 may be suitable for directing MSCs towards the IVD-like phenotype.

  19. Transcriptional intermediary factor 1γ binds to the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and promotes mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedgwick, G.G.; Townsend, K.; Martin, A.

    2013-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an ubiquitin ligase that functions during mitosis. Here we identify the transcriptional regulator, transcriptional intermediary factor 1γ, TIF1γ, as an APC/C-interacting protein that regulates APC/C function. TIF1γ is not a substrate for APC....../C-dependent ubiquitylation but instead, associates specifically with the APC/C holoenzyme and Cdc20 to affect APC/C activity and progression through mitosis. RNA interference studies indicate that TIF1γ knockdown results in a specific reduction in APC/C ubiquitin ligase activity, the stabilization of APC/C substrates......, and an increase in the time taken for cells to progress through mitosis from nuclear envelope breakdown to anaphase. TIF1γ knockdown cells are also characterized by the inappropriate presence of cyclin A at metaphase, and an increase in the number of cells that fail to undergo metaphase-to-anaphase transition...

  20. Electric fields generated by synchronized oscillations of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes regulate the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Super-macromolecular complexes play many important roles in eukaryotic cells. Classical structural biological studies focus on their complicated molecular structures, physical interactions and biochemical modifications. Recent advances concerning intracellular electric fields generated by cell organelles and super-macromolecular complexes shed new light on the mechanisms that govern the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis. In this review we synthesize this knowledge to provide an integrated theoretical model of these cellular events. We suggest that the electric fields generated by synchronized oscillation of microtubules, centrosomes, and chromatin fibers facilitate several events during mitosis and meiosis, including centrosome trafficking, chromosome congression in mitosis and synapsis between homologous chromosomes in meiosis. These intracellular electric fields are generated under energy excitation through the synchronized electric oscillations of the dipolar structures of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes, three of the super-macromolecular complexes within an animal cell.

  1. Inhibition of phosphorylated Ser473-Akt from translocating into the nucleus contributes to 2-cell arrest and defective zygotic genome activation in mouse preimplantation embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junming; Lian, Xiuli; Du, Juan; Xu, Songhua; Wei, Jianen; Pang, Lili; Song, Chanchan; He, Lin; Wang, Shie

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorylated Ser473-Akt (p-Ser473-Akt) is extensively studied as a correlate for the activity of Akt, which plays an important role in mouse oogenesis and preimplantation embryogenesis. However, little progress has been made about its effect on the mouse zygotic genome activation (ZGA) of 2-cell stage in mouse preimplantation embryos. In this study, we confirmed its localization in the pronuclei of 1-cell embryos and found that p-Ser473-Akt acquired prominent nucleus localization in 2-cell embryos physiologically. Akt specific inhibitors API-2 and MK2206 could inhibit the development of mouse preimplantation embryos in vitro, and induce 2-cell arrest at certain concentrations. 2-cell embryos exposed to 2.0 μmol/L API-2 or 30 μmol/L MK2206 displayed attenuated immunofluorescence intensity of p-Ser473-Akt in the nucleus. Simultaneously, qRT-PCR results revealed that 2.0 μmol/L API-2 treatment significantly downregulated the mRNA pattern of MuERV-L and eIF-1A, two marker genes of ZGA, suggesting a defect in ZGA compared with that of control group. Collectively, our work demonstrated the nuclear localization of p-Ser473-Akt during major ZGA, and Akt specific inhibitors API-2 and MK2206 which led to 2-cell arrest inhibited p-Ser473-Akt from translocating into the nucleus of 2-cell embryos with defective ZGA as well, implying p-Ser473-Akt may be a potential player in the major ZGA of 2-cell mouse embryos. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  2. Cdk1/cyclin B-mediated phosphorylation stabilizes SREBP1 during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoechea-Alonso, Maria T; Ericsson, Johan

    2006-08-01

    Members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors control the biosynthesis of cholesterol and other lipids, and lipid synthesis is critical for cell growth and proliferation. We recently found that the mature forms of SREBP1a and SREBP1c are hyperphosphorylated in mitotic cells, giving rise to a phosphoepitope recognized by the mitotic protein monoclonal-2 (MPM-2) antibody. In addition, we found that mature SREBP1 was stabilized in a phosphorylation-dependent manner during mitosis. We have now mapped the major MPM-2 epitope to a serine residue, S439, in the C terminus of mature SREBP1. Using phosphorylation-specific antibodies, we demonstrate that endogenous SREBP1 is phosphorylated on S439 specifically during mitosis. Mature SREBP1 interacts with the Cdk1/cyclin B complex in mitotic cells and we demonstrate that Cdk1 phosphorylates S439, both in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that Cdk1-mediated phosphorylation of S439 stabilizes mature SREBP1 during mitosis, thereby preserving a critical pool of active transcription factors to support lipid synthesis. Taken together with our previous work, the current study suggests that SREBP1 may provide a link between lipid synthesis, proliferation and cell growth. This hypothesis was supported by our observation that siRNA-mediated inactivation of SREBP1 arrested cells in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, thereby attenuating cell growth.

  3. Laser microirradiation of Chinese hamster cells at wavelength 365 nm: effects of psoralen and caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, T.; Peterson, S.P.; Cremer, C.; Berns, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    Cells of a V79 subline of the Chinese hamster were microirradiated at wavelength 365 nm in the presence of the psoralen derivative, trioxsalen. Microirradiation was accomplished by a pulsed argon laser microbeam either in anaphase or in interphase 3 h after mitosis. Inhibition of clonal growth and formation of micronuclei at the first postirradiation mitosis were observed after microirradiation of anaphase chromosomes and of small parts of the interphase nucleus. Microirradiation of the cytoplasm beside the interphase nucleus or between the sets of chromosomes moving apart from each other in anaphase did not produce these effects. Anaphase experiments showed that only the daughter cell which received microirradiated chromatin exhibited an abnormal growth pattern. Most interestingly, shattering of the whole chromosome complement could be induced by microirradiation of small parts of the interphase nucleus and post-treatment with caffeine. Since microirradiation of chromatin in the absence of psoralen was not effective, we consider formation of psoralen photoadducts to nucleic acids in microirradiated chromatin to be the specific cause of the effects. We suggest that DNA photolesions in chromosome segments present in the microirradiated part of the nucleus can induce shattering of all the chromosomes in the microirradiated nucleus. Several possibilities are discussed to explain this unexpected finding

  4. DNA damage response during mitosis induces whole chromosome mis-segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F.; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P.; Zaki, Bassem I.; Compton, Duane A.

    2014-01-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here we show that activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and Plk1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or Chk2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. PMID:25107667

  5. The master Greatwall kinase, a critical regulator of mitosis and meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Suzanne; Robert, Perle; Hached, Khaled; Sundermann, Lena; Charrasse, Sophie; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Castro, Anna; Lorca, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Entry into mitosis requires the coordinated activation of various protein kinases and phosphatases that together activate sequential signaling pathways allowing entry, progression and exit of mitosis. The limiting step is thought to be the activation of the mitotic Cdk1-cyclin B kinase. However, this model has recently evolved with new data showing that in addition to the Cdk1-cyclin B complex, Greatwall (Gwl) kinase is also required to enter into and maintain mitosis. This new concept proposes that entry into mitosis is now based on the combined activation of both kinases Cdk1-cyclin B and Gwl, the former promoting massive phosphorylation of mitotic substrates and the latter inhibiting PP2A-B55 phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of these substrates. Activated Gwl phosphorylates both Arpp19 and ENSA, which associate and inhibit PP2A-B55. This pathway seems relatively well conserved from yeast to humans, although some differences appear based on models or techniques used. While Gwl is activated by phosphorylation, its inactivation requires dephosphorylation of critical residues. Several phosphatases such as PP1, PP2A-B55 and FCP1 are required to control the dephosphorylation and inactivation of Gwl and a properly regulated mitotic exit. Gwl has also been reported to be involved in cancer processes and DNA damage recovery. These new findings support the idea that the Gwl-Arpp19/ENSA-PP2A-B55 pathway is essential to achieve an efficient division of cells and to maintain genomic stability.

  6. Evolutionary consequences of polyploidy in prokaryotes and the origin of mitosis and meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Alexander V; Kaznacheev, Ilya S

    2016-06-08

    The origin of eukaryote-specific traits such as mitosis and sexual reproduction remains disputable. There is growing evidence that both mitosis and eukaryotic sex (i.e., the alternation of syngamy and meiosis) may have already existed in the basal eukaryotes. The mating system of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii probably represents an intermediate stage between typical prokaryotic and eukaryotic sex. H. volcanii is highly polyploid, as well as many other Archaea. Here, we use computer simulation to explore genetic and evolutionary outcomes of polyploidy in amitotic prokaryotes and its possible role in the origin of mitosis, meiosis and eukaryotic sex. Modeling suggests that polyploidy can confer strong short-term evolutionary advantage to amitotic prokaryotes. However, it also promotes the accumulation of recessive deleterious mutations and the risk of extinction in the long term, especially in highly mutagenic environment. There are several possible strategies that amitotic polyploids can use in order to reduce the genetic costs of polyploidy while retaining its benefits. Interestingly, most of these strategies resemble different components or aspects of eukaryotic sex. They include asexual ploidy cycles, equalization of genome copies by gene conversion, high-frequency lateral gene transfer between relatives, chromosome exchange coupled with homologous recombination, and the evolution of more accurate chromosome distribution during cell division (mitosis). Acquisition of mitosis by an amitotic polyploid results in chromosome diversification and specialization. Ultimately, it transforms a polyploid cell into a functionally monoploid one with multiple unique, highly redundant chromosomes. Specialization of chromosomes makes the previously evolved modes of promiscuous chromosome shuffling deleterious. This can result in selective pressure to develop accurate mechanisms of homolog pairing, and, ultimately, meiosis. Emergence of mitosis and the first

  7. Centromere separation and association in the nuclei of an interspecific hybrid between Torenia fournieri and T. baillonii (Scrophulariaceae) during mitosis and meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shinji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Wako, Toshiyuki; Tsujimoto, Hisashi

    2007-10-01

    In the nuclei of some interspecific hybrid and allopolyploid plant species, each genome occupies a separate spatial domain. To analyze this phenomenon, we studied localization of the centromeres in the nuclei of a hybrid between Torenia fournieri and T. baillonii during mitosis and meiosis using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization (3D-FISH) probed with species-specific centromere repeats. Centromeres of each genome were located separately in undifferentiated cells but not differentiated cells, suggesting that cell division might be the possible force causing centromere separation. However, no remarkable difference of dividing distance was detected between chromatids with different centromeres in anaphase and telophase, indicating that tension of the spindle fiber attached to each chromatid is not the cause of centromere separation in Torenia. In differentiated cells, centromeres in both genomes were not often observed for the expected chromosome number, indicating centromere association. In addition, association of centromeres from the same genome was observed at a higher frequency than between different genomes. This finding suggests that centromeres within one genome are spatially separated from those within the other. This close position may increase possibility of association between centromeres of the same genome. In meiotic prophase, all centromeres irrespective of the genome were associated in a certain portion of the nucleus. Since centromere association in the interspecific hybrid and amphiploid was tighter than that in the diploid parents, it is possible that this phenomenon may be involved in sorting and pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  8. Real-time fluorescence imaging of the DNA damage repair response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Efimova, Elena V; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    The response to DNA damage during mitosis was visualized using real-time fluorescence imaging of focus formation by the DNA-damage repair (DDR) response protein 53BP1 linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (53BP1-GFP) in the MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) pancreatic cancer cell line. To observe 53BP1-GFP foci during mitosis, MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells were imaged every 30 min by confocal microscopy. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that 11.4 ± 2.1% of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells had increased focus formation over time. Non-mitotic cells did not have an increase in 53BP1-GFP focus formation over time. Some of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells with focus formation became apoptotic. The results of the present report suggest that DNA strand breaks occur during mitosis and undergo repair, which may cause some of the mitotic cells to enter apoptosis in a phenomenon possibly related to mitotic catastrophe. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibits DNA damage response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benada, Jan; Burdová, Kamila; Lidak, Tomáš; von Morgen, Patrick; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    In response to genotoxic stress, cells protect their genome integrity by activation of a conserved DNA damage response (DDR) pathway that coordinates DNA repair and progression through the cell cycle. Extensive modification of the chromatin flanking the DNA lesion by ATM kinase and RNF8/RNF168 ubiquitin ligases enables recruitment of various repair factors. Among them BRCA1 and 53BP1 are required for homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining, respectively. Whereas mechanisms of DDR are relatively well understood in interphase cells, comparatively less is known about organization of DDR during mitosis. Although ATM can be activated in mitotic cells, 53BP1 is not recruited to the chromatin until cells exit mitosis. Here we report mitotic phosphorylation of 53BP1 by Plk1 and Cdk1 that impairs the ability of 53BP1 to bind the ubiquitinated H2A and to properly localize to the sites of DNA damage. Phosphorylation of 53BP1 at S1618 occurs at kinetochores and in cytosol and is restricted to mitotic cells. Interaction between 53BP1 and Plk1 depends on the activity of Cdk1. We propose that activity of Cdk1 and Plk1 allows spatiotemporally controlled suppression of 53BP1 function during mitosis.

  10. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells exhibit immature nucleus pulposus cell phenotype in a laminin-rich pseudo-three-dimensional culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cell supplementation to the herniated or degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD) is a potential strategy to promote tissue regeneration and slow disc pathology. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (HUCMSCs) – originating from the Wharton’s jelly – remain an attractive candidate for such endeavors with their ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. Previously, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been studied as a potential source for disc tissue regeneration. However, no studies have demonstrated that MSCs can regenerate matrix with unique characteristics matching that of immature nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues of the IVD. In our prior work, immature NP cells were found to express specific laminin isoforms and laminin-binding receptors that may serve as phenotypic markers for evaluating MSC differentiation to NP-like cells. The goal of this study is to evaluate these markers and matrix synthesis for HUCMSCs cultured in a laminin-rich pseudo-three-dimensional culture system. Methods HUCMSCs were seeded on top of Transwell inserts pre-coated with Matrigel™, which contained mainly laminin-111. Cells were cultured under hypoxia environment with three differentiation conditions: NP differentiation media (containing 2.5% Matrigel™ solution to provide for a pseudo-three-dimensional laminin culture system) with no serum, or the same media supplemented with either insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Cell clustering behavior, matrix production and the expression of NP-specific laminin and laminin-receptors were evaluated at days 1, 7, 13 and 21 of culture. Results Data show that a pseudo-three-dimensional culture condition (laminin-1 rich) promoted HUCMSC differentiation under no serum conditions. Starting at day 1, HUCMSCs demonstrated a cell clustering morphology similar to that of immature NP cells in situ and that observed for primary immature NP cells within the similar laminin

  11. Functional expression of P2 purinoceptors in a primary neuroglial cell culture of the rat arcuate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollatzek, Eric; Hitzel, Norma; Ott, Daniela; Raisl, Katrin; Reuter, Bärbel; Gerstberger, Rüdiger

    2016-07-07

    The arcuate nucleus (ARC) plays an important role in the hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis. Expression of various purinoceptor subtypes in the rat ARC and physiological studies suggest a modulatory function of P2 receptors within the neuroglial ARC circuitry. A differentiated mixed neuronal and glial microculture was therefore established from postnatal rat ARC, revealing neuronal expression of ARC-specific transmitters involved in food intake regulation (neuropeptide Y (NPY), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)). Some NPYergic neurons cosynthesized TH, while POMC and TH expression proved to be mutually exclusive. Stimulation with the general purinoceptor agonists 2-methylthioadenosine-5'triphosphate (2-MeSATP) and ATP but not the P2X1/P2X3 receptor subtype agonist α,β-methyleneadenosine-5'triphosphate (α,β-meATP) induced intracellular calcium signals in ARC neurons and astrocytes. Some 5-10% each of 2-MeSATP responsive neurons expressed POMC, NYP or TH. Supporting the calcium imaging data, radioligand binding studies to hypothalamic membranes showed high affinity for 2-MeSATP, ATP but not α,β-meATP to displace [α-(35)S]deoxyadenosine-5'thiotriphosphate ([(35)S]dATPαS) from P2 receptors. Repetitive superfusion with equimolar 2-MeSATP allowed categorization of ARC cells into groups with a high or low (LDD) degree of purinoceptor desensitization, the latter allowing further receptor characterization. Calcium imaging experiments performed at 37°C vs. room temperature showed further reduction of desensitization. Agonist-mediated intracellular calcium signals were suppressed in all LDD neurons but only 25% of astrocytes in the absence of extracellular calcium, suggestive of metabotropic P2Y receptor expression in the majority of ARC astrocytes. The highly P2Y1-selective receptor agonists MRS2365 and 2-methylthioadenosine-5'diphosphate (2-MeSADP) activated 75-85% of all 2-MeSATP-responsive ARC astrocytes. Taking into consideration the

  12. Akt is transferred to the nucleus of cells treated with apoptin, and it participates in apoptin-induced cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddika, S; Bay, GH; Kroczak, TJ

    2007-01-01

    -selective inducer of apoptosis. RESULTS: We show for the first time that apoptin interacts with the p85 regulatory subunit, leading to constitutive activation of PI3-K. The inhibition of PI3-K activation either by chemical inhibitors or by genetic approaches severely impairs cell death induced by apoptin...

  13. Elimination of radiation-induced chromosomal damages in numan peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. 1. The frequency of aberrations in the first and second mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatkin, E.K.; Nugis, V.Yu.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative analysis of chromosomal aberrations in the first and second mitosis of cultivated human peripheral blood lymphocytes after gamma irradiation in vitro at 1-5 Gy doses has been made. Irradiated blood lymphocytes were incubated for 58 to 66 h at 37 deg with PGA and BDU (20 μg /ml). The first, second and third postradiation mitosises were identified using the distinguishing staining of sister chromatids. The share of the cells in the first mitosis fluctuated from 32 to 77 %, in the second - from 23 to 68 %, and the third - from 0 to 9 %. At all radiation doses significant differences in the frequency of the aberration cells passing the first and second mitosises were revealed as well as in the total number of chromosomal aberrations in all the cells. The frequency of pair fragments and dicentrics chromosomes in the first mitosis was on the average 1.6 and 2 times as high as in the second one, respectively. In the first mitosis almost all dicentric chromosomes occurred with accompanying pair fragments, and in the second mitosis the share of dicentric chromosomes without accompanying fragments was 25 to 50 %. The distribution of the dicentric chromosomes in the cells in the first and second mitosis did not differ from Poison distribution for the 2 to 5 Gy dose range

  14. Elimination of radiation-induced chromosomal damages in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. 1. The frequency of aberrations in the first and second mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyatkin, E.K.; Nugis, V.Yu. (Institut Biofiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    1981-01-01

    A comparative analysis of chromosomal aberrations in the first and second mitosis of cultivated human peripheral blood lymphocytes after gamma irradiation in vitro at 1-5 Gy doses has been made. Irradiated blood lymphocytes were incubated for 58 to 66 h at 37 deg with PGA and BDU (20 ..mu..g /ml). The first, second and third postradiation mitoses were identified using the distinguishing staining of sister chromatids. The share of the cells in the first mitosis fluctuated from 32 to 77 %, in the second - from 23 to 68 %, and the third - from 0 to 9 %. At all radiation doses significant differences in the frequency of the aberration cells passing the first and second mitoses were revealed as well as in the total number of chromosomal aberrations in all the cells. The frequency of pair fragments and dicentric chromosomes in the first mitosis was on the average 1.6 and 2 times as high as in the second one, respectively. In the first mitosis almost all dicentric chromosomes occurred with accompanying pair fragments, and in the second mitosis the share of dicentric chromosomes without accompanying fragments was 25 to 50 %. The distribution of the dicentric chromosomes in the cells in the first and second mitosis did not differ from Poisson distribution for the 2 to 5 Gy dose range.

  15. Icariin Prevents H2O2-Induced Apoptosis via the PI3K/Akt Pathway in Rat Nucleus Pulposus Intervertebral Disc Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiangyu; Chen, Sheng; Zheng, Dong; Shao, Zengwu; Liang, Hang; Hu, Hongzhi

    2017-01-01

    Icariin is a prenylated flavonol glycoside derived from the Chinese herb Epimedium sagittatum. This study investigated the mechanism by which icariin prevents H 2 O 2 -induced apoptosis in rat nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. NP cells were isolated from the rat intervertebral disc and they were divided into five groups after 3 passages: (A) blank control; (B) 200  μ M H 2 O 2 ; (C) 200  μ M H 2 O 2 + 20  μ M icariin; (D) 20  μ M icariin + 200  μ M H 2 O 2 + 25  μ M LY294002; (E) 200  μ M H 2 O 2 + 25  μ M LY294002. LY294002 is a selective inhibitor of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. NP cell viability, apoptosis rate, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, and the expression of AKT, p-AKT, p53, Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 were estimated. The results show that, compared with the control group, H 2 O 2 significantly increased NP cell apoptosis and the level of intracellular ROS. Icariin pretreatment significantly decreased H 2 O 2 -induced apoptosis and intracellular ROS and upregulated p-Akt and BCL-2 and downregulated caspase-3 and Bax. LY294002 abolished the protective effects of icariin. Our results show that icariin can attenuate H2O2-induced apoptosis in rat nucleus pulposus cells and PI3K/AKT pathway is at least partly included in this protection effect.

  16. A possible role of transglutaminase 2 in the nucleus of INS-1E and of cells of human pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sileno, Sara; D'Oria, Valentina; Stucchi, Riccardo; Alessio, Massimo; Petrini, Stefania; Bonetto, Valentina; Maechler, Pierre; Bertuzzi, Federico; Grasso, Valeria; Paolella, Katia; Barbetti, Fabrizio; Massa, Ornella

    2014-01-16

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a multifunctional protein with Ca(2+)-dependent transamidating and G protein activity. Previously we reported that the role of TG2 in insulin secretion may involve cytoplasmic actin remodeling and a regulative action on other proteins during granule movement. The aim of this study was to gain a better insight into the role of TG2 transamidating activity in mitochondria and in the nucleus of INS-1E rat insulinoma cell line (INS-1E) during insulin secretion. To this end we labeled INS-1E with an artificial donor (biotinylated peptide), in basal condition and after stimulus with glucose for 2, 5, and 8min. Biotinylated proteins of the nuclear/mitochondrial-enriched fraction were analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Many mitochondrial proteins involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis (e.g. voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein, prohibitin and different ATP synthase subunits) and many nuclear proteins involved in gene regulation (e.g. histone H3, barrier to autointegration factor and various heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein) were identified among a number of transamidating substrates of TG2 in INS-1E. The combined results provide evidence that a temporal link exists between glucose-stimulation, first phase insulin secretion and the action of TG on histone H3 both in INS-1E and human pancreatic islets. Research into the role of transglutaminase 2 during insulin secretion in INS-1E rat insulinoma cellular model is depicting a complex role for this enzyme. Transglutaminase 2 acts in the different INS-1E compartments in the same way: catalyzing a post-translational modification event of its substrates. In this work we identify some mitochondrial and nuclear substrates of INS-1E during first phase insulin secretion. The finding that TG2 interacts with nuclear proteins that include BAF and histone H3 immediately after (2-5min) glucose stimulus of INS-1E suggests that TG2 may be involved not only in insulin

  17. IMPACT OF BEP OR CARBOPLATIN CHEMOTHERAPY ON TESTICULAR FUNCTION AND SPERM NUCLEUS OF SUBJECTS WITH TESTICULAR GERM CELL TUMOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eGhezzi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Young males have testicular germ cells tumours (TGCT as the most common malignancy and its incidence is increasing in several countries. Besides unilateral orchiectomy (UO, the treatment of TGCT may include surveillance, radiotherapy or chemotherapy (CT, basing on tumour histology and stage of disease. It is well known that both radio and CT may have negative effects on testicular function, affecting spermatogenesis and sex hormones. Many reports investigated these aspects in patients treated with bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin (BEP, after UO. In contrast no data are available on the side effects of carboplatin treatment in these patients. We included in this study 212 consecutive subjects who undergone to sperm banking at our Andrology and Human Reproduction Unit after UO for TGCT. Hundred subjects were further treated with one or more BEP cycles (BEP-group, 54 with carboplatin (Carb group and 58 were just surveilled (S-group. All patients were evaluated for seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidy, sperm DNA, sex hormones, volume of the residual testis at baseline (T0 and after 12 (T1 and 24 months (T2 from UO or end of CT. Seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidies, DNA status, gonadic hormones and testicular volume at baseline were not different between groups. At T1 we observed a significant reduction of sperm concentration and sperm count in the BEP group versus baseline and versus both Carb and S- group. A significant increase of sperm aneuploidies was present at T1 in the BEP group. Similarly, the same group at 1 had altered sperm DNA integrity and fragmentation compared with baseline, S group and Carb group. These alterations were persistent after two years from the end of BEP treatment. Despite a slight improvement at T2, the BEP group had still higher percentages of sperm aneuploidies than other groups. No impairment of sperm aneuploidies and DNA status were observed in the Carb group both after one and two years from the end of treatment

  18. 2001 Volvo Award Winner in Basic Science Studies: Effect of nutrient supply on the viability of cells from the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, H A; Urban, J P

    2001-12-01

    Disc cell viability was analyzed in relation to nutrient supply and cellular demand in vitro in a diffusion chamber. To determine relations among nutrient supply, nutrient concentrations. and cell viability. Although a fall in nutrient supply has long been thought the cause of disc degeneration in vivo, little information exists about the effects of nutrient levels or supply on cell viability and metabolism. Isolated bovine nucleus cells were cultured in agarose gels in a diffusion chamber up to 13 days. Nutrients were supplied to the open sides of the chamber and diffused through the gel to the center, 12.5 mm away from the nutrient supply, in a configuration analogous to that of the disc in vivo. Profiles of cell viability and concentration of glycosaminoglycans across the chamber were measured in relation to cell density and medium composition. Cells remained viable across the chamber at low cell densities. However, at higher densities, cells in the center of the chamber died. The viable distance from the nutrient supply fell with an increase in cell density. Glucose was a critical nutrient. Survival was also poor at acidic pH (6.0). At 0% oxygen, disc cells survived up to 13 days with no loss of viability, but produced very little proteoglycan. The results support the idea that maximum cell density in the disc is regulated by nutritional constraints, and that a fall in nutrient supply reduces the number of viable cells in the disc and thus leads to degeneration.

  19. Use of unstable chromosome aberrations for biological dosimetry after the first postirradiation mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doloy, M.T.; Malarbet, J.L.; Guedeney, G.; Bourguignon, M.; Leroy, A.; Reillaudou, M.; Masse, R.

    1991-01-01

    The loss of unstable chromosome aberrations after the first postirradiation mitosis makes their use difficult in radiation dosimetry. We describe here a method which, in a cell population observed at this stage, allows retrospective estimation of the frequencies of the unstable aberrations induced at the time of irradiation, and their use as a dosimeter. The laws controlling the behavior of unstable aberrations during mitosis were defined from a large-scale experiment on irradiated human lymphocytes. For cells undergoing the first, second, or third mitosis after irradiation, relationships were determined between the frequency, at irradiation time, of acentric fragments not arising from formation of dicentrics or rings, and the ratio of dicentrics and centric rings appearing without acentric fragments to the total number of dicentrics plus rings. On the basis of this ratio, the method described here provides an assessment of the postirradiation mitotic activity in a cell population. This assessment permitted estimation of the cell distribution and frequency of dicentrics plus centric rings, and of the frequency of acentric fragments at the time of irradiation. The use of this method for retrospective dosimetry after whole-body irradiation under various conditions of exposure is illustrated

  20. Unconventional actin conformations localize on intermediate filaments in mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Unconventional actin conformations colocalize with vimentin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. → These conformations are detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 ('lower dimer') and 2G2 ('nuclear actin'), but not C4 (monomeric actin). → Mitotic unconventional actin cables are independent of filamentous actin or microtubules. → Unconventional actin colocalizes with vimentin on a nocodazole-induced perinuclear dense mass of cables. -- Abstract: Different structural conformations of actin have been identified in cells and shown to reside in distinct subcellular locations of cells. In this report, we describe the localization of actin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. Actin was detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 and 2G2, but not with the anti-actin antibody C4. Actin contained in this structure is independent of microtubules and actin filaments, and colocalizes with vimentin. Taking advantage of intermediate filament collapse into a perinuclear dense mass of cables when microtubules are depolymerized, we were able to relocalize actin to such structures. We hypothesize that phosphorylation of intermediate filaments at mitosis entry triggers the recruitment of different actin conformations to mitotic intermediate filaments. Storage and partition of the nuclear actin and antiparallel 'lower dimer' actin conformations between daughter cells possibly contribute to gene transcription and transient actin filament dynamics at G1 entry.

  1. Experimental study of mutagenous and mitosis modifying activity of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Kirbik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutagenous and mitosis modifying impact of silver nanoparticles has been studied on outbred mice. Nanoparticles were of round shape with dimensions of 5-50 nm, size of generated organic shell of 2-5 nm, the quantity in 1 mcm3 makes 120-270. Metaphasic analysis of mice bone marrow cells was used as a testing technique. The frequency of chromosome aberrations and mitotic index of preparations were accounted. During single intraperitoneal administration of the agent in the dose of 250 mcg/kg the silver nanoparticles demonstrated mitosis stimulating activity. No mutagenous effect of silver nanoparticles by daily administration for 4 days of 25 mcg/kg and single administration in the dose of 250 mcg/kg has been registered, but there is statistically insignificant tendency of aberrant metaphases increase. Consequently silver nanoparticles in the investigated doses demonstrated no mutagenous activity and can be considered safe for mammalian cells.

  2. NuMA is a major acceptor of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by tankyrase 1 in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, William; Dynek, Jasmin N; Smith, Susan

    2005-10-15

    Tankyrase 1 is a PARP [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase] that localizes to multiple subcellular sites, including telomeres and mitotic centrosomes. Previous studies demonstrated that cells deficient in tankyrase 1 suffered a block in resolution of sister telomeres and arrested in early anaphase [Dynek and Smith (2004) Science 304, 97-100]. This phenotype was dependent on the catalytic PARP activity of tankyrase 1. To identify critical acceptors of PARsylation [poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation] by tankyrase 1 in mitosis, tankyrase 1 immunoprecipitates were analysed for associated PARsylated proteins. We identified NuMA (nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) as a major acceptor of poly(ADP-ribose) from tankyrase 1 in mitosis. We showed by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation that association between tankyrase 1 and NuMA increases dramatically at the onset of mitosis, concomitant with PARsylation of NuMA. Knockdown of tankyrase 1 by siRNA (small interfering RNA) eliminates PARsylation of NuMA in mitosis, confirming tankyrase 1 as the PARP responsible for this modification. However, even in the absence of tankyrase 1 and PARsylation, NuMA localizes to spindle poles. By contrast, siRNA knockdown of NuMA results in complete loss of tankyrase 1 from spindle poles. We discuss our result in terms of a model where PARsylation of NuMA by tankyrase 1 in mitosis could play a role in sister telomere separation and/or mitotic progression.

  3. The nucleus basalis (Ch4) in the alcoholic Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: reduced cell number in both amnesic and non-amnesic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, K M; Halliday, G M; Caine, D; Kril, J J

    1997-09-01

    The cholinergic nucleus basalis (Ch4) is an exclusive site of neurofibrillary degeneration in alcoholic patients with Wernicke's encephalopathy. To test the hypothesis that the loss of Ch4 neurons contributes to the memory disorder, Korsakoff's psychosis, commonly seen in Wernicke's encephalopathy. Magnocellular basal forebrain neurons were quantified in alcoholic patients with Wernicke's encephalopathy, both with and without Korsakoff's psychosis, and neurologically asymptomatic alcoholic and non-alcoholic controls. Because amnesic and non-amnesic patients with Wernicke's encephalopathy share common periventricular lesions, both thiamine deficient groups as well as alcoholic patients with no neurological complications were included to determine the lesion specific to memory impairment. Ch4 cell number did not differ significantly between alcoholic and non-alcoholic controls and there was no correlation between cell number and lifetime alcohol intake. However, Ch4 cell number in all groups was significantly correlated with the volume of its major projection target, the cerebral cortex. Ch4 cell number in the non-amnesic Wernicke's encephalopathy group was significantly below controls (24%), with cell number in patients with Korsakoff's psychosis 21% below controls. There was considerable overlap in cell number between groups. On discriminant analysis, there was significantly greater cell loss in three non-amnesic patients with Wernicke's encephalopathy than in some patients with Korsakoff's psychosis. The nonamnesic patient with the greatest cell loss was impaired on attentional tasks. Whereas neurons in the nucleus basalis are at risk in thiamine deficient alcoholic patients, cell loss is minor and does not account for the profound memory disorder.

  4. Cell proliferation and radiosensitivity of cow lymphocytes in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modave, C.; Fabry, L.; Leonard, A.

    1982-01-01

    The harlequin-staining technique has been used to study, after PHA-stimulation, the cell proliferation of cow lymphocytes in culture and to assess the radiosensitivity in first mitosis cells. At the 48 h fixation time, only 34% of the cells are in first mitosis whereas 55% are already in second and 11% in third mitosis. The exposure of cow lymphocytes to 200 rad X-rays result in the production of 16% dicentric chromosomes in first mitosis cells [fr

  5. The cellular prion protein: a new partner of the lectin CBP70 in the nucleus of NB4 human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybner, C; Finel-Szermanski, S; Felin, M; Sahraoui, T; Rousseau, C; Fournier, J G; Sève, A P; Botti, J

    2002-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by the presence of an abnormal isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrPc) whose physiological role still remains elusive. To better understand the function of PrPc, it is important to identify the different subcellular localization(s) of the protein and the different partners with which it might be associated. In this context, the PrPc-lectins interactions are investigated because PrPc is a sialoglycoprotein which can react with lectins which are carbohydrate-binding proteins. We have previously characterized a nuclear lectin CBP70 able to recognize N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine residues in HL60 cells. Using confocal immunofluorescence, flow-cytofluorometry, and Western-blotting, we have found that PrPc is expressed in the nucleus of the NB4 human promyelocytic leukemia cell line. It was also found that the lectin CBP70 is localized in NB4 cell nuclei. Moreover, several approaches revealed that PrPc and CBP70 are colocalized in the nucleus. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that these proteins are coprecipitated and interact via a sugar-dependent binding moiety. In conclusion, PrPc and CBP70 are colocalized in the nuclear compartment of NB4 cells and this interaction may be important to better understand the biological function and possibly the conversion process of PrPc into its pathological form (PrPsc). Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Exosomes as potential alternatives to stem cell therapy for intervertebral disc degeneration: in-vitro study on exosomes in interaction of nucleus pulposus cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kang; Li, Hai-Yin; Yang, Kuang; Wu, Jun-Long; Cai, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yue; Li, Chang-Qing

    2017-05-10

    The stem cell-based therapies for intervertebral disc degeneration have been widely studied. However, the mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells interacting with intervertebral disc cells, such as nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs), remain unknown. Exosomes as a vital paracrine mechanism in cell-cell communication have been highly focused on. The purpose of this study was to detect the role of exosomes derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and NPCs in their interaction with corresponding cells. The exosomes secreted by BM-MSCs and NPCs were purified by differential centrifugation and identified by transmission electron microscope and immunoblot analysis of exosomal marker proteins. Fluorescence confocal microscopy was used to examine the uptake of exosomes by recipient cells. The effects of NPC exosomes on the migration and differentiation of BM-MSCs were determined by transwell migration assays and quantitative RT-PCR analysis of NPC phenotypic genes. Western blot analysis was performed to examine proteins such as aggrecan, sox-9, collagen II and hif-1α in the induced BM-MSCs. Proliferation and the gene expression profile of NPCs induced by BM-MSC exosomes were measured by Cell Counting Kit-8 and qRT-PCR analysis, respectively. Both the NPCs and BM-MSCs secreted exosomes, and these exosomes underwent uptake by the corresponding cells. NPC-derived exosomes promoted BM-MSC migration and induced BM-MSC differentiation to a nucleus pulposus-like phenotype. BM-MSC-derived exosomes promoted NPC proliferation and healthier extracellular matrix production in the degenerate NPCs. Our study indicates that the exosomes act as an important vehicle in information exchange between BM-MSCs and NPCs. Given a variety of functions and multiple advantages, exosomes alone or loaded with specific genes and drugs would be an appropriate option in a cell-free therapy strategy for intervertebral disc degeneration.

  7. Cytoskeleton, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus alterations in CHO-K1 cell line after Crotalus durissus terrificus (South American rattlesnake venom treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Tamieti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake venoms are toxic to a variety of cell types. However, the intracellular damages and the cell death fate induced by venom are unclear. In the present work, the action of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus venom on CHO-K1 cell line was analyzed. The cells CHO-K1 were incubated with C. d. terrificus venom (10, 50 and 100g/ml for 1 and 24 hours, and structural alterations of actin filaments, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus were assessed using specific fluorescent probes and agarose gel electrophoresis for DNA fragmentation. Significant structural changes were observed in all analyzed structures. DNA fragmentation was detected suggesting that, at the concentrations used, the venom induced apoptosis.

  8. Polo kinase regulates the localization and activity of the chromosomal passenger complex in meiosis and mitosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmena, Mar; Lombardia, Miguel Ortiz; Ogawa, Hiromi; Earnshaw, William C

    2014-11-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), Polo and Aurora families of protein kinases. The levels of expression and localization of the key regulatory kinases are themselves subject to very tight control. There is increasing evidence that crosstalk between the mitotic kinases provides for an additional level of regulation. We have previously shown that Aurora B activates Polo kinase at the centromere in mitosis, and that the interaction between Polo and the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) component INCENP is essential in this activation. In this report, we show that Polo kinase is required for the correct localization and activity of the CPC in meiosis and mitosis. Study of the phenotype of different polo allele combinations compared to the effect of chemical inhibition revealed significant differences in the localization and activity of the CPC in diploid tissues. Our results shed new light on the mechanisms that control the activity of Aurora B in meiosis and mitosis.

  9. Regulation of mitosis and taxane response by Daxx and Rassf1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovinazzi, Serena; Lindsay, Cory R.; Morozov, Viacheslav M.; Escobar-Cabrera, Eric; Summers, Matthew K.; Han, Hyo Sook; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; Ishov, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    Current theories suggest that mitotic checkpoint proteins are essential for proper cellular response to taxanes, a widely-used family of chemotherapeutic compounds. We recently demonstrated that absence or depletion of protein Daxx increases cellular taxol (paclitaxel) resistance—a common trait of patients diagnosed with several malignancies, including breast cancer. Further investigation of Daxx-mediated taxol response revealed that Daxx is important for the proper timing of mitosis progression and cyclin B stability. Daxx interacts with mitotic checkpoint protein Rassf1 and partially co-localizes with this protein during mitosis. Rassf1/Daxx depletion or expression of Daxx binding domain of Rassf1 elevates cyclin B stability and increases taxol resistance in cells and mouse xenograft models. In breast cancer patients, we observed the inverse correlation between Daxx and clinical response to taxane-based chemotherapy. These data suggest that Daxx and Rassf1 define a mitotic stress checkpoint that enables cells to exit mitosis as micronucleated cells (and eventually die) when encountered with specific mitotic stress stimuli, including taxol. Surprisingly, depletion of Daxx or Rassf1 does not change activity of E3 ubiquitin ligase APC/C in in vitro settings, suggesting necessity of mitotic cellular environment for proper activation of this checkpoint. Daxx and Rassf1 may become useful predictive markers for the proper selection of patients for taxane chemotherapy. PMID:21643015

  10. Proteomic analysis of polyribosomes identifies splicing factors as potential regulators of translation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviner, Ranen; Hofmann, Sarah; Elman, Tamar; Shenoy, Anjana; Geiger, Tamar; Elkon, Ran; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2017-06-02

    Precise regulation of mRNA translation is critical for proper cell division, but little is known about the factors that mediate it. To identify mRNA-binding proteins that regulate translation during mitosis, we analyzed the composition of polysomes from interphase and mitotic cells using unbiased quantitative mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We found that mitotic polysomes are enriched with a subset of proteins involved in RNA processing, including alternative splicing and RNA export. To demonstrate that these may indeed be regulators of translation, we focused on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C) as a test case and confirmed that it is recruited to elongating ribosomes during mitosis. Then, using a combination of pulsed SILAC, metabolic labeling and ribosome profiling, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP C affects both global and transcript-specific translation rates and found that hnRNP C is specifically important for translation of mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. Taken together, our results demonstrate how proteomic analysis of polysomes can provide insight into translation regulation under various cellular conditions of interest and suggest that hnRNP C facilitates production of translation machinery components during mitosis to provide daughter cells with the ability to efficiently synthesize proteins as they enter G1 phase. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. The NIMA Kinase Is Required To Execute Stage-Specific Mitotic Functions after Initiation of Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraghavan, Meera; Lad, Alisha A.

    2014-01-01

    The G2-M transition in Aspergillus nidulans requires the NIMA kinase, the founding member of the Nek kinase family. Inactivation of NIMA results in a late G2 arrest, while overexpression of NIMA is sufficient to promote mitotic events independently of cell cycle phase. Endogenously tagged NIMA-GFP has dynamic mitotic localizations appearing first at the spindle pole body and then at nuclear pore complexes before transitioning to within nuclei and the mitotic spindle and back at the spindle pole bodies at mitotic exit, suggesting that it functions sequentially at these locations. Since NIMA is indispensable for mitotic entry, it has been difficult to determine the requirement of NIMA for subaspects of mitosis. We show here that when NIMA is partially inactivated, although mitosis can be initiated, a proportion of cells fail to successfully generate two daughter nuclei. We further define the mitotic defects to show that normal NIMA function is required for the formation of a bipolar spindle, nuclear pore complex disassembly, completion of chromatin segregation, and the normal structural rearrangements of the nuclear envelope required to generate two nuclei from one. In the remaining population of cells that enter mitosis with inadequate NIMA, two daughter nuclei are generated in a manner dependent on the spindle assembly checkpoint, indicating highly penetrant defects in mitotic progression without sufficient NIMA activity. This study shows that NIMA is required not only for mitotic entry but also sequentially for successful completion of stage-specific mitotic events. PMID:24186954

  12. Microtubule Reorganization during Mitosis and Cytokinesis: Lessons Learned from Developing Microgametophytes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo eLiu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In angiosperms, mitosis and cytokinesis take place in the absence of structurally defined microtubule-organizing centers and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In the spindle and phragmoplast, microtubule reorganization depends on microtubule-interacting factors like the -tubulin complex. Because of their critical functions in cell division, loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding genes are often homozygous or sporophytic lethal. However, a number of mutations like gem1, gcp2, and nedd1 can be maintained in heterozygous mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. When mutant microspores produced by a heterozygous parent undergo pollen mitosis I, they are amenable for phenotypic characterization by fluorescence microscopy. The results would allow us to pinpoint at specific functions of particular proteins in microtubule reorganization that are characteristic to specific stages of mitosis and cytokinesis. Conclusions made in the developing microgametophytes can be extrapolated to somatic cells regarding mechanisms that regulate nuclear migration, spindle pole formation, phragmoplast assembly, and cell division plane determination.

  13. In vivo Whole-Cell Recordings Combined with Electron Microscopy Reveal Unexpected Morphological and Physiological Properties in the Lateral Nucleus of the Trapezoid Body in the Auditory Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Tom P; Smith, Philip H; Joris, Philip X

    2016-01-01

    The lateral nucleus of the trapezoid body (LNTB) is a prominent nucleus in the superior olivary complex in mammals including humans. Its physiology in vivo is poorly understood due to a paucity of recordings. It is thought to provide a glycinergic projection to the medial superior olive (MSO) with an important role in binaural processing and sound localization. We combined in vivo patch clamp recordings with labeling of individual neurons in the Mongolian gerbil. Labeling of the recorded neurons allowed us to relate physiological properties to anatomy at the light and electron microscopic level. We identified a population of quite dorsally located neurons with surprisingly large dendritic trees on which most of the synaptic input impinges. In most neurons, one or more of these dendrites run through and are then medial to the MSO. These neurons were often binaural and could even show sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITDs) of stimulus fine structure or envelope. Moreover, a subpopulation showed enhanced phase-locking to tones delivered in the tuning curve tail. We propose that these neurons constitute the gerbil main LNTB (mLNTB). In contrast, a smaller sample of neurons was identified that was located more ventrally and that we designate to be in posteroventral LNTB (pvLNTB). These cells receive large somatic excitatory terminals from globular bushy cells. We also identified previously undescribed synaptic inputs from the lateral superior olive. pvLNTB neurons are usually monaural, display a primary-like-with-notch response to ipsilateral short tones at CF and can phase-lock to low frequency tones. We conclude that mLNTB contains a population of neurons with extended dendritic trees where most of the synaptic input is found, that can show enhanced phase-locking and sensitivity to ITD. pvLNTB cells, presumed to provide glycinergic input to the MSO, get large somatic globular bushy synaptic inputs and are typically monaural with short tone responses similar

  14. Hyperphosphorylation regulates the activity of SREBP1 during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoechea-Alonso, Maria T; Punga, Tanel; Ericsson, Johan

    2005-08-16

    The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors controls the biosynthesis of cholesterol and other lipids, and lipid synthesis is critical for cell growth and proliferation. We were, therefore, interested in the expression and activity of SREBPs during the cell cycle. We found that the expression of a number of SREBP-responsive promoter-reporter genes were induced in a SREBP-dependent manner in cells arrested in G2/M. In addition, the mature forms of SREBP1a and SREBP1c were hyperphosphorylated in mitotic cells, giving rise to a phosphoepitope recognized by the mitotic protein monoclonal-2 (MPM-2) antibody. In contrast, SREBP2 was not hyperphosphorylated in mitotic cells and was not recognized by the MPM-2 antibody. The MPM-2 epitope was mapped to the C terminus of mature SREBP1, and the mitosis-specific hyperphosphorylation of SREBP1 depended on this domain of the protein. The transcriptional and DNA-binding activity of SREBP1 was enhanced in cells arrested in G2/M, and these effects depended on the C-terminal domain of the protein. In part, these effects could be explained by our observation that mature SREBP1 was stabilized in G2/M. In agreement with these observations, we found that the synthesis of cholesterol was increased in G2/M-arrested cells. Thus, our results demonstrate that the activity of mature SREBP1 is regulated by phosphorylation during the cell cycle, suggesting that SREBP1 may provide a link between lipid synthesis, proliferation, and cell growth.

  15. INHIBITING MAP KINASE ACTIVITY PREVENTS CALCIUM TRANSIENTS AND MITOSIS ENTRY IN EARLY SEA URCHIN EMBRYOS

    OpenAIRE

    Philipova, Rada; Larman, Mark G.; Leckie, Calum P.; Harrison, Patrick K.; Groigno, Laurence; Whitaker, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A transient calcium increase triggers nuclear envelope breakdown (mitosis entry) in sea urchin embryos. Cdk1/cyclin B kinase activation is also known to be required for mitosis entry. More recently MAP kinase activity has also been shown to increase during mitosis. In sea urchin embryos both kinases show a similar activation profile, peaking at the time of mitosis entry.

  16. Perspective of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    The paper concerns the lectures given at the International School of nuclear physics, Erice, 1985, which survey the expectations for the field of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The primary motivation for the field, the organization of the lectures, and a description of the NA 34 experiment, are all briefly given. (U.K.)

  17. The G2/M DNA damage checkpoint inhibits mitosis through Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, X S; Fincher, R R; Tang, A; Osmani, S A

    1997-01-02

    It is possible to cause G2 arrest in Aspergillus nidulans by inactivating either p34cdc2 or NIMA. We therefore investigated the negative control of these two mitosis-promoting kinases after DNA damage. DNA damage caused rapid Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 and transient cell cycle arrest but had little effect on the activity of NIMA. Dividing cells deficient in Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 were sensitive to both MMS and UV irradiation and entered lethal premature mitosis with damaged DNA. However, non-dividing quiescent conidiospores of the Tyr15 mutant strain were not sensitive to DNA damage. The UV and MMS sensitivity of cells unable to tyrosine phosphorylate p34cdc2 is therefore caused by defects in DNA damage checkpoint regulation over mitosis. Both the nimA5 and nimT23 temperature-sensitive mutations cause an arrest in G2 at 42 degrees C. Addition of MMS to nimT23 G2-arrested cells caused a marked delay in their entry into mitosis upon downshift to 32 degrees C and this delay was correlated with a long delay in the dephosphorylation and activation of p34cdc2. Addition of MMS to nimA5 G2-arrested cells caused inactivation of the H1 kinase activity of p34cdc2 due to an increase in its Tyr15 phosphorylation level and delayed entry into mitosis upon return to 32 degrees C. However, if Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 was prevented then its H1 kinase activity was not inactivated upon MMS addition to nimA5 G2-arrested cells and they rapidly progressed into a lethal mitosis upon release to 32 degrees C. Thus, Tyr15 phosphorylation of p34cdc2 in G2 arrests initiation of mitosis after DNA damage in A. nidulans.

  18. Regulation of kinetochore-microtubule attachments through homeostatic control during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godek, Kristina M; Kabeche, Lilian; Compton, Duane A

    2015-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis is essential for genome integrity and is mediated by the bi-oriented attachment of replicated chromosomes to spindle microtubules through kinetochores. Errors in kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachment that could cause chromosome mis-segregation are frequent and are corrected by the dynamic turnover of k-MT attachments. Thus, regulating the rate of spindle microtubule attachment and detachment to kinetochores is crucial for mitotic fidelity and is frequently disrupted in cancer cells displaying chromosomal instability. A model based on homeostatic principles involving receptors, a core control network, effectors and feedback control may explain the precise regulation of k-MT attachment stability during mitotic progression to ensure error-free mitosis.

  19. Heterologous expression of mammalian Plk1 in Drosophila reveals divergence from Polo during late mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, John; Godinho, Susana A.; Tavares, Alvaro; Glover, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Drosophila Polo kinase is the founder member of a conserved kinase family required for multiple stages of mitosis. We assessed the ability of mouse Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) to perform the multiple mitotic functions of Polo kinase, by expressing a Plk1-GFP fusion in Drosophila. Consistent with the previously reported localization of Polo kinase, Plk1-GFP was strongly localized to centrosomes and recruited to the centromeric regions of condensing chromosomes during early mitosis. However, in contrast to a functional Polo-GFP fusion, Plk1-GFP failed to localize to the central spindle midzone in both syncytial embryo mitosis and the conventional mitoses of cellularized embryos and S2 cells. Moreover, unlike endogenous Polo kinase and Polo-GFP, Plk1-GFP failed to associate with the contractile ring. Expression of Plk1-GFP enhanced the lethality of hypomorphic polo mutants and disrupted the organization of the actinomyosin cytoskeleton in a dominant-negative manner. Taken together, our results suggest that endogenous Polo kinase has specific roles in regulating actinomyosin rearrangements during Drosophila mitoses that its mammalian counterpart, Plk1, cannot fulfill. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observed defects in the cortical recruitment of myosin and myosin regulatory light chain in Polo deficient cells

  20. PLK1 Activation in Late G2 Sets Up Commitment to Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheghiani, Lilia; Loew, Damarys; Lombard, Bérangère; Mansfeld, Jörg; Gavet, Olivier

    2017-06-06

    Commitment to mitosis must be tightly coordinated with DNA replication to preserve genome integrity. While we have previously established that the timely activation of CyclinB1-Cdk1 in late G2 triggers mitotic entry, the upstream regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we report that Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is required for entry into mitosis during an unperturbed cell cycle and is rapidly activated shortly before CyclinB1-Cdk1. We determine that Plk1 associates with the Cdc25C1 phosphatase and induces its phosphorylation before mitotic entry. Plk1-dependent Cdc25C1 phosphosites are sufficient to promote mitotic entry, even when Plk1 activity is inhibited. Furthermore, we find that activation of Plk1 during G2 relies on CyclinA2-Cdk activity levels. Our findings thus elucidate a critical role for Plk1 in CyclinB1-Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry and outline how CyclinA2-Cdk, an S-promoting factor, poises cells for commitment to mitosis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamic Alterations to α-Actinin Accompanying Sarcomere Disassembly and Reassembly during Cardiomyocyte Mitosis.

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    Xiaohu Fan

    Full Text Available Although mammals are thought to lose their capacity to regenerate heart muscle shortly after birth, embryonic and neonatal cardiomyocytes in mammals are hyperplastic. During proliferation these cells need to selectively disassemble their myofibrils for successful cytokinesis. The mechanism of sarcomere disassembly is, however, not understood. To study this, we performed a series of immunofluorescence studies of multiple sarcomeric proteins in proliferating neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and correlated these observations with biochemical changes at different cell cycle stages. During myocyte mitosis, α-actinin and titin were disassembled as early as prometaphase. α-actinin (representing the sarcomeric Z-disk disassembly precedes that of titin (M-line, suggesting that titin disassembly occurs secondary to the collapse of the Z-disk. Sarcomere disassembly was concurrent with the dissolution of the nuclear envelope. Inhibitors of several intracellular proteases could not block the disassembly of α-actinin or titin. There was a dramatic increase in both cytosolic (soluble and sarcomeric α-actinin during mitosis, and cytosolic α-actinin exhibited decreased phosphorylation compared to sarcomeric α-actinin. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 induced the quick reassembly of the sarcomere. Sarcomere dis- and re-assembly in cardiomyocyte mitosis is CDK1-dependent and features dynamic differential post-translational modifications of sarcomeric and cytosolic α-actinin.

  2. Multipolar mitosis and aneuploidy after chrysotile treatment: a consequence of abscission failure and cytokinesis regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Beatriz Araujo; Rezende-Teixeira, Paula; Redick, Sambra; Doxsey, Stephen; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia Maria

    2016-02-23

    Chrysotile, like other types of asbestos, has been associated with mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis. However, the cellular abnormalities induced by these fibers involved in cancer development have not been elucidated yet. Previous works show that chrysotile fibers induce features of cancer cells, such as aneuploidy, multinucleation and multipolar mitosis. In the present study, normal and cancer derived human cell lines were treated with chrysotile and the cellular and molecular mechanisms related to generation of aneuploid cells was elucidated. The first alteration observed was cytokinesis regression, the main cause of multinucleated cells formation and centrosome amplification. The multinucleated cells formed after cytokinesis regression were able to progress through cell cycle and generated aneuploid cells after abnormal mitosis. To understand the process of cytokinesis regression, localization of cytokinetic proteins was investigated. It was observed mislocalization of Anillin, Aurora B, Septin 9 and Alix in the intercellular bridge, and no determination of secondary constriction and abscission sites. Fiber treatment also led to overexpression of genes related to cancer, cytokinesis and cell cycle. The results show that chrysotile fibers induce cellular and molecular alterations in normal and tumor cells that have been related to cancer initiation and progression, and that tetraploidization and aneuploid cell formation are striking events after fiber internalization, which could generate a favorable context to cancer development.

  3. Appressorium morphogenesis and cell cycle progression are linked in the grass powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansjakob, Anton; Riederer, Markus; Hildebrandt, Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    Conidial germination and differentiation - the so-called prepenetration processes - of the barley powdery mildew fungus (Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei) are essential prerequisites for facilitating penetration of the host cuticle. Although the cell cycle is known to be pivotal to cellular differentiation in several phytopathogenic fungi there is as yet no information available concerning the relationship between cell cycle and infection structure development in the obligate biotroph B. graminis. The timing of specific developmental events with respect to nuclear division and morphogenesis was followed on artificial and host leaf surfaces by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining in combination with a pharmacological approach applying specific cell cycle inhibitors. It was found that the uninucleate conidia germinated and then underwent a single round of mitosis 5-6 h after inoculation. During primary germ tube formation the nucleus frequently migrated close to the site of primary germ tube emergence. This nuclear repositioning was distinctly promoted by very-long-chain aldehydes that are common host cuticular wax constituents known to induce conidial differentiation. The subsequent morphogenesis of the appressorial germ tube preceded mitosis that was spatially uncoupled from subsequent cytokinesis. Blocking of S-phase with hydroxyurea did not inhibit formation of the appressorial germ tube but prevented cytokinesis and appressorium maturation. Benomyl treatment that arrests the cell cycle in mitosis inhibited nuclear separation, cytokinesis, and formation of mature appressoria. Thus, we conclude that a completed mitosis is not a prerequisite for the formation and swelling of the appressorial germ tube, which normally provides the destination for one of the daughter nuclei, while appressorium maturation depends on mitosis. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The importance of G1/S-border and mitosis in the fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, G.; Nuesse, M.

    1983-01-01

    The ability of synchronized Ehrlich ascites tumour cells to repair PLD was measured by introducing delays in their progression through the cell cycle either in the same phase as that where the irradiation was given or in a subsequent phase. Cells were incubated for this purpose either in balanced salt solution which nonspecifically delayed progression in all cell cycle phases or with 0.5 μg/ml aphidicolin which delayed cells in S-phase. Cells which had been delayed in their progression through the cell cycle were able to repair PLD irrespective of the phase at which they were held. In cases where the delay in the progression through the cell cycle was introduced in a phase subsequent to that of the exposure to irradiation, repair of PLD was observed only if the cells had not passed the G1/S-border or